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Sample records for cardiac rhythm disturbance

  1. Cardiac rhythm disturbance in athletes with cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrjerdi Sh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome consists of mitral valve prolapse (MVP, anomalously located chordae tendinae of the left ventricle, or a combination of the two. MVP is marked by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during systole. The nonclassic form of MVP carries a low risk of complications. Patients with severe classic MVP can suffer from mitral regurgitation (MR, infective endocarditis, and, infrequently, sudden death from cardiac arrest. Anomalously located left ventricular chordae tendinae are fibrous or fibromuscular bands that stretch across the left ventricle from the septum to the free wall. They have been associated with murmurs and arrhythmias. The purpose of this study is to assess the performance, as measured by the physical working capacity (PWC170 and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max, in athletes with cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome. Methods: Of the 183 male athletes studied, 158 had cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome and 25 were normal, healthy controls. Their mean age was 16.23 (± 5.48 years and mean training time was 5.2 (±- 4.6 years. Athletes with cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome were divided to four groups. Group 1 consisted of those with MVP; Group 2 had patients with an additional cord in left ventricle; Group 3 was made up of athletes with a combination of MVP and additional cord; Group 4 contained athletes with a combination of MVP and MR. All sportsmen were studied by echocardiograph, veloergometer, and those with arrhythmias were studied and recorded using a Holter monitor. Results: The most common form of this syndrome in our study groups was MVP. The PWC170and VO2 max among the athletes with the combination of MVP+MR (Group 4 was lower than that of athletes in other groups (P<0.05. The most common arrhythmia among the athletes with anomalously located left ventricular chordae, Group 2, was Wolf

  2. SILENT MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA AND CARDIAC RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN WOMEN WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    D. S. Novikova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the rate of silent myocardial ischemia (SMI and the pattern of cardiac rhythm disturbances in women with rheumatoidarthritis (RA, their association with traditional risk factors (TRF for cardiovascular diseases (CVD, with subclinical structural and functionalchanges in the heart and vessels, with the activity and severity of rheumatoid inflammation.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and ninety-one female patients aged less than 60 years with a valid diagnosis of RA and no clinicalsigns were examined. A control group consisted of 125 women without rheumatic diseases. In addition to the clinical manifestations, activity,and severity of RA, the authors assessed major TRFs for CVD, performed Holter ECG monitoring, common carotid artery duplex scanning, transthoracic echocardiographic study, and determined the levels of serum inflammatory markers.Results. The women with RA differ from the control group in the higher incidence of SMI, supraventricular arrhythmias (SVA and highgradepremature ventricular contractions (PVC. The patients with RA and SMI are characterized in terms of age-adjustment by higher disease activity (DAS28, systemic manifestations, cumulative larger-dose glucocorticoids (GC and a higher percentage of patients receiving disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs as compared with those with RA and no SMI with adjustment for age. High disease activity(DAS28, level of inflammatory markers, IgM rheumatoid arthritis seropositivity, and GC therapy are SVA-associated factors in women with RA; larger left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and serositis are factors associated with high-grade PVC.Conclusion. The RA women without clinical manifestations of CVD are recorded to have high rates of SMI, SVA, and high-grade PVC, which is primarily due to the activity and severity of rheumatoid inflammation.

  3. RHYTHM DISTURBANCES DURING COLONOSCOPY

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    D. Jordanov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the risk of inducing rhythm disturbances of the heart during colonoscopy.Patients and methods used: 80 patients had undergone colonoscopyper formed by two experienced specialists of endoscopy for the period from March to December 2011. The endoscopies were performed without premedication and sedation. Holter was placed on each patient one hour before the endoscopic examination, and the record continued one hour after the manipulation. The blood pressure was measured before, during and after the procedure.Results: During colonoscopy 25 patients (31,25% manifested rhythm disorders. In 15 patients (18,75% sinus tachycardia occurred. In 7 patients (8,75% suptraventricular extra systoles were observed and in 3 patients (3,75% - ventricular extra systoles. No ST-T changes were found. Highest values of the blood pressure were measured before and during the endoscopy, but the values did not exceed 160/105 mmHg. In 10 patients (12,5% a hypotensive reaction was observed, bur the values were not lower than 80/ 50. In 2 patients there was a short bradycardia with a heart frequency 50-55 /min.Conclusions: Our results showed that the rhythm disorders during lower colonoscopy occur in approximately 1/3 of the examined patients, there is an increase or decrease of the blood pressure in some patients, but that doesn’t require physician’s aid and the examination can be carried out safely without monitoring.

  4. Clinical skills: cardiac rhythm recognition and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Joanna

    With technological advances, changes in provision of healthcare services and increasing pressure on critical care services, ward patients' severity of illness is ever increasing. As such, nurses need to develop their skills and knowledge to care for their client group. Competency in cardiac rhythm monitoring is beneficial to identify changes in cardiac status, assess response to treatment, diagnosis and post-surgical monitoring. This paper describes the basic anatomy and physiology of the heart and its conduction system, and explains a simple and easy to remember process of analysing cardiac rhythms (Resuscitation Council UK, 2000) that can be used in first-line assessment to assist healthcare practitioners in providing care to their patients.

  5. Studies on circadian rhythm disturbances and melatonin in delirium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonghe, A.-M.

    2014-01-01

    The circadian sleep/wake rhythm disturbances that are seen in delirium and the role of melatonin supplementation provide a new angle in delirium research. More research is needed to determine the role of melatonin in the pathophysiological mechanisms of delirium and to determine whether the

  6. Disturbed mouse circadian rhythm before the Kobe EQ in 1995

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    Yokoi, Sayoko

    2013-04-01

    Legends of macro-anomalies before large earthquakes have been passed down for generations in Asia. Most of the statements on earthquake precursors are considered unreliable afterthoughts by traditional scientists. However, disturbed biological rhythms in mice were observed before the Kobe EQ in 1995 (Yokoi et al, 2003). The records of unusual mouse behavior before the earthquake were obtained to study biological clock at Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University. It is clarified that the disturbance was very rare phenomena statistically. Similar phenomenon was observed before the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, too (Li et al, 2009). In the presentation, I will discuss the phenomena as one example of preseismic unusual animal behaviors.

  7. Biological and psychological rhythms: an integrative approach to rhythm disturbances in autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botbol, Michel; Cabon, Philippe; Kermarrec, Solenn; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Biological rhythms are crucial phenomena that are perfect examples of the adaptation of organisms to their environment. A considerable amount of work has described different types of biological rhythms (from circadian to ultradian), individual differences in their patterns and the complexity of their regulation. In particular, the regulation and maturation of the sleep-wake cycle have been thoroughly studied. Its desynchronization, both endogenous and exogenous, is now well understood, as are its consequences for cognitive impairments and health problems. From a completely different perspective, psychoanalysts have shown a growing interest in the rhythms of psychic life. This interest extends beyond the original focus of psychoanalysis on dreams and the sleep-wake cycle, incorporating central theoretical and practical psychoanalytic issues related to the core functioning of the psychic life: the rhythmic structures of drive dynamics, intersubjective developmental processes and psychic containment functions. Psychopathological and biological approaches to the study of infantile autism reveal the importance of specific biological and psychological rhythmic disturbances in this disorder. Considering data and hypotheses from both perspectives, this paper proposes an integrative approach to the study of these rhythmic disturbances and offers an etiopathogenic hypothesis based on this integrative approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sleep and circadian rhythm disturbance in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, A J; Webb-Mitchell, R; Hazu, A; Slater, N; Middleton, B; Gallagher, P; McAllister-Williams, H; Anderson, K N

    2017-07-01

    Subjective reports of insomnia and hypersomnia are common in bipolar disorder (BD). It is unclear to what extent these relate to underlying circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD). In this study we aimed to objectively assess sleep and circadian rhythm in a cohort of patients with BD compared to matched controls. Forty-six patients with BD and 42 controls had comprehensive sleep/circadian rhythm assessment with respiratory sleep studies, prolonged accelerometry over 3 weeks, sleep questionnaires and diaries, melatonin levels, alongside mood, psychosocial functioning and quality of life (QoL) questionnaires. Twenty-three (50%) patients with BD had abnormal sleep, of whom 12 (52%) had CRD and 29% had obstructive sleep apnoea. Patients with abnormal sleep had lower 24-h melatonin secretion compared to controls and patients with normal sleep. Abnormal sleep/CRD in BD was associated with impaired functioning and worse QoL. BD is associated with high rates of abnormal sleep and CRD. The association between these disorders, mood and functioning, and the direction of causality, warrants further investigation.

  9. Circadian Rhythm Disturbances in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawit A. Weldemichael

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian Rhythm Disturbances (CRDs affect as many as a quarter of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients during some stage of their illness. Alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and melatonin secretion are the major factors linked with the cause of CRDs. As a result, the normal physiology of sleep, the biological clock, and core body temperature are affected. This paper systematically discusses some of the causative factors, typical symptoms, and treatment options for CRDs in patients with AD. This paper also emphasizes the implementation of behavioral and environmental therapies before embarking on medications to treat CRDs. Pharmacotherapeutic options are summarized to provide symptomatic benefits for the patient and relieve stress on their families and professional care providers. As of today, there are few studies relative to CRDs in AD. Large randomized trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of treatments such as bright light therapy and engaging activities in the reduction of CRDs in AD patients.

  10. Keeping the Rhythm : Cardiac Pacemaker Cell Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkhard, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to form and function in the developing vertebrate embryo. Its proper morphogenesis and function is crucial for survival. Here we focus on the development and characterization of a highly specialized subset of cardiac cells, the pacemaker cells. In the mammalian heart,

  11. Sleep disturbances after non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob

    2001-01-01

    . The sleep disturbances seem to be related to the magnitude of trauma and thereby to the surgical stress response and/or post-operative opioid administration. Post-operative sleep disturbances may contribute to the development of early post-operative fatigue, episodic hypoxaemia, haemodynamic instability......After major non-cardiac surgery sleep pattern is usually disturbed with initial suppression of rapid eye movement sleep with a subsequent rebound during the first post-operative week. Deep sleep is also suppressed for several days after the operation and subjective sleep quality is impaired...... and altered mental status, all with a potential negative effect on post-operative outcome. Minimizing surgical trauma and avoiding or minimizing use of opioids for pain relief may prevent or reduce post-operative sleep disturbances. Post-operative sleep pattern represents an important research field, since...

  12. Indirect bright light improves circadian rest-activity rhythm disturbances in demented patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Someren, E. J.; Kessler, A.; Mirmiran, M.; Swaab, D. F.

    1997-01-01

    Light is known to be an important modulator of circadian rhythms. We tested the hypothesis than an enduring increase in the daytime environmental illumination level improves rest-activity rhythm disturbances in demented patients. Actigraphy was performed before, during, and after 4 weeks of

  13. Rhythm disturbances in childhood obstructive sleep apnea during apnea-hypopnea episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khositseth, Anant; Chokechuleekorn, Jittamas; Kuptanon, Teeradej; Leejakpai, Anchalee

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) can result in cardiovascular complications. Nocturnal arrhythmias are reported up to 50% of adult OSA patients. Arrhythmias and heart rate variability in children with OSA have not been well studied. We sought to study rhythm disturbances in childhood OSA and also to analyze the relationship of heart rate variability to the severity of OSA in children. In a retrospective cross sectional study, records of children aged < 15 years with history of snoring and suspected OSA, who had undergone polysomnography (PSG) for first time were analyzed. The cardiac rhythm and heart rate variability were studied during PSG. A total of 124 patients diagnosed with OSA were grouped into mild (n = 52), moderate (n = 30), and severe (n = 42) OSA. During PSG, all had sinus arrhythmias and only three patients had premature atrial contractions (PACs). The standard deviation of heart rate (SD-HR) during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in severe OSA (9.1 ± 2.4) was significantly higher than SD-HR in mild OSA (7.5 ± 1.3, P < 0.0001). The maximum heart rate (max-HR) during REM-sleep in severe OSA (132.1 ± 22.1) was significantly higher than the max-HR in mild OSA (121.3 ± 12.6 bpm, P = 0.016). There was no significant arrhythmia in children with OSA during their sleep. Heart rate variability correlated with the severity of OSA

  14. Wet cupping therapy restores sympathovagal imbalances in cardiac rhythm.

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    Arslan, Müzeyyen; Yeşilçam, Nesibe; Aydin, Duygu; Yüksel, Ramazan; Dane, Senol

    2014-04-01

    A recent study showed that cupping had therapeutic effects in rats with myocardial infarction and cardiac arrhythmias. The current studyaimed to investigate the possible useful effects of cupping therapy on cardiac rhythm in terms of heart rate variability (HRV). Forty healthy participants were included. Classic wet cupping therapy was applied on five points of the back. Recording electrocardiography (to determine HRV) was applied 1 hour before and 1 hour after cupping therapy. All HRV parameters increased after cupping therapy compared with before cupping therapy in healthy persons. These results indicate for the first time in humans that cupping might be cardioprotective. In this study, cupping therapy restored sympathovagal imbalances by stimulating the peripheral nervous system.

  15. Stochastic Alternating Dynamics for Synchronous EAD-Like Beating Rhythms in Cultured Cardiac Myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ning; ZHANG Hui-Min; LIU Zhi-Qiang; DING Xue-Li; YANG Ming-Hao; GU Hua-Guang; REN Wei

    2009-01-01

    Dissolved cardiac myocytes can couple together and generate synchronous beatings in culture. We observed a synchronized early after-depolarization(EAD)-like rhythm in cultured cardiac myocytes and reproduced the experimental observation in a network mathematical model whose dynamics are close to a Hopf bifurcation. The mechanism for this EAD-like rhythm is attributed to noised-induced stochastic alternatings between the focus and the limit cycle. These results provide novel understandings for pathological heart rhythms like the early immature beatings.

  16. Circadian Rhythm Disturbances in Mood Disorders: Insights into the Role of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disturbances are a common symptom among individuals with mood disorders. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), in the ventral part of the anterior hypothalamus, orchestrates physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms. The SCN consists of self-sustaining oscillators and receives photic and nonphotic cues, which entrain the SCN to the external environment. In turn, through synaptic and hormonal mechanisms, the SCN can drive and synchronize circadian rhythms in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral tissues. Thus, genetic or environmental perturbations of SCN rhythms could disrupt brain regions more closely related to mood regulation and cause mood disturbances. Here, we review clinical and preclinical studies that provide evidence both for and against a causal role for the SCN in mood disorders. PMID:29230328

  17. Circadian rhythm disturbance after radiotherapy for brain tumor in infantile period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Masaya; Shinozaki, Masako; Sasaki, Hideo.

    1993-01-01

    We report a 19-year-old man suffering from circadian sleep-wake (S-W) rhythm disturbance after total tumor resection and whole brain irradiation. The patient was diagnosed as having astrocytoma in the right temporal lobe by CT scan and angiography at the age of 6 months. After total tumor resection and whole brain irradiation ( 60 Co 60 Gy), he showed profound psychomotor retardation, endoclinologic dysfunction including hypothyroidism and growth hormone deficiency, and S-W rhythm disturbance. At the age of 19, brain MRI revealed asymmetrical low intensity in the hypothalamic region. On endoclinological examination panhypopituitarism due to primary hypothalamic lesion was evident. His S-W rhythm was disturbed; i.e., sleep periods were dispersedly distributed throughout 24 hours. So he showed a lethargic tendency in the daytime. All-day polysomnography revealed abnormal sleep structure such as the absence of sleep spindle and hump, peripheral apnea, snoring and low oxygen saturation. After L-thyroxine supplementation his daily activity improved gradually. The decrease in short time sleep and tendency of a free-running rhythm were observed and oxygen saturation improved remarkably. Peripheral apnea and snoring disappeared. This wakening effect of L-thyroxine administration may be due to improvement of hypothyroidism symptom such as myxoedematous pharynx. It also seems related to the alteration of the central S-W rhythm regulation, because free-running rhythm appeared after L-thyroxine administration. Vitamin B 12 (VB 12 ), which has been reported to be effective for S-W rhythm disorders, was not effective for our patient's free-running rhythm. Compared with the patients responding to VB 12 , our patient's organic brain damage was more evident radiologically and endoclinologically. Following the hypothesis that VB 12 has a potential to reinforce the entrainment of circadian rhythm, our patient's organic brain damage may include entrainment system. (author)

  18. Therapeutic strategies for circadian rhythm and sleep disturbances in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wamelen, Daniel J; Roos, Raymund Ac; Aziz, Nasir A

    2015-12-01

    Aside from the well-known motor, cognitive and psychiatric signs and symptoms, Huntington disease (HD) is also frequently complicated by circadian rhythm and sleep disturbances. Despite the observation that these disturbances often precede motor onset and have a high prevalence, no studies are available in HD patients which assess potential treatments. In this review, we will briefly outline the nature of circadian rhythm and sleep disturbances in HD and subsequently focus on potential treatments based on findings in other neurodegenerative diseases with similarities to HD, such as Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. The most promising treatment options to date for circadian rhythm and sleep disruption in HD include melatonin (agonists) and bright light therapy, although further corroboration in clinical trials is warranted.

  19. A new era for cardiac rhythm management devices : Solutions for transvenous lead complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knops, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    Both pacemakers and cardiac defibrillators (ICD) have been designed to treat cardiac arrhythmias. These arrhythmias often lead to life-threatening conditions. Numerous studies have shown the benefits on survival and quality of life of these cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices. These devices rely

  20. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    by atropine in both tetraplegic and healthy subjects, these rhythms reflect in an important way rhythmic firing of vagal cardiac motoneurones.

  1. Disturbance and strategies for reactivation of the circadian rhythm system in aging and Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.-H.; Swaab, D.F.

    2007-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disturbances, such as sleep disorders, are frequently seen in aging and are even more pronounced in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in the biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and the pineal gland during aging and AD are considered to be the biological basis

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves circadian rhythm disturbances in Alzheimer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Someren, E. J.; Scherder, E. J.; Swaab, D. F.

    1998-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), an irregular day-night rhythm with behavioral restlessness during the night makes a strong demand on caregivers and is among the most important reasons for institutionalization. A dysfunctioning circadian timing system is supposed to underlie the disturbance

  3. Cardiac disturbances after pneumonectomy--the value of prophylactic digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, A; Mattila, T; Appelqvist, P; Meurala, H; Mattila, S

    1978-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative cardiac disturbances and the value of prophylactic digitalization were studied retrospectively in 143 patients undergoing pneumonectomy for carcinoma of the lung. Cardiac arrhythmias occurred in 29% and tachycardia episodes in 30% of the patients. The incidence of myocardial infarction was 2%. Operative mortality was 4%. The cardiac disturbances developed more often after left than after right pneumonectomy. The age of the patients, a history of angina pectoris or hypertension did not markedly increase the incidence of cardiac disturbances, neither did operative factors, such as pericardiotomy, left atrial resection, major bleeding nor postoperative empyema. Prophylactic digitalization significantly reduced postoperative cardiac disorders, their frequency being 33% in the group of patients who received prophylactic digitalis compared with 65% in the group that did not.

  4. STEM promotion through museum exhibits on cardiac monitoring & cardiac rhythm management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Countryman, Jordan D; Dow, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Formal education in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) does not successfully engage all of the students who have potential to become skilled in STEM activities and careers. Museum exhibits may be able to reach and engage a broader range of the public. STEM Exhibits that are both understandable and capture the imagination of viewers may contribute toward increased interest in STEM activities. One such topic for such an exhibit could be cardiac pacemakers and cardioverter defibrillators that sustain life. Although museums have existed for centuries, the available types of exhibit designs has dramatically increased in recent decades due to innovations in technology. Science and technology museums have especially taken advantage of the progression of exhibit design to developed new ways to communicate to their viewers. These novel presentation tools allow museums to more effectively convey to and engage viewers. This paper examines the techniques employed by museums in exhibits and considers the practices of several museums with exhibits related to cardiac monitoring (CM) and cardiac rhythm management (CRM).

  5. Disturbed diurnal rhythm of three classical phase markers in the chronic mild stress rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, S L; Højgaard, K; Wiborg, O

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of circadian rhythms have been suggested to be a causal factor in the development of major depressive disorder. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between circadian rhythm abnormalities and mood disorders are still unknown. In the current study the association between...

  6. Adolescents at clinical-high risk for psychosis: Circadian rhythm disturbances predict worsened prognosis at 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford-Avery, Jessica R; Gonçalves, Bruno da Silva Brandão; Brietzke, Elisa; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Gadelha, Ary; Auerbach, Randy P; Mittal, Vijay A

    2017-11-01

    Individuals with psychotic disorders experience disruptions to both the sleep and circadian components of the sleep/wake cycle. Recent evidence has supported a role of sleep disturbances in emerging psychosis. However, less is known about how circadian rhythm disruptions may relate to psychosis symptoms and prognosis for adolescents with clinical high-risk (CHR) syndromes. The present study examines circadian rest/activity rhythms in CHR and healthy control (HC) youth to clarify the relationships among circadian rhythm disturbance, psychosis symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and the longitudinal course of illness. Thirty-four CHR and 32 HC participants were administered a baseline evaluation, which included clinical interviews, 5days of actigraphy, and a sleep/activity diary. CHR (n=29) participants were re-administered clinical interviews at a 1-year follow-up assessment. Relative to HC, CHR youth exhibited more fragmented circadian rhythms and later onset of nocturnal rest. Circadian disturbances (fragmented rhythms, low daily activity) were associated with increased psychotic symptom severity among CHR participants at baseline. Circadian disruptions (lower daily activity, rhythms that were more fragmented and/or desynchronized with the light/dark cycle) also predicted severity of psychosis symptoms and psychosocial impairment at 1-year follow-up among CHR youth. Circadian rhythm disturbances may represent a potential vulnerability marker for emergence of psychosis, and thus, rest/activity rhythm stabilization has promise to inform early-identification and prevention/intervention strategies for CHR youth. Future studies with longer study designs are necessary to further examine circadian rhythms in the prodromal period and rates of conversion to psychosis among CHR teens. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Determination of myocardial energetic output for cardiac rhythm pacing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heřman, D.; Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2007), s. 156-161 ISSN 1567-8822 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/03/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : heart arrhythmia * cardiac pacing modes * numerical simulation Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  8. Clinical predictors of shockable versus non-shockable rhythms in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2016-01-01

    Aim To identify factors associated with a non-shockable rhythm as first recorded heart rhythm. Methods Patients ≥18 years old suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 2001 and 2012 were identified in the population-based Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Danish administrative registries were...... used to identify chronic diseases (within 10 years) and drug prescriptions (within 180 days). A multivariable logistic regression model, including patient related and cardiac arrest related characteristics, was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with non-shockable rhythm. Results...... compared to patients with shockable rhythm. In the adjusted multivariable regression model, pre-existing non-cardiovascular disease and drug prescription were associated with a non-shockable rhythm e.g. chronic obstructive lung disease (OR 1.44 [95% CI: 1.32–1.58]); and the prescription for antidepressants...

  9. Chaos control applied to cardiac rhythms represented by ECG signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borem Ferreira, Bianca; Amorim Savi, Marcelo; Souza de Paula, Aline

    2014-01-01

    The control of irregular or chaotic heartbeats is a key issue in cardiology. In this regard, chaos control techniques represent a good alternative since they suggest treatments different from those traditionally used. This paper deals with the application of the extended time-delayed feedback control method to stabilize pathological chaotic heart rhythms. Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals are employed to represent the cardiovascular behavior. A mathematical model is employed to generate ECG signals using three modified Van der Pol oscillators connected with time delay couplings. This model provides results that qualitatively capture the general behavior of the heart. Controlled ECG signals show the ability of the strategy either to control or to suppress the chaotic heart dynamics generating less-critical behaviors. (paper)

  10. Effects of adrenaline on rhythm transitions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neset, Andres; Nordseth, Trond; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Wik, Lars; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2013-11-01

    We wanted to study the effects of intravenous (i.v.) adrenaline (epinephrine) on rhythm transitions during cardiac arrest with initial or secondary ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia (VF/VT). Post hoc analysis of patients included in a randomised controlled trial of i.v. drugs in adult, non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients who were defibrillated and had a readable electrocardiography recording. Patients who received adrenaline were compared with patients who did not. Cardiac rhythms were annotated manually using the defibrillator data. Eight hundred and forty-nine patients were included in the randomised trial of which 223 were included in this analysis; 119 in the adrenaline group and 104 in the no-adrenaline group. The proportion of patients with one or more VF/VT episodes after temporary return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was higher in the adrenaline than in the no-adrenaline group, 24% vs. 12%, P = 0.03. Most relapses from ROSC to VF/VT in the no-adrenaline group occurred during the first 20 min of resuscitation, whereas patients in the adrenaline group experienced such relapses even after 20 min. Fibrillations from asystole or pulseless electrical activity, shock resistant VF/VT and the number of rhythm transitions per patient was higher in the adrenalin group compared with the no-adrenalin group: 90% vs. 69%, P adrenaline had more rhythm transitions from ROSC and non-shockable rhythms to VF/VT. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. DISTURBANCES OF BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS IN A RAT CHRONIC MILD STRESS MODEL OF DEPRESSION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Wiborg, Ove; Bouzinova, Elena

    validated animal model of depression, the chronic mild stress model (CMS). Depression-like and control rats were killed by decapitation within 24 h. Trunk blood, brain and liver tissue were collected. The quantitative amount of plasma corticosterone and melatonin were measured using an ELISA and RIA kit...... that depression-like animals showed an abnormal circadian rhythm in the liver and in subregions of the rat brains related to depression. However, the SCN was partly protected against stress. We found an increased level of corticosteron and melatonin, in the depression-like animals as well as a shifted circadian......Aim: The focus of this project is to identify biomarkers related to circadian disturbances in major depressive disorder. Background: A large body of clinical data from depressed individuals showed that sleep, temperature, hormones, physiological states and moodchanges are consistent...

  12. Cardiorespiratory Coupling: Common Rhythms in Cardiac, Sympathetic, and Respiratory Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Baekey, David M.; Galán, Roberto F.; Wehrwein, Erica; Morris, Kendall F.

    2014-01-01

    purpose for cardiorespiratory coupling is the biggest barrier for recognizing its significance. Cardiorespiratory coupling has only a small effect on the efficiency of gas exchange; rather, we propose that cardiorespiratory control system may act as weakly coupled oscillator to maintain rhythms within a bounded variability. PMID:24746049

  13. Identification of cardiac rhythm features by mathematical analysis of vector fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Tamara N; Brooks, Dana H; Triedman, John K

    2005-01-01

    Automated techniques for locating cardiac arrhythmia features are limited, and cardiologists generally rely on isochronal maps to infer patterns in the cardiac activation sequence during an ablation procedure. Velocity vector mapping has been proposed as an alternative method to study cardiac activation in both clinical and research environments. In addition to the visual cues that vector maps can provide, vector fields can be analyzed using mathematical operators such as the divergence and curl. In the current study, conduction features were extracted from velocity vector fields computed from cardiac mapping data. The divergence was used to locate ectopic foci and wavefront collisions, and the curl to identify central obstacles in reentrant circuits. Both operators were applied to simulated rhythms created from a two-dimensional cellular automaton model, to measured data from an in situ experimental canine model, and to complex three-dimensional human cardiac mapping data sets. Analysis of simulated vector fields indicated that the divergence is useful in identifying ectopic foci, with a relatively small number of vectors and with errors of up to 30 degrees in the angle measurements. The curl was useful for identifying central obstacles in reentrant circuits, and the number of velocity vectors needed increased as the rhythm became more complex. The divergence was able to accurately identify canine in situ pacing sites, areas of breakthrough activation, and wavefront collisions. In data from human arrhythmias, the divergence reliably estimated origins of electrical activity and wavefront collisions, but the curl was less reliable at locating central obstacles in reentrant circuits, possibly due to the retrospective nature of data collection. The results indicate that the curl and divergence operators applied to velocity vector maps have the potential to add valuable information in cardiac mapping and can be used to supplement human pattern recognition.

  14. Insulin resistance and circadian rhythm of cardiac autonomic modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Jianwen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance (IR has been associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Heart rate variability (HRV, an index of cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM, is also associated with CVD mortality and CVD morbidity. Currently, there are limited data about the impairment of IR on the circadian pattern of CAM. Therefore, we conducted this investigation to exam the association between IR and the circadian oscillations of CAM in a community-dwelling middle-aged sample. Method Homeostasis models of IR (HOMA-IR, insulin, and glucose were used to assess IR. CAM was measured by HRV analysis from a 24-hour electrocardiogram. Two stage modeling was used in the analysis. In stage one, for each individual we fit a cosine periodic model based on the 48 segments of HRV data. We obtained three individual-level cosine parameters that quantity the circadian pattern: mean (M, measures the overall average of a HRV index; amplitude (Â, measures the amplitude of the oscillation of a HRV index; and acrophase time (θ, measures the timing of the highest oscillation. At the second stage, we used a random-effects-meta-analysis to summarize the effects of IR variables on the three circadian parameters of HRV indices obtained in stage one of the analysis. Results In persons without type diabetes, the multivariate adjusted β (SE of log HOMA-IR and M variable for HRV were -0.251 (0.093, -0.245 (0.078, -0.19 (0.06, -4.89 (1.76, -3.35 (1.31, and 2.14 (0.995, for log HF, log LF, log VLF, SDNN, RMSSD and HR, respectively (all P Conclusion Elevated IR, among non-diabetics significantly impairs the overall mean levels of CAM. However, the  or θ of CAM were not significantly affected by IR, suggesting that the circadian mechanisms of CAM are not impaired. However, among persons with type 2 diabetes, a group clinically has more severe form of IR, the adverse effects of increased IR on all three HRV circadian parameters are much larger.

  15. Rhythm disturbances in childhood obstructive sleep apnea during apnea-hypopnea episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Khositseth

    2013-01-01

    Methods: In a retrospective cross sectional study, records of children aged < 15 years with history of snoring and suspected OSA, who had undergone polysomnography (PSG for first time were analyzed. The cardiac rhythm and heart rate variability were studied during PSG. Results: A total of 124 patients diagnosed with OSA were grouped into mild ( n = 52, moderate ( n = 30, and severe ( n = 42 OSA. During PSG, all had sinus arrhythmias and only three patients had premature atrial contractions (PACs. The standard deviation of heart rate (SD-HR during rapid eye movement (REM sleep in severe OSA (9.1 ± 2.4 was significantly higher than SD-HR in mild OSA (7.5 ± 1.3, P < 0.0001. The maximum heart rate (max-HR during REM-sleep in severe OSA (132.1 ± 22.1 was significantly higher than the max-HR in mild OSA (121.3 ± 12.6 bpm, P = 0.016. Conclusions: There was no significant arrhythmia in children with OSA during their sleep. Heart rate variability correlated with the severity of OSA.

  16. [Cardiac rhythm variability as an index of vegetative heart regulation in a situation of psychoemotional tension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revina, N E

    2006-01-01

    Differentiated role of segmental and suprasegmental levels of cardiac rhythm variability regulation in dynamics of motivational human conflict was studied for the first time. The author used an original method allowing simultaneous analysis of psychological and physiological parameters of human activity. The study demonstrates that will and anxiety, as components of motivational activity spectrum, form the "energetic" basis of voluntary-constructive and involuntary-affective behavioral strategies, selectively uniting various levels of suprasegmental and segmental control of human heart functioning in a conflict situation.

  17. Non-contact tonometry synchronized with cardiac rhythm and its relationship with blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, A; González-Méijome, J M; Fernandes, P; Jorge, J; Almeida, J B; Parafita, M A

    2006-07-01

    The main objectives of this study were to determine the differences between non-synchronized intraocular pressure (IOP_N) and intraocular pressure readings synchronized with cardiac pulse and try to determine if these parameters are related to blood pressure values. One hundred and sixty-five right eyes from 165 volunteers (107 females, 58 males) aged from 19 to 73 years (mean +/- S.D., 29.93 +/- 11.17) were examined with the Nidek NT-4000, a new non-contact tonometer that allows the measurement of IOP synchronized with the cardiac rhythm. IOP measurements in the four different modes of synchronization were taken in a randomized order. Three measures of each parameter were taken and then averaged. The blood pressure was determined three times with a portable manometer and mean values of systolic and diastolic pressure and the pulse rate were computed. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was determined as being 1/3 of systolic plus 2/3 of diastolic blood pressure. The mean +/- S.D. values for the standard intraocular pressure (IOP_N: 14.76 +/- 2.86), intraocular pressure in the systolic instant or peak (IOP_P: 14.99 +/- 2.85), intraocular pressure in the middle instant between heartbeats or middle (IOP_M: 14.68 +/- 2.76), and intraocular pressure in the diastolic instant or bottom (IOP_B: 13.86 +/- 2.61) were obtained. The IOP_P was higher than the remaining values. A significant difference in mean IOP existed between IOP_B and the remaining modes of measuring (p non-synchronized and the remaining synchronized parameters in a significant way. Other than a weak association with MAP, no significant correlation between IOP and BP was found. The measurements of IOP readings for the three modes are consistent with timings during the cardiac cycle and IOP pulse cycle.

  18. Circadian rhythm disturbance after radiotherapy for brain tumor in infantile period; Clinical effect of L-thyroxine and vitamin B[sub 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Masaya; Shinozaki, Masako (Metropolitan Medical Center for the Severely Handicapped, Fuchu, Tokyo (Japan)); Sasaki, Hideo

    1993-08-01

    We report a 19-year-old man suffering from circadian sleep-wake (S-W) rhythm disturbance after total tumor resection and whole brain irradiation. The patient was diagnosed as having astrocytoma in the right temporal lobe by CT scan and angiography at the age of 6 months. After total tumor resection and whole brain irradiation ([sup 60]Co 60 Gy), he showed profound psychomotor retardation, endoclinologic dysfunction including hypothyroidism and growth hormone deficiency, and S-W rhythm disturbance. At age 19, brain MRI revealed asymmetrical low intensity in the hypothalamic region. On endoclinological examination panhypopituitarism due to primary hypothalamic lesion was evident. His S-W rhythm was disturbed; i.e., sleep periods were dispersedly distributed throughout 24 hours. He showed a lethargic tendency in the daytime. All-day polysomnography revealed abnormal sleep structure such as the absence of sleep spindle and hump, peripheral apnea, snoring and low oxygen saturation. After L-thyroxine supplementation his daily activity improved gradually. The decrease in short time sleep and tendency of a free-running rhythm were observed and oxygen saturation improved remarkably. Peripheral apnea and snoring disappeared. This wakening effect of L-thyroxine administration may be due to improvement of hypothyroidism symptom such as myxoedematous pharynx. It also seems related to the alteration of the central S-W rhythm regulation, because free-running rhythm appeared after L-thyroxine administration. Vitamin B[sub 12] (VB[sub 12]), which has been reported to be effective for S-W rhythm disorders, was not effective for our patient's free-running rhythm. Compared with the patients responding to VB[sub 12], our patient's organic brain damage was more evident radiologically and endoclinologically. Following the hypothesis that VB[sub 12] has a potential to reinforce the entrainment of circadian rhythm, our patient's organic brain damage may include entrainment

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of implantable cardiac rhythm devices at 3.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, J Rod

    2008-07-01

    A relaxation of the prohibition of scanning cardiac rhythm device patients is underway, largely because of the growing experience of safe scanning events at 1.5T. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T is becoming more common and may pose a different risk profile and outcome of MRI of cardiac device patients. No restrictions were placed on pacemaker dependency, region scanned, device type, or manufacturer. Sixteen scans at 3T were performed with an electrophysiologist present on 14 patients with a variety of devices from various manufacturers. An "MRI-S" strategy was used. Multimodal monitoring was required. Device interrogation was performed prior to, immediately after, and 1-3 months after the MRI. For nonpacemaker-dependent device patients, attempts were made to turn all device features off (with OOO programming the goal) conceptually rendering the device "invisible." In pacemaker-dependent patients, the device was programmed to asynchronous mode at highest output for the duration of the scan with the goal of rendering the device conceptually "invulnerable" to MRI effects. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was limited to 2W/kg. All patients were successfully scanned. No arrhythmias were noted. No significant change in the programmed parameters, pacing thresholds, sensing, impedance, or battery parameters was noted. The insertable loop recorder (ILR) recorded prolonged artifactual asystole during MRI. One patient noted chest burning during the scan. Device patients may undergo carefully tailored 3T MRI scans when pre-MRI reprogramming of the device occurs in conjunction with extensive monitoring, supervision, and follow-up.

  20. Selection and collection of multi parameter physiological data for cardiac rhythm diagnostic algorithm development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostock, J.; Weller, P. [School of Informatics, City University London, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Cooklin, M., E-mail: jbostock1@msn.co [Cardiovascular Directorate, Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Automated diagnostic algorithms are used in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD's) to detect abnormal heart rhythms. Algorithms misdiagnose and improved specificity is needed to prevent inappropriate therapy. Knowledge engineering (KE) and artificial intelligence (AI) could improve this. A pilot study of KE was performed with artificial neural network (ANN) as AI system. A case note review analysed arrhythmic events stored in patients ICD memory. 13.2% patients received inappropriate therapy. The best ICD algorithm had sensitivity 1.00, specificity 0.69 (p<0.001 different to gold standard). A subset of data was used to train and test an ANN. A feed-forward, back-propagation network with 7 inputs, a 4 node hidden layer and 1 output had sensitivity 1.00, specificity 0.71 (p<0.001). A prospective study was performed using KE to list arrhythmias, factors and indicators for which measurable parameters were evaluated and results reviewed by a domain expert. Waveforms from electrodes in the heart and thoracic bio-impedance; temperature and motion data were collected from 65 patients during cardiac electrophysiological studies. 5 incomplete datasets were due to technical failures. We concluded that KE successfully guided selection of parameters and ANN produced a usable system and that complex data collection carries greater risk of technical failure, leading to data loss.

  1. Selection and collection of multi parameter physiological data for cardiac rhythm diagnostic algorithm development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostock, J.; Weller, P.; Cooklin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Automated diagnostic algorithms are used in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD's) to detect abnormal heart rhythms. Algorithms misdiagnose and improved specificity is needed to prevent inappropriate therapy. Knowledge engineering (KE) and artificial intelligence (AI) could improve this. A pilot study of KE was performed with artificial neural network (ANN) as AI system. A case note review analysed arrhythmic events stored in patients ICD memory. 13.2% patients received inappropriate therapy. The best ICD algorithm had sensitivity 1.00, specificity 0.69 (p<0.001 different to gold standard). A subset of data was used to train and test an ANN. A feed-forward, back-propagation network with 7 inputs, a 4 node hidden layer and 1 output had sensitivity 1.00, specificity 0.71 (p<0.001). A prospective study was performed using KE to list arrhythmias, factors and indicators for which measurable parameters were evaluated and results reviewed by a domain expert. Waveforms from electrodes in the heart and thoracic bio-impedance; temperature and motion data were collected from 65 patients during cardiac electrophysiological studies. 5 incomplete datasets were due to technical failures. We concluded that KE successfully guided selection of parameters and ANN produced a usable system and that complex data collection carries greater risk of technical failure, leading to data loss.

  2. Geometric patterns of time-delay plots from different cardiac rhythms and arrhythmias using short-term EKG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borracci, Raúl A; Montoya Pulvet, José D; Ingino, Carlos A; Fitz Maurice, Mario; Hirschon Prado, Alfredo; Dominé, Enrique

    2017-12-27

    To date, no systematic work has been intended to describe spatio-temporal patterns of cardiac rhythms using only short series of RR intervals, to facilitate visual or computerized-aided identification of EKG motifs for use in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to detect and classify eye-catching geometric patterns of Poincaré time-delay plots from different types of cardiac rhythms and arrhythmias using short-term EKG signals. Approximately 150-300 representative, consecutive beats were retrieved from 24-h Holter registers of 100 patients with different heart rhythms. Two-dimensional Poincaré charts were created, and the resulting geometric patterns were transformed into representative familiar eye-catching drawings to interpret different arrhythmias. Poincaré plot representation of RR interval data revealed a wide variety of visual patterns: (i) comet-shaped for sinus rhythm; (ii) torpedo-shaped for sinus bradycardia; (iii) cigarette-shaped for sinus tachycardia; (iv) butterfly-shaped for sinus tachycardia and isolated atrial premature complexes; (v) arrow-shaped for isolated premature complexes and inappropriate sinus tachycardia; (vi) inverted fan-shaped for sinus rhythm with frequent atrial premature complexes; (vii) tornado-shaped for atrial flutter and atrial tachycardia; and (viii) fan-shaped for atrial fibrillation. Modified Poincaré plots with smoothed lines connecting successive points could accurately classify different types of arrhythmias based on short RR interval sequence variability. Characteristic emergent patterns can be visually identified and eventually could be distinguished by an automatic classification system able to discern between arrhythmias. This work provides an alternative method to interpret time-delay plots obtained from short-term EKG signal recordings. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implantable devices for treatment of disturbed heart rhythm: review of the current situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridova, A A

    The question of the possibility of MRI scanning in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) appeared simultaneously with the introduction of MRI in clinical practice. A lot of in-vitro, in-vivo and clinical researches were performed to estimate wat going on with CIED in strong magnetic field and is it possible to perform some unified protocol of safe MRI-scanning for these patients. Recommendations were provided, but not for the wide practice. MRI remained strongly contraindicated for CIED patient. To meet the clinical need CIEM manufacturers changed the design of devices to made them MRI-compatible, including reducing of ferromagnetic components, additional filters, new software. Lead coil design was changed as well to minimize lead heating and electrical current induction. Now all leaders of CIED industry have in their portfolio all types of MRI-conditional implanted cardiac rhythm management devices (pacemakers, ICDs, CRTs). "Conditional" means MRI scanning can be done only under specific condition. For MRI device and lead in one system have to be from the same manufacturer. Now, if you need to implant the device, you must proceed from the fact that the patient is more likely to need an MRI in the future and choose the appropriate model, not forgetting that the electrodes should also be MRI-compatible.

  4. The effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cardiac rhythm: antiarrhythmic, proarrhythmic, both or neither?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens evon Schacky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis review focuses on developments after 2008, when the topic was last reviewed by the author. Pertinent publications were found by medline searches and in the author’s personal data base. Prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF was investigated in a number of trials, sparked by one positive report on the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, considerations of upstream therapy, and data from electrophysiologic laboratories. If EPA+DHA prevent postoperative AF, the effect is probably smaller than initially expected. The same is probably true for maintenance of sinus rhythm after cardioversion and for new-onset AF. Larger trials are currently ongoing. Prevention of ventricular arrhythmias was studied in carriers of an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator, with no clear results. This might have been due to a broad definition of the primary endpoint, including any ventricular arrhythmia and any action of the device. Epidemiologic studies support the contention that high levels of EPA+DHA prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD. However, since SCD is a rare occurrence, it is difficult to conduct an adequately powered trial. In patients with congestive heart failure, EPA+DHA reduced total mortality and rehospitalizations, but not SCD or presumed arrhythmic death. Of three trials in patients after a myocardial infarction, two were inadequately powered, and in one, the dose might have been too low. Taken together, while epidemiologic studies support an inverse relation between EPA+DHA and occurrence of SCD or arrhythmic death, demonstrating this effect in intervention trials remained elusive so far.A pro-arrhythmic effect of EPA+DHA has not been seen in intervention studies, and epidemiologic studies also rather argue against such an effect. A different, and probably more productive, perspective is provided by a standardized analytical assessment of a person’s status in EPA+DHA by use of the Omega-3 Index, EPA+DHA in

  5. Safety, efficacy, and performance of implanted recycled cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices in underprivileged patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Reema; Ghanbari, Hamid; Feldman, Dustin; Menesses, Daniel; Rivas, Daniel; Zakhem, Nicole C; Duarte, Carlos; Machado, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Patients in underdeveloped nations have limited access to life-saving medical technology including cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices. We evaluated alternative means to provide such technology to this patient population while assessing the safety and efficacy of such a practice. Patients in the United States with clinical indications for extraction of CRM devices were consented. Antemortem CRM devices were cleaned and sterilized following a protocol established at our institution. Surveillance in vitro cultures were performed for quality assurance. The functional status of pulse generators was tested with a pacing system analyzer to confirm at least 70% battery life. Most generators were transported, in person, to an implanting institution in Nicaragua. Recipients with a Class I indication for CRM implantation, and meeting economical criteria set forth, were consented for implantation of a recycled device. Between 2003 and 2009, implantation was performed in 17 patients with an average age of 42.1 ± 20.3 years. Of the 17 patients, nine were male and eight were female. Mean follow-up was 68 ± 38 months. Device evaluation occurred prior to discharge, 4 weeks post implantation, and every 6 months thereafter. There were three deaths during the follow-up period secondary to myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure. Hematoma formation occurred in one patient. No infections, early battery depletion, or device malfunction were identified during follow-up. Our case series is the longest follow-up of recipients of recycled antemortem CRM devices. Our findings support the feasibility and safety of this alternative acquisition of life-saving technology. ©2011, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Physiotherapy and cardiac rhythm devices: a review of the current scope of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digby, Geneviève C; Daubney, Marguerite E; Baggs, Jim; Campbell, Debra; Simpson, Christopher S; Redfearn, Damian P; Brennan, F James; Abdollah, Hoshiar; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2009-07-01

    Several case reports have demonstrated negative interactions between various physiotherapy modalities and cardiac rhythm devices (CRD). Fear of these potential interactions may lead to suboptimal utilization of physiotherapy treatments in CRD patients. No prior review of available guidelines, or management strategies, on the interaction between physiotherapy modalities and CRD patients has been reported. To review existing guidelines regarding the use of physiotherapy modalities in patients with pacemakers and/or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). To retrospectively analyse CRD patient encounters at a local physiotherapy facility during a period of 2 years. A review of the literature regarding the potential interactions between physiotherapy modalities and CRDs was performed. Next, a 2 year retrospective analysis of patient encounters at a physiotherapy facility was conducted. In addition, seven international physiotherapy societies and four CRD manufacturers were surveyed with respect to recommendations regarding physiotherapy treatments in device patients. The local physiotherapy facility treated 25 patients with CRD (22 pacemaker and 3 ICD patients) for a total of 230 visits (9.2 visits/patient). Five patients received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and all 25 were administered additional treatment in the form of ultrasound (15), acupuncture (19), Laser (7), traction/manual therapy (12), exercise (8), education (18), taping (5), and/or moist heat (5). No complications occurred. Meanwhile, international societies and device manufacturers offered few specific or consistent recommendations. There are no specific international policies regarding the administration of physiotherapy modalities in CRD patients and, thus, there are no specific guidelines to be implemented at the local level. Review of the literature and of recommendations from CRD manufacturers suggests that TENS, Diathermy, and Interferential Electrical Current Therapy

  7. Enhanced sodium sensitivity and disturbed circadian rhythm of blood pressure in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzu, Takashi; Kimura, Genjiro; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kanasaki, Masami; Isshiki, Keiji; Araki, Shin-ichi; Sugiomoto, Toshiro; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2006-08-01

    To assess whether an association between sodium-sensitive hypertension and metabolic syndrome exists; and whether, in patients with metabolic syndrome, the nocturnal fall of blood pressure decreases and salt restriction affects the circadian blood pressure rhythm. Japanese patients with essential hypertension, who were treated without any antihypertensive agent, were maintained on a high-sodium diet and a low-sodium diet for 1 week each. On the last day of each diet, the 24-h blood pressures were measured. A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was made according to the International Diabetes Foundation definition Among the 56 patients with essential hypertension, 15 patients were complicated with metabolic syndrome while 41 patients were not. The nocturnal blood pressure fall was significant in patients without metabolic syndrome, while it was not so in patients with metabolic syndrome. Only in patients with metabolic syndrome was the nocturnal blood pressure fall enhanced by sodium restriction. The prevalence of sodium-sensitive hypertension in patients with metabolic syndrome was significantly higher than in those without metabolic syndrome (70.6 versus 36.0%, respectively; P = 0.017). A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed central obesity to be an independent risk factor for sodium-sensitive hypertension (odds ratio, 1.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.91). In patients with essential hypertension, an inter-relationship exists among metabolic syndrome, enhanced sodium sensitivity of the blood pressure and non-dipping. The elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients with metabolic syndrome may be related to sodium-sensitive hypertension and non-dipping.

  8. Ecstasy (MDMA) Alters Cardiac Gene Expression and DNA Methylation: Implications for Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction in the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Christopher A; Ludlow, Ivan; Hight, Robert S; Jiao, Zhe; Fields, Earl; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Torres, Rebecca A; Lewis, William

    2015-11-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is an illicit drug that stimulates monoamine neurotransmitter release and inhibits reuptake. MDMA's acute cardiotoxicity includes tachycardia and arrhythmia which are associated with cardiomyopathy. MDMA acute cardiotoxicity has been explored, but neither long-term MDMA cardiac pathological changes nor epigenetic changes have been evaluated. Microarray analyses were employed to identify cardiac gene expression changes and epigenetic DNA methylation changes. To identify permanent MDMA-induced pathogenetic changes, mice received daily 10- or 35-day MDMA, or daily 10-day MDMA followed by 25-day saline washout (10 + 25 days). MDMA treatment caused differential gene expression (p 1.5) in 752 genes following 10 days, 558 genes following 35 days, and 113 genes following 10-day MDMA + 25-day saline washout. Changes in MAPK and circadian rhythm gene expression were identified as early as 10 days. After 35 days, circadian rhythm genes (Per3, CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2) persisted to be differentially expressed. MDMA caused DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation that was independent of gene expression; hypermethylation of genes was found to be 71% at 10 days, 68% at 35 days, and 91% at 10 + 25 days washout. Differential gene expression paralleled DNA methylation in 22% of genes at 10-day treatment, 17% at 35 days, and 48% at 10 + 25 days washout. We show here that MDMA induced cardiac epigenetic changes in DNA methylation where hypermethylation predominated. Moreover, MDMA induced gene expression of key elements of circadian rhythm regulatory genes. This suggests a fundamental organism-level event to explain some of the etiologies of MDMA dysfunction in the heart. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Training Standards and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Martin S; Guerra, Peter G; Krahn, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    The last guidelines on training for adult cardiac electrophysiology (EP) were published by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society in 1996. Since then, substantial changes in the knowledge and practice of EP have mandated a review of the previous guidelines by the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society, an affiliate of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Novel tools and techniques also now allow electrophysiologists to map and ablate increasingly complex arrhythmias previously managed with pharmacologic or device therapy. Furthermore, no formal attempt had previously been made to standardize EP training across the country. The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Training Standards and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology represent a consensus arrived at by panel members from both societies, as well as EP program directors across Canada and other select contributors. In describing program requirements, the technical and cognitive skills that must be acquired to meet training standards, as well as the minimum number of procedures needed in order to acquire these skills, the new guidelines provide EP program directors and committee members with a template to develop an appropriate curriculum for EP training for cardiology fellows here in Canada. Copyright © 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PGC-1α accelerates cytosolic Ca2+ clearance without disturbing Ca2+ homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Min; Wang, Yanru; Qu, Aijuan

    2010-01-01

    Energy metabolism and Ca 2+ handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1α in cardiac Ca 2+ signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1α via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1α improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca 2+ transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca 2+ increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca 2+ transients and Ca 2+ waves accelerated in PGC-1α-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca 2+ transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na + /Ca 2+ exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1α-induced cytosolic Ca 2+ clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1α induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1α did not disturb cardiac Ca 2+ homeostasis, because SR Ca 2+ load and the propensity for Ca 2+ waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1α can ameliorate cardiac Ca 2+ cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1α-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1α in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  11. Early administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) in patients with cardiac arrest with initial shockable rhythm in hospital: propensity score matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars W; Kurth, Tobias; Chase, Maureen; Berg, Katherine M; Cocchi, Michael N; Callaway, Clifton; Donnino, Michael W

    2016-04-06

    To evaluate whether patients who experience cardiac arrest in hospital receive epinephrine (adrenaline) within the two minutes after the first defibrillation (contrary to American Heart Association guidelines) and to evaluate the association between early administration of epinephrine and outcomes in this population. Prospective observational cohort study. Analysis of data from the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, which includes data from more than 300 hospitals in the United States. Adults in hospital who experienced cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, including patients who had a first defibrillation within two minutes of the cardiac arrest and who remained in a shockable rhythm after defibrillation. Epinephrine given within two minutes after the first defibrillation. Survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with a good functional outcome. A propensity score was calculated for the receipt of epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, based on multiple characteristics of patients, events, and hospitals. Patients who received epinephrine at either zero, one, or two minutes after the first defibrillation were then matched on the propensity score with patients who were "at risk" of receiving epinephrine within the same minute but who did not receive it. 2978 patients were matched on the propensity score, and the groups were well balanced. 1510 (51%) patients received epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, which is contrary to current American Heart Association guidelines. Epinephrine given within the first two minutes after the first defibrillation was associated with decreased odds of survival in the propensity score matched analysis (odds ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.82; P<0.001). Early epinephrine administration was also associated with a decreased odds of return of spontaneous circulation

  12. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu

    2013-01-01

    of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate-increasing and heart rate-decreasing variants associate...

  13. [Analysis of variability of cardiac rhythm and sexual function in men with arterial hypertension during therapy with biosporolol and nebivolol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmamedova, G S; Mustafaev, I I

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study effect of bisoprolol and nebivolol therapy on the sexual function of men with AH. 20 men aged 35-55 (48 +/- 3.5) yr with grade I and II AH received either drug for 2 months. Cardiac rhythm variability (CRV) was estimated in the end of the 4-week placebo period and after 2-month monotherapy. Dopplerography of penile arteries and a questionnaire study (as described by Vasilchenko) were conducted. Both drugs significantly increased the tone of the parasympathetic component of the vegetative nervous system, improved systolic blood flow in cavernous and dorsal arteries. The questionnaire study failed to revel significant changes of the sexual function. It is concluded that biosporolol and nebivolol did not compromise the sexual function of men with AH; they improve spectral CRV characteristics and blood flow in cavernous arteries.

  14. The impact of cardiac rhythm on the mitral valve area and gradient in patients with mitral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arı, Hasan; Arı, Selma; Karakuş, Alper; Camcı, Sencer; Doğanay, Kübra; Tütüncü, Ahmet; Melek, Mehmet; Bozat, Tahsin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cardiac rhythm on the echocardiographic mitral valve area (MVA) and transmitral gradient calculation in relation to net atrioventricular compliance (Cn). Patients (n=22) with mild or moderate pure rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS) (MVA 1 cm2) and atrial fibrillation (AF) were evaluated. All patients underwent transthoracic electrical DC cardioversion under amiodarone treatment. Nineteen of the 22 patients were successfully converted to sinus rhythm (SR). The patients were evaluated with transthoracic echocardiography before and two to three days after DC cardioversion. In order to deal with variable R-R intervals, the measurements were averaged on five to eight consecutive beats in AF. Cn was calculated with a previously validated equation [Cn (mL/mm Hg)=1.270 x MVA/E-wave downslope]. The Cn difference between AF and SR was calculated as follows: [(AF Cn-SR Cn)/AF Cn] x 100. The percentage gradient (mean or maximal) difference between AF and SR was calculated as follows: [AF gradient (mean or maximal) - SR gradient (mean or maximal)]/[AF gradient (mean or maximal)] x 100. The MVA was lower (MVA planimetric; 1.62±0.29 vs. 1.54±0.27; p=.003, MVA PHT; 1.66±0.30 vs. 1.59±0.26; p=0.01) but transmitral gradient (mean gradient; 6.49±2.51 vs. 8.89±3.52; p=0.001, maximal gradient: 16.94±5.11 vs. 18.57±4.54; p=0.01) and Cn values (5.37±0.77 vs. 6.26±0.64; pgradient difference (mean and maximal) (Cn difference-mean gradient difference; r=0.46; p=0.05; Cn difference-maximal gradient difference; r=0.72; p=0.001). Cardiac rhythm has a significant impact on echocardiographic evaluation of MVA, transmitral gradient, and Cn in patients with MS.

  15. Regional variations in baseline characteristics of cardiac rhythm device recipients: The PANORAMA observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kandari, Fawziah; Erglis, Andrejs; Sweidan, Raed; Dannheimer, Ingrid; Sepsi, Milan; Bénézet, Juan; Padour, Michal; Naik, Ajay; Escudero, Jaime; West, Teena; Holbrook, Reece; Lorgat, Faizel

    2014-09-01

    The PANORAMA study was designed to collect concurrent data on subjects from different worldwide regions implanted with CRM devices. In this prospective, multi-center study, we analyzed baseline data on 8586 subjects implanted with CRM devices with no additional selection criteria (66% pacemaker (IPG), 16% implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICD), 17% cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and CRM devices from a range of geographies that are not typically reported in literature. We found significant variations in clinical characteristics and implant practices. Long term follow-up data will help evaluate if these variations require adjustments to outcome expectations.

  16. Weightlessness and Cardiac Rhythm Disorders: Current Knowledge from Space Flight and Bed-Rest Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caiani, Enrico G.; Martin-Yebra, Alba; Landreani, Federica; Bolea, Juan; Laguna, Pablo; Vaïda, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Isolated episodes of heart rhythm disorders have been reported during 40 years of space flight, triggering research to evaluate the risk of developing life-threatening arrhythmias induced by prolonged exposure to weightlessness. In fact, these events could compromise astronaut performance during exploratory missions, as well as pose at risk the astronaut health, due to limited options of care on board the International Space Station. Starting from original observations, this mini review will explore the latest research in this field, considering results obtained both during space flight and on Earth, the latter by simulating long-term exposure to microgravity by head-down bed rest maneuver in order to elicit cardiovascular deconditioning on normal volunteers.

  17. Weightlessness and Cardiac Rhythm Disorders: Current Knowledge from Space Flight and Bed-Rest Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caiani, Enrico G. [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Martin-Yebra, Alba [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Instituto de Investigación en Ingeniería de Aragón (I3A), Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Landreani, Federica [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Bolea, Juan; Laguna, Pablo [Instituto de Investigación en Ingeniería de Aragón (I3A), Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, Zaragoza (Spain); Vaïda, Pierre, E-mail: enrico.caiani@polimi.it [École Nationale Supérieure de Cognitique, Institut Polytechnique de Bordeaux, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2016-08-23

    Isolated episodes of heart rhythm disorders have been reported during 40 years of space flight, triggering research to evaluate the risk of developing life-threatening arrhythmias induced by prolonged exposure to weightlessness. In fact, these events could compromise astronaut performance during exploratory missions, as well as pose at risk the astronaut health, due to limited options of care on board the International Space Station. Starting from original observations, this mini review will explore the latest research in this field, considering results obtained both during space flight and on Earth, the latter by simulating long-term exposure to microgravity by head-down bed rest maneuver in order to elicit cardiovascular deconditioning on normal volunteers.

  18. Cognitive Behavioral Social Rhythm Group Therapy for Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and sleep disturbance: Results from an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Patricia L; Kelly, Monica; Warner, Lesley; Quan, Stuart F; Krakow, Barry; Bootzin, Richard R

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Social Rhythm Therapy (CBSRT) is a group psychotherapy tailored for Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and sleep disturbances. The aims of this study were to introduce and present initial outcomes of Cognitive Behavioral Social Rhythm Therapy (CBSRT), a 12-week skills group therapy designed to improve sleep and mood by reducing chaotic or isolated lifestyles in Veterans with PTSD. Twenty-four male Veterans with at least moderate PTSD and MDD participated in this open trial. Main outcomes were the daily sleep diary for sleep disturbances, the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for PTSD, and the Hamilton Depression Rating scale for MDD. Veterans improved on all measures (a) with large within subject effects on PTSD symptoms, MDD symptoms, and sleep quality, and (b) with 46-58% of the sample receiving clinically significant benefits on MDD and PTSD symptoms respectively. The consistency of social rhythms was associated with the average reduction in global CAPS scores over time. Only 13% of participants dropped-out of the group therapy prematurely suggesting that this new group therapy is relatively well-tolerated by Veterans. Future research that employs a control condition is necessary to establish efficacy of CBSRT. Data from this initial pilot study demonstrate that CBSRT may be an effective group treatment option for Veterans presenting with all three symptom complaints. These data also suggest that daily routine may be an important mechanism to consider in the treatment of PTSD symptoms comorbid with depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of initial rhythm with neurologically favorable survival in non-shockable out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without a bystander witness or bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Matsubara, Takehiro; Doi, Kent; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a predominantly non-shockable rhythm. Non-shockable rhythm, and the absence of a bystander witness or bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are associated with poor outcomes. However, the association between the type of non-shockable rhythm and outcomes is not well known. To examine the association between the initial rhythm and neurologically favorable outcomes after non-shockable OHCA without a bystander witness or bystander CPR. In a nationwide, population-based, cohort study, we analyzed 213,984 adult OHCA patients with a non-shockable rhythm who had neither a bystander witness nor bystander CPR. They were identified through the Japanese national OHCA registry data from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival. Among 213,984 patients, the initial rhythm was Pulseless Electrical Activity (PEA) in 31,179 patients (14.6%) and Asystole in 182,805 patients (85.4%). The neurological outcome was more favorable in PEA than in Asystole (1.4% vs. 0.2%, padvanced airway management, time from call to contact with patient, and calendar year, PEA was associated with an increased neurologically favorable survival rate (odds ratio 7.86; 95% confidence interval 6.81-9.07). In subgroup analysis stratified by age group (18-64, 65-84, or ≥85years), the neurologically favorable survival rate was ≥1% in PEA, even for patients aged ≥85years, but <1% in Asystole among all age groups. PEA and Asystole should not be considered to be identical to non-shockable rhythm, but rather should be clearly distinguished from each other from the perspective of quantitative medical futility. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High Incidence of De Novo and Subclinical Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Cardiac Rhythm Management Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Iris; Witzel, Katrin; Münch, Julia; Pecha, Simon; Blankenberg, Stephan; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Willems, Stephan; Patten, Monica; Aydin, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important prognostic parameter in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Though cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices (e.g., ICD, pacemaker or implantable loop recorder) can detect subclinical AF, data describing the incidence of AF are rare. We therefore investigated the incidence and clinical impact of de novo and subclinical AF detected by CRM devices in patients with HCM. In our retrospective single-center study, we included patients with HCM and need for CRM devices. The primary endpoint of the study was the incidence of clinical and subclinical de novo AF. During follow-up, patients were screened for adverse events like stroke, ventricular arrhythmia, heart failure, or death. From 192 HCM patients, 44 patients received a CRM device (38 ICDs, 5 pacemakers, 1 implantable loop recorder). In 14 of these patients (32%), AF had been documented before device implantation. Thirty (68%) patients were free from AF at the time of implantation. During a median follow-up of 595 days (interquartile range, 367-890 days), de novo AF was recorded in 16 of these 30 patients (53%). Fourteen (88%) of the 16 patients with de novo AF were free from any clinical symptoms, so these patients were classified to have subclinical AF. In logistic regression analysis, age was the only significant predictor for an increased risk of AF. AF is common in patients with HCM who need a CRM device. More than 50% of these patients develop de novo AF that was predominantly subclinical in our cohort. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Target temperature management of 33°C and 36°C in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial non-shockable rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Erlinge, David

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite a lack of randomized trials in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with an initial non-shockable rhythm (NSR), guidelines recommend induced hypothermia to be considered in these patients. We assessed the effect on outcome of two levels of induced hypothermia...... in comatose patient resuscitated from NSR. METHODS: Hundred and seventy-eight patients out of 950 in the TTM trial with an initial NSR were randomly assigned to targeted temperature management at either 33°C (TTM33, n=96) or 36°C (TTM36, n=82). We assessed mortality, neurologic function (Cerebral Performance...... Score (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS)), and organ dysfunction (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score). RESULTS: Patients with NSR were older, had longer time to ROSC, less frequently had bystander CPR and had higher lactate levels at admission compared to patients with shockable rhythm...

  2. Cardiac autonomic regulation is disturbed in children with euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ayhan; Gulgun, Mustafa; Tascilar, Mehmet Emre; Sari, Erkan; Yokusoglu, Mehmet

    2012-03-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (chronic autoimmune thyroiditis) is the most common form of thyroiditis in childhood. Previous studies have found autonomic dysfunction of varying magnitude in patients with autoimmune diseases, which is considered a cardiovascular risk factor. We aimed to evaluate the heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of cardiac autonomic modulation, in children with euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis (eHT). The study included 32 patients with eHT (27 girls and 5 boys; mean age 11 ± 4.1 years, range 8-16; body mass index 0.47 ± 0.69 kg/m(2)), as judged by normal or minimally elevated serum TSH levels (normal range: 0.34-5.6 mIU/l) and normal levels of free thyroid hormones (FT4 and FT3) and 38 euthyroid age-matched controls. Patients with eHT and control subjects underwent physical examination and 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitoring. Time-domain parameters of HRV were evaluated for cardiac autonomic functions. Children with eHT displayed significantly lower values of time-domain parameters of SDANN (standard deviation of the averages of NN intervals), RMSSD (square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals), NN50 counts (number of pairs of adjacent NN intervals differing by more than 50 ms) and PNN50 (NN50 count divided by the total number of all NN intervals) for each 5-min interval, compared to healthy controls (p < 0.05 for each), indicating the decreased beat-to-beat variation of heart rate. In conclusion, eHT is associated with disturbed autonomic regulation of heart rate. Hence, the children with eHT are at higher risk for developing cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Study on cardiac output in children with orthostatic disturbances measured by the external dilution method with a radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, K [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo

    1975-04-01

    As one of the studies on circulation dynamics which possibly contributed to orthostatic disturbance, application to children of the external measurement of cardiac output with /sup 131/I labeled human serum albumin was examined. The effect of orthostatic load was then studied by this method on the children with orthostatic disturbances and the patients improving from other diseases, and the following results were obtained: (1) As in the external method with radioisotope, the head of the scintillation detector was easily oriented, and the diversion of orientation was examined by circulation dilution curve, and the cardiac output was easily and safely measured without causing severe pain to the subjects. This method was performed on 40 children in the recumbent position and 27 in orthostatic load, and it was confirmed that the method was fully applicable to the pediatric field. (2) In half of the 20 patients with orthostatic disturbances and 20 control subjects, the cardiac index in the recumbent position was between 3 l/min/m/sup 2/ and 5 l/min/m/sup 2/. Mean cardiac index was 4.45 l/min/m/sup 2/ in male children, while 4.72 l/min/m/sup 2/ in female children. This mean value was the same or a little higher than the reported adult value.

  4. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; Chiang, Chern-En; Williams, Bryan; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gorenek, Bulent; Fauchier, Laurent; Savelieva, Irina; Hatala, Robert; van Gelder, Isabelle; Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Erdine, Serap; Lovic, Dragan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Salinas-Arce, Jorge; Field, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Changes in cardiac glycoside receptor sites /sup 86/ rubidium uptake and intracellular sodium concentrations in the erythrocytes of patients receiving digoxin during the early phases of treatment of cardiac failure in regular rhythm and of atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, A R; Aronson, J K; Grahame-Smith, D G; Carver, J G [Medical Research Council, Oxford (UK)

    1979-08-01

    Measurements of the binding of 12-..cap alpha..-(/sup 3/H)-digoxin to the membranes of intact erythrocytes, erythrocytic /sup 86/Rb uptake and intraerythrocytic sodium concentrations have been made in the red cells of patients receiving digoxin in the short-term for atrial fibrillation or cardiac failure in regular rhythm. During the first few days of treatment (/sup 3/H)-digoxin binding and /sup 86/Rb uptake fall and intraerythrocytic sodium concentrations rise. Subsequently parallel fluctuations occur in (/sup 3/H)-digoxin binding and /sup 86/Rb uptake but not in intraerythrocytic sodium concentrations and the significance of the fluctuations is discussed. The values of all three measurements correlate significantly with the response of the heart in sinus rhythm as measured by QS/sub 2/I. Plasma digoxin concentrations do not correlate with QS/sub 2/I.

  6. PGC-1{alpha} accelerates cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance without disturbing Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Min, E-mail: chenminyx@gmail.com [Institute of Molecular Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yunnan Centers for Diseases Prevention and Control, Kunming 650022 (China); Wang, Yanru [Institute of Molecular Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qu, Aijuan [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Energy metabolism and Ca{sup 2+} handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1{alpha} in cardiac Ca{sup 2+} signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1{alpha} via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca{sup 2+} transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca{sup 2+} transients and Ca{sup 2+} waves accelerated in PGC-1{alpha}-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca{sup 2+} transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1{alpha}-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1{alpha} induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} did not disturb cardiac Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, because SR Ca{sup 2+} load and the propensity for Ca{sup 2+} waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1{alpha} can ameliorate cardiac Ca{sup 2+} cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1{alpha}-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1{alpha} in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  7. Mood disturbance and depression in Arab women following hospitalisation from acute cardiac conditions: a cross-sectional study from Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Suwaidi, Jassim Mohd; Al-Qahtani, Awad; Asaad, Nidal; Fung, Tak; Singh, Rajvir; Qader, Najlaa Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Depression is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates among cardiovascular patients. Depressed patients have three times higher risk of death than those who are not. We sought to determine the presence of depressive symptoms, and whether gender and age are associated with depression among Arab patients hospitalised with cardiac conditions in a Middle Eastern country. Setting Using a non-probability convenient sampling technique, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 1000 Arab patients ≥20 years who were admitted to cardiology units between 2013 and 2014 at the Heart Hospital in Qatar. Patients were interviewed 3 days after admission following the cardiac event. Surveys included demographic and clinical characteristics, and the Arabic version of the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II). Depression was assessed by BDI-II clinical classification scale. Results 15% of the patients had mild mood disturbance and 5% had symptoms of clinical depression. Twice as many females than males suffered from mild mood disturbance and clinical depression symptoms, the majority of females were in the age group 50 years and above, whereas males were in the age group 40–49 years. χ2 Tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that gender and age were statistically significantly related to depression (p<0.001 for all). Conclusions Older Arab women are more likely to develop mood disturbance and depression after being hospitalised with acute cardiac condition. Gender and age differences approach, and routine screening for depression should be conducted with all cardiovascular patients, especially for females in the older age groups. Mental health counselling should be available for all cardiovascular patients who exhibit depressive symptoms. PMID:27388362

  8. Low intensity exercise prevents disturbances in rat cardiac insulin signaling and endothelial nitric oxide synthase induced by high fructose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanišić, Jelena; Korićanac, Goran; Ćulafić, Tijana; Romić, Snježana; Stojiljković, Mojca; Kostić, Milan; Pantelić, Marija; Tepavčević, Snežana

    2016-01-15

    Increase in fructose consumption together with decrease in physical activity contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome and consequently cardiovascular diseases. The current study examined the preventive role of exercise on defects in cardiac insulin signaling and function of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in fructose fed rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, sedentary fructose (received 10% fructose for 9 weeks) and exercise fructose (additionally exposed to low intensity exercise) groups. Concentration of triglycerides, glucose, insulin and visceral adipose tissue weight were determined to estimate metabolic syndrome development. Expression and/or phosphorylation of cardiac insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and eNOS were evaluated. Fructose overload increased visceral adipose tissue, insulin concentration and homeostasis model assessment index. Exercise managed to decrease visceral adiposity and insulin level and to increase insulin sensitivity. Fructose diet increased level of cardiac PTP1B and pIRS1 (Ser307), while levels of IR and ERK1/2, as well as pIRS1 (Tyr 632), pAkt (Ser473, Thr308) and pERK1/2 were decreased. These disturbances were accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. Exercise managed to prevent most of the disturbances in insulin signaling caused by fructose diet (except phosphorylation of IRS1 at Tyr 632 and phosphorylation and protein expression of ERK1/2) and consequently restored function of eNOS. Low intensity exercise could be considered as efficient treatment of cardiac insulin resistance induced by fructose diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; En Chiang, Chern; Williams, Bryan

    2017-10-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Circadian rhythms, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR alpha/gamma profiles in diseases with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves eLecarpentier

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clock mechanisms are far-from-equilibrium dissipative structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta/delta and gamma play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes, particularly in heart muscle. Links between circadian rhythms (CRs and PPARs have been established. Mammalian CRs involve at least two critical transcription factors, CLOCK and BMAL1 (Gekakis et al., 1998; Hogenesch et al., 1998. PPAR gamma plays a major role in both glucose and lipid metabolisms and presents circadian properties which coordinate the interplay between metabolism and CRs. PPAR gamma is a major component of the vascular clock. Vascular PPAR gamma is a peripheral regulator of cardiovascular rhythms controlling circadian variations in blood pressure and heart rate through BMAL1. We focused our review on diseases with abnormalities of CRs and with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction. Moreover, these diseases presented changes in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPARs, according to two opposed profiles. Profile 1 was defined as follows: inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with increased expression of PPAR gamma. Profile 2 was defined as follows: activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with decreased expression of PPAR gamma. A typical profile 1 disease is arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic cardiac disease which presents mutations of the desmosomal proteins and is mainly characterized by fatty acid accumulation in adult cardiomyocytes mainly in the right ventricle. The link between PPAR gamma dysfunction and desmosomal genetic mutations occurs via inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway presenting oscillatory properties. A typical profile 2 disease is type 2 diabetes, with activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and decreased expression of PPAR gamma. CRs abnormalities are present in numerous pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction

  11. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure. PMID:26073556

  12. Glucose ingestion causes cardiac repolarization disturbances in type 1 long QT syndrome patients and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltén-Cavallius, Louise; Iepsen, Eva W; Christiansen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both hypoglycemia and severe hyperglycemia constitute known risk factors for cardiac repolarization changes potentially leading to malignant arrhythmias. Patients with loss of function mutations in KCNQ1 are characterized by long QT syndrome (LQTS) and may be at increased risk...

  13. Buerger's Disease and Anaesthesia: The Neglected Cardiac Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagun Bhatia Shah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Distal limb amputations and respiratory complications are common in patients with Buerger’s disease. Nicotine in cigarette is arrhythmogenic as it blocks cardiac potassium channels. Preoperative Holter ECG monitoring may be useful if preoperative electrocardiogram is normal. If the patient is undergoing major surgery, preservative free lignocaine & amiodarone infusions and a cardioverter defibrillator should be available for the intraoperative cardiac rhythm disturbances.

  14. Technological advances shed light on left ventricular cardiac disturbances in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyid, Zahra N; Sellers, Zachary M

    2017-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common autosomal recessive lethal disease in Caucasians, causes chronic pulmonary disease and can lead to cor pulmonale with right ventricular dysfunction. The presence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cardiac myocardia has prompted debate regarding possible defective ion channel-induced cardiomyopathy. Clinical heart disease in CF is considered rare and is restricted to case reports. It has been unclear if this is due to the lack of physiological importance of CFTR in the heart, the relatively short lifespan of those with CF, or a technical inability to detect subclinical disease. Extensive echocardiographic investigations have yielded contradictory results, leading to the dogma that left ventricular defects in CF occur secondary to lung disease. In this review, we consider why studies examining heart function in CF have not provided clarity on this topic. We then focus on data from new echocardiographic and magnetic resonance imaging technology, which are providing greater insight into cardiac function in CF and demonstrating that, in addition to secondary effects from pulmonary disease, there may be an intrinsic primary defect in the CF heart. With advancing lifespans and activity levels, understanding the risk of cardiac disease is vital to minimizing morbidity in adults with CF. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in Heart Rhythm and Breathing in Acute Systemic Injury Due to Cold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Konnov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the patterns of a change in heart rhythm and breathing in patients with acute systemic injury due to cold in hypothermic and early posthypothermic periods.Subjects and methods. Thirty patients aged 18 to 60 years (3 groups of 10 patients with mild, moderate, and severe cold injury were examined in hypothermic and posthypothermic periods. The patient groups did not differ in gender, age, and weight. Within the first 24 hours after admission, all the patients underwent high-resolution Holter electrocardiographic monitoring that recorded cardiac arrhythmias and breathing disorders.Results. During the therapy performed, as the degree of acute systemic cold injury increased, the patients were found to have a heart rate reduction (from 102 [90; 122] beats/min in Group 1 to 49 [38; 58] beats/min in Group 3 and a circadian index increase (from 105 [88; 125]% in Group 1 to 210 [185; 223]% in Group 3. With increased hypothermia, the victims were detected to have progressive cardiac rhythm and cardiac electrical conduction disturbances, such as supraventricular pacemaker migration, single and paired supraventricular premature beats, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillations, and ventricular premature beats. There was decreased heart rhythm variability in all the study groups, to the greatest extent in the patents with severe systemic cold injury. Late ventricular potentials were found in 2 and 7 patients with moderate and severe cold injury, respectively. Breathing disorders were recorded in all the study groups, the greatest increase in the frequency and duration of apnea/hypopnea episodes was noted in the patients with severe hypothermia. A fatal outcome occurred in 4 of the 10 patients with critical hypothermia due to the occurrence of idioventricular rhythm with transition to asystole.Conclusion. Systemic hypothermia is accompanied by cardiac rhythm and cardiac electrical conduction disturbances and respiratory depression

  16. Statistics on the use of cardiac electronic devices and electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology countries: 2014 report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Merino, Jose Luis; Levya, Francisco; Hindriks, Gerhardt; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    There has been large variations in the use of invasive electrophysiological therapies in the member countries of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy trends in the ESC countries over the last five years. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has collected data on CIED and catheter ablation therapy since 2008. Last year 49 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. This analysis is based on the current and previous editions of the EHRA White Book. Data on procedure rates together with information on economic aspects, local reimbursement systems and training activities are presented for each ESC country and the five geographical ESC regions. In 2013, the electrophysiological procedure rates per million population were highest in Western Europe followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The CIED implantation and catheter ablation rate was lowest in the Eastern European and in the non-European ESC countries, respectively. However, in some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product procedure rates exceeded those of some wealthier Western countries, suggesting that economic resources are not the only driver for utilization of arrhythmia therapies. These statistics indicate that despite significant improvements, there still is considerable heterogeneity in the availability of arrhythmia therapies across the ESC area. Hopefully, these data will help identify areas for improvement and guide future activities in cardiac arrhythmia management. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Interference of GSM mobile phones with communication between Cardiac Rhythm Management devices and programmers: A combined in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong; Dong, Zhi-Feng; Chen, Yan; Wang, Fa-Bin; Wei, Zhi; Zhao, Wen-Bin; Li, Shuai; Liu, Ming-Ya; Zhu, Wei; Wei, Meng; Li, Jing-Bo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate interference, and how to avoid it, by high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) mobile phone with communication between cardiac rhythm management devices (CRMs) and programmers, a combined in vivo and in vitro testing was conducted. During in vivo testing, GSM mobile phones interfered with CRM-programmer communication in 33 of 65 subjects tested (50.8%). Losing ventricle sensing was representative in this study. In terms of clinical symptoms, only 4 subjects (0.6%) felt dizzy during testing. CRM-programmer communication recovered upon termination of mobile phone communication. During in vitro testing, electromagnetic interference by high-frequency (700-950 MHz) EMFs reproducibly occurred in duplicate testing in 18 of 20 CRMs (90%). During each interference, the pacing pulse signal on the programmer would suddenly disappear while the synchronous signal was normal on the amplifier-oscilloscope. Simulation analysis showed that interference by radiofrequency emitting devices with CRM-programmer communication may be attributed to factors including materials, excitation source distance, and implant depth. Results suggested that patients implanted with CRMs should not be restricted from using GSM mobile phones; however, CRMs should be kept away from high-frequency EMFs of GSM mobile phone during programming. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Determinants of geographic variations in implantation of cardiac defibrillators in the European Society of Cardiology member countries--data from the European Heart Rhythm Association White Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinski, Andrzej; Bissinger, Andrzej; Boersma, Lucas; Leenhardt, Antoine; Merkely, Bela; Oto, Ali; Proclemer, Alessandro; Brugada, Josep; Vardas, Panos E; Wolpert, Christian

    2011-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major health concern in developed countries. Many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy in the prevention of SCD and total mortality reduction. However, the high individual costs and the reimbursement policy may limit widespread ICD utilization. This study analyzed the temporal and the geographical trends of the ICD implantation rate. Data were gathered from two editions of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) White Books published in 2008 and 2009. The analysis revealed significant differences in the rates of ICD implantation per million capita between the countries, but the median implantations was constantly increasing. The number of ICD implantations correlated with gross domestic product (GDP), GDP per capita, expenditure on health, life expectancy, and the number of implanting centres. There are great number of differences in the ICD-implanting rates between EHRA member countries, consequent to the increase in the number of ICD implantations. The ICD implantation rates are related to national economic status and healthcare expenses.

  19. Effects of a cyanobacterial extract containing-anatoxin-a(s on the cardiac rhythm of Leurolestes circunvagans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Rodríguez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the effects of an anatoxin-a(s-containing extract on a cockroach semi-isolated heart preparation and the results supporting the extract’s biological activity on acetylcholinesterase (purified from ell. The presence of the toxin in cyanobacterial strains Anabaena spiroides (ITEP-024, ITEP-025 and ITEP-026 isolated from the Tapacurá reservoir in Pernambuco, Brazil, was confirmed by means of liquid chromatography coupled to an ion-trap mass spectrometer. The anticholinesterase activity was assessed biochemically by the Ellman test and was confirmed by measuring the cockroach’s heart rate. The concentration of the extract containing the tested anatoxin-a(s (antx-a(s (10, 16 and 100 μg.μL-1 inhibited the eel acetylcholinesterase (AChE by more than 90%. The cockroach cardiac frequency increased by a maximum of about 20% within 29 min after the addition of 2.5x10³ μg of extract containing antxa (s.g-1 bw (n=9, p<0.05. Our results strongly indicate that antx-a(s is capable of exerting biological effects on cockroach, indicating that more research might be conducted to determine its role in the environment, especially on insects.

  20. Smart meters and routers radiofrequency disturbances study with pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostiguy, Geneviève; Black, Tom; Bluteau, Louis-Jean; Dupont, Louis; Dyrda, Katia; Girard, Guillaume; Nguyen, Duc-Hai; Plante, Michel; Thibault, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    There is no scientific literature that examines radiofrequency (RF) interference from Smart Meters with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The objective of this in vitro study was to assess any potential interference with Medtronic CIEDs (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA). In the Quebec testing, five models of Medtronic CIEDs were placed in an acrylic cylinder filled with a saline solution and faced a Landis+Gyr Smart Meter or Router (Landis+Gyr AG, Zug, Switzerland). The distance between CIEDs and the meter casing or router antenna was 10 cm. The Meter's normal operating conditions were modified to artificially set the number of impulsions at an abnormally high level (one, two, and three impulses per second). Each scenario was repeated one to five times, for 1 minute each. In the U.S. testing, 6 cm and 15 cm (∼2.25' and ∼6') separated the six models of Medtronic CIEDs from the Schlumberger Smart Meter (Itron Inc., Liberty Lake, WA, USA), which generally sent out a 96-bit Standard Consumption Message over 3 seconds. The transmission varied in frequencies along with the interval between cycles. A total of 6,966 RF transmissions were completed during the 34 tests conducted in Quebec. In the United States, the CIED was exposed to the meter for 10 minutes to provide a minimum of 200 completed RF transmissions. No interference was observed in worst-case scenarios (testing of meters and CIEDs at their performance limits). Landis+Gyr Smart Meters/Routers and Schlumberger Smart Meters do not interfere with the functioning of the Medtronic CIEDs tested, when placed, respectively, 10 cm and 6 cm and 15 cm apart. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    thus appear to be simple responses of living beings to cyclic presence/absence of ... For example, during leaf movement rhythms, leaves alternate between open and closed states .... gist of his time, in an elegant experiment (Box 2) to study the navigational .... diurnal rhythms as true biological timekeepers, a question which.

  2. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    and clocks driving such rhythms have been studied for a long time now, our ... passage of time using near 24 h oscillation as a reference process, and (iii) Output .... Bünning's work on circadian rhythms across model systems ranging from ..... E Bünning, The Physiological Clock, Revised 3rd Edition, The English. Universities ...

  3. Effects of hot shot (non cardioplegic blood based) on cardiac contractility and rhythm as parameters of myocardial protection in cabg surgery abstract objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjua, A.M.; Iqbal, M.A.; Rashid, A.

    2012-01-01

    To compare the effects of warm blood cardioplegia along with hot shot (non-cardioplegic blood based) at the end of ischemic time to warm blood cardioplegia without hot shot to assess resumption of effective electromechanical activity and need for internal electrical cardioversion as indicators of myocardial protection and preservation. Study Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration: The study was conducted at Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology (AFIC), Rawalpindi for a period of 10 months (March 2009 - Dec 2009). Patients and Methods: Total 100 patients of coronary artery disease having coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery were equally and randomly divided into two groups using random numbers table. Group A (n=50), consisted of warm blood cardioplegia with non cardioplegic blood based hot shot and group B (n=50), consisted of warm blood cardioplegia only. The adequacy of myocardial protection techniques was assessed by noting the time interval (in seconds) between declamping of the ascending aorta and patient regaining electromechanical activity. Additional parameters were rhythm, use of internal cardiac defibrillation, inotropes, IABP requirement and ECG evidenced peri-op MI. Results: Average age in group A was 56.98 +- 9.47 years and in Group B it was 59.1 9.35 years. In group A there were 48 (96%) males and group B there were 43 (86%) males with p-value of 0.081. Comparison of preoperative variables of both the groups revealed no difference in cross clamp time (p=0.52), CPB time (p = 0.68) and endarterectomy (p=0.55). The electromechanical activity (contractility of heart) returned within 7.53 +- 2.09 min in group A as compared to 9.81 +- 2.6 min in group B (p<0.001). Significantly high frequency was observed for defibrillation (p=0.025), inotropic support (p=0.045) and IABP insertion (p=0.041) in group B as compared to group A. Conclusion: In CABG surgery the additional use of hot shot (non cardioplegic blood based) during cardiopulmonary

  4. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    nature of the system underlying such rhythms and inspired one of the ... behaviours and physiological processes were discovered in a wide range of animals. ... is thought to coordinate internal physiology, and thereby confer benefits to living ...

  5. Comparison of effects of bright light therapy alone or combined with fluoxetine on severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in patients with non-seasonal depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ağargün MY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Yücel Agargün,1 Gokben Hizli Sayar,2 Hüseyin Bulut,3 Oguz Tan21Medipol University, Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Uskudar University, Neuropsychiatry Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Büyükçekmece Government Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul, TurkeyPurpose: To compare effects of bright light therapy (BLT alone or combined with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine, on severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in patients with non-seasonal depression.Patients and methods: Drug-free patients who were administered 10,000 lux of BLT for 30 minutes for 7 days comprised the BLT group (n = 7, while patients who started fluoxetine as an add-on treatment day comprised the SSRI + BLT group (n = 8. The primary outcomes were severity of depression, measured using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; chronotype, measured using the Morningness Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ; mood disturbance, measured using the Profile of Mood States (POMS survey; and sleep quality, measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, before and after treatment in both groups.Results: All patients completed the study, and none reported obvious side effects. The mean onset age of depression was 26.1 years ± 5.3 years in the BLT group and 27 years ± 9.5 years in the SSRI + BLT group (P = 0.425. The number of past depressive episodes was 1.29 ± 0.76 in the BLT group, and 1.5 ± 0.8 in the SSRI + BLT group (P = 0.427. The difference between pre- and posttreatment scores revealed no significant difference between groups for the HAM-D scale, BDI, MEQ, POMS survey, and the PSQI.Conclusion: This study suggests that BLT is effective with respect to the severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in non-seasonal depression. However, there was no evidence in favor of adjunctive fluoxetine with BLT

  6. MURC, a muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein that modulates the Rho/ROCK pathway, induces cardiac dysfunction and conduction disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Takehiro; Ueyama, Tomomi; Isodono, Koji; Tagawa, Masashi; Takehara, Naofumi; Kawashima, Tsuneaki; Harada, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Shioi, Tetsuo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Oh, Hidemasa

    2008-05-01

    We identified a novel muscle-restricted putative coiled-coil protein, MURC, which is evolutionarily conserved from frog to human. MURC was localized to the cytoplasm with accumulation in the Z-line of the sarcomere in the murine adult heart. MURC mRNA expression in the heart increased during the developmental process from the embryonic stage to adulthood. In response to pressure overload, MURC mRNA expression increased in the hypertrophied heart. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified the serum deprivation response (SDPR) protein, a phosphatidylserine-binding protein, as a MURC-binding protein. MURC induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway, which modulated serum response factor-mediated atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression and myofibrillar organization. SDPR augmented MURC-induced transactivation of the ANP promoter in cardiomyocytes, and RNA interference of SDPR attenuated the action of MURC on the ANP promoter. Transgenic mice expressing cardiac-specific MURC (Tg-MURC) exhibited cardiac contractile dysfunction and atrioventricular (AV) conduction disturbances with atrial chamber enlargement, reduced thickness of the ventricular wall, and interstitial fibrosis. Spontaneous episodes of atrial fibrillation and AV block were observed in Tg-MURC mice. These findings indicate that MURC modulates RhoA signaling and that MURC plays an important role in the development of cardiac dysfunction and conduction disturbance with increased vulnerability to atrial arrhythmias.

  7. Dissipative structures and biological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Sustained oscillations abound in biological systems. They occur at all levels of biological organization over a wide range of periods, from a fraction of a second to years, and with a variety of underlying mechanisms. They control major physiological functions, and their dysfunction is associated with a variety of physiological disorders. The goal of this review is (i) to give an overview of the main rhythms observed at the cellular and supracellular levels, (ii) to briefly describe how the study of biological rhythms unfolded in the course of time, in parallel with studies on chemical oscillations, (iii) to present the major roles of biological rhythms in the control of physiological functions, and (iv) the pathologies associated with the alteration, disappearance, or spurious occurrence of biological rhythms. Two tables present the main examples of cellular and supracellular rhythms ordered according to their period, and their role in physiology and pathophysiology. Among the rhythms discussed are neural and cardiac rhythms, metabolic oscillations such as those occurring in glycolysis in yeast, intracellular Ca++ oscillations, cyclic AMP oscillations in Dictyostelium amoebae, the segmentation clock that controls somitogenesis, pulsatile hormone secretion, circadian rhythms which occur in all eukaryotes and some bacteria with a period close to 24 h, the oscillatory dynamics of the enzymatic network driving the cell cycle, and oscillations in transcription factors such as NF-ΚB and tumor suppressors such as p53. Ilya Prigogine's concept of dissipative structures applies to temporal oscillations and allows us to unify within a common framework the various rhythms observed at different levels of biological organization, regardless of their period and underlying mechanism.

  8. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 11. Circadian Rhythms ... M Vaze1 Vijay Kumar Sharma1. Chronobiology Laboratory Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research Jakkur, PO Box 6436, Bangalore 560 064, India.

  9. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 2. Circadian Rhythms: Why do ... Nikhil Vijay Kumar Sharma1. Chronobiology Laboratory Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research Jakkur, PO Box 6436, Bangalore 560 064, India.

  10. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Early studies on circadian rhythms focussed on unravelling the fundamental .... careful analysis revealed that deaths of most arrhythmic indi- viduals were due to .... is no more a sci-fi movie script and is achievable through a technique called ...

  11. Plasma melatonin circadian rhythm disturbances during pregnancy and postpartum in depressed women and women with personal or family histories of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Barbara L; Meliska, Charles J; Sorenson, Diane L; Lopez, Ana M; Martinez, Luis F; Nowakowski, Sara; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Hauger, Richard L; Kripke, Daniel F

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that disturbances in levels of plasma melatonin differentiate pregnant and postpartum women with major depression from matched pregnant and postpartum healthy comparison women. Participants were 25 pregnant women (10 with major depression, 15 healthy) and 24 postpartum women (13 with major depression, 11 healthy). Healthy comparison women were matched on the number of weeks pregnant or postpartum. Plasma melatonin levels for each subject were measured every 30 minutes, in dim light (melatonin levels were log-transformed, and calculations were determined for the following measures: baseline and synthesis onset and offset times, duration, peak concentration, and area under the curve. Groups were compared by analyses of covariance, with age, number of weeks pregnant or postpartum, breast-feeding status, and body mass index as covariates. Morning melatonin levels from 2:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. were significantly lower in pregnant women with major depression relative to healthy pregnant women. However, these levels were significantly higher in postpartum women with major depression across time intervals relative to postpartum healthy women. Pregnant but not postpartum women with a personal or family history of depression, regardless of their current diagnosis, had significantly earlier melatonin synthesis and baseline offset times relative to women without a family history of depression. In pregnant healthy women but not pregnant women with major depression, melatonin levels increased during the course of pregnancy. This association was not found among postpartum women with major depression or postpartum healthy women. Plasma nocturnal melatonin concentrations, particularly during morning hours, were lower in depressed pregnant women but elevated in depressed postpartum women relative to matched healthy comparison women. In addition, melatonin timing measures were advanced in pregnant women with a personal or family

  12. The Rest-Activity Rhythm and Physical Activity in Early-Onset Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, A.M.; Eggermont, L.H.P.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.; Scherder, E.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A substantial part of elderly persons with dementia show rest-activity rhythm disturbances. The rest-activity rhythm is important to study in people with early-onset dementia (EOD) for rest-activity rhythm disturbances are predictive of institutionalization, and caregivers of young

  13. Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Dumas Cintra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective: To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of São Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA® S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart® system. Results: A total of 767 participants (461 men with a mean age of 42.00 ± 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001. After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion: Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample.

  14. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    ) in urine the first night after both minor and major surgery. This delay after major surgery was correlated to the duration of surgery. The amplitude in the melatonin rhythm was unchanged the first night but increased in the second night after major surgery. The amplitude in AMT6s was reduced the first...... night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively....... There was also a shift in the autonomic nervous balance after major surgery with a significantly increased number of myocardial ischaemic episodes during the nighttime period. The circadian activity rhythm was also disturbed after both minor and major surgery. The daytime AMT6s excretion in urine after major...

  15. The effects of extra-supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cardiac rhythm:antiarrhythmic, proarrhythmic, both or neither ?It depends….

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eRauch

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Extra supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids (Ω-3 has been associated with a decreased cardiovascular risk, thereby focusing on a potentially preventive effect on tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Recent randomized controlled trials, however, challenge the efficiency of the additional application of Ω-3 in its anti-arrhythmic effect under certain clinical conditions. The present paper reflects the results of earlier and recent clinical studies with respect to the individual background conditions that potentially may explain apparently conflicting clinical data. It is suggested that the efficiency of Ω-3 supplementation to prevent cardiac arrhythmias strongly depends on the underlying clinical and pharmacological conditions, a hypothesis that may be supported by the data from experimental animal studies and the molecular interactions of Ω-3 at the cellular level.

  16. Evaluation of heart rhythm variability and arrhythmia in children with systemic and localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Jacek; Dabrowski, Rafal; Luczak, Dariusz; Kwiatkowska, Malgorzata; Musiej-Nowakowska, Elzbieta; Kowalik, Ilona; Szwed, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate possible disturbances in autonomic regulation and cardiac arrhythmias in children with localized and systemic scleroderma. There were 40 children included in the study: 20 with systemic and 20 with localized scleroderma. The control group comprised 20 healthy children. In 24-hour Holter recording, the average rate of sinus rhythm was significantly higher in the groups with systemic and localized scleroderma than in the control group, but there was no significant difference between them. The variability of heart rhythm in both groups was significantly decreased. In the group with systemic scleroderma, single supraventricular ectopic beats were observed in 20% and runs were seen in 40% of patients. In the group with localized scleroderma, supraventricular single ectopic beats occurred in 35% of patients and runs in 45% of those studied. Ventricular arrhythmia occurred in 2 children with systemic scleroderma, but in 1 child, it was complex. The most frequent cardiac arrhythmias in both types of scleroderma in children were of supraventricular origin, whereas ventricular arrhythmias did not occur very often. There were no significant differences in autonomic disturbances manifesting as a higher heart rate and decreased heart rate variability between localized and systemic scleroderma.

  17. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias : A consensus document fromthe European Heart RhythmAssociation (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart RhythmSociety (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart RhythmSociety (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulacion Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia (SOLEACE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S.; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S.; Steffel, Jan; Marin, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Marcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S.; Chiang, Chern-En; Williams, Bryan; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gorenek, Bulent; Fauchier, Laurent; Savelieva, Irina; Hatala, Robert; van Gelder, Isabelle; Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Erdine, Serap; Lovic, Dragan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Salinas-Arce, Jorge; Field, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both

  18. Melatonin in sleepless children : everything has a rhythm?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geijlswijk, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    Every living organism has an biological clock regulating endogenous melatonin production, synchronized by exogenous impulses like daylight, temperature and feeding. Inappropriately applied bright light disturbs this melatonin rhythm. Some large swine producers apply artificial light three times a

  19. Mechanical perturbation control of cardiac alternans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazim, Azzam; Belhamadia, Youssef; Dubljevic, Stevan

    2018-05-01

    Cardiac alternans is a disturbance in heart rhythm that is linked to the onset of lethal cardiac arrhythmias. Mechanical perturbation control has been recently used to suppress alternans in cardiac tissue of relevant size. In this control strategy, cardiac tissue mechanics are perturbed via active tension generated by the heart's electrical activity, which alters the tissue's electric wave profile through mechanoelectric coupling. We analyze the effects of mechanical perturbation on the dynamics of a map model that couples the membrane voltage and active tension systems at the cellular level. Therefore, a two-dimensional iterative map of the heart beat-to-beat dynamics is introduced, and a stability analysis of the system of coupled maps is performed in the presence of a mechanical perturbation algorithm. To this end, a bidirectional coupling between the membrane voltage and active tension systems in a single cardiac cell is provided, and a discrete form of the proposed control algorithm, that can be incorporated in the coupled maps, is derived. In addition, a realistic electromechanical model of cardiac tissue is employed to explore the feasibility of suppressing alternans at cellular and tissue levels. Electrical activity is represented in two detailed ionic models, the Luo-Rudy 1 and the Fox models, while two active contractile tension models, namely a smooth variant of the Nash-Panfilov model and the Niederer-Hunter-Smith model, are used to represent mechanical activity in the heart. The Mooney-Rivlin passive elasticity model is employed to describe passive mechanical behavior of the myocardium.

  20. Implementation and reimbursement of remote monitoring for cardiac implantable electronic devices in Europe: a survey from the health economics committee of the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Georges H; Braunschweig, Frieder; Klersy, Katherine; Cowie, Martin R; Leyva, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) permits early detection of arrhythmias, device, and lead failure and may also be useful in risk-predicting patient-related outcomes. Financial benefits for patients and healthcare organizations have also been shown. We sought to assess the implementation and funding of RM of CIEDs, including conventional pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices in Europe. Electronic survey from 43 centres in 15 European countries. In the study sample, RM was available in 22% of PM patients, 74% of ICD patients, and 69% of CRT patients. The most significant perceived benefits were the early detection of atrial arrhythmias in pacemaker patients, lead failure in ICD patients, and worsening heart failure in CRT patients. Remote monitoring was reported to lead a reduction of in-office follow-ups for all devices. The most important reported barrier to the implementation of RM for all CIEDs was lack of reimbursement (80% of centres). Physicians regard RM of CIEDs as a clinically useful technology that affords significant benefits for patients and healthcare organizations. Remote monitoring, however, is perceived as increasing workload. Reimbursement for RM is generally perceived as a major barrier to implementation. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Visible Battle Rhythm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cort, Brian; Bouchard, Alain; Gouin, Denis; Proulx, Pascale; Wright, William

    2006-01-01

    .... Visual Battle Rhythm (VBR) is a software prototype which updates the battle rhythm process with modern technology and careful information design to improve the synchronization, situational awareness and decision making ability of commanders...

  2. Biological Rhythms in the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary S. Matsui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism’s rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional–translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism’s sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin.

  3. Markets, Bodies, Rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian; Bondo Hansen, Kristian; Lange, Ann-Christina

    2015-01-01

    to respond to a widely perceived problem, namely that market rhythms might be contagious and that some form of separation of bodily and market rhythms might therefore be needed. Finally, we show how current high-frequency trading, despite being purely algorithmic, does not render the traders' bodies......This article explores the relationship between bodily rhythms and market rhythms in two distinctly different financial market configurations, namely the open-outcry pit (prevalent especially in the early 20th century) and present-day high-frequency trading. Drawing on Henri Lefebvre......'s rhythmanalysis, we show how traders seek to calibrate their bodily rhythms to those of the market. We argue that, in the case of early-20th-century open-outcry trading pits, traders tried to enact a total merger of bodily and market rhythms. We also demonstrate how, in the 1920s and '30s, market observers began...

  4. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Akinci

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The circadian rhythm sleep disorders define the clinical conditions where sleep and ndash;wake rhythm is disrupted despite optimum environmental and social conditions. They occur as a result of the changes in endogenous circadian hours or non-compatibility of environmental factors or social life with endogenous circadian rhythm. The sleep and ndash;wake rhythm is disrupted continuously or in repeating phases depending on lack of balance between internal and external cycles. This condition leads to functional impairments which cause insomnia, excessive sleepiness or both in people. Application of detailed sleep anamnesis and sleep diary with actigraphy record, if possible, will be sufficient for diagnosis. The treatment aims to align endogenous circadian rhythm with environmental conditions. The purpose of this article is to review pathology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of circadian rhythm disorder. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 178-189

  5. Compound heterozygosity for mutations (W156X and R225W) in SCN5A associated with severe cardiac conduction disturbances and degenerative changes in the conduction system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezzina, Connie R.; Rook, Martin B.; Groenewegen, W. Antoinette; Herfst, Lucas J.; van der Wal, Allard C.; Lam, Jan; Jongsma, Habo J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cardiac conduction defects associate with mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the cardiac Na+ channel. In the present study, we characterized a family in which the proband was born in severe distress with irregular wide complex tachycardia. His older sister died at 1 year of age from severe

  6. European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) position paper on arrhythmia management and device therapies in endocrine disorders, endorsed by Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Latin American Heart Rhythm Society (LAHRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenek, Bulent; Boriani, Giuseppe; Dan, Gheorge-Andrei; Fauchier, Laurent; Fenelon, Guilherme; Huang, He; Kudaiberdieva, Gulmira; Lip, Gregory Y H; Mahajan, Rajiv; Potpara, Tatjana; Ramirez, Juan David; Vos, Marc A; Marin, Francisco

    2018-03-16

    Endocrine disorders are associated with various tachyarrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation (AF), ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and bradyarrhythmias. Along with underlying arrhythmia substrate, electrolyte disturbances, glucose, and hormone levels, accompanying endocrine disorders contribute to development of arrhythmia. Arrhythmias may be life-threatening, facilitate cardiogenic shock development and increase mortality. The knowledge on the incidence of tachy- and bradyarrhythmias, clinical and prognostic significance as well as their management is limited; it is represented in observational studies and mostly in case reports on management of challenging cases. It should be also emphasized, that the topic is not covered in detail in current guidelines. Therefore, cardiologists and multidisciplinary teams participating in care of such patients do need the evidence-based, or in case of limited evidence expert-opinion based recommendations, how to treat arrhythmias using contemporary approaches, prevent their complications and recurrence in patients with endocrine disorders. In recognizing this close relationship between endocrine disorders and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) convened a Task Force, with representation from Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLAECE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on endocrine disorders and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice.

  7. Effects of atomoxetine on heart rhythm in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Tanidir, Canan; Ozturk, Erkut; Bahali, Kayhan; Gunes, Hatice; Ergul, Yakup; Uneri, Ozden Sukran; Akdeniz, Celal; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of atomoxetine on heart rhythm using 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) and 24 h Holter monitoring. Children and adolescents who were diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder according to DSM-IV-TR were referred to a pediatric cardiology clinic for cardiologic examination before and after 4 or 5 weeks of atomoxetine treatment. Cardiac examination, complete blood count, biochemistry, thyroid function tests, 12-lead ECG and 24 h Holter monitoring were performed routinely in all patients. Each subject underwent 24 h Holter ECG monitoring before atomoxetine was started and after 4 or 5 weeks of effective dose atomoxetine treatment. Forty-one patients were included in this prospective study. No statistically significant change was found in QT, QTc or QT interval dispersion or blood pressure before and after 4 or 5 weeks of atomoxetine treatment. There was a statistically significant increase in heart rate (both during the day and at night) and QRS duration, and a statistically significant decrease in P wave dispersion. Three patients had rhythm disturbances. All of these three patients were asymptomatic and none of these arrhythmias reached clinical significance. Atomoxetine did not cause significant changes in ECG or Holter variables. In two patients, who had undiagnosed subclinical extrasystoles, extra beats were increased after 4th week of treatment, but still remained clinically insignificant. Before and after atomoxetine treatment, listening to the heart sounds for a longer time, may help clinicians to notice an extra beat. If an extra beat is identified then 24 Holter monitoring is recommended. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Circadian rhythm in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Andreas; Ulander, Martin; Lundin, Fredrik

    2018-01-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) takes place in structures close to the cerebral ventricular system. Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), situated close to the third ventricle, is involved in circadian rhythm. Diurnal disturbances are well-known in demented patients. The cognitive decline in iNPH is potentially reversible after a shunt operation. Diurnal rhythm has never been studied in iNPH. We hypothesize that there is a disturbance of circadian rhythm in iNPH-patients and the aim was to study any changes of the diurnal rhythm (mesor and circadian period) as well as any changes of the diurnal amplitude and acrophase of the activity in iNPH-patients before and after a shunt operation. Twenty consecutive iNPH-patients fulfilling the criteria of the American iNPH-guidelines, 9 males and 11 females, mean age 73 (49-81) years were included. The patients underwent a pre-operative clinical work-up including 10m walk time (w10mt) steps (w10ms), TUG-time (TUGt) and steps (TUGs) and for cognitive function an MMSE score was measured. In order to receive circadian rhythm data actigraphic recordings were performed using the SenseWear 2 (BodyMedia Inc Pittsburgh, PA, USA) actigraph. Cosinor analyses of accelerometry data were performed in "R" using non-linear regression with Levenburg- Marquardt estimation. Pre- and post-operative data regarding mesor, amplitude and circadian period were compared using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test for paired data. Twenty patients were evaluated before and three month post-operatively. Motor function (w10mt, w10ms, TUGt, TUGs) was significantly improved while MMSE was not significantly changed. Actigraphic measurements (mesor, amplitude and circadian period) showed no significant changes after shunt operation. This is the first systematic study of circadian rhythm in iNPH-patients. We found no significant changes in circadian rhythm after shunt surgery. The conceptual idea of diurnal rhythm changes in hydrocephalus is

  9. Rhythm in language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langus, Alan; Mehler, Jacques; Nespor, Marina

    2017-10-01

    Spoken language is governed by rhythm. Linguistic rhythm is hierarchical and the rhythmic hierarchy partially mimics the prosodic as well as the morpho-syntactic hierarchy of spoken language. It can thus provide learners with cues about the structure of the language they are acquiring. We identify three universal levels of linguistic rhythm - the segmental level, the level of the metrical feet and the phonological phrase level - and discuss why primary lexical stress is not rhythmic. We survey experimental evidence on rhythm perception in young infants and native speakers of various languages to determine the properties of linguistic rhythm that are present at birth, those that mature during the first year of life and those that are shaped by the linguistic environment of language learners. We conclude with a discussion of the major gaps in current knowledge on linguistic rhythm and highlight areas of interest for future research that are most likely to yield significant insights into the nature, the perception, and the usefulness of linguistic rhythm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Particles Alter Diesel Exhaust Gases-Induced Hypotension, Cardiac Arrhythmia,Conduction Disturbance, and Autonomic Imbalance in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that acute exposures to vehicular traffic and particulate matter (PM) air pollution are key causes of fatal cardiac arrhythmia, especially in those with preexisting cardiovascular disease. Researchers point to electrophysiologic dysfunction and auto...

  11. Disturbing forest disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volney, W.J.A.; Hirsch, K.G. [Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    This paper described the role that disturbances play in maintaining the ecological integrity of Canadian boreal forests. Potential adaptation options to address the challenges that these disturbances present were also examined. Many forest ecosystems need fire for regeneration, while other forests rely on a cool, wet disintegration process driven by insects and commensal fungi feeding on trees to effect renewal. While there are characteristic natural, temporal and spatial patterns to these disturbances, recent work has demonstrated that the disturbances are being perturbed by climatic change that has been compounded by anthropogenic disturbances in forests. Fire influences species composition and age structure, regulates forest insects and diseases, affects nutrient cycling and energy fluxes, and maintains the productivity of different habitats. Longer fire seasons as a result of climatic change will lead to higher intensity fires that may more easily evade initial attacks and become problematic. Fire regimes elevated beyond the range of natural variation will have a dramatic effect on the regional distribution and functioning of forest ecosystems and pose a threat to the safety and prosperity of people. While it was acknowledged that if insect outbreaks were to be controlled on the entire forest estate, the productivity represented by dead wood would be lost, it was suggested that insects such as the forest tent caterpillar and the spruce bud worm may also pose a greater threat as the climate gets warmer and drier. Together with fungal associates, saproxylic arthropods are active in nutrient cycling and ultimately determine the fertility of forest sites. It was suggested that the production of an age class structure and forest mosaic would render the forest landscape less vulnerable to the more negative aspects of climate change on vegetation response. It was concluded that novel management design paradigms are needed to successfully reduce the risk from threats

  12. Chaos control applied to heart rhythm dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borem Ferreira, Bianca, E-mail: biaborem@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 68.503, 21.941.972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza de Paula, Aline, E-mail: alinedepaula@unb.br [Universidade de Brasi' lia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 70.910.900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Amorim Savi, Marcelo, E-mail: savi@mecanica.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 68.503, 21.941.972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > A natural cardiac pacemaker is modeled by a modified Van der Pol oscillator. > Responses related to normal and chaotic, pathological functioning of the heart are investigated. > Chaos control methods are applied to avoid pathological behaviors of heart dynamics. > Different approaches are treated: stabilization of unstable periodic orbits and chaos suppression. - Abstract: The dynamics of cardiovascular rhythms have been widely studied due to the key aspects of the heart in the physiology of living beings. Cardiac rhythms can be either periodic or chaotic, being respectively related to normal and pathological physiological functioning. In this regard, chaos control methods may be useful to promote the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits using small perturbations. In this article, the extended time-delayed feedback control method is applied to a natural cardiac pacemaker described by a mathematical model. The model consists of a modified Van der Pol equation that reproduces the behavior of this pacemaker. Results show the ability of the chaos control strategy to control the system response performing either the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits or the suppression of chaotic response, avoiding behaviors associated with critical cardiac pathologies.

  13. Cardiac arrhythmias during aerobatic flight and its simulation on a centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzka-Bartczak, Ewelina K; Kopka, Lech H

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that accelerations during centrifuge training and during flight can provoke cardiac arrhythmias. Our study was designed to investigate both the similarities and differences between heart rhythm disturbances during flights and centrifuge tests. There were 40 asymptomatic, healthy pilots who performed two training flights and were also tested in a human centrifuge according to a program of rapid onset rate acceleration (ROR) and of centrifuge simulation of the actual acceleration experienced in flight (Simulation). During the flight and centrifuge tests ECG was monitored with the Holter method. ECG was examined for heart rhythm changes and disturbances. During flights, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) were found in 25% of the subjects, premature supraventricular contractions (PSVCs) and PVCs with bigeminy in 5%, and pairs of PVCs in 2.5% of subjects. During the centrifuge tests, PVCs were experienced by 45% of the subjects, PSVCs and pairs of PVCs by 7.5%, and PVCs with bigeminy by 2.5%. Sinus bradycardia was observed during flights and centrifuge tests in 7.5% of subjects. Comparative evaluation of electrocardiographic records in military pilots during flights and centrifuge tests demonstrated that: 1) there were no clinically significant arrhythmias recorded; and 2) the frequency and kind of heart rhythm disturbances during aerobatic flight and its simulation on a centrifuge were not identical and did not occur repetitively in the same persons during equal phases of the tests.

  14. A sodium-channel mutation causes isolated cardiac conduction disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, HL; Bink-Boelkens, MTE; Bezzina, CR; Viswanathan, PC; Beaufort-Krol, GCM; van Tintelen, PJ; van den Berg, MP; Wilde, AAM; Balser, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders slow the heart rhythm and cause disability in millions of people worldwide. Inherited mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the human cardiac sodium (Na+) channel, have been associated with rapid heart rhythms that occur suddenly and are life-threatening(1-3); however, a

  15. A sodium-channel mutation causes isolated cardiac conduction disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. L.; Bink-Boelkens, M. T.; Bezzina, C. R.; Viswanathan, P. C.; Beaufort-Krol, G. C.; van Tintelen, P. J.; van den Berg, M. P.; Wilde, A. A.; Balser, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders slow the heart rhythm and cause disability in millions of people worldwide. Inherited mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the human cardiac sodium (Na+) channel, have been associated with rapid heart rhythms that occur suddenly and are life-threatening; however, a

  16. Protocolo de actuación preventiva para riesgo debido a alteraciones del ritmo circadiano en médicos de urgencias que trabajan en turnos de 24 horas Preventive action protocol for risk due to circadian rhythm disturbances in emergency physicians working in 24 hours shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Fillat de Acosta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La autora analiza la situación patológica de los médicos de urgencias con turnos de 24 horas que alteran el ritmo circadiano, el estudio describe las condiciones de trabajo que afectan el ritmo biológico sueño-vigilia y las tareas intelectuales y de habilidades mecánicas desempeñadas por este personal, los daños a prevenir (accidentes in itinere, accidentes por manipulación de material biológico, enfermedades somáticas y psíquicas y el riesgo para los pacientes. Se propone un protocolo de actuación preventiva que abarca la mayor parte del trabajo, cuándo actuar, revisión de recursos, actuaciones a realizar en una unidad de salud laboral y sistema de comunicación al resto del hospital, Servicio de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales y Sistema Nacional de Salud.The author analyzes the pathological situation concerning to emergency physicians with 24-hour shifts which disturb their circadian rhythms, the study describes the working conditions that affect the biological sleep-wake rhythm and intellectual tasks and mechanical skills performed by these staff, damage to be prevented (commuting accidents, accidents caused by handling of biological material, somatic and psychic diseases and the risk to patients. After that, it's developed a proposal of preventive action protocol covering most of the work and finally when to act, available resources and actions to be taken in an occupational health unit, in addition to the communication system to the rest of the hospital, Occupational and Hazard Preventive Service and the National Health System.

  17. A Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Ayala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR compromise defibrillation success. However, CPR must be interrupted to analyze the rhythm because although current methods for rhythm analysis during CPR have high sensitivity for shockable rhythms, the specificity for nonshockable rhythms is still too low. This paper introduces a new approach to rhythm analysis during CPR that combines two strategies: a state-of-the-art CPR artifact suppression filter and a shock advice algorithm (SAA designed to optimally classify the filtered signal. Emphasis is on designing an algorithm with high specificity. The SAA includes a detector for low electrical activity rhythms to increase the specificity, and a shock/no-shock decision algorithm based on a support vector machine classifier using slope and frequency features. For this study, 1185 shockable and 6482 nonshockable 9-s segments corrupted by CPR artifacts were obtained from 247 patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The segments were split into a training and a test set. For the test set, the sensitivity and specificity for rhythm analysis during CPR were 91.0% and 96.6%, respectively. This new approach shows an important increase in specificity without compromising the sensitivity when compared to previous studies.

  18. Hypertension and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation......) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence...

  19. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  20. Light Rhythms in Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Katja

    2013-01-01

    formation and rhythm. When integrated into an architectural concept, electrical lighting non-intended for poetic composition has the ability to contribute to place, time, and function-telling aspects of places in urban contexts. Urban environments are information wise challenging to pre-historic human...

  1. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  2. Antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation associated with valvular heart disease: a joint consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, endorsed by the ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrhythmia Society of Southern Africa (CASSA), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), South African Heart (SA Heart) Association and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Collet, Jean Philippe; Caterina, Raffaele de; Fauchier, Laurent; Lane, Deirdre A; Larsen, Torben B; Marin, Francisco; Morais, Joao; Narasimhan, Calambur; Olshansky, Brian; Pierard, Luc; Potpara, Tatjana; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sliwa, Karen; Varela, Gonzalo; Vilahur, Gemma; Weiss, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rocca, Bianca

    2017-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major worldwide public health problem, and AF in association with valvular heart disease (VHD) is also common. However, management strategies for this group of patients have been less informed by randomized trials, which have largely focused on 'non-valvular AF' patients. Thrombo-embolic risk also varies according to valve lesion and may also be associated with CHA2DS2VASc score risk factor components, rather than only the valve disease being causal. Given marked heterogeneity in the definition of valvular and non-valvular AF and variable management strategies, including non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with VHD other than prosthetic heart valves or haemodynamically significant mitral valve disease, there is a need to provide expert recommendations for professionals participating in the care of patients presenting with AF and associated VHD. To address this topic, a Task Force was convened by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Working Group on Thrombosis, with representation from the ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease, Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), South African Heart (SA Heart) Association and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE) with the remit to comprehensively review the published evidence, and to publish a joint consensus document on the management of patients with AF and associated VHD, with up-to-date consensus recommendations for clinical practice for different forms of VHD. This consensus document proposes that the term 'valvular AF' is outdated and given that any definition ultimately relates to the evaluated practical use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) type, we propose a functional Evaluated Heartvalves, Rheumatic or Artificial (EHRA) categorization in relation to the type of OAC use in patients with AF, as follows: (i) EHRA Type 1 VHD, which refers

  3. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  4. [Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottai, T; Biloa-Tang, M; Christophe, S; Dupuy, C; Jacquesy, L; Kochman, F; Meynard, J-A; Papeta, D; Rahioui, H; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Kaladjian, A; Pringuey, D; Azorin, J-M

    2010-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is common, recurrent, often severe and debiliting disorder. All types of bipolar disorder have a common determinant: depressive episode. It is justify to propose a psychotherapy which shown efficacy in depression. Howewer, perturbations in circadian rhythms have been implicated in the genesis of each episode of the illness. Biological circadian dysregulation can be encouraged by alteration of time-givers (Zeitgebers) or occurrence of time-disturbers (Zeitstörers). Addition of social rhythm therapy to interpersonal psychotherapy leads to create a new psychotherapy adaptated to bipolar disorders: InterPersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT). IPSRT, in combinaison with medication, has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for bipolar disorders. IPSRT combines psychoeducation, behavioral strategy to regularize daily routines and interpersonal psychotherapy which help patients cope better with the multiple psychosocial and relationship problems associated with this chronic disorder. The main issues of this psychotherapy are: to take the history of the patient's illness and review of medication, to help patient for "grief for the lost healthy self" translated in the french version in "acceptance of a long-term medical condition", to give the sick role, to examinate the current relationships and changes proximal to the emergence of mood symptoms in the four problem areas (unresolved grief, interpersonal disputes, role transitions, role déficits), to examinate and increase daily routines and social rhythms. French version of IPSRT called TIPARS (with few differences), a time-limited psychotherapy, in 24 sessions during approximatively 6 months, is conducted in three phases. In the initial phase, the therapist takes a thorough history of previous episodes and their interpersonal context and a review of previous medication, provides psychoeducation, evaluates social rhythms, introduces the Social Rhythm Metric, identifies the patient's main interpersonal

  5. Recent Advances in Circadian Rhythms in Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong eChen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence shows that intrinsic circadian clocks are tightly related to cardiovascular functions. The diurnal changes in blood pressure and heart rate are well known circadian rhythms. Endothelial function, platelet aggregation and thrombus formation exhibit circadian changes as well. The onset of many cardiovascular diseases (CVDs or events, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death, also exhibits temporal trends. Furthermore, there is strong evidence from animal models and epidemiological studies showing that disruption of circadian rhythms is a significant risk factor for many CVDs, and the intervention of CVDs may have a time dependent effect. In this mini review, we summarized recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between circadian rhythm and cardiovascular physiology and diseases including blood pressure regulation and myocardial infarction.

  6. Delayed Circadian Rhythm in Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, M.M.; Kooij, J.J.S; Boonstra, A. M.; Gordijn, M.C.M.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest circadian rhythm disturbances in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and sleep-onset insomnia (SOI). We investigate here sleep and rhythms in activity and melatonin in adults with ADHD. Methods: Sleep logs and actigraphy data were

  7. Circadian activity rhythms for mothers with an infant in ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu eLee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms influence sleep and wakefulness. Circadian activity rhythms (CAR are altered in individuals with dementia or seasonal affective disorder. To date, studies exploring CAR and sleep in postpartum women are rare. The purpose of this report is to describe relationships between CAR, sleep disturbance, and fatigue among 72 first-time mothers during their 2nd week postpartum while their newborn remain hospitalized in intensive care unit (ICU. Seventy two mothers were included in this secondary data analysis sample from three separate studies. Participants completed the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS, Numerical Rating Scale for Fatigue (NRS-F, and a sleep diary. The objective sleep data included total sleep time (TST, wake after sleep onset (WASO, and CAR determined by the circadian quotient (amplitude/mesor averaged from at least 48-hours of wrist actigraphy monitoring. The TST of mothers who self-reported as poor sleepers was 354 minutes (SEM= 21.9, with a mean WASO of 19.5% (SEM= 2.8. The overall sleep quality measured by the GSDS was clinically, significantly disrupted (M= 5.5, SD= 1.2. The mean score for morning fatigue was 5.8 (SD= 2.0, indicating moderate fatigue severity. The CAR was .62 (SEM= .04, indicating poor synchronization. The self-reported good sleepers (GSDS < 3 had better CAR (M= .71, SEM= .02 than poor sleepers (GSDS > 3 (t [70] = 2.0, p< .05. A higher circadian equation was associated with higher TST (r= .83, p<.001, less WASO (r= -.50, p< .001, lower self-reported sleep disturbance scores (r= -.35, p= .01, and less morning fatigue (r= -.26. Findings indicate that mothers with a hospitalized infant have both nocturnal sleep problems and disturbed circadian activity rhythms. Factors responsible for these sleep and rhythm disturbances, the adverse effects on mother’s physical and mental well-being, and mother-infant relationship require further study.

  8. Churg-Strauss syndrome associated with rapid deterioration of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and conduction disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jung Yeon; Yi, Jeong Eun; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a major cause of mortality. Here we report a case of a 75-year-old woman with eosinophilic endomyocarditis due to CSS. An electrocardiogram showed intraventricular conduction delay, and echocardiography showed an impaired relaxation pattern and biventricular apical thickening. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed subendocardial delayed enhancement with biventricular apical thrombi. Endomyocardial biopsy showed perivascular eosinophilic infiltration. Despite resolution of the hypereosinophilia after steroid therapy, her left ventricular (LV) diastolic function worsened into a restrictive pattern and she died with a ventricular escape rhythm on her 14th day in the hospital. This case is unusual in that there was rapid progression of the LV diastolic dysfunction and conduction disturbance due to CSS. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Routine versus aggressive upstream rhythm control for prevention of early atrial fibrillation in heart failure: background, aims and design of the RACE 3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alings, M; Smit, M D; Moes, M L; Crijns, H J G M; Tijssen, J G P; Brügemann, J; Hillege, H L; Lane, D A; Lip, G Y H; Smeets, J R L M; Tieleman, R G; Tukkie, R; Willems, F F; Vermond, R A; Van Veldhuisen, D J; Van Gelder, I C

    2013-07-01

    Rhythm control for atrial fibrillation (AF) is cumbersome because of its progressive nature caused by structural remodelling. Upstream therapy refers to therapeutic interventions aiming to modify the atrial substrate, leading to prevention of AF. The Routine versus Aggressive upstream rhythm Control for prevention of Early AF in heart failure (RACE 3) study hypothesises that aggressive upstream rhythm control increases persistence of sinus rhythm compared with conventional rhythm control in patients with early AF and mild-to-moderate early systolic or diastolic heart failure undergoing electrical cardioversion. RACE 3 is a prospective, randomised, open, multinational, multicenter trial. Upstream rhythm control consists of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, statins, cardiac rehabilitation therapy, and intensive counselling on dietary restrictions, exercise maintenance, and drug adherence. Conventional rhythm control consists of routine rhythm control therapy without cardiac rehabilitation therapy and intensive counselling. In both arms, every effort is made to keep patients in the rhythm control strategy, and ion channel antiarrhythmic drugs or pulmonary vein ablation may be instituted if AF relapses. Total inclusion will be 250 patients. If upstream therapy proves to be effective in improving maintenance of sinus rhythm, it could become a new approach to rhythm control supporting conventional pharmacological and non-pharmacological rhythm control.

  10. Light Rhythms in Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Katja

    2013-01-01

    On one hand, urban lighting expresses itself in a complex visual environment made by the interplay by between many separate lighting schemes, as street lighting, shop lighting, luminous commercials etc. On the other, a noticeable order of patterns occurs, when lighting is observed as luminous...... formation and rhythm. When integrated into an architectural concept, electrical lighting non-intended for poetic composition has the ability to contribute to place, time, and function-telling aspects of places in urban contexts. Urban environments are information wise challenging to pre-historic human...... instincts, but they can be met by careful selection and adjustment of existing light situations....

  11. Orchestrating intensities and rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Juelskjær, Malou

    2016-01-01

    environmentality and learning-centered governance standards has dramatic and performative effects for the production of (educational) subjectivities. This implies a shift from governing identities, categories and structures towards orchestrating affective intensities and rhythms. Finally, the article discusses...... and the making of subjects have held sway for many years; and it is also well known that schools have been some of the most regular purchasers of psychological methods, tests and classifications. Following but also elaborating upon governmentality studies, it is suggested that a current shift towards...

  12. Circadian melatonin rhythm and excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Noble, Charleston; Reid, Kathryn J; Peng, Jie; Turek, Fred W; Marconi, Angelica; Rademaker, Alfred W; Simuni, Tanya; Zadikoff, Cindy; Zee, Phyllis C

    2014-04-01

    Diurnal fluctuations of motor and nonmotor symptoms and a high prevalence of sleep-wake disturbances in Parkinson disease (PD) suggest a role of the circadian system in the modulation of these symptoms. However, surprisingly little is known regarding circadian function in PD and whether circadian dysfunction is involved in the development of sleep-wake disturbances in PD. To determine the relationship between the timing and amplitude of the 24-hour melatonin rhythm, a marker of endogenous circadian rhythmicity, with self-reported sleep quality, the severity of daytime sleepiness, and disease metrics. A cross-sectional study from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012, of 20 patients with PD receiving stable dopaminergic therapy and 15 age-matched control participants. Both groups underwent blood sampling for the measurement of serum melatonin levels at 30-minute intervals for 24 hours under modified constant routine conditions at the Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center of Northwestern University. Twenty-four hour monitoring of serum melatonin secretion. Clinical and demographic data, self-reported measures of sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and circadian markers of the melatonin rhythm, including the amplitude, area under the curve (AUC), and phase of the 24-hour rhythm. Patients with PD had blunted circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion compared with controls; the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm and the 24-hour AUC for circulating melatonin levels were significantly lower in PD patients (P hour melatonin AUC (P = .001). Disease duration, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores, levodopa equivalent dose, and global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score in the PD group were not significantly related to measures of the melatonin circadian rhythm. Circadian dysfunction may underlie excessive sleepiness in PD. The nature of this association needs to be explored further

  13. Rapid Electrical Stimulation Increased Cardiac Apoptosis Through Disturbance of Calcium Homeostasis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Geng

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Heart failure induced by tachycardia, the most common arrhythmia, is frequently observed in clinical practice. This study was designed to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Rapid electrical stimulation (RES at a frequency of 3 Hz was applied on human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs for 7 days, with 8 h/day and 24 h/day set to represent short-term and long-term tachycardia, respectively. Age-matched hiPSC-CMs without electrical stimulation or with slow electrical stimulation (1 Hz were set as no electrical stimulation (NES control or low-frequency electrical stimulation (LES control. Following stimulation, JC-1 staining flow cytometry analysis was performed to examine mitochondrial conditions. Apoptosis in hiPSC-CMs was evaluated using Hoechst staining and Annexin V/propidium iodide (AV/PI staining flow cytometry analysis. Calcium transients and L-type calcium currents were recorded to evaluate calcium homeostasis. Western blotting and qPCR were performed to evaluate the protein and mRNA expression levels of apoptosis-related genes and calcium homeostasis-regulated genes. Results: Compared to the controls, hiPSC-CMs following RES presented mitochondrial dysfunction and an increased apoptotic percentage. Amplitudes of calcium transients and L-type calcium currents were significantly decreased in hiPSC-CMs with RES. Molecular analysis demonstrated upregulated expression of Caspase3 and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes related to calcium re-sequence were downregulated, while phosphorylated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII was significantly upregulated following RES. There was no significant difference between the NES control and LES control groups in these aspects. Inhibition of CaMKII with 1 µM KN93 partly reversed these adverse effects of RES. Conclusion: RES on hiPSC-CMs disturbed calcium homeostasis, which led to mitochondrial stress, promoted cell apoptosis and

  14. Sleep, Memory & Brain Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Brendon O; Buzsáki, György

    2015-01-01

    Sleep occupies roughly one-third of our lives, yet the scientific community is still not entirely clear on its purpose or function. Existing data point most strongly to its role in memory and homeostasis: that sleep helps maintain basic brain functioning via a homeostatic mechanism that loosens connections between overworked synapses, and that sleep helps consolidate and re-form important memories. In this review, we will summarize these theories, but also focus on substantial new information regarding the relation of electrical brain rhythms to sleep. In particular, while REM sleep may contribute to the homeostatic weakening of overactive synapses, a prominent and transient oscillatory rhythm called "sharp-wave ripple" seems to allow for consolidation of behaviorally relevant memories across many structures of the brain. We propose that a theory of sleep involving the division of labor between two states of sleep-REM and non-REM, the latter of which has an abundance of ripple electrical activity-might allow for a fusion of the two main sleep theories. This theory then postulates that sleep performs a combination of consolidation and homeostasis that promotes optimal knowledge retention as well as optimal waking brain function.

  15. Circadian rhythms regulate amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Seon, Yoon Ji; Mourão, Marcio A; Schnell, Santiago; Kim, Doohak; Harada, Hidemitsu; Papagerakis, Silvana; Papagerakis, Petros

    2013-07-01

    Ameloblasts, the cells responsible for making enamel, modify their morphological features in response to specialized functions necessary for synchronized ameloblast differentiation and enamel formation. Secretory and maturation ameloblasts are characterized by the expression of stage-specific genes which follows strictly controlled repetitive patterns. Circadian rhythms are recognized as key regulators of the development and diseases of many tissues including bone. Our aim was to gain novel insights on the role of clock genes in enamel formation and to explore the potential links between circadian rhythms and amelogenesis. Our data shows definitive evidence that the main clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) oscillate in ameloblasts at regular circadian (24 h) intervals both at RNA and protein levels. This study also reveals that the two markers of ameloblast differentiation i.e. amelogenin (Amelx; a marker of secretory stage ameloblasts) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (Klk4, a marker of maturation stage ameloblasts) are downstream targets of clock genes. Both, Amelx and Klk4 show 24h oscillatory expression patterns and their expression levels are up-regulated after Bmal1 over-expression in HAT-7 ameloblast cells. Taken together, these data suggest that both the secretory and the maturation stages of amelogenesis might be under circadian control. Changes in clock gene expression patterns might result in significant alterations of enamel apposition and mineralization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Autism as a disorder of biological and behavioral rhythms: Towards new therapeutic perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie eTordjman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in the role of biological and behavioral rhythms in typical and atypical development. Recent studies in cognitive and developmental psychology have highlighted the importance of rhythmicity and synchrony of motor, emotional and relational rhythms in early development of social communication. The synchronization of rhythms allows tuning and adaptation to the external environment. The role of melatonin in the ontogenetic establishment of circadian rhythms and the synchronization of peripheral oscillators suggests that this hormone might be also involved in the synchrony of motor, emotional and relational rhythms. Autism provides a challenging model of physiological and behavioral rhythm disturbances and their possible effects on the development of social communication impairments and repetitive behaviors or interests. This article situates autism as a disorder of biological and behavioral rhythms and reviews the recent literature on the role of rhythmicity and synchrony of rhythms in child development. Finally, the hypothesis is developed that an integrated approach focusing on biological, motor, emotional and relational rhythms may open interesting therapeutic perspectives for children with autism. More specifically, promising avenues are discussed for potential therapeutic benefits in autism spectrum disorder of melatonin combined with developmental behavioral interventions that emphasize synchrony such as the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM.

  17. Autism as a disorder of biological and behavioral rhythms: toward new therapeutic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, Sylvie; Davlantis, Katherine S; Georgieff, Nicolas; Geoffray, Marie-Maude; Speranza, Mario; Anderson, George M; Xavier, Jean; Botbol, Michel; Oriol, Cécile; Bellissant, Eric; Vernay-Leconte, Julie; Fougerou, Claire; Hespel, Anne; Tavenard, Aude; Cohen, David; Kermarrec, Solenn; Coulon, Nathalie; Bonnot, Olivier; Dawson, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of biological and behavioral rhythms in typical and atypical development. Recent studies in cognitive and developmental psychology have highlighted the importance of rhythmicity and synchrony of motor, emotional, and interpersonal rhythms in early development of social communication. The synchronization of rhythms allows tuning and adaptation to the external environment. The role of melatonin in the ontogenetic establishment of circadian rhythms and the synchronization of the circadian clocks network suggests that this hormone might be also involved in the synchrony of motor, emotional, and interpersonal rhythms. Autism provides a challenging model of physiological and behavioral rhythm disturbances and their possible effects on the development of social communication impairments and repetitive behaviors and interests. This article situates autism as a disorder of biological and behavioral rhythms and reviews the recent literature on the role of rhythmicity and synchrony of rhythms in child development. Finally, the hypothesis is developed that an integrated approach focusing on biological, motor, emotional, and interpersonal rhythms may open interesting therapeutic perspectives for children with autism. More specifically, promising avenues are discussed for potential therapeutic benefits in autism spectrum disorder of melatonin combined with developmental behavioral interventions that emphasize synchrony, such as the Early Start Denver Model.

  18. Differential analysis of contraction of the cardiac chambers by digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, F.; Nitsch, J.; Franken, T.; Manz, M.; Becher, H.; Bonn Univ.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-six patients with various cardiac abnormalities that had been diagnosed by standard methods, were examined by I-V DSA; images of the left and right ventricles during a representative cardiac cycle were submitted to amplitude and phase analysis, using a Fourier transformation. Temporal differentiation of ventricular function was derived from the best available right anterior oblique projection; the amplitude of cardiac movement of abnormal areas in the myocardium were obtained from a grey scale or colour coding at a fixed point. Comparison with a control group of 35 individuals showed the following pathological findings: hypokinetic segments (33 cases) showed delay, dyskinesias (20 cases) showed complete separation of maximal phases, frequently with a double peak in the phase histogram; disturbances of cardiac rhythm (14 cases) showed atypical localisation of initiation of contraction: in Wolfe-Parkinson-White syndrome this is basal-anterior, in left bundle branch block and VVI stimulation it is apical inferior; in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (eight cases) it is postero-basal inferior with high, narrow peaks on the phase histogram. Differential phase analysis on I-V DSA enables one to define cardiac contraction in a simple manner. (orig.) [de

  19. Cardiac Ca2+ signalling in zebrafish: Translation of findings to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opbergen, Chantal J M; van der Voorn, Stephanie M; Vos, Marc A; de Boer, Teun P; van Veen, Toon A B

    2018-05-07

    Sudden cardiac death is a leading cause of death worldwide, mainly caused by highly disturbed electrical activation patterns in the heart. Currently, murine models are the most popular model to study underlying molecular mechanisms of inherited or acquired cardiac electrical abnormalities, although the numerous electrophysiological discrepancies between mouse and human raise the question whether mice are the optimal model to study cardiac rhythm disorders. Recently it has been uncovered that the zebrafish cardiac electrophysiology seems surprisingly similar to the human heart, mainly because the zebrafish AP contains a clear plateau phase and ECG characteristics show alignment with the human ECG. Although, before using zebrafish as a model to study cardiac arrhythmogenesis, however, it is very important to gain a better insight into the electrophysiological characteristics of the zebrafish heart. In this review we outline the electrophysiological machinery of the zebrafish cardiomyocytes, with a special focus on the intracellular Ca 2+ dynamics and excitation-contraction coupling. We debate the potential of zebrafish as a model to study human cardiovascular diseases and postulate steps to employ zebrafish into a more 'humanized' model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Calmodulin Mutations Associated with Recurrent Cardiac Arrest in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Graf, Elisabeth; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Ovadia, Marc; Papagiannis, John; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Rathi, Subodh G.; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Clark, Travis; Shaffer, Christian; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kääb, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Chazin, Walter J.; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Life-threatening disorders of heart rhythm may arise during infancy and can result in the sudden and tragic death of a child. We performed exome sequencing on two unrelated infants presenting with recurrent cardiac arrest to discover a genetic cause. Methods and Results We ascertained two unrelated infants (probands) with recurrent cardiac arrest and dramatically prolonged QTc interval who were both born to healthy parents. The two parent-child trios were investigated using exome sequencing to search for de novo genetic variants. We then performed follow-up candidate gene screening on an independent cohort of 82 subjects with congenital long-QT syndrome without an identified genetic cause. Biochemical studies were performed to determine the functional consequences of mutations discovered in two genes encoding calmodulin. We discovered three heterozygous de novo mutations in either CALM1 or CALM2, two of the three human genes encoding calmodulin, in the two probands and in two additional subjects with recurrent cardiac arrest. All mutation carriers were infants who exhibited life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias combined variably with epilepsy and delayed neurodevelopment. Mutations altered residues in or adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain. Recombinant mutant calmodulins exhibited several fold reductions in calcium binding affinity. Conclusions Human calmodulin mutations disrupt calcium ion binding to the protein and are associated with a life-threatening condition in early infancy. Defects in calmodulin function will disrupt important calcium signaling events in heart affecting membrane ion channels, a plausible molecular mechanism for potentially deadly disturbances in heart rhythm during infancy. PMID:23388215

  1. The Rhetorical Nature of Rhythm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balint, Mihaela; Dascalu, Mihai; Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Up to date, linguistic rhythm has been studied for speech, but the rhythm of written texts has been merely recognized, and not analyzed or interpreted in connection to natural language tasks. We provide an extension of the textual rhythmic features we proposed in previous work, and

  2. Circadian rhythm in QT interval is preserved in mice deficient of potassium channel interacting protein 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Lisa A; Lubberding, Anniek; Larsen, Anders Peter

    2017-01-01

    Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is suggested to be responsible for the circadian rhythm in repolarization duration, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. We investigated the hypothesis that there is no circadian rhythm in QT interval in the absence of KChIP2. Implanted...... cardiac deaths were observed. We find similar diurnal (light:dark) and circadian (darkness) rhythms of RR intervals in WT and KChIP2(-/-) mice. Circadian rhythms in QT100 intervals are present in both groups, but at physiological small amplitudes: 1.6 ± 0.2 and 1.0 ± 0.3 ms in WT and KChIP2......(-/-), respectively (p = 0.15). A diurnal rhythm in QT100 intervals was only found in WT mice. QTmean-RR intervals display clear diurnal and circadian rhythms in both WT and KChIP2(-/-). The amplitude of the circadian rhythm in QTmean-RR is 4.0 ± 0.3 and 3.1 ± 0.5 ms in WT and KChIP2(-/-), respectively (p = 0...

  3. Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complex cardiac arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, L.; Courtemanche, M.; Shrier, A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Periodic stimulation of a nonlinear cardiac oscillator in vitro gives rise to complex dynamics that is well described by one-dimensional finite difference equations. As stimulation parameters are varied, a large number of different phase-locked and chaotic rhythms is observed. Similar rhythms can be observed in the intact human heart when there is interaction between two pacemaker sites. Simplified models are analyzed, which show some correspondence to clinical observations.

  4. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... His height. mass. intelligence and genitalia were normal. The aSSOCiatIOn between deafness and disturbance of cardiac conduction and between pigmented skin lesions and cardiac abnormalities, has been well described. Should. ~I patient present with multiple lentigines and/or familial sensineural ...

  5. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  6. How Two Players Negotiate Rhythm in a Shared Rhythm Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2012-01-01

    from each other. Video analysis of user interaction shines light upon how users engaged in a rhythmical relationship, and interviews give information about the user experience in terms of the game play and user collaboration. Based on the findings in this paper we propose design guidelines......In a design and working prototype of a shared music interface eleven teams of two people were to collaborate about filling in holes with tones and beats in an evolving ground rhythm. The hypothesis was that users would tune into each other and have sections of characteristic rhythmical...... relationships that related to the ground rhythm. Results from interaction data show that teams did find a mutual rhythm, and that they were able to keep this rhythm for a while and/or over several small periods. Results also showed that two players engaged in very specific rhythmical relationships that differed...

  7. NEWBORNS OF HIGH RISK GROUPS AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CARDIAC ACTIVITY DURING THE PERIOD OF EARLY ADAPTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Tumaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study characteristics of electrophysiological cardiac activity in children of risk groups and to assess possibilities of Holter-electrocardiography (H-ECG in revealing of cardiac dysfunction during the period of early adaptation. Patients and methods: 250 newborns were examined. The main group consisted of 200 children with cerebral ischemia (CI. This group was divided into 2 subgroups: 100 full-term and 100 premature (at various gestation age infants. Control group contained 50 children born at 38–40th weeks of gestation with physiological course of pregnancy and delivery, APGAR score of 8–9 points. Complex examination included H-ECG according the standard technic with evaluation of the hearth rate (HR during sleep and wakefulness; HRmin, HRmax; arrhythmias, conductivity disorders, duration of the intervals; rhythm variability. Results: according to the ECG children with CI, especially premature ones, and children delivered via Cesarean section more often had ST-T disturbances, arrhythmias (sinus tachycardia, less often — sinus bradycardia and conductivity disorders, Q-Tc prolongation. H-EGC revealed decrease of sleep HR, HRmin and HRmax in children with CI especially in delivered via Cesarean section. The most common arrhythmia was supraventricular extrasystole.  Pauses in rhythms and variability were the highest in premature children delivered via Cesarean section. Conclusions: hypoxia/ischemia is a trigger for development of cardiovascular dysfuncion in newborns. Premature and children delivered via Cesarean section form a group of high risk. H-ECG widens possibilities of revealing of symptoms of cardiac dysfunction (disturbances at the basal level of functioning, of adaptation resources of the sinus node, electric instability of the myocardium and heart rate variability in children of risk group for development of cardiovascular disorders. 

  8. Cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding-Barclay, Michael A; Stern, Jessica; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder, which is associated with many different medical complications as a result of the weight loss and malnutrition that characterise this illness. It has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. A large portion of deaths are attributable to the cardiac abnormalities that ensue as a result of the malnutrition associated with anorexia nervosa. In this review, the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa will be discussed. A comprehensive literature review on cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa was carried out. There are structural, functional, and rhythm-type changes that occur in patients with anorexia nervosa. These become progressively significant as ongoing weight loss occurs. Cardiac changes are inherent to anorexia nervosa and they become more life-threatening and serious as the anorexia nervosa becomes increasingly severe. Weight restoration and attention to these cardiac changes are crucial for a successful treatment outcome.

  9. Learning by joining the rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Ravn, Susanne; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to explore how a joint rhythm is learned. The exploration is based on a combination of a case study of training in elite rowing and theoretical considerations concerning mutual incorporation of skills in learning. In 2009 Juliane and Anne start to row the double sculler together....... The two rowers’ aim is to be among the exclusive group of teams that qualify for the Olympic Games three years later. However Anne is not a rower, and has to be apprenticed by Juliane, who is an experienced elite rower. One important learning goal in the apprenticeship is to find a good joint rhythm......, to be able to put optimal effort into the rowing. Thus the apprenticeship is about developing a sense for a good rhythm in Anne which corresponds to Juliane’s fine-grained sense of what a good rhythm should feel like. Our study suggests that apprenticeship learning has to be understood as an embodied...

  10. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Taiwan Thailand Turkey United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Venezuela Vietnam Within 5 miles 10 miles 15 miles ... info@HRSonline.org © Heart Rhythm Society 2017 Privacy Policy | Linking Policy | Patient Education Disclaimer You are about ...

  11. Sympathetic rhythms and nervous integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbey, Michael P

    2007-04-01

    1. The present review focuses on some of the processes producing rhythms in sympathetic nerves influencing cardiovascular functions and considers their potential relevance to nervous integration. 2. Two mechanisms are considered that may account for rhythmic sympathetic discharges. First, neuronal elements of peripheral or central origin produce rhythmic activity by phasically exciting and/or inhibiting neurons within central sympathetic networks. Second, rhythms arise within central sympathetic networks. Evidence is considered that indicates the operation of both mechanisms; the first in muscle and the second in skin sympathetic vasoconstrictor networks. 3. Sympathetic activity to the rat tail, a model for the nervous control of skin circulation, is regulated by central networks involved in thermoregulation and those associated with fear and arousal. In an anaesthetized preparation, activity displays an apparently autonomous rhythm (T-rhythm; 0.4-1.2 Hz) and the level of activity can be manipulated by regulating core body temperature. This model has been used to study rhythm generation in central sympathetic networks and possible functional relevance. 4. A unique insight provided by the T rhythm, into possible physiological function(s) underlying rhythmic sympathetic discharges is that the activity of single sympathetic post-ganglionic neurons within a population innervating the same target can have different rhythm frequencies. Therefore, the graded and dynamic entrainment of the rhythms by inputs, such as central respiratory drive and/or lung inflation-related afferent activity, can produce graded and dynamic synchronization of sympathetic discharges. The degree of synchronization may influence the efficacy of transmission in a target chain of excitable cells. 5. The T-rhythm may be generated within the spinal cord because the intrathecal application of 5-hydroxytryptamine at the L1 level of the spinal cord of a rat spinalized at T10-T11 produces a T-like rhythm

  12. Circadian rhythms and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Michael J; Kennaway, David J

    2006-09-01

    There is a growing recognition that the circadian timing system, in particular recently discovered clock genes, plays a major role in a wide range of physiological systems. Microarray studies, for example, have shown that the expression of hundreds of genes changes many fold in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, liver heart and kidney. In this review, we discuss the role of circadian rhythmicity in the control of reproductive function in animals and humans. Circadian rhythms and clock genes appear to be involved in optimal reproductive performance, but there are sufficient redundancies in their function that many of the knockout mice produced do not show overt reproductive failure. Furthermore, important strain differences have emerged from the studies especially between the various Clock (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycle Kaput) mutant strains. Nevertheless, there is emerging evidence that the primary clock genes, Clock and Bmal1 (Brain and Muscle ARNT-like protein 1, also known as Mop3), strongly influence reproductive competency. The extent to which the circadian timing system affects human reproductive performance is not known, in part, because many of the appropriate studies have not been done. With the role of Clock and Bmal1 in fertility becoming clearer, it may be time to pursue the effect of polymorphisms in these genes in relation to the various types of infertility in humans.

  13. Technology-enabled examinations of cardiac rhythm, optic nerve, oral health, tympanic membrane, gait and coordination evaluated jointly with routine health screenings: an observational study at the 2015 Kumbh Mela in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Otkrist; Patalano II, Vincent; Mohit, Mrinal; Merchant, Rikin; Subramanian, S V

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Technology-enabled non-invasive diagnostic screening (TES) using smartphones and other point-of-care medical devices was evaluated in conjunction with conventional routine health screenings for the primary care screening of patients. Design Dental conditions, cardiac ECG arrhythmias, tympanic membrane disorders, blood oxygenation levels, optic nerve disorders and neurological fitness were evaluated using FDA-approved advanced smartphone powered technologies. Routine health screenings were also conducted. A novel remote web platform was developed to allow expert physicians to examine TES data and compare efficacy with routine health screenings. Setting The study was conducted at a primary care centre during the 2015 Kumbh Mela in Maharashtra, India. Participants 494 consenting 18–90 years old adults attending the 2015 Kumbh Mela were tested. Results TES and routine health screenings identified unique clinical conditions in distinct patients. Intraoral fluorescent imaging classified 63.3% of the population with dental caries and periodontal diseases. An association between poor oral health and cardiovascular illnesses was also identified. Tympanic membrane imaging detected eardrum abnormalities in 13.0% of the population, several with a medical history of hearing difficulties. Gait and coordination issues were discovered in eight subjects and one subject had arrhythmia. Cross-correlations were observed between low oxygen saturation and low body mass index (BMI) with smokers (p=0.0087 and p=0.0122, respectively), and high BMI was associated with elevated blood pressure in middle-aged subjects. Conclusions TES synergistically identified clinically significant abnormalities in several subjects who otherwise presented as normal in routine health screenings. Physicians validated TES findings and used routine health screening data and medical history responses for comprehensive diagnoses for at-risk patients. TES identified high prevalence of oral diseases

  14. Circadian Rhythm Shapes the Gut Microbiota Affecting Host Radiosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming; Xiao, Huiwen; Luo, Dan; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Shuyi; Zheng, Qisheng; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Dong, Jiali; Li, Hang; Wang, Haichao; Fan, Saijun

    2016-10-26

    Modern lifestyles, such as shift work, nocturnal social activities, and jet lag, disturb the circadian rhythm. The interaction between mammals and the co-evolved intestinal microbiota modulates host physiopathological processes. Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of modern management of malignancies; however, it was previously unknown whether circadian rhythm disorder impairs prognosis after radiotherapy. To investigate the effect of circadian rhythm on radiotherapy, C57BL/6 mice were housed in different dark/light cycles, and their intestinal bacterial compositions were compared using high throughput sequencing. The survival rate, body weight, and food intake of mice in diverse cohorts were measured following irradiation exposure. Finally, the enteric bacterial composition of irradiated mice that experienced different dark/light cycles was assessed using 16S RNA sequencing. Intriguingly, mice housed in aberrant light cycles harbored a reduction of observed intestinal bacterial species and shifts of gut bacterial composition compared with those of the mice kept under 12 h dark/12 h light cycles, resulting in a decrease of host radioresistance. Moreover, the alteration of enteric bacterial composition of mice in different groups was dissimilar. Our findings provide novel insights into the effects of biological clocks on the gut bacterial composition, and underpin that the circadian rhythm influences the prognosis of patients after radiotherapy in a preclinical setting.

  15. Sleep, circadian rhythm and body weight: parallel developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2016-11-01

    Circadian alignment is crucial for body-weight management, and for metabolic health. In this context, circadian alignment consists of alignment of sleep, meal patterns and physical activity. During puberty a significant reduction in sleep duration occurs, and pubertal status is inversely associated with sleep duration. A consistent inverse association between habitual sleep duration and body-weight development occurs, independent of possible confounders. Research on misalignment reveals that circadian misalignment affects sleep-architecture and subsequently disturbs glucose-insulin metabolism, substrate oxidation, leptin- and ghrelin concentrations, appetite, food reward, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis activity and gut-peptide concentrations enhancing positive energy balance and metabolic disturbance. Not only aligning meals and sleep in a circadian way is crucial, also regular physical activity during the day strongly promotes the stability and amplitude of circadian rhythm, and thus may serve as an instrument to restore poor circadian rhythms. Endogenicity may play a role in interaction of these environmental variables with a genetic predisposition. In conclusion, notwithstanding the separate favourable effects of sufficient daily physical activity, regular meal patterns, sufficient sleep duration and quality sleep on energy balance, the overall effect of the amplitude and stability of the circadian rhythm, perhaps including genetic predisposition, may integrate the separate effects in an additive way.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of pace spikes in the electrocardiogram to diagnose paced rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Hedvig Bille; Hansen, Marco Bo; Thorsberger, Mads

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how often cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) pacing systems generate visible pace spikes in the electrocardiogram (ECG). METHODS: In 46 patients treated with CRT pacing systems, we recorded ECGs during intrinsic rhythm, atrial pacing and ventricular pacing. ECGs were...

  17. Criteria for intraventricular conduction disturbances and pre-excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, J.L.; Robles de Medina, E.O.; Bernard, R.; Coumel, Ph.; Fisch, Ch.; Mazur, N.A.; Meijler, F.L.; Mogensen, L.; Moret, P.; Pisa, Z.; Rautaharju, P.M.; Surawicz, B.; Watanabe, Y.; Wellens, H.J.J.; WHO/ISFC Task Force ad hoc

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to standardize terminology and criteria for clinical electrocardiography, and as a follow-up of its work on definitions of terms related to cardiac rhythm, an Ad Hoc Working Group established by the World Health Organization and the International Society and Federation of Cardiology

  18. Temporal correlation between auditory neurons and the hippocampal theta rhythm induced by novel stimulations in awake guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Tamara; Velluti, Ricardo A; Pedemonte, Marisa

    2009-11-17

    The hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with the processing of sensory systems such as touch, smell, vision and hearing, as well as with motor activity, the modulation of autonomic processes such as cardiac rhythm, and learning and memory processes. The discovery of temporal correlation (phase locking) between the theta rhythm and both visual and auditory neuronal activity has led us to postulate the participation of such rhythm in the temporal processing of sensory information. In addition, changes in attention can modify both the theta rhythm and the auditory and visual sensory activity. The present report tested the hypothesis that the temporal correlation between auditory neuronal discharges in the inferior colliculus central nucleus (ICc) and the hippocampal theta rhythm could be enhanced by changes in sensory stimulation. We presented chronically implanted guinea pigs with auditory stimuli that varied over time, and recorded the auditory response during wakefulness. It was observed that the stimulation shifts were capable of producing the temporal phase correlations between the theta rhythm and the ICc unit firing, and they differed depending on the stimulus change performed. Such correlations disappeared approximately 6 s after the change presentation. Furthermore, the power of the hippocampal theta rhythm increased in half of the cases presented with a stimulation change. Based on these data, we propose that the degree of correlation between the unitary activity and the hippocampal theta rhythm varies with--and therefore may signal--stimulus novelty.

  19. The cardiovascular and cardiac actions of ecstasy and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenouda, S K; Carvalho, F; Varner, K J

    2010-08-01

    The recreational use of 3, 4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy or MDMA) has increased dramatically over the past thirty years due to its ability to increase stamina and produce feelings of emotional closeness and wellbeing. In spite of the popular perception that MDMA is a safe drug, there is a large literature documenting that the drug can produce significant neurotoxicity, especially in serotonergic and catecholaminergic systems. There are also experimental and clinical data which document that MDMA can alter cardiovascular function and produce cardiac toxicity, including rhythm disturbances, infarction and sudden death. This manuscript will review the literature documenting the cardiovascular responses elicited by MDMA in humans and experimental animals and will examine the underlying mechanisms mediating these responses. We will also review the available clinical, autopsy and experimental data linking MDMA with cardiac toxicity. Most available data indicate that oxidative stress plays an important role in the cardiotoxic actions of MDMA. Moreover, new data indicates that redox active metabolites of MDMA may play especially important roles in MDMA induced toxicity.

  20. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  1. [The influence of interfered circadian rhythm on pregnancy and neonatal rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Sheng, Wen-Jie; Guo, Yin-Hua; Tan, Yong

    2015-10-25

    The aim of this study was to observe the influence of interfered circadian rhythm on pregnancy of rats and growth of neonatal rats, and to explore the relationship between the interfered circadian rhythm and the changes of melatonin and progesterone. Continuous light was used to inhibit melatonin secretion and therefore the interfered circadian rhythm animal model was obtained. The influence of interfered circadian rhythm on delivery of pregnant rats was observed. Serum was collected from rats during different stages of pregnancy to measure the concentrations of melatonin and progesterone. In order to observe the embryo resorption rate, half of pregnant rats were randomly selected to undergo a laparotomy, and the remainder was used to observe delivery and assess the growth of neonatal rats after delivery. The results showed that the interfered circadian rhythm induced adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes, including an increase of embryo resorption rate and a decrease in the number of live births; inhibited the secretion of melatonin along with decreased serum progesterone level; prolonged the stage of labor, but not the duration of pregnancy; and disturbed the fetal intrauterine growth and the growth of neonatal rats. The results suggest that interfered circadian rhythm condition made by continuous light could make adverse effects on both pregnant rats and neonatal rats. The results of our study may provide a way to modulate pregnant women's circadian rhythm and a possibility of application of melatonin on pregnant women.

  2. Endocrine and metabolic diurnal rhythms in young adult men born small vs appropriate for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Charlotte; Saltbæk, Pernille N; Friedrichsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sleep disturbances and alterations of diurnal endocrine rhythms are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We previously showed that young men born small for gestational age (SGA) and with increased risk of T2D have elevated fat and decreased glucose oxidation rates d...

  3. Long-term fitness training improves the circadian rest-activity rhythm in healthy elderly males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Someren, E. J.; Lijzenga, C.; Mirmiran, M.; Swaab, D. F.

    1997-01-01

    In old age, the circadian timing system loses optimal functioning. This process is even accelerated in Alzheimer's disease. Because pharmacological treatment of day-night rhythm disturbances usually is not very effective and may have considerable side effects, nonpharmacological treatments deserve

  4. Circadian Rhythms in Diet-Induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    The biological clocks of the circadian timing system coordinate cellular and physiological processes and synchronizes these with daily cycles, feeding patterns also regulates circadian clocks. The clock genes and adipocytokines show circadian rhythmicity. Dysfunction of these genes are involved in the alteration of these adipokines during the development of obesity. Food availability promotes the stimuli associated with food intake which is a circadian oscillator outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Its circadian rhythm is arranged with the predictable daily mealtimes. Food anticipatory activity is mediated by a self-sustained circadian timing and its principal component is food entrained oscillator. However, the hypothalamus has a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance rather than food intake. Fatty acids or their metabolites can modulate neuronal activity by brain nutrient-sensing neurons involved in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. The timing of three-meal schedules indicates close association with the plasma levels of insulin and preceding food availability. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by altered timing of food intake and diet composition can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and to the development of metabolic disorders. Metabolic dysfunction is associated with circadian disturbances at both central and peripheral levels and, eventual disruption of circadian clock functioning can lead to obesity. While CLOCK expression levels are increased with high fat diet-induced obesity, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha increases the transcriptional level of brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) in obese subjects. Consequently, disruption of clock genes results in dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and obesity. Modifying the time of feeding alone can greatly affect body weight. Changes in the circadian clock are associated with temporal alterations in

  5. Timing of host feeding drives rhythms in parasite replication

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Kimberley F.; van der Veen, Daan R.; O’ Donnell, Aidan J.; Cumnock, Katherine; Schneider, David; Pain, Arnab; Subudhi, Amit; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Rund, Samuel S. C.; Savill, Nicholas J.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2018-01-01

    by the central, light-entrained circadian oscillator in the brain, determine the timing (phase) of parasite rhythms. Further investigation reveals that parasite rhythms correlate closely with blood glucose rhythms. In addition, we show that parasite rhythms

  6. Nonlinear dynamics in cardiac conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. T.; Smith, J. M.; Saxberg, B. E.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Electrical conduction in the heart shows many phenomena familiar from nonlinear dynamics. Among these phenomena are multiple basins of attraction, phase locking, and perhaps period-doubling bifurcations and chaos. We describe a simple cellular-automation model of electrical conduction which simulates normal conduction patterns in the heart as well as a wide range of disturbances of heart rhythm. In addition, we review the application of percolation theory to the analysis of the development of complex, self-sustaining conduction patterns.

  7. Electrocardiographic changes during induced therapeutic hypothermia in comatose survivors after cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pablo; Salinas; Esteban; Lopez-de-Sa; Laura; Pena-Conde; Ana; Viana-Tejedor; Juan; Ramon; Rey-Blas; Eduardo; Armada; Jose; Luis; Lopez-Sendon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety of therapeutic hypothermia(TH) concerning arrhythmias we analyzed serial electrocardiograms(ECG) during TH.METHODS: All patients recovered from a cardiac arrest with Glasgow < 9 at admission were treated with induced mild TH to 32-34℃. TH was obtained with cool fluid infusion or a specific intravascular device. Twelvelead ECG before,during,and after TH,as well as ECG telemetry data was recorded in all patients. From a total of 54 patients admitted with cardiac arrest during the study period,47 patients had the 3 ECG and telemetry data available. ECG analysis was blinded and performed with manual caliper by two independent cardiologists from blinded copies of original ECG,recorded at 25 mm/s and 10 mm/m V. Coronary care unit staff analyzed ECG telemetry for rhythm disturbances. Variables measured in ECG were rhythm,RR,PR,QT and corrected QT(QTc by Bazett formula,measured in lead v2) intervals,QRS duration,presence of Osborn’s J wave and U wave,as well as ST segment displacement and T wave amplitude in leads Ⅱ,v2 and v5.RESULTS: Heart rate went down an average of 19 bpm during hypothermia and increased again 16 bpm with rewarming(P < 0.0005,both). There was a nonsignificant prolongation of the PR interval during TH and a significant decrease with rewarming(P = 0.041). QRS duration significantly prolonged(P = 0.041) with TH and shortened back(P < 0.005) with rewarming. QTc interval presented a mean prolongation of 58 ms(P < 0.005) during TH and a significant shortening with rewarming of 22.2 ms(P = 0.017). Osborn or J wave was found in 21.3% of the patients. New arrhythmias occurred in 38.3% of the patients. Most frequent arrhythmia was non-sustained ventricular tachycardia(19.1%),followed by severe bradycardia or paced rhythm(10.6%),accelerated nodal rhythm(8.5%) and atrial fibrillation(6.4%). No life threatening arrhythmias(sustained ventricular tachycardia,polymorphic ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation) occurred

  8. Effects of N-acetylcysteine and imipramine in a model of acute rhythm disruption in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Luísa K; Trojan, Yasmine; Quiles, Caroline L; Benvenutti, Radharani; Melo, Gabriela; Levandovski, Rosa; Hidalgo, Maria Paz L; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2015-03-01

    Circadian rhythm disturbances are among the risk factors for depression, but specific animal models are lacking. This study aimed to characterize the effects of acute rhythm disruption in mice and investigate the effects of imipramine and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on rhythm disruption-induced changes. Mice were exposed to 12:12-hour followed by 10:10-hour light:dark cycles (LD); under the latter, mice were treated with saline, imipramine or NAC. Rhythms of rest/activity and temperature were assessed with actigraphs and iButtons, respectively. Hole-board and social preference tests were performed at the beginning of the experiment and again at the 8th 10:10 LD, when plasma corticosterone and IL-6 levels were also assessed. Actograms showed that the 10:10 LD schedule prevents the entrainment of temperature and activity rhythms for at least 13 cycles. Subsequent light regimen change activity and temperature amplitudes showed similar patterns of decline followed by recovery attempts. During the 10:10 LD schedule, activity and temperature amplitudes were significantly decreased (paired t test), an effect exacerbated by imipramine (ANOVA/SNK). The 10:10 LD schedule increased anxiety (paired t test), an effect prevented by NAC (30 mg/kg). This study identified mild but significant behavioral changes at specific time points after light regimen change. We suggest that if repeated overtime, these subtle changes may contribute to lasting behavioral disturbancess relevant to anxiety and mood disorders. Data suggest that imipramine may contribute to sustained rhythm disturbances, while NAC appears to prevent rhythm disruption-induced anxiety. Associations between sleep/circadian disturbances and the recurrence of depressive episodes underscore the relevance of potential drug-induced maintenance of disturbed rhythms.

  9. The ECG Vertigo in Diabetes and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers...

  10. Circadian rhythms in mitochondrial respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goede, Paul; Wefers, Jakob; Brombacher, Eline Constance; Schrauwen, P; Kalsbeek, A.

    2018-01-01

    Many physiological processes are regulated with a 24h periodicity to anticipate the environmental changes of day to nighttime and vice versa. These 24h regulations, commonly termed circadian rhythms, amongst others control the sleep-wake cycle, locomotor activity and preparation for food

  11. Rhythm Deficits in "Tone Deafness"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, Jessica M.; Nandy, Rachel K.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    It is commonly observed that "tone deaf" individuals are unable to hear the beat of a tune, yet deficits on simple timing tests have not been found. In this study, we investigated rhythm processing in nine individuals with congenital amusia ("tone deafness") and nine controls. Participants were presented with pairs of 5-note sequences, and were…

  12. ALCOHOL AND HEART RHYTHM DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Yusupova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse and particularly extension of alcohol consumption in alcohol diseas increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias development and aggravates existing arrhythmias. Patients do not always receive the necessary specific treatment due to lack of detection of the ethanol genesis of these arrhythmias. Management of patients with alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence, including its cardiac complications among other cardiac arrhythmias should use both antiarrhythmic and anti-alcohol drugs and antidepressants. Such issues as diagnosis and management of patients with alcohol-induced cardiac arrhythmias are presented.

  13. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this chapter, we will review the molecular identities and biophysical properties of these channels. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the possibility and prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:27261823

  14. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this article, we will review their molecular identities and biophysical properties. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electromagnetic Interference in Implantable Rhythm Devices - The Indian Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Implantable rhythm device (IRD is the generic name for the group of implantable devices used for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Devices in this category include cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and implantable loop recorders. Since these devices have complex microelectronic circuitry and use electromagnetic waves for communication, they are susceptible to interference from extraneous sources of electromagnetic radiation and magnetic energy. Electromagnetic interference (EMI is generally not a major problem outside of the hospital environment. The most important interactions occur when a patient is subjected to medical procedures such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, electrocautery and radiation therapy. Two articles in this issue of the journal discusses various aspects of EMI on IRD1,2 . Together these articles provide a good review of the various sources of EMI and their interaction with IRD for the treating physician.

  16. Targeting sodium channels in cardiac arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remme, Carol Ann; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for proper electrical conduction in the heart. During acquired pathological conditions and inherited sodium channelopathies, altered sodium channel function causes conduction disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias. Although the clinical,

  17. Consequences of delirium after cardiac operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogen-Koster, S.; Hensens, A.G.; Schuurmans, M.J.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background Delirium is a transient mental syndrome characterized by disturbances in consciousness, cognition, and perception. The risk that delirium will develop is increased in patients who undergo cardiac operations, especially the elderly. Generally, delirium during hospital admission is

  18. Crosslinguistic Application of English-Centric Rhythm Descriptors in Motor Speech Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Julie M.; Utianski, Rene; Lansford, Kaitlin

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhythmic disturbances are a hallmark of motor speech disorders, in which the motor control deficits interfere with the outward flow of speech and by extension speech understanding. As the functions of rhythm are language-specific, breakdowns in rhythm should have language-specific consequences for communication. Objective The goals of this paper are to (i) provide a review of the cognitive- linguistic role of rhythm in speech perception in a general sense and crosslinguistically; (ii) present new results of lexical segmentation challenges posed by different types of dysarthria in American English, and (iii) offer a framework for crosslinguistic considerations for speech rhythm disturbances in the diagnosis and treatment of communication disorders associated with motor speech disorders. Summary This review presents theoretical and empirical reasons for considering speech rhythm as a critical component of communication deficits in motor speech disorders, and addresses the need for crosslinguistic research to explore language-universal versus language-specific aspects of motor speech disorders. PMID:24157596

  19. Human biological rhythm in traditional Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxing Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has a comprehensive and thorough understanding of biological rhythm. Biological rhythm is an inherent connotation of “harmony between human and nature”, one of the thoughts in TCM. TCM discusses emphatically circadian rhythm, syzygial rhythm and seasonal rhythm, and particularly circadian and seasonal rhythms. Theories of Yin Yang and Five Elements are the principles and methods, with which TCM understands biological rhythms. Based on theories in TCM, biological rhythm in essence is a continuous variation of the human body state synchronized with natural rhythms, and theories of Yin Yang and Five Elements are both language tools to describe this continuous variation and theoretical tools for its investigation and application. The understandings of biological rhythm in TCM can be applied to etiology, health care, disease control and treatment. Many understandings in TCM have been confirmed by modern research and clinical reports, but there are still some pending issues. TCM is distinguished for its holistic viewpoint on biological rhythms.

  20. An analysis of heart rhythm dynamics using a three-coupled oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gois, Sandra R.F.S.M.; Savi, Marcelo A.

    2009-01-01

    Rhythmic phenomena represent one of the most striking manifestations of the dynamic behavior in biological systems. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for biological rhythms is crucial for the comprehension of the dynamics of life. Natural rhythms could be either regular or irregular over time and space. Each kind of dynamical behavior may be related to both normal and pathological physiological functioning. The cardiac conducting system can be treated as a network of self-excitatory elements and, since these elements exhibit oscillatory behavior, they can be modeled as nonlinear oscillators. This paper proposes a mathematical model to describe heart rhythms considering three modified Van der Pol oscillators connected with time delay couplings. Therefore, the heart dynamics is represented by a system of differential difference equations. Numerical simulations are carried out presenting qualitative agreement with the general heart rhythm behavior. Normal and pathological rhythms represented by the ECG signals are reproduced. Pathological rhythms are generated by either the coupling alterations that represents communications aspects in the heart electric system or forcing excitation representing external pacemaker excitation.

  1. Ischemic stroke destabilizes circadian rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin Jimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central circadian pacemaker is a remarkably robust regulator of daily rhythmic variations of cardiovascular, endocrine, and neural physiology. Environmental lighting conditions are powerful modulators of circadian rhythms, but regulation of circadian rhythms by disease states is less clear. Here, we examine the effect of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythms in rats using high-resolution pineal microdialysis. Methods Rats were housed in LD 12:12 h conditions and monitored by pineal microdialysis to determine baseline melatonin timing profiles. After demonstration that the circadian expression of melatonin was at steady state, rats were subjected to experimental stroke using two-hour intralumenal filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The animals were returned to their cages, and melatonin monitoring was resumed. The timing of onset, offset, and duration of melatonin secretion were calculated before and after stroke to determine changes in circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion. At the end of the monitoring period, brains were analyzed to determine infarct volume. Results Rats demonstrated immediate shifts in melatonin timing after stroke. We observed a broad range of perturbations in melatonin timing in subsequent days, with rats exhibiting onset/offset patterns which included: advance/advance, advance/delay, delay/advance, and delay/delay. Melatonin rhythms displayed prolonged instability several days after stroke, with a majority of rats showing a day-to-day alternation between advance and delay in melatonin onset and duration. Duration of melatonin secretion changed in response to stroke, and this change was strongly determined by the shift in melatonin onset time. There was no correlation between infarct size and the direction or amplitude of melatonin phase shifting. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating

  2. Sleep disturbance in older ICU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterniczuk R

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Roxanne Sterniczuk,1–3 Benjamin Rusak,1,2 Kenneth Rockwood31Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 2Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS, 3Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS, CanadaAbstract: Maintaining a stable and adequate sleeping pattern is associated with good health and disease prevention. As a restorative process, sleep is important for supporting immune function and aiding the body in healing and recovery. Aging is associated with characteristic changes to sleep quantity and quality, which make it more difficult to adjust sleep–wake rhythms to changing environmental conditions. Sleep disturbance and abnormal sleep–wake cycles are commonly reported in seriously ill older patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. A combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors appears to contribute to these disruptions. Little is known regarding the effect that sleep disturbance has on health status in the oldest of old (80+, a group, who with diminishing physiological reserve and increasing prevalence of frailty, is at a greater risk of adverse health outcomes, such as cognitive decline and mortality. Here we review how sleep is altered in the ICU, with particular attention to older patients, especially those aged ≥80 years. Further work is required to understand what impact sleep disturbance has on frailty levels and poor outcomes in older critically ill patients.Keywords: intensive care unit, sleep–wake rhythm, aging, frailty

  3. Temporal interactions between cortical rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita K Roopun

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple local neuronal circuits support different, discrete frequencies of network rhythm in neocortex. Relationships between different frequencies correspond to mechanisms designed to minimise interference, couple activity via stable phase interactions, and control the amplitude of one frequency relative to the phase of another. These mechanisms are proposed to form a framework for spectral information processing. Individual local circuits can also transform their frequency through changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and interactions with other oscillating microcircuits. Here we discuss a frequency transformation in which activity in two coactive local circuits may combine sequentially to generate a third frequency whose period is the concatenation sum of the original two. With such an interaction, the intrinsic periodicity in each component local circuit is preserved – alternate, single periods of each original rhythm form one period of a new frequency - suggesting a robust mechanism for combining information processed on multiple concurrent spatiotemporal scales.

  4. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  5. Perioperative Rosuvastatin in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Jayaram, Raja; Jiang, Lixin; Emberson, Jonathan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Qi; Du, Juan; Guarguagli, Silvia; Hill, Michael; Chen, Zhengming; Collins, Rory; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-05-05

    Complications after cardiac surgery are common and lead to substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Meta-analyses of small randomized trials have suggested that perioperative statin therapy can prevent some of these complications. We randomly assigned 1922 patients in sinus rhythm who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery to receive perioperative rosuvastatin (at a dose of 20 mg daily) or placebo. The primary outcomes were postoperative atrial fibrillation within 5 days after surgery, as assessed by Holter electrocardiographic monitoring, and myocardial injury within 120 hours after surgery, as assessed by serial measurements of the cardiac troponin I concentration. Secondary outcomes included major in-hospital adverse events, duration of stay in the hospital and intensive care unit, left ventricular and renal function, and blood biomarkers. The concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein after surgery were lower in patients assigned to rosuvastatin than in those assigned to placebo (PSTICS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01573143.).

  6. Serial binary interval ratios improve rhythm reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Westanmo, Anders; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Junhao

    2013-01-01

    Musical rhythm perception is a natural human ability that involves complex cognitive processes. Rhythm refers to the organization of events in time, and musical rhythms have an underlying hierarchical metrical structure. The metrical structure induces the feeling of a beat and the extent to which a rhythm induces the feeling of a beat is referred to as its metrical strength. Binary ratios are the most frequent interval ratio in musical rhythms. Rhythms with hierarchical binary ratios are better discriminated and reproduced than rhythms with hierarchical non-binary ratios. However, it remains unclear whether a superiority of serial binary over non-binary ratios in rhythm perception and reproduction exists. In addition, how different types of serial ratios influence the metrical strength of rhythms remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated serial binary vs. non-binary ratios in a reproduction task. Rhythms formed with exclusively binary (1:2:4:8), non-binary integer (1:3:5:6), and non-integer (1:2.3:5.3:6.4) ratios were examined within a constant meter. The results showed that the 1:2:4:8 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 and 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm types, and the 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 rhythm type. Further analyses showed that reproduction performance was better predicted by the distribution pattern of event occurrences within an inter-beat interval, than by the coincidence of events with beats, or the magnitude and complexity of interval ratios. Whereas rhythm theories and empirical data emphasize the role of the coincidence of events with beats in determining metrical strength and predicting rhythm performance, the present results suggest that rhythm processing may be better understood when the distribution pattern of event occurrences is taken into account. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlining musical rhythm perception.

  7. Serial binary interval ratios improve rhythm reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang eWu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Musical rhythm perception is a natural human ability that involves complex cognitive processes. Rhythm refers to the organization of events in time, and musical rhythms have an underlying hierarchical metrical structure. The metrical structure induces the feeling of a beat and the extent to which a rhythm induces the feeling of a beat is referred to as its metrical strength. Binary ratios are the most frequent interval ratio in musical rhythms. Rhythms with hierarchical binary ratios are better discriminated and reproduced than rhythms with hierarchical non-binary ratios. However, it remains unclear whether a superiority of serial binary over non-binary ratios in rhythm perception and reproduction exists. In addition, how different types of serial ratios influence the metrical strength of rhythms remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated serial binary vs. non-binary ratios in a reproduction task. Rhythms formed with exclusively binary (1:2:4:8, non-binary integer (1:3:5:6, and non-integer (1:2.3:5.3:6.4 ratios were examined within a constant meter. The results showed that the 1:2:4:8 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 and 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm types, and the 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 rhythm type. Further analyses showed that reproduction performance was better predicted by the distribution pattern of event occurrences within an inter-beat interval, than by the coincidence of events with beats, or the magnitude and complexity of interval ratios. Whereas rhythm theories and empirical data emphasize the role of the coincidence of events with beats in determining metrical strength and predicting rhythm performance, the present results suggest that rhythm processing may be better understood when the distribution pattern of event occurrences is taken into account. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlining musical rhythm perception.

  8. Modifying risks to improve outcome in cardiac surgery: An anesthesiologist's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenging times are here for cardiac surgical and anesthesia team. The interventional cardiologist seem to have closed the flow of 'good cases' coming up for any of the surgery,; successful percutaneous interventions seem to be offering reasonable results in these patients, who therefore do not knock on the doors of the surgeons any more . It is a common experience among the cardiac anesthesiologists and surgeons that the type of the cases that come by now are high risk. That may be presence of comorbidities, ongoing medical therapies, unstable angina, uncontrolled heart failure and rhythm disturbances; and in patients with ischemic heart disease, the target coronaries are far from ideal. Several activities such as institution of preoperative supportive circulatory, ventilatory, and systemic disease control maneuvers seem to have helped improving the outcome of these 'high risk ' patients. This review attempts to look at various interventions and the resulting improvement in outcomes. Several changes have happened in the realm of cardiac surgery and several more are en route. At times, for want of evidence, maximal optimization may not take place and the patient may encounter unfavorable outcomes.. This review is an attempt to bring the focus of the members of the cardiac surgical team on the value of preoperative optimization of risks to improve the outcome. The cardiac surgical patients may broadly be divided into adults undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, valve surgery and pediatric patients undergoing repair/ palliation of congenital heart ailments. Optimization of risks appear to be different in each genre of patients. This review also brings less often discussed issues such as anemia, nutritional issues and endocrine problems. The review is an attempt to data on ameliorating modifiable risk factors and altering non modifiable ones.

  9. [Experimental therapy of cardiac remodeling with quercetin-containing drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, M A; Pavlyuchenko, V B; Tumanovskaya, L V; Dosenko, V E; Moybenko, A A

    2013-01-01

    It was shown that continuous beta-adrenergic hyperstimulation resulted in cardiac function disturbances and fibrosis of cardiac tissue. Treatment with quercetin-containing drugs, particularly, water-soluble corvitin and tableted quertin exerted favourable effect on cardiac hemodynamics, normalized systolic and diastolic function in cardiac remodeling, induced by sustained beta-adrenergic stimulation. It was estimated that conducted experimental therapy limited cardiac fibrosis area almost three-fold, that could be associated with first and foremost improved cardiac distensibility, characteristics of diastolic and also pump function in cardiac remodeling.

  10. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  12. Acquisition of speech rhythm in first language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanskaya, Leona; Ordin, Mikhail

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of English rhythm in speech produced by children and adults revealed that speech rhythm becomes increasingly more stress-timed as language acquisition progresses. Children reach the adult-like target by 11 to 12 years. The employed speech elicitation paradigm ensured that the sentences produced by adults and children at different ages were comparable in terms of lexical content, segmental composition, and phonotactic complexity. Detected differences between child and adult rhythm and between rhythm in child speech at various ages cannot be attributed to acquisition of phonotactic language features or vocabulary, and indicate the development of language-specific phonetic timing in the course of acquisition.

  13. Factors influencing circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, R C; Bozigian, H P; Davies, M H; Merrick, B A; Park, K S; McMillan, D A

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of changes in lighting schedules and food consumption on circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice. Under a normal lighting schedule (light: 06.00-18.00 h), male mice exhibited a circadian rhythm in acetaminophen lethality (peak: 18.00 h; nadir: 06.00, 10.00 h) and an inverse rhythm in hepatic glutathione concentrations (peak: 06.00, 10.00 h; nadir: 18.00 h). Under a reversed lighting schedule (light: 18.00-06.00 h) the glutathione rhythm was reversed and the rhythm in acetaminophen lethality was altered showing greater sensitivity to the drug. Under continuous light, there was a shift in the acetaminophen lethality and the hepatic glutathione rhythms. Under continuous dark, both rhythms were abolished. Under a normal lighting regimen, hepatic glutathione levels were closely correlated with food consumption; i.e., both were increased during the dark phase and decreased during the light phase. Fasting the mice for 12 h abolished the rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels; moreover, the lethality was increased and the hepatic glutathione levels were decreased. These experiments show that both lighting schedules and feeding can alter the circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice.

  14. Antithrombotic Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Associated with Valvular Heart Disease: Executive Summary of a Joint Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, Endorsed by the ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrhythmia Society of Southern Africa (CASSA), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), South African Heart (SA Heart) Association and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Collet, Jean Philippe; de Caterina, Raffaele; Fauchier, Laurent; Lane, Deirdre A; Larsen, Torben B; Marin, Francisco; Morais, Joao; Narasimhan, Calambur; Olshansky, Brian; Pierard, Luc; Potpara, Tatjana; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sliwa, Karen; Varela, Gonzalo; Vilahur, Gemma; Weiss, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rocca, Bianca

    2017-12-01

    Management strategies for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in association with valvular heart disease (VHD) have been less informed by randomized trials, which have largely focused on ‘non-valvular AF’ patients. Thromboembolic risk also varies according to valve lesion and may also be associated with CHA2DS2-VASc score risk factor components, rather than only the valve disease being causal. Given the need to provide expert recommendations for professionals participating in the care of patients presenting with AF and associated VHD, a task force was convened by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Working Group (WG) on Thrombosis, with representation from the ESC WG on Valvular Heart Disease, Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), South African Heart (SA Heart) Association and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE) with the remit to comprehensively review the published evidence, and to produce a consensus document on the management of patients with AF and associated VHD, with up-to-date consensus statements for clinical practice for different forms of VHD, based on the principles of evidence-based medicine. This is an executive summary of a consensus document which proposes that the term ‘valvular AF’ is outdated and given that any definition ultimately relates to the evaluated practical use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) type, we propose a functional EHRA (Evaluated Heartvalves, Rheumatic or Artificial) categorization in relation to the type of OAC use in patients with AF, as follows: (1) EHRA (Evaluated Heartvalves, Rheumatic or Artificial) type 1 VHD, which refers to AF patients with ‘VHD needing therapy with a vitamin K antagonist (VKA)’ and (2) EHRA (Evaluated Heartvalves, Rheumatic or Artificial) type 2 VHD, which refers to AF patients with ‘VHD needing therapy with a VKA or a non-VKA oral anticoagulant also taking

  15. Associations of sleep disturbance with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvolby, A.

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly associated with disordered or disturbed sleep. The relationships of ADHD with sleep problems, psychiatric comorbidities and medications are complex and multidirectional. Evidence from published studies comparing sleep in individuals......, difficulty with morning awakenings, sleep onset difficulties, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness in subjective studies. ADHD is also frequently coincident with sleep disorders (obstructive sleep apnea, peripheral limb movement disorder, restless legs syndrome and circadian......-rhythm sleep disorders). Psychostimulant medications are associated with disrupted or disturbed sleep, but also 'paradoxically' calm some patients with ADHD for sleep by alleviating their symptoms. Long-acting formulations may have insufficient duration of action, leading to symptom rebound at bedtime. Current...

  16. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both...... supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia......, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society...

  17. The ECG vertigo in diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  18. Physiological basis for human autonomic rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressures, heart periods, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity have been studied intensively in recent years to explore otherwise obscure human neurophysiological mechanisms. The best-studied rhythms are those occurring at breathing frequencies. Published evidence indicates that respiratory fluctuations of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and electrocardiographic R-R intervals result primarily from the action of a central 'gate' that opens during expiration and closes during inspiration. Parallel respiratory fluctuations of arterial pressures and R-R intervals are thought to be secondary to arterial baroreflex physiology: changes in systolic pressure provoke changes in the R-R interval. However, growing evidence suggests that these parallel oscillations result from the influence of respiration on sympathetic and vagal-cardiac motoneurones rather than from baroreflex physiology. There is a rapidly growing literature on the use of mathematical models of low- and high-frequency (respiratory) R-R interval fluctuations in characterizing instantaneous 'sympathovagal balance'. The case for this approach is based primarily on measurements made with patients in upright tilt. However, the strong linear relation between such measures as the ratio of low- to high-frequency R-R interval oscillations and the angle of the tilt reflects exclusively the reductions of the vagal (high-frequency) component. As the sympathetic component does not change in tilt, the low- to high-frequency R-R interval ratio provides no proof that sympathetic activity increases. Moreover, the validity of extrapolating from measurements performed during upright tilt to measurements during supine rest has not been established. Nonetheless, it is clear that measures of heart rate variability provide important prognostic information in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is not known whether reduced heart rate variability is merely a marker for the severity of disease or a

  19. Sleep- and circadian rhythm-associated pathways as therapeutic targets in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellivier, Frank; Geoffroy, Pierre-Alexis; Etain, Bruno; Scott, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms are observed in individuals with bipolar disorders (BD), both during acute mood episodes and remission. Such abnormalities may relate to dysfunction of the molecular circadian clock and could offer a target for new drugs. This review focuses on clinical, actigraphic, biochemical and genetic biomarkers of BDs, as well as animal and cellular models, and highlights that sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances are closely linked to the susceptibility to BDs and vulnerability to mood relapses. As lithium is likely to act as a synchronizer and stabilizer of circadian rhythms, we will review pharmacogenetic studies testing circadian gene polymorphisms and prophylactic response to lithium. Interventions such as sleep deprivation, light therapy and psychological therapies may also target sleep and circadian disruptions in BDs efficiently for treatment and prevention of bipolar depression. We suggest that future research should clarify the associations between sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances and alterations of the molecular clock in order to identify critical targets within the circadian pathway. The investigation of such targets using human cellular models or animal models combined with 'omics' approaches are crucial steps for new drug development.

  20. Analysis of Handwriting based on Rhythm Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazuya; Uchida, Masafumi; Nozawa, Akio

    Humanity fluctuation was reported in some fields. In handwriting process, fluctuation appears on handwriting-velocity. In this report, we focused attention on human rhythm perception and analyzed fluctuation in handwriting process. As a result, 1/f noise related to rhythm perception and features may caused by Kahneman's capacity model were measured on handwriting process.

  1. Development of cortisol circadian rhythm in infancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerth, C. de; Zijl, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cortisol is the final product of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. It is secreted in a pulsatile fashion that displays a circadian rhythm. Infants are born without a circadian rhythm in cortisol and they acquire it during their first year of life. Studies do not

  2. Sleep quality and circadian rhythm disruption in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Toft, Palle

    2017-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythm are reported to be severely abnormal in critically ill patients. Disturbed sleep can lead to the development of delirium and, as a result, can be associated with prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and increased mortality. The standard criterion method...... aiming to improve sleep quality and circadian rhythm in the ICU. The results of these studies were inconclusive due to using the sleep assessment methods other than PSG or the absence of a reliable sleep scoring tool for the analysis of the PSG findings in this patient population. Development of a valid......, medication, as well as the critical illness itself have been reported as important sleep disturbing factors. Secretion of sleep hormone, melatonin, expressing circadian rhythmicity was found abolished or phase delayed in critically ill patients. Various interventions have been tested in several studies...

  3. Measurement of the occipital alpha rhythm and temporal tau rhythm by using magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. E.; Gohel, Bakul; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; An, Kyung Min [Center for Biosignals, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science(KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Developing Magnetoencephalography (MEG) based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) facilitates to observe the human brain functions in non-invasively and high temporal and high spatial resolution. By using this MEG, we studied alpha rhythm (8-13 Hz) that is one of the most predominant spontaneous rhythm in human brain. The 8–13 Hz rhythm is observed in several sensory region in the brain. In visual related region of occipital, we call to alpha rhythm, and auditory related region of temporal call to tau rhythm, sensorimotor related region of parietal call to mu rhythm. These rhythms are decreased in task related region and increased in task irrelevant regions. This means that these rhythms play a pivotal role of inhibition in task irrelevant region. It may be helpful to attention to the task. In several literature about the alpha-band inhibition in multi-sensory modality experiment, they observed this effect in the occipital and somatosensory region. In this study, we hypothesized that we can also observe the alpha-band inhibition in the auditory cortex, mediated by the tau rhythm. Before that, we first investigated the existence of the alpha and tau rhythm in occipital and temporal region, respectively. To see these rhythms, we applied the visual and auditory stimulation, in turns, suppressed in task relevant regions, respectively.

  4. Measurement of the occipital alpha rhythm and temporal tau rhythm by using magnetoencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. E.; Gohel, Bakul; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; An, Kyung Min

    2015-01-01

    Developing Magnetoencephalography (MEG) based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) facilitates to observe the human brain functions in non-invasively and high temporal and high spatial resolution. By using this MEG, we studied alpha rhythm (8-13 Hz) that is one of the most predominant spontaneous rhythm in human brain. The 8–13 Hz rhythm is observed in several sensory region in the brain. In visual related region of occipital, we call to alpha rhythm, and auditory related region of temporal call to tau rhythm, sensorimotor related region of parietal call to mu rhythm. These rhythms are decreased in task related region and increased in task irrelevant regions. This means that these rhythms play a pivotal role of inhibition in task irrelevant region. It may be helpful to attention to the task. In several literature about the alpha-band inhibition in multi-sensory modality experiment, they observed this effect in the occipital and somatosensory region. In this study, we hypothesized that we can also observe the alpha-band inhibition in the auditory cortex, mediated by the tau rhythm. Before that, we first investigated the existence of the alpha and tau rhythm in occipital and temporal region, respectively. To see these rhythms, we applied the visual and auditory stimulation, in turns, suppressed in task relevant regions, respectively

  5. Circadian melatonin concentration rhythm is lost in pregnant women with altered blood pressure rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquilli, A L; Turi, A; Giannubilo, S R; Garbati, E

    2004-03-01

    We assessed the correlation between the rhythm of melatonin concentration and circadian blood pressure patterns in normal and hypertensive pregnancy. Ambulatory 24-h blood pressure and blood samples every 4 h were monitored in 16 primigravidae who had shown an abnormal circadian blood pressure pattern (eight pre-eclamptic and eight normotensive) in pregnancy and 6-12 months after pregnancy. The circadian rhythm was analyzed by chronobiological measures. Eight normotensive women with maintained blood pressure rhythm served as controls. During pregnancy, melatonin concentration was significantly higher in pre-eclamptic than in normotensive women (pre-eclampsia, 29.4 +/- 1.9 pg/ml, normotensin, altered rhythm, 15.6 +/- 2.1; controls, 22.7 +/- 1.8; p lost in all pregnant women with loss of blood pressure rhythm. After pregnancy, normotensive women showed a reappearance of both melatonin and blood pressure rhythm, whereas pre-eclamptic women showed a reappearance of blood pressure but not melatonin rhythm. The loss of blood pressure rhythm in pregnancy is consistent with the loss of melatonin concentration rhythm. In pre-eclamptic women, the normalization of blood pressure rhythm, while melatonin rhythm remained altered, suggests a temporal or causal priority of circadian concentration of melatonin in the determination of blood pressure trend.

  6. Abnormality of circadian rhythm of serum melatonin and other biochemical parameters in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Fatima, Ghizal; Das, Siddhartha Kumar; Verma, Nar Singh

    2011-04-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a complex chronic condition causing widespread pain and variety of other symptoms. It produces pain in the soft tissues located around joints throughout the body. FMS has unknown etiology and its pathophysiology is not fully understood. However, abnormality in circadian rhythm of hormonal profiles and cytokines has been observed in this disorder. Moreover, there are reports of deficiency of serotonin, melatonin, cortisol and cytokines in FMS patients, which are fully regulated by circadian rhythm. Melatonin, the primary hormone of the pineal gland regulates the body's circadian rhythm and normally its levels begin to rise in the mid-to-late evening, remain high for most of the night, and then decrease in the early morning. FMS patients have lower melatonin secretion during the hours of darkness than the healthy subjects. This may contribute to impaired sleep at night, fatigue during the day and changed pain perception. Studies have shown blunting of normal diurnal cortisol rhythm, with elevated evening serum cortisol level in patients with FMS. Thus, due to perturbed level of cortisol secretion several symptoms of FMS may occur. Moreover, disturbed cytokine levels have also been reported in FMS patients. Therefore, circadian rhythm can be an important factor in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of FMS. This article explores the circadian pattern of abnormalities in FMS patients, as this may help in better understanding the role of variation in symptoms of FMS and its possible relationship with circadian variations of melatonin, cortisol, cytokines and serotonin levels.

  7. The impact of non-dipper circadian rhythm of blood pressure on left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xiajing; Mou, Shan; Zhang, Weiming; Zhang, Minfang; Gu, Leyi; Yan, Yucheng; Ying, Hua; Hu, Chunhua; Qian, Jiaqi; Ni, Zhaohui

    2017-04-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between non-dipper circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods and results All 257 patients with stage 1 to 5 CKD were enrolled in the study and classified into a CKD1-3 group and a CKD4-5 group according to renal function. The parameters and circadian rhythm of BP were measured by a GE Marquette Tonoport V Eng dynamic sphygmomanometer, and cardiac structure was examined by echocardiography. The incidence of abnormal circadian BP rhythm (non-dipper rhythm) was quite high (75.4% in all enrolled patients and 71.3% in the patients with normal BP levels) in CKD patients and increased with the deterioration of renal function. Changes of cardiac structure such as LVH in patients with non-dipper BP were more distinct than in patients with dipper BP. The development of left ventricular mass index (LVMI) correlated positively with the incidence of non-dipper BP rhythm. Multiple regression analysis showed that 24-h systolic BP (β = 0.417, P circadian rhythm of blood pressure was quite high in CKD patients and increased with the deterioration of renal function. Non-dipper circadian rhythm of BP is closely related with LVMI.

  8. Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    Prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias and their reversal after trach- ostomy . An. J. Ned., 63, 1977, 348-358. 69. Richardson, G. S., Carsk..on, M. A., Flagg, W...balanced distribution of sleep stages Avid the hoped for effect of refreshing sleep is disappointed. But snort periods Of 3leep Of about C haours can lead

  9. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  10. Multimodality assessment of cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome patients in clinical remission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczeklik, W.; Miszalski-Jamka, T.; Mastalerz, L.; Sokolowska, B.; Dropinski, J.; Musial, J.; Banys, R.; Hor, K.N.; Mazur, W.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is not uncommon, but its frequency varies widely and may depend on the activity of the disease. Therefore, the cardiac involvement in CSS patients in clinical remission was assessed in the present study. In 20 CSS patients in remission and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls, an electrocardiogram (ECG) stress test, echocardiography, and 24-h ECG Holter monitoring were performed, together with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). Cardiac involvement was present in 90% (18/20) of CSS patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was on average lower in the CSS group than in controls (P<0.05), with 7 patients showing systolic heart failure (LVEF <50%). cMRI changes included late gadolinium enhancement lesions in the LV in 89% of patients (17/19), present in all layers of the myocardium. Signs of ongoing inflammation (early gadolinium enhancement) and edema (T2-weighted imaging) were present in 6/19 patients. Holter monitoring revealed both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias more frequently in CSS patients when compared with controls (P<0.05). Absolute eosinophil count before the initiation of treatment was higher in rhythm disturbances (P<0.05), and inversely correlated with LV systolic function (rho -0.65). Heart involvement in CSS patients who are in clinical remission is very common. It is characterized not only by fibrosis, but also by an active inflammatory process. The latter finding might influence therapeutic decisions in CSS patients in full clinical remission. (author)

  11. Multimodality assessment of cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome patients in clinical remission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczeklik, W; Miszalski-Jamka, T; Mastalerz, L; Sokolowska, B; Dropinski, J; Musial, J [Medical Coll., Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland); Banys, R [John Paul II Hospital, Krakow (Poland); Hor, K N [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, OH (United States); Mazur, W [Heart and Vascular Center at The Christ Hospitals, OH (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is not uncommon, but its frequency varies widely and may depend on the activity of the disease. Therefore, the cardiac involvement in CSS patients in clinical remission was assessed in the present study. In 20 CSS patients in remission and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls, an electrocardiogram (ECG) stress test, echocardiography, and 24-h ECG Holter monitoring were performed, together with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). Cardiac involvement was present in 90% (18/20) of CSS patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was on average lower in the CSS group than in controls (P<0.05), with 7 patients showing systolic heart failure (LVEF <50%). cMRI changes included late gadolinium enhancement lesions in the LV in 89% of patients (17/19), present in all layers of the myocardium. Signs of ongoing inflammation (early gadolinium enhancement) and edema (T2-weighted imaging) were present in 6/19 patients. Holter monitoring revealed both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias more frequently in CSS patients when compared with controls (P<0.05). Absolute eosinophil count before the initiation of treatment was higher in rhythm disturbances (P<0.05), and inversely correlated with LV systolic function (rho -0.65). Heart involvement in CSS patients who are in clinical remission is very common. It is characterized not only by fibrosis, but also by an active inflammatory process. The latter finding might influence therapeutic decisions in CSS patients in full clinical remission. (author)

  12. Circadian rhythm in QT interval is preserved in mice deficient of potassium channel interacting protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Lisa A; Lubberding, Anniek; Larsen, Anders Peter; Thomsen, Morten B

    2017-01-01

    Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is suggested to be responsible for the circadian rhythm in repolarization duration, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. We investigated the hypothesis that there is no circadian rhythm in QT interval in the absence of KChIP2. Implanted telemetric devices recorded electrocardiogram continuously for 5 days in conscious wild-type mice (WT, n = 9) and KChIP2 -/- mice (n = 9) in light:dark periods and in complete darkness. QT intervals were determined from all RR intervals and corrected for heart rate (QT 100 = QT/(RR/100) 1/2 ). Moreover, QT intervals were determined from complexes within the RR range of mean-RR ± 1% in the individual mouse (QT mean-RR ). We find that RR intervals are 125 ± 5 ms in WT and 123 ± 4 ms in KChIP2 -/- (p = 0.81), and QT intervals are 52 ± 1 and 52 ± 1 ms, respectively(p = 0.89). No ventricular arrhythmias or sudden cardiac deaths were observed. We find similar diurnal (light:dark) and circadian (darkness) rhythms of RR intervals in WT and KChIP2 -/- mice. Circadian rhythms in QT 100 intervals are present in both groups, but at physiological small amplitudes: 1.6 ± 0.2 and 1.0 ± 0.3 ms in WT and KChIP2 -/- , respectively (p = 0.15). A diurnal rhythm in QT 100 intervals was only found in WT mice. QT mean-RR intervals display clear diurnal and circadian rhythms in both WT and KChIP2 -/- . The amplitude of the circadian rhythm in QT mean-RR is 4.0 ± 0.3 and 3.1 ± 0.5 ms in WT and KChIP2 -/- , respectively (p = 0.16). In conclusion, KChIP2 expression does not appear to underlie the circadian rhythm in repolarization duration.

  13. An update on insertable cardiac monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming J; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krieger, Derk W

    2015-01-01

    Continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring has undergone compelling progress over the past decades. Cardiac monitoring has emerged from 12-lead electrocardiograms being performed at the discretion of the treating physician to in-hospital telemetry, Holter monitoring, prolonged external event monitoring...... turning point in the field of arrhythmia management. However, their role in the detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation after cryptogenic strokes has yet to evolve. This will be the main focus of this review. Issues surrounding patient selection, clinical relevance and determination of cost......-effectiveness for prolonged cardiac monitoring require further studies. Furthermore, insertable cardiac monitoring has not only the potential to augment diagnostic capabilities but also to improve the management of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  14. Optimizing survival outcomes for adult patients with nontraumatic cardiac arrest [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna; Zaurova, Milana

    2016-10-22

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  15. Are sleep disturbances preclinical markers of Parkinson’s disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brito dos Santos, Altair; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Barreto, George

    2015-01-01

    REM sleep behaviour and currently several other disturbances have gained importance as potential markers, such as excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs syndrome and new evidence also points to changes in circadian rhythms. Here we present a brief review of the major evidence indicating......Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by motor symptoms and signs, and non-motor abnormalities such as olfactory dysfunction, pain, sleep disorders and cognitive impairment. Amongst these alterations, sleep disturbances play an important role in the pathology......, but presence of disturbed sleep is not currently considered in diagnosis. However, sleeping problems may precede by many years the classic motor abnormalities of PD and should be clinically evaluated as a potential marker before disease onset. The first disturbance reported with this potential was the disorder...

  16. Cardiac Arrhythmia: Atrial Flutter in a Newborn. Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Klimenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article gives case report of rare in neonatal period cardiac arrhythmia — atrial flutter. The disease is one of the manifestations of life-threatening heart rhythm disorders, has no characteristic clinical picture, is diagnosed only by means of an electrocardiogram.

  17. Biological rhythms for rehabilitation of radiation damage of population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, T.G.; Vasil'eva, G.S.; Efimov, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Considerable disturbances in biological eurhythmycal structure of redoracu were discovered for people living in Borodulikha area of the Semipalatinsk test site. The deep desynchronise may result in a development of the cardiovascular, bronco-pulmonary, endocrine, oncologic, neuro psychic diseases. A method to correct the biological eurhythmycal structure was developed. Homeopathic doses of melatonin ('rhythm driver' managing the most regenerating and immune systems) and uthynol (promoting production of dehydroepiandrosterone of maternal prehormone of 27 hormones) were used to provide the general correction. The endocrine diseases are not practically subjected to the homeopathic correction. The sub correction was sometimes carried out after 5 months. The developed methods of rehabilitation of the radiation damages are unique, since they allow performing the homeopathic correction using the acupuncture monitoring

  18. Сircadian rhythm and metabolic effects of melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Igorevich Burchakov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a highly important process, required for normal organ and system function. Researchers assume, that during sleep brain shifts to internal body signals. Therefore, any sleep disturbance will disrupt health. Industrial and post-industrial society links high stress level and sleep problems. Excess light stimulation in living space, including bedroom, disorganize circadian rhythm of melatonin. Besides regulation this hormone has antioxidant and adaptogen functions. From psychological standpoint the same high-stress social context depletes the adaptation resources. To normalize sleep function we can utilize both sleep hygiene measures and modern pharmacotherapy. There are melatonin-based drugs, which help to restore sleep-wake cycle, augment adaptive capability and in some cases empower the existing treatment for specific somatic maladies. From a clinical and chronobiological standpoint melatonin is useful in broad spectrum of disorders.

  19. Circadian rhythms in sports performance--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drust, B; Waterhouse, J; Atkinson, G; Edwards, B; Reilly, T

    2005-01-01

    We discuss current knowledge on the description, impact, and underlying causes of circadian rhythmicity in sports performance. We argue that there is a wealth of information from both applied and experimental work, which, when considered together, suggests that sports performance is affected by time of day in normal entrained conditions and that the variation has at least some input from endogenous mechanisms. Nevertheless, precise information on the relative importance of endogenous and exogenous factors is lacking. No single study can answer both the applied and basic research questions that are relevant to this topic, but an appropriate mixture of real-world research on rhythm disturbances and tightly controlled experiments involving forced desynchronization protocols is needed. Important issues, which should be considered by any chronobiologist interested in sports and exercise, include how representative the study sample and the selected performance tests are, test-retest reliability, as well as overall design of the experiment.

  20. Fluctuation of biological rhythm in finger tapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, H.; Miyazima, S.; Mitake, S.

    2000-06-01

    By analyzing biological rhythms obtained from finger tapping, we have investigated the differences of two biological rhythms between healthy and handicapped persons caused by Parkinson, brain infraction, car accident and so on. In this study, we have observed the motion of handedness of all subjects and obtained a slope a which characterizes a power-law relation between frequency and amplitude of finger-tapping rhythm. From our results, we have estimated that the slope a=0.06 is a rough criterion in order to distinguish healthy and handicapped persons.

  1. [Echocardiographic factors predictive of restoration and maintenance of sinus rhythm after reduction of atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khalfallah, A; Sanaa, I

    2007-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. While the arrhythmia was initially thought to be little more than a nuisance, it is now clear that AF has a significant negative impact on quality of life and a corresponding increase in both morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify Doppler echographic patterns that allow prediction of atrial fibrillation reduction and maintenance of sinus rhythm within 12 months. One hundred and thirty patients having permanent atrial fibrillation, recent (51) or chronic (79) are included in the study, excepting those with valvular heart disease or thyroid dysfunction. The mean age was 63.5 +/- 11.3 years. Both transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography was performed using a Philips SONOS 5500 Echograph, before cardioversion. Were studied: end diastolic and systolic left ventricular diameters, left ventricular ejectionnal fraction, left atrial area (LAA), left atrial diameter, left atrial appendage area and peak emptying velocities of the left atrial appendage (PeV). Sinus rhythm was re-established in 102 patients (44 having recent and 58 chronic atrial fibrillation). Sinus rhythm was maintained for 12 months in 79 patients. Within the echographic parameters studied, the left atrial area (LAA) and peak emptying velocities of left atrial appendage (PeV) before cardioversion were the best predictors of restoration of sinus rhythm. On monovariate analysis, SOG is significantly lower and PicV is significantly higher in patients whose sinus rhythm had been restored in comparison with those with permanent atrial fibrillation. (Mean SOG: 27.7 +/- 7.62 vs. 34 +/- 7,6 cm2, ppredict on mono and multivariate analysis (p=0.05, OR=0.5, IC=0.36 à 3.56), re-establishing of sinus rhythm whereas in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation, peak emptying velocity of left atrial appendage predict better re-establishing of sinus rhythm (p=0.04, OR=1.29, IC=0.12 à 4.23). The threshold values of LAA and Pe

  2. Agomelatine's effect on circadian locomotor rhythm alteration and depressive-like behavior in 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Leonardo C; Martynhak, Bruno J; Bassani, Taysa B; Turnes, Joelle de M; Machado, Meira M; Moura, Eric; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2018-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often suffer from circadian locomotor rhythms impairment and depression, important non-motor symptoms. It is known that toxin-based animal models of PD can reproduce these features. In a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) intranigral model, we first investigated the possible disturbances on circadian rhythms of locomotor activity. The rats were divided into 6-OHDA and Sham groups. After a partial dopaminergic lesion, the 6-OHDA group showed slight alterations in different circadian locomotor rhythms parameters. In a second experiment, we hypothesized agomelatine, an melatoninergic antidepressant with potential to resynchronize disturbed rhythms, could prevent neuronal damage and rhythm alterations in the same 6-OHDA model. The animals were divided into four groups: 6-OHDA+vehicle, 6-OHDA+ago, Sham+vehicle and 6-OHDA+ago. However, the treated animals (agomelatine 50 mg/kg for 22 days) showed an impaired rhythm robustness, and agomelatine did not induce significant changes in the other circadian parameters nor neuroprotection. Finally, in a third experiment, we examined the effects of agomelatine in the 6-OHDA model regarding depressive-like behavior, evaluated by sucrose preference test. The animals were also divided into four groups: 6-OHDA+vehicle, 6-OHDA+ago, Sham+vehicle and 6-OHDA+ago. The toxin infused animals showed a decrease in sucrose preference in comparison with the vehicle infused animals, however, agomelatine did not prevent this decrease. Our findings indicate that agomelatine worsened circadian locomotor rhythm and was not able to reverse the depressive-like behavior of rats in the 6-OHDA PD model. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Circadian Rhythm Management System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The value of measuring sleep-wake cycles is significantly enhanced by measuring other physiological signals that depend on circadian rhythms (such as heart rate and...

  4. Circadian rhythms in effects of hypnotics and sleep inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinberg, A

    1986-01-01

    Chronopharmacology involves the investigation of drug effects as a function of biological time and the investigation of drug effects on rhythm characteristics. Three new concepts must be considered: (a) the chronokinetics of a drug, embracing rhythmic (circadian) changes in drug bioavailability (or pharmacokinetics) and its excretion (urinary among others); (b) the chronaesthesia of a biosystem to a drug, i.e. circadian changes in the susceptibility of any biosystem to a drug (including organ systems, parasites, etc.); skin and bronchial chronaesthesia to various agents have been documented in man; and (c) the chronergy of a drug, taking into consideration its chronokinetics and the chronaesthesia of the involved organismic biosystems. The term chronergy includes rhythmic changes in the overall effects and in the effectiveness of some drugs. Clinical chronopharmacology is useful for solving problems of drug optimization, i.e. enhancing the desired efficiency of a drug and reducing its undesired effects. Circadian rhythms can be demonstrated in various effects of drugs on sleep, anaesthesia and related processes. For example, in the rat the duration of sleep induced by substances such as pentobarbital, hexobarbital, Althesin (alphaxadone and alphadoline in castor oil) is circadian system stage-dependent. Time-dependent changes of liver enzymes (e.g. hexobarbital oxidase) play a role in these circadian rhythms. The clinical chronopharmacokinetics of benzodiazepines have been documented in man. Chronopharmacologic methods can be used to study desired and undesired hypnotic effects of substances. Such is the case of new antihistamines (anti-H1), which do not induce sleepiness, in either acute or chronic administration. Pertinent also is the problem of intolerance to shift-work. Intolerant shift-workers are subject to internal desynchronization between at least two rhythms (e.g. activity-rest cycle and body temperature). Clinically these workers suffer from sleep

  5. [Effect of Earth magnetic field on circadian rhythm of total antioxidant capacity of human saliva in the North].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenkov, M F

    2007-01-01

    In the inhabitants of the North during increase of geomagnetic activity and during magnetic calm the decrease of amplitude of circadian rhythm of total antioxidant capacity of saliva is observed. The most favorable conditions to display the circadian rhythm are observed at Kp from 0,5 up to 2. The long residing in the North is connected to influence of irregularly varying geomagnetic activity causing disturbance of function of circadian and antioxidant systems that, probably, is one of the reasons of acceleration of process of aging at northerner and of higher risk of occurrence in them the age associated diseases.

  6. Demonstration of a day-night rhythm in human skeletal muscle oxidative capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Moorsel, Dirk; Hansen, Jan; Havekes, Bas; Scheer, Frank A J L; Jörgensen, Johanna A; Hoeks, Joris; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B; Duez, Helene; Lefebvre, Philippe; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Hesselink, Matthijs K C; Staels, Bart; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    A disturbed day-night rhythm is associated with metabolic perturbations that can lead to obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In skeletal muscle, a reduced oxidative capacity is also associated with the development of T2DM. However, whether oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle displays a day-night rhythm in humans has so far not been investigated. Lean, healthy subjects were enrolled in a standardized living protocol with regular meals, physical activity and sleep to reflect our everyday lifestyle. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity was examined in skeletal muscle biopsies taken at five time points within a 24-hour period. Core-body temperature was lower during the early night, confirming a normal day-night rhythm. Skeletal muscle oxidative capacity demonstrated a robust day-night rhythm, with a significant time effect in ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3 MO, state 3 MOG and state 3 MOGS, p < 0.05). Respiration was lowest at 1 PM and highest at 11 PM (state 3 MOGS: 80.6 ± 4.0 vs. 95.8 ± 4.7 pmol/mg/s). Interestingly, the fluctuation in mitochondrial function was also observed in whole-body energy expenditure, with peak energy expenditure at 11 PM and lowest energy expenditure at 4 AM (p < 0.001). In addition, we demonstrate rhythmicity in mRNA expression of molecular clock genes in human skeletal muscle. Our results suggest that the biological clock drives robust rhythms in human skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. It is tempting to speculate that disruption of these rhythms contribute to the deterioration of metabolic health associated with circadian misalignment.

  7. Dysrhythmia: a specific congenital rhythm perception deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques eLaunay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Why do some people have problems ‘feeling the beat’? Here we investigate participants with congenital impairments in musical rhythm perception and production. A web-based version of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA was used to screen for difficulties with rhythmic processing in a large sample and we identified three ‘dysrhythmic’ individuals who scored below cut-off for the rhythm subtest, but not the pitch-based subtests. Follow-up testing in the laboratory was conducted to characterize the nature of both rhythm perception and production deficits in these dysrhythmic individuals. We found that they differed from control participants when required to synchronize their tapping to an external stimulus with a metrical pulse, but not when required to tap spontaneously (with no external stimulus or to tap in time to an isochronous stimulus. Dysrhythmics exhibited a general tendency to tap at half the expected tempo when asked to synchronize to the beat of strongly metrical rhythms. These results suggest that the individuals studied here did not have motor production problems, but suffer from a selective rhythm perception deficit that influences the ability to entrain to metrical rhythms.

  8. The role of feeding rhythm, adrenal hormones and neuronal inputs in synchronizing daily clock gene rhythms in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Cailotto, Cathy; Foppen, Ewout; Jansen, Remi; Zhang, Zhi; Buijs, Ruud; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2016-02-15

    The master clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is assumed to distribute rhythmic information to the periphery via neural, humoral and/or behavioral connections. Until now, feeding, corticosterone and neural inputs are considered important signals for synchronizing daily rhythms in the liver. In this study, we investigated the necessity of neural inputs as well as of the feeding and adrenal hormone rhythms for maintaining daily hepatic clock gene rhythms. Clock genes kept their daily rhythm when only one of these three signals was disrupted, or when we disrupted hepatic neuronal inputs together with the adrenal hormone rhythm or with the daily feeding rhythm. However, all clock genes studied lost their daily expression rhythm after simultaneous disruption of the feeding and adrenal hormone rhythm. These data indicate that either a daily rhythm of feeding or adrenal hormones should be present to synchronize clock gene rhythms in the liver with the SCN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An artificial vector model for generating abnormal electrocardiographic rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, Gari D; Nemati, Shamim; Sameni, Reza

    2010-01-01

    We present generalizations of our previously published artificial models for generating multi-channel ECG to provide simulations of abnormal cardiac rhythms. Using a three-dimensional vectorcardiogram (VCG) formulation, we generate the normal cardiac dipole for a patient using a sum of Gaussian kernels, fitted to real VCG recordings. Abnormal beats are specified either as perturbations to the normal dipole or as new dipole trajectories. Switching between normal and abnormal beat types is achieved using a first-order Markov chain. Probability transitions can be learned from real data or modeled by coupling to heart rate and sympathovagal balance. Natural morphology changes from beat-to-beat are incorporated by varying the angular frequency of the dipole as a function of the inter-beat (RR) interval. The RR interval time series is generated using our previously described model whereby time- and frequency-domain heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability characteristics can be specified. QT-HR hysteresis is simulated by coupling the Gaussian kernels associated with the T-wave in the model with a nonlinear factor related to the local HR (determined from the last n RR intervals). Morphology changes due to respiration are simulated by introducing a rotation matrix couple to the respiratory frequency. We demonstrate an example of the use of this model by simulating HR-dependent T-wave alternans (TWA) with and without phase-switching due to ectopy. Application of our model also reveals previously unreported effects of common TWA estimation methods

  10. Ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: Incidence, predictive factors, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesel, Laurence; Berthon, Charlotte; Messas, Nathan; Lim, Han S; Girardey, Mélanie; Marzak, Halim; Marchandot, Benjamin; Trinh, Annie; Ohlmann, Patrick; Morel, Olivier

    2018-04-06

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a stress-related transient cardiomyopathy. Life-threatening arrhythmias (LTA) can occur and worsen prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and outcome of LTA in TTC, as well as its predictive factors and clinical implications. We studied 214 consecutive cases of TTC over 8 years. The study cohort was divided into 2 groups: those with LTA (LTA group) and those without (non-LTA group). LTA was defined as ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or cardiac arrest. LTA occurred in 10.7% of patients mainly in the first 24 hours of hospitalization: ventricular tachycardia (n = 2), ventricular fibrillation (n = 11), cardiac arrest (n = 10: 5 asystole, 3 complete heart block, and 2 sinoatrial block). LTA were associated with lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and a high rate of conduction disturbances. In-hospital (39.1% vs 8.9%; P 105 ms were independent predictors of LTA. In cases where a device was implanted, conduction disturbances persisted after the index event despite complete recovery of LVEF. There was no ventricular arrhythmia recurrence during follow-up. LTA occur early in patients presenting with TTC and is associated with significantly worse short- and long-term prognosis. Left ventricular impairment and QRS duration >105 ms are independent predictors of LTA. Ventricular arrhythmias occurred in the acute phase without further recurrence recorded in hospital survivors, whereas severe conduction disorders persisted during long-term follow-up. These findings may have implications on the choice of device therapy for this specific patient subgroup. Copyright © 2018 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Timing of host feeding drives rhythms in parasite replication

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Kimberley F.

    2018-02-26

    Circadian rhythms enable organisms to synchronise the processes underpinning survival and reproduction to anticipate daily changes in the external environment. Recent work shows that daily (circadian) rhythms also enable parasites to maximise fitness in the context of ecological interactions with their hosts. Because parasite rhythms matter for their fitness, understanding how they are regulated could lead to innovative ways to reduce the severity and spread of diseases. Here, we examine how host circadian rhythms influence rhythms in the asexual replication of malaria parasites. Asexual replication is responsible for the severity of malaria and fuels transmission of the disease, yet, how parasite rhythms are driven remains a mystery. We perturbed feeding rhythms of hosts by 12 hours (i.e. diurnal feeding in nocturnal mice) to desynchronise the host’s peripheral oscillators from the central, light-entrained oscillator in the brain and their rhythmic outputs. We demonstrate that the rhythms of rodent malaria parasites in day-fed hosts become inverted relative to the rhythms of parasites in night-fed hosts. Our results reveal that the host’s peripheral rhythms (associated with the timing of feeding and metabolism), but not rhythms driven by the central, light-entrained circadian oscillator in the brain, determine the timing (phase) of parasite rhythms. Further investigation reveals that parasite rhythms correlate closely with blood glucose rhythms. In addition, we show that parasite rhythms resynchronise to the altered host feeding rhythms when food availability is shifted, which is not mediated through rhythms in the host immune system. Our observations suggest that parasites actively control their developmental rhythms. Finally, counter to expectation, the severity of disease symptoms expressed by hosts was not affected by desynchronisation of their central and peripheral rhythms. Our study at the intersection of disease ecology and chronobiology opens up a new

  12. Timing of host feeding drives rhythms in parasite replication

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Kimberley F

    2017-12-07

    Circadian rhythms enable organisms to synchronise the processes underpinning survival and reproduction to anticipate daily changes in the external environment. Recent work shows that daily (circadian) rhythms also enable parasites to maximise fitness in the context of ecological interactions with their hosts. Because parasite rhythms matter for their fitness, understanding how they are regulated could lead to innovative ways to reduce the severity and spread of diseases. Here, we examine how host circadian rhythms influence rhythms in the asexual replication of malaria parasites. Asexual replication is responsible for the severity of malaria and fuels transmission of the disease, yet, how parasite rhythms are driven remains a mystery. We perturbed feeding rhythms of hosts by 12 hours (i.e. diurnal feeding in nocturnal mice) to desynchronise the host\\'s peripheral oscillators from the central, light-entrained oscillator in the brain and their rhythmic outputs. We demonstrate that the rhythms of rodent malaria parasites in day-fed hosts become inverted relative to the rhythms of parasites in night-fed hosts. Our results reveal that the host\\'s peripheral rhythms (associated with the timing of feeding and metabolism), but not rhythms driven by the central, light-entrained circadian oscillator in the brain, determine the timing (phase) of parasite rhythms. Further investigation reveals that parasite rhythms correlate closely with blood glucose rhythms. In addition, we show that parasite rhythms resynchronise to the altered host feeding rhythms when food availability is shifted, which is not mediated through rhythms in the host immune system. Our observations suggest that parasites actively control their developmental rhythms. Finally, counter to expectation, the severity of disease symptoms expressed by hosts was not affected by desynchronisation of their central and peripheral rhythms. Our study at the intersection of disease ecology and chronobiology opens up a new

  13. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  14. Circadian Rhythm and Sleep During Prolonged Antarctic Residence at Chinese Zhongshan Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Wu, Quan; Xiong, Yanlei; Chen, Guang; Song, Dandan; Xu, Chengli

    2016-12-01

    Residence at Zhongshan Station (69°22'24″S, 76°22'40″E) for over 1 year exposes winter-over members to marked changes of light-dark cycle, ranging from the constant daylight of polar days to the constant darkness of polar nights, in addition to geographic and social isolation. This extreme photoperiodic environment may increase the risk of sleep disturbances and circadian desynchrony. The aim of this study was to investigate the circadian rhythm and sleep phase of Chinese winter-over expeditioners at Zhongshan Station. This study was conducted on 17 healthy male participants before departure from Shanghai and during residence at Zhongshan Station for 1 year (before winter, mid-winter, and end of winter). Sequential urine samples over 48 hours were obtained, 6-sulphatoxymelatonin in urine was assessed, and the circadian rhythm was analyzed by a cosine curve-fitting method. Participants' sleep parameters were obtained from wrist actigraphy and sleep logs. Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire were completed. The acrophase of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythm, sleep onset, sleep offset, and mid-sleep time were delayed significantly (P circadian rhythm and sleep phase, later chronotype, and incidence of subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder. An appropriate combination of artificial bright light during dark winter months and a strict social schedule are recommended in a winter-over station in Antarctica. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... magnesium. These minerals help your heart's electrical system work. Abnormally high or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your ...

  16. Cardiac Ochronosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erek, Ersin; Casselman, Filip P.A.; Vanermen, Hugo

    2004-01-01

    We report the case of 67-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair due to ochronotic valvular disease (alkaptonuria), which was diagnosed incidentally during cardiac surgery. PMID:15745303

  17. Cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests. However, it is very safe when done by an experienced team. The risks include: Cardiac tamponade Heart attack Injury to a coronary artery Irregular heartbeat Low blood pressure Reaction to the contrast dye Stroke Possible complications ...

  18. [Cardiac myxoma -- the influence of preoperative clinical presentation and surgical technique on late outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikić, Aleksandar; Obrenović-Krcanski, Bilijana; Kocica, Mladen; Vranes, Mile; Lacković, Vesna; Velinović, Milos; Miarković, Miroslav; Kovacević, Natasa; Djukić, Petar

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are the most frequent primary tumours of the heart in adults, and they can be found in each of four cardiac chambers. Although biologically benign, due to their unfavourable localization, myxomas are considered "functionally malignant" tumours. Diagnosis of cardiac myxoma necessitates surgical treatment. To analyse: 1) the influence of localization, size and consistency of cardiac myxomas on preoperative symptomatology; 2) the influence of different surgical techniques (left, right, biatrial approach, tumour basis solving) on early, and late outcomes. From 1982 to 2000, at the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, Clinical Centre of Serbia, there were 46 patients with cardiac myxomas operated on, 67.4% of them women, mean age 47.1 +/- 16.3 years. The diagnosis was made according to clinical presentation, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examinations and cardiac catheterization. Follow-up period was 4-18 (mean 7.8) years. In 41 (89.1%) patients, myxoma was localized in the left, while in 5 (10.9%), it was found in the right atrium. Average size was 5.8 x 3.8 cm (range: 1 x l cm to 9 x 8 cm) and 6 x 4 cm (range: 3 x 2 cm to 9 x 5 cm) for the left and right atrial myxomas, respectively. A racemous form predominated in the left (82.6%) and globous in the right (80%) atrium. Fatigue was the most common general (84.8%) and dyspnoea the most common cardiologic symptom (73.9%). Preoperative embolic events were present in 8 patients (4 pulmonary, 4 systemic). In our series: 1) different localization, size and consistency had no influence on the preoperative symptomatology; 2) surgical treatment applied, regardless of different approaches and basis solving, resulted in excellent functional improvements (63.1% patients in NYHA III and IV class preoperatively vs. 6.7% patients postoperatively) and had no influence on new postoperative rhythm disturbances (8.7% patients preoperatively vs. 24.4% patients postoperatively); 3) early (97.8%), and late

  19. Circadian rhythm abnormalities - Association with the course of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Szemraj, Janusz; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the main representatives of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a group of chronic, immune system-mediated inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The pathogenesis of the intestinal lesions in IBD is not entirely identified and understood: excessive activation of the immune system may come as a result of the interaction of various environmental and infectious factors, genetic predisposition, and the mediation of abnormal intestinal flora. The main objective of the current study is to further identify the risk factors for the development of IBD. Currently, there is very little knowledge about circadian rhythm and IBD and there are only a few studies on the relationship between sleep disturbances and the course of the disease, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile and general immune system functioning. Furthermore, the relationship between the expression of circadian rhythm genes and severe course of IBD is still unknown. The aim of this review is to show the current state of knowledge about the relationship between circadian rhythm disorders, sleep disturbance and inflammation in the GI tract and to analyze the possibility of employing this knowledge in diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear cardiac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques

  1. [Cardiac resynchronization therapy for heart failure - from experimental pacing to evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, S; Butter, C; Fleck, E

    2006-01-01

    Within the last decade, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has become an evidence-based cornerstone for a subset of patients with chronic heart failure. For those, who suffer from ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathies at NYHA III or IV, have sinus rhythm, a left bundle branch block and a left ventricular ejection fraction below 35%, CRT has evolved as an important treatment option with promising results. Numerous studies have shown that in these patients pacemaker-mediated correction of intra- and interventicular conduction disturbances can improve not only clinical symptoms, exercise tolerance and the frequency of hospitalizations, but even more important the overall mortality. These clinical results are due to several functional aspects. In the failing heart characteristic intra- and interventricular alterations in electrical conduction result in mechanical asynchrony that leads to an abnormal contraction of the left ventricle with delayed activation of the lateral wall, a paradoxical septal movement, a reduced diastolic filling and a mitral regurgitation due to dyssynchrony of papillary muscle activation. It is conceivable that these functional changes have fatal consequences for the failing heart. AV-optimized left- or biventricular stimulation by modern pacemakers can correct the pathological dyssynchrony, thereby improving cardiac function and clinical outcome in these patients. Although tremendous progress in cardiac resynchronization therapy has been made during the last decade, a couple of questions still need to be resolved. Critical issues are the identification of patients, who will predictably benefit from CRT, the value of CRT-pacemakers versus CRT-ICDs, and the usefullness of CRT in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  2. Sleep, Hormones, and Circadian Rhythms throughout the Menstrual Cycle in Healthy Women and Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Shechter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship exists between the sleep-wake cycle and hormone secretion, which, in women, is further modulated by the menstrual cycle. This interaction can influence sleep across the menstrual cycle in healthy women and in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD, who experience specific alterations of circadian rhythms during their symptomatic luteal phase along with sleep disturbances during this time. This review will address the variation of sleep at different menstrual phases in healthy and PMDD women, as well as changes in circadian rhythms, with an emphasis on their relationship with female sex hormones. It will conclude with a brief discussion on nonpharmacological treatments of PMDD which use chronotherapeutic methods to realign circadian rhythms as a means of improving sleep and mood in these women.

  3. Sleep, Hormones, and Circadian Rhythms throughout the Menstrual Cycle in Healthy Women and Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ari; Boivin, Diane B

    2010-01-01

    A relationship exists between the sleep-wake cycle and hormone secretion, which, in women, is further modulated by the menstrual cycle. This interaction can influence sleep across the menstrual cycle in healthy women and in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), who experience specific alterations of circadian rhythms during their symptomatic luteal phase along with sleep disturbances during this time. This review will address the variation of sleep at different menstrual phases in healthy and PMDD women, as well as changes in circadian rhythms, with an emphasis on their relationship with female sex hormones. It will conclude with a brief discussion on nonpharmacological treatments of PMDD which use chronotherapeutic methods to realign circadian rhythms as a means of improving sleep and mood in these women.

  4. Mu rhythm desynchronization by tongue thrust observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotoe eSakihara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the mu rhythm in the sensorimotor area during tongue thrust observation and to obtain an answer to the question as to how subtle non-verbal orofacial movement observation activates the sensorimotor area. Ten healthy volunteers performed finger tap execution, tongue thrust execution, and tongue thrust observation. The electroencephalogram was recorded from 128 electrodes placed on the scalp, and regions of interest were set at sensorimotor areas. The event-related desynchronization (ERD and event-related synchronization (ERS for the mu rhythm (8–13 Hz and beta (13−25 Hz bands were measured. Tongue thrust observation induced mu rhythm ERD, and the ERD was detected at the left hemisphere regardless whether the observed tongue thrust was toward the left or right. Mu rhythm ERD was also recorded during tongue thrust execution. However, temporal analysis revealed that the ERD associated with tongue thrust observation preceded that associated with execution by approximately 2 s. Tongue thrust observation induces mu rhythm ERD in sensorimotor cortex with left hemispheric dominance.

  5. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-09

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Dynamic Attending Binds Time and Rhythm Perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Fuminori; Kadota, Hiroshi

    2017-11-01

    Relations between time and rhythm perception are discussed in this review of psychophysical research relevant to the multiple-look effect and dynamic-attending theory. Discrimination of two neighboring intervals that are marked by three successive sounds is improved when the presentation of the first (standard, S) interval is repeated before that of the second (comparison, C), as SSSSC. This improvement in sensitivity, called the multiple-look effect, occurs because listeners (1) perceive regular rhythm during the repetition of the standard interval, (2) predict the timing of subsequent sounds, and (3) detect sounds that are deviated from the predicted timing. The dynamic-attending theory attributes such predictions to the entrainment of attentional rhythms. An endogenous attentional rhythm is synchronized with the periodic succession of sounds marking the repeated standard. The standard and the comparison are discriminated on the basis of whether the ending marker of the comparison appears at the peak of the entrained attentional rhythm. This theory is compatible with the findings of recent neurophysiological studies that relate temporal prediction to neural oscillations.

  7. Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aledavood, Talayeh; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I M; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals' social networks. Further, women's calls were longer than men's calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls were typically focused on a small number of emotionally intense relationships. These results demonstrate that individual differences in circadian rhythms are not just related to broad patterns of morningness and eveningness, but have a strong social component, in directing phone calls to specific individuals at specific times of day.

  8. Targeted next-generation sequencing provides novel clues for associated epilepsy and cardiac conduction disorder/SUDEP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Coll

    Full Text Available Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is an unpredicted condition in patients with a diagnosis of epilepsy, and autopsy does not conclusively identify cause of death. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie this entity remain unknown, the fact that epilepsy can affect cardiac function is not surprising. The genetic factors involving ion channels co-expressed in the heart and brain and other candidate genes have been previously described. In the present study, 20 epilepsy patients with personal or family history of heart rhythm disturbance/cardiac arrhythmias/sudden death were sequenced using a custom re-sequencing panel. Twenty-six relatives were genetically analysed to ascertain the family segregation in ten individuals. Four subjects revealed variants with positive genotype-phenotype segregation: four missense variants in the CDKL5, CNTNAP2, GRIN2A and ADGRV1 genes and one copy number variant in KCNQ1. The potential pathogenic role of variants in new candidate genes will need further studies in larger cohorts, and the evaluation of the potential pathogenic role in the cardio-cerebral mechanisms requires in vivo/in vitro studies. In addition to family segregation, evaluation of the potential pathogenic roles of these variants in cardio-cerebral mechanisms by in vivo/in vitro studies should also be performed. The potential pathogenic role of variants in new candidate genes will need further studies in larger cohorts.

  9. Circadian Clock Protein Content and Daily Rhythm of Locomotor Activity Are Altered after Chronic Exposure to Lead in Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbar, Mariam; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid; Lakhdar-Ghazal, Nouria

    2017-01-01

    Lead exposure has been reported to produce many clinical features, including parkinsonism. However, its consequences on the circadian rhythms are still unknown. Here we aimed to examine the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity following lead intoxication and investigate the mechanisms by which lead may induce alterations of circadian rhythms in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with lead or sodium acetate (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.) during 4 weeks. Both groups were tested in the “open field” to quantify the exploratory activity and in the rotarod to evaluate motor coordination. Then, animals were submitted to continuous 24 h recordings of locomotor activity under 14/10 Light/dark (14/10 LD) cycle and in complete darkness (DD). At the end of experiments, the clock proteins BMAL1, PER1-2, and CRY1-2 were assayed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) using immunohistochemistry. We showed that lead significantly reduced the number of crossing in the open field, impaired motor coordination and altered the daily locomotor activity rhythm. When the LD cycle was advanced by 6 h, both groups adjusted their daily locomotor activity to the new LD cycle with high onset variability in lead-intoxicated rats compared to controls. Lead also led to a decrease in the number of immunoreactive cells (ir-) of BMAL1, PER1, and PER2 without affecting the number of ir-CRY1 and ir-CRY2 cells in the SCN. Our data provide strong evidence that lead intoxication disturbs the rhythm of locomotor activity and alters clock proteins expression in the SCN. They contribute to the understanding of the mechanism by which lead induce circadian rhythms disturbances. PMID:28970786

  10. Clinically oriented device programming in bradycardia patients: part 1 (sinus node disease). Proposals from AIAC (Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziacchi, Matteo; Palmisano, Pietro; Biffi, Mauro; Ricci, Renato P; Landolina, Maurizio; Zoni-Berisso, Massimo; Occhetta, Eraldo; Maglia, Giampiero; Botto, Gianluca; Padeletti, Luigi; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2018-04-01

    : Modern pacemakers have an increasing number of programable parameters and specific algorithms designed to optimize pacing therapy in relation to the individual characteristics of patients. When choosing the most appropriate pacemaker type and programing, the following variables must be taken into account: the type of bradyarrhythmia at the time of pacemaker implantation; the cardiac chamber requiring pacing, and the percentage of pacing actually needed to correct the rhythm disorder; the possible association of multiple rhythm disturbances and conduction diseases; the evolution of conduction disorders during follow-up. The goals of device programing are to preserve or restore the heart rate response to metabolic and hemodynamic demands; to maintain physiological conduction; to maximize device longevity; to detect, prevent, and treat atrial arrhythmia. In patients with sinus node disease, the optimal pacing mode is DDDR. Based on all the available evidence, in this setting, we consider appropriate the activation of the following algorithms: rate responsive function in patients with chronotropic incompetence; algorithms to maximize intrinsic atrioventricular conduction in the absence of atrioventricular blocks; mode-switch algorithms; algorithms for autoadaptive management of the atrial pacing output; algorithms for the prevention and treatment of atrial tachyarrhythmias in the subgroup of patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias/atrial fibrillation. The purpose of this two-part consensus document is to provide specific suggestions (based on an extensive literature review) on appropriate pacemaker setting in relation to patients' clinical features.

  11. Daily rhythm of cerebral blood flow velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spielman Arthur J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CBFV (cerebral blood flow velocity is lower in the morning than in the afternoon and evening. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the time of day changes in CBFV: 1 CBFV changes are due to sleep-associated processes or 2 time of day changes in CBFV are due to an endogenous circadian rhythm independent of sleep. The aim of this study was to examine CBFV over 30 hours of sustained wakefulness to determine whether CBFV exhibits fluctuations associated with time of day. Methods Eleven subjects underwent a modified constant routine protocol. CBFV from the middle cerebral artery was monitored by chronic recording of Transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasonography. Other variables included core body temperature (CBT, end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2, blood pressure, and heart rate. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO served as a measure of endogenous circadian phase position. Results A non-linear multiple regression, cosine fit analysis revealed that both the CBT and CBFV rhythm fit a 24 hour rhythm (R2 = 0.62 and R2 = 0.68, respectively. Circadian phase position of CBT occurred at 6:05 am while CBFV occurred at 12:02 pm, revealing a six hour, or 90 degree difference between these two rhythms (t = 4.9, df = 10, p Conclusion In conclusion, time of day variations in CBFV have an approximately 24 hour rhythm under constant conditions, suggesting regulation by a circadian oscillator. The 90 degree-phase angle difference between the CBT and CBFV rhythms may help explain previous findings of lower CBFV values in the morning. The phase difference occurs at a time period during which cognitive performance decrements have been observed and when both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events occur more frequently. The mechanisms underlying this phase angle difference require further exploration.

  12. Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are caused by solar flare enhanced X-rays in the 1 to 10 angstrom range. Solar flares can produce large increases of ionization...

  13. Depression Disturbs Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The suicide of Robert Enke,the goalkeeper of the Germany national football team who had battled depression for years,stunned the country and cast depression into the national spotlight as a disturbing disease.

  14. Circadian rhythm asynchrony in man during hypokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winget, C. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Cronin, S. E.; Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Posture and exercise were investigated as synchronizers of certain physiologic rhythms in eight healthy male subjects in a defined environment. Four subjects exercised during bed rest. Body temperature (BT), heart rate, plasma thyroid hormone, and plasma steroid data were obtained from the subjects for a 6-day ambulatory equilibration period before bed rest, 56 days of bed rest, and a 10-day recovery period after bed rest. The results indicate that the mechanism regulating the circadian rhythmicity of the cardiovascular system is rigorously controlled and independent of the endocrine system, while the BT rhythm is more closely aligned to the endocrine system.

  15. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciala-Wein, H.; Stegmaier, W.

    1977-12-01

    The analyses of disturbances are the supposition for the development of processes and plants. They are very important in the field of nuclear testing plants. In this report are described the possibilities to register the circumstances of the disturbance in a pilot waste processing facility and a computer programme to interpret them. This is a first scheme and it will be necessary to complete it. (orig.) [de

  17. Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  18. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  19. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  20. Circadian rhythm and sleep influences on digestive physiology and disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, Bradley; Rotolo,Sean; Roth,Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Bradley V Vaughn, Sean Rotolo, Heidi L Roth Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Circadian rhythms and sleep influence a variety of physiological functions, including the digestive system. The digestive system also has intrinsic rhythms that interact dynamically with circadian rhythms. New advances in understanding the interaction of these rhythms and sleep provide the prospect of evaluating their...

  1. Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention and management of implantable cardiac electronic device infection. Report of a joint Working Party project on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC, host organization), British Heart Rhythm Society (BHRS), British Cardiovascular Society (BCS), British Heart Valve Society (BHVS) and British Society for Echocardiography (BSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoe, Jonathan A T; Barlow, Gavin; Chambers, John B; Gammage, Michael; Guleri, Achyut; Howard, Philip; Olson, Ewan; Perry, John D; Prendergast, Bernard D; Spry, Michael J; Steeds, Richard P; Tayebjee, Muzahir H; Watkin, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Infections related to implantable cardiac electronic devices (ICEDs), including pacemakers, implantable cardiac defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices, are increasing in incidence in the USA and are likely to increase in the UK, because more devices are being implanted. These devices have both intravascular and extravascular components and infection can involve the generator, device leads and native cardiac structures or various combinations. ICED infections can be life-threatening, particularly when associated with endocardial infection, and all-cause mortality of up to 35% has been reported. Like infective endocarditis, ICED infections can be difficult to diagnose and manage. This guideline aims to (i) improve the quality of care provided to patients with ICEDs, (ii) provide an educational resource for all relevant healthcare professionals, (iii) encourage a multidisciplinary approach to ICED infection management, (iv) promote a standardized approach to the diagnosis, management, surveillance and prevention of ICED infection through pragmatic evidence-rated recommendations, and (v) advise on future research projects/audit. The guideline is intended to assist in the clinical care of patients with suspected or confirmed ICED infection in the UK, to inform local infection prevention and treatment policies and guidelines and to be used in the development of educational and training material by the relevant professional societies. The questions covered by the guideline are presented at the beginning of each section. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Monkey Lipsmacking Develops Like the Human Speech Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Ryan J.; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved "de novo" in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial…

  3. EFFECTS OF CIRCADIAN RHYTHM ON BALANCE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karagul Osman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of circadian rhythm on dynamic balance performance and to determine the role of physical activity level, body temperature, chronotype, and gender in this possible effect. Material and

  4. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitor...

  5. Egg-laying rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-31

    Dec 31, 2008 ... production of oocytes to egg-laying on selected sites (Alle- mand 1976b; Yang et al. .... (vii) Is the egg-laying rhythm regulated by hormones? .... were shown to be induced by factors synthesized in the re- productive tract of the ...

  6. Atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Once considered as nothing more than a nuisance after cardiac surgery, the importance of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF has been realized in the last decade, primarily because of the morbidity associated with the condition. Numerous causative factors have been described without any single factor being singled out as the cause of this complication. POAF has been associated with stroke, renal failure and congestive heart failure, although it is difficult to state whether POAF is directly responsible for these complications. Guidelines have been formulated for prevention of POAF. However, very few cardiothoracic centers follow any form of protocol to prevent POAF. Routine use of prophylaxis would subject all patients to the side effects of anti-arrhythmic drugs, while only a minority of the patients do actually develop this problem postoperatively. Withdrawal of beta blockers in the postoperative period has been implicated as one of the major causes of POAF. Amiodarone, calcium channel blockers and a variety of other pharmacological agents have been used for the prevention of POAF. Atrial pacing is a non-pharmacological measure which has gained popularity in the prevention of POAF. There is considerable controversy regarding whether rate control is superior to rhythm control in the treatment of established atrial fibrillation (AF. Amiodarone plays a central role in both rate control and rhythm control in postoperative AF. Newer drugs like dronedarone and ranazoline are likely to come into the market in the coming years.

  7. [Cardiac cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miján, Alberto; Martín, Elvira; de Mateo, Beatriz

    2006-05-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF), especially affecting the right heart, frequently leads to malnutrition. If the latter is severe and is combined to other factors, it may lead to cardiac cachexia. This one is associated to increased mortality and lower survival of patients suffering from it. The causes of cardiac cachexia are diverse, generally associated to maintenance of a negative energy balance, with increasing evidence of its multifactorial origin. Neurohumoral, inflammatory, immunological, and metabolic factors, among others, are superimposed in the patient with CHF, leading to involvement and deterioration of several organs and systems, since this condition affects both lean (or active cellular) mass and adipose and bone tissue osteoporosis. Among all, the most pronounced deterioration may be seen at skeletal muscle tissue, at both structural and functional levels, the heart not being spared. As for treatment, it should be based on available scientific evidence. Assessment of nutritional status of any patient with CHF is a must, with the requirement of nutritional intervention in case of malnutrition. In this situation, especially if accompanied by cardiac cachexia, it is required to modify energy intake and oral diet quality, and to consider the indication of specific complementary or alternative artificial nutrition. Besides, the causal relationship of the beneficial role of moderate physical exertion is increasing, as well as modulation of metabolic and inflammatory impairments observed in cardiac cachexia with several drugs, leading to a favorable functional and structural response in CHF patients.

  8. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiandra, O.; Espasandin, W.; Fiandra, H.

    1984-01-01

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  9. Indicators of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage as a Cause of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Zachariah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH may present with cardiac arrest (SAH-CA. We report a case of SAH-CA to assist providers in distinguishing SAH as an etiology of cardiac arrest despite electrocardiogram findings that may be suggestive of a cardiac etiology. SAH-CA is associated with high rates of return of spontaneous circulation, but overall poor outcome. An initially non-shockable cardiac rhythm and the absence of brain stem reflexes are important clues in indentifying SAH-CA.

  10. Methyl-CpG binding-protein 2 function in cholinergic neurons mediates cardiac arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2016-11-15

    Sudden unexpected death occurs in one quarter of deaths in Rett Syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). People with RTT show a variety of autonomic nervous system (ANS) abnormalities and mouse models show similar problems including QTc interval prolongation and hypothermia. To explore the role of cardiac problems in sudden death in RTT, we characterized cardiac rhythm in mice lacking Mecp2 function. Male and female mutant mice exhibited spontaneous cardiac rhythm abnormalities including bradycardic events, sinus pauses, atrioventricular block, premature ventricular contractions, non-sustained ventricular arrhythmias, and increased heart rate variability. Death was associated with spontaneous cardiac arrhythmias and complete conduction block. Atropine treatment reduced cardiac arrhythmias in mutant mice, implicating overactive parasympathetic tone. To explore the role of MeCP2 within the parasympathetic neurons, we selectively removed MeCP2 function from cholinergic neurons (MeCP2 ChAT KO), which recapitulated the cardiac rhythm abnormalities, hypothermia, and early death seen in RTT male mice. Conversely, restoring MeCP2 only in cholinergic neurons rescued these phenotypes. Thus, MeCP2 in cholinergic neurons is necessary and sufficient for autonomic cardiac control, thermoregulation, and survival, and targeting the overactive parasympathetic system may be a useful therapeutic strategy to prevent sudden unexpected death in RTT.

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, Frederic; Triba, Mohamed N; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frederic; Hubert, Hervé; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Escutnaire, Josephine; Guenin, Aurelien; Hoogvorst, Astrid; Marbeuf-Gueye, Carol; Reuter, Paul-Georges; Javaud, Nicolas; Vicaut, Eric; Chevret, Sylvie

    2017-02-01

    Relationship between cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation (CPR) durations and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain unclear. Our primary aim was to determine the association between survival without neurologic sequelae and cardiac arrest intervals in the setting of witnessed OHCA. We analyzed 27,301 non-traumatic, witnessed OHCA patients in France included in the national registry from June 1, 2011 through December 1, 2015. We analyzed cardiac arrest intervals, designated as no-flow (NF; from collapse to start of CPR) and low-flow (LF; from start of CPR to cessation of resuscitation) in relation to 30-day survival without sequelae. We determined the influence of recognized prognostic factors (age, gender, initial rhythm, location of cardiac arrest) on this relation. For the entire cohort, the area delimited by a value of NF greater than 12min (95% confidence interval: 11-13min) and LF greater than 33min (95% confidence interval: 29-45min), yielded a probability of 30-day survival of less than 1%. These sets of values were greatly influenced by initial cardiac arrest rhythm, age, sex and location of cardiac arrest. Extended CPR duration (greater than 40min) in the setting of initial shockable cardiac rhythm is associated with greater than 1% survival with NF less than 18min. The NF interval was highly influential on the LF interval regardless of outcome, whether return of spontaneous circulation (padvanced techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Crisis management during anaesthesia: cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runciman, W B; Morris, R W; Watterson, L M; Williamson, J A; Paix, A D

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac arrest attributable to anaesthesia occurs at the rate of between 0.5 and 1 case per 10 000 cases, tends to have a different profile to that of cardiac arrest occurring elsewhere, and has an in-hospital mortality of 20%. However, as individual practitioners encounter cardiac arrest rarely, the rapidity with which the diagnosis is made and the consistency of appropriate management varies considerably. To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD-A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a sub-algorithm for cardiac arrest, in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with anaesthesia. The potential performance of this structured approach for each the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. There were 129 reports of cardiac arrest associated with anaesthesia among the first 4000 AIMS incident reports. Identified aetiological factors were grouped into five categories: (1) anaesthetic technique (11 cases with this category alone; 32 with this and one or more of the other categories, representing 25% of all 129 cardiac arrests); (2) drug related (16; 32, 25%); (3) associated with surgical procedure (9; 29, 22%); (4) associated with pre-existing medical or surgical disease (30; 82, 64%); (5) unknown (8; 14, 11%). The "real life" presentation and management of cardiac arrest in association with anaesthesia differs substantially from that detailed in general published guidelines. Cardiac rhythms at the time were sinus bradycardia (23%); asystole (22%); tachycardia/ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (14%); and normal (7%), with a further third unknown. Details of treatment were recorded in 110 reports; modalities employed included cardiac compression (72%); adrenaline (61%); 100% oxygen (58%); atropine (38%); intravenous fluids (25%), and electrical defibrillation (17%). There

  13. RNAi of the circadian clock gene period disrupts the circadian rhythm but not the circatidal rhythm in the mangrove cricket

    OpenAIRE

    Takekata, Hiroki; Matsuura, Yu; Goto, Shin G.; Satoh, Aya; Numata, Hideharu

    2012-01-01

    The clock mechanism for circatidal rhythm has long been controversial, and its molecular basis is completely unknown. The mangrove cricket, Apteronemobius asahinai, shows two rhythms simultaneously in its locomotor activity: a circatidal rhythm producing active and inactive phases as well as a circadian rhythm modifying the activity intensity of circatidal active phases. The role of the clock gene period (per), one of the key components of the circadian clock in insects, was investigated in t...

  14. Disturbance recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, A.K.; Deshpande, S.V.; Mayya, A.; Vaidya, U.W.; Premraj, M.K.; Patil, N.B.

    1994-01-01

    A computerized system for disturbance monitoring, recording and display has been developed for use in nuclear power plants and is versatile enough to be used where ever a large number of parameters need to be recorded, e.g. conventional power plants, chemical industry etc. The Disturbance Recording System (DRS) has been designed to continuously monitor a process plant and record crucial parameters. The DRS provides a centralized facility to monitor and continuously record 64 process parameters scanned every 1 sec for 5 days. The system also provides facility for storage of 64 parameters scanned every 200 msec during 2 minutes prior to and 3 minutes after a disturbance. In addition the system can initiate, on demand, the recording of 8 parameters at a fast rate of every 5 msec for a period of 5 sec. and thus act as a visicorder. All this data is recorded in non-volatile memory and can be displayed, printed/plotted and used for subsequent analysis. Since data can be stored densely on floppy disks, the volume of space required for archival storage is also low. As a disturbance recorder, the DRS allows the operator to view the state of the plant prior to occurrence of the disturbance and helps in identifying the root cause. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs

  15. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Spilde

    Full Text Available Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios, which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  16. Sleep quality and circadian rhythm disruption in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Toft, Palle

    2017-01-01

    , medication, as well as the critical illness itself have been reported as important sleep disturbing factors. Secretion of sleep hormone, melatonin, expressing circadian rhythmicity was found abolished or phase delayed in critically ill patients. Various interventions have been tested in several studies...... aiming to improve sleep quality and circadian rhythm in the ICU. The results of these studies were inconclusive due to using the sleep assessment methods other than PSG or the absence of a reliable sleep scoring tool for the analysis of the PSG findings in this patient population. Development of a valid...

  17. Design and validation of a three-instrument toolkit for the assessment of competence in electrocardiogram rhythm recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Padilla, José M; Granero-Molina, José; Márquez-Hernández, Verónica V; Suthers, Fiona; López-Entrambasaguas, Olga M; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano

    2017-06-01

    Rapid and accurate interpretation of cardiac arrhythmias by nurses has been linked with safe practice and positive patient outcomes. Although training in electrocardiogram rhythm recognition is part of most undergraduate nursing programmes, research continues to suggest that nurses and nursing students lack competence in recognising cardiac rhythms. In order to promote patient safety, nursing educators must develop valid and reliable assessment tools that allow the rigorous assessment of this competence before nursing students are allowed to practise without supervision. The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically evaluate a toolkit to holistically assess competence in electrocardiogram rhythm recognition. Following a convenience sampling technique, 293 nursing students from a nursing faculty in a Spanish university were recruited for the study. The following three instruments were developed and psychometrically tested: an electrocardiogram knowledge assessment tool (ECG-KAT), an electrocardiogram skills assessment tool (ECG-SAT) and an electrocardiogram self-efficacy assessment tool (ECG-SES). Reliability and validity (content, criterion and construct) of these tools were meticulously examined. A high Cronbach's alpha coefficient demonstrated the excellent reliability of the instruments (ECG-KAT=0.89; ECG-SAT=0.93; ECG-SES=0.98). An excellent context validity index (scales' average content validity index>0.94) and very good criterion validity were evidenced for all the tools. Regarding construct validity, principal component analysis revealed that all items comprising the instruments contributed to measure knowledge, skills or self-efficacy in electrocardiogram rhythm recognition. Moreover, known-groups analysis showed the tools' ability to detect expected differences in competence between groups with different training experiences. The three-instrument toolkit developed showed excellent psychometric properties for measuring competence in

  18. Sleep disturbances in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, J J M

    2003-02-01

    The present article is meant to suggest an approach to the guidelines for the therapy of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients.The factors affecting the quality of life in PD patients are depression, sleep disturbances and dependence. A large review of the literature on sleep disturbances in PD patients, provided the basis for the following classification of the sleep-arousal disturbances in PD patients. We suggest a model based on 3 steps in the treatment of sleep disturbances in PD patients. This model allowing the patient, the spouse or the caregiver a quiet sleep at night, may postpone the retirement and the institutionalization of the PD patient. I. Correct diagnosis of sleep disorders based on detailed anamnesis of the patient and of the spouse or of the caregiver. One week recording on a symptom diary (log) by the patient or the caregiver. Correct diagnosis of sleep disorders co morbidities. Selection of the most appropriate sleep test among: polysomnography (PSG), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), multiple wake latency test (MWLT), Epworth Sleepiness Scale, actigraphy or video-PSG. II. The nonspecific therapeutic approach consists in: a) Checking the sleep effect on motor performance, is it beneficial, worse or neutral. b) Psycho-physical assistance. c) Dopaminergic adjustment is necessary owing to the progression of the nigrostriatal degeneration and the increased sensitivity of the terminals, which alter the normal modulator mechanisms of the motor centers in PD patients. Among the many neurotransmitters of the nigro-striatal pathway one can distinguish two with a major influence on REM and NonREM sleep. REM sleep corresponds to an increased cholinergic receptor activity and a decreased dopaminergic activity. This is the reason why REM sleep deprivation by suppressing cholinergic receptor activity ameliorates PD motor symptoms. L-Dopa and its agonists by suppressing cholinergic receptors suppress REM sleep. The permanent adjustment

  19. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Jongwha; Whang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but weak opposite relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion. PMID:23914165

  20. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daekeun eKim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but, again, no significant relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion.

  1. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Jongwha; Whang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but weak opposite relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion.

  2. [Cardiac sarcoidosis: Diagnosis and therapeutic challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Aubart, F; Nunes, H; Mathian, A; Haroche, J; Hié, M; Le-Thi Huong Boutin, D; Cluzel, P; Soussan, M; Waintraub, X; Fouret, P; Valeyre, D; Amoura, Z

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder of unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma in young adults. Cardiac involvement is rare and range from 2 to 75% depending on diagnostic criteria. Cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis may be asymptomatic or may manifest as rhythm/conduction troubles or congestive heart failure. The diagnosis and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis may be challenging. However, advances have come in recent years from the use of cardiac MRI and 18 FDG-TEP scanner, as well as from the stratification of the risk of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation. Due to the rarity of the disease, there is no reliable prospective large study to guide therapeutic strategy for cardiac sarcoidosis. Corticosteroids are probably efficacious, in particular in case of atrio-ventricular block or moderate heart failure. Immunosuppressive drugs have not been largely studied but methotrexate could be helpful. In refractory forms, TNF-α antagonists have been used with success. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ratheal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac ablation is a procedure that uses either radiofrequency or cryothermal energy to destroy cells in the heart to terminate and/or prevent arrhythmias. The indications for cardiac catheter ablation include refractory, symptomatic arrhythmias, with more specific guidelines for atrial fibrillation in particular. The ablation procedure itself involves mapping the arrhythmia and destruction of the aberrant pathway in an effort to permanently prevent the arrhythmia. There are many types of arrhythmias, and they require individualized approaches to ablation based on their innately different electrical pathways. Ablation of arrhythmias, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, and atrial-fibrillation, is discussed in this review. Ablation has a high success rate overall and minimal complication rates, leading to improved quality of life in many patients.

  4. Nutritional disturbances by adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Stassart, Martine

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional disturbances are frequent by adolescents. That is a psychological defense against dependance toward the mother but also a middle to remain in a childish position i.e. either as a fat baby - in the fall of obesity- or as the ideal pre- or bisexual great child - in the case of anorexia.

  5. The Impact of Sleep and Circadian Disturbance on Hormones and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Won Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of several hormones fluctuate according to the light and dark cycle and are also affected by sleep, feeding, and general behavior. The regulation and metabolism of several hormones are influenced by interactions between the effects of sleep and the intrinsic circadian system; growth hormone, melatonin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin levels are highly correlated with sleep and circadian rhythmicity. There are also endogenous circadian mechanisms that serve to regulate glucose metabolism and similar rhythms pertaining to lipid metabolism, regulated through the actions of various clock genes. Sleep disturbance, which negatively impacts hormonal rhythms and metabolism, is also associated with obesity, insulin insensitivity, diabetes, hormonal imbalance, and appetite dysregulation. Circadian disruption, typically induced by shift work, may negatively impact health due to impaired glucose and lipid homeostasis, reversed melatonin and cortisol rhythms, and loss of clock gene rhythmicity.

  6. Changes in the Diurnal Rhythms during a 45-Day Head-Down Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaodi; Zhang, Lin; Wan, Yufeng; Yu, Xinyang; Guo, Yiming; Chen, Xiaoping; Tan, Cheng; Huang, Tianle; Shen, Hanjie; Chen, Xianyun; Li, Hongying; Lv, Ke; Sun, Fei; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2012-01-01

    In spaceflight human circadian rhythms and sleep patterns are likely subject to change, which consequently disturbs human physiology, cognitive abilities and performance efficiency. However, the influence of microgravity on sleep and circadian clock as well as the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Placing volunteers in a prone position, whereby their heads rest at an angle of −6° below horizontal, mimics the microgravity environment in orbital flight. Such positioning is termed head-down bed rest (HDBR). In this work, we analysed the influence of a 45-day HDBR on physiological diurnal rhythms. We examined urinary electrolyte and hormone excretion, and the results show a dramatic elevation of cortisol levels during HDBR and recovery. Increased diuresis, melatonin and testosterone were observed at certain periods during HDBR. In addition, we investigated the changes in urination and defecation frequencies and found that the rhythmicity of urinary frequency during lights-off during and after HDBR was higher than control. The grouped defecation frequency data exhibits rhythmicity before and during HDBR but not after HDBR. Together, these data demonstrate that HDBR can alter a number of physiological processes associated with diurnal rhythms. PMID:23110150

  7. Cardiac conductive disturbance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Chen; Hsu, Ming-I; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2010-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality of reproductive-aged women and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the effects of PCOS on electrocardiograms (ECGs) are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of ECGs in patients with PCOS. This study included 24 patients with PCOS and 12 patients without PCOS. The heart rate, PR interval, QRS duration, Sokolow-Lyon voltage (SV1 + RV5/6), Cornell voltage (RaVL + SV3), QT interval and QTc interval were measured in 12-lead ECGs. The QRS duration was wider in patients with PCOS than those without PCOS (91 ± 8 vs. 81 ± 10 ms, p heart rate, PR interval, Sokolow-Lyon voltage, product of the QRS duration times Cornell voltage combination, QT interval, QTc interval, QT dispersion and QTc dispersion were similar between the two groups. PCOS is associated with a widening QRS duration, which may contribute to its increased cardiovascular risks.

  8. Circadian rhythms in the incidence of apoptotic cells and number of clonogenic cells in intestinal crypts after radiation using normal and reversed light conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, K.; Potten, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Variations in the number of radiation-induced morphologically dead or dying cells (apoptotic cells) in the crypts in the small intestine of the mouse have been studied throughout a 24-h period under a normal light regimen. A clear circadian rhythm was displayed in the apoptotic incidence 3 or 6 h after irradiation for each gamma-ray dose studied (range 0.14-9.0 Gy). The most prominent circadian rhythm was obtained after 0.5 Gy. Peak time of day for inducing apoptosis was 06.00-09.00 h, and the trough occurred at 18.00-21.00 h. Some mice were also transferred to a reversed light cycle, and irradiated on different days after transfer. Apoptosis induced by 0.5 Gy or 9.0 Gy, or number of surviving crypts (microcolonies) after 11.0 Gy or 13.0 Gy was examined. The transition point for reversal of circadian rhythm in apoptosis (after 0.5 Gy) occurred 7 days after transfer and the rhythm was reversed by 14 days. The rhythm for crypt survival (i.e. for clonogenic cell radiosensitivity) was disturbed on 1 day and transition point for reversal occurred 3 days after transfer. The rhythm became reversed by 7 days. (author)

  9. Sleep, circadian rhythms, and athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Eirunn; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Flo, Elisabeth; Harris, Anette; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-10-01

    Sleep deprivation and time of day are both known to influence performance. A growing body of research has focused on how sleep and circadian rhythms impact athletic performance. This review provides a systematic overview of this research. We searched three different databases for articles on these issues and inspected relevant reference lists. In all, 113 articles met our inclusion criteria. The most robust result is that athletic performance seems to be best in the evening around the time when the core body temperature typically is at its peak. Sleep deprivation was negatively associated with performance whereas sleep extension seems to improve performance. The effects of desynchronization of circadian rhythms depend on the local time at which performance occurs. The review includes a discussion of differences regarding types of skills involved as well as methodological issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of reproduction by the circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Xiang; Chen, Si-Yu; Liu, Chang

    2016-12-25

    Mammals synchronize their circadian activity primarily to the cycles of light and darkness in the environment. Circadian rhythm is controlled by the central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the peripheral clocks in various tissues. More importantly, the central clock can integrate photic/nonphotic signals to generate rhythmic outputs, and then drive the slave oscillators in peripheral tissues through neuroendocrine and behavioral signals. Human reproductive activities, as some other physiological functions, are controlled by the biological clocks. Accumulating lines of epidemiological and genetic evidence indicate that disruption of circadian clock can be directly involved in multiple pathological processes, including infertility. In this review, we mainly discuss the presence of a circadian clock in reproductive tissues and its roles in follicles development, ovulation, spermatogenesis, fertilization and embryo implantation, etc. As the increased shift work and assisted reproductive technologies possibly disrupt circadian rhythmicity to impact reproduction, the importance of circadian rhythms should be highlighted in the regulation of reproductive process.

  11. Circadian rhythms and obesity in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froy, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious public health problem and a major risk factor for the development of illnesses, such as insulin resistance and hypertension. Attempts to understand the causes of obesity and develop new therapeutic strategies have mostly focused on caloric intake and energy expenditure. Recent studies have shown that the circadian clock controls energy homeostasis by regulating the circadian expression and/or activity of enzymes, hormones, and transport systems involved in metabolism. Moreover, disruption of circadian rhythms leads to obesity and metabolic disorders. Therefore, it is plausible that resetting of the circadian clock can be used as a new approach to attenuate obesity. Feeding regimens, such as restricted feeding (RF), calorie restriction (CR), and intermittent fasting (IF), provide a time cue and reset the circadian clock and lead to better health. In contrast, high-fat (HF) diet leads to disrupted circadian expression of metabolic factors and obesity. This paper focuses on circadian rhythms and their link to obesity.

  12. The ECG Vertigo in Diabetes and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Voulgari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  13. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  14. Taser X26 discharges in swine: ventricular rhythm capture is dependent on discharge vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Daniel J; Walter, Robert J; Dennis, Andrew J; Margeta, Bosko; Starr, Frederic; Nagy, Kimberly K; Bokhari, Faran; Wiley, Dorion E; Joseph, Kimberly T; Roberts, Roxanne R

    2008-12-01

    Data from our previous studies indicate that Taser X26 stun devices can acutely alter cardiac function in swine. We hypothesized that most transcardiac discharge vectors would capture ventricular rhythm, but that other vectors, not traversing the heart, would fail to capture the ventricular rhythm. Using an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approved protocol, four Yorkshire pigs (25-36 kg) were anesthetized, paralyzed with succinylcholine (2 mg/kg), and then exposed to 10 second discharges from a police-issue Taser X26. For most discharges, the barbed darts were pushed manually into the skin to their full depth (12 mm) and were arranged in either transcardiac (such that a straight line connecting the darts would cross the region of the heart) or non-transcardiac vectors. A total of 11 different vectors and 22 discharge conditions were studied. For each vector, by simply rotating the cartridge 180-degrees in the gun, the primary current-emitting dart was changed and the direction of current flow during the discharge was reversed without physically moving the darts. Echocardiography and electrocardiograms (ECGs) were performed before, during, and after all discharges. p values captured immediately in 52.5% (31 of 59) of the discharges on the ventral surface of the animal. In each of these cases, capture of the ventricular rhythm with rapid ventricular contractions consistent with ventricular tachycardia (VT) or flutter was seen throughout the discharge. A total of 27 discharges were administered with transcardiac vectors and ventricular capture occurred in 23 of these discharges (85.2% capture rate). A total of 32 non-transcardiac discharges were administered ventrally and capture was seen in only eight of these (25% capture rate). Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was seen with two vectors, both of which were transcardiac. In the remaining animals, VT occurred postdischarge until sinus rhythm was regained spontaneously. For most transcardiac vectors

  15. Effects of Auditory Rhythm and Music on Gait Disturbances in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoori, Aidin; Eagleman, David M; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Gait abnormalities, such as shuffling steps, start hesitation, and freezing, are common and often incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other parkinsonian disorders. Pharmacological and surgical approaches have only limited efficacy in treating these gait disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS), such as playing marching music and dance therapy, has been shown to be a safe, inexpensive, and an effective method in improving gait in PD patients. However, RAS that adapts to patients' movements may be more effective than rigid, fixed-tempo RAS used in most studies. In addition to auditory cueing, immersive virtual reality technologies that utilize interactive computer-generated systems through wearable devices are increasingly used for improving brain-body interaction and sensory-motor integration. Using multisensory cues, these therapies may be particularly suitable for the treatment of parkinsonian freezing and other gait disorders. In this review, we examine the affected neurological circuits underlying gait and temporal processing in PD patients and summarize the current studies demonstrating the effects of RAS on improving these gait deficits.

  16. Effects of auditory rhythm and music on gait disturbances in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidin eAshoori

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gait abnormalities such as shuffling steps, start hesitation, and freezing are common and often incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD and other parkinsonian disorders. Pharmacological and surgical approaches have only limited efficacy in treating these gait disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS, such as playing marching music or dance therapy, has been shown to be a safe, inexpensive, and an effective method in improving gait in PD patients. However, RAS that adapts to patients’ movements may be more effective than rigid, fixed-tempo RAS used in most studies. In addition to auditory cueing, immersive virtual reality technologies that utilize interactive computer-generated systems through wearable devices are increasingly used for improving brain-body interaction and sensory-motor integration. Using multisensory cues, these therapies may be particularly suitable for the treatment of parkinsonian freezing and other gait disorders. In this review, we examine the affected neurological circuits underlying gait and temporal processing in PD patients and summarize the current studies demonstrating the effects of RAS on improving these gait deficits.

  17. Effect of photic stimuli disturbing overt circadian rhythms on the dorsomedial and ventrolateral SCN rhythmicity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Illnerová, Helena

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 1048, č. 1-2 (2005), s. 161-169 ISSN 0006-8993 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian clock * suprachiasmatic nucleus * photic entrainment Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.296, year: 2005

  18. Cognitive Behavioral Social Rhythm Therapy (CBSRT) for Sleep and Mood Disturbances in Veterans with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Patricia.Haynes3@va.gov Fax: (520) 626-6050 E-mail: thaynes@email.arizona.edu Home Address: Citizenship : United States 2828 W. Calle...of the Ambivalent Sleeper [Board Review Question]. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 15, 511-512. Haynes, P. L. (2009). Is CBT-I effective for...Support Networks in Asymptomatic Individuals with a History of Depression Versus Never-Depressed Individuals. Personal Life Events: Birth of Child

  19. Toward a complex system understanding of bipolar disorder: A chaotic model of abnormal circadian activity rhythms in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaeghi, Fatemeh; Hashemi Golpayegani, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Sajad; Murray, Greg

    2016-08-01

    In the absence of a comprehensive neural model to explain the underlying mechanisms of disturbed circadian function in bipolar disorder, mathematical modeling is a helpful tool. Here, circadian activity as a response to exogenous daily cycles is proposed to be the product of interactions between neuronal networks in cortical (cognitive processing) and subcortical (pacemaker) areas of the brain. To investigate the dynamical aspects of the link between disturbed circadian activity rhythms and abnormalities of neurotransmitter functioning in frontal areas of the brain, we developed a novel mathematical model of a chaotic system which represents fluctuations in circadian activity in bipolar disorder as changes in the model's parameters. A novel map-based chaotic system was developed to capture disturbances in circadian activity across the two extreme mood states of bipolar disorder. The model uses chaos theory to characterize interplay between neurotransmitter functions and rhythm generation; it aims to illuminate key activity phenomenology in bipolar disorder, including prolonged sleep intervals, decreased total activity and attenuated amplitude of the diurnal activity rhythm. To test our new cortical-circadian mathematical model of bipolar disorder, we utilized previously collected locomotor activity data recorded from normal subjects and bipolar patients by wrist-worn actigraphs. All control parameters in the proposed model have an important role in replicating the different aspects of circadian activity rhythm generation in the brain. The model can successfully replicate deviations in sleep/wake time intervals corresponding to manic and depressive episodes of bipolar disorder, in which one of the excitatory or inhibitory pathways is abnormally dominant. Although neuroimaging research has strongly implicated a reciprocal interaction between cortical and subcortical regions as pathogenic in bipolar disorder, this is the first model to mathematically represent this

  20. Circadian rhythms in handwriting kinematics and legibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Isabelle; Gordijn, Marijke; Häussler, Andreas; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the circadian rhythmicity in handwriting kinematics and legibility and to compare the performance between Dutch and German writers. Two subject groups underwent a 40 h sleep deprivation protocol under Constant Routine conditions either in Groningen (10 Dutch subjects) or in Berlin (9 German subjects). Both groups wrote every 3h a test sentence of similar structure in their native language. Kinematic handwriting performance was assessed with a digitizing tablet and evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency, and script size. Writing speed (frequency of strokes and average velocity) revealed a clear circadian rhythm, with a parallel decline during night and a minimum around 3:00 h in the morning for both groups. Script size and movement fluency did not vary with time of day in neither group. Legibility of handwriting was evaluated by intra-individually ranking handwriting specimens of the 13 sessions by 10 German and 10 Dutch raters. Whereas legibility ratings of the German handwriting specimens deteriorated during night in parallel with slower writing speed, legibility of the Dutch handwriting deteriorated not until the next morning. In conclusion, the circadian rhythm of handwriting kinematics seems to be independent of script language at least among the two tested western countries. Moreover, handwriting legibility is also subject to a circadian rhythm which, however, seems to be influenced by variations in the assessment protocol. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Basic Principles of Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy is a psychotherapy modality that helps the patient recognize the relationship between disruptions in social rhythms and the onset of previous episodes of psychiatric disorders. It uses psychoeducation and behavioral techniques to maintain social rhythm and sleep/wake regularity. It is closely related to and ldquo;social zeitgeber theory and rdquo; that emphasizes the importance that social rhythm regularity may play in synchronization of circadian rhythms in individuals with or at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy have been shown to stabilize social rhythms and enhance course and outcome in bipolar disorder. This review focuses on the theoretical principles and the basic steps of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy as a psychotherapy approach in bipolar disorder. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar databases were searched without temporal restriction. Search terms included interpersonal social rhythm therapy, bipolar, mood disorders. Abstracts were reviewed for relevance, and randomized controlled trials of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy in bipolar disorder selected. These researches also summarized on the final part of this review. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 438-446

  2. Wernicke's encephalopathy after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yoshiyuki

    2018-05-01

    A 76-year-old woman who had been on hemodialysis for 3 years developed ischemic mitral valve insufficiency, tricuspid insufficiency, and chronic atrial fibrillation, and underwent cardiac surgery. On the 4th postoperative day, she experienced a sudden disturbance of consciousness, aphasia, and limb ataxia. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities. Wernicke's encephalopathy was suspected and the patient was given vitamin B1, whereupon her symptoms gradually improved. On the 42nd postoperative day, she was free of neurological symptoms and discharged.

  3. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    ); and in females (4.8% in 2001 to 6.7% in 2010), psexes in patients with a non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.00; CI 0.72-1.40), while female sex was positively associated...... characteristics in females with a lower proportion of shockable rhythm. In an adjusted model, female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm.......AIM: Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. METHODS: Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation...

  4. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths Hairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Spilde; A Lanzirotti; C Qualls; G Phillips; A Ali; L Agenbroad; O Appenzeller

    2011-12-31

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was {approx}31 cms/year and {approx}16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  5. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic

  6. Rehabilitation of disturbed land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, L.C. [Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research, Kenmore, Qld. (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    This chapter discusses the objectives of rehabilitation of lands in Australian disturbed by mining. It gives advice on rehabilitation planning and outlines the factors influencing post-mining land use and rehabilitation strategies, including climate, topography, hydrology, properties of soils, overburden and mineral processing wastes, flora and fauna and social considerations. Finally, the key elements of a rehabilitation plan are discussed, namely: landscape reconstruction; selective handling of overburden; and establishment and maintenance of a vegetative cover. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Complications after implantation of a new-generation insertable cardiac monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Søren Zöga; Haugan, Ketil Jørgen; Højberg, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insertable cardiac monitors (ICM) are leadless devices utilized in long-term monitoring of the heart rhythm. The implantation procedure of the new-generation ICMs is minimally invasive, but little experience exists regarding complications. We thus aimed to investigate adverse events (AE...

  8. Frailty syndrome in patients with heart rhythm disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarska, Agnieszka; Mlynarski, Rafal; Golba, Krzysztof S

    2017-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of frailty syndrome in patients with heart rhythm disorders that qualified for pacemaker implantation. The study included 171 patients (83 women, aged 73.9 ± 6.7 years) who qualified for pacemaker implantation as a result of sinus node dysfunction (81 patients) or atrio-ventricular blocks (AVB; 90 patients). A total of 60 patients (25 women, aged 72.40 ± 7.09 years) without heart rhythm disorders were included in the control group. Frailty syndrome was diagnosed using the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale test. Frailty syndrome was diagnosed in 25.15% of the patients, and pre-frailty in 36.84% of the patients. Frailty syndrome was diagnosed in 10% of the control group, and the average value of frailty was 3.35 ± 0.92. Frailty occurred significantly more often among patients with AVB (33.34%) compared with patients who were diagnosed with sinus node dysfunction (16.05%); P = 0.0081. The average score of frailty for sinus node dysfunction was 3.71 ± 0.89, and for AVB it was 4.14 ± 0.93; P = 0.0152. In the case of AVB, the women had a statistically more intense level of frailty of 4.54 ± 0.90 as compared with the men 3.87 ± 0.85; P = 0.0294. In the multiple logistic analysis, the presence of any arrhythmia was strongly associated with frailty syndrome (OR 2.1286, 95% CI 1.4594 - 3.1049; P = 0.0001). Frailty syndrome was diagnosed in one-quarter of patients with cardiac arrhythmias, whereas a further 40% were at a higher risk of frailty syndrome, and its occurrence was significantly higher if compared with the control group. Frailty occurred significantly more often among patients with atrio-ventricular blocks, especially in women. The results of the present research showed that there is a statistical association between frailty and arrhythmias. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1313-1318. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Acquired valvar disease and cardiac tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruttley, M.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation must determine the severity of the valve fault or faults, the effect on cardiac function and the significance of any associated cardiac disease in order that surgical referral can be made when appropriate with knowledge of operative risk and prognosis; radiology plays an important part in this. Radiological features will depend on the valve or valves affected, the type and severity of the haemodynamic disturbance and its time scale of development and duration. They may be modified by embolism or infection and there may be specific radiological manifestations of the underlying disease

  10. Sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback as adjunct therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Ingrid H C H M; Wubben, Jacqueline A; Vanwersch, Raymond A P; Estevao, Dave L; Tass, Peter A

    2017-08-01

    Neurofeedback may enhance compensatory brain mechanisms. EEG-based sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback training was suggested to be beneficial in Parkinson's disease. In a placebo-controlled study in parkinsonian nonhuman primates we here show that sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback training reduces MPTP-induced parkinsonian symptoms and both ON and OFF scores during classical L-DOPA treatment. Our findings encourage further development of sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback training as adjunct therapy for Parkinson's disease which might help reduce L-DOPA-induced side effects.

  11. Climate change and forest disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia H. Dale; Linda A. Joyce; Steve McNulty; Ronald P. Neilson; Matthew P. Ayres; Michael D. Flannigan; Paul J. Hanson; Lloyd C. Irland; Ariel E. Lugo; Chris J. Peterson; Daniel Simberloff; Frederick J. Swanson; Brian J. Stocks; Michael Wotton

    2001-01-01

    This article examines how eight disturbances influence forest structure, composition, and function, and how climate change may influence the severity, frequency, and magnitude of disturbances to forests. We focus on examples from the United States, although these influences occur worldwide. We also consider options for coping with disturbance under changing climate....

  12. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, A. V., E-mail: ave@cardio-tomsk.ru; Evtushenko, V. V. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Saushkina, Yu. V.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O. [Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Sergeevichev, D. S. [Academician E.N. Meshalkin State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lotkov, A. I. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science of the Siberian Branch of the RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Pokushalov, E. A.

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using {sup 123}I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  13. Can cardiac surgery cause hypopituitarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Flverly; Burger, Ines; Poll, Eva Maria; Reineke, Andrea; Strasburger, Christian J; Dohmen, Guido; Gilsbach, Joachim M; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka

    2012-03-01

    Apoplexy of pituitary adenomas with subsequent hypopituitarism is a rare but well recognized complication following cardiac surgery. The nature of cardiac on-pump surgery provides a risk of damage to the pituitary because the vascular supply of the pituitary is not included in the cerebral autoregulation. Thus, pituitary tissue may exhibit an increased susceptibility to hypoperfusion, ischemia or intraoperative embolism. After on-pump procedures, patients often present with physical and psychosocial impairments which resemble symptoms of hypopituitarism. Therefore, we analyzed whether on-pump cardiac surgery may cause pituitary dysfunction also in the absence of pre-existing pituitary disease. Twenty-five patients were examined 3-12 months after on-pump cardiac surgery. Basal hormone levels for all four anterior pituitary hormone axes were measured and a short synacthen test and a growth hormone releasing hormone plus arginine (GHRH-ARG)-test were performed. Quality of life (QoL), depression, subjective distress for a specific life event, sleep quality and fatigue were assessed by means of self-rating questionnaires. Hormonal alterations were only slight and no signs of anterior hypopituitarism were found except for an insufficient growth hormone rise in two overweight patients in the GHRH-ARG-test. Psychosocial impairment was pronounced, including symptoms of moderate to severe depression in 9, reduced mental QoL in 8, dysfunctional coping in 6 and pronounced sleep disturbances in 16 patients. Hormone levels did not correlate with psychosocial impairment. On-pump cardiac surgery did not cause relevant hypopituitarism in our sample of patients and does not serve to explain the psychosocial symptoms of these patients.

  14. Influence of light intensity and spectral composition of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and mRNA expression of gonadotropins in roach Rutilus rutilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Kleiner, Wibke; Kloas, Werner

    2018-02-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of artificial light at night (ALAN) of different intensities (0, 1, 10, 100 lx) and different colours (blue, green, red) on the daily melatonin rhythm and mRNA expression of gonadotropins in roach Rutilus rutilus, a ubiquitous cyprinid, which occur in standing and moderately flowing freshwater habitats of central Europe. Melatonin concentrations were significantly lowered under nocturnal white light already at 1 lx. Low intensity blue, green and red ALAN lowered the melatonin levels significantly in comparison to a dark control. We conclude that ALAN can disturb melatonin rhythms in roach at very low intensities and at different wavelengths and thus light pollution in urban waters has the potential to impact biological rhythms in fish. However, mRNA expression of gonadotropins was not affected by ALAN during the period of the experiments. Thus, suspected implications of ALAN on reproduction of roach could not be substantiated.

  15. Disturbance by optimal discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Ryûitirô; Koike, Tatsuhiko

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the disturbance by measurements which unambiguously discriminate between given candidate states. We prove that such an optimal measurement necessarily changes distinguishable states indistinguishable when the inconclusive outcome is obtained. The result was previously shown by Chefles [Phys. Lett. A 239, 339 (1998), 10.1016/S0375-9601(98)00064-4] under restrictions on the class of quantum measurements and on the definition of optimality. Our theorems remove these restrictions and are also applicable to infinitely many candidate states. Combining with our previous results, one can obtain concrete mathematical conditions for the resulting states. The method may have a wide variety of applications in contexts other than state discrimination.

  16. Standing down Straight: Jump Rhythm Technique's Rhythm-Driven, Community-Directed Approach to Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenfeld, Billy

    2009-01-01

    "Standing down straight" means to stand on two feet with both stability and relaxation. Using standing down straight as the foundation of class work, Jump Rhythm Technique offers a fresh alternative to conventional systems of dance study. It bases its pedagogy on three behaviors: grounding the body so that it can move with power and efficiency,…

  17. Sleep Disturbances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Shelton, Althea; Malow, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are extremely prevalent in children with neurodevelopmental disorders compared to typically developing children. The diagnostic criteria for many neurodevelopmental disorders include sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbance in this population is often multifactorial and caused by the interplay of genetic, neurobiological and environmental overlap. These disturbances often present either as insomnia or hypersomnia. Different sleep disorders present with these complaints and based on the clinical history and findings from diagnostic tests, an appropriate diagnosis can be made. This review aims to provide an overview of causes, diagnosis, and treatment of sleep disturbances in neurodevelopmental disorders that present primarily with symptoms of hypersomnia and/or insomnia.

  18. Defining Disturbance for Microbial Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Craig J

    2017-08-01

    Disturbance can profoundly modify the structure of natural communities. However, microbial ecologists' concept of "disturbance" has often deviated from conventional practice. Definitions (or implicit usage) have frequently included climate change and other forms of chronic environmental stress, which contradict the macrobiologist's notion of disturbance as a discrete event that removes biomass. Physical constraints and disparate biological characteristics were compared to ask whether disturbances fundamentally differ in microbial and macroorganismal communities. A definition of "disturbance" for microbial ecologists is proposed that distinguishes from "stress" and other competing terms, and that is in accord with definitions accepted by plant and animal ecologists.

  19. Cardiac pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenik, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of a cardiac pacemaker is described which is characterized by particularly small dimensions, small weight and long life duration. The weight is under 100g, the specific weight under 1.7. Mass inertia forces which occur through acceleration and retardation processes, thus remain below the threshold values, above which one would have to reckon with considerable damaging of the surrounding body tissue. The maintaining of small size and slight weight is achieved by using an oscillator on COSMOS basis, where by considerably lower energy consumption, amongst others the lifetimes of the batteries used - a lithium anode with thionyl chloride electrolyte - is extended to over 5 years. The reliability can be increased by the use of 2 or more batteries. The designed dimension are 20x60x60 mm 3 . (ORU/LH) [de

  20. Cardiac ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillis, L.D.; Grossman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Cardiac ventriculography has been used extensively to define the anatomy of the ventricles and related structures in patients with congenital, valvular, coronary, and cardiomyopathic heart disease. Specifically, left ventriculography may provide valuable information about global and segmental left ventricular function, mitral valvular incompetence, and the presence, location, and severity of a number of other abnormalities, including ventricular septal defect and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. As a result, it should be a routine part of catheterization in patients being evaluated for coronary artery disease, aortic or mitral valvular disease, unexplained left ventricular failure, or congenital heart disease. Similarly, right ventriculography may provide information about global and segmental right ventricular function and can be especially helpful in patients with congenital heart disease

  1. Melatonin and stable circadian rhythms optimize maternal, placental and fetal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun Xian; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A

    2014-01-01

    circadian clock, either directly or indirectly via the melatonin rhythm, programs the developing master oscillator of the fetus. Experimental studies have shown that disturbed maternal circadian rhythms, referred to as chronodisruption, and perturbed melatonin cycles have negative consequences for the maturing fetal oscillators, which may lead to psychological and behavioral problems in the newborn. To optimize regular circadian rhythms and prevent disturbances of the melatonin cycle during pregnancy, shift work and bright light exposure at night should be avoided, especially during the last trimester of pregnancy. Finally, melatonin synergizes with oxytocin to promote delivery of the fetus. Since blood melatonin levels are normally highest during the dark period, the propensity of childbirth to occur at night may relate to the high levels of melatonin at this time which work in concert with oxytocin to enhance the strength of uterine contractions. A number of conclusions naturally evolve from the data summarized in this review: (i) melatonin, of both pineal and placental origin, has essential functions in fetal maturation and placenta/uterine homeostasis; (ii) circadian clock genes, which are components of all cells including those in the peripheral reproductive organs, have important roles in reproductive and organismal (fetal and maternal) physiology; (iii) due to the potent antioxidant actions of melatonin, coupled with its virtual absence of toxicity, this indoleamine may have utility in the treatment of pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, placental and fetal ischemia/reperfusion, etc. (iv) the propensity for parturition to occur at night may relate to the synergism between the nocturnal increase in melatonin and oxytocin.

  2. Pilot investigation of the circadian plasma melatonin rhythm across the menstrual cycle in a small group of women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Shechter

    Full Text Available Women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD experience mood deterioration and altered circadian rhythms during the luteal phase (LP of their menstrual cycles. Disturbed circadian rhythms may be involved in the development of clinical mood states, though this relationship is not fully characterized in PMDD. We therefore conducted an extensive chronobiological characterization of the melatonin rhythm in a small group of PMDD women and female controls. In this pilot study, participants included five women with PMDD and five age-matched controls with no evidence of menstrual-related mood disorders. Participants underwent two 24-hour laboratory visits, during the follicular phase (FP and LP of the menstrual cycle, consisting of intensive physiological monitoring under "unmasked", time-isolation conditions. Measures included visual analogue scale for mood, ovarian hormones, and 24-hour plasma melatonin. Mood significantly (P≤.03 worsened during LP in PMDD compared to FP and controls. Progesterone was significantly (P = .025 increased during LP compared to FP, with no between-group differences. Compared to controls, PMDD women had significantly (P<.05 decreased melatonin at circadian phases spanning the biological night during both menstrual phases and reduced amplitude of its circadian rhythm during LP. PMDD women also had reduced area under the curve of melatonin during LP compared to FP. PMDD women showed affected circadian melatonin rhythms, with reduced nocturnal secretion and amplitude during the symptomatic phase compared to controls. Despite our small sample size, these pilot findings support a role for disturbed circadian rhythms in affective disorders. Possible associations with disrupted serotonergic transmission are proposed.

  3. Circadian rhythm and its role in malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Saqib

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations of multiple biological processes directed by endogenous clocks. The circadian timing system comprises peripheral oscillators located in most tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Circadian genes and the proteins produced by these genes constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator which form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends beyond clock genes to involve various clock-controlled genes (CCGs including various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle and on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis. This may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. Different lines of evidence in mice and humans suggest that cancer may be a circadian-related disorder. The genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian clock has been found in various cancers including breast, ovarian, endometrial, prostate and hematological cancers. The acquisition of current data in circadian clock mechanism may help chronotherapy, which takes into consideration the biological time to improve treatments by devising new therapeutic approaches for treating circadian-related disorders, especially cancer.

  4. Turn exchange rhythm in English dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fon, Janice

    2005-09-01

    This study looked at the relationship between rhythm and exchange type in British English, a stress-timed language, and Singaporean English, a syllable-timed language, using a spontaneous speech corpus. Exchange intervals (EIs), or the time difference between the end of one speaker and the beginning of another, were measured and exchanges of different types were labeled. Results showed that, in a dialogue, EIs were generally limited to a narrow range. However, within this range, EIs had at least four functions. First, EIs were reflective of the cognitive load and functioned as a way to differentiate various exchange types. Those requiring more cognitive resources, such as question-and-answer pairs, generally needed longer EIs than those not as cognitively loaded, such as backchanneling pairs. Second, EIs were indicative of linguistic rhythm. Singaporean English tended to have shorter EIs than British English. Third, EIs were reflective of politeness. The degree of politeness correlated negatively with EI. Shorter EIs showed a higher degree of respect. Finally, EIs were also indicative of the level of insecurity of a speaker, which was best reflected by gender differences. Females in general had longer EIs than males.

  5. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenstein, C; Heiland, I; Schuster, S

    2012-01-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles. (paper)

  6. Strength of Gamma Rhythm Depends on Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Supratim; Ni, Amy M.; Maunsell, John H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal assemblies often exhibit stimulus-induced rhythmic activity in the gamma range (30–80 Hz), whose magnitude depends on the attentional load. This has led to the suggestion that gamma rhythms form dynamic communication channels across cortical areas processing the features of behaviorally relevant stimuli. Recently, attention has been linked to a normalization mechanism, in which the response of a neuron is suppressed (normalized) by the overall activity of a large pool of neighboring neurons. In this model, attention increases the excitatory drive received by the neuron, which in turn also increases the strength of normalization, thereby changing the balance of excitation and inhibition. Recent studies have shown that gamma power also depends on such excitatory–inhibitory interactions. Could modulation in gamma power during an attention task be a reflection of the changes in the underlying excitation–inhibition interactions? By manipulating the normalization strength independent of attentional load in macaque monkeys, we show that gamma power increases with increasing normalization, even when the attentional load is fixed. Further, manipulations of attention that increase normalization increase gamma power, even when they decrease the firing rate. Thus, gamma rhythms could be a reflection of changes in the relative strengths of excitation and normalization rather than playing a functional role in communication or control. PMID:23393427

  7. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Deprivation, and Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Namni; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi; Dinges, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the current science on, and mathematical modeling of, dynamic changes in human performance within and between days is dominated by the two-process model of sleep–wake regulation, which posits a neurobiological drive for sleep that varies homeostatically (increasing as a saturating exponential during wakefulness and decreasing in a like manner during sleep), and a circadian process that neurobiologically modulates both the homeostatic drive for sleep and waking alertness and performance. Endogenous circadian rhythms in neurobehavioral functions, including physiological alertness and cognitive performance, have been demonstrated using special laboratory protocols that reveal the interaction of the biological clock with the sleep homeostatic drive. Individual differences in circadian rhythms and genetic and other components underlying such differences also influence waking neurobehavioral functions. Both acute total sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction increase homeostatic sleep drive and degrade waking neurobehavioral functions as reflected in sleepiness, attention, cognitive speed, and memory. Recent evidence indicating a high degree of stability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep loss suggests that these trait-like individual differences are phenotypic and likely involve genetic components, including circadian genes. Recent experiments have revealed both sleep homeostatic and circadian effects on brain metabolism and neural activation. Investigation of the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying the dynamically complex interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian systems is beginning. A key goal of this work is to identify biomarkers that accurately predict human performance in situations in which the circadian and sleep homeostatic systems are perturbed. PMID:23899598

  8. Rhythms of EEG and cognitive processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikova S.I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of cognitive processes is regarded to be more effective if it combines a psychological approach with a neurophysiological one. This approach makes it possible to come closer to understanding of the basic mechanisms of different cognitive processes, to describe the patterns of forming these mechanisms in ontogenesis, to investigate the origin of cognitive impairments, and to develop intervention techniques. The promising way of investigating the mechanisms of cognitive functions is the electroencephalography (EEG. This is a non-invasive, safe, and relatively cheap method of research of the functional condition of the brain. The characteristics of EEG rhythms, recorded with different cognitive loads, reflect the processes of functional modulation of neural network activity of the cortex, which serves the neurophysiologic basis for attention, memory and other cognitive processes. The article provides an overview of works containing the analysis of the alpha and theta rhythms’ dynamics in various states of wakefulness. It also introduces the substantiation of methodology of functional regulatory approach to the interpretation of behaviors of EEG rhythms.

  9. The effects of memantine on behavioral disturbances in patients with Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishi T

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Taro Kishi,* Shinji Matsunaga,* Nakao Iwata Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Memantine is effective in the treatment of behavioral disturbances in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. It has not yet been fully determined which behavioral disturbances respond best to memantine.Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of memantine vs control (placebo or usual care for the treatment of individual behavioral disturbances (delusion, hallucination, agitation/aggression, dysphoria, anxiety/phobia, euphoria, apathy, disinhibition, irritability/lability, aberrant motor activity/activity disturbances, nighttime disturbance/diurnal rhythm disturbances, and eating disturbances. Randomized controlled studies of memantine in patients with Alzheimer’s disease were included in this study. To evaluate these outcomes, standardized mean difference (SMD, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs, based upon a random-effects model was evaluated in the meta-analysis.Results: A total of 11 studies (n=4,261; memantine vs placebo: N=4, n=1,500; memantine + cholinesterase inhibitors [M + ChEIs] vs ChEIs: N=7, n=2,761 were included in the meta-analysis. Compared to control, memantine showed significant improvement in agitation/aggression (SMD =-0.11; 95% CIs =-0.20, -0.03; P=0.01; I2=47%, delusion (SMD =-0.12; 95% CIs =-0.18, -0.06; P=0.0002; I2=0%, disinhibition (SMD =-0.08; 95% CIs =-0.15, -0.00; P=0.04; I2=0%, and nighttime disturbance/diurnal rhythm disturbances (SMD =-0.10; 95% CIs =-0.18, -0.02; P=0.02; I2=36%. Memantine was also marginally superior to control in hallucination (SMD =-0.06; 95% CIs =-0.12, 0.01; P=0.07; I2=0% and irritability/lability (SMD =-0.09; 95% CIs =-0.19, 0.01; P=0.07; I2=42%. Memantine is similar to control in dysphoria, anxiety/phobia, euphoria, apathy, and eating disturbance.Conclusion: The meta-analysis suggest

  10. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na v 1.5 sodium and Ca v 1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on ion channels are a potential

  11. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hilber, Karlheinz, E-mail: karlheinz.hilber@meduniwien.ac.at [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sandtner, Walter [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on

  12. Hyperventilation and circadian rhythm of the electrical stability of rat myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svorc P

    2013-08-01

    A. Conclusion: Although hyperventilation insignificantly increased the electrical stability of the heart compared to values of electrical stability of the heart during normal pulmonary ventilation during the whole 24 hour period, the results show that hyperventilation probably only modulates, but not disturbs, the circadian rhythm of the electrical stability of the heart in pentobarbital anaesthetized female Wistar rats. Keywords: circadian rhythm, myocardial vulnerability, hyperventilation, rat

  13. A circadian rhythm regulating hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Burton H; Burnham, A Michele; Dunkle, Larry D

    2010-01-01

    Many metabolic and developmental processes in fungi are controlled by biological rhythms. Circadian rhythms approximate a daily (24 h) cycle and have been thoroughly studied in the model fungus, Neurospora crassa. However relatively few examples of true circadian rhythms have been documented among other filamentous fungi. In this study we describe a circadian rhythm underlying hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii, an important pathogen of soybean. After growth in light or light : dark cycles, colonies transferred to darkness produced zonate bands of melanized hyphae interspersed with bands of hyaline hyphae. Rhythmic production of bands was remarkably persistent in the absence of external cues, lasting at least 7 d after transfer to darkness, and was compensated over a range of temperatures. As in N. crassa, blue light but not red light was sufficient to entrain the circadian rhythm in C. kikuchii, and a putative ortholog of white collar-1, one of the genes required for light responses in N. crassa, was identified in C. kikuchii. Circadian regulation of melanization is conserved in other members of the genus: Similar rhythms were identified in another field isolate of C. kikuchii as well as field isolates of C. beticola and C. sorghi, but not in wild-type strains of C. zeae-maydis or C. zeina. This report represents the first documented circadian rhythm among Dothideomycete fungi and provides a new opportunity to dissect the molecular basis of circadian rhythms among filamentous fungi.

  14. Effects of Some Aspects of Rhythm on Tempo Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cecilia Chu

    1984-01-01

    Results indicated that significantly more time is needed to perceive tempo increase than tempo decrease, uneven rhythm then even rhythm, and melody alone than melody with accompaniment. Furthermore, significant interaction effects involving beat locations of tempo change suggest that differential groupings may be a factor in tempo discrimination.…

  15. Effects of tempo and timing of simple musical rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repp, B.H.; Windsor, W.L.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether and how the timing of musical rhythms changes with tempo. Twelve skilled pianists played a monophonic 8-bar melody in 21 different rhythmic versions at 4 different tempi. Within bars, the rhythms represented all possible ordered pairs and triplets of note values

  16. A Circadian Rhythm Regulating Hyphal Melanization in Cercospora Kikuchii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian rhythms, biochemical or developmental processes with a period length of approximately 24 hours, are thoroughly documented in plants and animals. However, virtually all of what is currently known about circadian rhythms in fungi is derived from the model fungus, Neurospora crassa, including...

  17. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  18. Circadian Activity Rhythms, Time Urgency, and Achievement Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Barbara L.

    Many physiological and psychological processes fluctuate throughout the day in fairly stable, rhythmic patterns. The relationship between individual differences in circadian activity rhythms and a sense of time urgency were explored as well as a number of achievement-related variables. Undergraduates (N=308), whose circadian activity rhythms were…

  19. Interactive Rhythm Learning System by Combining Tablet Computers and Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a percussion learning device that combines tablet computers and robots. This device comprises two systems: a rhythm teaching system, in which users can compose and practice rhythms by using a tablet computer, and a robot performance system. First, teachers compose the rhythm training contents on the tablet computer. Then, the learners practice these percussion exercises by using the tablet computer and a small drum set. The teaching system provides a new and user-friendly score editing interface for composing a rhythm exercise. It also provides a rhythm rating function to facilitate percussion training for children and improve the stability of rhythmic beating. To encourage children to practice percussion exercises, a robotic performance system is used to interact with the children; this system can perform percussion exercises for students to listen to and then help them practice the exercise. This interaction enhances children’s interest and motivation to learn and practice rhythm exercises. The results of experimental course and field trials reveal that the proposed system not only increases students’ interest and efficiency in learning but also helps them in understanding musical rhythms through interaction and composing simple rhythms.

  20. Unexpected diversity in socially synchronized rhythms of shorebirds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulla, Martin; Valcu, Mihai; Dokter, Adriaan M; Dondua, Alexei G; Kosztolányi, András; Helm, Barbara; Sandercock, Brett K; Casler, Bruce; Ens, Bruno J.; Spiegel, Caleb S; Hassell, Chris J; Küpper, Clemens; Minton, Clive; Burgas, Daniel; Lank, David B; Payer, David C; Loktionov, Egor Y; Nol, Erica; Kwon, Eunbi; Smith, Fletcher; Gates, H River; Vitnerová, Hana; Prüter, Hanna; Johnson, James A; St Clair, James J H; Lamarre, Jean-François; Rausch, Jennie; Reneerkens, Jeroen; Conklin, Jesse R; Burger, Joanna; Liebezeit, Joe; Bêty, Joël; Coleman, Jonathan T; Figuerola, Jordi; Hooijmeijer, Joslyn; Alves, José A; Smith, Joseph A M; Weidinger, Karel; Koivula, Kari; Gosbell, Ken; Exo, Klaus-Michael; Niles, Larry; Koloski, Laura; McKinnon, Laura; Praus, Libor; Klaassen, Marcel; Giroux, Marie-Andrée; Sládeček, Martin; Boldenow, Megan L; Goldstein, Michael I; Šálek, Miroslav; Senner, Nathan; Rönkä, Nelli; Lecomte, Nicolas; Gilg, Olivier; Vincze, Orsolya; Johnson, Oscar W; Smith, Paul A; Woodard, Paul F; Tomkovich, Pavel S; Battley, Phil F; Bentzen, Rebecca; Lanctot, Richard B; Porter, Ron; Saalfeld, Sarah T; Freeman, Scott; Brown, Stephen C; Yezerinac, Stephen; Székely, Tamás; Montalvo, Tomás; Piersma, Theunis; Loverti, Vanessa; Pakanen, Veli-Matti; Tijsen, Wim; Kempenaers, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The behavioural rhythms of organisms are thought to be under strong selection, influenced by the rhythmicity of the environment. Such behavioural rhythms are well studied in isolated individuals under laboratory conditions, but free-living individuals have to temporally synchronize their activities

  1. The evolution of rhythm cognition: Timing in music and speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravignani, A.; Honing, H.; Kotz, S.A.

    This editorial serves a number of purposes. First, it aims at summarizing and discussing 33 accepted contributions to the special issue ‘The evolution of rhythm cognition: Timing in music and speech’. The major focus of the issue is the cognitive neuroscience of rhythm, intended as a neurobehavioral

  2. Interaction with Mass Media: The Importance of Rhythm and Tempo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses that understanding the impact of interaction with mass media requires conceptualizing media as an institutionalized social form. A critical feature of this process is the grammatical character of media interaction in the form of rhythm and tempo, because these rhythms and tempos become established in everyday routine. (SKC)

  3. Disturbance hydrology: Preparing for an increasingly disturbed future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Ebel, Brian A.; Mohr, Christian H.; Zegre, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    This special issue is the result of several fruitful conference sessions on disturbance hydrology, which started at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco and have continued every year since. The stimulating presentations and discussions surrounding those sessions have focused on understanding both the disruption of hydrologic functioning following discrete disturbances, as well as the subsequent recovery or change within the affected watershed system. Whereas some hydrologic disturbances are directly linked to anthropogenic activities, such as resource extraction, the contributions to this special issue focus primarily on those with indirect or less pronounced human involvement, such as bark-beetle infestation, wildfire, and other natural hazards. However, human activities are enhancing the severity and frequency of these seemingly natural disturbances, thereby contributing to acute hydrologic problems and hazards. Major research challenges for our increasingly disturbed planet include the lack of continuous pre- and post-disturbance monitoring, hydrologic impacts that vary spatially and temporally based on environmental and hydroclimatic conditions, and the preponderance of overlapping or compounding disturbance sequences. In addition, a conceptual framework for characterizing commonalities and differences among hydrologic disturbances is still in its infancy. In this introduction to the special issue, we advance the fusion of concepts and terminology from ecology and hydrology to begin filling this gap. We briefly explore some preliminary approaches for comparing different disturbances and their hydrologic impacts, which provides a starting point for further dialogue and research progress.

  4. Dim nighttime illumination interacts with parametric effects of bright light to increase the stability of circadian rhythm bifurcation in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer A; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Gorman, Michael R

    2011-07-01

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker of mammals is synchronized to the environmental day by the ambient cycle of relative light and dark. The present studies assessed the actions of light in a novel circadian entrainment paradigm where activity rhythms are bifurcated following exposure to a 24-h light:dark:light:dark (LDLD) cycle. Bifurcated entrainment under LDLD reflects the temporal dissociation of component oscillators that comprise the circadian system and is facilitated when daily scotophases are dimly lit rather than completely dark. Although bifurcation can be stably maintained in LDLD, it is quickly reversed under constant conditions. Here the authors examine whether dim scotophase illumination acts to maintain bifurcated entrainment under LDLD through potential interactions with the parametric actions of bright light during the two daily photophases. In three experiments, wheel-running rhythms of Syrian hamsters were bifurcated under LDLD with dimly lit scotophases, and after several weeks, dim scotophase illumination was either retained or extinguished. Additionally, "full" and "skeleton" photophases were employed under LDLD cycles with dimly lit or completely dark scotophases to distinguish parametric from nonparametric effects of bright light. Rhythm bifurcation was more stable in full versus skeleton LDLD cycles. Dim light facilitated the maintenance of bifurcated entrainment under full LDLD cycles but did not prevent the loss of rhythm bifurcation in skeleton LDLD cycles. These studies indicate that parametric actions of bright light maintain the bifurcated entrainment state; that dim scotophase illumination increases the stability of the bifurcated state; and that dim light interacts with the parametric effects of bright light to increase the stability of rhythm bifurcation under full LDLD cycles. A further understanding of the novel actions of dim light may lead to new strategies for understanding, preventing, and treating chronobiological

  5. ‘Ragged Time’ in Intra-panel Comics Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corry Shores

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A phenomenological method of comics analysis can be useful when we need to uncover the structural features of the comics experience itself. One fruitful application would be in the study of irregular intra-panel rhythms, where the temporalized divisions are not visibly indicated but rather are only experienced. By means of Gilles Deleuze’s notion of rhythmic repetition and his elaboration of it through Olivier Messiaen’s theory of ‘kinetic’ rhythm, we will formulate a conception of visual rhythm as being based on metrical irregularity. We further explicate this concept of irregular rhythm by drawing upon the notion of ‘ragged time’ in the early jazz musical form, ragtime. We finally test its usefulness by examining how the ‘jazzy’ rhythms of Cubist-styled panels by Art Spiegelman and Mary Fleener generate an experience of ragged time.

  6. Cardiac regeneration therapy: connections to cardiac physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Naofumi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    Without heart transplantation, a large number of patients with failing hearts worldwide face poor outcomes. By means of cardiomyocyte regeneration, cardiac regeneration therapy is emerging with great promise as a means for restoring loss of cardiac function. However, the limited success of clinical trials using bone marrow-derived cells and myoblasts with heterogeneous constituents, transplanted at a wide range of cell doses, has led to disagreement on the efficacy of cell therapy. It is therefore essential to reevaluate the evidence for the efficacy of cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy, focusing on targets, materials, and methodologies. Meanwhile, the revolutionary innovation of cardiac regeneration therapy is sorely needed to help the millions of people who suffer heart failure from acquired loss of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac regeneration has been used only in limited species or as a developing process in the rodent heart; now, the possibility of cardiomyocyte turnover in the human heart is being revisited. In the pursuit of this concept, the use of cardiac stem/progenitor stem cells in the cardiac niche must be focused to usher in a second era of cardiac regeneration therapy for the severely injured heart. In addition, tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming will advance the next era of treatment that will enable current cell-based therapy to progress to "real" cardiac regeneration therapy. Although many barriers remain, the prevention of refractory heart failure through cardiac regeneration is now becoming a realistic possibility.

  7. Cardioverter-defibrillator implantation in myeloma-associated cardiac amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanile, Alfonso; Sozzi, Fabiola B; Canetta, Ciro; Danzi, Gian Battista

    2013-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman with multiple myeloma and light-chain amyloidosis with significant heart involvement developed an in-hospital cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a stable sinus rhythm without any cerebral damage was restored, and the patient was admitted to the coronary care unit. A cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted, and it successfully intervened in two sustained ventricular tachycardia episodes and one ventricular fibrillation episode, which were recorded during hospitalization. After achieving discrete cardiac compensation, the patient was transferred to the emergency medicine department where she underwent chemotherapy for multiple myeloma. The patient died 40 days after admission from refractory heart failure. In the literature, there are studies that describe the use of cardioverter-defibrillator implantation in cardiac amyloidosis; however, at present, there is no evidence of a beneficial effect on survival with the use of this intervention. A high index of suspicion for amyloid heart disease and early diagnosis are critical to improving outcomes.

  8. The scope of cardiac complication of thyrotoxicosis in lagos, nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbera, A.; Fasanmade, O.; Isiba, A.

    2007-01-01

    One of the main complications of thyrotoxicosis (TS) is heart disease, including heart rhythm abnormalities. There is a dearth of reports from sub-saharan Africa hence this study sets out to bridge this gap. This was a prospective study carried out for a 24 months period. All subjects with clinical and or biochemical evidence of TS, were followed up and examined for clinical and laboratory features of cardiac complications of thyrotoxicosis. A total of 103 subjects with TS were seen thus giving an incidence rate of 27%. The Male: Female ratio of the subjects with thyrocardiac disease was 1:5 Frequency of hypertension, arrhythmias and heart failure were 53%, 25% and 42% respectively. Subjects with cardiac complications of TS had florid clinical features of thyrotoxicosis. Echcocardiographic features documented in some of the subjects with heart failure include dilated heart wall, impaired systolic function, reduced ejection fraction and fractional shortening. Thyrotoxicosis is a notable cause of cardiac morbidity in Nigerians. (author)

  9. Cardiac ablation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart disease - risk factors ... of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association (AHA), the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and the Society ...

  10. Cross-cultural influences on rhythm processing: reproduction, discrimination, and beat tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Bentley, Jocelyn; Grahn, Jessica A

    2015-01-01

    The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to entrain movement to musical rhythm occurs in virtually all individuals across cultures. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on perception, production, and beat tapping for rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were the same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced by the culture of the participant and the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant's ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than for unfamiliar rhythms. Moreover, there were differences between the two participant groups, and between the two types of rhythms, in the metrical level selected for beat tapping. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion.

  11. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Disturbance Hydrology: Preparing for an Increasingly Disturbed Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Ebel, Brian A.; Mohr, Christian H.; Zegre, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    This special issue is the result of several fruitful conference sessions on disturbance hydrology, which started at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco and have continued every year since. The stimulating presentations and discussions surrounding those sessions have focused on understanding both the disruption of hydrologic functioning following discrete disturbances, as well as the subsequent recovery or change within the affected watershed system. Whereas some hydrologic disturbances are directly linked to anthropogenic activities, such as resource extraction, the contributions to this special issue focus primarily on those with indirect or less pronounced human involvement, such as bark-beetle infestation, wildfire, and other natural hazards. However, human activities are enhancing the severity and frequency of these seemingly natural disturbances, thereby contributing to acute hydrologic problems and hazards. Major research challenges for our increasingly disturbed planet include the lack of continuous pre and postdisturbance monitoring, hydrologic impacts that vary spatially and temporally based on environmental and hydroclimatic conditions, and the preponderance of overlapping or compounding disturbance sequences. In addition, a conceptual framework for characterizing commonalities and differences among hydrologic disturbances is still in its infancy. In this introduction to the special issue, we advance the fusion of concepts and terminology from ecology and hydrology to begin filling this gap. We briefly explore some preliminary approaches for comparing different disturbances and their hydrologic impacts, which provides a starting point for further dialogue and research progress.

  13. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-04-01

    Sleep-wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mechanisms underlying the connection between circadian/sleep dysregulation and neurodegeneration remain unclear, but several recent studies provide interesting possibilities. While mechanistic analysis is under way, it is worth considering treatment of circadian/sleep disruption as a means to alleviate symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Choreographing Compassion: A Clinical Adventure of Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopst, Charles George

    2015-06-01

    Compassion is a primary catalyst motivating positive human relationships, especially of those less fortunate. Our rhythms Expand-Contract of our own non-verbal body joints movements and of the law of counter-balance, enable us to identify which of nine innate affects-emotions is directing the body's movements. With this reading, a trained person can synchronize choreography of these into fully authentic compassion between two or more persons. Primary references for this are the late Silvan S. Tomkins's four volumes "Affect Imagery Consciousness," and choreographers the late Rudolf Laban, Warren Lamb, Irmgard Bartenieff, and Marian Chace. Professionals, clinicians, and laity counselors can all use these. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Effect of Pilates Training on Alpha Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Bian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of Pilates training on the brain function was investigated through five case studies. Alpha rhythm changes during the Pilates training over the different regions and the whole brain were mainly analyzed, including power spectral density and global synchronization index (GSI. It was found that the neural network of the brain was more active, and the synchronization strength reduced in the frontal and temporal regions due to the Pilates training. These results supported that the Pilates training is very beneficial for improving brain function or intelligence. These findings maybe give us some line evidence to suggest that the Pilates training is very helpful for the intervention of brain degenerative diseases and cogitative dysfunction rehabilitation.

  16. Effect of Pilates Training on Alpha Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Zhijie; Sun, Hongmin; Lu, Chengbiao; Yao, Li; Chen, Shengyong; Li, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of Pilates training on the brain function was investigated through five case studies. Alpha rhythm changes during the Pilates training over the different regions and the whole brain were mainly analyzed, including power spectral density and global synchronization index (GSI). It was found that the neural network of the brain was more active, and the synchronization strength reduced in the frontal and temporal regions due to the Pilates training. These results supported that the Pilates training is very beneficial for improving brain function or intelligence. These findings maybe give us some line evidence to suggest that the Pilates training is very helpful for the intervention of brain degenerative diseases and cogitative dysfunction rehabilitation. PMID:23861723

  17. Sensorimotor Rhythm Neurofeedback Enhances Golf Putting Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-Yang; Huang, Chung-Ju; Chang, Yu-Kai; Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Hung, Tsung-Min

    2015-12-01

    Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity has been related to automaticity during skilled action execution. However, few studies have bridged the causal link between SMR activity and sports performance. This study investigated the effect of SMR neurofeedback training (SMR NFT) on golf putting performance. We hypothesized that preelite golfers would exhibit enhanced putting performance after SMR NFT. Sixteen preelite golfers were recruited and randomly assigned into either an SMR or a control group. Participants were asked to perform putting while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, both before and after intervention. Our results showed that the SMR group performed more accurately when putting and exhibited greater SMR power than the control group after 8 intervention sessions. This study concludes that SMR NFT is effective for increasing SMR during action preparation and for enhancing golf putting performance. Moreover, greater SMR activity might be an EEG signature of improved attention processing, which induces superior putting performance.

  18. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival in rural Northwest Ireland: 17 years' experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Masterson, Siobhán

    2011-05-01

    SAVES, the name used to describe a register of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), was established in rural Northwest Ireland in 1992. From 1992 to 2008, 80 survivors were identified (population 239,000 (2006)). Most incidents were witnessed (69\\/70) and all were in shockable rhythm at the time of first rhythm analysis (66\\/66). Of 66 patients who could be traced, 46 were alive in December 2008. Average survival rates appeared to increase over the lifetime of the database. SAVES has also contributed to the development of a national OHCA register.

  19. Alcohol, cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupari, M; Koskinen, P

    1998-01-01

    Studies in experimental animals have shown varying and apparently opposite effects of alcohol on cardiac rhythm and conduction. Given acutely to non-alcoholic animals, ethanol may even have anti-arrhythmic properties whereas chronic administration clearly increases the animals' susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias. Chronic heavy alcohol use has been incriminated in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias in humans. The evidence has come from clinical observations, retrospective case-control studies, controlled studies of consecutive admissions for arrhythmias, and prospective epidemiological investigations. Furthermore, electrophysiological studies have shown that acute alcohol administration facilitates the induction of tachyarrhythmias in selected heavy drinkers. The role of alcohol appears particularly conspicuous in idiopathic atrial fibrillation. Occasionally, ventricular tachyarrhythmias have also been provoked by alcohol intake. Several lines of evidence suggest that heavy drinking increases the risk of sudden cardiac death with fatal arrhythmia as the most likely mechanism. According to epidemiological studies this effect appears most prominent in middle-aged men and is only partly explained by confounding traits such as smoking and social class. The basic arrhythmogenic effects of alcohol are still insufficiently delineated. Subclinical heart muscle injury from chronic heavy use may be instrumental in producing patchy delays in conduction. The hyperadrenergic state of drinking and withdrawal may also contribute, as may electrolyte abnormalities, impaired vagal heart rate control, repolarization abnormalities with prolonged QT intervals and worsening of myocardial ischaemia or sleep apnoea. Most of what we know about alcohol and arrhythmias relates to heavy drinking. The effect of social drinking on clinical arrhythmias in non-alcoholic cardiac patients needs to be addressed further.

  20. Clinical learning environments: place, artefacts and rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Dale; Jowsey, Tanisha; Parwaiz, Mariam; Birch, Mark; Seaton, Philippa; Shaw, Susan; Duggan, Alison; Wilkinson, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Health care practitioners learn through experience in clinical environments in which supervision is a key component, but how that learning occurs outside the supervision relationship remains largely unknown. This study explores the environmental factors that inform and support workplace learning within a clinical environment. An observational study drawing on ethnographic methods was undertaken in a general medicine ward. Observers paid attention to interactions among staff members that involved potential teaching and learning moments that occurred and were visible in the course of routine work. General purpose thematic analysis of field notes was undertaken. A total of 376 observations were undertaken and documented. The findings suggest that place (location of interaction), rhythm (regularity of activities occurring in the ward) and artefacts (objects and equipment) were strong influences on the interactions and exchanges that occurred. Each of these themes had inherent tensions that could promote or inhibit engagement and therefore learning opportunities. Although many learning opportunities were available, not all were taken up or recognised by the participants. We describe and make explicit how the natural environment of a medical ward and flow of work through patient care contribute to the learning architecture, and how this creates or inhibits opportunities for learning. Awareness of learning opportunities was often tacit and not explicit for either supervisor or learner. We identify strategies through which tensions inherent within space, artefacts and the rhythms of work can be resolved and learning opportunities maximised. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  1. Prevention of depression and sleep disturbances in elderly with memory-problems by activation of the biological clock with light - a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Most, E.I.S.; Scheltens, P.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Depression frequently occurs in the elderly and in patients suffering from dementia. Its cause is largely unknown, but several studies point to a possible contribution of circadian rhythm disturbances. Post-mortem studies on aging, dementia and depression show impaired functioning of the

  2. Heart rhythm at the time of death documented by an implantable loop recorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Uffe Jakob Ortved; Jøns, Christian; Jørgensen, Rikke Mørch

    2009-01-01

    Aims The aims of this study were to describe arrhythmias documented with an implantable loop recorder (ILR) in post-acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with left ventricular dysfunction at the time of death and to establish the correlation to mode of death. Methods and results Post......-mortem ILR device interrogations were analysed from patients dying in the CARISMA study. Mode of death was classified by a modified CAST classification. Twenty-six patients died with an implanted ILR. Of these, 16 had an electrocardiogram recorded at the time of death. Ventricular tachycardia (VT......)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) was terminal rhythm in eight patients and bradyarrhythmias were observed in another eight patients. Of the deaths with peri-mortem recordings, seven were classified as sudden cardiac death (SCD). In six of these, VF was documented at the time of death. Six monitored deaths were classified...

  3. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable...... rhythm from AEDs used by laypersons with the corresponding proportion recorded by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) on arrival. METHODS: In a 20-month study, we collected data on OHCAs in the Capital Region of Denmark where an AED was deployed prior to arrival of EMS. The AEDs were brought...... to the emergency medical dispatch centre for data downloading and rhythm analysis. Patient data were retrieved from the medical records from the admitting hospital, whereas data on EMS rhythm analyses were obtained from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2001 and 2010. RESULTS: A total of 121 AEDs were...

  4. Ionospheric disturbance dynamo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, M.; Richmond, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical simulation study of the thermospheric winds produced by auroral heating during magnetic storms, and of their global dynamo effects, establishes the main features of the ionospheric disturbanc dynamo. Driven by auroral heating, a Hadley cell is created with equatorward winds blowing above about 120 km at mid-latitudes. The transport of angular momentum by these winds produces a subrotation of the midlatitude thermosphere, or westward motion with respect to the earth. The westward winds in turn drive equatorward Pedersen currents which accumulate charge toward the equator, resulting in the generation of a poleward electric field, a westward E x B drift, and an eastward current. When realistic local time conductivity variations are simulated, the eastward mid-latitude current is found to close partly via lower latitudes, resulting in an 'anti-Sq' type of current vortex. Both electric field and current at low latitudes thus vary in opposition to their normal quiet-day behavior. This total pattern of distrubance winds, electric fields, and currents is superimposed upon the background quiet-day pattern. When the neutral winds are artificially confined on the nightside, the basic pattern of predominantly westward E x B plasma drifts still prevails on the nightside but no longer extends into the dayside. Considerable observational evidence exists, suggesting that the ionospheric disturbance dynamo has an appreciable influence on storm-time ionospheric electric fields at middle and low latitudes

  5. Chronotype and circadian rhythm in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Matias C A; Abreu, Rafael L C; Linhares Neto, Vicente B; de Bruin, Pedro F C; de Bruin, Veralice M S

    2017-08-01

    Despite a complex relationship between mood, sleep and rhythm, the impact of circadian disruptions on bipolar disorder (BD) has not been clarified. The purpose of this systematic review was to define current evidence regarding chronotype and circadian rhythm patterns in BD patients. 42 studies were included, involving 3432 BD patients. Disruption of the biological rhythm was identified, even in drug-naïve BD patients and independently of mood status. Daily profiles of melatonin levels and cortisol indicated a delayed phase. Depression was more frequently associated with circadian alterations than euthymia. Few studies evaluated mania, demonstrating irregular rhythms. Evening type was more common in BD adults. Studies about the influence of chronotype on depressive symptoms showed conflicting results. Only one investigation observed the influences of chronotype in mania, revealing no significant association. Effects of psychoeducation and lithium on rhythm in BD patients were poorly studied, demonstrating no improvement of rhythm parameters. Studies about genetics are incipient. In conclusion, disruption in circadian rhythm and eveningness are common in BD. Prospective research evaluating the impact of circadian disruption on mood symptoms, metabolism, seasonality, the influence of age and the effects of mood stabilizers are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural responses to complex auditory rhythms: the role of attending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Chapin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the role of attention in pulse and meter perception using complex rhythms. We used a selective attention paradigm in which participants attended to either a complex auditory rhythm or a visually presented word list. Performance on a reproduction task was used to gauge whether participants were attending to the appropriate stimulus. We hypothesized that attention to complex rhythms – which contain no energy at the pulse frequency – would lead to activations in motor areas involved in pulse perception. Moreover, because multiple repetitions of a complex rhythm are needed to perceive a pulse, activations in pulse related areas would be seen only after sufficient time had elapsed for pulse perception to develop. Selective attention was also expected to modulate activity in sensory areas specific to the modality. We found that selective attention to rhythms led to increased BOLD responses in basal ganglia, and basal ganglia activity was observed only after the rhythms had cycled enough times for a stable pulse percept to develop. These observations suggest that attention is needed to recruit motor activations associated with the perception of pulse in complex rhythms. Moreover, attention to the auditory stimulus enhanced activity in an attentional sensory network including primary auditory, insula, anterior cingulate, and prefrontal cortex, and suppressed activity in sensory areas associated with attending to the visual stimulus.

  7. Cross-Cultural Influences on Rhythm Processing: Reproduction, Discrimination, and Beat Tapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cameron

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to synchronize one’s movements to musical rhythms appears to be universal. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on the perception, production, and beat tapping of rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced both by the culture of the participant and by the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant’s ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than unfamiliar rhythms. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion.

  8. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Nielsen, Anne Møller

    2014-12-01

    Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable rhythm from AEDs used by laypersons with the corresponding proportion recorded by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) on arrival. In a 20-month study, we collected data on OHCAs in the Capital Region of Denmark where an AED was deployed prior to arrival of EMS. The AEDs were brought to the emergency medical dispatch centre for data downloading and rhythm analysis. Patient data were retrieved from the medical records from the admitting hospital, whereas data on EMS rhythm analyses were obtained from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2001 and 2010. A total of 121 AEDs were deployed, of which 91 cases were OHCAs with presumed cardiac origin. The prevalence of initial shockable rhythm was 55.0% (95% CI [44.7-64.8%]). This was significantly greater than the proportion recorded by the EMS (27.6%, 95% CI [27.0-28.3%], p<0.0001). Shockable arrests were significantly more likely to be witnessed (92% vs. 34%, p<0.0001) and the bystander CPR rate was higher (98% vs. 85%, p=0.04). More patients with initial shockable rhythm achieved return of spontaneous circulation upon hospital arrival (88% vs. 7%, p<0.0001) and had higher 30-day survival rate (72% vs. 5%, p<0.0001). AEDs used by laypersons revealed a higher proportion of shockable rhythms compared to the EMS rhythm analyses. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex: a nationwide registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K; Weeke, Peter; Karlsson, Lena; Rajan, Shahzleen; Søndergaard, Kathrine Bach; Kragholm, Kristian; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Nielsen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation was attempted, were identified through the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry 2001-2010. A total of 19,372 patients were included. One-third were female, with a median age of 75 years (IQR 65-83). Compared to females, males were five years younger; and less likely to have severe comorbidities, e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (12.8% vs. 16.5%); but more likely to have arrest outside of the home (29.4% vs. 18.7%), receive bystander CPR (32.9% vs. 25.9%), and have a shockable rhythm (32.6% vs. 17.2%), all p<0.001. Thirty-day crude survival increased in males (3.0% in 2001 to 12.9% in 2010); and in females (4.8% in 2001 to 6.7% in 2010), p<0.001. Multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusted for patient characteristics including comorbidities, showed no survival difference between sexes in patients with a non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.00; CI 0.72-1.40), while female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm (OR 1.31; CI 1.07-1.59). Analyses were rhythm-stratified due to interaction between sex and heart rhythm; there was no interaction between sex and calendar-year. Temporal increase in crude survival was more marked in males due to poorer prognostic characteristics in females with a lower proportion of shockable rhythm. In an adjusted model, female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of the daily feeding rhythm in the regulation of the day/night rhythm in triglyceride secretion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Foppen, Ewout; Mansur Machado, Frederico Sander; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2018-02-15

    Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels show a clear daily rhythm, however, thus far it is still unknown whether this rhythm results from a daily rhythm in TG production, TG uptake or both. Previous studies have shown that feeding activity affects plasma TG concentrations, but it is not clear how the daily rhythm in feeding activity affects plasma TG concentrations. In the present study, we measured plasma TG concentrations and TG secretion rates in rats at 6 Zeitgeber times to investigate whether plasma TG concentrations and TG secretion show a daily rhythm. We found that plasma TG concentrations and TG secretion show a significant day/night rhythm. Next, we removed the daily rhythm in feeding behavior by introducing a 6-meals-a-day (6M) feeding schedule to investigate whether the daily rhythm in feeding behavior is necessary to maintain the daily rhythm in TG secretion. We found that the day/night rhythm in TG secretion was abolished under 6M feeding conditions. Hepatic apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and microsomal TG transfer protein (Mttp), which are both involved in TG secretion, also lost their daily rhythmicity under 6M feeding conditions. Together, these results indicate that: (1) the daily rhythm in TG secretion contributes to the formation of a day/night rhythm in plasma TG levels and (2) a daily feeding rhythm is essential for maintaining the daily rhythm in TG secretion.

  11. Sleep disturbances and glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Scheurink, Anton J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances, induced by either lifestyle, shift work or sleeping disorders, have become more prevalent in our 24/7 Western society. Sleep disturbances are associated with impaired health including metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The question remains whether there is a

  12. The effect of intermittent fasting during Ramadan on sleep, sleepiness, cognitive function, and circadian rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasrawi, Shaden O; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2017-09-01

    Studies have shown that experimental fasting can affect cognitive function, sleep, and wakefulness patterns. However, the effects of experimental fasting cannot be generalized to fasting during Ramadan due to its unique characteristics. Therefore, there has been increased interest in studying the effects of fasting during Ramadan on sleep patterns, daytime sleepiness, cognitive function, sleep architecture, and circadian rhythm. In this review, we critically discuss the current research findings in those areas during the month of Ramadan. Available data that controlled for sleep/wake schedule, sleep duration, light exposure, and energy expenditure do not support the notion that Ramadan intermittent fasting increases daytime sleepiness and alters cognitive function. Additionally, recent well-designed studies showed no effect of fasting on circadian rhythms. However, in non-constrained environments that do not control for lifestyle changes, studies have demonstrated sudden and significant delays in bedtime and wake time. Studies that controlled for environmental factors and sleep/wake schedule reported no significant disturbances in sleep architecture. Nevertheless, several studies have consistently reported that the main change in sleep architecture during fasting is a reduction in the proportion of REM sleep.

  13. Circadian rhythm genes mediate fenvalerate-induced inhibition of testosterone synthesis in mouse Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yichen; Shen, Ouxi; Han, Jingjing; Duan, Hongyu; Yang, Siyuan; Zhu, Zhenghong; Tong, Jian; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Fenvalerate (Fen), a widely used pesticide, is known to impair male reproductive functions by mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. Recent studies indicated that circadian clock genes may play an important role in successful male reproduction. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Fen on circadian clock genes involved in the biosynthesis of testosterone using TM3 cells derived from mouse Leydig cells. Data demonstrated that the circadian rhythm of testosterone synthesis in TM3 cells was disturbed following Fen treatment as evidenced by changes in the circadian rhythmicity of core clock genes (Bmal1, Rev-erbα, Rorα). Further, the observed altered rhythms were accompanied by increased intracellular Ca 2+ levels and modified steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) mRNA expression. Thus, data suggested that Fen inhibits testosterone synthesis via pathways involving intracellular Ca 2+ and clock genes (Bmal1, Rev-Erbα, Rorα) as well as StAR mRNA expression in TM3 cells.

  14. Circadian Rhythms of Oxidative Stress Markers and Melatonin Metabolite in Patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a genetic disorder in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) with severe neurological disorders, in which oxidative stress and disturbed melatonin metabolism may be involved. Herein we confirmed the diurnal variation of melatonin metabolites, oxidative stress markers, and antioxidant power in urine of patients with XPA and age-matched controls, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The peak of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, a metabolite of melatonin, was seen at 6:00 in both the XPA patients and controls, though the peak value is lower, specifically in the younger age group of XPA patients. The older XPA patients demonstrated an increase in the urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, having a robust peak at 6:00 and 18:00, respectively. In addition, the urinary level of total antioxidant power was decreased in the older XPA patients. Recently, it is speculated that oxidative stress and antioxidant properties may have a diurnal variation, and the circadian rhythm is likely to influence the NER itself. We believe that the administration of melatonin has the possibility of ameliorating the augmented oxidative stress in neurodegeneration, especially in the older XPA patients, modulating the melatonin metabolism and the circadian rhythm.

  15. Circadian Rhythms of Oxidative Stress Markers and Melatonin Metabolite in Patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Miyata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a genetic disorder in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER with severe neurological disorders, in which oxidative stress and disturbed melatonin metabolism may be involved. Herein we confirmed the diurnal variation of melatonin metabolites, oxidative stress markers, and antioxidant power in urine of patients with XPA and age-matched controls, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The peak of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, a metabolite of melatonin, was seen at 6:00 in both the XPA patients and controls, though the peak value is lower, specifically in the younger age group of XPA patients. The older XPA patients demonstrated an increase in the urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, having a robust peak at 6:00 and 18:00, respectively. In addition, the urinary level of total antioxidant power was decreased in the older XPA patients. Recently, it is speculated that oxidative stress and antioxidant properties may have a diurnal variation, and the circadian rhythm is likely to influence the NER itself. We believe that the administration of melatonin has the possibility of ameliorating the augmented oxidative stress in neurodegeneration, especially in the older XPA patients, modulating the melatonin metabolism and the circadian rhythm.

  16. Spotlight on fish: light pollution affects circadian rhythms of European perch but does not cause stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Preuer, Torsten; Kloas, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Flora and fauna evolved under natural day and night cycles. However, natural light is now enhanced by artificial light at night, particularly in urban areas. This alteration of natural light environments during the night is hypothesised to alter biological rhythms in fish, by effecting night-time production of the hormone melatonin. Artificial light at night is also expected to increase the stress level of fish, resulting in higher cortisol production. In laboratory experiments, European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to four different light intensities during the night, 0 lx (control), 1 lx (potential light level in urban waters), 10 lx (typical street lighting at night) and 100 lx. Melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24 hour period. This study revealed that the nocturnal increase in melatonin production was inhibited even at the lowest light level of 1 lx. However, cortisol levels did not differ between control and treatment illumination levels. We conclude that artificial light at night at very low intensities may disturb biological rhythms in fish since nocturnal light levels around 1 lx are already found in urban waters. However, enhanced stress induction could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dim light at night disturbs the daily sleep-wake cycle in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenvers, Dirk Jan; van Dorp, Rick; Foppen, Ewout; Mendoza, Jorge; Opperhuizen, Anne-Loes; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H; Meijer, Johanna H; Kalsbeek, Andries; Deboer, Tom

    2016-10-20

    Exposure to light at night (LAN) is associated with insomnia in humans. Light provides the main input to the master clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that coordinates the sleep-wake cycle. We aimed to develop a rodent model for the effects of LAN on sleep. Therefore, we exposed male Wistar rats to either a 12 h light (150-200lux):12 h dark (LD) schedule or a 12 h light (150-200 lux):12 h dim white light (5 lux) (LDim) schedule. LDim acutely decreased the amplitude of daily rhythms of REM and NREM sleep, with a further decrease over the following days. LDim diminished the rhythms of 1) the circadian 16-19 Hz frequency domain within the NREM sleep EEG, and 2) SCN clock gene expression. LDim also induced internal desynchronization in locomotor activity by introducing a free running rhythm with a period of ~25 h next to the entrained 24 h rhythm. LDim did not affect body weight or glucose tolerance. In conclusion, we introduce the first rodent model for disturbed circadian control of sleep due to LAN. We show that internal desynchronization is possible in a 24 h L:D cycle which suggests that a similar desynchronization may explain the association between LAN and human insomnia.

  18. When to Stop CPR and When to Perform Rhythm Analysis: Potential Confusion Among ACLS Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberson, Brandon; Uber, Amy; F Gaieski, David; Miller, Joseph B; Wira, Charles; Berg, Katherine; Giberson, Tyler; Cocchi, Michael N; S Abella, Benjamin; Donnino, Michael W

    2016-09-01

    Health care providers nationwide are routinely trained in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), an American Heart Association program that teaches cardiac arrest management. Recent changes in the ACLS approach have de-emphasized routine pulse checks in an effort to promote uninterrupted chest compressions. We hypothesized that this new ACLS algorithm may lead to uncertainty regarding the appropriate action following detection of a pulse during a cardiac arrest. We conducted an observational study in which a Web-based survey was sent to ACLS-trained medical providers at 4 major urban tertiary care centers in the United States. The survey consisted of 5 multiple-choice, scenario-based ACLS questions, including our question of interest. Adult staff members with a valid ACLS certification were included. A total of 347 surveys were analyzed. The response rate was 28.1%. The majority (53.6%) of responders were between 18 and 32 years old, and 59.9% were female. The majority (54.2%) of responders incorrectly stated that they would continue CPR and possibly administer additional therapies when a team member detects a pulse immediately following defibrillation. Secondarily, only 51.9% of respondents correctly chose to perform a rhythm check following 2 minutes of CPR. The other 3 survey questions were correctly answered an average of 89.1% of the time. Confusion exists regarding whether or not CPR and cardiac medications should be continued in the presence of a pulse. Education may be warranted to emphasize avoiding compressions and medications when a palpable pulse is detected. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Importance of radioimmunoassays in studies of physiological circadian rhythms of children in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolyuk, I.P.; Katricheva, L.V.; Kel'tsev, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of the circadian activity of the thyroid gland, adrenal gland and hypophysis in 42 children, of them 23 suffered from rheumatic fever, 11 from the articular and articular-visceral forms of rhematoid arthritis, and 8 children were practically healthy. The concentration of T 3 , T 4 , TTH, AKTH and hydrocortisone was determined in the blood serum using standard kits for in vitro diagnosis. Certain rhytmicality is noted in the functioning of the endocrine glands in healthy children. This rhythm is simultaneous with sleep. The circadian activity of the endocrine glands gets distorted in children with rheumatic diseases: the more severe the process the more marked desynchronosis. The same type of changes in the level of hormones in the blood of children with rheumatic fever and rheumatoid arthritis presupposes some identical mechanism of the compensatory-adaptive reaction of the body to disturbances of the hormonal homeostasis that shoud be considered in the treatment of such patients

  20. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle.

  1. Myostatin and carbohydrate disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assyov, Yavor S; Velikova, Tsvetelina V; Kamenov, Zdravko A

    2017-05-01

    Purpose/aim of the study: Myostatin is a myokine that has been shown to inhibit muscle growth and to have potentially deleterious effects on metabolism. The aim of the current study was to compare its circulating serum levels in subjects from the whole spectrum of carbohydrate disturbances leading to diabetes. A total of 159 age-, sex-, and BMI-matched subjects participated in the study - 50 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 60 had prediabetes (PreDM), and 49 had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Oral glucose tolerance testing was used to determine glucose tolerance. Serum myostatin was quantified by means of ELISA. Circulating serum myostatin levels were highest in patients with T2D, lower in subjects with prediabetes, and lowest in subjects with normoglycemia (all p Myostatin was shown to be positively associated with fasting plasma glucose, HOMA-IR, hepatic enzymes, uric acid, and FINDRISC questionnaire scores in both sexes. ROC analyses determined circulating myostatin levels to be of value for differentiating subjects with T2D (AUC = 0.72, p = 0.002 in men; AUC = 0.70, p = 0.004 in women) in the study population. After adjustment for potential confounders, in a multiple binary logistic regression model, serum myostatin added further information to traditional risk estimates in distinguishing subjects with T2D. Serum myostatin levels are higher with deterioration of carbohydrate tolerance. Furthermore, circulating myostatin is positively associated with traditional biochemical estimates of poor metabolic health. These data add to evidence of the involvement of this myokine in the pathogenesis of T2D.

  2. Sleep disturbances in critically ill patients in ICU: how much do we know?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Y.; Ording, H.; Jennum, Poul

    2012-01-01

    the underlying literature. There are no studies of level 1 evidence proving the positive impact of the tested interventions on the critically ill patients sleep pattern. Thus, disturbed sleep in critically ill patients with all the severe consequences remains an unresolved problem and needs further investigation.......Sleep disturbances in the intensive care unit (ICU) seem to lead to development of delirium, prolonged ICU stay, and increased mortality. That is why sufficient sleep is important for good outcome and recovery in critically ill patients. A variety of small studies reveal pathological sleep patterns...... in critically ill patients including abnormal circadian rhythm, high arousal and awakening index, reduced Slow Wave Sleep, and Rapid Eye Movement sleep. The purpose of this study is to summarise different aspects of sleep-awake disturbances, causes and handling methods in critically ill patients by reviewing...

  3. Significance of Circadian Rhythms in Aerospace Operations,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    maximum during the day and a minimum at night. The differences of "efficiency" for 140 21 physical labour performed either at 1600 or at 0400 hours...magnitude of 5 - 10 % extra oxygen 120. uptake. The lower efficieny could explain the feeling of temporary night workers that nocturnal labour is...intestinal disturbances (reported in some studies only) - both, lower and higher absenteeism ; - no higher mortality rate. More recent investigations revealed

  4. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Gurpreet S; Kothari, Shyam S

    2011-01-01

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  5. Altered circadian rhythms of the stress hormone and melatonin response in lupus-prone MRL/MP-fas(Ipr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, O; Dietrich, H; Oliveira dos Santos, A; Wiegers, G J; Schwarz, S; Harbutz, M; Herold, M; Wick, G

    2000-06-01

    The immune system interacts with the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis via so-called glucocorticoid increasing factors, which are produced by the immune system during immune reactions, causing an elevation of systemic glucocorticoid levels that contribute to preservation of the immune reactions specificities. Previous results from our laboratory had already shown an altered immuno-neuroendocrine dialogue via the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in autoimmune disease-prone chicken and mouse strains. In the present study, we further investigated the altered glucocorticoid response via the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in murine lupus. We established the circadian rhythms of corticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, adrenocorticotropic hormone and melatonin, as well as the time response curves after injection of interleukin-1 of the first three parameters in normal SWISS and lupus-prone MRL/MP-fas(Ipr) mice. The results show that lupus-prone MRL/ MP-fas(Ipr) mice do not react appropriately to changes of the light/dark cycle, circadian melatonin rhythms seem to uncouple from the light/dark cycle, and plasma corticosterone levels are elevated during the resting phase. Diurnal changes of dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate and adrenocorticotropic hormone were normal compared to healthy controls. These data indicate that MRL/ MP-fas(Ipr) mice not only show an altered glucocorticoid response mediated via the hypothalamo pituitary adrenal axis to IL-1, but are also affected by disturbances of corticosterone and melatonin circadian rhythms. Our findings may have implications for intrathymic T cell development and the emergence of autoimmune disease.

  6. The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry in patients with bipolar disorder: correlation with affective temperaments and schizotypy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dopierala

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the relationship of biological rhythms, evaluated by the Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN, with affective temperaments and schizotypy. Methods: The BRIAN assessment, along with the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego-Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A and the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory for Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE, was administered to 54 patients with remitted bipolar disorder (BD and 54 healthy control (HC subjects. Results: The TEMPS-A cyclothymic temperament correlated positively and the hyperthymic temperament correlated negatively with BRIAN scores in both the BD and HC groups, although the correlation was stronger in BD subjects. Depressive temperament was associated with BRIAN scores in BD but not in HC; conversely, the irritable temperament was associated with BRIAN scores in HC, but not in BD. Several positive correlations between BRIAN scores and the schizotypal dimensions of the O-LIFE were observed in both BD and HC subjects, especially with cognitive disorganization and less so with unusual experiences and impulsive nonconformity. A correlation with introversion/anhedonia was found only in BD subjects. Conclusion: Cyclothymic and depressive temperaments predispose to disturbances of biological rhythms in BD, while a hyperthymic temperament can be protective. Similar predispositions were also found for all schizotypal dimensions, mostly for cognitive disorganization.

  7. Introduction: circadian rhythm and its disruption: impact on reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Robert F; Gladanac, Bojana

    2014-08-01

    Almost all forms of life have predictable daily or circadian rhythms in molecular, endocrine, and behavioral functions. In mammals, a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei coordinates the timing of these rhythms. Daily light exposure that affects the retina of the eye directly influences this area, which is required to align endogenous processes to the appropriate time of day. The present "Views and Reviews" articles discuss the influence of circadian rhythms, especially nightly secretion of melatonin, on reproductive function and parturition. In addition, an examination is made of problems that arise from recurrent circadian rhythm disruption associated with changes in light exposure patterns common to modern day society. Finally, a possible solution to prevent disruptions in circadian phase markers by filtering out short wavelengths from nocturnal light is reviewed. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gamification Quest: Rhythm. Music as a game mechanic

    OpenAIRE

    Granell Díaz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Treball Final de Grau en Disseny i Desenvolupament de Videojocs. Codi: VJ1241. Curs acadèmic: 2016/2017 This document constitutes the Technical Report for the project Gamification Quest: Rhythm, music as a game mechanic for the Videogame Design and Development bachelor degree. The project consists on the design and implementation of rhythm game mechanics integrated in a gamification environment applied to education. The video game will be implemented on the game engine Unity (10), ...

  9. Using Rhythms of Relationships to Understand Email Archives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perer, Adam; Shneiderman, Ben; Oard, Douglas W

    2005-01-01

    ...: analyzing the temporal rhythms of social relationships. We provide methods for constructing meaningful rhythms from the email headers by identifying relationships and interpreting their attributes. With these visualization techniques, email archive explorers can uncover insights that may have been otherwise hidden in the archive. We apply our methods to an individual's fifteen-year email archive, which consists of about 45,000 messages and over 4,000 relationships.

  10. Cardiac Arrhythmia: In vivo screening in the zebrafish to overcome complexity in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, Calum A

    2010-07-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Cardiac arrhythmias remain a major challenge for modern drug discovery. Clinical events are paroxysmal, often rare and may be asymptomatic until a highly morbid complication. Target selection is often based on limited information and though highly specific agents are identified in screening, the final efficacy is often compromised by unanticipated systemic responses, a narrow therapeutic index and substantial toxicities. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: Our understanding of complexity of arrhythmogenesis has grown dramatically over the last two decades, and the range of potential disease mechanisms now includes pathways previously thought only tangentially involved in arrhythmia. This review surveys the literature on arrhythmia mechanisms from 1965 to the present day, outlines the complex biology underlying potentially each and every rhythm disturbance, and highlights the problems for rational target identification. The rationale for in vivo screening is described and the utility of the zebrafish for this approach and for complementary work in functional genomics is discussed. Current limitations of the model in this setting and the need for careful validation in new disease areas are also described. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: An overview of the complex mechanisms underlying most clinical arrhythmias, and insight into the limits of ion channel conductances as drug targets. An introduction to the zebrafish as a model organism, in particular for cardiovascular biology. Potential approaches to overcoming the hurdles to drug discovery in the face of complex biology including in vivo screening of zebrafish genetic disease models. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: In vivo screening in faithful disease models allows the effects of drugs on integrative physiology and disease biology to be captured during the screening process, in a manner agnostic to potential drug target or targets. This systematic strategy bypasses current gaps in our understanding of disease

  11. Human daily rhythms measured for one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, S; Tome, M B; Crawford, D; Mosher, K

    1990-08-01

    Four human subjects recorded their wake-up and to-sleep times for one year each. The data were plotted to display individual circadian rhythms and the data were analyzed statistically. First, individuals had characteristic patterns in which visible changes in the patterns were observed mainly when time zones were changed because of travel. Second, the months with the latest wake-up and latest to-sleep times concentrated around the winter solstice; the months with the earliest wake-up and earliest to-sleep times concentrated around the fall equinox. Third, new moon versus full moon days were not different. Fourth, one-hour changes between standard and daylight savings time in the USA were reflected by near one-hour changes in two subjects, but not in a third. Fifth, weekend delays in wake-up time (0.8-1.6 hours), weekend delays in to-sleep time (0.1-0.5 hours), and shorter weekend awake time (0.8-1.3 hours) were observed. Sixth, throughout the year, wake-up times were close to the time of sunrise, but to-sleep times were several hours past sunset.

  12. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress).

  13. Music and speech prosody: A common rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija eHausen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61 using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress.

  14. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R.; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress). PMID:24032022

  15. Circadian rhythm and sleep influences on digestive physiology and disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughn BV

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bradley V Vaughn, Sean Rotolo, Heidi L Roth Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Circadian rhythms and sleep influence a variety of physiological functions, including the digestive system. The digestive system also has intrinsic rhythms that interact dynamically with circadian rhythms. New advances in understanding the interaction of these rhythms and sleep provide the prospect of evaluating their role in normal physiology and the link of their disruption to pathological conditions. Recent work has demonstrated that sleep and circadian factors influence appetite, nutrient absorption, and metabolism. Disruption of sleep and circadian rhythms may increase vulnerability to digestive disorders, including reflux, ulcers, inflammatory bowel issues, irritable bowel disease, and gastrointestinal cancer. As our knowledge of the link between circadian timing and gastrointestinal physiology grows, so do our opportunities to provide promising diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for gastrointestinal disorders. Keywords: digestion, digestive diseases, gastrointestinal reflux, sleep, circadian rhythm 

  16. Educating the sense of rhythm in primary education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia GRĂDINARU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rhythm as a core element of complex coordination is the key to efficient moulding of motor skills specific to sports activities in curricula. Practicing physical exercise in a varied rhythm and tempo in primary school students moulds the skill of achieving correct movement basics (direction, span, coordination, and expressivity. The use of music in sports classes improves kinetics and vestibular sensitivity. The sense of rhythm and tempo are imperative criteria in vocational schools. Purpose: This paper aims to describe a pattern of means selected to develop the sense of rhythm and to allow movements in different sports branches with increased efficiency. Methods: The test battery was applied on a sample of 15 students from the 4th grade of the “Ion Vidu” National Arts College in Timisoara, Romania, aged 9-10 years, over an entire school year, using different rhythms and tempos during sports classes, which were later used in gymnastics, athletic events, and basketball. Results: Data recorded after the application tests, processed and interpreted confirms the proposed assumption and validates the motor contents used. Conclusions: Sense of rhythm is a component of coordinative capacity that is required to be educated from an early age. Rhythmic movements are easier to automate saving energy and motivating students to an active and conscious participation.

  17. Circadian rhythms in cognitive performance: implications for neuropsychological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdez P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Valdez, Candelaria Ramírez, Aída GarcíaLaboratory of Psychophysiology, School of Psychology, University of Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, MéxicoAbstract: Circadian variations have been found in human performance, including the efficiency to execute many tasks, such as sensory, motor, reaction time, time estimation, memory, verbal, arithmetic calculations, and simulated driving tasks. Performance increases during the day and decreases during the night. Circadian rhythms have been found in three basic neuropsychological processes (attention, working memory, and executive functions, which may explain oscillations in the performance of many tasks. The time course of circadian rhythms in cognitive performance may be modified significantly in patients with brain disorders, due to chronotype, age, alterations of the circadian rhythm, sleep deprivation, type of disorder, and medication. This review analyzes the recent results on circadian rhythms in cognitive performance, as well as the implications of these rhythms for the neuropsychological assessment of patients with brain disorders such as traumatic head injury, stroke, dementia, developmental disorders, and psychiatric disorders.Keywords: human circadian rhythms, cognitive performance, neuropsychological assessment, attention, working memory, executive functions

  18. Implications of Circadian Rhythm in Dopamine and Mood Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongah; Jang, Sangwon; Choe, Han Kyoung; Chung, Sooyoung; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2017-07-31

    Mammalian physiology and behavior are regulated by an internal time-keeping system, referred to as circadian rhythm. The circadian timing system has a hierarchical organization composed of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and local clocks in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral organs. The circadian clock molecular mechanism involves a network of transcription-translation feedback loops. In addition to the clinical association between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders, recent studies have suggested a molecular link between mood regulation and circadian rhythm. Specifically, genetic deletion of the circadian nuclear receptor Rev-erbα induces mania-like behavior caused by increased midbrain dopaminergic (DAergic) tone at dusk. The association between circadian rhythm and emotion-related behaviors can be applied to pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease (PD), DAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta progressively degenerate leading to motor dysfunction. Patients with PD also exhibit non-motor symptoms, including sleep disorder and neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms that link the molecular circadian clock and brain machinery in the regulation of emotional behaviors and related midbrain DAergic neuronal circuits in healthy and pathological states. This review summarizes the current literature regarding the association between circadian rhythm and mood regulation from a chronobiological perspective, and may provide insight into therapeutic approaches to target psychiatric symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases involving circadian rhythm dysfunction.

  19. Dynamical Analysis of bantam-Regulated Drosophila Circadian Rhythm Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3‧untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation, and play a crucial role in regulating many different biological processes. bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as regulating Drosophila growth and circadian rhythm. Recently, it has been discovered that bantam plays a crucial role in the core circadian pacemaker. In this paper, based on experimental observations, a detailed dynamical model of bantam-regulated circadian clock system is developed to show the post-transcriptional behaviors in the modulation of Drosophila circadian rhythm, in which the regulation of bantam is incorporated into a classical model. The dynamical behaviors of the model are consistent with the experimental observations, which shows that bantam is an important regulator of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The sensitivity analysis of parameters demonstrates that with the regulation of bantam the system is more sensitive to perturbations, indicating that bantam regulation makes it easier for the organism to modulate its period against the environmental perturbations. The effectiveness in rescuing locomotor activity rhythms of mutated flies shows that bantam is necessary for strong and sustained rhythms. In addition, the biological mechanisms of bantam regulation are analyzed, which may help us more clearly understand Drosophila circadian rhythm regulated by other miRNAs.

  20. [Melatonin, synthetic analogs, and the sleep/wake rhythm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escames, G; Acuña-Castroviejo, D

    Melatonin, a widespread hormone in the animal kingdom, is produced by several organs and tissues besides the pineal gland. Whilst extrapineal melatonin behaves as a cytoprotective molecule, the pineal produces the hormone in a rhythmic manner. The discovery of melatonin in 1958, and the characterization of its synthesis somewhat later, let to the description of its photoperiodic regulation and its relationship with the biological rhythms such as the sleep/wake rhythm. The suprachiasmatic nuclei are the anatomical seat of the biological clock, represented by the clock genes, which code for the period and frequency of the rhythms. The photoperiod synchronizes the activity of the auprachiasmatic biological clock, which in turn induces the melatonin's rhythm. The rhythm of melatonin, peaking at 2-3 am, acts as an endogenous synchronizer that translates the environmental photoperiodic signal in chemical information for the cells. The sleep/wake cycle is a typical biological rhythm synchronized by melatonin, and the sleep/wake cycle alterations of chronobiological origin, are very sensitive to melatonin treatment. Taking advantage of the chronobiotic and antidepressive properties of melatonin, a series of synthetic analogs of this hormone, with high interest in insomnia, are now available. Melatonin is a highly effective chronobiotic in the treatment of chronobiological alterations of the sleep/wake cycle. From a pharmacokinetic point of view, the synthetic drugs derived from melatonin are interesting tools in the therapy of these alterations.

  1. Cardiac gated ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart

  2. Efficiency evaluation of treatment of atrial rhythm disorders on the left ventricular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberini, J.L.; Mansour, H.; Victor, F.; De Place, C.; Carre, F.; Daubert, J.C.; Borguet, P.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this prospective study was to evaluate the development and evolution of the LV function after treatment of atrial arrhythmias, evolving for at least three months, associated to an alteration of the LV function. Twelve patients (61.3 ± 13.9 years) were divided into two groups: Gr1 - treatment by cardio-version or radiofrequency; Gr2 - pharmacological treatment or ablation of atrial-ventricular junction and implantation of a cardiac pacemaker. An examination including ECG, Holter, test-to-effort, echocardiography, cavitary angio-scintigraphy was effectuated 48 h and 6 weeks after reduction. A net clinic amelioration was observed in the evolution, confirmed by results of the echocardiographic and angio-scintigraphic examinations (with a correlation coefficient of 0.87). In exchange, between the two examinations, there is no significant difference for the test-to-effort with medium or maximal cardiac frequencies and the diameters or tele-diastolic and tele-systolic volumes for echography. After the multi-variable analysis the initial angio-scintigraphic measurement of the LV function is a good predictive factor in ameliorating the LV function in patients maintained in sinusal rhythm. In conclusion, the angio-scintigraphy permits predicting the treatment efficiency of the atrial arrhythmias on the LV function

  3. Genetic Disruption of Circadian Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Causes Helplessness, Behavioral Despair, and Anxiety-like Behavior in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Dominic; Long, Jaimie E.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Barandas, Rita; Malinow, Roberto; Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. To investigate the causal relationship between mood disorders and circadian clock disruption, previous studies in animal models have employed light/dark manipulations, global mutations of clock genes, or brain area lesions. However, light can impact mood by noncircadian mechanisms; clock genes have pleiotropic, clock-independent functions; and brain lesions not only disrupt cellular circadian rhythms but also destroy cells and eliminate important neuronal connections, including light reception pathways. Thus, a definitive causal role for functioning circadian clocks in mood regulation has not been established. Methods We stereotactically injected viral vectors encoding short hairpin RNA to knock down expression of the essential clock gene Bmal1 into the brain's master circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Results In these SCN-specific Bmal1-knockdown (SCN-Bmal1-KD) mice, circadian rhythms were greatly attenuated in the SCN, while the mice were maintained in a standard light/dark cycle, SCN neurons remained intact, and neuronal connections were undisturbed, including photic inputs. In the learned helplessness paradigm, the SCN-Bmal1-KD mice were slower to escape, even before exposure to inescapable stress. They also spent more time immobile in the tail suspension test and less time in the lighted section of a light/dark box. The SCN-Bmal1-KD mice also showed greater weight gain, an abnormal circadian pattern of corticosterone, and an attenuated increase of corticosterone in response to stress. Conclusions Disrupting SCN circadian rhythms is sufficient to cause helplessness, behavioral despair, and anxiety-like behavior in mice, establishing SCN-Bmal1-KD mice as a new animal model of depression. PMID:27113500

  4. Genetic Disruption of Circadian Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Causes Helplessness, Behavioral Despair, and Anxiety-like Behavior in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Dominic; Long, Jaimie E; Proulx, Christophe D; Barandas, Rita; Malinow, Roberto; Welsh, David K

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. To investigate the causal relationship between mood disorders and circadian clock disruption, previous studies in animal models have employed light/dark manipulations, global mutations of clock genes, or brain area lesions. However, light can impact mood by noncircadian mechanisms; clock genes have pleiotropic, clock-independent functions; and brain lesions not only disrupt cellular circadian rhythms but also destroy cells and eliminate important neuronal connections, including light reception pathways. Thus, a definitive causal role for functioning circadian clocks in mood regulation has not been established. We stereotactically injected viral vectors encoding short hairpin RNA to knock down expression of the essential clock gene Bmal1 into the brain's master circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In these SCN-specific Bmal1-knockdown (SCN-Bmal1-KD) mice, circadian rhythms were greatly attenuated in the SCN, while the mice were maintained in a standard light/dark cycle, SCN neurons remained intact, and neuronal connections were undisturbed, including photic inputs. In the learned helplessness paradigm, the SCN-Bmal1-KD mice were slower to escape, even before exposure to inescapable stress. They also spent more time immobile in the tail suspension test and less time in the lighted section of a light/dark box. The SCN-Bmal1-KD mice also showed greater weight gain, an abnormal circadian pattern of corticosterone, and an attenuated increase of corticosterone in response to stress. Disrupting SCN circadian rhythms is sufficient to cause helplessness, behavioral despair, and anxiety-like behavior in mice, establishing SCN-Bmal1-KD mice as a new animal model of depression. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  5. A CASE OF GRANISETRON ASSOCIATED INTRAOPERATIVE CARDIAC ARREST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Harbi, Mohammed; Al Rifai, Derar; Al Habeeb, Hassan; Wambi, Freddie; Geldhof, Georges; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of intraoperative severe bradycardia that resulted in asystole and cardiac arrest shortly after (granisetron 1mg for postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis, that occurred in a female patient who underwent an elective total thyroidectomy. After two cycles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, spontaneous circulation and sinus rhythm returned successfully. Postoperatively, the patient was diagnosed with a drug-induced long QT syndrome. At the time of the event, granisetron was the only medication administered. Furthermore, there was no reason to suspect electrolyte abnormalities. We explore the association of the onset of severe sinus bradycardia with the intravenous administration of granisetron.

  6. [Management of surgery patients with implanted cardiac pacemakers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugljen, R; Dadić, D; Ferek-Petrić, B; Jelić, I; Letica, D; Anić, D; Husar, J

    1995-01-01

    Patients having cardiac pacemaker implanted may be subjected to various general surgery procedures. Application of electrosurgery for the purpose of resection and coagulation, provides a high frequency electric field which produces electric voltage on the electrodes of the pacing system. This voltage may be detected within the pacing system, and various arrhythmias can be provoked in correlation with underlying rhythm and mode of pacing. Preoperative patient control and proper pacemaker programming can prevent the pacing malfunctions due to the electrosurgery application. Appropriate positioning of the neutral electrode in relation to the pacing system avoids the electric fields intersection and decreases their interference.

  7. Cardiac manifestation's history in the systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Rondon, Federico; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2001-01-01

    In this paper it is broadly and in depth reviewed the cardiac manifestation's history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), since an historical analysis of clinical manifestations both in pre and post corticosteroids period. The way how the heart and the cardiovascular system's functions have been studied by clinical and semiological views are showed, through clinical manifestations such as myocarditis pericarditis, endocarditis, rhythm alterations, etc, and the evolution of laboratory methods used to its study as well as immunologic prognostic markers and risk factors for coronary disease in SLE

  8. [A novel proposal explaining sleep disturbance of children in Japan--asynchronization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Jun

    2008-07-01

    It has been reported that more than half of the children in Japan suffer from daytime sleepiness. In contrast, about one quarter of junior high-school students in Japan complain of insomnia. According to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (Second edition), these children could be diagnosed as having behaviorally-induced insufficient sleep syndrome due to inadequate sleeping habits. Getting on adequate amount of sleep should solve such problems;however, such a therapeutic approach often fails. Although social factors are involved in these sleep disturbances, I feel that a novel notion - asynchronization - leads to an understanding of the pathophysiology of disturbances in these children. Further, it could contribute to resolve their problems. The essence of asynchronization is a disturbance of various aspects (e.g., cycle, amplitude, phase, and interrelationship) of the biological rhythms that normally exhibits circadian oscillation. The main cause of asynchronization is hypothesized to be the combination of light exposure during night and the lack of light exposure in the morning. Asynchronization results in the disturbance of variable systems. Thus, symptoms of asynchronization include disturbances of the autonomic nervous system (sleepiness, insomnia, disturbance of hormonal excretion, gastrointestinal problems, etc.) and higher brain function (disorientation, loss of sociality, loss of will or motivation, impaired alertness and performance, etc.). Neurological (attention deficit, aggression, impulsiveness, hyperactivity, etc.), psychiatric (depressive disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, etc.) and somatic (tiredness, fatigue, etc.) disturbances could also be symptoms of asynchronization. At the initial phase of asynchronization, disturbances are functional and can be resolved relatively easily, such as by the establishment of a regular sleep-wakefulness cycle;however, without adequate intervention the disturbances could gradually

  9. Reducing language to rhythm: Amazonian Bora drummed language exploits speech rhythm for long-distance communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifart, Frank; Meyer, Julien; Grawunder, Sven; Dentel, Laure

    2018-04-01

    Many drum communication systems around the world transmit information by emulating tonal and rhythmic patterns of spoken languages in sequences of drumbeats. Their rhythmic characteristics, in particular, have not been systematically studied so far, although understanding them represents a rare occasion for providing an original insight into the basic units of speech rhythm as selected by natural speech practices directly based on beats. Here, we analyse a corpus of Bora drum communication from the northwest Amazon, which is nowadays endangered with extinction. We show that four rhythmic units are encoded in the length of pauses between beats. We argue that these units correspond to vowel-to-vowel intervals with different numbers of consonants and vowel lengths. By contrast, aligning beats with syllables, mora or only vowel length yields inconsistent results. Moreover, we also show that Bora drummed messages conventionally select rhythmically distinct markers to further distinguish words. The two phonological tones represented in drummed speech encode only few lexical contrasts. Rhythm thus appears to crucially contribute to the intelligibility of drummed Bora. Our study provides novel evidence for the role of rhythmic structures composed of vowel-to-vowel intervals in the complex puzzle concerning the redundancy and distinctiveness of acoustic features embedded in speech.

  10. The role of the daily feeding rhythm in the regulation of the day/night rhythm in triglyceride secretion in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Yan; Foppen, Ewout; Mansur Machado, Frederico Sander; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, A.

    2018-01-01

    Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels show a clear daily rhythm, however, thus far it is still unknown whether this rhythm results from a daily rhythm in TG production, TG uptake or both. Previous studies have shown that feeding activity affects plasma TG concentrations, but it is not clear how the daily

  11. Estimation of 3-D conduction velocity vector fields from cardiac mapping data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, A R; Bayly, P V; Zhang, S; Walcott, G P; Ideker, R E; Smith, W M

    2000-08-01

    A method to estimate three-dimensional (3-D) conduction velocity vector fields in cardiac tissue is presented. The speed and direction of propagation are found from polynomial "surfaces" fitted to space-time (x, y, z, t) coordinates of cardiac activity. The technique is applied to sinus rhythm and paced rhythm mapped with plunge needles at 396-466 sites in the canine myocardium. The method was validated on simulated 3-D plane and spherical waves. For simulated data, conduction velocities were estimated with an accuracy of 1%-2%. In experimental data, estimates of conduction speeds during paced rhythm were slower than those found during normal sinus rhythm. Vector directions were also found to differ between different types of beats. The technique was able to distinguish between premature ventricular contractions and sinus beats and between sinus and paced beats. The proposed approach to computing velocity vector fields provides an automated, physiological, and quantitative description of local electrical activity in 3-D tissue. This method may provide insight into abnormal conduction associated with fatal ventricular arrhythmias.

  12. Use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ratika; Tang, Anthony; Wells, George; Blackburn, Josée; Stiell, Ian; Simpson, Christopher; Dorian, Paul; Yee, Raymond; Cameron, Doug; Connolly, Stuart; Birnie, David; Nichol, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Background Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are at high risk of recurrent arrests, many of which could be prevented with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). We sought to determine the ICD insertion rate among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and to determine factors associated with ICD implantation. Methods The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study is a prospective, multiphase, before–after study assessing the effectiveness of prehospital interventions for people experiencing cardiac arrest, trauma or respiratory arrest in 19 Ontario communities. We linked OPALS data describing survivors of cardiac arrest with data from all defibrillator implantation centres in Ontario. Results From January 1997 to April 2002, 454 patients in the OPALS study survived to hospital discharge after experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The mean age was 65 (standard deviation 14) years, 122 (26.9%) were women, 398 (87.7%) had a witnessed arrest, 372 (81.9%) had an initial rhythm of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF), and 76 (16.7%) had asystole or another arrhythmia. The median cerebral performance category at discharge (range 1–5, 1 = normal) was 1. Only 58 (12.8%) of the 454 patients received an ICD. Patients with an initial rhythm of VT/VF were more likely than those with an initial rhythm of asystole or another rhythm to undergo device insertion (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–71.50). Similarly, patients with a normal cerebral performance score were more likely than those with abnormal scores to undergo ICD insertion (adjusted OR 12.52, 95% CI 1.74–92.12). Interpretation A minority of patients who survived cardiac arrest underwent ICD insertion. It is unclear whether this low usage rate reflects referral bias, selection bias by electrophysiologists, supply constraint or patient preference. PMID:15505267

  13. Cortical layers, rhythms and BOLD signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeringa, René; Fries, Pascal

    2017-11-03

    This review investigates how laminar fMRI can complement insights into brain function derived from the study of rhythmic neuronal synchronization. Neuronal synchronization in various frequency bands plays an important role in neuronal communication between brain areas, and it does so on the backbone of layer-specific interareal anatomical projections. Feedforward projections originate predominantly in supragranular cortical layers and terminate in layer 4, and this pattern is reflected in inter-laminar and interareal directed gamma-band influences. Thus, gamma-band synchronization likely subserves feedforward signaling. By contrast, anatomical feedback projections originate predominantly in infragranular layers and terminate outside layer 4, and this pattern is reflected in inter-laminar and interareal directed alpha- and/or beta-band influences. Thus, alpha-beta band synchronization likely subserves feedback signaling. Furthermore, these rhythms explain part of the BOLD signal, with independent contributions of alpha-beta and gamma. These findings suggest that laminar fMRI can provide us with a potentially useful method to test some of the predictions derived from the study of neuronal synchronization. We review central findings regarding the role of layer-specific neuronal synchronization for brain function, and regarding the link between neuronal synchronization and the BOLD signal. We discuss the role that laminar fMRI could play by comparing it to invasive and non-invasive electrophysiological recordings. Compared to direct electrophysiological recordings, this method provides a metric of neuronal activity that is slow and indirect, but that is uniquely non-invasive and layer-specific with potentially whole brain coverage. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Circadian Rhythms in Floral Scent Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Myles P; Imaizumi, Takato

    2016-01-01

    To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT 1 (ODO1), EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI), and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success.

  15. Circadian rhythms in floral scent emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles eFenske

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT1 (ODO1, EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI, and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success.

  16. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  17. [Psychoeducation and interpersonal and social rhythm therapy for bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    In treating bipolar disorder, specific psychotherapies in adjunct to pharmacotherapy have been shown to be effective in preventing new episodes and treating depressive episodes. Among those, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) developed by Frank, amalgamation of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) with behavioral therapy focused on social rhythm has been shown to be an efficacious adjunct to mediation in preventing new episodes in bipolar I patients and in treating depression in bipolar I arid II disorder. IPSRT has also been shown to enhance total functioning, relationship functioning and life satisfaction among patients with bipolar disorder, even after pretreatment functioning and concurrent depression were covaried. IPSRT was designed to directly address the major pathways to recurrence in bipolar disorder, namely medication nonadherence, stressful life events, and disruptions in social rhythms. IPT, originated by Klerman et al., is a strategic time-limited psychotherapy focused on one or two of four current interpersonal problem areas (ie, grief, interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, and interpersonal dificits). In IPSRT, the fifth problem area "grief for the lost healthy self" has been added in order to promote acceptance of the diagnosis and the need for life-long treatment. Social rhythm therapy is a behavioral approach aiming at increasing regularity of social rhythms using the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM), a chart to record daily social activities including how stimulating they were, developed from observation that disruptions in social rhythms often trigger affective episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. IPSRT also appears to be a promising intervention for a subset of individuals with bipolar II depression as monotherapy for the acute treatment.

  18. Rhythms of mammalian body temperature can sustain peripheral circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven A; Zumbrunn, Gottlieb; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Preitner, Nicolas; Schibler, Ueli

    2002-09-17

    Low-amplitude temperature oscillations can entrain the phase of circadian rhythms in several unicellular and multicellular organisms, including Neurospora and Drosophila. Because mammalian body temperature is subject to circadian variations of 1 degrees C-4 degrees C, we wished to determine whether these temperature cycles could serve as a Zeitgeber for circadian gene expression in peripheral cell types. In RAT1 fibroblasts cultured in vitro, circadian gene expression could be established by a square wave temperature rhythm with a (Delta)T of 4 degrees C (12 hr 37 degrees C/12 hr 33 degrees C). To examine whether natural body temperature rhythms can also affect circadian gene expression, we first measured core body temperature cycles in the peritoneal cavities of mice by radiotelemetry. We then reproduced these rhythms with high precision in the liquid medium of cultured fibroblasts for several days by means of a homemade computer-driven incubator. While these "in vivo" temperature rhythms were incapable of establishing circadian gene expression de novo, they could maintain previously induced rhythms for multiple days; by contrast, the rhythms of control cells kept at constant temperature rapidly dampened. Moreover, circadian oscillations of environmental temperature could reentrain circadian clocks in the livers of mice, probably via the changes they imposed upon both body temperature and feeding behavior. Interestingly, these changes in ambient temperature did not affect the phase of the central circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. We postulate that both endogenous and environmental temperature cycles can participate in the synchronization of peripheral clocks in mammals.

  19. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    OpenAIRE

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a rol...

  20. Plakophilin-2 is required for transcription of genes that control calcium cycling and cardiac rhythm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerrone, Marina; Montnach, Jerome; Lin, Xianming; Zhao, Yan Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Alvarado, Francisco J.; Dolgalev, Igor; Karathanos, Thomas V.; Malkani, Kabir; Van Opbergen, Chantal J.M.; Van Bavel, Joanne J.A.; Yang, Hua Qian; Vasquez, Carolina; Tester, David; Fowler, Steven J; Liang, Fengxia; Rothenberg, Eli; Heguy, Adriana; Morley, Gregory E.; Coetzee, William A.; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Van Veen, Toon A.B.; Valdivia, Hector H.; Delmar, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Plakophilin-2 (PKP2) is a component of the desmosome and known for its role in cell-cell adhesion. Mutations in human PKP2 associate with a life-threatening arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, often of right ventricular predominance. Here, we use a range of state-of-the-art methods and a

  1. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hoed, M.A.H.; Eijgelsheim, M.; Esko, T.; Brundel, B.J.; Peal, D.S.; Evans, D.M.; Nolte, I.M.; Segrè, A.V.; Holm, H.; Handsaker, R.E.; Westra, H.J.; Johnson, T.; Isaacs, A.; Yang, L.; Lundby, A.; Zhao, J.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Go, M.J.; Almgren, P.; Bochud, M.; Boucher, G.; Cornelis, M.C.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Hadley, D.; van der Harst, P.; Hayward, C.; den Heijer, M.; Igl, W.; Jackson, A.U.; Kutalik, Z.; Luan, J.; Kemp, J.P.; Kristiansson, K.; Ladenvall, C.; Lorentzon, M.; Montasser, M.E.; Njajou, O.T.; O'Reilly, P.F.; Padmanabhan, S.; St Pourcain, B.; Rankinen, T.; Salo, P.; Tanaka, T.; Timpson, N.J.; Vitart, V.; Waite, L.; Wheeler, W.; Zhang, W.; Draisma, H.H.M.; Feitosa, M.F.; Kerr, K.F.; Lind, P.A.; Mihailov, E.; Onland-Moret, N.C.; Song, C.; Weedon, M.N.; Xie, W.; Yengo, L.; Absher, D.; Albert, C.M.; Alonso, A.; Arking, D.E.; de Bakker, P.I.; Balkau, B.; Barlassina, C.; Benaglio, P.; Bis, J.C.; Bouatia-Naji, N.; Brage, S.; Chanock, S.J.; Chines, P.S.; Chung, M.; Darbar, D.; Dina, C.; Dörr, M.; Elliott, P.; Felix, S.B.; Fischer, K.; Fuchsberger, C.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Goyette, P.; Gudnason, V.; Harris, T.B.; Hartikainen, A.L.; Havulinna, A.S.; Heckbert, S.R.; Hicks, A.A.; Hofman, A.; Holewijn, S.; Hoogstra-Berends, F.; Hottenga, J.J.; Jensen, M.K.; Johansson, A.; Junttila, J.; Kääb, S.; Kanon, B.; Ketkar, S.; Khaw, K.T.; Knowles, J.W.; Kooner, A.S.; Kors, J.A.; Kumari, M.; Milani, L.; Laiho, P.; Lakatta, E.G.; Langenberg, C.; Leusink, M.; Liu, Y.; Luben, R.N.; Lunetta, K.L.; Lynch, S.N.; Markus, M.R.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Mateo Leach, I.; McArdle, W.L.; McCarroll, S.A.; Medland, S.E.; Miller, K.A.; Montgomery, G.W.; Morrison, A.C.; Müller-Nurasyid, M.; Navarro, P.; Nelis, M.; O'Connell, J.R.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Ong, K.K.; Newman, A.B.; Peters, A.; Polasek, O.; Pouta, A.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Psaty, B.M.; Rao, D.C.; Ring, S.M.; Rossin, E.J.; Rudan, D.; Sanna, S.; Scott, R.A.; Sehmi, J.S.; Sharp, S.; Shin, J.T.; Singleton, A.B.; Smith, A.V.; Soranzo, N.; Spector, T.D.; Stewart, C.; Stringham, H.M.; Tarasov, K.V.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Vandenput, L.; Hwang, S.J.; Whitfield, J.B.; Wijmenga, C.; Wild, S.H.; Willemsen, G.; Wilson, J.F.; Witteman, J.C.; Wong, A.; Wong, Q.; Jamshidi, Y.; Zitting, P.; Boer, J.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Borecki, I.B.; van Duijn, C.M.; Ekelund, U.; Forouhi, N.G.; Froguel, P.; Hingorani, A.D.; Ingelsson, E.; Kivimaki, M.; Kronmal, R.A.; Kuh, D; Lind, L.; Martin, N.G.; Oostra, B.A.; Pedersen, N.L.; Quertermous, T.; Rotter, J.I.; van der Schouw, Y.T.; Verschuren, W.M.; Walker, M.; Albanes, D.; Arnar, D.O.; Assimes, T.L.; Bandinelli, S.; Boehnke, M.; de Boer, R.A.; Bouchard, C.; Caulfield, W.L.; Chambers, J.C.; Curhan, G.; Cusi, D.; Eriksson, J.; Ferrucci, L.; van Gilst, W.H.; Glorioso, N.; de Graaf, J.; Groop, L.; Gyllensten, U.; Hsueh, W.C.; Hu, F.B.; Huikuri, H.V.; Hunter, D.J.; Iribarren, C.; Isomaa, B.; Järvelin, M.R.; Jula, A.; Kähönen, M.; Kiemeney, L.A.; van der Klauw, M.M.; Kooner, J.S.; Kraft, P.; Iacoviello, L.; Lehtimäki, T.; Lokki, M.L.; Mitchell, B.D.; Navis, G.; Nieminen, M.S.; Ohlsson, C.; Poulter, N.R.; Qi, L.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rimm, E.B.; Rioux, J.D.; Rizzi, F.; Rudan, I.; Salomaa, V.; Sever, P.S.; Shields, D.C.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Sinisalo, J.; Stanton, A.V.; Stolk, R.P.; Strachan, D.P.; Tardif, J.C.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Tuomilehto, J.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Virtamo, J.; Viikari, J.; Vollenweider, P.; Waeber, G.; Widen, E.; Cho, Y.S.; Olsen, J.V.; Visscher, P.M.; Willer, C.J.; Franke, L; Erdmann, J.; Thompson, J.R.; Pfeufer, A.; Sotoodehnia, N.; Newton-Cheh, C.; Ellinor, P.T.; Stricker, B.H.C.; Metspalu, A.; Perola, M.; Beckmann, J.S.; Smith, G.D.; Stefansson, K.; Wareham, N.J.; Munroe, P.B.; Sibon, O.C.M.; Milan, D.J.; Snieder, H.; Samani, N.J.; Loos, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously

  2. Traumatic brain injury and disturbed sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a frequent condition worldwide, and sleep-wake disturbances often complicate the course after the injuring event. Current evidence suggests that the most common sleep-wake disturbances following traumatic brain injury include excessive daytime sleepiness and posttraumatic hypersomnia, that is, increased sleep need per 24 h. The neuromolecular basis of posttraumatic sleep pressure enhancement is not entirely clear. First neuropathological and clinical studies suggest that impaired hypocretin (orexin) signalling might contribute to sleepiness, but direct or indirect traumatic injury also to other sleep-wake modulating systems in the brainstem and the mesencephalon is likely. Posttraumatic insomnia may be less common than posttraumatic sleepiness, but studies on its frequency revealed conflicting results. Furthermore, insomnia is often associated with psychiatric comorbidities, and some patients with posttraumatic disruption of their circadian rhythm may be misdiagnosed as insomnia patients. The pathophysiology of posttraumatic circadian sleep disorders remains elusive; however, there is some evidence that reduced evening melatonin production due to traumatic brain damage may cause disruption of circadian regulation of sleep and wakefulness.

  3. Cardiac Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Pediatric Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Lykke, Mikkel; Hother, Anne-Louise

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Half a million children die annually of severe acute malnutrition and cardiac dysfunction may contribute to the mortality. However, cardiac function remains poorly examined in cases of severe acute malnutrition. OBJECTIVE: To determine malnutrition-induced echocardiographic disturbances...... and longitudinal changes in plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T in a pediatric porcine model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Five-week old piglets (Duroc-x-Danish Landrace-x-Yorkshire) were fed a nutritionally inadequate maize-flour diet to induce malnutrition (MAIZE, n = 12) or a reference diet...... groups. The myocardial performance index was 86% higher in MAIZE vs AGE-REF (pMalnutrition associates with cardiac dysfunction in a pediatric porcine model by increased myocardial performance index and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide...

  4. Integrative computational models of cardiac arrhythmias -- simulating the structurally realistic heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trayanova, Natalia A; Tice, Brock M

    2009-01-01

    Simulation of cardiac electrical function, and specifically, simulation aimed at understanding the mechanisms of cardiac rhythm disorders, represents an example of a successful integrative multiscale modeling approach, uncovering emergent behavior at the successive scales in the hierarchy of structural complexity. The goal of this article is to present a review of the integrative multiscale models of realistic ventricular structure used in the quest to understand and treat ventricular arrhythmias. It concludes with the new advances in image-based modeling of the heart and the promise it holds for the development of individualized models of ventricular function in health and disease. PMID:20628585

  5. Formation of a national network for rapid response to device and lead advisories: The Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Device Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Andrew D; Simpson, Christopher S; Parkash, Ratika; Yee, Raymond; Champagne, Jean; Healey, Jeffrey S; Cameron, Doug; Thibault, Bernard; Mangat, Iqwal; Tung, Stanley; Sterns, Laurence; Birnie, David H; Exner, Derek V; Sivakumaran, Soori; Davies, Ted; Coutu, Benoit; Crystal, Eugene; Wolfe, Kevin; Verma, Atul; Stephenson, Elizabeth A; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Gow, Robert; Connors, Sean; Paredes, Felix Ayala; Turabian, Mike; Kus, Teresa; Essebag, Vidal; Gardner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Heart Rhythm Society (CHRS) Device Advisory Committee was commissioned to respond to advisories regarding cardiac rhythm device and lead performance on behalf of the CHRS. In the event of an advisory, the Chair uses an e-mail network to disseminate advisory information to Committee members broadly representative of the Canadian device community. A consensus recommendation is prepared by the Committee and made available to all Canadian centres on the CHRS Web site after approval by the CHRS executive. This collaborative approach using an e-mail network has proven very efficient in providing a rapid national response to device advisories. The network is an ideal tool to collect specific data on implanted device system performance and allows for prompt reporting of clinically relevant data to front-line clinicians and patients. PMID:19584969

  6. Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use and Clinical Outcomes after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Mathias J; Vognsen, Mikael; Andersen, Mikkel S

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To systematically review studies comparing bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use to no AED use in regard to clinical outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and to provide a descriptive summary of studies on the cost-effectiveness of bystander AED use. Methods: We...... randomized trials, and 13 cost-effectiveness studies were included. Meta-analysis of 6 observational studies without critical risk of bias showed that bystander AED use was associated with survival to hospital discharge (all rhythms OR: 1.73 [95% CI: 1.36, 2.18], shockable rhythms OR: 1.66 [95% CI: 1.54, 1.......79]) and favorable neurological outcome (all rhythms OR: 2.12 [95% CI: 1.36, 3.29], shockable rhythms OR: 2.37 [95% CI: 1.58, 3.57]). There was no association between bystander AED use and neurological outcome for non-shockable rhythms (OR: 0.76 [95% CI: 0.10, 5.87]). The Public-Access Defibrillation trial found...

  7. Contrast-induced encephalopathy following cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Roberto; Simon, Neil; Markus, Romesh; Muller, David Wm; Kathir, Krishna

    2017-08-01

    To describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIE) following cardiac catheterization. CIE is an acute, reversible neurological disturbance directly attributable to the intra-arterial administration of iodinated contrast medium. The PubMed database was searched and all cases in the literature were retrieved and reviewed. 52 reports of CIE following cardiac catheterization were found. Encephalopathy, motor and sensory disturbances, vision disturbance, opthalmoplegia, aphasia, and seizures have been reported. Transient cortical blindness is the most commonly reported neurological syndrome, occurring in approximately 50% of cases. The putative mechanism involves disruption of the blood brain barrier and direct neuronal injury. Contrast-induced transient vasoconstriction has also been implicated. Symptoms typically appear within minutes to hours of contrast administration and resolve entirely within 24-48 hr. Risk factors may include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, the administration of large volumes of iodinated contrast, percutaneous coronary intervention or selective angiography of internal mammary grafts, and previous adverse reaction to iodinated contrast. Characteristic findings on cerebral imaging include cortical and sub-cortical contrast enhancement on computed tomography (CT). Imaging findings in CIE may mimic subarachnoid hemorrhage or cerebral ischemia; the Hounsfield scale on CT and the apparent diffusion coefficient on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful imaging tools in distinguishing these entities. In some cases, brain imaging is normal. Prognosis is excellent with supportive management alone. CIE tends to recur, although re-challenge with iodinated contrast without adverse effects has been documented. CIE is an important clinical entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of stroke following cardiac catheterization. Given that prognosis is

  8. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John

    2007-01-01

    of cardiac arrest. 83 of those (28 %) received first aid. The first aid was provided by layman (68 %), physicians (11 %), nurses (11 %) and first-aiders (4 %). In 6 % the identity of the first aid provider was unknown. The majority of the patients (n = 177 (58 %)) had asystole upon ambulance arrival. 37 (12...... patients according to whether they received first aid, the identity of the first aid provider and the initial cardiac rhythm as diagnosed by the patient monitor.   Results: 18,666 patients where in contact with an emergency ambulance in the study period. Of those 296 (89/100,000/year) met the definition...... a considerably higher incidence rate for OHCA, than documented by the analogue nationwide registry. Further we discovered a high rate of first aid to OHCA-patients. Finally our data showed a high occurence of asystolia in patients who met the official criteria for OHCA....

  9. Evaluation of Accordance of Magnetic Resonance Volumetric and Flow Measurements in Determining Ventricular Stroke Volume in Cardiac Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeltsch, M.; Ranft, S.; Klass, O.; Aschoff, A.J.; Hoffmann, M.H.K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has become an established noninvasive method for evaluating ventricular function utilizing three-dimensional volumetry. Postprocessing of volumetric measurements is still tedious and time consuming. Stroke volumes obtained by flow quantification across the aortic root or pulmonary trunk could be utilized to increase both speed of workflow and accuracy. Purpose: To assess accuracy of stroke volume quantification using MR volumetric imaging compared to flow quantification in patients with various cardiac diseases. Strategies for the augmentation of accuracy in clinical routine were deduced. Material and Methods: 78 patients with various cardiac diseases -excluding intra- or extracardiac shunts, regurgitant valvular defects, or heart rhythm disturbance -underwent cardiac function analysis with flow measurements across the aortic root and cine imaging of the left ventricle. Forty-six patients additionally underwent flow measurements in the pulmonary trunk and cine imaging of the right ventricle. Results: Left ventricular stroke volume (LVSV) and stroke volume of the aortic root (SVAo) correlated with r=0.97, and Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of 0.11 ml and a standard error of estimation (SEE) of 4.31 ml. Ninety-two percent of the data were within the 95% limits of agreement. Right ventricular stroke volume (RVSV) and stroke volume of the pulmonary trunk (SVP) correlated with a factor of r=0.86, and mean difference in the Bland-Altman analysis was fixed at -2.62 ml (SEE 8.47 ml). For RVSV and SVP, we calculated r=0.82, and Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean difference of 1.27 ml (SEE 9.89 ml). LVSV and RVSV correlated closely, with r=0.91 and a mean difference of 2.79 ml (SEE 7.17 ml). SVAo and SVP correlated with r=0.95 and a mean difference of 0.50 ml (SEE 5.56 ml). Conclusion: Flow quantification can be used as a guidance tool, providing accurate and reproducible stroke volumes of both

  10. Are circadian rhythms new pathways to understand Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffray, M-M; Nicolas, A; Speranza, M; Georgieff, N

    2016-11-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a frequent neurodevelopmental disorder. ASD is probably the result of intricate interactions between genes and environment altering progressively the development of brain structures and functions. Circadian rhythms are a complex intrinsic timing system composed of almost as many clocks as there are body cells. They regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral processes such as the sleep-wake rhythm. ASD is often associated with sleep disorders and low levels of melatonin. This first point raises the hypothesis that circadian rhythms could have an implication in ASD etiology. Moreover, circadian rhythms are generated by auto-regulatory genetic feedback loops, driven by transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1, who drive transcription daily patterns of a wide number of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) in different cellular contexts across tissues. Among these, are some CCGs coding for synapses molecules associated to ASD susceptibility. Furthermore, evidence emerges about circadian rhythms control of time brain development processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Rhythms in the endocrine system of fish: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Mairi; Azpeleta, Clara; López-Olmeda, Jose Fernando

    2017-12-01

    The environment which living organisms inhabit is not constant and many factors, such as light, temperature, and food availability, display cyclic and predictable variations. To adapt to these cyclic changes, animals present biological rhythms in many of their physiological variables, timing their functions to occur when the possibility of success is greatest. Among these variables, many endocrine factors have been described as displaying rhythms in vertebrates. The aim of the present review is to provide a thorough review of the existing knowledge on the rhythms of the endocrine system of fish by examining the hormones that show rhythmicity, how environmental factors control these rhythms and the variation in the responses of the endocrine system depending on the time of the day. We mainly focused on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, which can be considered as the master axis of the endocrine system of vertebrates and regulates a great variety of functions, including reproduction, growth, metabolism, energy homeostasis, stress response, and osmoregulation. In addition, the rhythms of other hormones, such as melatonin and the factors, produced in the gastrointestinal system of fish are reviewed.

  12. Intracerebral evidence of rhythm transform in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Mouraux, André; Jonas, Jacques; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2017-07-01

    Musical entrainment is shared by all human cultures and the perception of a periodic beat is a cornerstone of this entrainment behavior. Here, we investigated whether beat perception might have its roots in the earliest stages of auditory cortical processing. Local field potentials were recorded from 8 patients implanted with depth-electrodes in Heschl's gyrus and the planum temporale (55 recording sites in total), usually considered as human primary and secondary auditory cortices. Using a frequency-tagging approach, we show that both low-frequency (30 Hz) neural activities in these structures faithfully track auditory rhythms through frequency-locking to the rhythm envelope. A selective gain in amplitude of the response frequency-locked to the beat frequency was observed for the low-frequency activities but not for the high-frequency activities, and was sharper in the planum temporale, especially for the more challenging syncopated rhythm. Hence, this gain process is not systematic in all activities produced in these areas and depends on the complexity of the rhythmic input. Moreover, this gain was disrupted when the rhythm was presented at fast speed, revealing low-pass response properties which could account for the propensity to perceive a beat only within the musical tempo range. Together, these observations show that, even though part of these neural transforms of rhythms could already take place in subcortical auditory processes, the earliest auditory cortical processes shape the neural representation of rhythmic inputs in favor of the emergence of a periodic beat.

  13. Social Rhythm and Mental Health: A Cross-Cultural Comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Margraf

    Full Text Available Social rhythm refers to the regularity with which one engages in social activities throughout the week, and has established links with bipolar disorder, as well as some links with depression and anxiety. The aim of the present study is to examine social rhythm and its relationship to various aspects of health, including physical health, negative mental health, and positive mental health.Questionnaire data were obtained from a large-scale multi-national sample of 8095 representative participants from the U.S., Russia, and Germany.Results indicated that social rhythm irregularity is related to increased reporting of health problems, depression, anxiety, and stress. In contrast, greater regularity is related to better overall health state, life satisfaction, and positive mental health. The effects are generally small in size, but hold even when controlling for gender, marital status, education, income, country, and social support. Further, social rhythm means differ across Russia, the U.S., and Germany. Relationships with mental health are present in all three countries, but differ in magnitude.Social rhythm irregularity is related to mental health in Russia, the U.S., and Germany.

  14. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  15. Computer aided analysis of disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldeweg, F.; Lindner, A.

    1986-01-01

    Computer aided analysis of disturbances and the prevention of failures (diagnosis and therapy control) in technological plants belong to the most important tasks of process control. Research in this field is very intensive due to increasing requirements to security and economy of process control and due to a remarkable increase of the efficiency of digital electronics. This publication concerns with analysis of disturbances in complex technological plants, especially in so called high risk processes. The presentation emphasizes theoretical concept of diagnosis and therapy control, modelling of the disturbance behaviour of the technological process and the man-machine-communication integrating artificial intelligence methods, e.g., expert system approach. Application is given for nuclear power plants. (author)

  16. Managing Sleep Disturbances in Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances, particularly daytime sleepiness and insomnia, are common problems reported by patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Poor sleep negatively impacts patients’ quality of life and cognitive functions and increases mortality. Although sleep disturbances can be an early sign of hepatic encephalopathy (HE, many patients without HE still complain of poor quality sleep. The pathophysiology of these disturbances is not fully understood but is believed to be linked to impaired hepatic melatonin metabolism. This paper provides an overview for the clinician of common comorbidities contributing to poor sleep in patients with liver disease, mainly restless leg syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea. It discusses nondrug and pharmacologic treatment options in these patients, such as the use of light therapy and histamine (H1 blockers.

  17. The Disturbing Student and the Judicial Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragle, John D.; Paine, Gage E.

    2009-01-01

    The Assessment-Intervention of Student Problems (AISP) model is a useful tool for preparing student affairs professionals to assess the problems of disturbed, disturbing, or disturbed/disturbing students and to make appropriate referrals. It is particularly useful because it emphasizes the necessity of developing an integrated system for this…

  18. Radiation dose and long term risk of cardiac pathology following radiotherapy and anthracyclin for a childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guldner, Laurence; Haddy, Nadia; Pein, Francois; Diallo, Ibrahima; Shamsaldin, Akthar; Dahan, Michel; Lebidois, Jerome; Merlet, Pascal; Villain, Elisabeth; Sidi, Daniel; Sakiroglu, Olivia; Hartmann, Olivier; Leftakopoulos, Dimitri; Vathaire, Florent de

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the cardiac status in children 15 years (yrs) or more after a solid tumour treatment. Patients and Methods: Of the 447 patients, 229 were fully studied and 218 were not. The following cardiac evaluation was proposed to all the 447 consecutive patients: (1) cardiac Doppler US by one of two expert cardiologists; (2) cardiac rhythm and conduction abnormalities including 24-h holter ECG; (3) 131 I-mIBG myocardial scintigraphy; (4) serum brain natriuretic peptide levels at rest; (5) an exercise test with VO 2 max measurement. The radiation dose delivered to 7 points in the heart was estimated for all patients who had received radiotherapy. Results: Cardiac disorder was diagnosed in 89 evaluated patients (39%) including 24 heart failures and 65 other asymptomatic cardiac diseases. When adjusting on potential confounders, cardiac disorder and cardiac failure risks were respectively linear (ERR at 1 Gy: 26%) and linear-quadratic (ERR at 1 Gy: 19%) functions of the average radiation dose received to the heart. No interaction between cumulative dose of adriamycin and average radiation dose was evidenced for cardiac disorders, but the ERR/Gy of cardiac failure was higher for patients receiving less than 350 mg/m 2 of Adriamycin. Conclusion: Long term heart pathologies are probably one of the major iatrogenic risks encored by patients who survived a childhood cancer. This study strongly emphasizes the need to limit the heart irradiation during radiotherapy, particularly, for patients who also received or were susceptible to later received adriamycin

  19. A Decade of Information on the Use of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices and Interventional Electrophysiological Procedures in the European Society of Cardiology Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Merkely, Bela

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on invasive cardiac arrhythmia therapies in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) area over the past 10 years. Methods and results: The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has collected data on invasive arrhythmia...

  20. Dissection of a Quantitative Trait Locus for PR Interval Duration Identifies Tnni3k as a Novel Modulator of Cardiac Conduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Scicluna, Brendon P.; Milano, Annalisa; Sun, Albert Y.; Tang, Hao; Remme, Carol Ann; Moerland, Perry D.; Tanck, Michael W. T.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2012-01-01

    Atrio-ventricular conduction disease is a common feature in Mendelian rhythm disorders associated with sudden cardiac death and is characterized by prolongation of the PR interval on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG). Prolongation of the PR interval is also a strong predictor of atrial

  1. Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Kleiner, Wibke; Kloas, Werner

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and intensity of artificial light at night, commonly referred to as light pollution, is consequently rising and progressively also ecological implications come to light. Low intensity light is known to suppress nocturnal melatonin production in several fish species. This study aims to examine the least suppressive light colour for melatonin excreted into the holding water and the influence of different light qualities and quantities in the night on gene expression of gonadotropins in fish. European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to light of different wavelengths during the night (blue, green, and red). Melatonin concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24h period. Gene expression of gonadotropins was measured in perch exposed to different light colours and was additionally examined for perch subjected to different intensities of white light (0 lx, 1 lx, 10 lx, 100 lx) during the night. All different light colours caused a significant drop of melatonin concentration; however, blue light was least suppressive. Gene expression of gonadotropins was not influenced by nocturnal light of different light colours, but in female perch gonadotropin expression was significantly reduced by white light already at the lowest level (1 lx). We conclude that artificial light with shorter wavelengths at night is less effective in disturbing biological rhythms of perch than longer wavelengths, coinciding with the light situation in freshwater habitats inhabited by perch. Different light colours in the night showed no significant effect on gonadotropin expression, but white light in the night can disturb reproductive traits already at very low light intensities. These findings indicate that light pollution has not only the potential to disturb the melatonin cycle but also the reproductive rhythm and may therefore have implications on whole species communities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [(3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled B(max value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls. On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

  3. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in neuropsychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannath, Aarti; Peirson, Stuart N; Foster, Russell G

    2013-10-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD) is a common feature in many neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. Although the precise mechanisms remain unclear, recent evidence suggests that this comorbidity is not simply a product of medication or an absence of social routine, but instead reflects commonly affected underlying pathways and mechanisms. For example, several genes intimately involved in the generation and regulation of circadian rhythms and sleep have been linked to psychiatric illness. Further, several genes linked to mental illness have recently been shown to also play a role in normal sleep and circadian behaviour. Here we describe some of the emerging common mechanisms that link circadian rhythms, sleep and SCRD in severe mental illnesses. A deeper understanding of these links will provide not only a greater understanding of disease mechanisms, but also holds the promise of novel avenues for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Circadian rhythms, time-restricted feeding, and healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoogian, Emily N C; Panda, Satchidananda

    2017-10-01

    Circadian rhythms optimize physiology and health by temporally coordinating cellular function, tissue function, and behavior. These endogenous rhythms dampen with age and thus compromise temporal coordination. Feeding-fasting patterns are an external cue that profoundly influence the robustness of daily biological rhythms. Erratic eating patterns can disrupt the temporal coordination of metabolism and physiology leading to chronic diseases that are also characteristic of aging. However, sustaining a robust feeding-fasting cycle, even without altering nutrition quality or quantity, can prevent or reverse these chronic diseases in experimental models. In humans, epidemiological studies have shown erratic eating patterns increase the risk of disease, whereas sustained feeding-fasting cycles, or prolonged overnight fasting, is correlated with protection from breast cancer. Therefore, optimizing the timing of external cues with defined eating patterns can sustain a robust circadian clock, which may prevent disease and improve prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Hyun; Duffy, Jeanne F

    2018-03-01

    The timing, duration, and consolidation of sleep result from the interaction of the circadian timing system with a sleep-wake homeostatic process. When aligned and functioning optimally, this allows wakefulness throughout the day and a long consolidated sleep episode at night. Mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall and remain asleep is a hallmark of the circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. This article discusses changes in circadian regulation of sleep with aging; how age influences the prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders; and how neurologic diseases in older patients affect circadian rhythms and sleep. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Core temperature rhythms in normal and tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, D J; Busot, J C; Lee, W E; Djeu, D J

    1993-01-01

    The core temperature temporal behavior of DBA/2 mice (11 normal and 13 with an ascites tumor) was studied using surgically implanted radio telemetry transmitters. Normal mice continuously displayed a stable 24 hour temperature rhythm. Tumor-bearers displayed a progressive deterioration of the temperature rhythm following inoculation with tumor cells. While such disruptions have been noted by others, details on the dynamics of the changes have been mostly qualitative, often due to time-averaging or steady-state analysis of the data. The present study attempts to quantify the dynamics of the disruption of temperature rhythm (when present) by continuously monitoring temperatures over periods up to a month. Analysis indicated that temperature regulation in tumor-bearers was adversely affected during the active period only. Furthermore, it appears that the malignancy may be influencing temperature regulation via pathways not directly attributable to the energy needs of the growing tumor.

  7. Current Conceptual Challenges in the Study of Rhythm Processing Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline eTranchant

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the study of rhythm processing deficits (RPD is currently growing in the cognitive neuroscience community, as this type of investigation constitutes a powerful tool for the understanding of normal rhythm processing. Because this field is in its infancy, it still lacks a common conceptual vocabulary to facilitate effective communication between different researchers and research groups. In this commentary, we provide a brief review of recent reports of RPD through the lens of one important empirical issue: the method by which beat perception is measured, and the consequences of method selection for the researcher’s ability to specify which mechanisms are impaired in RPD. This critical reading advocates for the importance of matching measurement tools to the putative neurocognitive mechanisms under study, and reveals the need for effective and specific assessments of the different aspects of rhythm perception and synchronization.

  8. Detection of heart rate and rhythm with a smartphone-based electrocardiograph versus a reference standard electrocardiograph in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Marc S; Gelzer, Anna R; Rishniw, Mark

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the diagnostic utility of ECGs acquired with a smartphone-based device, compared with reference 6-lead ECGs, for identification of heart rate and rhythm in dogs and cats. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 51 client-owned dogs and 27 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES Patients examined by a small animal referral cardiology service between April 2012 and January 2013 were enrolled consecutively. In each patient, a 30-second ECG was simultaneously acquired with a smartphone-based device (a bipolar, single-lead recorder coupled to a smartphone with an ECG application) and a standard 6-lead ECG machine. Recordings were evaluated by 3 board-certified cardiologists, and intra- and interobserver agreement were evaluated for both rhythm diagnosis and QRS polarity identification. RESULTS Values for instantaneous and mean heart rates for the smartphone-acquired and reference ECGs were within 1 beat of each other when mean heart rates were calculated. Intraobserver agreement for rhythm assessment was very high, with maximum disagreement for any observer for only 2 of 51 dogs and only 4 of 27 cats. There was minimal disagreement in the polarity of depolarization between the smartphone-acquired and reference ECGs in dogs but frequent disagreement in cats. Interobserver agreement for smartphone-acquired ECGs was similar to that for reference ECGs. with all 3 observers agreeing on the rhythm analysis and minimal disagreement on polarity. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that ECGs acquired with the smartphone-based device accurately identified heart rate and rhythm in dogs and cats. Thus, the device may allow veterinarians to evaluate and manage cardiac arrhythmias relatively inexpensively at the cage side and could also allow clinicians to rapidly share information via email for further consultation, potentially enhancing patient care.

  9. Rhythm information represented in the fronto-parieto-cerebellar motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoike, Naho; Kotozaki, Yuka; Miyachi, Shigehiro; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Yomogida, Yukihito; Akimoto, Yoritaka; Kuraoka, Koji; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2012-10-15

    Rhythm is an essential element of human culture, particularly in language and music. To acquire language or music, we have to perceive the sensory inputs, organize them into structured sequences as rhythms, actively hold the rhythm information in mind, and use the information when we reproduce or mimic the same rhythm. Previous brain imaging studies have elucidated brain regions related to the perception and production of rhythms. However, the neural substrates involved in the working memory of rhythm remain unclear. In addition, little is known about the processing of rhythm information from non-auditory inputs (visual or tactile). Therefore, we measured brain activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging while healthy subjects memorized and reproduced auditory and visual rhythmic information. The inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, and cerebellum exhibited significant activations during both encoding and retrieving rhythm information. In addition, most of these areas exhibited significant activation also during the maintenance of rhythm information. All of these regions functioned in the processing of auditory and visual rhythms. The bilateral inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, and cerebellum are thought to be essential for motor control. When we listen to a certain rhythm, we are often stimulated to move our body, which suggests the existence of a strong interaction between rhythm processing and the motor system. Here, we propose that rhythm information may be represented and retained as information about bodily movements in the supra-modal motor brain system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Is there an endogenous tidal foraging rhythm in marine iguanas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikelski, M; Hau, M

    1995-12-01

    As strictly herbivorous reptiles, Galápagos marine iguanas graze on algae in the intertidal areas during low tide. Daily foraging rhythms were observed on two islands during 3 years to determine the proximate factors underlying behavioral synchrony with the tides. Marine iguanas walked to their intertidal foraging grounds from far-off resting areas in anticipation of the time of low tide. Foraging activity was restricted to daytime, resulting in a complex bitidal rhythm including conspicuous switches from afternoon foraging to foraging during the subsequent morning when low tide occurred after dusk. The animals anticipated the daily low tide by a maximum of 4 h. The degree of anticipation depended on environmental parameters such as wave action and food supply. "Early foragers" survived in greater numbers than did animals arriving later at foraging sites, a result indicating selection pressure on the timing of anticipation. The timing of foraging trips was better predicted by the daily changes in tabulated low tide than it was by the daily changes in actual exposure of the intertidal foraging flats, suggesting an endogenous nature of the foraging rhythms. Endogenous rhythmicity would also explain why iguanas that had spontaneously fasted for several days nevertheless went foraging at the "right" time of day. A potential lunar component of the foraging rhythmicity of marine iguanas showed up in their assemblage on intertidal rocks during neap tide nights. This may indicate that iguanas possessed information on the semi-monthly rhythms in tide heights. Enclosure experiments showed that bitidal foraging rhythms of iguanas may free run in the absence of direct cues from the intertidal areas and operate independent of the light:dark cycle and social stimuli. Therefore, the existence of a circatidal oscillator in marine iguanas is proposed. The bitidal foraging pattern may result from an interaction of a circadian system with a circatidal system. Food intake or related

  11. Rhythm generation through period concatenation in rat somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Kramer

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic voltage oscillations resulting from the summed activity of neuronal populations occur in many nervous systems. Contemporary observations suggest that coexistent oscillations interact and, in time, may switch in dominance. We recently reported an example of these interactions recorded from in vitro preparations of rat somatosensory cortex. We found that following an initial interval of coexistent gamma ( approximately 25 ms period and beta2 ( approximately 40 ms period rhythms in the superficial and deep cortical layers, respectively, a transition to a synchronous beta1 ( approximately 65 ms period rhythm in all cortical layers occurred. We proposed that the switch to beta1 activity resulted from the novel mechanism of period concatenation of the faster rhythms: gamma period (25 ms+beta2 period (40 ms = beta1 period (65 ms. In this article, we investigate in greater detail the fundamental mechanisms of the beta1 rhythm. To do so we describe additional in vitro experiments that constrain a biologically realistic, yet simplified, computational model of the activity. We use the model to suggest that the dynamic building blocks (or motifs of the gamma and beta2 rhythms combine to produce a beta1 oscillation that exhibits cross-frequency interactions. Through the combined approach of in vitro experiments and mathematical modeling we isolate the specific components that promote or destroy each rhythm. We propose that mechanisms vital to establishing the beta1 oscillation include strengthened connections between a population of deep layer intrinsically bursting cells and a transition from antidromic to orthodromic spike generation in these cells. We conclude that neural activity in the superficial and deep cortical layers may temporally combine to generate a slower oscillation.

  12. Circadian Rhythm Connections to Oxidative Stress: Implications for Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilking, Melissa; Ndiaye, Mary; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxygen and circadian rhythmicity are essential in a myriad of physiological processes to maintain homeostasis, from blood pressure and sleep/wake cycles, down to cellular signaling pathways that play critical roles in health and disease. If the human body or cells experience significant stress, their ability to regulate internal systems, including redox levels and circadian rhythms, may become impaired. At cellular as well as organismal levels, impairment in redox regulation and circadian rhythms may lead to a number of adverse effects, including the manifestation of a variety of diseases such as heart diseases, neurodegenerative conditions, and cancer. Recent Advances: Researchers have come to an understanding as to the basics of the circadian rhythm mechanism, as well as the importance of the numerous species of oxidative stress components. The effects of oxidative stress and dysregulated circadian rhythms have been a subject of intense investigations since they were first discovered, and recent investigations into the molecular mechanisms linking the two have started to elucidate the bases of their connection. Critical Issues: While much is known about the mechanics and importance of oxidative stress systems and circadian rhythms, the front where they interact has had very little research focused on it. This review discusses the idea that these two systems are together intricately involved in the healthy body, as well as in disease. Future Directions: We believe that for a more efficacious management of diseases that have both circadian rhythm and oxidative stress components in their pathogenesis, targeting both systems in tandem would be far more successful. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 192–208 PMID:23198849

  13. A circadian rhythm of conidiation in Neurospora crassa (L-12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yashuhiro

    1993-01-01

    Two fungi growth chambers containing six growth tubes each are used in this experiment. One chamber is for the space experiment; the other is for the simultaneous ground control experiment. The hyphae of Neurospora crassa band A mutant are inoculated at one end of each tube. Both the chambers are kept at 3 C plus or minus 1.5 C to stop hyphae growth until the Spacelab is activated. After the activation, each chamber is transferred simultaneously to the Spacelab and a phytotron in KSC and kept in continuous light at the same temperature. After about 24 hours of light exposure, each chamber is inserted into a growth chamber bag to keep it in constant darkness. The circadian rhythm of conidiation is initiated by this light to dark transition. After the dark incubation for 5 days at room temperature, both the growth chambers are kept at 3 C plus or minus 1.5 C to stop growth of the hyphae. After the space shuttle lands, both conidiation patterns are compared and analyzed. It has been known that numerous physiological phenomena show circadian rhythms. They are characterized by the fact that the oscillation can persist under constant conditions of light and temperature. Therefore, it has been accepted by most investigators that the generation mechanism of the circadian rhythm is endogeneous. However, one cannot reject the possibility that these rhythms are caused by some geophysical exogeneous factor having a 24-hour period, such as atmospheric pressure, gravity, or electromagnetic radiation. We use Neurospora crassa band A mutual which shows an obvious circadian rhythm in its spore-forming (conidiation) on the ground, and we intend to attempt the conidation of this mutant in the Spacelab where 24-hour periodicity is severely attenuated and to elucidate the effect of the geophysical exogeneous factor in the generation mechanism of the circadian rhythm.

  14. Design, construction and operation of a measurement device to evaluate the disturbance effect caused by the magnetic field in the cardiac muscle of rats; Diseno, construccion y operacion de un dispositivo de medicion para evaluar el efecto perturbador del campo magnetico en el funcionamiento del musculo cardiaco de ratas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soibelzon, Hector Leopoldo; Arcione, Juan Carlos [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria. Grupo Energia y Ambiente]. E-mail: hsoibel@fi.uba.br

    2001-07-01

    This article focuses the requirements and procedures for design, construction of inductors and measurement explorer coils in relation to an addressed device to analyse the effects of magnetic fields in the cardiac muscle of rats. It also offers information about tests and measurements involving heart systems made by Buenos Aires Medicine College. It also presents a description of a suitable mechanism that could explain the international current concern in relation to risks for the health starting from the submission to electric and magnetic fields.

  15. Circadian rhythm of temperature selection in a nocturnal lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refinetti, R; Susalka, S J

    1997-08-01

    We recorded body temperature and locomotor activity of Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) with free access to a heat source under a 14:10 light-dark cycle and in constant darkness. Under the light-dark cycle, the lizards selected higher temperatures during the light phase, when locomotor activity was less intense. Rhythmicity in temperature selection was transiently disrupted but later resumed when the animals were placed in constant darkness. These results demonstrate the existence of a circadian rhythm of temperature selection in nocturnal ectotherms and extend previous findings of a temporal mismatch between the rhythms of locomotor activity and temperature selection in nocturnal rodents.

  16. Meditations on the unitary rhythm of dying-grieving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinski, Violet M

    2012-07-01

    When someone faces loss of a loved one, that person simultaneously grieves and dies a little, just as the one dying also grieves. The author's personal conceptualization of dying and grieving as a unitary rhythm is explored based primarily on her interpretation of Rogers' science of unitary human beings, along with selected examples from related nursing literature and from the emerging focus on continuing bonds in other disciplines. Examples from contemporary songwriters that depict such a unitary conceptualization are given along with personal examples. The author concludes with her description of the unitary rhythm of dying-grieving.

  17. Rhythm-based segmentation of Popular Chinese Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to segment popular music based on rhythm. By computing a shortest path based on the self-similarity matrix calculated from a model of rhythm, segmenting boundaries are found along the di- agonal of the matrix. The cost of a new segment is opti- mized by matching manual...... and automatic segment boundaries. We compile a small song database of 21 randomly selected popular Chinese songs which come from Chinese Mainland, Taiwan and Hong Kong. The segmenting results on the small corpus show that 78% manual segmentation points are detected and 74% auto- matic segmentation points...

  18. Facial nerve activity disrupts psychomotor rhythms in the forehead microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Peter D; O'Brien, Geraldine

    2011-10-28

    Forehead blood flow was monitored in seven participants with a unilateral facial nerve lesion during relaxation, respiratory biofeedback and a sad documentary. Vascular waves at 0.1Hz strengthened during respiratory biofeedback, in tune with breathing cycles that also averaged 0.1Hz. In addition, a psychomotor rhythm at 0.15Hz was more prominent in vascular waveforms on the denervated than intact side of the forehead, both before and during relaxation and the sad documentary. These findings suggest that parasympathetic activity in the facial nerve interferes with the psychomotor rhythm in the forehead microvasculature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Posibilities of cardiac pacemaker use in paroxsysmal atrial fibrilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Kamenik

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of atrial fibrillation is a big therapeutic challenge because of all known negative consequences of this the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia. Numerous of clinical studies showed bad control or ineffectiveness of antiarhythmic drugs. Nonfarmakological therapies like surgical treatment, radiofrequency ablation and atrial pacing are being tested. Effectiveness of atrial pacing in prevention of paroxysmal artial fibrillation has been documented in numerous prospective studies and is effective for a long time interval, but only for patients with bradicardic underlying cardiac rhythm. In Normocardic rhythm or normal AV conduction the effective Atrial fibrillation prevention was not proven. The mechanism of action is based on premature atrial complex suppression, reduction of dispersion of refractoriness after short-long cycles and reduction of interatrial conduction delay. The atrial stimulation site or multi-site atrial pacing could be effective in AF prevention when interatrial conduction delay is present; otherwise the difference is not significant.Conclusions: In bradicardic patient who has frequent paroxysms of atrial fibrillation, regardless if bradycardia is due to ineffective antiarrhythmic drug treathement, implantation of DDDR pacemaker with atrial prevention algorhythm is indicated. If the P-wave duration is >120 milliseconds multi-site atrial pacing or septal atrial pacing should be considered. Pacemaker diagnostic tools could be used for adequate start of anticoagulant therapy and control of effectiveness of anthyarhythmic drug therapy.

  20. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  1. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cardiac Catheterization KidsHealth / For Kids / Cardiac Catheterization What's in this article? What Is ...

  2. Forest disturbances under climate change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seidl, R.; Thom, D.; Kautz, M.; Martin-Benito, D.; Peltoniemi, M.; Vacchiano, G.; Wild, Jan; Ascoli, D.; Petr, M.; Honkaniemi, J.; Lexer, M. J.; Trotsiuk, V.; Mairota, P.; Svoboda, M.; Fabrika, M.; Nagel, T.A.; Reyer, C. P. O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2017), s. 395-402 ISSN 1758-678X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD15158 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : climate change * disturbance * forest Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 19.304, year: 2016

  3. Gastrointestinal disturbances in marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddoch, C; Trinick, T

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this survey was to investigate the prevalence of running-induced gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in marathon runners. A questionnaire was completed by 471 of the estimated 1,750 competitors in the 1986 Belfast City Marathon. Eighty-three per cent of respondents indicated that they occasionally or frequently suffered one or more GI disturbances during or immediately after running. The urge to have a bowel movement (53%) and diarrhoea (38%) were the most common symptoms, especially among female runners (74% and 68% respectively). Upper GI tract symptoms were experienced more by women than men (p less than 0.05) and more by younger runners than older runners (p less than 0.01). Women also suffered more lower GI tract symptoms than men (p less than 0.05) with younger runners showing a similar trend. Both upper and lower tract symptoms were more common during a "hard" run than an "easy" run (p less than 0.01) and were equally as common both during and after running. Of those runners who suffered GI disturbances, 72% thought that running was the cause and 29% believed their performance to be adversely affected. There was no consensus among sufferers as to the causes of symptoms and a wide variety of "remedies" were suggested. GI disturbances are common amongst long-distance runners and their aetiology is unknown. Medical practitioners should be aware of this when dealing with patients who run.

  4. Flexion relaxation of the hamstring muscles during lumbar-pelvic rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, T

    1997-05-01

    This study investigated the simultaneous activity of back muscles and hamstring muscles during sagittal forward body flexion and extension in healthy persons. The study was cross-sectional. A descriptive study of paraspinal and hamstring muscle activity in normal persons during lumbar-pelvic rhythm. A university hospital. Forty healthy volunteers (21 men, 19 women, ages 17 to 48 years), all without back pain or other pain syndromes. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to follow activities in the back and the hamstring muscles. With movement sensors, real lumbar flexion was separated from simultaneous pelvic motion by monitoring the components of motion with a two-inclinometer method continuously from the initial upright posture into full flexion. All signals were sampled during real-time monitoring for off-line analyses. Back muscle activity ceased (ie, flexion relaxation [FR] occurred) at lumbar flexion with a mean of 79 degrees. Hamstring activity lasted longer and EMG activity ceased in the hamstrings when nearly full lumbar flexion (97%) was reached. After this point total flexion and pelvic flexion continued further, so that the last part of lumbar flexion and the last part of pelvic flexion happened without back muscle activity or hamstring bracing, respectively. FR of the back muscles during body flexion has been well established and its clinical significance in low back pain has been confirmed. In this study, it was shown for the first time that the hip extensors (ie, hamstring muscles) relax during forward flexion but with different timing. FR in hamstrings is not dependent on or coupled firmly with back muscle behavior in spinal disorders and the lumbar pelvic rhythm can be locally and only partially disturbed.

  5. Is a SIMPLe smartphone application capable of improving biological rhythms in bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Reinares, María; Mateu, Ainoa; Juruena, Mario F; Young, Allan H; Pérez-Sola, Víctor; Vieta, Eduard; Colom, Francesc

    2017-12-01

    Biological rhythms (BR) disturbance has been suggested as a potential mediator of mood episodes in Bipolar Disorder (BD). The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) was designed as an assessment tool to evaluate BR domains comprehensively. In the context of a trial evaluating a smartphone application delivering personalized psychoeducational contents for BD (SIMPLe 1.0), the main aim of this study is to evaluate the potential impact of SIMPLe 1.0 in BR regulation using the BRIAN scale. 51 remitted BD patients were asked to use the application for 3 months. Paired t-test analyses were employed to compare baseline and follow-up BRIAN´s total and domains scores. The sample was divided into completers and non-completers of the study to evaluate differences between groups regarding BRIAN scores using ANCOVA analyses. The BRIAN's mean total score of the whole sample significantly decreased from baseline to post-intervention (35.89 (SD 6.64) vs. 31.18 (SD 6.33), t = 4.29, p = 0.001). At post-intervention, there was a significant difference between groups regarding the total BRIAN mean score (29.47 (SD 6.21) completers vs. 35.92 (SD 3.90) non-completers, t = 2.50, p = 0.02). This difference was maintained after conducting a one-way ANCOVA controlling for pre-intervention BRIAN scores, F (1, 46) = 10.545, p=0.002. A limited sample, pre-post measures, and a short study timeframe could have affected the results. Additional factors affecting BR, such as medication, could not be ruled out. Our results suggest that there are potential positive effects of a psychoeducational smartphone application as an adjunctive to treatment as usual on BD patients' BR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  7. CARDIAC LYMPHOMA IN DOG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Cruz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma is a lymphoid tumor that originates in hematopoietic organs such as lymph node, spleen or liver. In dogs, the overall prevalence of cardiac tumors was estimated to be only 0.19% based on the results of the survey of a large database, and lymphomas accounts for approximately 2% of all cardiac tumors. In general, the involvement of the myocardium is rarely described in canine lymphoma. Currently, there is no evidence of a viral association with primary cardiac lymphoma in dogs, but other types of immunosuppression may contribute to abnormal events, such as involvement primary cardiac. The aim of this study was to analyze a case of sudden death of a bitch, SRD, aged 10, who had the final diagnosis of cardiac lymphoma.

  8. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  9. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  10. Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Elderly Patients with the Cox Maze Procedure Concurrently with Other Cardiac Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Hong Kuh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly patients who have atrial fibrillation (AF, surgical ablation of the arrhythmia during cardiac surgery may be challenging. Despite the reported advantages of ablating AF with the Cox maze procedure (CMP, the addition of the CMP may complicate other cardiac operations. We evaluated the effect of the CMP in elderly patients concurrent with other cardiac operations. Methods: From October 2007 to December 2015, we enrolled 27 patients aged >70 years who had AF and who underwent the CMP concurrently with other cardiac operations. The mean preoperative additive European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score was 8±11 (high risk. Results: Only 1 hospital death occurred (4%. The Kaplan-Meier method showed a high 5‐year cumulative survival rate (92%. At mean follow‐up of 51 months, 23 patients (89% had sinus rhythm conversion. The postoperative left atrial dimensions did not significantly differ between the 8 patients who had reduction plasty for giant left atrium (53.4±7.5 cm and the 19 patients who did not have reduction plasty (48.7±5.7 cm. Conclusion: In patients aged >70 years, concurrent CMP may be associated with a high rate of sinus rhythm conversion without increased surgical risk, despite the added complexity of the main cardiac procedure.

  11. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntz, Y.; Chambron, J.; Dumitresco, B.; Eclancher, B. E-mail: eclan@alsace.u-strasbg.fr; Prat, V

    1999-06-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5x5x2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) which well depicted the filling and ejection of the cardiac beats, allowing to compare the clinically relevant parameters of the cardiac performance, proportional variables of the stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular flow-rate with the known absolute values programmed on the model. The portable system is now in operation for clinical assessment of cardiac patients.

  12. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arntz, Y.; Chambron, J.; Dumitresco, B.; Eclancher, B.; Prat, V.

    1999-01-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5x5x2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) which well depicted the filling and ejection of the cardiac beats, allowing to compare the clinically relevant parameters of the cardiac performance, proportional variables of the stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular flow-rate with the known absolute values programmed on the model. The portable system is now in operation for clinical assessment of cardiac patients

  13. Usefulness of emergency ultrasound in nontraumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpicelli, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    Treatment of nontraumatic cardiac arrest in the hospital setting depends on the recognition of heart rhythm and differential diagnosis of the underlying condition while maintaining a constant oxygenated blood flow by ventilation and chest compression. Diagnostic process relies only on patient's history, physical findings, and active electrocardiography. Ultrasound is not currently scheduled in the resuscitation guidelines. Nevertheless, the use of real-time ultrasonography during resuscitation has the potential to improve diagnostic accuracy and allows the physician a greater confidence in deciding aggressive life-saving therapeutic procedures. This article reviews the current opinions and literature about the use of emergency ultrasound during resuscitation of nontraumatic cardiac arrest. Cardiac and lung ultrasound have a great potential in identifying the reversible mechanical causes of pulseless electrical activity or asystole. Brief examination of the heart can even detect a real cardiac standstill regardless of electrical activity displayed on the monitor, which is a crucial prognostic indicator. Moreover, ultrasound can be useful to verify and monitor the tracheal tube placement. Limitation to the use of ultrasound is the need to minimize the no-flow intervals during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, real-time ultrasound can be successfully applied during brief pausing of chest compression and first pulse-check. Finally, lung sonographic examination targeted to the detection of signs of pulmonary congestion has the potential to allow hemodynamic noninvasive monitoring before and after mechanical cardiopulmonary maneuvers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Examination of Relationship between Life Rhythm and Parent's Consciousness among Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Saori

    2008-01-01

    The social background of child care and rearing has changed rapidly today in Japan. Also young children's life rhythm has changed compared with before. These disorders of life rhythm cause big influence to young children's mind and body health. To improve young child's mind and body health, it is effective that parents improve the life rhythm at home. Therefore, the educational campaign to parents about young child's life rhythm was held. In this research, the relationship between improvement...

  15. Neurologic complications of electrolyte disturbances and acid-base balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espay, Alberto J

    2014-01-01

    Electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are common occurrences in daily clinical practice. Although these abnormalities can be readily ascertained from routine laboratory findings, only specific clinical correlates may attest as to their significance. Among a wide phenotypic spectrum, acute electrolyte and acid-base disturbances may affect the peripheral nervous system as arreflexic weakness (hypermagnesemia, hyperkalemia, and hypophosphatemia), the central nervous system as epileptic encephalopathies (hypomagnesemia, dysnatremias, and hypocalcemia), or both as a mixture of encephalopathy and weakness or paresthesias (hypocalcemia, alkalosis). Disabling complications may develop not only when these derangements are overlooked and left untreated (e.g., visual loss from intracranial hypertension in respiratory or metabolic acidosis; quadriplegia with respiratory insufficiency in hypermagnesemia) but also when they are inappropriately managed (e.g., central pontine myelinolisis when rapidly correcting hyponatremia; cardiac arrhythmias when aggressively correcting hypo- or hyperkalemia). Therefore prompt identification of the specific neurometabolic syndromes is critical to correct the causative electrolyte or acid-base disturbances and prevent permanent central or peripheral nervous system injury. This chapter reviews the pathophysiology, clinical investigations, clinical phenotypes, and current management strategies in disorders resulting from alterations in the plasma concentration of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus as well as from acidemia and alkalemia. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Children's Aural and Kinesthetic Understanding of Rhythm: Developing an Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Adam D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a deeper understanding of aural and kinesthetic rhythm skill development in elementary school-age children. In this study, I examined my curriculum model for rhythm understanding, which included creating and implementing assessments of movement skills in meter and rhythm. The research questions were: 1.…

  17. Relation between functional connectivity and rhythm discrimination in children who do and do not stutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Eun Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to perceive and produce rhythmic patterns in the environment supports fundamental human capacities ranging from music and language processing to the coordination of action. This article considers whether spontaneous correlated brain activity within a basal ganglia-thalamocortical (rhythm network is associated with individual differences in auditory rhythm discrimination. Moreover, do children who stutter with demonstrated deficits in rhythm perception have weaker links between rhythm network functional connectivity and rhythm discrimination? All children in the study underwent a resting-state fMRI session, from which functional connectivity measures within the rhythm network were extracted from spontaneous brain activity. In a separate session, the same children completed an auditory rhythm-discrimination task, where behavioral performance was assessed using signal detection analysis. We hypothesized that in typically developing children, rhythm network functional connectivity would be associated with behavioral performance on the rhythm discrimination task, but that this relationship would be attenuated in children who stutter. Results supported our hypotheses, lending strong support for the view that (1 children who stutter have weaker rhythm network connectivity and (2 the lack of a relation between rhythm network connectivity and rhythm discrimination in children who stutter may be an important contributing factor to the etiology of stuttering.

  18. Sleep, 24-hour activity rhythms, and brain structure : A population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Zuurbier (Lisette)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn this thesis, Chapter 2 focuses on sleep, 24-hour activity rhythms and health. Chapter 2.1 describes the influence of demographics, lifestyle and sleep on 24-hour activity rhythms. In Chapter 2.2 sleep and 24-hour activity rhythms are used to predict mortality. This chapter is

  19. Circadian Sleep-Wake Rhythm of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaskant, Marijke; van de Wouw, Ellen; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Echteld, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian sleep-wake rhythm changes with aging, resulting in a more fragmented sleep-wake pattern. In individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), brain structures regulating the sleep-wake rhythm might be affected. The aims of this study were to compare the sleep-wake rhythm of older adults with ID to that of older adults in the general…

  20. Exogenous melatonin entrains rhythm and reduces amplitude of endogenous melatonin : An in vivo microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, W.J; Homan, E.J; Brons, H.F; Oakley, M; Skingle, M; Grol, Cor; Westerink, B.H.C.

    The circadian rhythm of melatonin production was studied using on-line, in vivo microdialysis in the rat pineal gland. With this technique it was possible to record a pronounced melatonin rhythm with very high time resolution. Three phase-markers of the rhythm were calculated from the data,

  1. Perceiving Speech Rhythm in Music: Listeners Classify Instrumental Songs According to Language of Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Eric E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the musical rhythm of a particular culture may parallel the speech rhythm of that culture's language (Patel, A. D., & Daniele, J. R. (2003). "An empirical comparison of rhythm in language and music." "Cognition, 87," B35-B45). The present experiments aimed to determine whether listeners actually perceive such rhythmic…

  2. Rhythm Perception and Its Role in Perception and Learning of Dysrhythmic Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrie, Stephanie A.; Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Barrett, Tyson S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The perception of rhythm cues plays an important role in recognizing spoken language, especially in adverse listening conditions. Indeed, this has been shown to hold true even when the rhythm cues themselves are dysrhythmic. This study investigates whether expertise in rhythm perception provides a processing advantage for perception…

  3. Speech rhythm in Kannada speaking adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthy, Santosh; Venugopal, Sahana; Parakh, Priyanka

    2017-10-01

    A longstanding hypothesis about the underlying mechanisms of stuttering suggests that speech disfluencies may be associated with problems in timing and temporal patterning of speech events. Fifteen adults who do and do not stutter read five sentences, and from these, the vocalic and consonantal durations were measured. Using these, pairwise variability index (raw PVI for consonantal intervals and normalised PVI for vocalic intervals) and interval based rhythm metrics (PercV, DeltaC, DeltaV, VarcoC and VarcoV) were calculated for all the participants. Findings suggested higher mean values in adults who stutter when compared to adults who do not stutter for all the rhythm metrics except for VarcoV. Further, statistically significant difference between the two groups was found for all the rhythm metrics except for VarcoV. Combining the present results with consistent prior findings based on rhythm deficits in children and adults who stutter, there appears to be strong empirical support for the hypothesis that individuals who stutter may have deficits in generation of rhythmic speech patterns.

  4. Activity rhythms and distribution of natal dens for red foxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenyang, Zhou; Wanhong, Wei; Biggins, Dean E.

    1995-01-01

    The red fox, Vulpes vulpes, was investigated with snow tracking, radiotracking and directive observation at the Haibei Research Station of Alpine Meadow Ecosystem, Academia Sinica, from March to September 1994. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution and use of natal dens, activity rhythms, and home range sizes for the foxes.

  5. The importance of hormonal circadian rhythms in daily feeding patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Iris J.M.M.; Boer, de Imke J.M.; Hofstede, Gert Jan; Fleur, la Susanne E.; Bokkers, Eddy

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between hormonal circadian rhythms and feeding behaviour is not well understood. This study aimed to deepen our understanding of mechanisms underlying circadian feeding behaviour in animals, using pigs, Sus scrofa, as a case study. Pigs show an alternans feeding pattern, that is,

  6. Rhythm Perturbations in Acoustically Paced Treadmill Walking After Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, M.; Lamoth, C.J.C.; van Kordelaar, J.; Elich, P.; Konijnenbelt, M.; Kwakkel, G.; Beek, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. In rehabilitation, acoustic rhythms are often used to improve gait after stroke. Acoustic cueing may enhance gait coordination by creating a stable coupling between heel strikes and metronome beats and provide a means to train the adaptability of gait coordination to environmental

  7. Circadian rhythms in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; van der Spek, R.; Lei, J.; Endert, E.; Buijs, R. M.; Fliers, E.

    2012-01-01

    The pronounced daily variation in the release of adrenal hormones has been at the heart of the deciphering and understanding of the circadian timing system. Indeed, the first demonstration of an endocrine day/night rhythm was provided by Pincus (1943), by showing a daily pattern of 17-keto-steroid

  8. EEG alpha rhythm, ocular activity and basal skin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbaten, M.N.; Beaujon, J.N.R.; Sjouw, W.

    Most hypotheses about the origin of the occipital alpha rhythm stress the specific influence of ocular activity. In this study, the influence of eye-movement frequency and extreme upward deviation of the eyeballs (enlarging the corneo-retinal potential) on occipital alpha activity and basal skin

  9. Ultradian rhythm unmasked in the Pdf clock mutant of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-20

    Ohtomo et al. .... stand the influence of these two phases, short sampling segments were ... per-long (perL) mutants also showed ultradian rhythms un- der L:L ..... would like to dedicate this paper to the memory of Dr Obaid. Siddiqi.

  10. Mood Disorders, Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin and Melatonin Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Quera Salva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the understanding of circadian rhythms have led to an interest in the treatment of major depressive disorder with chronobiotic agents. Many tissues have autonomous circadian rhythms, which are orchestrated by the master clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine is secreted from the pineal gland during darkness. Melatonin acts mainly on MT1 and MT2 receptors, which are present in the SNC, regulating physiological and neuroendocrine functions, including circadian entrainment, referred to as the chronobiotic effet. Circadian rhythms has been shown to be either misaligned or phase shifted or decreased in amplitude in both acute episodes and relapse of major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar disorder. Manipulation of circadian rhythms either using physical treatments (such as high intensity light or behavioral therapy has shown promise in improving symptoms. Pharmacotherapy using melatonin and pure melatonin receptor agonists, while improving sleep, has not been shown to improve symptoms of depression. A novel antidepressant, agomelatine, combines 5HT2c antagonist and melatonin agonist action, and has shown promise in both acute treatment of MDD and in preventing relapse.

  11. Discrepancy between circadian rhythms of inulin and creatinine clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Acker, B. A.; Koomen, G. C.; Koopman, M. G.; Krediet, R. T.; Arisz, L.

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate the disparity between circadian rhythmicity of inulin and creatinine clearance, we simultaneously measured inulin and creatinine clearances every 3 hours during 1 day in 14 normal subjects and in 8 patients with nephrotic syndrome. All patients and normal subjects had a circadian rhythm

  12. An analysis of rhythm in Japanese and English popular music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadakata, M.; Desain, P.W.M.; Honing, H.J.; Patel, A.D.; Iversen, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been evidence that the rhythm in English and French non-vocal musical themes are significantly different in their contrastiveness of successive durations in the same manner as those of spoken language, suggesting that acomposer's native language exerts an influence on the music

  13. Rapping dyslexia : learning rhythm, rhyme and flow in dyslectic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tittarelli, M.; Marti, P.; Peppoloni, D.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a design case that draws inspiration from rap music as a way to tell stories rhythmically, with simple instruments for accompaniment. Rhythm, rhymes and flow are key features of rap music. In this study, we attempted to apply rap principles and dynamics to a very specific field of

  14. Circadian rhythms, metabolism, and chrononutrition in rodents and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrononutrition is an emerging discipline that builds on the intimate relation between endogenous circadian (24-h) rhythms and metabolism. Circadian regulation of metabolic function can be observed from the level of intracellular biochemistry to whole-organism physiology and even postprandial respon...

  15. Transitions between beta and gamma rhythms in neural systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Setsinsky, D; Fausbøll, Anders

    2002-01-01

    We study the coexistence of different rhythms in a local network of one inhibitory and two excitatory nerve cells for a wide range of the excitatory synapse strength and of the slow K+-channel conductance. The dynamic features of spike trains in the presence of noise are discussed. It is found...

  16. Capturing daily urban rhythms: the use of location aware technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krygsman, S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Daily activities and travel often follow a natural rhythm or flow that is structured by the fixed spatial and temporal constraints. The work and home location act as pegs that define individual’s activity space and it is within these spaces...

  17. Hourly awakening vs continuous contact lens sensor measurements of 24-hour intraocular pressure: effect on sleep macrostructure and intraocular pressure rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptel, Florent; Tamisier, Renaud; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Mottet, Benjamin; Hubanova, Ralitsa; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Chiquet, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    All studies of 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) rhythm conducted to date have used repeated IOP measurements requiring nocturnal awakenings, potentially disturbing sleep macrostructure. To evaluate the effects on sleep architecture and IOP rhythm of hourly awakening vs a contact lens sensor (CLS) to continuously monitor IOP without awakening. Cross-sectional study at a referral center of chronobiology among 12 young healthy volunteers, with a mean (SD) age of 22.3 (2.3) years. Volunteers underwent two 24-hour IOP measurement sessions during a 2-month period. The eye order and session order were randomized. During one session, the IOP of the first eye was continuously monitored using a CLS, and the IOP of the fellow eye was measured hourly using a portable noncontact tonometer (session with nocturnal hourly awakening). During the other session, the IOP of the first eye was continuously monitored using a CLS, and the IOP of the fellow eye was not measured (session without nocturnal awakening). Overnight polysomnography was performed during the 2 sessions. A nonlinear least squares, dual-harmonic regression analysis was used to model the 24-hour IOP rhythm from the CLS data. Comparisons of acrophase, bathyphase, amplitude, and the midline estimating statistic of rhythm were used to evaluate the effect of hourly awakening on IOP rhythm. To evaluate the effects of hourly awakening on sleep architecture, comparisons of sleep structure were used, including total sleep period, rapid eye movement, wake after sleep onset, absolute and relative total sleep time, and non-rapid eye movement sleep (N1, N2, and N3). A 24-hour IOP rhythm was found in all individuals for the sessions with and without awakening (P  .30). Hourly awakening during noncontact tonometer IOP measurements did not seem to alter the mean variables of the 24-hour IOP pattern evaluated using CLS, including signal, maximum signal, minimum signal, acrophase, and bathyphase (P > .15). The 24-hour IOP

  18. Disturbances in small bowel motility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    Recently, the small intestine has become the focus of investigation as a potential site of dysmotility in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A number of motor abnormalities have been defined in some studies, and include \\'clustered\\' contractions, exaggerated post-prandial motor response and disturbances in intestinal transit. The significance of these findings remains unclear. The interpretation of available studies is complicated by differences in subject selection, the direct influence of certain symptoms, such as diarrhoea and constipation, and the interference of compounding factors, such as stress and psychopathology. Dysmotility could also reflect autonomic dysfunction, disturbed CNS control and the response to heightened visceral sensation or central perception. While motor abnormalities may not explain all symptoms in IBS, sensorimotor interactions may be important in symptom pathogenesis and deserve further study.

  19. Familial Atrial Septal Defect and Sudden Cardiac Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellesøe, Sabrina Gade; Johansen, Morten Munk; Bjerre, Jesper Vandborg

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial septal defect (ASD) is the second most common congenital heart defect (CHD) and is observed in families as an autosomal dominant trait as well as in nonfamilial CHD. Mutations in the NKX2-5 gene, located on chromosome 5, are associated with ASD, often combined with conduction...... disturbances, cardiomyopathies, complex CHD, and sudden cardiac death as well. Here, we show that NKX2-5 mutations primarily occur in ASD patients with conduction disturbances and heritable ASD. Furthermore, these families are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death. RESULTS: We screened 39 probands...... with familial CHD for mutations in NKX2-5 and discovered a novel mutation in one family (2.5%) with ASD and atrioventricular block. A review of the literature revealed 59 different NKX2-5 mutations in 202 patients. Mutations were significantly more common in familial cases compared to nonfamilial cases (P = 7...

  20. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....