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Sample records for cardiac repolarization insights

  1. Na/K pump regulation of cardiac repolarization: insights from a systems biology approach

    KAUST Repository

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso

    2013-05-15

    The sodium-potassium pump is widely recognized as the principal mechanism for active ion transport across the cellular membrane of cardiac tissue, being responsible for the creation and maintenance of the transarcolemmal sodium and potassium gradients, crucial for cardiac cell electrophysiology. Importantly, sodium-potassium pump activity is impaired in a number of major diseased conditions, including ischemia and heart failure. However, its subtle ways of action on cardiac electrophysiology, both directly through its electrogenic nature and indirectly via the regulation of cell homeostasis, make it hard to predict the electrophysiological consequences of reduced sodium-potassium pump activity in cardiac repolarization. In this review, we discuss how recent studies adopting the systems biology approach, through the integration of experimental and modeling methodologies, have identified the sodium-potassium pump as one of the most important ionic mechanisms in regulating key properties of cardiac repolarization and its rate dependence, from subcellular to whole organ levels. These include the role of the pump in the biphasic modulation of cellular repolarization and refractoriness, the rate control of intracellular sodium and calcium dynamics and therefore of the adaptation of repolarization to changes in heart rate, as well as its importance in regulating pro-arrhythmic substrates through modulation of dispersion of repolarization and restitution. Theoretical findings are consistent across a variety of cell types and species including human, and widely in agreement with experimental findings. The novel insights and hypotheses on the role of the pump in cardiac electrophysiology obtained through this integrative approach could eventually lead to novel therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. Na/K pump regulation of cardiac repolarization: insights from a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Sánchez, Carlos; Pueyo, Esther; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2014-02-01

    The sodium-potassium pump is widely recognized as the principal mechanism for active ion transport across the cellular membrane of cardiac tissue, being responsible for the creation and maintenance of the transarcolemmal sodium and potassium gradients, crucial for cardiac cell electrophysiology. Importantly, sodium-potassium pump activity is impaired in a number of major diseased conditions, including ischemia and heart failure. However, its subtle ways of action on cardiac electrophysiology, both directly through its electrogenic nature and indirectly via the regulation of cell homeostasis, make it hard to predict the electrophysiological consequences of reduced sodium-potassium pump activity in cardiac repolarization. In this review, we discuss how recent studies adopting the systems biology approach, through the integration of experimental and modeling methodologies, have identified the sodium-potassium pump as one of the most important ionic mechanisms in regulating key properties of cardiac repolarization and its rate dependence, from subcellular to whole organ levels. These include the role of the pump in the biphasic modulation of cellular repolarization and refractoriness, the rate control of intracellular sodium and calcium dynamics and therefore of the adaptation of repolarization to changes in heart rate, as well as its importance in regulating pro-arrhythmic substrates through modulation of dispersion of repolarization and restitution. Theoretical findings are consistent across a variety of cell types and species including human, and widely in agreement with experimental findings. The novel insights and hypotheses on the role of the pump in cardiac electrophysiology obtained through this integrative approach could eventually lead to novel therapeutic and diagnostic strategies.

  3. Major rapid weight loss induces changes in cardiac repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Larsen, Esben; Iepsen, Eva Pers Winning; Lundgren, Julie

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity is associated with increased all-cause mortality, but weight loss may not decrease cardiovascular events. In fact, very low calorie diets have been linked to arrhythmias and sudden death. The QT interval is the standard marker for cardiac repolarization, but T-wave morphology...... analysis has been suggested as a more sensitive method to identify changes in cardiac repolarization. We examined the effect of a major and rapid weight loss on T-wave morphology. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-six individuals had electrocardiograms (ECG) taken before and after eight weeks of weight loss......A1c (pweight loss induces changes in cardiac repolarization. Monitoring of MCS during calorie restriction makes it possible to detect repolarization changes with higher discriminative power than the QT-interval during major rapid weight...

  4. Probing cardiac repolarization reserve in drug safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalos, L.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive prolongation of cardiac repolarization, manifested as QT prolongation on ECG, is common unwanted side effect of many drugs and drug candidates. Prolongation of QT interval may lead to life threatening cardiac arrhythmia – Torsade de Point (TdP). Number of drugs was withdrawn from the

  5. Cardiac action potential repolarization revisited: early repolarization shows all-or-none behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenor, Beatriz; Cardona, Karen; Saiz, Javier; Noble, Denis; Giles, Wayne

    2017-11-01

    In healthy mammalian hearts the action potential (AP) waveform initiates and modulates each contraction, or heartbeat. As a result, AP height and duration are key physiological variables. In addition, rate-dependent changes in ventricular AP duration (APD), and variations in APD at a fixed heart rate are both reliable biomarkers of electrophysiological stability. Present guidelines for the likelihood that candidate drugs will increase arrhythmias rely on small changes in APD and Q-T intervals as criteria for safety pharmacology decisions. However, both of these measurements correspond to the final repolarization of the AP. Emerging clinical evidence draws attention to the early repolarization phase of the action potential (and the J-wave of the ECG) as an additional important biomarker for arrhythmogenesis. Here we provide a mechanistic background to this early repolarization syndrome by summarizing the evidence that both the initial depolarization and repolarization phases of the cardiac action potential can exhibit distinct time- and voltage-dependent thresholds, and also demonstrating that both can show regenerative all-or-none behaviour. An important consequence of this is that not all of the dynamics of action potential repolarization in human ventricle can be captured by data from single myocytes when these results are expressed as 'repolarization reserve'. For example, the complex pattern of cell-to-cell current flow that is responsible for AP conduction (propagation) within the mammalian myocardium can change APD and the Q-T interval of the electrocardiogram alter APD stability, and modulate responsiveness to pharmacological agents (such as Class III anti-arrhythmic drugs). © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  6. Glucose ingestion causes cardiac repolarization disturbances in type 1 long QT syndrome patients and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltén-Cavallius, Louise; Iepsen, Eva W; Christiansen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both hypoglycemia and severe hyperglycemia constitute known risk factors for cardiac repolarization changes potentially leading to malignant arrhythmias. Patients with loss of function mutations in KCNQ1 are characterized by long QT syndrome (LQTS) and may be at increased risk...... by ingestion of 75-g glucose caused cardiac repolarization disturbances that were more severe in KCNQ1 LQTS patients compared with control subjects....

  7. Covariate analysis of QTc and T-wave morphology: new possibilities in the evaluation of drugs that affect cardiac repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Struijk, Johannes J.; Matz, J

    2010-01-01

    This study adds the dimension of a T-wave morphology composite score (MCS) to the QTc interval-based evaluation of drugs that affect cardiac repolarization. Electrocardiographic recordings from 62 subjects on placebo and 400 mg moxifloxacin were compared with those from 21 subjects on 160 and 320......MCS showed that changes in T-wave morphology are a significant effect of D,L-sotalol. By contrast, moxifloxacin was found to have no significant effect on T-wave morphology (DeltaMCS) at any given change in QTc. This study offers new insights into the repolarization behavior of a drug associated with low...

  8. Rabbit models as tools for preclinical cardiac electrophysiological safety testing: Importance of repolarization reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczkó, István; Jost, Norbert; Virág, László; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Varró, András

    2016-07-01

    It is essential to more reliably assess the pro-arrhythmic liability of compounds in development. Current guidelines for pre-clinical and clinical testing of drug candidates advocate the use of healthy animals/tissues and healthy individuals and focus on the test compound's ability to block the hERG current and prolong cardiac ventricular repolarization. Also, pre-clinical safety tests utilize several species commonly used in cardiac electrophysiological studies. In this review, important species differences in cardiac ventricular repolarizing ion currents are considered, followed by the discussion on electrical remodeling associated with chronic cardiovascular diseases that leads to altered ion channel and transporter expression and densities in pathological settings. We argue that the choice of species strongly influences experimental outcome and extrapolation of results to human clinical settings. We suggest that based on cardiac cellular electrophysiology, the rabbit is a useful species for pharmacological pro-arrhythmic investigations. In addition to healthy animals and tissues, the use of animal models (e.g. those with impaired repolarization reserve) is suggested that more closely resemble subsets of patients exhibiting increased vulnerability towards the development of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sudden cardiac death in dogs with remodeled hearts is associated with larger beat-to-beat variability of repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Truin, Michiel; van Opstal, Jurren M

    2005-01-01

    Increased proarrhythmia in dogs with chronic AV block (AVB) has been explained by ventricular remodeling causing a decrease in repolarization reserve. Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization (BVR) has been suggested to reflect repolarization reserve, in which high variability represents...... diminished reserve and larger propensity for repolarization-dependent ventricular arrhythmia. A subset of chronic AVB dogs (10%) suffers sudden cardiac death (SCD). With the assumption that repolarization defects constitute a potentially lethal proarrhythmic substrate, we hypothesized that BVR in SCD dogs...... are larger than in matched control chronic AVB dogs. From a population of 200 chronic AVB dogs, initially two groups were chosen retrospectively: 8 dogs that died suddenly (SCD) and 8 control dogs. Control dogs had a longer lifespan after AVB (10 to 18 weeks) than SCD dogs (5 to 10 weeks). All dogs had...

  10. Cardiac repolarization during hypoglycaemia and hypoxaemia in healthy males: impact of renin-angiotensin system activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Andersen, Rikke; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Activity in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may influence the susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmia. To study the effect of basal RAS activity on cardiac repolarization during myocardial stress induced by hypoglycaemia or hypoxaemia in healthy humans. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten subjects...... with high RAS activity and 10 subjects with low RAS activity were studied on three different occasions: (i) hypoglycaemia (nadir P-glucose 2.7 +/- 0.5 mmol/L), (ii) hypoxaemia (nadir pO(2) 5.8 +/- 0.5 kPa), and (iii) normoglycaemic normoxia (control day). QT parameters were registered by Holter monitoring...

  11. Repolarization gradients in the canine left ventricle before and after induction of short-term cardiac memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Michiel J.; Sosunov, Eugene A.; Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Plotnikov, Alexei N.; Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Danilo, Peter; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Background - Questions remain about the contributions of transmural versus apicobasal repolarization gradients to the configuration of the T wave in control settings and after the induction of short-term cardiac memory. Methods and Results - Short-term cardiac memory is seen as T-wave changes

  12. Cardiac repolarization changes in the children with breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Saleh, Fazl; Farhani, Nahal; Rafiei, Mohammad; Inaloo, Soroor; Asadipooya, Ali-Akbar

    2013-12-01

    Breath-holding spells are known as benign attacks, frequencies of which decrease by the development of the autonomic nervous system. The present study aims to compare the electrocardiographic repolarization in children with breath-holding spells. In this study, QT dispersion, QTc dispersion, T peak to T end dispersion, and P wave dispersion of the twelve-lead surface electrocardiography of fifty children who had breath-holding spells were measured and compared with normal children from April 2011 to August 2012. Forty-four (88%) patients had cyanotic spells, while 6 (12%) had pallid spells. QTc dispersion was increased in the patients with breath-holding spells (148.2±33.1) compared to the healthy children (132±27.3) and the difference was statically significant (P = 0.01). Meanwhile, no statistically significant differences were observed between the patients and the control subjects regarding the other parameters (P > 0.05). QTc dispersion was significantly increased in the patients with breath-holding spells compared to normal children and this is a sign of cardiac repolarization abnormality as well as the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia in patients with breath-holding spells.

  13. Induced KCNQ1 autoimmunity accelerates cardiac repolarization in rabbits: potential significance in arrhythmogenesis and antiarrhythmic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Maguy, Ange; Duverger, James Elber; Vigneault, Patrick; Comtois, Philippe; Shi, Yanfen; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thomas, Dierk; Nattel, Stanley

    2014-11-01

    Autoantibodies directed against various cardiac receptors have been implicated in cardiomyopathy and heart rhythm disturbances. In a previous study among patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, autoantibodies targeting the cardiac voltage-gated KCNQ1 K(+) channel were associated with shortened corrected QT intervals (QTc). However, the electrophysiologic actions of KCNQ1 autoimmunity have not been assessed experimentally in a direct fashion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cardiac electrophysiologic effects of KCNQ1 autoantibody production induced by vaccination in a rabbit model. Rabbits were immunized with KCNQ1 channel peptide. ECG recordings were obtained during a 1-month follow-up period. Rabbits then underwent in vivo electrophysiologic study, after which cardiomyocytes were isolated for analysis of slow delayed rectifier current (IKs) and action potential properties via patch-clamp. KCNQ1-immunized rabbits exhibited shortening of QTc compared to sham-immunized controls. Reduced ventricular effective refractory periods and increased susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia induction were noted in KCNQ1-immunized rabbits upon programmed ventricular stimulation. Action potential durations were shortened in cardiomyocytes isolated from KCNQ1-immunized rabbits compared to the sham group. IKs step and tail current densities were enhanced after KCNQ1 immunization. Functional and structural changes of the heart were not observed. The potential therapeutic significance of KCNQ1 immunization was then explored in a dofetilide-induced long QT rabbit model. KCNQ1 immunization prevented dofetilide-induced QTc prolongation and attenuated long QT-related arrhythmias. Induction of KCNQ1 autoimmunity accelerates cardiac repolarization and increases susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia induction through IKs enhancement. On the other hand, vaccination against KCNQ1 ameliorates drug-induced QTc prolongation and might be useful therapeutically to

  14. Long-term cardiac memory in canine heart is associated with the evolution of a transmural repolarization gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Plotnikov, Alexei N.; Wilms-Schopman, Francien J. G.; Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Danilo, Peter; Sosunov, Eugene A.; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P.; Janse, Michiel J.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The contribution of regional electrophysiologic heterogeneity to the T-wave changes of long-term cardiac memory (CM) is not known. We mapped activation and repolarization in dogs after induction of CM and in sham animals. METHODS AND RESULTS: CM was induced by three weeks of AV-sequential

  15. Prevention of Pazopanib-Induced Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Proarrhythmic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Tulay; Erbas, Oytun; Akman, Levent; Yilmaz, Ahmet U

    2014-11-01

    Background: Pazopanib (PZP) may induce prolonged cardiac repolarization and proarrhythmic effects, similarly to other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Objectives: To demonstrate PZP-induced prolonged cardiac repolarization and proarrhythmic electrophysiological effects and to investigate possible preventive effects of metoprolol and diltiazem on ECG changes (prolonged QT) in an experimental rat model. Methods: Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley adult male rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 6). The first group (normal group) received 4 mL of tap water and the other groups received 100 mg/kg of PZP (Votrient® tablet) perorally, via orogastric tubes. After 3 hours, the following solutions were intraperitoneally administered to the animals: physiological saline solution (SP), to the normal group and to the second group (control-PZP+SP group); 1 mg/kg metoprolol (Beloc, Ampule, AstraZeneca), to the third group (PZP+metoprolol group); and 1mg/kg diltiazem (Diltiazem, Mustafa Nevzat), to the fourth group (PZP+diltiazem group). One hour after, and under anesthesia, QTc was calculated by recording ECG on lead I. Results: The mean QTc interval values were as follows: normal group, 99.93 ± 3.62 ms; control-PZP+SP group, 131.23 ± 12.21 ms; PZP+metoprolol group, 89.36 ± 3.61 ms; and PZP+diltiazem group, 88.86 ± 4.04 ms. Both PZP+metoprolol and PZP+diltiazem groups had significantly shorter QTc intervals compared to the control-PZP+SP group (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Both metoprolol and diltiazem prevented PZP-induced QT interval prolongation. These drugs may provide a promising prophylactic strategy for the prolonged QTc interval associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor use.

  16. Prevention of Pazopanib-Induced Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Proarrhythmic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulay Akman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pazopanib (PZP may induce prolonged cardiac repolarization and proarrhythmic effects, similarly to other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Objectives: To demonstrate PZP-induced prolonged cardiac repolarization and proarrhythmic electrophysiological effects and to investigate possible preventive effects of metoprolol and diltiazem on ECG changes (prolonged QT in an experimental rat model. Methods: Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley adult male rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 6. The first group (normal group received 4 mL of tap water and the other groups received 100 mg/kg of PZP (Votrient® tablet perorally, via orogastric tubes. After 3 hours, the following solutions were intraperitoneally administered to the animals: physiological saline solution (SP, to the normal group and to the second group (control-PZP+SP group; 1 mg/kg metoprolol (Beloc, Ampule, AstraZeneca, to the third group (PZP+metoprolol group; and 1mg/kg diltiazem (Diltiazem, Mustafa Nevzat, to the fourth group (PZP+diltiazem group. One hour after, and under anesthesia, QTc was calculated by recording ECG on lead I. Results: The mean QTc interval values were as follows: normal group, 99.93 ± 3.62 ms; control-PZP+SP group, 131.23 ± 12.21 ms; PZP+metoprolol group, 89.36 ± 3.61 ms; and PZP+diltiazem group, 88.86 ± 4.04 ms. Both PZP+metoprolol and PZP+diltiazem groups had significantly shorter QTc intervals compared to the control-PZP+SP group (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Both metoprolol and diltiazem prevented PZP-induced QT interval prolongation. These drugs may provide a promising prophylactic strategy for the prolonged QTc interval associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor use.

  17. Influence of type of sport on cardiac repolarization assessed by electrocardiographic T-wave morphology combination score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tischer, Susanne Glasius; Graff, Claus; Ellervik, Christina

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Interpreting repolarization changes in the electrocardiograms of athletes present a clinical challenge. AIM: Assessment of cardiac repolarization by T-wave morphology using the Morphology Combination Score (MCS), and evaluate how this quantitative description of T-wave morphology...... was influenced by the sport performed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Digital electrocardiograms of 469 young elite athletes were analyzed for T-wave asymmetry, flatness and notching, and combined in the MCS. Athletes >22years were compared to a sex-and age matched control group from the general population (N=198......). RESULTS: MCS increased with increasing endurance component of the sport performed ranging from 0.79±0.15 (low) to 0.92±0.21 (high) (p

  18. Modulation of KCNQ1 alternative splicing regulates cardiac IKs and action potential repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Rudy, Yoram; Po-Yuan, Phd; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Cui, Jianmin

    2013-08-01

    Slow delayed-rectifier potassium current (IKs) channels, made of the pore-forming KCNQ1 and auxiliary KCNE1 subunits, play a key role in determining action potential duration (APD) in cardiac myocytes. The consequences of drug-induced KCNQ1 splice alteration remain unknown. To study the modulation of KCNQ1 alternative splicing by amiloride and the consequent changes in IKs and action potentials (APs) in ventricular myocytes. Canine endocardial, midmyocardial, and epicardial ventricular myocytes were isolated. Levels of KCNQ1a and KCNQ1b as well as a series of splicing factors were quantified by using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effect of amiloride-induced changes in the KCNQ1b/total KCNQ1 ratio on AP was measured by using whole-cell patch clamp with and without isoproterenol. With 50 μmol/L of amiloride for 6 hours, KCNQ1a at transcriptional and translational levels increased in midmyocardial myocytes but decreased in endo- and epicardial myocytes. Likewise, changes in splicing factors in midmyocardial were opposite to that in endo- and epicardial myocytes. In midmyocardial myocytes amiloride shortened APD and decreased isoproterenol-induced early afterdepolarizations significantly. The same amiloride-induced effects were demonstrated by using human ventricular myocyte model for AP simulations under beta-adrenergic stimulation. Moreover, amiloride reduced the transmural dispersion of repolarization in pseudo-electrocardiogram. Amiloride regulates IKs and APs with transmural differences and reduces arrhythmogenicity through the modulation of KCNQ1 splicing. We suggested that the modulation of KCNQ1 splicing may help prevent arrhythmia. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Early repolarization with horizontal ST segment may be associated with aborted sudden cardiac arrest: a retrospective case control study

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    Kim Sung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk stratification of the early repolarization pattern (ERP is needed to identify malignant early repolarization. J-point elevation with a horizontal ST segment was recently suggested as a malignant feature of the ERP. In this study, the prevalence of the ERP with a horizontal ST segment was examined among survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA without structural heart disease to evaluate the value of ST-segment morphology in risk stratification of the ERP. Methods We reviewed the data of 83 survivors of SCA who were admitted from August 2005 to August 2010. Among them, 25 subjects without structural heart disease were included. The control group comprised 60 healthy subjects who visited our health promotion center; all control subjects were matched for age, sex, and underlying disease (diabetes mellitus, hypertension. Early repolarization was defined as an elevation of the J point of at least 0.1 mV above the baseline in at least two continuous inferior or lateral leads that manifested as QRS slurring or notching. An ST-segment pattern of Results The SCA group included 17 men (64% with a mean age of 49.7 ± 14.5 years. The corrected QTc was not significantly different between the SCA and control groups (432.7 ± 37.96 vs. 420.4 ± 26.3, respectively; p = 0.089. The prevalence of ERP was not statistically different between the SCA and control groups (5/25, 20% vs. 4/60, 6.7%, respectively; p = 0.116. The prevalence of early repolarization with a horizontal ST segment was more frequent in the SCA than in the control group (20% vs. 3.3%, respectively; p = 0.021. Four SCA subjects (16% and one control subject (1.7% had a J-point elevation of >2 mm (p = 0.025. Four SCA subjects (16% and one (1.7% control subject had an ERP in the inferior lead (p = 0.025. Conclusion The prevalence of ERP with a horizontal ST segment was higher in patients with aborted SCA than in matched controls. This result suggests that ST morphology has

  20. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    were not significantly different between groups. Patients with Chagas heart disease have increased cardiac repolarization abnormalities, especially by advanced ECG. Moreover, as a group, they have decreased uncorrected JT and QT interval durations and increased filtered QRS interval durations (versus age/gender-matched controls), all suggesting a potential loss of cardiac sodium channel function that might be mediated, in part, by cardiac autonomic damage. Overall findings support Brugada et al's recent hypothesis that the pathway leading to sudden death may often be similar in Chagas' disease and Brugada syndrome i.e., damage to the sodium channel (infectious/immunologic/autonomic in Chagas' genetic in Brugada) with consequent loss of sodium currents may facilitate a phase II-reentry based arrhythmic substrate for ventricular fibrillation in both conditions. In general, JT interval-related results have been underreported in the Chagas literature.

  1. A thorough QT study to assess the effects of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects

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    Adar L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Liat Adar,1 Noa Avisar,1 Andreas Lammerich,2 Robert B Kleiman,3 Ofer Spiegelstein1 1R&D, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd, Netanya, Israel; 2Biosimilars Clinical Development, CPP Teva ratiopharm, Merckle GmbH, Ulm, Germany; 3Global Cardiology, eResearch Technology Inc, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Tbo-filgrastim is a recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to reduce the duration of severe neutropenia in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive anticancer drugs associated with a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia. We assessed the effect of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac conduction and repolarization in healthy subjects. A three-arm, parallel-group, active- and placebo-controlled, double-blind study randomized healthy adults to a single 5 µg/kg intravenous tbo-filgrastim infusion, a single intravenous placebo infusion, or a single 400 mg moxifloxacin oral dose. The primary end point was placebo-corrected time-matched change from baseline in QT interval corrected using a QT individual correction (QTcI method. Secondary end points included heart rate, PR interval, QRS duration, change in electrocardiogram patterns, correlation between QTcI change from baseline (milliseconds and tbo-filgrastim serum concentrations, and safety variables. A total of 145 subjects were enrolled (50 tbo-filgrastim, 50 placebo, 45 moxifloxacin. Peak placebo-corrected change from baseline for QTcI with tbo-filgrastim was 3.5 milliseconds, with a two-sided 95% upper confidence interval of 7.2 milliseconds, demonstrating no signal for any tbo-filgrastim effect on QTc. Concentration-effect modeling showed no evidence of an effect of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac repolarization. Tbo-filgrastim produced no clinically significant changes in other electrocardiogram parameters. Tbo-filgrastim was well tolerated. Keywords: tbo-filgrastim, electrocardiogram, QT interval

  2. A thorough QT study to assess the effects of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adar, Liat; Avisar, Noa; Lammerich, Andreas; Kleiman, Robert B; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Tbo-filgrastim is a recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to reduce the duration of severe neutropenia in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive anticancer drugs associated with a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia. We assessed the effect of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac conduction and repolarization in healthy subjects. A three-arm, parallel-group, active- and placebo-controlled, double-blind study randomized healthy adults to a single 5 μg/kg intravenous tbo-filgrastim infusion, a single intravenous placebo infusion, or a single 400 mg moxifloxacin oral dose. The primary end point was placebo-corrected time-matched change from baseline in QT interval corrected using a QT individual correction (QTcI) method. Secondary end points included heart rate, PR interval, QRS duration, change in electrocardiogram patterns, correlation between QTcI change from baseline (milliseconds) and tbo-filgrastim serum concentrations, and safety variables. A total of 145 subjects were enrolled (50 tbo-filgrastim, 50 placebo, 45 moxifloxacin). Peak placebo-corrected change from baseline for QTcI with tbo-filgrastim was 3.5 milliseconds, with a two-sided 95% upper confidence interval of 7.2 milliseconds, demonstrating no signal for any tbo-filgrastim effect on QTc. Concentration-effect modeling showed no evidence of an effect of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac repolarization. Tbo-filgrastim produced no clinically significant changes in other electrocardiogram parameters. Tbo-filgrastim was well tolerated. PMID:26028962

  3. Cardiac repolarization during hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes: impact of basal renin-angiotensin system activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Andersen, Rikke; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Larroude, Charlotte Ellen

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Hypoglycaemia-induced cardiac arrhythmias may be involved in the pathogenesis of the 'dead-in-bed syndrome' in patients with type 1 diabetes. Evidence suggests that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) influences the occurrence of arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to explore if basal RAS...

  4. Quantification of cardiac magnetic field orientation during ventricular de- and repolarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwen, Peter van; Lange, Silke; Klein, Anita; Geue, Daniel; Groenemeyer, Dietrich [Department of Biomagnetism, Groenemeyer Institute of Microtherapy, Universitaetsstr. 142, 44799 Bochum (Germany); Hailer, Birgit [Department of Medicine, Philippusstift, Huelsmannstr. 17, 43455 Essen (Germany); Seybold, Katrin [Department of Obstetrics, Marienhospital, University of Witten/Herdecke, Marienplatz 2, 58452 Witten (Germany); Poplutz, Christian [Zentrum fuer Informations- und Medizintechnik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Tiergartenstrasse 15, 69121 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: petervl@microtherapy.de

    2008-05-07

    We compared the stability and discriminatory power of different methods of determining cardiac magnetic field map (MFM) orientation within the context of coronary artery disease (CAD). In 27 healthy subjects and 24 CAD patients, multichannel magnetocardiograms were registered at rest. MFM orientation was determined during QT interval using: (a) locations of the positive and negative centres-of-gravity, (b) locations of the field extrema and (c) the direction of the maximum field gradient. Deviation from normal orientation quantified the ability of each approach to discriminate between healthy and CAD subjects. Although the course of orientation was similar for all methods, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed the best discrimination of CAD patients for the centre-of-gravity approach (area-under-the-curve = 86%), followed by the gradient (84%) and extrema (76%) methods. Consideration of methodological and discriminatory advantages with respect to noninvasive diagnosis of CAD suggests that the centres-of-gravity method is the most suited one.

  5. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Åsa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W.H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M.; consortium, HRGEN; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Fabiola Del, Greco M.; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C.M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R.P.; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimäki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal Mendelian Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals we identified 35 common variant QT interval loci, that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 novel QT loci in 298 unrelated LQTS probands identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode for proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies novel candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS,and SCD. PMID:24952745

  6. Association of early repolarization pattern on ECG with risk of cardiac and all-cause mortality: a population-based prospective cohort study (MONICA/KORA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz F Sinner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early repolarization pattern (ERP on electrocardiogram was associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac arrest in a case-control study and with cardiovascular mortality in a Finnish community-based sample. We sought to determine ERP prevalence and its association with cardiac and all-cause mortality in a large, prospective, population-based case-cohort study (Monitoring of Cardiovascular Diseases and Conditions [MONICA]/KORA [Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg] comprised of individuals of Central-European descent. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Electrocardiograms of 1,945 participants aged 35-74 y, representing a source population of 6,213 individuals, were analyzed applying a case-cohort design. Mean follow-up was 18.9 y. Cause of death was ascertained by the 9th revision of the International Classification of Disease (ICD-9 codes as documented in death certificates. ERP-attributable effects on mortality were determined by a weighted Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for covariables. Prevalence of ERP was 13.1% in our study. ERP was associated with cardiac and all-cause mortality, most pronounced in those of younger age and male sex; a clear ERP-age interaction was detected (p = 0.005. Age-stratified analyses showed hazard ratios (HRs for cardiac mortality of 1.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-3.68, p = 0.035 for both sexes and 2.65 (95% CI 1.21-5.83, p = 0.015 for men between 35-54 y. An inferior localization of ERP further increased ERP-attributable cardiac mortality to HRs of 3.15 (95% CI 1.58-6.28, p = 0.001 for both sexes and to 4.27 (95% CI 1.90-9.61, p<0.001 for men between 35-54 y. HRs for all-cause mortality were weaker but reached significance. CONCLUSIONS: We found a high prevalence of ERP in our population-based cohort of middle-aged individuals. ERP was associated with about a 2- to 4-fold increased risk of cardiac mortality in individuals between 35 and 54 y. An inferior

  7. Influence of serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR polymorphism on the relation between brain 5-HT transporter binding and heart rate corrected cardiac repolarization interval.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esa Kauppila

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR polymorphism predicts the degree of structural and functional connectivity in the brain, and less consistently the degree of vulnerability for anxiety and depressive disorders. It is less known how 5-HTTLPR polymorphism influences on the coupling between brain and neuronal cardiovascular control. The present study demonstrates the impact of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on the relations between heart rate (HR corrected cardiac repolarization interval (QTc interval and the brain 5-HTT binding. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty healthy young adults (fifteen monozygotic twin pairs (mean age 26±1.3 years, 16 females were imagined with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT using iodine-123 labeled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl nortropane (nor-β-CIT. Continuous ECG recording was obtained from each participant at supine rest. Signal averaged QTc interval on continuous ECG was calculated and compared with the brain imaging results. RESULTS: In the two groups [l homozygotes (n = 16, 10 females, s carriers (n = 14, 8 female] HR and the length of QTc interval were not influenced by 5-HTTLPR polymorphism. There were no significant relations between HR and 5-HTT binding in the brain. There were significant associations between QTc interval and nor-β-CIT binding in the brain in l homozygotes, but not in s carriers (correlations for QTc interval and nor-β-CIT binding of striatum, thalamus and right temporal region were -0.8--0.9, (p<0.0005, respectively. CONCLUSION: The finding of longer QTc interval with less 5-HTT binding availability in major serotonergic binding sites in l homozygotes, but not in s carriers, implicate to differentiated control of QTc interval by 5-HTTLPR polymorphism.

  8. Entropy of cardiac repolarization predicts ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in patients receiving an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator for primary prevention of sudden death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMazumder, Deeptankar; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Dorante, Miguel; Dey, Swati; Mukhopadhyay, Bhasha; Zhang, Yiyi; Moorman, J Randall; Cheng, Alan; Berger, Ronald D; Guallar, Eliseo; Jones, Steven R; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2016-12-01

    The need for a readily available, inexpensive, non-invasive method for improved risk stratification of heart failure (HF) patients is paramount. Prior studies have proposed that distinct fluctuation patterns underlying the variability of physiological signals have unique prognostic value. We tested this hypothesis in an extensively phenotyped cohort of HF patients using EntropyX QT , a novel non-linear measure of cardiac repolarization dynamics. In a prospective, multicentre, observational study of 852 patients in sinus rhythm undergoing clinically indicated primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation (2003-10), exposures included demographics, history, physical examination, medications, laboratory results, serum biomarkers, ejection fraction, conventional electrocardiographic (ECG) analyses of heart rate and QT variability, and EntropyX QT . The primary outcome was first 'appropriate' ICD shock for ventricular arrhythmias. The secondary outcome was composite events (appropriate ICD shock and all-cause mortality). After exclusions, the cohort (n = 816) had a mean age of 60 ± 13 years, 28% women, 36% African Americans, 56% ischaemic cardiomyopathy, and 29 ± 16% Seattle HF risk score (SHFS) 5-year predicted mortality. Over 45 ± 24 months, there were 134 appropriate shocks and 166 deaths. After adjusting for 30 exposures, the hazard ratios (comparing the 5th to 1st quintile of EntropyX QT ) for primary and secondary outcomes were 3.29 (95% CI 1.74-6.21) and 2.28 (1.53-3.41), respectively. Addition of EntropyX QT to a model comprised of the exposures or SHFS significantly increased net reclassification and the ROC curve area. EntropyX QT measured during ICD implantation strongly and independently predicts appropriate shock and all-cause mortality over follow-up. EntropyX QT complements conventional risk predictors and has the potential for broad clinical application. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All

  9. [Parameters of cardiac muscle repolarization on the electrocardiogram when changing anatomical and electric position of the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaĭkovskiĭ, I A; Baum, O V; Popov, L A; Voloshin, V I; Budnik, N N; Frolov, Iu A; Kovalenko, A S

    2014-01-01

    While discussing the diagnostic value of the single channel electrocardiogram a set of theoretical considerations emerges inevitably, one of the most important among them is the question about dependence of the electrocardiogram parameters from the direction of electrical axis of heart. In other words, changes in what of electrocardiogram parameters are in fact liable to reflect pathological processes in myocardium, and what ones are determined by extracardiac factors, primarily by anatomic characteristics of patients. It is arguable that while analyzing electrocardiogram it is necessary to orient to such physiologically based informative indexes as ST segment displacement. Also, symmetry of the T wave shape is an important parameter which is independent of patients anatomic features. The results obtained are of interest for theoretical and applied aspects of the biophysics of the cardiac electric field.

  10. Quantitative analysis of T-wave morphology increases confidence in drug-induced cardiac repolarization abnormalities: evidence from the investigational IKr inhibitor Lu 35-138

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Matz, Jørgen; Christensen, Ellen B

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates repolarization changes induced by a new candidate drug to determine whether a composite electrocardiographic (ECG) measure of T-wave morphology could be used as a reliable marker to support the evidence of abnormal repolarization, which is indicated by QT interval...... prolongation. Seventy-nine healthy subjects were included in this parallel study. After a baseline day during which no drug was given, 40 subjects received an I(Kr)-blocking antipsychotic compound (Lu 35-138) on 7 consecutive days while 39 subjects received placebo. Resting ECGs were recorded and used...

  11. Double pharmacological challenge on repolarization opens new avenues for drug safety research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard

    2007-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is testing new potential drugs for their propensity to prolong human cardiac repolarization, and regards this as a sign of proarrhythmic risk. Many studies have dethroned the common perception that prolonged repolarization is a reliable surrogate marker for torsades de...

  12. The Association between Myocardial Iron Load and Ventricular Repolarization Parameters in Asymptomatic Beta-Thalassemia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kayrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated impaired ventricular repolarization in patients with β-TM. However, the effect of iron overload with cardiac T2* magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on cardiac repolarization remains unclear yet. We aimed to examine relationship between repolarization parameters and iron loading using cardiac T2* MRI in asymptomatic β-TM patients. Twenty-two β-TM patients and 22 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled to the study. From the 12-lead surface electrocardiography, regional and transmyocardial repolarization parameters were evaluated manually by two experienced cardiologists. All patients were also undergone MRI for cardiac T2* evaluation. Cardiac T2* score <20 msec was considered as iron overload status. Of the QT parameters, QT duration, corrected QT interval, and QT peak duration were significantly longer in the β-TM group compared to the healthy controls. Tp−Te and Tp−Te dispersions were also significantly prolonged in β-TM group compared to healthy controls. (Tp-Te/QT was similar between groups. There was no correlation between repolarization parameters and cardiac T2* MRI values. In conclusion, although repolarization parameters were prolonged in asymptomatic β-TM patients compared with control, we could not find any relation between ECG findings and cardiac iron load.

  13. Diclofenac Prolongs Repolarization in Ventricular Muscle with Impaired Repolarization Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristóf, Attila; Husti, Zoltán; Koncz, István; Kohajda, Zsófia; Szél, Tamás; Juhász, Viktor; Biliczki, Péter; Jost, Norbert; Baczkó, István; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Virág, László

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the present work was to characterize the electrophysiological effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac and to study the possible proarrhythmic potency of the drug in ventricular muscle. Methods Ion currents were recorded using voltage clamp technique in canine single ventricular cells and action potentials were obtained from canine ventricular preparations using microelectrodes. The proarrhythmic potency of the drug was investigated in an anaesthetized rabbit proarrhythmia model. Results Action potentials were slightly lengthened in ventricular muscle but were shortened in Purkinje fibers by diclofenac (20 µM). The maximum upstroke velocity was decreased in both preparations. Larger repolarization prolongation was observed when repolarization reserve was impaired by previous BaCl2 application. Diclofenac (3 mg/kg) did not prolong while dofetilide (25 µg/kg) significantly lengthened the QTc interval in anaesthetized rabbits. The addition of diclofenac following reduction of repolarization reserve by dofetilide further prolonged QTc. Diclofenac alone did not induce Torsades de Pointes ventricular tachycardia (TdP) while TdP incidence following dofetilide was 20%. However, the combination of diclofenac and dofetilide significantly increased TdP incidence (62%). In single ventricular cells diclofenac (30 µM) decreased the amplitude of rapid (IKr) and slow (IKs) delayed rectifier currents thereby attenuating repolarization reserve. L-type calcium current (ICa) was slightly diminished, but the transient outward (Ito) and inward rectifier (IK1) potassium currents were not influenced. Conclusions Diclofenac at therapeutic concentrations and even at high dose does not prolong repolarization markedly and does not increase the risk of arrhythmia in normal heart. However, high dose diclofenac treatment may lengthen repolarization and enhance proarrhythmic risk in hearts with reduced repolarization reserve. PMID:23300901

  14. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arking, Dan E; Pulit, Sara L; Crotti, Lia

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Usi...

  15. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Arking (Dan); S.L. Pulit (Sara); L. Crotti (Lia); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Munroe (Patricia); T.T. Koopmann (Tamara); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); E. Rossin (Elizabeth); M. Morley (Michael); X. Wang (Xinchen); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); A. Lundby (Alicia); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); P.A. Noseworthy (Peter); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); Y. Bradford (Yuki); K.V. Tarasov (Kirill); M. Dörr (Marcus); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.M. Lahtinen (Annukka); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); G.D. Smith; J.C. Bis (Joshua); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); S.J. Newhouse (Stephen); D.S. Evans (Daniel); W.S. Post (Wendy S.); D. Waggott (Daryl); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L. Eisele (Lewin); D. Ellinghaus (David); C. Hayward (Caroline); P. Navarro (Pau); S. Ulivi (Shelia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); D.J. Tester (David); S. Chatel (Stéphanie); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); M. Kumari (Meena); R. Morris (Richard); A.T. Naluai (Asa); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); A. Kluttig (Alexander); B. Strohmer (Bernhard); A.G. Panayiotou (Andrie); M. Torres (Maria); M. Knoflach (Michael); J.A. Hubacek (Jaroslav A.); K. Slowikowski (Kamil); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); R.D. Kumar (Runjun); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); A. Alonso (Alvaro); J.S. Bader (Joel); G.B. Ehret (Georg); H. Huang (Hailiang); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); J.B. Strait (James); P.W. Macfarlane (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M. Caulfield (Mark); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); F. Kronenberg (Florian); J. Willeit (Johann); J.G. Smith (J. Gustav); K.H. Greiser (Karin Halina); H.M. Zu Schwabedissen (Henriette Meyer); K. Werdan (Karl); C. Carella (Cintia); L. Zelante (Leopoldo); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); I. Kolcic (Ivana); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.F. Wright (Alan); M. Griffin (Maura); M.J. Daly (Mark); D.O. Arnar (David); H. Hólm (Hilma); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.C. Denny (Joshua); D.M. Roden (Dan); R.L. Zuvich (Rebecca); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); M.G. Larson (Martin); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); X. Yin (Xiaoyan); M. Bobbo (Marco); P. d' Adamo (Pio); A. Iorio (Annamaria); G. Sinagra (Gianfranco); A. Carracedo (Angel); S.R. Cummings (Steven); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Jula (Antti); K.K. Kontula (Kimmo); A. Marjamaa (Annukka); L. Oikarinen (Lasse); M. Perola (Markus); K. Porthan (Kimmo); R. Erbel (Raimund); P. Hoffmann (Per); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); H. Kälsch (Hagen); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); M. den Hoed (Marcel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D.S. Thelle (Dag); C. Gieger (Christian); T. Meitinger (Thomas); S. Perz (Siegfried); A. Peters (Annette); H. Prucha (Hanna); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); L. Franke (Lude); P.A. van der Vleuten (Pieter); B.M. Beckmann (Britt); E. Martens (Eimo); A. Bardai (Abdennasser); N. Hofman (Nynke); A.A.M. Wilde (Arthur); E.R. Behr (Elijah ); C. Dalageorgou (Chrysoula); J.R. Giudicessi (John); A. Medeiros-Domingo (Argelia); J. Barc (Julien); F. Kyndt (Florence); V. Probst (Vincent); A. Ghidoni (Alice); R. Insolia (Roberto); R.M. Hamilton (Robert); S.W. Scherer (Stephen); J. Brandimarto (Jeffrey); K. Margulies (Kenneth); C.E. Moravec (Christine); F. Del Greco M (Fabiola); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); J.R. O'Connell (Jeffery); W.K. Lee (Wai); G.C.M. Watt (Graham); H. Campbell (Harry); S.H. Wild (Sarah); N.E. El Mokhtari (Nour); N. Frey (Norbert); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); G. Navis (Gerjan); M.P. van den Berg (Maarten); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); M. Kellis (Manolis); B.P. Krijthe (Bouwe); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); J.A. Kors (Jan); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L. Kedenko (Lyudmyla); C. Lamina (Claudia); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); E. Lakatta (Edward); A. Mulas (Antonella); M. Orrù (Marco); D. Schlessinger (David); M. Uda (Manuela); M.R.P. Markus (Marcello R. P.); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); L. Lind (Lars); J. Sundstrom (Johan); A.C. Syvanen; M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Kähönen (Mika); K. Mononen (Kari); O. Raitakari (Olli); J. Viikari (Jorma); V. Adamkova (Vera); S. Kiechl (Stefan); M.-J. Brion (Maria); A.N. Nicolaides (Andrew); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); J. Haerting (Johannes); A. Dominiczak (Anna); F. Nyberg (Fredrik); P.H. Whincup (Peter); A. Hingorani (Aroon); J.-J. Schott (Jean-Jacques); C.R. Bezzina (Connie); E. Ingelsson (Erik); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P. Gasparini (Paolo); J.F. Wilson (James); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Franke (Andre); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A.D. Paterson (Andrew); A. Parsa (Afshin); Y. Liu (YongMei); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); D.S. Siscovick (David); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); Y. Jamshidi (Yalda); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S.B. Felix (Stephan); S. Sanna (Serena); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); L.A. Boyer (Laurie); T.P. Cappola (Thomas); J.V. Olsen (Jesper); P. Lage (Pedro); P.J. Schwartz (Peter); S. Kääb (Stefan); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); M. Ackerman (Margaret); A. Pfeufer (Arne); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome

  16. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; Van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dorr, Marcus; Miiller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stephanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Asa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; EhreT, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W. H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer Zu; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Poagek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Holm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobboll, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbe, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kalsch, Hagen; Nothen, Markus M.; Den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pruchal, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; De Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; Van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardail, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Del Greco, Fabiola; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C. M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orru, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Volker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Arnlov, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundstrom, Johan; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kahonen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, I. T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiech, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gaspariniin, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Miihleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimaki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Karl; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kaab, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; De Bakker, Paul I. W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using

  17. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Åsa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W. H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M.; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; del Greco M, Fabiola; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C. M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimäki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using

  18. The Early Repolarization ECG Pattern – An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó István Adorján

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Early repolarization pattern (ERP, a form of J-wave syndromes, was considered long time a benign ECG phenomenon. However, recent data confirmed that certain phenotypes of ERP are related to an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. Our paper gives a short and practical update regarding the main issues related to ERP: epidemiological data, molecular and electrophysiological background, clinical significance and risk stratification. At the end, the future directions of research and clinical management related to ERP are presented.

  19. Cardiac conduction system anomalies and sudden cardiac death: insights from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Eva Aranega

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac conduction system (CCS is a series of specialized tissues in the heart responsible for the initiation and co-ordination of the heartbeat. Alterations in the CCS, especially the His-Purkinje system, have been identified as an important player in the generation of lethal arrhythmias. Unstable arrhythmias secondary to channelopathies highly increase the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD. Sudden cardiac death is a major contributor to mortality in industrialized nations, and most cases of SCD in the young are related to inherited ion channel diseases. In this review we examine how murine transgenic models have contributed to understanding that a broad variety of cardiac arrhythmias involve the cardiac specialized conduction system and may lead to sudden cardiac death.

  20. Cardiac sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ahmad S; Asghari-Roodsari, Alaleh; Tan, Hanno L

    2010-07-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (INa) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of INa for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of arrhythmias in cardiac sodium channelopathies, i.e., arrhythmogenic diseases in patients with mutations in SCN5A, the gene responsible for the pore-forming ion-conducting alpha-subunit, or in genes that encode the ancillary beta-subunits or regulatory proteins of the cardiac sodium channel. While clinical and genetic studies have laid the foundation for our understanding of cardiac sodium channelopathies by establishing links between arrhythmogenic diseases and mutations in genes that encode various subunits of the cardiac sodium channel, biophysical studies (particularly in heterologous expression systems and transgenic mouse models) have provided insights into the mechanisms by which INa dysfunction causes disease in such channelopathies. It is now recognized that mutations that increase INa delay cardiac repolarization, prolong action potential duration, and cause long QT syndrome, while mutations that reduce INa decrease cardiac excitability, reduce electrical conduction velocity, and induce Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, or combinations thereof. Recently, mutation-induced INa dysfunction was also linked to dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, and sudden infant death syndrome. This review describes the structure and function of the cardiac sodium channel and its various subunits, summarizes major cardiac sodium channelopathies and the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and underlying molecular mechanisms, and discusses recent advances in the discovery of mutation-specific therapies in the management of these channelopathies.

  1. Diagnosing cardiac contusion : old wisdom and new insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybrandy, KC; Cramer, MJM; Burgersdijk, C

    Cardiac contusion is usually caused by blunt chest trauma and therefore is frequently suspected in patients involved in car or motorcycle accidents. The diagnosis of a myocardial contusion is difficult because of non-specific symptoms and the lack of an ideal test to detect myocardial damage.

  2. Premature Ventricular Contraction Coupling Interval Variability Destabilizes Cardiac Neuronal and Electrophysiological Control: Insights From Simultaneous Cardioneural Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, David; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Chui, Ray W; Ajijola, Olujimi A; Irie, Tadanobu; Talebi, Ramin; Salavatian, Siamak; Vaseghi, Marmar; Bradfield, Jason S; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2017-04-01

    Variability in premature ventricular contraction (PVC) coupling interval (CI) increases the risk of cardiomyopathy and sudden death. The autonomic nervous system regulates cardiac electrical and mechanical indices, and its dysregulation plays an important role in cardiac disease pathogenesis. The impact of PVCs on the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, a neural network on the heart, remains unknown. The objective was to determine the effect of PVCs and CI on intrinsic cardiac nervous system function in generating cardiac neuronal and electric instability using a novel cardioneural mapping approach. In a porcine model (n=8), neuronal activity was recorded from a ventricular ganglion using a microelectrode array, and cardiac electrophysiological mapping was performed. Neurons were functionally classified based on their response to afferent and efferent cardiovascular stimuli, with neurons that responded to both defined as convergent (local reflex processors). Dynamic changes in neuronal activity were then evaluated in response to right ventricular outflow tract PVCs with fixed short, fixed long, and variable CI. PVC delivery elicited a greater neuronal response than all other stimuli ( P <0.001). Compared with fixed short and long CI, PVCs with variable CI had a greater impact on neuronal response ( P <0.05 versus short CI), particularly on convergent neurons ( P <0.05), as well as neurons receiving sympathetic ( P <0.05) and parasympathetic input ( P <0.05). The greatest cardiac electric instability was also observed after variable (short) CI PVCs. Variable CI PVCs affect critical populations of intrinsic cardiac nervous system neurons and alter cardiac repolarization. These changes may be critical for arrhythmogenesis and remodeling, leading to cardiomyopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Cardiac disease and arrhythmogenesis: Mechanistic insights from mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Choy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is the second mammalian species, after the human, in which substantial amount of the genomic information has been analyzed. With advances in transgenic technology, mutagenesis is now much easier to carry out in mice. Consequently, an increasing number of transgenic mouse systems have been generated for the study of cardiac arrhythmias in ion channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. Mouse hearts are also amenable to physical manipulation such as coronary artery ligation and transverse aortic constriction to induce heart failure, radiofrequency ablation of the AV node to model complete AV block and even implantation of a miniature pacemaker to induce cardiac dyssynchrony. Last but not least, pharmacological models, despite being simplistic, have enabled us to understand the physiological mechanisms of arrhythmias and evaluate the anti-arrhythmic properties of experimental agents, such as gap junction modulators, that may be exert therapeutic effects in other cardiac diseases. In this article, we examine these in turn, demonstrating that primary inherited arrhythmic syndromes are now recognized to be more complex than abnormality in a particular ion channel, involving alterations in gene expression and structural remodelling. Conversely, in cardiomyopathies and heart failure, mutations in ion channels and proteins have been identified as underlying causes, and electrophysiological remodelling are recognized pathological features. Transgenic techniques causing mutagenesis in mice are extremely powerful in dissecting the relative contributions of different genes play in producing disease phenotypes. Mouse models can serve as useful systems in which to explore how protein defects contribute to arrhythmias and direct future therapy.

  4. Effect of ECG-derived respiration (EDR) on modeling ventricular repolarization dynamics in different physiological and psychological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, M H; Karmakar, C K; Khandoker, A H; Palaniswami, M

    2014-10-01

    Ventricular repolarization dynamics is an important predictor of the outcome in cardiovascular diseases. Mathematical modeling of the heart rate variability (RR interval variability) and ventricular repolarization variability (QT interval variability) is one of the popular methods to understand the dynamics of ventricular repolarization. Although ECG derived respiration (EDR) was previously suggested as a surrogate of respiration, but the effect of respiratory movement on ventricular repolarization dynamics was not studied. In this study, the importance of considering the effect of respiration and the validity of using EDR as a surrogate of respiration for linear parametric modeling of ventricular repolarization variability is studied in two cases with different physiological and psychological conditions. In the first case study, we used 20 young and 20 old healthy subjects' ECG and respiration data from Fantasia database at Physionet to analyze a bivariate QT-RR and a trivariate [Formula: see text] model structure to study the aging effect on cardiac repolarization variability. In the second study, we used 16 healthy subjects' data from drivedb (stress detection for automobile drivers) database at Physionet to do the same analysis for different psychological condition (i.e., in stressed and no stress condition). The results of our study showed that model having respiratory information (QT-RR-RESP and QT-RR-EDR) gave significantly better fit value (p 0.05) performance as that of respiration as an exogenous model input in describing repolarization variability irrespective of age and different mental conditions. Another finding of our study is that both respiration and EDR-based models can significantly (p < 0.05) differentiate the ventricular repolarization dynamics between healthy subjects of different age groups and with different psychological conditions, whereas models without respiration or EDR cannot distinguish between the groups. These results established

  5. Premature Ventricular Contraction Coupling Interval Variability Destabilizes Cardiac Neuronal and Electrophysiological Control: Insights from Simultaneous Cardio-Neural Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, David; Rajendran, Pradeep S.; Chui, Ray W.; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Irie, Tadanobu; Talebi, Ramin; Salavatian, Siamak; Vaseghi, Marmar; Bradfield, Jason S.; Armour, J. Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2017-01-01

    Background Variability in premature ventricular contraction (PVC) coupling interval (CI) increases the risk of cardiomyopathy and sudden death. The autonomic nervous system regulates cardiac electrical and mechanical indices, and its dysregulation plays an important role in cardiac disease pathogenesis. The impact of PVCs on the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS), a neural network on the heart, remains unknown. The objective was to determine the effect of PVCs and CI on ICNS function in generating cardiac neuronal and electrical instability using a novel cardio-neural mapping approach. Methods and Results In a porcine model (n=8) neuronal activity was recorded from a ventricular ganglion using a microelectrode array, and cardiac electrophysiological mapping was performed. Neurons were functionally classified based on their response to afferent and efferent cardiovascular stimuli, with neurons that responded to both defined as convergent (local reflex processors). Dynamic changes in neuronal activity were then evaluated in response to right ventricular outflow tract PVCs with fixed short, fixed long, and variable CI. PVC delivery elicited a greater neuronal response than all other stimuli (P<0.001). Compared to fixed short and long CI, PVCs with variable CI had a greater impact on neuronal response (P<0.05 versus short CI), particularly on convergent neurons (P<0.05), as well as neurons receiving sympathetic (P<0.05) and parasympathetic input (P<0.05). The greatest cardiac electrical instability was also observed following variable (short) CI PVCs. Conclusions Variable CI PVCs affect critical populations of ICNS neurons and alter cardiac repolarization. These changes may be critical for arrhythmogenesis and remodeling leading to cardiomyopathy. PMID:28408652

  6. Repolarization abnormalities in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter J; Stramba-Badiale, Marco

    2010-06-01

    The recognition of ventricular repolarization abnormalities in the newborn carries several and significant implications, because it calls attention to the possibility of dealing with an infant affected by the long QT syndrome (LQTS). This article provides key elements for the correct measurement of the QT interval in newborns and succinctly reviews some aspects of the disease. It gives normative values on the QT interval distribution in the first month of life based on a prospective study in more than 44,000 infants. It shows the probability, based on the QTc observed in two recordings, to find disease-causing mutations. The data indicate clearly that widespread electrocardiographic screening in the newborn allows early identification of most, if not all, the infants affected by LQTS with marked QT prolongation and thus of those at higher risk for life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden death. Through the affected infants, it becomes possible to identify the family members affected by LQTS, including the "silent mutation carriers"; our study shows that disease-causing mutations are found in 51% of the family members. Because early recognition leads to the implementation of effective preventive strategies, it follows that electrocardiographic screening will avoid preventable deaths either in the first year of life when they are usually labeled as "sudden infant death syndrome" or later in life. The case is made for medicolegal implications whenever neonatologists and pediatricians fail to inform the parents of a newborn child of the prevalence of LQTS (one in 2000), of the effectiveness of existing therapies, and of the diagnosis with a simple electrocardiogram.

  7. Pharmacological inhibition of I-K1 by PA-6 in isolated rat hearts affects ventricular repolarization and refractoriness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarsfeldt, Mark A.; Carstensen, Helena; Skibsbye, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    .1 14.7 msec, 67%, P ERP nor duration of atrial fibrillation was altered following PA-6 application. The results show that pharmacological inhibition...... of cardiac IK1 affects ventricular action potential repolarization and refractoriness and increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmia in isolated rat hearts....

  8. A dual potassium channel activator improves repolarization reserve and normalizes ventricular action potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Di Diego, José M; Hansen, Rie Schultz

    2016-01-01

    in cultured canine cardiac myocytes and determined whether a dual K(+) current activator can normalize K(+) currents and restore action potential (AP) configuration. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ventricular myocytes were isolated and cultured for up to 48h. Current and voltage clamp recordings were made using patch...... of EADs. Our results suggest a potential benefit of K(+) current activators under conditions of reduced repolarization reserve including heart failure....

  9. Diabetes mellitus attenuates the repolarization reserve in mammalian heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Csaba; Virág, László; Bíró, Tamás; Jost, Norbert; Magyar, János; Biliczki, Péter; Kocsis, Erzsébet; Skoumal, Réka; Nánási, Péter P; Tóth, Miklós; Kecskeméti, Valéria; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András

    2007-02-01

    In diabetes mellitus several cardiac electrophysiological parameters are known to be affected. In rodent experimental diabetes models changes in these parameters were reported, but no such data are available in other mammalian species including the dog. The present study was designed to analyse the effects of experimental type 1 diabetes on ventricular repolarization and its underlying transmembrane ionic currents and channel proteins in canine hearts. Diabetes was induced by a single injection of alloxan, a subgroup of dogs received insulin substitution. After the development of diabetes (8 weeks) electrophysiological studies were performed using conventional microelectrodes, whole cell voltage clamp, and ECG. Expression of ion channel proteins was evaluated by Western blotting. The QTc interval and the ventricular action potential duration in diabetic dogs were moderately prolonged. This was accompanied by significant reduction in the density of the transient outward K+ current (I(to)) and the slow delayed rectifier K+ current (I(Ks)), to 54.6% and 69.3% of control, respectively. No differences were observed in the density of the inward rectifier K+ current (I(K1)), rapid delayed rectifier K+ current (I(Kr)), and L-type Ca2+ current (I(Ca)). Western blot analysis revealed a reduced expression of Kv4.3 and MinK (to 25+/-21% and 48+/-15% of control, respectively) in diabetic dogs, while other channel proteins were unchanged (HERG, MiRP1, alpha(1c)) or increased (Kv1.4, KChIP2, KvLQT1). Insulin substitution fully prevented the diabetes-induced changes in I(Ks), KvLQT1 and MinK, however, the changes in I(to), Kv4.3, and Kv1.4 were only partially diminished by insulin. It is concluded that type 1 diabetes mellitus, although only moderately, lengthens ventricular repolarization, attenuates the repolarization reserve by decreasing I(to) and I(Ks) currents, and thereby may markedly enhance the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  10. Interactions between Activation and Repolarization Restitution Properties in the Intact Human Heart: In-Vivo Whole-Heart Data and Mathematical Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orini, Michele; Taggart, Peter; Srinivasan, Neil; Hayward, Martin; Lambiase, Pier D

    2016-01-01

    The restitution of the action potential duration (APDR) and conduction velocity (CVR) are mechanisms whereby cardiac excitation and repolarization adapt to changes in heart rate. They modulate the vulnerability to dangerous arrhythmia, but the mechanistic link between restitution and arrhythmogenesis remains only partially understood. This paper provides an experimental and theoretical study of repolarization and excitation restitution properties and their interactions in the intact human epicardium. The interdependence between excitation and repolarization dynamic is studied in 8 patients (14 restitution protocols, 1722 restitution curves) undergoing global epicardial mapping with multi-electrode socks before open heart surgery. A mathematical description of the contribution of both repolarization and conduction dynamics to the steepness of the APDR slope is proposed. This study demonstrates that the APDR slope is a function of both activation and repolarization dynamics. At short cycle length, conduction delay significantly increases the APDR slope by interacting with the diastolic interval. As predicted by the proposed mathematical formulation, the APDR slope was more sensitive to activation time prolongation than to the simultaneous shortening of repolarization time. A steep APDR slope was frequently identified, with 61% of all cardiac sites exhibiting an APDR slope > 1, suggesting that a slope > 1 may not necessarily promote electrical instability in the human epicardium. APDR slope did not change for different activation or repolarization times, and it was not a function of local baseline APD. However, it was affected by the spatial organization of electrical excitation, suggesting that in tissue APDR is not a unique function of local electrophysiological properties. Spatial heterogeneity in both activation and repolarization restitution contributed to the increase in the modulated dispersion of repolarization, which for short cycle length was as high as 250

  11. Flecainide attenuates rate adaptation of ventricular repolarization in guinea-pig heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Flecainide is class Ic antiarrhythmic agent that was found to increase the risk of sudden cardiac death. Arrhythmic responses to flecainide could be precipitated by exercise, suggesting a role played by inappropriate rate adaptation of ventricular repolarization. This study therefore...... examined flecainide effect on adaptation of the QT interval and ventricular action potential duration (APD) to abrupt reductions of the cardiac cycle length. DESIGN: ECG and ventricular epicardial and endocardial monophasic APD were recorded in isolated, perfused guinea-pig heart preparations upon...

  12. Interactions between antiarrhythmic drugs and cardiac memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotnikov, A. N.; Shvilkin, A.; Xiong, W.; de Groot, J. R.; Rosenshtraukh, L.; Feinmark, S.; Gainullin, R.; Danilo, P.; Rosen, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Ventricular pacing or arrhythmias can induce cardiac memory (CM). We hypothesized that clinically administered antiarrhythmic drugs alter the expression of CM, and that the repolarization changes characteristic of CM can modulate the effects of antiarrhythmic drugs. We studied conscious,

  13. Identification of local myocardial repolarization time by bipolar electrode potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Tsunetoyo; Todo, Takahiro; Yao, Takenori; Ashihara, Takashi; Haraguchi, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ikeda, Takanori; Ohe, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether bipolar electrode potentials (BEPs) reflect local myocardial repolarization dynamics, using computer simulation. Simulated action potential and BEP mapping of myocardial tissue during fibrillation was performed. The BEP was modified to make all the fluctuations have the same polarity. Then, the modified BEP (mBEP) was transformed to "dynamic relative amplitude" (DRA) designed to make all the fluctuations have the similar amplitude. The repolarization end point corresponded to the end of the repolarization-related small fluctuation that clearly appeared in the DRA of mBEP. Using the DRA of mBEP, we could reproduce the repolarization dynamics in the myocardial tissue during fibrillation. The BEP may facilitate identifying the repolarization time. Furthermore, BEP mapping has the possibility that it would be available for evaluating repolarization behavior in myocardial tissue even during fibrillation. The accuracy of activation-recovery interval was also reconfirmed.

  14. Characterization of Myocardial Repolarization Reserve in Adolescent Females With Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padfield, Gareth J; Escudero, Carolina A; DeSouza, Astrid M; Steinberg, Christian; Gibbs, Karen; Puyat, Joseph H; Lam, Pei Yoong; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Sherwin, Elizabeth; Potts, James E; Sandor, George; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-02-09

    Patients with anorexia nervosa exhibit abnormal myocardial repolarization and are susceptible to sudden cardiac death. Exercise testing is useful in unmasking QT prolongation in disorders associated with abnormal repolarization. We characterized QT adaptation during exercise in anorexia. Sixty-one adolescent female patients with anorexia nervosa and 45 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers performed symptom-limited cycle ergometry during 12-lead ECG monitoring. Changes in the QT interval during exercise were measured, and QT/RR-interval slopes were determined by using mixed-effects regression modeling. Patients had significantly lower body mass index than controls; however, resting heart rates and QT/QTc intervals were similar at baseline. Patients had shorter exercise times (13.7±4.5 versus 20.6±4.5 minutes; Padolescent anorexic females have impaired repolarization reserve in comparison with healthy controls. Further study may identify impaired QT dynamics as a risk factor for arrhythmias in anorexia nervosa. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Components of action potential repolarization in cerebellar parallel fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekala, Dobromila; Baginskas, Armantas; Szkudlarek, Hanna J; Raastad, Morten

    2014-11-15

    Repolarization of the presynaptic action potential is essential for transmitter release, excitability and energy expenditure. Little is known about repolarization in thin, unmyelinated axons forming en passant synapses, which represent the most common type of axons in the mammalian brain's grey matter.We used rat cerebellar parallel fibres, an example of typical grey matter axons, to investigate the effects of K(+) channel blockers on repolarization. We show that repolarization is composed of a fast tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive component, determining the width and amplitude of the spike, and a slow margatoxin (MgTX)-sensitive depolarized after-potential (DAP). These two components could be recorded at the granule cell soma as antidromic action potentials and from the axons with a newly developed miniaturized grease-gap method. A considerable proportion of fast repolarization remained in the presence of TEA, MgTX, or both. This residual was abolished by the addition of quinine. The importance of proper control of fast repolarization was demonstrated by somatic recordings of antidromic action potentials. In these experiments, the relatively broad K(+) channel blocker 4-aminopyridine reduced the fast repolarization, resulting in bursts of action potentials forming on top of the DAP. We conclude that repolarization of the action potential in parallel fibres is supported by at least three groups of K(+) channels. Differences in their temporal profiles allow relatively independent control of the spike and the DAP, whereas overlap of their temporal profiles provides robust control of axonal bursting properties.

  16. Mechanistic and structural insight into promiscuity based metabolism of cardiac drug digoxin by gut microbial enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kundan; Jaiswal, Shubham K; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Srivastava, Gopal N; Sharma, Ashok K; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-12-23

    The recent advances in microbiome studies have revealed the role of gut microbiota in altering the pharmacological properties of oral drugs, which contributes to patient-response variation and undesired effect of the drug molecule. These studies are essential to guide us for achieving the desired efficacy and pharmacological activity of the existing drug molecule or for discovering novel and more effective therapeutics. However, one of the main limitations is the lack of atomistic details on the binding and metabolism of these drug molecules by gut-microbial enzymes. Therefore, in this study, for a well-known and important FDA-approved cardiac glycoside drug, digoxin, we report the atomistic details and energy economics for its binding and metabolism by the Cgr2 protein of Eggerthela lenta DSM 2243. It was observed that the binding pocket of digoxin to Cgr2 primarily involved the negatively charged polar amino acids and a few non-polar hydrophobic residues. The drug digoxin was found to bind Cgr2 at the same binding site as that of fumarate, which is the proposed natural substrate. However, digoxin showed a much lower binding energy (17.75 ±2 Kcal mol -1 ) than the binding energy (42.17 ±2 Kcal mol -1 ) of fumarate. This study provides mechanistic insights into the structural and promiscuity-based metabolism of widely used cardiac drug digoxin and presents a methodology, which could be useful to confirm the promiscuity-based metabolism of other orally administrated drugs by gut microbial enzymes and also help in designing strategies for improving the efficacy of the drugs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective activation of heteromeric SK channels contributes to action potential repolarization in mouse atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Jane M; Weatherall, Kate L; Choisy, Stéphanie C; James, Andrew F; Hancox, Jules C; Marrion, Neil V

    2015-05-01

    Activation of small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels is proposed to contribute to repolarization of the action potential in atrial myocytes. This role is controversial, as these cardiac SK channels appear to exhibit an uncharacteristic pharmacology. The objectives of this study were to resolve whether activation of SK channels contributes to atrial action potential repolarization and to determine the likely subunit composition of the channel. The effect of 2 SK channel inhibitors was assessed on outward current evoked in voltage clamp and on action potential duration in perforated patch and whole-cell current clamp recording from acutely isolated mouse atrial myocytes. The presence of SK channel subunits was assessed using immunocytochemistry. A significant component of outward current was reduced by the SK channel blockers apamin and UCL1684. Block by apamin displayed a sensitivity indicating that this current was carried by homomeric SK2 channels. Action potential duration was significantly prolonged by UCL1684, but not by apamin. This effect was accompanied by an increase in beat-to-beat variability and action potential triangulation. This pharmacology was matched by that of expressed heteromeric SK2-SK3 channels in HEK293 cells. Immunocytochemistry showed that atrial myocytes express both SK2 and SK3 channels with an overlapping expression pattern. Only proposed heteromeric SK2-SK3 channels are physiologically activated to contribute to action potential repolarization, which is indicated by the difference in pharmacology of evoked outward current and prolongation of atrial action potential duration. The effect of blocking this channel on the action potential suggests that SK channel inhibition during cardiac function has the potential to be proarrhythmic. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Ventricular Premature Beats and Repolarization Parameters in Physiological Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Yiginer, Omer; Uz, Omer; Kucuk, Ugur; Degirmencioglu, Gokhan; Isilak, Zafer; Uzun, Mehmet; Davulcu, Ezgi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of gender difference on cardiac electrophysiology have been well studied. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of estradiol and progesteron changes occuring in physiological menstrual cycle on ventricular premature beats (VPBs) and cardiac repolarization parameters. Women of reproductive age with VPBs were included into the study group and healthy women were recruited as the control group. During the menstruation period, a 12-lead electrocardiography, blood samples, and 24-hour rhythm Holter were applied to the study group. Similarly, all tests were repeated in the estimated ovulation period (12-14 days before menstruation) by all cases. The study group consisted of 20 women patients with VPB, and the control group of 18 healthy women. While the number of VPB in the menstruation period was 210 beats/day (interquartile range [IQR]: 1,144), it decreased to 86 beats/day (IQR: 251) in the ovulation period with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Average heart rate in the menstruation period was 81.4 ± 10 beats/min and it significantly increased to 84.6 ± 8 beats/min in the ovulation period (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cardiac repolarization parameters in both menstruation and ovulation periods between the study and control groups. Comparing the menstruation and the ovulation periods, J-Tpeak interval, which reflects early repolarization, was shorter in the ovulation period (193 ± 27.7 ms and 201.1 ± 28.6 ms, respectively; P < 0.05). Other repolarization parameters did not show any significant difference. VPB frequency decreases with estradiol peak in the ovulation period. This suggests that estrogen may have protective effects against ventricular arrhythmias. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pulmonary valve replacement in tetralogy of Fallot improves the repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft van Huysduynen, Bart; Henkens, Ivo R.; Swenne, Cees A.; Oosterhof, Thomas; Draisma, Harmen H. M.; Maan, Arie C.; Hazekamp, Mark G.; de Roos, Albert; Schalij, Martin J.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Vliegen, Hubert W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) on the repolarization of patients with tetralogy of Fallot. Background: Pulmonary valve regurgitation may cause right ventricular failure in adult patients with Fallot's tetralogy. In these patients, prolonged depolarization and

  20. MicroRNAs in cardiac arrhythmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Carlsen, Anting L; Christiansen, Kasper M

    2014-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic cardiac condition associated with prolonged ventricular repolarization, primarily a result of perturbations in cardiac ion channels, which predisposes individuals to life-threatening arrhythmias. Using DNA screening and sequencing methods, over 700 different L...

  1. Early repolarization: an evolving concept for the past 70 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasco, Luigi; Cristoforetti, Yvonne; De Backer, Ole; Castagno, Davide; Giustetto, Carla; Orzan, Fulvio; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-01-01

    For more than 70 years, early repolarization has been considered to be a common normal variant. In the general population, the prevalence ranges between 5 and 13%, and in athletes, a rising trend is observed from 20 to 90%. Nevertheless, from the latter half of the 1990s, a growing number of case reports, series, observational and prospective studies reported that the presence of various electrocardiographic patterns attributed to early repolarization may constitute a potential marker for the increased risk of sudden death in otherwise normal individuals, casting a dark shadow on this ECG peculiarity. This review provides a historical summary of the evolution of the concept of early repolarization from its original description to the latest works and a guide to help physicians in evaluating individuals with this common electrocardiographic pattern.

  2. VANADIUM EXPOSURE ALTERS SPONTANEOUS BEAT RATE AND GENE EXPRESSION OF CULTURED CARDIAC MYOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recent toxicological studies report PM-induced changes in a number of cardiac parameters, including heart rate variability, arrhythmias, repolarization, and internal defib...

  3. Insights into the clinical and functional significance of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Junqueira Junior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Exclusive or associated lesions in various structures of the autonomic nervous system occur in the chronic forms of Chagas disease. In the indeterminate form, the lesions are absent or mild, whereas in the exclusive or combined heart and digestive disease forms, they are often more pronounced. Depending on their severity these lesions can result mainly in cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction but also in sympathetic dysfunction of variable degrees. Despite the key autonomic effect on cardiovascular functioning, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease remains unknown. METHODS: Review of data on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease and their potential consequences, and considerations supporting the possible relationship between this disturbance and general or cardiovascular clinical and functional adverse outcomes. RESULTS: We hypothesise that possible consequences that cardiac dysautonomia might variably occasion or predispose in Chagas disease include: transient or sustained arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, adverse overall and cardiovascular prognosis with enhanced morbidity and mortality, an inability of the cardiovascular system to adjust to functional demands and/or respond to internal or external stimuli by adjusting heart rate and other hemodynamic variables, and immunomodulatory and cognitive disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac autonomic modulation in Chagas disease might not be a mere epiphenomenon without significance. Indirect evidences point for a likely important role of this alteration as a primary predisposing or triggering cause or mediator favouring the development of subtle or evident secondary cardiovascular functional disturbances and clinical consequences, and influencing adverse outcomes.

  4. Dispersion in ventricular repolarization in the human, canine and porcine heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opthof, Tobias|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814741; Janse, Michiel J.; Meijborg, Veronique M F; Cinca, Juan; Rosen, Michael R.; Coronel, Ruben

    Dispersion in repolarization is important for the genesis of the T wave, and for the induction of reentrant arrhtyhmias. Because the T wave differs across species our intent here is to review the epicardial, endocardial and transmural repolarization patterns contributing to repolarization in whole

  5. Dispersion in ventricular repolarization in the human, canine and porcine heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opthof, Tobias; Janse, Michiel J.; Meijborg, Veronique M. F.; Cinca, Juan; Rosen, Michael R.; Coronel, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Dispersion in repolarization is important for the genesis of the T wave, and for the induction of reentrant arrhtyhmias. Because the T wave differs across species our intent here is to review the epicardial, endocardial and transmural repolarization patterns contributing to repolarization in whole

  6. Assessment of repolarization heterogeneity for prediction of mortality in cardiovascular disease: peak to the end of the T wave interval and nondipolar repolarization components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Peter; Schmidt, Anna; Zabel, Markus; Hnatkova, Katerina; Franz, Michael; Huber, Kurt; Malik, Marek

    2011-01-01

    In the canine wedge preparation, the interval from the peak to the end of the T wave (TpTe) reflects transwedge heterogeneities. Increase of ventricular dispersion of action potential durations has been repeatedly shown to be arrhythmogenic; thus, prolonged TpTe intervals were assumed to reflect increased risk. However, despite attempted extrapolation to clinical electrocardiograms, the appropriateness of this assumption has not been investigated in a large population. In another animal model, nondipolar components of the descending T-wave limb (TWRd) have been shown to correlate with TpTe interval. Although total T-wave nondipolar components (TWRt), believed to reflect heterogeneities during total repolarization, were shown associated with worse outcome of cardiac patients, this has not been investigated for TWRd. Male cardiovascular patients (n = 813) had digital 12-lead electrocardiograms recorded between 1984 and 1991 and were followed until 2000. Using commercial and previously validated technology, QT intervals, TpTe intervals, TWRd, and TWRt were calculated, heart rate corrected, and compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. Their predictive power was also compared with established markers of mortality risk. In contrast to former reports, TpTe(c) intervals were significantly shorter in nonsurvivors (98.76 ± 20.63 milliseconds vs 103.14 ± 20.87 milliseconds, P = .016) and not predictive of outcome. Although TWRd(c) was significantly higher in nonsurvivors (0.007% ± 0.02% vs 0.005% ± 0.08%, P = .03), it was also not predictive of outcome. Only increased TWRt(c), increased heart rate, and increased age were predictive of death. The findings challenge the concept that prolongation of TpTe corresponds to higher risk of death from any cause in every population. Further investigations are needed to confirm that clinically measured TpTe reflects transmural repolarization heterogeneity in all clinical populations and indeed is a useful risk marker. Copyright

  7. A Review of the Effects of Sedation on Thermoregulation: Insights for the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effects that the sedative and analgesic medications commonly used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have on thermoregulation. A structured review strategy was used. MEDLINE and CINAHL were searched for published studies, and reference lists of retrieved studies were scrutinized for further studies. Data were extracted using a standardized extraction tool. A total of nine studies examined the effect that sedative and analgesic medications have on thermoregulation. Midazolam has minimal impact on thermoregulation, whereas opioids, dexmedetomidine, and propofol markedly decrease vasoconstriction and shivering thresholds. Patients who receive sedation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory may be at risk of hypothermia because of the use of medications that impair thermoregulation. Further research is required to identify the prevalence of unplanned hypothermia during sedation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental and Computational Insight Into Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Paracrine Signaling and Heterocellular Coupling Effects on Cardiac Contractility and Arrhythmogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayourian, Joshua; Cashman, Timothy J; Ceholski, Delaine K; Johnson, Bryce V; Sachs, David; Kaji, Deepak A; Sahoo, Susmita; Hare, Joshua M; Hajjar, Roger J; Sobie, Eric A; Costa, Kevin D

    2017-08-04

    -handling genes (eg, SERCA2a, L-type calcium channel). Collectively, this integrated experimental and computational study helps unravel relative hMSC PS and HC effects on human cardiac contractility and arrhythmogenicity, and provides novel insight into the role of exosomes in hMSC paracrine-mediated effects on contractility. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. New insight into epirubicin cardiac toxicity: competing risks analysis of 1097 breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Marianne; Cortese, Giuliana; Nielsen, Gitte

    2008-01-01

    % confidence interval = 1.21 to 1.61), patient age, predisposition to cardiac disease, history of mediastinal irradiation, or antihormonal treatment for metastatic disease. Risk factors for death from all other causes (including breast cancer) included lesser dosages of epirubicin, increased tumor burden...

  10. Novel insights into mechanisms for Pak1-mediated regulation of cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwen eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of recent studies report novel roles for Pak1, a key member of the highly conserved family of serine-threonine protein kinases regulated by Ras-related small G-proteins, Cdc42/Rac1, in cardiac physiology and cardioprotection. Previous studies had identified Pak1 in the regulation of hypertrophic remodelling that could potentially lead to heart failure. This article provides a review of more recent findings on the roles of Pak1 in cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis. These findings identified crucial roles for Pak1 in cardiomyocyte Ca2+ handling and demonstrated that it does so through unique mechanisms involving regulation of the post-transcriptional activity of key Ca2+-handling proteins including the expression of Ca2+-ATPase SERCA2a with the speculative possibility of an involvement in the maintenance of transverse (T-tubular structure. They highlight important balance and regulatory functions of Pak1 in Ca2+ homeostasis in cardiac cells, and identify novel potential therapeutic strategies directed at manipulation of Pak1 signalling for the management of cardiac disease, particularly heart failure.

  11. Novel insights into the distribution of cardiac HCN channels: an expression study in the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Stefan; Layh, Beate; Ludwig, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    HCN pacemaker channels (I(f) channels) are believed to contribute to important functions in the heart; thus these channels became an attractive target for generating transgenic mouse mutants to elucidate their role in physiological and pathophysiological cardiac conditions. A full understanding of cardiac I(f) and the interpretation of studies using HCN mouse mutants require detailed information about the expression profile of the individual HCN subunits. Here we investigate the cardiac expression pattern of the HCN isoforms at the mRNA as well as at the protein level. The specificity of antibodies used was strictly confirmed by the use of HCN1, HCN2 and HCN4 knockout animals. We find a low, but highly differential HCN expression profile outside the cardiac conduction pathway including left and right atria and ventricles. Additionally HCN distribution was investigated in tissue slices of the sinoatrial node, the atrioventricular node, the bundle of His and the bundle branches. The conduction system was marked by acetylcholine esterase staining. HCN4 was confirmed as the predominant isoform of the primary pacemaker followed by a distinct expression of HCN1. In contrast HCN2 shows only a confined expression to individual pacemaker cells. Immunolabeling of the AV-node reveals also a pronounced specificity for HCN1 and HCN4. Compared to the SN and AVN we found a low but selective expression of HCN4 as the only isoform in the atrioventricular bundle. However in the bundle branches HCN1, HCN4 and also HCN2 show a prominent and selective expression pattern. Our results display a characteristic distribution of individual HCN isoforms in several cardiac compartments and reveal that beside HCN4, HCN1 represents the isoform which is selectively expressed in most parts of the conduction system suggesting a substantial contribution of HCN1 to pacemaking. 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-Rate Pacing Reduces Variability of Repolarization and Prevents Repolarization-Dependent Arrhythmias in Dogs With Chronic AV Block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oosterhoff, Peter; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Maas, Joep N

    2010-01-01

    -term variability of repolarization (STV) as a feedback parameter of arrhythmic risk. Methods and Results: The minimal signal sampling frequency required for measuring STV was determined through computer simulation. Arrhythmogenic response to dofetilide (25 µg/kg/5minutes) was tested at two different paced heart...

  13. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  14. Left atrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus: insights from cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graca, Bruno; Donato, Paulo; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe [University of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Coimbra' s Hospital Centre and University, Medical Imaging Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Joao Ferreira, Maria [University of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Coimbra' s Hospital Centre and University, Cardiology Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Gomes, Leonor [University of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Coimbra' s Hospital Centre and University, Endocrinology Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Castelo-Branco, Miguel [University of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-11-15

    The left atrium (LA) modulates left ventricular filling through reservoir, conduit and booster pump functions. Only limited data exist on LA involvement in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This study sought to assess LA function in asymptomatic DM2 with cardiac MRI. We hypothesized that cardiac MRI can detect LA dysfunction in asymptomatic DM2. Forty-five patients with asymptomatic DM2 and 24 normoglycaemic controls were studied. MRI cine imaging was performed to measure LA maximal and minimal volumes. A flow-sensitive phase-contrast gradient-echo sequence was used for flow measurements perpendicular to the orifice of the mitral valve, to quantify active LA stroke volume. LA total, passive and active emptying volumes and fractions were calculated. LA reservoir function, namely LA total ejection fraction, was significantly greater in controls compared to patients with DM2 (62.2 ± 5.2 vs 57.0 ± 7.6 %, P = 0.004). LA passive ejection fraction was also greater in the controls (26.2 ± 9.5 vs 16.1 ± 11.0 %, P < 0.001). Regarding parameters of LA booster pump function, LA active ejection fraction was not significantly different between groups. DM2 was demonstrated to be an independent determinant of LA function. Cardiac MRI enables the detection of LA dysfunction in asymptomatic DM2, characterized by a reduction in LA reservoir and conduit functions. (orig.)

  15. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    . The underlying posttranscriptional and posttranslational remodeling of the individual K(+) channels changes their activity and significance relative to each other, and they must be viewed together to understand their role in keeping a stable heart rhythm, also under menacing conditions like attacks of reentry......About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... that they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure...

  16. Cardiac pathophysiology in twin-twin transfusion syndrome: new insights into its evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmuth, C; Boudreaux, D; Moise, K J; Johnson, A; Papanna, R; Bebbington, M; Gardiner, H M

    2018-03-01

    In twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), unbalanced transfer of vasoactive mediators and fluid from the donor to the recipient cotwin alters their cardiovascular function. The aims of this study were to describe the impact of TTTS on fetal cardiac function in a large cohort of monochorionic-diamniotic (MCDA) pregnancies, and determine the early hemodynamic response to selective fetoscopic laser photocoagulation (SFLP). Echocardiography was performed in 145 MCDA pregnancies, including 26 uncomplicated MCDA, 61 TTTS Stages I+II and 58 TTTS Stages III+IV pregnancies, prior to SFLP for TTTS. Echocardiographic data after SFLP were available in a subset of 41/119 (34%) TTTS cases at a mean of 1.7 ± 1.9 days. Mitral (MAPSE) and tricuspid (TAPSE) annular systolic excursion, myocardial performance index (MPI), tissue Doppler velocities (E', A', S') and filling pressures (E/E') were measured and transformed into Z-scores. Ventricular pressure was estimated from peak atrioventricular regurgitation velocity. Left ventricular hemodynamics of the recipient twin were affected in early TTTS. In all stages of TTTS, left MPI and E/E' of the recipient twin were elevated in comparison to those of the donor (all P group difference in right ventricular E/E' was significant only in TTTS Stages III+IV recipients compared with TTTS Stages I+II (P = 0.007) and uncomplicated MCDA (P = 0.041). Recipient left and right MPI decreased while S', MAPSE and TAPSE increased after SFLP; in donors, left E/E' and cardiac output increased. Cardiac function of the recipient twin in TTTS is abnormal, even in the early stages of the disease. Left ventricular filling pressures are elevated and systolic function is decreased before abnormalities in the right heart become apparent. SFLP produces rapid hemodynamic improvement. Copyright © 2017 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2017 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Insights into cardiac involvement in ankylosing spondylitis from cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroek, P Stefan; Heslinga, Sjoerd C; Konings, Thelma C; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Hofman, Mark B M; van de Ven, Peter M; Kamp, Otto; van Halm, Vokko P; Peters, Mike J L; Smulders, Yvo M; van Rossum, Albert C; Nurmohamed, Mike T; Nijveldt, Robin

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate cardiac involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Patients with ankylosing spondylitis without cardiovascular symptoms or known cardiovascular disease were screened by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for participation in this exploratory CMR study. We prospectively enrolled 15 ankylosing spondylitis patients with an abnormal TTE for further tissue characterisation using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and T1 mapping. T1 mapping was used to calculate myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). Disease activity was assessed by C reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) measurements. In the total of 15 included patients, 14 had a complete CMR exam (mean age 62 years, 93% male and mean disease duration 21 years). Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction was the most common finding on TTE (79%), followed by aortic root dilatation (14%), right ventricular (RV) dilatation (7%) and RV dysfunction (7%). CMR revealed focal hyperenhancement in three patients (21%), all with a particular pattern of enhancement. LV dysfunction, as defined by a LV ejection fraction below 55%, was observed in five patients (36%). Myocardial ECV was correlated with the CRP concentration (R=0.78, pankylosing spondylitis, CMR with cine imaging and LGE identified global LV dysfunction and focal areas of hyperenhancement. Myocardial ECV, quantified by CMR T1 mapping, was associated with the degree of disease activity. These results may suggest the presence of cardiac involvement in ankylosing spondylitis and may show the potential of ECV as a marker for disease monitoring. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Identifying drug-induced repolarization abnormalities from distinct ECG patterns in congenital long QT syndrome: a study of sotalol effects on T-wave morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Andersen, Mads P; Xue, Joel Q

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal repolariz......BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal...... are typical ECG patterns in LQT2. Blinded to labels, the new morphology measures were tested in a third group of 39 healthy subjects receiving sotalol. Over 3 days the sotalol group received 0, 160 and 320 mg doses, respectively, and a 12-lead Holter ECG was recorded for 22.5 hours each day. Drug...... with QTcF, p ECG patterns in LQT2 carriers effectively quantified repolarization changes induced by sotalol. Further studies are needed to validate whether this measure has...

  19. ECG-Based Measurements of Drug-induced Repolarization Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the abnormal repolarization both in the cellular and the surface ECG along with their relationship. It has been identified that the certain morphological changes of the monophasic action potential are predictor of TdP arrhythmia. Therefore the proporti......The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the abnormal repolarization both in the cellular and the surface ECG along with their relationship. It has been identified that the certain morphological changes of the monophasic action potential are predictor of TdP arrhythmia. Therefore...... the proportional changes of the surface ECG which corresponds to the arrhythmia-triggering MAP morphology is warranted to increase the confidence of determining cardiotoxicity of drugs....

  20. Delayed Repolarization Underlies Ventricular Arrhythmias in Rats With Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Hyung; Zhang, Rui; Kilfoil, Peter J; Gallet, Romain; de Couto, Geoffrey; Bresee, Catherine; Goldhaber, Joshua I; Marbán, Eduardo; Cingolani, Eugenio

    2017-11-21

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) represents approximately half of heart failure, and its incidence continues to increase. The leading cause of mortality in HFpEF is sudden death, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed a high-salt diet (8% NaCl) from 7 weeks of age to induce HFpEF (n=38). Rats fed a normal-salt diet (0.3% NaCl) served as controls (n=13). Echocardiograms were performed to assess systolic and diastolic function from 14 weeks of age. HFpEF-verified and control rats underwent programmed electrical stimulation. Corrected QT interval was measured by surface ECG. The mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias (VA) were probed by optical mapping, whole-cell patch clamp to measure action potential duration and ionic currents, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting to investigate changes in ion channel expression. After 7 weeks of a high-salt diet, 31 of 38 rats showed diastolic dysfunction and preserved ejection fraction along with signs of heart failure and hence were diagnosed with HFpEF. Programmed electric stimulation demonstrated increased susceptibility to VA in HFpEF rats ( P hearts demonstrated prolonged action potentials ( P hearts. Susceptibility to VA was markedly increased in rats with HFpEF. Underlying abnormalities include QT prolongation, delayed repolarization from downregulation of potassium currents, and multiple reentry circuits during VA. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that potassium current downregulation leads to abnormal repolarization in HFpEF, which in turn predisposes to VA and sudden cardiac death. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Non-responders to cardiac resynchronization therapy: Insights from multimodality imaging and electrocardiography. A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carità, Patrizia; Corrado, Egle; Pontone, Gianluca; Curnis, Antonio; Bontempi, Luca; Novo, Giuseppina; Guglielmo, Marco; Ciaramitaro, Gianfranco; Assennato, Pasquale; Novo, Salvatore; Coppola, Giuseppe

    2016-12-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a successful strategy for heart failure (HF) patients. The pre-requisite for the response is the evidence of electrical dyssynchrony on the surface electrocardiogram usually as left bundle branch block (LBBB). Non-response to CRT is a significant problem in clinical practice. Patient selection, inadequate delivery and sub-optimal left ventricle lead position may be important causes. In an effort to improve CRT response multimodality imaging (especially echocardiography, computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) could play a decisive role and extensive literature has been published on the matter. However, we are so far from routinary use in clinical practice. Electrocardiography (with respect to left ventricle capture and QRS narrowing) may represent a simple and low cost approach for early prediction of potential non-responder, with immediate practical implications. This brief review covers the current recommendations for CRT in HF patients with particular attention to the potential benefits of multimodality imaging and electrocardiography in improving response rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent Advances on Pathophysiology, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Insights in Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Antineoplastic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilisa Molinaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the improvement of survival after cancer, cardiotoxicity due to antineoplastic treatments has emerged as a clinically relevant problem. Potential cardiovascular toxicities due to anticancer agents include QT prolongation and arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia and infarction, hypertension and/or thromboembolism, left ventricular (LV dysfunction, and heart failure (HF. The latter is variable in severity, may be reversible or irreversible, and can occur soon after or as a delayed consequence of anticancer treatments. In the last decade recent advances have emerged in clinical and pathophysiological aspects of LV dysfunction induced by the most widely used anticancer drugs. In particular, early, sensitive markers of cardiac dysfunction that can predict this form of cardiomyopathy before ejection fraction (EF is reduced are becoming increasingly important, along with novel therapeutic and cardioprotective strategies, in the attempt of protecting cardiooncologic patients from the development of congestive heart failure.

  3. Ventricular Repolarization Evaluation From Surface ECG for Identification of the Patients With Increased Myocardial Electrical Instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lass, Jaanus

    2001-01-01

    In order to reveal the possible correlation between the level of myocardial electrical instability assessed at Holter monitoring and certain ECG parameters characterizing ventricular repolarization...

  4. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cros, C.; Skinner, M.; Moors, J.; Lainee, P.; Valentin, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I Na ) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I Na , this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E max 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two out of three

  5. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, C., E-mail: caroline.cros@hotmail.co.uk [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Skinner, M., E-mail: Matthew.Skinner@astrazeneca.com [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Moors, J. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Lainee, P. [Sanofi-Aventis R and D, 371, rue du Pr Joseph Blayac, 34184 Montpellier Cedex 04 (France); Valentin, J.P. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two

  6. Cardiac safety of citalopram: prospective trials and retrospective analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Poul Lind; Overø, K F; Tanghøj, P

    1999-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are believed to have a more benign cardiovascular safety profile than do the tricyclic antidepressants. The effects of the SSRI citalopram on cardiac conduction and repolarization have been extensively evaluated, both in prospective studies...... variability of the QTc interval, as well as possible changes during treatment with placebo or citalopram, and its correlation to plasma drug levels. To document any dose-related changes, ECGs were performed at baseline and at the end of study in three randomized, double-blind, placebo- or active...... no effect on cardiac conduction and repolarization during short- or long-term treatment....

  7. Molecular motions that shape the cardiac action potential: Insights from voltage clamp fluorometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wandi; Varga, Zoltan; Silva, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Very recently, voltage-clamp fluorometry (VCF) protocols have been developed to observe the membrane proteins responsible for carrying the ventricular ionic currents that form the action potential (AP), including those carried by the cardiac Na(+) channel, NaV1.5, the L-type Ca(2+) channel, CaV1.2, the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and the rapid and slow components of the delayed rectifier, KV11.1 and KV7.1. This development is significant, because VCF enables simultaneous observation of ionic current kinetics with conformational changes occurring within specific channel domains. The ability gained from VCF, to connect nanoscale molecular movement to ion channel function has revealed how the voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) control ion flux through channel pores, mechanisms of post-translational regulation and the molecular pathology of inherited mutations. In the future, we expect that this data will be of great use for the creation of multi-scale computational AP models that explicitly represent ion channel conformations, connecting molecular, cell and tissue electrophysiology. Here, we review the VCF protocol, recent results, and discuss potential future developments, including potential use of these experimental findings to create novel computational models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulatory role of regucalcin in heart calcium signaling: Insight into cardiac failure (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Regucalcin was first identified in 1978 as a regulatory protein of Ca 2+ signaling in liver cells. Regucalcin was shown to play a multifunctional role in cell regulation, such as maintainance of intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis and suppression of signal transduction, protein synthesis, nuclear function, cell proliferation and apoptosis in various types of cells and tissues. Cardiac excitation-contraction coupling is based on the regulation of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration by the Ca 2+ pump in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of heart muscle cells. Regucalcin, which is expressed in the heart, was found to increase rat heart sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase activity and ATP-dependent Ca 2+ uptake and mitochondrial Ca 2+ -ATPase activity. Regucalcin was also shown to suppress Ca 2+ -dependent protein tyrosine phosphatase, Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase (calcineurin) and nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity in the heart cytoplasm. Moreover, regucalcin was found to activate superoxide dismutase (SOD), which plays a significant role in the prevention of cell death and apoptosis in the heart. Regucalcin may be a key molecule in heart muscle cell regulation through Ca 2+ signaling. Regucalcin may also play a pathophysiological role in heart failure. The aim of this study was to review the recent findings regarding the role of regucalcin in Ca 2+ signaling in the heart.

  9. Analysis of 24-h Rhythm in Ventricular Repolarization Identifies QT Diurnality As a Novel Clinical Parameter Associated with Previous Ventricular Arrhythmias in Heart Failure Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan C. Du Pre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac repolarization abnormalities are among the major causes of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. In humans, cardiac repolarization duration has a 24-h rhythm. Animal studies show that this rhythm is regulated by 24-h rhythms in ion channel function and that disruption of this rhythm leads to ventricular arrhythmias. We hypothesized that 24-h rhythms in QT duration can be used as a predictor for sudden cardiac death and are associated with ventricular arrhythmias. Secondly, we assessed a possible mechanistic explanation by studying the putative role of hERG channel dysfunction.Materials and Methods: In 2 retrospective studies, measures of the 24-h variation in the QT and QTc intervals (QT and QTc diurnality, QTd and QTcd, respectively have been derived from Holter analyses and compared between groups: 1 39 post-infarct patients with systolic heart failure (CHF: EF < 35%, of which 14 with, and 25 without a history of ventricular arrhythmias and 2 five patients with proven (LQTS2 and 16 with potential (Sotalol-induced hERG channel dysfunction vs. 22 controls.Results: QTd was two-fold higher in CHF patients with a history of ventricular arrhythmias (38 ± 15 ms compared to CHF patients without VT (16 ± 9 ms, p = 0.001. QTd was significantly increased in LQT2 patients (43 ± 24 ms or those treated with Sotalol (30 ± 10 ms compared to controls (21 ± 8 ms, p < 0.05 for both.Discussion: QT diurnality presents a novel clinical parameter of repolarization that can be derived from Holter registrations and may be useful for identification of patients at risk for ventricular arrhythmias.

  10. Identification of genetic markers for treatment success in heart failure patients: insight from cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Boris; De Maria, Renata; Gatsios, Dimitris; Chrysanthakopoulou, Theodora; Landolina, Maurizio; Gasparini, Maurizio; Campolo, Jonica; Parolini, Marina; Sanzo, Antonio; Galimberti, Paola; Bianchi, Michele; Lenders, Malte; Brand, Eva; Parodi, Oberdan; Lunati, Maurizio; Brand, Stefan-Martin

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can improve ventricular size, shape, and mass and reduce mitral regurgitation by reverse remodeling of the failing ventricle. About 30% of patients do not respond to this therapy for unknown reasons. In this study, we aimed at the identification and classification of CRT responder by the use of genetic variants and clinical parameters. Of 1421 CRT patients, 207 subjects were consecutively selected, and CRT responder and nonresponder were matched for their baseline parameters before CRT. Treatment success of CRT was defined as a decrease in left ventricular end-systolic volume >15% at follow-up echocardiography compared with left ventricular end-systolic volume at baseline. All other changes classified the patient as CRT nonresponder. A genetic association study was performed, which identified 4 genetic variants to be associated with the CRT responder phenotype at the allelic (P<0.035) and genotypic (P<0.031) level: rs3766031 (ATPIB1), rs5443 (GNB3), rs5522 (NR3C2), and rs7325635 (TNFSF11). Machine learning algorithms were used for the classification of CRT patients into responder and nonresponder status, including combinations of the identified genetic variants and clinical parameters. We demonstrated that rule induction algorithms can successfully be applied for the classification of heart failure patients in CRT responder and nonresponder status using clinical and genetic parameters. Our analysis included information on alleles and genotypes of 4 genetic loci, rs3766031 (ATPIB1), rs5443 (GNB3), rs5522 (NR3C2), and rs7325635 (TNFSF11), pathophysiologically associated with remodeling of the failing ventricle. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Analysis of Ion Currents Contribution to Repolarization in Human Heart Failure Using Computer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marotta, F.; Paci, M.A.; Severi, S.; Trenor, B.

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying repolarization of the ventricular action potential (AP) are subject of research for anti-arrhythmic drugs. In fact, the prolongation of the AP occurs in several conditions of heart disease, such as heart failure, a major problem precursor for serious arrhythmias. In this study, we investigated the phenomena of repolarization reserve, defined as the capacity of the cell to repolarize in case of a functional loss, and the all-or-none repolarization, which depends on the delicate balance of inward and outward currents in the different phases of the AP, under conditions of human heart failure (HF). To simulate HF conditions, the O'Hara et al. human AP model was modified and specific protocols for all-or-none repolarization were applied. Our results show that in the early repolarization the threshold for all-or-none repolarization is not altered in HF even if a decrease in potassium currents can be observed. To quantify the contribution of the individual ion currents to HF induced AP prolongation, we used a novel piecewise-linear approximation approach proposed by Paci et al. In particular, INaL and ICaL are the main responsible for APD prolongation due to HF (85 and 35 ms respectively). Our results highlight this novel algorithm as a powerful tool to have a more complete picture of the complex ionic mechanisms underlying this disease and confirm the important role of the late sodium current in HF repolarization. (Author)

  12. Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Priya; Wei, Annan; Welter, Elisabeth; Bamps, Yvan; Stoll, Shelley; Bukach, Ashley; Sajatovic, Martha; Sahoo, Satya S

    2015-11-01

    Insight is a Semantic Web technology-based platform to support large-scale secondary analysis of healthcare data for neurology clinical research. Insight features the novel use of: (1) provenance metadata, which describes the history or origin of patient data, in clinical research analysis, and (2) support for patient cohort queries across multiple institutions conducting research in epilepsy, which is the one of the most common neurological disorders affecting 50 million persons worldwide. Insight is being developed as a healthcare informatics infrastructure to support a national network of eight epilepsy research centers across the U.S. funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This paper describes the use of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) PROV recommendation for provenance metadata that allows researchers to create patient cohorts based on the provenance of the research studies. In addition, the paper describes the use of descriptive logic-based OWL2 epilepsy ontology for cohort queries with "expansion of query expression" using ontology reasoning. Finally, the evaluation results for the data integration and query performance are described using data from three research studies with 180 epilepsy patients. The experiment results demonstrate that Insight is a scalable approach to use Semantic provenance metadata for context-based data analysis in healthcare informatics.

  13. Overexpression of M3 Muscarinic Receptor Suppressed Adverse Electrical Remodeling in Hypertrophic Myocardium Via Increasing Repolarizing K+ Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiac hypertrophy (CH is an adaptive response to diverse cardiovascular conditions, which is accompanied by adverse electrical remodeling manifested as abnormal K+ channel activities. M3 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR is a novel regulator of cardiac electrical activity. In this study we aim to explore if the overexpression of M3-mAChR could attenuate the adverse electrical remodeling in CH and then uncover its underlying electrophysiological mechanisms. Methods: Transgenic mice with M3-mAChR overexpression (M3-TG and wild type (WT mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC to induce CH. Myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac function were quantified by the measurement of echocardiography, electrocardiogram, heart weight and tibia length. Whole-cell and signal-cell patch-clamp were employed to record electrophysiological properties by acute isolation of acutely isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes and Western blot was carried out to evaluate the Kir2.1and Kv4.2/4.3 protein levels in left ventricular tissue. Results: Compared with WT group, the elevation of cardiac index, including heart weight/body weight index and heart weight/tibia length index confirmed the myocardial hypertrophic growth induced by TAC. Echocardiography detection revealed that the TAC-treated mice showed an obvious increase in the thickness of left ventricular posterior wall (LVPW and ejection fraction (EF due to compensatory hypertrophy, which attenuated by the overexpression of M3-mAChR. Pressure overload induced a prolongation of QTc interval in WT mice, an effect blunted in M3-TG mice. Furthermore, compared with WT mice, M3-mAChR overexpression in hypertrophic myocardium accelerated cardiac repolarization and shortened action potential duration, and thus correcting the prolongation of QTc interval. Moreover, M3-TG mice have the greater current density of IK1 and Ito in ventricular myocytes after TAC compared with WT

  14. Repolarization Parameters Are Associated With Mortality In Chagas Disease Patients In The United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bradfield, MD

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: CD patients with CM and BBB or BBB alone have increased evidence of dispersion of repolarization compared to controls. QTd and (Tp-Ted were associated with increased mortality and/or need for transplant.

  15. Similar arrhythmicity in hypertrophic and fibrotic cardiac cultures caused by distinct substrate-specific mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Saïd F A; Bingen, Brian O; Schalij, Martin J; Swildens, Jim; Atsma, Douwe E; Schutte, Cindy I; de Vries, Antoine A F; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Ypey, Dirk L; Pijnappels, Daniël A

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are associated with potentially lethal arrhythmias. As these substrates often occur simultaneously in one patient, distinguishing between pro-arrhythmic mechanisms is difficult. This hampers understanding of underlying pro-arrhythmic mechanisms and optimal treatment. This study investigates and compares arrhythmogeneity and underlying pro-arrhythmic mechanisms of either cardiac hypertrophy or fibrosis in in vitro models. Fibrosis was mimicked by free myofibroblast (MFB) proliferation in neonatal rat ventricular monolayers. Cultures with inhibited MFB proliferation were used as control or exposed to phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy. At Day 9, cultures were studied with patch-clamp and optical-mapping techniques and assessed for protein expression. In hypertrophic (n = 111) and fibrotic cultures (n = 107), conduction and repolarization were slowed. Triggered activity was commonly found in these substrates and led to high incidences of spontaneous re-entrant arrhythmias [67.5% hypertrophic, 78.5% fibrotic vs. 2.9% in controls (n = 102)] or focal arrhythmias (39.1, 51.7 vs. 8.8%, respectively). Kv4.3 and Cx43 protein expression levels were decreased in hypertrophy but unaffected in fibrosis. Depolarization of cardiomyocytes (CMCs) was only found in fibrotic cultures (-48 ± 7 vs. -66 ± 7 mV in control, P arrhythmias in hypertrophy, but caused conduction block in fibrosis. Targeting heterocellular coupling by low doses of gap-junction uncouplers prevented arrhythmias by accelerating repolarization only in fibrotic cultures. Cultured hypertrophic or fibrotic myocardial tissues generated similar focal and re-entrant arrhythmias. These models revealed electrical remodelling of CMCs as a pro-arrhythmic mechanism of hypertrophy and MFB-induced depolarization of CMCs as a pro-arrhythmic mechanism of fibrosis. These findings provide novel mechanistic insight into substrate-specific arrhythmicity.

  16. Effects of Atorvastatin on Ventricular Late Potentials and Repolarization Dispersion in Patients with Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Sheng Chu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that statins have a favorable impact on the reduction of arrhythmia events and sudden cardiac death in patients with structural heart disease. We aimed to investigate the possibly and directly favorable effects of statins on ventricular late potentials, QT dispersion, and transmural dispersion of repolarization attained by analyzing clinical electrocardiography (ECG risk stratification parameters in patients with hypercholesterolemia without structural heart disease. In total, 82 patients (45 females; mean age, 62 ± 10 years with hypercholesterolemia were enrolled in this prospective study to examine the effects of statin therapy (atorvastatin 10mg/day for 3 months on ECG risk stratification parameters. Surface 12-lead ECG and signal-average ECG (SAECG were recorded before and after statin treatment. The SAECG parameters, QT dispersion, Bazett-corrected QT (QTc dispersion, T wave peak-to-end interval (Tpe, and percentage of Tpe/QT interval were calculated and compared before and after statin therapy. Twelve-lead ambulatory 24-hour ECGs were recorded in 12 patients. The results demonstrated that after statin therapy for 3 months, serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly reduced (both p values < 0.001. However, neither significant changes of each SAECG parameter nor the frequency of late potentials were demonstrated after atorvastatin therapy. In addition, no significant changes in QT dispersion, QTc dispersion, Tpe, or Tpe/QT were found. However, 24-hour ambulatory ECG revealed a flattening effect of circadian variation of QTc dispersion after atorvastatin therapy. In conclusion, the favorable antiarrhythmia effect of atorvastatin (10 mg/day therapy cannot be directly reflected by analyzing these noninvasive ECG risk stratification parameters in low-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia.

  17. Hybrid cardiac imaging: Insights in the dilemma of the appropriate clinical management of patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukouraki, S.; Pagonidis, K.; Perisinakis, K.; Klinaki, I.; Stathaki, M.; Damilakis, J.; Karantanas, A.; Karkavitsas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the potential of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI)–computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) hybrid fusion imaging to improve the diagnostic performance of cardiac SPECT/MPI and CTCA alone in order to act as more accurate gate keeper to further investigation invasive or not. Methods and results: Twenty-five patients were subjected to SPECT/MPI and CTCA within a period of 1 month without any medical treatment modification. A fusion software package was used for cardiac SPECT–CTCA image fusion. Semiquantitative analysis was performed for cardiac SPECT, CTCA and SPECT/MPI–CTCA fusion images. Patients were classified in 2 groups according to the clinical decision for further investigation (group A), or not (group B). Statistically significant differences were observed when SPECT/MPI–CTCA fusion images were used instead of cardiac SPECT alone (p < 0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed comparing CTCA alone to SPECT/MPI–CTCA fusion images (p = 0.25). A mid-term follow-up (mean 3.58 ± 0.24 years) showed that all patients classified in group A based on the interpretation of SPECT MPI–CTCA fused images underwent conventional coronary angiography with further necessity for PTCA or CABG whereas absence of major or minor cardiac events was revealed for all patients of group B. Conclusion: In patients suspected for coronary artery disease, cardiac SPECT/MPI–CTCA fusion imaging was found to considerably alter the clinical decision for referral to further investigation derived from SPECT/MPI

  18. Short-term variability of repolarization is superior to other repolarization parameters in the evaluation of diverse antiarrhythmic interventions in the chronic atrioventricular block dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossu, Alexandre; Varkevisser, Rosanne; Beekman, Henriette D.M.; Houtman, Marien J C; Van Der Heyden, Marcel A.G.; Vos, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Short-term variability (STV), to quantify beat-to-beat variability of repolarization, is a surrogate parameter that reliably identifies proarrhythmic risk in preclinical models. Examples include not only the use in the chronic atrioventricular block (CAVB) dog model whereby it was developed but also

  19. Increased short-term variability of repolarization predicts d-sotalol-induced torsades de pointes in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Verduyn, S Cora; Stengl, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk for drug-induced torsades de pointes arrhythmia (TdP) is difficult. Increased temporal lability of repolarization has been suggested as being valuable to predict proarrhythmia. The predictive value of different repolarization parameters, including beat-to-beat v......Identification of patients at risk for drug-induced torsades de pointes arrhythmia (TdP) is difficult. Increased temporal lability of repolarization has been suggested as being valuable to predict proarrhythmia. The predictive value of different repolarization parameters, including beat...

  20. The role of insulin-like growth factor during a postischemic period - new insights into pathophysiologic pathways in cardiac tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, Meindert; Twickler, Marcel T.; Daemen, Mat J.; Cramer, Maarten Jan; Doevendans, Pieter A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite an improvement in the therapeutic strategies available for an acute ischemic event, cardiac disease is still the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. A shift from acute towards more chronic heart disease due to atherosclerotic disease has been recognized.

  1. QTc interval in the assessment of cardiac risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Hanne; Brendorp, Bente; Køber, Lars

    2002-01-01

    In the United States alone 300,000-400,000 people die of sudden cardiac death every year. Much of this mortality is assumed to be caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Prolonged QTc reflect cardiac repolarization prolongation and/or increased repolarization inhomogenity known to be associated...... with increased risk of arrhythmias. The paper gives a review of the possibilities to assess the risk of ventricular arrhythmia and/or cardiac death from QTc. Prolonged QTc may hold independent prognostic importance for mortality in common diseases as ischemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus where...... importance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or in the arrhythmogenic right ventricular disease. The degree of QTc prolonging during treatment with QTc prolonging drugs is prognostic for the risk of ventricular arrhythmia in form of torsade de pointes and QTc prolonging drugs should probably not be prescribed...

  2. Cardiac involvement in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy: new diagnostic and pathophysiological insights by a CMR approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiene Gaetano

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Becker-Kiener muscular dystrophy (BMD represents an X-linked genetic disease associated with myocardial involvement potentially resulting in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Early diagnosis of cardiac involvement may permit earlier institution of heart failure treatment and extend life span in these patients. Both echocardiography and nuclear imaging methods are capable of detecting later stages of cardiac involvement characterised by wall motion abnormalities. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has the potential to detect cardiac involvement by depicting early scar formation that may appear before onset of wall motion abnormalities. Methods In a prospective two-center-study, 15 male patients with BMD (median age 37 years; range 11 years to 56 years underwent comprehensive neurological and cardiac evaluations including physical examination, echocardiography and CMR. A 16-segment model was applied for evaluation of regional wall motion abnormalities (rWMA. The CMR study included late gadolinium enhancement (LGE imaging with quantification of myocardial damage. Results Abnormal echocardiographic results were found in eight of 15 (53.3% patients with all of them demonstrating reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and rWMA. CMR revealed abnormal findings in 12 of 15 (80.0% patients (p = 0.04 with 10 (66.6% having reduced LVEF (p = 0.16 and 9 (64.3% demonstrating rWMA (p = 0.38. Myocardial damage as assessed by LGE-imaging was detected in 11 of 15 (73.3% patients with a median myocardial damage extent of 13.0% (range 0 to 38.0%, an age-related increase and a typical subepicardial distribution pattern in the inferolateral wall. Ten patients (66.7% were in need of medical heart failure therapy based on CMR results. However, only 4 patients (26.7% were already taking medication based on clinical criteria (p = 0.009. Conclusion Cardiac involvement in patients with BMD is underdiagnosed by echocardiographic methods resulting

  3. Why did high-dose rosuvastatin not improve cardiac remodeling in chronic heart failure? Mechanistic insights from the UNIVERSE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Emma; Windebank, Emma; Skiba, Marina; Reid, Christopher; Schneider, Hans; Rosenfeldt, Franklin; Tonkin, Andrew; Krum, Henry

    2011-02-03

    Statins are often prescribed for prevention of atherosclerotic outcomes in patients who have chronic heart failure (CHF), if this has an ischaemic etiology. These agents may also possess additional properties, independent of effects on blood lipid levels, which may have an effect on cardiac remodeling. However, beneficial effects were not observed in the recent UNIVERSE trial. We prospectively planned a sub-study of UNIVERSE to explore relevant mechanistic effects of rosuvastatin, including effects on collagen turnover and plasma coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) levels. Additionally, CoQ levels in CHF patients receiving chronic statin therapy were measured. CoQ levels were significantly reduced after 26 weeks of rosuvastatin statin therapy (n = 32), compared to placebo (n = 37) in CHF patients in UNIVERSE trial. Patients with CHF (n = 56) matched for age, gender and severity of disease who had been taking statins for 12 months or longer had CoQ levels of 847 ± 344 nmol/L, significantly lower than 1065.4 ± 394 nmol/L in UNIVERSE patients at baseline (p = 0.0001). Serum types I and III N-terminal procollagen peptide (PINP and PIIINP), measures of collagen turnover which can contribute to cardiac fibrosis were significantly increased in the rosuvastatin group compared to baseline in UNIVERSE patients (PINP: p = 0.03, PIIINP: p = 0.001). In conclusion putative beneficial effects of statin therapy on cardiac remodeling in UNIVERSE may have been negated by increases in collagen turnover markers as well as a reduction in plasma CoQ levels in these patients with CHF. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Whole transcriptome analysis of the fasting and fed Burmese python heart: insights into extreme physiological cardiac adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Christopher E; Cozza, Steven; Riquelme, Cecilia A; McCombie, W Richard; Heimiller, Joseph K; Marr, Thomas G; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    The infrequently feeding Burmese python (Python molurus) experiences significant and rapid postprandial cardiac hypertrophy followed by regression as digestion is completed. To begin to explore the molecular mechanisms of this response, we have sequenced and assembled the fasted and postfed Burmese python heart transcriptomes with Illumina technology using the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome as a reference. In addition, we have used RNA-seq analysis to identify differences in the expression of biological processes and signaling pathways between fasted, 1 day postfed (DPF), and 3 DPF hearts. Out of a combined transcriptome of ∼2,800 mRNAs, 464 genes were differentially expressed. Genes showing differential expression at 1 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for biological processes involved in metabolism and energetics, while genes showing differential expression at 3 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for processes involved in biogenesis, structural remodeling, and organization. Moreover, we present evidence for the activation of physiological and not pathological signaling pathways in this rapid, novel model of cardiac growth in pythons. Together, our data provide the first comprehensive gene expression profile for a reptile heart.

  5. Identifying drug-induced repolarization abnormalities from distinct ECG patterns in congenital long QT syndrome: a study of sotalol effects on T-wave morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Andersen, Mads P; Xue, Joel Q

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal......-induced prolongation of the heart rate corrected QT interval (QTcF) was compared with changes in the computerized measure for T-wave morphology. Effect sizes for QTcF and MCS were calculated at the time of maximum plasma concentrations and for maximum change from baseline. Accuracy for separating baseline from sotalol......% and for the 320 mg dose: (AUC) 94% versus 87%, p effect sizes for QTcF were less than half the effect sizes for MCS, p Effect sizes at peak changes of the mean were up to 3-fold higher for MCS compared...

  6. Cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent: insights from repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers and the modified Oxford method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, Helen M; Peebles, Karen C; Galletly, Duncan C; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac baroreflex gain is usually quantified as the reflex alteration in heart rate during changes in blood pressure without considering the effect of the rate of change in blood pressure on the estimated gain. This study sought to (i) characterize baroreflex gain as a function of blood pressure oscillation frequencies using a repeat sit-to-stand method and (ii) compare baroreflex gain values obtained using the sit-to-stand method against the modified Oxford method. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent the repeated sit-to-stand method in which blood pressure oscillations were driven at 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, and 0.1 Hz. Sixteen healthy participants underwent the sit-to-stand and modified Oxford methods to examine their agreement. Sit-to-stand baroreflex gain was highest at 0.05 Hz (8.8 ± 3.2 ms·mm Hg(-1)) and lowest at 0.1 Hz (5.8 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg(-1)). Baroreflex gains at 0.03 Hz (7.7 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg(-1)) and 0.07 Hz (7.5 ± 3.3 ms·mm Hg(-1)) were not different from the baroreflex gain at 0.05 Hz. There was moderate correlation between phenylephrine gain and sit-to-stand gain (r values ranged from 0.52 to 0.75; all frequencies, p baroreflex gains derived from these 2 methods cannot be used interchangeably. Furthermore, cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent between 0.03 Hz and 0.1 Hz, which challenges the conventional practice of summarizing baroreflex gain as a single number.

  7. An activation-repolarization time metric to predict localized regions of high susceptibility to reentry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Child, Nicholas; Bishop, Martin J.; Hanson, Ben; Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Boukens, Bastiaan J.; Walton, Richard D.; Efimov, Igor R.; Bostock, Julian; Hill, Yolanda; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of reentrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) involves complex interactions between front and tail of the activation wave. Recent experimental work has identified the time interval between S2 repolarization proximal to a line of functional block and S2 activation at the adjacent distal side

  8. The T-peak–T-end Interval as a Marker of Repolarization Abnormality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer A.; Graff, Claus; Kanters, Jørgen K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The T-peak to T-end (TpTe) interval has been suggested as an index of transmural dispersion and as a marker of drug-induced abnormal repolarization. In this study, we investigate the relation between TpTe and the QT interval. METHODS: Electrocardiograms (ECGs) from five...

  9. Six-Year Outcome of Subjects Without Overt Heart Disease With an Early Repolarization/J Wave Electrocardiographic Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Gaetano Antonio; Argirò, Alessia; Mollo, Roberto; De Vita, Antonio; Spera, Francesco; Golino, Michele; Rota, Elisabetta; Filice, Monica; Crea, Filippo

    2017-12-01

    "Early repolarization" (ER) is a frequent finding at standard electrocardiogram (ECG). In this study we assessed whether ER is associated with an increased risk of events, as recently suggested by some studies. We prospectively enrolled 4,176 consecutive subjects without any heart disease who underwent routine ECG recording. ER was diagnosed in case of typical concave ST-segment elevation ≥0.1 mV; a J wave was diagnosed when the QRS showed a notch or a slur in its terminal part. In this study we compared the 6-year outcome of all 687 subjects with ER/J wave and 687 matched subjects without ER/J wave (controls). Both groups included 335 males and 352 females, and age was 48.8 ± 18 years. Overall, 145 deaths occurred (11%), only 11 of which attributed to cardiac causes. No sudden death was reported. Cardiac deaths occurred in 5 (0.8%) and 6 (0.9%) ER/J wave subjects and controls, respectively (odds ratio [OR] 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.26 to 2.80, p = 0.79). Both ER (OR 1.68, 95% CI 0.21 to 13.3, p = 0.62) and J wave (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.28 to 3.00, p = 0.88) showed no association with cardiac death. Total mortality was 11.5% in the ER/J wave group and 10.6% in the control group (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.56, p = 0.58). Both ER (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.16 to 1.24, p = 0.12) and J wave (OR 1.20, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.70, p = 0.30) showed also no association with all-cause death. In subjects without any evidence of heart disease, we found no significant association of ER/J wave with the risk of cardiac, as well as all-cause, death at medium-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Uncomplicated type 1 diabetes and preclinical left ventricular myocardial dysfunction: insights from echocardiography and exercise cardiac performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Vittorio; Capaldo, Brunella; Russo, Cesare; Iaccarino, Michele; Pezzullo, Salvatore; Quintavalle, Gabriele; Di Minno, Giovanni; Riccardi, Gabriele; Celentano, Aldo

    2008-02-01

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is considered the earliest manifestation of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Whether LV abnormalities identified at rest by echocardiography predict peak exercise LV performance in uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) is largely unknown. We evaluated LV size, mass, and functions and peak exercise LV performance in 25 subjects with uncomplicated DM1 (median disease duration 13.5 years, 1-30 years) and in 56 non-DM subjects (24 hypertensive (HT) and 32 normotensive (NT)). Overt coronary heart disease, significant microangiopathy and central autonomic neuropathy were minimized by exclusion criteria. Peak exercise LV stroke index (SVi), cardiac index (COi), LV ejection fraction (EF), LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were assessed noninvasively. No subject was on cardiovascular medications at the time of evaluation. In our study, DM1 did not show LV hypertrophy or impaired LV systolic function at rest. Prevalence of diastolic dysfunction was 8% among DM1, 18% among NT and 50% among HT. Pre-exercise heart rate, SVi, COi, and peak exercise blood pressure (BP) and heart rate were comparable among the three groups, but peak exercise LV EF, SVi and COi were lower in DM1 than in HT and NT independent to covariates (p<0.05). In separate analyses, DM1 predicted lower peak exercise SVi (B=-6.2) and COi (B=-1.6, both p<0.05) independently. Within DM1, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and disease duration did not predict peak exercise LV systolic function. Our study suggests that uncomplicated DM1 may be associated with subnormal LV contractility reserve, which might not be predicted by LV dysfunction evaluated at rest.

  11. An Autonomic Link Between Inhaled Diesel Exhaust and Impaired Cardiac Performance: Insight From Treadmill and Doubutamine Challenges in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Short-term exposure to vehicular emissions is associated with adverse cardiac events. Diesel exhaust (DE) is an ubiquitous air pollutant believed to provoke cardiac events partly through imbalance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervo...

  12. [Contribution of cardiac MRI in the etiologic diagnosis of chest pain syndrome with a normal angiographic aspect of the coronary arteries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurent, G; Langella, B; Boulmier, D; Larralde, A; Donal, E; Bedossa, M; Le Breton, H

    2008-04-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of chest pain with elevation of specific cardiac enzymes, repolarization abnormalities and a normal angiographic aspect of the coronary arteries is difficult. In this situation, the role of cardiac MRI is growing, frequently allowing to precise the etiology of the chest pain. We present a literature review concerning the semiology of the cardiac MRI in the three main involved etiologies: myocarditis, takotsubo syndrome, and myocardial ischemia with a normal angiographic aspect of the coronary arteries.

  13. Cyanide poisoning and cardiac disorders: 161 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jean-Luc; Desmettre, Thibault; Manzon, Cyril; Judic-Peureux, Virginie; Peugeot-Mortier, Caroline; Giocanti, Jean-Pascal; Hachelaf, Mohamed; Grangeon, Marie; Hostalek, Ulrike; Crouzet, Julien; Capellier, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    Inhalation of hydrogen cyanide from smoke in structural fires is common, but cardiovascular function in these patients is poorly documented. The objective was to study the cardiac complications of cyanide poisoning in patients who received early administration of a cyanide antidote, hydroxocobalamin (Cyanokit; Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany [in the United States, marketed by Meridian Medical Technologies, Bristol, TN]). The medical records of 161 fire survivors with suspected or confirmed cyanide poisoning were reviewed in an open, multicenter, retrospective review of cases from the Emergency Medical Assistance Unit (Service d'Aide Médical d'Urgence) in France. Cardiac arrest (61/161, 58 asystole, 3 ventricular fibrillation), cardiac rhythm disorders (57/161, 56 supraventricular tachycardia), repolarization disorders (12/161), and intracardiac conduction disorders (5/161) were observed. Of the total 161 patients studied, 26 displayed no cardiac disorder. All patients were given an initial dose of 5 g of hydroxocobalamin. Non-responders received a second dose of 5 g of hydroxocobalamin. Of the patients initially in cardiac arrest, 30 died at the scene, 24 died in hospital, and 5 survived without cardiovascular sequelae. Cardiac disorders improved with increasing doses of hydroxocobalamin, and higher doses of the antidote seem to be associated with a superior outcome in patients with initial cardiac arrest. Cardiac complications are common in cyanide poisoning in fire survivors. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An activation-repolarization time metric to predict localized regions of high susceptibility to reentry

    OpenAIRE

    Child, Nicholas; Bishop, Martin J.; Hanson, Ben; Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Boukens, Bastiaan J.; Walton, Richard D.; Efimov, Igor R.; Bostock, Julian; Hill, Yolanda; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundInitiation of reentrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) involves complex interactions between front and tail of the activation wave. Recent experimental work has identified the time interval between S2 repolarization proximal to a line of functional block and S2 activation at the adjacent distal side as a critical determinant of reentry. Objectives We hypothesized that (1) an algorithm could be developed to generate a spatial map of this interval ("reentry vulnerability index" [RVI]), ...

  15. Early Myocardial Repolarization Heterogeneity Is Detected by Magnetocardiography in Diabetic Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Chau-Chung; Lin, Chih-Hung; Wu, Yen-Wen; Yang, Ying-Chieh; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Jiang, Yi-Der; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Multi-channel magnetocardiography (MCG) is a sensitive technique to map spatial ventricular repolarization with high resolution and reproducibility. Spatial ventricular repolarization heterogeneity measured by MCG has been shown to accurately detect and localize myocardial ischemia. Here, we explored whether these measurements correlated with cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Two hundreds and seventy-seven type 2 diabetic patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) and arrhythmia were recruited consecutively from the outpatient clinic of National Taiwan University Hospital. The spatially distributed QTc contour maps were constructed with 64-channel MCG using the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system. Indices of myocardial repolarization heterogeneity including the smoothness index of QTc (SI-QTc) and QTc dispersion were derived and analyzed for association with conventional cardiovascular risk factors. SI-QTc correlated strongly with the QTc dispersion (r = 0.70, p patients with presence of metabolic syndrome in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome (8.56 vs. 7.96 ms, p = 0.02). In univariate correlation analyses, QTc dispersion was associated with smoking status (average 79.90, 83.83, 86.51, and 86.00 ms for never smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers reporting less than 10 cigarettes daily, and current smoker reporting more than 10 cigarettes daily, respectively, p = 0.03), body weight (r = 0.15, p = 0.01), and hemoglobin A1c (r = 0.12, p = 0.04). In stepwise multivariate regression analyses, QTc dispersion was associated with smoking (p = 0.02), body weight (p = 0.04), total cholesterol levels (p = 0.05), and possibly estimated glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.07). In summary, spatial heterogeneity of myocardial repolarization measured by MCG is positively associated cardiovascular risk factors including adiposity, smoking, and total cholesterol levels.

  16. Atrial fibrillation in inherited cardiac channelopathies: From mechanisms to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Andres; Antzelevitch, Charles; Bismah, Verdah; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent in cardiac channelopathies and may be the presenting feature in some patients. The pathogenesis is related to the primary ion channel dysfunction in atrial myocytes that affects atrial conduction or repolarization. The development of AF is associated with adverse outcomes, and its management is challenging in these patients. In this article we review the current information on the prevalence, risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of AF in specific cardiac channelopathies. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Early repolarization in young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder versus normal controls: a retrospective preliminary chart review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahshoni, Eitan; Sclarovsky, Samuel; Spitzer, Sara; Zalsman, Gil; Strasberg, Boris; Weizman, Abraham

    2009-12-01

    Early repolarization (ER), considered a common and benign electrocardiographic pattern on the surface 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), was recently found to be prevalent among patients with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. It is also highly predominant in physically active young males. Reports on sudden cardiac death (SCD) of children and adolescents treated with psychotropic agents have raised concerns regarding the need for cardiovascular monitoring and risk stratification schedules. The rate of ER pattern has not been estimated in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Thus, in the present retrospective chart review study, we estimated the rate of ER pattern, as well as RR, QT, and QTc intervals, from ECG tracings of physically healthy children with ADHD versus physically and mentally healthy controls. The ECG tracings of 50 children (aged 8.7 +/- 1.4 years; 12 girls, 44 boys) diagnosed as suffering from ADHD were compared to 55 physically and mentally healthy controls (aged 8.25 +/- 2.1 years; 20 girls, 35 boys). ER was defined as an elevation of the QRS-ST junction (J point) of at least 0.1 mV from baseline with slurring or notching of the QRS complex, and assessed separately by two senior cardiologists who were blind to all other data relating to the study participants. The rate of ER pattern was significantly higher in ADHD children compared to normal controls (32% vs. 13%, respectively, P = 0.012; relative risk [RR] = 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-2.44), irrespective of stimulant treatment or gender. All other standard ECG measures (heart rate, QT and QTc intervals) were within normal range. The rate of ER in children with ADHD is significantly higher than in normal controls. Its clinical significance awaits further research.

  18. Characterization of a Chinese KCNQ1 mutation (R259H) that shortens repolarization and causes short QT syndrome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Juan; Huang, Yun; Fu, Yi-Cheng; Zhao, Xiao-Jing; Zhu, Chao; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Qing-Lei; Li, Yang

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the association between a KCNQ1 mutation, R259H, and short QT syndrome (SQTS) and to explore the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying their association. We performed genetic screening of SQTS genes in 25 probands and their family members (63 patients). We used direct sequencing to screen the exons and intron-exon boundaries of candidate genes that encode ion channels which contribute to the repolarization of the ventricular action potential, including KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNJ2, CACNA1c, CACNB2b and CACNA2D1. In one of the 25 SQTS probands screened, we discovered a KCNQ1 mutation, R259H. We cloned R259H and transiently expressed it in HEK-293 cells; then, currents were recorded using whole cell patch clamp techniques. R259H-KCNQ1 showed significantly increased current density, which was approximately 3-fold larger than that of wild type (WT) after a depolarizing pulse at 1 s. The steady state voltage dependence of the activation and inactivation did not show significant differences between the WT and R259H mutation (P > 0.05), whereas the time constant of deactivation was markedly prolonged in the mutant compared with the WT in terms of the test potentials, which indicated that the deactivation of R259H was markedly slower than that of the WT. These results suggested that the R259H mutation can effectively increase the slowly activated delayed rectifier potassium current (I Ks) in phase 3 of the cardiac action potential, which may be an infrequent cause of QT interval shortening. R259H is a gain-of-function mutation of the KCNQ1 channel that is responsible for SQTS2. This is the first time that the R259H mutation was detected in Chinese people.

  19. Cardiac fibrosis as a determinant of ventricular tachyarrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norishige Morita, MD, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Animal and emerging clinical studies have demonstrated that increased ventricular fibrosis in a setting of reduced repolarization reserve promotes early afterdepolarizations (EADs and triggered activity that can initiate ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF. Increased ventricular fibrosis plays a key facilitatory role in allowing oxidative and metabolic stress-induced EADs to manifest as triggered activity causing VT/VF. The lack of such an arrhythmogenic effect by the same stressors in normal non-fibrotic hearts highlights the importance of fibrosis in the initiation of VT/VF. These findings suggest that antifibrotic therapy combined with therapy designed to increase ventricular repolarization reserve may act synergistically to reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  20. The naked mole-rat exhibits an unusual cardiac myofilament protein profile providing new insights into heart function of this naturally subterranean rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Kelly M; Barefield, David Y; Kumar, Mohit; McNamara, James W; Weintraub, Susan T; de Tombe, Pieter P; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2017-12-01

    The long-lived, hypoxic-tolerant naked mole-rat well-maintains cardiac function over its three-decade-long lifespan and exhibits many cardiac features atypical of similar-sized laboratory rodents. For example, they exhibit low heart rates and resting cardiac contractility, yet have a large cardiac reserve. These traits are considered ecophysiological adaptations to their dank subterranean atmosphere of low oxygen and high carbon dioxide levels and may also contribute to negligible declines in cardiac function during aging. We asked if naked mole-rats had a different myofilament protein signature to that of similar-sized mice that commonly show both high heart rates and high basal cardiac contractility. Adult mouse ventricles predominantly expressed α-myosin heavy chain (97.9 ± 0.4%). In contrast, and more in keeping with humans, β myosin heavy chain was the dominant isoform (79.0 ± 2.0%) in naked mole-rat ventricles. Naked mole-rat ventricles diverged from those of both humans and mice, as they expressed both cardiac and slow skeletal isoforms of troponin I. This myofilament protein profile is more commonly observed in mice in utero and during cardiomyopathies. There were no species differences in phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C or troponin I. Phosphorylation of both ventricular myosin light chain 2 and cardiac troponin T in naked mole-rats was approximately half that observed in mice. Myofilament function was also compared between the two species using permeabilized cardiomyocytes. Together, these data suggest a cardiac myofilament protein signature that may contribute to the naked mole-rat's suite of adaptations to its natural subterranean habitat.

  1. The Electrogenic Na+/K+ Pump Is a Key Determinant of Repolarization Abnormality Susceptibility in Human Ventricular Cardiomyocytes: A Population-Based Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver J. Britton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cellular repolarization abnormalities occur unpredictably due to disease and drug effects, and can occur even in cardiomyocytes that exhibit normal action potentials (AP under control conditions. Variability in ion channel densities may explain differences in this susceptibility to repolarization abnormalities. Here, we quantify the importance of key ionic mechanisms determining repolarization abnormalities following ionic block in human cardiomyocytes yielding normal APs under control conditions.Methods and Results: Sixty two AP recordings from non-diseased human heart preparations were used to construct a population of human ventricular models with normal APs and a wide range of ion channel densities. Multichannel ionic block was applied to investigate susceptibility to repolarization abnormalities. IKr block was necessary for the development of repolarization abnormalities. Models that developed repolarization abnormalities over the widest range of blocks possessed low Na+/K+ pump conductance below 50% of baseline, and ICaL conductance above 70% of baseline. Furthermore, INaK made the second largest contribution to repolarizing current in control simulations and the largest contribution under 75% IKr block. Reversing intracellular Na+ overload caused by reduced INaK was not sufficient to prevent abnormalities in models with low Na+/K+ pump conductance, while returning Na+/K+ pump conductance to normal substantially reduced abnormality occurrence, indicating INaK is an important repolarization current.Conclusions: INaK is an important determinant of repolarization abnormality susceptibility in human ventricular cardiomyocytes, through its contribution to repolarization current rather than homeostasis. While we found IKr block to be necessary for repolarization abnormalities to occur, INaK decrease, as in disease, may amplify the pro-arrhythmic risk of drug-induced IKr block in humans.

  2. The Electrogenic Na+/K+ Pump Is a Key Determinant of Repolarization Abnormality Susceptibility in Human Ventricular Cardiomyocytes: A Population-Based Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Oliver J; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Virág, László; Varró, András; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cellular repolarization abnormalities occur unpredictably due to disease and drug effects, and can occur even in cardiomyocytes that exhibit normal action potentials (AP) under control conditions. Variability in ion channel densities may explain differences in this susceptibility to repolarization abnormalities. Here, we quantify the importance of key ionic mechanisms determining repolarization abnormalities following ionic block in human cardiomyocytes yielding normal APs under control conditions. Methods and Results: Sixty two AP recordings from non-diseased human heart preparations were used to construct a population of human ventricular models with normal APs and a wide range of ion channel densities. Multichannel ionic block was applied to investigate susceptibility to repolarization abnormalities. I Kr block was necessary for the development of repolarization abnormalities. Models that developed repolarization abnormalities over the widest range of blocks possessed low Na + /K + pump conductance below 50% of baseline, and I CaL conductance above 70% of baseline. Furthermore, I NaK made the second largest contribution to repolarizing current in control simulations and the largest contribution under 75% I Kr block. Reversing intracellular Na + overload caused by reduced I NaK was not sufficient to prevent abnormalities in models with low Na + /K + pump conductance, while returning Na + /K + pump conductance to normal substantially reduced abnormality occurrence, indicating I NaK is an important repolarization current. Conclusions: I NaK is an important determinant of repolarization abnormality susceptibility in human ventricular cardiomyocytes, through its contribution to repolarization current rather than homeostasis. While we found I Kr block to be necessary for repolarization abnormalities to occur, I NaK decrease, as in disease, may amplify the pro-arrhythmic risk of drug-induced I Kr block in humans.

  3. Noninvasive risk stratification of lethal ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death after myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Yodogawa, MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of lethal ventricular arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death is one of the most important and challenging problems after myocardial infarction (MI. Identification of MI patients who are prone to ventricular tachyarrhythmias allows for an indication of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement. To date, noninvasive techniques such as microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA, signal-averaged electrocardiography (SAECG, heart rate variability (HRV, and heart rate turbulence (HRT have been developed for this purpose. MTWA is an indicator of repolarization abnormality and is currently the most promising risk-stratification tool for predicting malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Similarly, late potentials detected by SAECG are indices of depolarization abnormality and are useful in risk stratification. However, the role of SAECG is limited because of its low predictive accuracy. Abnormal HRV and HRT patterns reflect autonomic disturbances, which may increase the risk of lethal ventricular arrhythmias, but the existing evidence is insufficient. Further studies of noninvasive assessment may provide a new insight into risk stratification in post-MI patients.

  4. New aspects of HERG K⁺ channel function depending upon cardiac spatial heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen Zhang

    Full Text Available HERG K(+ channel, the genetic counterpart of rapid delayed rectifier K(+ current in cardiac cells, is responsible for many cases of inherited and drug-induced long QT syndromes. HERG has unusual biophysical properties distinct from those of other K(+ channels. While the conventional pulse protocols in patch-clamp studies have helped us elucidate these properties, their limitations in assessing HERG function have also been progressively noticed. We employed AP-clamp techniques using physiological action potential waveforms recorded from various regions of canine heart to study HERG function in HEK293 cells and identified several novel aspects of HERG function. We showed that under AP-clamp IHERG increased gradually with membrane repolarization, peaked at potentials around 20-30 mV more negative than revealed by pulse protocols and at action potential duration (APD to 60%-70% full repolarization, and fell rapidly at the terminal phase of repolarization. We found that the rising phase of IHERG was conferred by removal of inactivation and the decaying phase resulted from a fall in driving force, which were all determined by the rate of membrane repolarization. We identified regional heterogeneity and transmural gradient of IHERG when quantified with the area covered by IHERG trace. In addition, we observed regional and transmural differences of IHERG in response to dofetilide blockade. Finally, we characterized the influence of HERG function by selective inhibition of other ion currents. Based on our results, we conclude that the distinct biophysical properties of HERG reported by AP-clamp confer its unique function in cardiac repolarization thereby in antiarrhythmia and arrhythmogenesis.

  5. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests during exercise among urban inhabitants in Japan: Insights from a population-based registry of Osaka City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Kosuke; Sado, Junya; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Nishiyama, Chika; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Hayashida, Sumito; Kitamura, Yuri; Sobue, Tomotaka; Nakata, Ken; Iwami, Taku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa

    2017-08-01

    The patient characteristics, pre-hospital interventions, and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) occurring during exercise, have not been sufficiently investigated among the general population. OHCA data from 2009 to 2015 were obtained from the population-based OHCA registry in Osaka City, Japan. Patients who suffered OHCA, which occurred during exercise before the arrival of emergency medical service personnel, were included. The primary endpoint was one-month survival with a favourable neurological outcome after OHCA, defined using the Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category scale 1 or 2. During the 7-year study period, 16,278 OHCAs were observed, and 52 (0.3%) occurred during exercise (male, n=41 [79%]; median age, 62 years). These incidents occurred mainly during running activities (n=14), followed by swimming (n=8), dance/social dance (n=6), tennis (n=4), and weight training (n=3). Within these exercise-related OHCAs, 47 (90%) were of cardiac origin, 45 (87%) were bystander-witnessed cardiac arrests, 49 (94%) received bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and 30 (57%) received public-access defibrillation (PAD). Overall, 56% (29/52) had one-month survival with a favourable neurological outcome after OHCA, which was significantly higher among OHCAs of cardiac origin with PAD (77%, 23/30) than among those of cardiac origin without PAD (35%, 6/17) and among those of non-cardiac origin (0%, 0/5) (pexercise represented a small subset of the overall OHCA burden, but occurred during a wide variety of exercise activities. Patients with OHCA of cardiac origin had a good prognosis, and PAD played an important role in improving patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Coronary Artery Disease Alters Ventricular Repolarization Dynamics in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtovec, Bojan; Sinkovec, Matjaz; Starc, Vito; Radovancevic, Branislav; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2005-01-01

    Ventricular repolarization dynamics (VRD) is an important predictor of outcome in diabetes. We examined the potential impact of coronary artery disease (CAD) on VRD in type 2 diabetic patients. We recorded 5-min high-resolution resting electrocardiograms (ECG) in 38 diabetic patients undergoing elective coronary angiography, and in 38 age- and gender- matched apparently healthy subjects (Controls). Using leads I and II, time-domain indices of VRD were calculated. Coronary angiography was regarded as positive if a 350% stenosis was found. Angiography was positive in 21 diabetic patients (55%). Patients with CAD had a significantly higher degree of VRD than Controls (SDNN(QT): 15.81+/-7.22 ms vs. 8.94+/-6.04 ms; P <0.001, rMSSD(QT): 21.02k7.07 ms vs. 11.18k7.45 ms; P <0.001). VRD in diabetic patients with negative angiograms did not differ from VRD in Controls (SDNN(QT): 8.94+/-6.04 ms vs. 7.44+/-5.72 ms; P=0.67, rMSSD(QT): 11.18+/-7.45 ms vs. 10.22+/-5.35 ms; P=O. 82). CAD increases VRD in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, changes in ventricular repolarization in diabetic patients may be due to silent CAD rather than to diabetes per se.

  7. Early Repolarization Pattern with the Huge and Tall Peaked T Wave as Clinical Suspicious Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Li Dan Mu Ai Ke Bai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BS is an arrhythmogenic ion channelopathy, which constitutes a distinct subtype of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. It is characterized by unique electrocardiographic (ECG manifestations, including right bundle branch block, ST-segment elevation of coved or saddle-back type, and T-wave inversion in the right precordial ECG from V1 to V3 leads, and a high incidence of sudden death from ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Early repolarization (ER has traditionally been considered a benign entity with ECG characterized by an elevation greater than 0.1 mV of the junction between the end of the magnetic resonance angiography (QRS complex and the beginning of the ST segment (J point and a notching or slurring of the terminal portion of the QRS complex followed by a positive T wave. Early repolarization pattern (ERP has been associated with vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation in independent case-controlled studies. Recently, clinical interest in ERP has been rekindled because of its similarities with BS. Here, we reported a case of a middle-aged male who presented with syncope that unmasked an ECG pattern consistent with diagnoses of both BS and ER, and discussed the variations in BS and the high-risk features associated with it.

  8. Interventricular dispersion in repolarization causes bifid T waves in dogs with dofetilide-induced long QT syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijborg, Veronique M F; Chauveau, Samuel; Janse, Michiel J; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P; Danilo, Peter R; Rosen, Michael R; Opthof, Tobias; Coronel, Ruben

    BACKGROUND: Long QT2 (LQT2) syndrome is characterized by bifid (or notched) T waves, whose mechanism is not understood. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test whether increased interventricular dispersion of repolarization induces bifid T waves. METHODS: We simultaneously recorded surface

  9. Interventricular dispersion in repolarization causes bifid T waves in dogs with dofetilide-induced long QT syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijborg, Veronique M. F.; Chauveau, Samuel; Janse, Michiel J.; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P.; Danilo, Peter R.; Rosen, Michael R.; Opthof, Tobias; Coronel, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Long QT2 (LQT2) syndrome is characterized by bifid (or notched) T waves, whose mechanism is not understood. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased interventricular dispersion of repolarization induces bifid T waves. We simultaneously recorded surface ECG and unipolar electrograms at

  10. Dispersion of repolarization in canine ventricle and the electrocardiographic T wave: Tp-e interval does not reflect transmural dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opthof, Tobias; Coronel, Ruben; Wilms-Schopman, Francien J. G.; Plotnikov, Alexei N.; Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Danilo, Peter; Rosen, Michael R.; Janse, Michiel J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concept that the interval between the peak (T(peak)) and the end (T(end)) of the T wave (T(p-e)) is a measure of transmural dispersion of repolarization time is widely accepted but has not been tested rigorously by transmural mapping of the intact heart. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of

  11. Spatially divergent cardiac responses to nicotinic stimulation of ganglionated plexus neurons in the canine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Armour, J Andrew

    2009-01-28

    Ganglionated plexuses (GPs) are major constituents of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, the final common integrator of regional cardiac control. We hypothesized that nicotinic stimulation of individual GPs exerts divergent regional influences, affecting atrial as well as ventricular functions. In 22 anesthetized canines, unipolar electrograms were recorded from 127 atrial and 127 ventricular epicardial loci during nicotine injection (100 mcg in 0.1 ml) into either the 1) right atrial (RA), 2) dorsal atrial, 3) left atrial, 4) inferior vena cava-inferior left atrial, 5) right ventricular, 6) ventral septal ventricular or 7) cranial medial ventricular (CMV) GP. In addition to sinus and AV nodal function, neural effects on atrial and ventricular repolarization were identified as changes in the area subtended by unipolar recordings under basal conditions and at maximum neurally-induced effects. Animals were studied with intact AV node or following ablation to achieve ventricular rate control. Atrial rate was affected in response to stimulation of all 7 GPs with an incidence of 50-95% of the animals among the different GPs. AV conduction was affected following stimulation of 6/7 GP with an incidence of 22-75% among GPs. Atrial and ventricular repolarization properties were affected by atrial as well as ventricular GP stimulation. Distinct regional patterns of repolarization changes were identified in response to stimulation of individual GPs. RAGP predominantly affected the RA and posterior right ventricular walls whereas CMVGP elicited biatrial and biventricular repolarization changes. Spatially divergent and overlapping cardiac regions are affected in response to nicotinic stimulation of neurons in individual GPs.

  12. Ventricular repolarization alterations in women with angina pectoris and suspected coronary microvascular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dose, Nynne; Michelsen, Marie Mide; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: CMD could be the explanation of angina pectoris with no obstructive CAD and may cause ventricular repolarization changes. We compared T-wave morphology and QTc interval in women with angina pectoris with a control group as well as the associations with CMD. METHODS: Women with angina...... pectoris and no obstructive coronary artery disease (n=138) and age-matched controls were compared in regard to QTc interval and morphology combination score (MCS) based on T-wave asymmetry, flatness and presence of T-wave notch. CMD was assessed as a coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) by transthoracic...... was attenuated after multivariable adjustment (p=0.08). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that women with angina pectoris have alterations in T-wave morphology as well as longer QTc interval compared with a reference population. CMD might be an explanation....

  13. Ventricular stimulus site influences dynamic dispersion of repolarization in the intact human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Neil T; Orini, Michele; Simon, Ron B; Providência, Rui; Khan, Fakhar Z; Segal, Oliver R; Babu, Girish G; Bradley, Richard; Rowland, Edward; Ahsan, Syed; Chow, Anthony W; Lowe, Martin D; Taggart, Peter; Lambiase, Pier D

    2016-09-01

    The spatial variation in restitution properties in relation to varying stimulus site is poorly defined. This study aimed to investigate the effect of varying stimulus site on apicobasal and transmural activation time (AT), action potential duration (APD) and repolarization time (RT) during restitution studies in the intact human heart. Ten patients with structurally normal hearts, undergoing clinical electrophysiology studies, were enrolled. Decapolar catheters were placed apex to base in the endocardial right ventricle (RVendo) and left ventricle (LVendo), and an LV branch of the coronary sinus (LVepi) for transmural recording. S1-S2 restitution protocols were performed pacing RVendo apex, LVendo base, and LVepi base. Overall, 725 restitution curves were analyzed, 74% of slopes had a maximum slope of activation recovery interval (ARI) restitution (Smax) > 1 (P < 0.001); mean Smax = 1.76. APD was shorter in the LVepi compared with LVendo, regardless of pacing site (30-ms difference during RVendo pacing, 25-ms during LVendo, and 48-ms during LVepi; 50th quantile, P < 0.01). Basal LVepi pacing resulted in a significant transmural gradient of RT (77 ms, 50th quantile: P < 0.01), due to loss of negative transmural AT-APD coupling (mean slope 0.63 ± 0.3). No significant transmural gradient in RT was demonstrated during endocardial RV or LV pacing, with preserved negative transmural AT-APD coupling (mean slope -1.36 ± 1.9 and -0.71 ± 0.4, respectively). Steep ARI restitution slopes predominate in the normal ventricle and dynamic ARI; RT gradients exist that are modulated by the site of activation. Epicardial stimulation to initiate ventricular activation promotes significant transmural gradients of repolarization that could be proarrhythmic. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Value of non-clinical cardiac repolarization assays in supporting the discovery and development of safer medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Pollard, Chris; Lainée, Pierre; Hammond, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Non-clinical QT-related assays aligned to the pharmaceutical drug discovery and development phases are used in several ways. During the early discovery phases, assays are used for hazard identification and wherever possible for hazard elimination. The data generated enable us to: (i) establish structure–activity relationships and thereby; (ii) influence the medicinal chemistry design and provide tools for effective decision making; and provide structure–activity data for in silico predictive databases; (iii) solve problems earlier; (iv) provide reassurance for compound or project to progress; and (v) refine strategies as scientific and technical knowledge grows. For compounds progressing into pre-clinical development, the ‘core battery’ QT-related data enable an integrated risk assessment to: (i) fulfil regulatory requirements; (ii) assess the safety and risk–benefit for compound progression to man; (iii) contribute to defining the starting dose during the phase I clinical trials; (iv) influence the design of the phase I clinical trials; (v) identify clinically relevant safety biomarkers; and (vi) contribute to the patient risk management plan. Once a compound progresses into clinical development, QT-related data can be applied in the context of risk management and risk mitigation. The data from ‘follow-up’ studies can be used to: (i) support regulatory approval; (ii) investigate discrepancies that may have emerged within and/or between non-clinical and clinical data; (iii) understand the mechanism of an undesirable pharmacodynamic effect; (iv) provide reassurance for progression into multiple dosing in humans and/or large-scale clinical trials; and (v) assess drug–drug interactions. Based on emerging data, the integrated risk assessment is then reviewed in this article, and the benefit–risk for compound progression was re-assessed. Project examples are provided to illustrate the impact of non-clinical data to support compound progression throughout the drug discovery and development phases, and regulatory approval. This article is part of a themed section on QT safety. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2010 PMID:20141518

  15. Transmural dispersion of repolarization and atrial electromechanical coupling: complementary indices for quantifying cardiac electrical heterogeneity in patients with conversion disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokatli A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alptug Tokatli,1 Omer Yiginer,2 Gokhan Degirmencioglu,2 Fethi Kilicaslan,3 Mehmet Uzun2 1Department of Cardiology, Golcuk Military Hospital, Kocaeli, 2Department of Cardiology, GATA Haydarpasa Hospital, 3Department of Cardiology, Medipol University, Istanbul, TurkeyWe read with great interest the article entitled “P-wave and QT dispersion in patients with conversion disorder” by Izci et al1 in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management. In this well designed research, Izci et al studied QT dispersion (QTd and P-wave dispersion (Pd in patients with conversion disorder (CD. In conclusion, they reported that corrected QT (QTc and QTd values were significantly altered in patients with CD when compared to healthy controls, but that there was no significant difference in terms of Pd.Read the original article

  16. Solithromycin, a novel macrolide, does not prolong cardiac repolarization: a randomized, three-way crossover study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darpo, Borje; Sager, Philip T; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Jamieson, Brian D; Keedy, Kara; Zhou, Meijian; Oldach, David

    2017-02-01

    Macrolide antibiotics may cause QT prolongation. To study the QT effect of a novel macrolide, solithromycin. This was a thorough QT study with a three-way crossover design performed in healthy male and female subjects to evaluate the ECG effects of a novel macrolide, solithromycin. Forty-eight subjects were randomized to receive 800 mg of intravenous (iv) solithromycin, 400 mg of oral moxifloxacin and placebo in three separate treatment periods. Continuous 12 lead ECGs were recorded at a pre-dose baseline and serially after drug administration for 24 h. After the 40 min infusion of 800 mg of solithromycin, the geometric mean solithromycin peak plasma concentration (C max ) reached 5.9 (SD: 1.30) μg/mL. Solithromycin infusion caused a heart rate increase with a peak effect of 15 bpm immediately after the end of the infusion. The change-from-baseline QTcF (ΔQTcF) was similar after dosing with solithromycin and placebo and the resulting placebo-corrected ΔQTcF (ΔΔQTcF) for solithromycin was therefore small at all timepoints with a peak effect at 4 h of only 2.8 ms (upper bound of the 90% CI: 4.9 ms). Using a linear exposure-response model, a statistically significant, slightly negative slope of -0.86 ms per ng/mL (90% CI: -1.19 to -0.53; P = 0.0001) was observed with solithromycin. The study's ability to detect small QT changes was confirmed by the moxifloxacin response. Solithromycin did not have a clinically meaningful effect on the PR or QRS interval. The study demonstrated that solithromycin, unlike other macrolide antibiotics, does not cause QT prolongation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Cardiac-resynchronization therapy in patients with systolic heart failure and QRS interval ≤130 ms: insights from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rachit M; Patel, Dhavalkumar; Molnar, Janos; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Koneru, Jayanthi N

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac-resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (SHF) and a wide QRS complex. It is unclear whether the same benefit extends to patients with QRS duration (QRSd) cardiac defibrillator (ICD) therapy in patients with SHF (ejection fraction heart failure, systolic dysfunction, dyssynchrony, left ventricular remodelling, readmission, mortality, survival, and various combinations of these terms. We studied the trends of overall mortality, SHF mortality, and hospitalizations due to SHF between the two groups. Heterogeneity of the studies was analysed by Q statistic. A fixed-effect model was used to compute the relative risk (RR) of mortality due to SHF, while a random-effects model was used to compare hospitalization due to SHF. Out of a total of 12 100 citations, four RCTs comparing CRTD vs. ICD therapy in patients with SHF and QRS ≤130 ms fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The median follow-up was 12 months and the cumulative number of patients was 1177. Relative Risk for all-cause mortality in patients treated with CRTD was 1.66 with a 95% CI of 1.096-2.515 (P = 0.017) while for SHF mortality was 1.29 with 95% CI of 0.68-2.45 (P = 0.42). Relative risk for HF hospitalization in patients treated with CRTD was 0.94 with 95% CI of 0.50-1.74 (P = 0.84) in comparison to the ICD group. Cardiac-resynchronization therapy defibrillator has no impact on SHF mortality and SHF hospitalization in patients with systolic HF with QRS duration ≤130 ms and is associated with higher all-cause mortality in comparison with ICD therapy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction and neuroinflammation; Cardiac surgery and abdominal surgery are not the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovens, Iris B.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.; Mariani, Massimo A.; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Schoemaker, Regien G.

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a debilitating surgical complication, with cardiac surgery patients at particular risk. To gain insight in the mechanisms underlying the higher incidence of POCD after cardiac versus non-cardiac surgery, systemic and central inflammatory changes,

  19. Electrocardiographic Characteristics of Potential Organ Donors and Associations with Cardiac Allograft Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khush, Kiran K.; Menza, Rebecca; Nguyen, John; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Zaroff, Jonathan G.; Drew, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current regulations require that all cardiac allograft offers for transplantation must include an interpreted 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). However, little is known about the expected ECG findings in potential organ donors, or the clinical significance of any identified abnormalities in terms of cardiac allograft function and suitability for transplantation. Methods and Results A single experienced reviewer interpreted the first ECG obtained after brainstem herniation in 980 potential organ donors managed by the California Transplant Donor Network from 2002-2007. ECG abnormalities were summarized, and associations between specific ECG findings and cardiac allograft utilization for transplantation were studied. ECG abnormalities were present in 51% of all cases reviewed. The most common abnormalities included voltage criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), prolongation of the corrected QT interval (QTc), and repolarization changes (ST/T wave abnormalities). Fifty seven percent of potential cardiac allografts in this cohort were accepted for transplantation. LVH on ECG was a strong predictor of allograft non-utilization. No significant associations were seen between QTc prolongation, repolarization changes and allograft utilization for transplantation, after adjusting for donor clinical variables and echocardiographic findings. Conclusions We have performed the first comprehensive study of ECG findings in potential donors for cardiac transplantation. Many of the common ECG abnormalities seen in organ donors may result from the heightened state of sympathetic activation that occurs after brainstem herniation, and are not associated with allograft utilization for transplantation. PMID:22615333

  20. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  1. Analyses of a novel SCN5A mutation (C1850S): conduction vs. repolarization disorder hypotheses in the Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petitprez, Séverine; Jespersen, Thomas; Pruvot, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    (Na). In the simulations, the I(to) density necessary to precipitate repolarization differed minimally between the two genotypes. In contrast, the mutation greatly affected conduction across a structural heterogeneity and precipitated conduction block. CONCLUSION: Our data confirm that mutations of the C-terminal domain...... of Na(v)1.5 alter the inactivation of the channel and support the notion that conduction alterations may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of BrS....

  2. Electrocardiographic Repolarization Abnormalities and Electroanatomic Substrate in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Maciej; Pathak, Rajeev K; Xie, Shuanglun; Casado Arroyo, Ruben; Tschabrunn, Cory M; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Garcia, Fermin C; Supple, Gregory E; Santangeli, Pasquale; Frankel, David S; Zado, Erica S; Callans, David J; Marchlinski, Francis E

    2018-03-01

    Repolarization abnormalities in arrhythmogenic right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathy and their relationship to ventricular tachycardia substrate are incompletely understood. In 40 patients (29 men, mean age 38 years) with arrhythmogenic RV cardiomyopathy, we compared the extent and location of abnormal T (NegT) waves ≥1 mm in depth (n=32) and downsloping elevated ST segment (n=13), in ≥2 adjacent leads, to area and location of endocardial bipolar (<1.5 mV) and unipolar (<5.5 mV) and epicardial bipolar (<1.0 mV) voltage abnormalities. Abnormal unipolar RV endocardial area of 33.4±19.3% was present in 8 patients without NegT waves. Patients with NegT waves extending beyond lead V 3 (n=20) had larger low bipolar (31.4±18.9% versus 16.5±14.6%; P =0.008) and unipolar endocardial areas (66.0±19.6% versus 47.4±25.1%; P =0.013) and larger epicardial low bipolar area (56.0±19.3% versus 40.1±24.9%; P =0.030) compared with those with NegT waves limited to leads V 1 through V 3 (n=20). ECG location of NegT waves regionalized to location of substrate. Patients with downsloping elevated ST segment, all localized to leads V 1 and V 2 , had more unipolar endocardial abnormalities (71.8±18.1% versus 49.4±23.5%; P =0.005) involving outflow and mid-RV, compared with patients without downsloping elevated ST segment. In arrhythmogenic RV cardiomyopathy, abnormal electroanatomic mapping areas are proportional to extent of T-wave inversion on 12-lead ECG. Marked voltage abnormalities can exist without repolarization change. Downsloping elevated ST-segment pattern in V 1 and V 2 occurs with more unipolar endocardial voltage abnormality, consistent with more advanced transmural disease. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Complications and 1-year benefit of cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients over 75 years of age - Insights from the German Device Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbe, Julia; Andresen, Dietrich; Maier, Sebastian; Stellbrink, Christoph; Kleemann, Thomas; Gonska, Bernd-Dieter; Reif, Sebastian; Hochadel, Matthias; Senges, Jochen; Eckardt, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Evidence on cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in older patients is scarce and conflicting. Nevertheless, CRT in the elderly is of major practical relevance as heart failure prevalence increases with age. The German Device Registry (DEVICE) is a nationwide, prospective registry with a longitudinal follow-up design investigating device implantations in 60 German centres. The present analysis of DEVICE focussed on perioperative complication rates and 1-year outcome of patients ≥75years (n=320) compared to younger patients (n=879) receiving a CRT device. Comorbidities were more common in older patients (chronic kidney disease (CKD): 27.5% vs. 21.5%, p=0.029; atrial fibrillation (AF): 26.9% vs. 15.6%, pcardiac deaths in the older group (p=0.05). Patients ≥75years being alive after 1year had lower response rates, with chronic kidney disease (OR 0.46, pheart failure symptoms. As expected severe heart failure (NYHA IV) was a strong independent predictor of death (HR 1.95, p=0.01), whereas AF as underlying rhythm could be worked out as predictor for mortality especially in the younger patients (HR 2.31, p=0.002). Patients ≥75years of age receiving a CRT device do not have a higher perioperative mortality and complication rate although comorbidities (CKD and AF) occur more frequently. The absolute 1-year mortality is higher; nevertheless, the proportion of cardiac deaths is even lower in the older patients reflecting a benefit of CRT in this group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Early repolarization of surface ECG predicts fatal ventricular arrhythmias in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy and symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chao-Shun; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chung, Fa-Po; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2015-10-15

    The clinical characteristics and prognostic value of early repolarization (ER) in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) and symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias remain unclear. We investigated the prevalence, clinical features, and cardiovascular outcomes of patients with symptomatic ARVD/C and ER. A total of 59 consecutive ARVD/C patients hospitalized for catheter ablation, presenting with and without J-point elevations of ≥0.1mV in at least 2 inferior leads or lateral leads were enrolled. Clinical characteristics, electrophysiological study, substrate mapping, catheter ablation, and future clinical outcomes in a prospective patient registry were investigated. ER was observed in 38 patients (64.4%). Among these patients, ER was found in the inferior leads in 18 patients (47.4%), in the lateral leads in 2 patients (5.3%), and in both inferior and lateral leads in 18 patients (47.4%). Patients exhibiting ER were commonly men, had lower right ventricular ejection fraction, had higher incidence of clinical ventricular fibrillation or aborted sudden cardiac death, had more defibrillator implantations, had higher the need of epicardial ablation, and had more major criteria according to the task force criteria. Significant higher incidence of induced ventricular fibrillation and shorter tachycardia cycle length of induced ventricular tachycardia were found during procedure. The recurrence rate of ventricular arrhythmias did not differ between patients with and without ER after catheter ablation. A high prevalence of electrocardiographic ER was found among symptomatic ARVD/C patients undergoing catheter ablation. ER in 12-lead ECG is associated with an increased risk of clinical fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium current contributes to ventricular repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Bo; Nissen, Jakob D; Laursen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional role of G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels in the cardiac ventricle.......The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional role of G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels in the cardiac ventricle....

  6. Reconstruction of action potential of repolarization in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Yokokawa, Miki; Kamakura, Shiro; Miyatake, Kunio; Murakami, Masahiro; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Ogata, Kuniomi; Tsukada, Keiji

    2004-01-01

    A method for reconstructing an action potential during the repolarization period was developed. This method uses a current distribution-plotted as a current-arrow map (CAM)-calculated using magnetocardiogram (MCG) signals. The current arrows are summarized during the QRS complex period and subtracted during the ST-T wave period in order to reconstruct the action-potential waveform. To ensure the similarity between a real action potential and the reconstructed action potential using CAM, a monophasic action potential (MAP) and an MCG of the same patient with type-I long-QT syndrome were measured. Although the MAP had one notch that was associated with early afterdepolarization (EAD), the reconstructed action potential had two large and small notches. The small notch timing agreed with the occurrence of the EAD in the MAP. On the other hand, the initiation time of an abnormal current distribution coincides with the appearance timing of the first large notch, and its end time coincides with that of the second small notch. These results suggest that a simple reconstruction method using a CAM based on MCG data can provide a similar action-potential waveform to a MAP waveform without having to introduce a catheter

  7. Oxidative Stress, Fibrosis, and Early Afterdepolarization-Mediated Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrayr eKaragueuzian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress, a common pathophysiological factor in cardiac disease, reduces repolarization reserve by enhancing the L-type calcium current, the late Na, and the Na-Ca exchanger, promoting early afterdepolarizations (EADs that can initiate ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF in structurally remodeled hearts. Increased ventricular fibrosis plays a key facilitatory role in allowing oxidative-stress induced EADs to manifest as triggered activity and VT/VF, since normal non-fibrotic hearts are resistant to arrhythmias when challenged with similar or higher levels of oxidative stress. The findings imply that antifibrotic therapy, in addition to therapies designed to suppress EAD formation at the cellular level, may be synergistic in reducing the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  8. Atrial fibrillation is under-recognized in chronic heart failure: insights from a heart failure cohort treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jane C; Contractor, Hussain; Petkar, Sanjiv; Ali, Razwan; Clarke, Bernard; Garratt, Clifford J; Neyses, Ludwig; Mamas, Mamas A

    2009-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Under-detection of asymptomatic paroxysmal AF (PAF) underestimates the true burden of AF in patients with CHF. We retrospectively studied the prevalence of asymptomatic PAF in 162 CHF patients through analysis of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device downloads to determine whether these episodes are associated with adverse outcomes. An episode of AF was defined by mode switching on CRT devices with an atrial rate >200 for at least 30 s. Of the 101 patients thought to be persistently in sinus rhythm (SR), 27% were found to have significant paroxysms of AF, with the cumulative percentage of time in the 'mode-switch mode' (i.e. the AF burden) of 1.6 +/- 0.9%. Mortality was 19.2% in patients with newly identified PAF with hospitalization and thrombo-embolism rates of 42.3 and 2.1%, respectively, compared with mortality of 10.4% with hospitalization and thrombo-embolism rates of 41.8 and 1.9%, respectively, in patients persistently in SR (P= NS). Analysis of data from CRT devices in a population of CHF patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction shows that a significant proportion of those perceived to be persistently in SR have undiagnosed paroxysms of AF but with relatively low burden. These episodes appear to be associated with a trend towards increased mortality but no effects on hospitalization or thrombo-embolism rates.

  9. Electro-mechanical characteristics of myocardial infarction border zones and ventricular arrhythmic risk: novel insights from grid-tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Dennis T.L.; Weightman, Michael J.; Baumert, Mathias; Tayeb, Hussam; Richardson, James D.; Puri, Rishi; Bertaso, Angela G.; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C.; Sanders, Prashanthan; Worthley, Matthew I.; Worthley, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether grid-tag myocardial strain evaluation can characterise 'border-zone' peri-infarct region and identify patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia as the peri-infarct myocardial zone may represent an important contributor to ventricular arrhythmia following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Forty-five patients with STEMI underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on days 3 and 90 following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Circumferential peak circumferential systolic strain (CS) and strain rate (CSR) were calculated from grid-tagged images. Myocardial segments were classified into 'infarct', 'border-zone', 'adjacent' and 'remote' regions by late-gadolinium enhancement distribution. The relationship between CS and CSR and these distinct myocardial regions was assessed. Ambulatory Holter monitoring was performed 14 days post myocardial infarction (MI) to estimate ventricular arrhythmia risk via evaluation of heart-rate variability (HRV). We analysed 1,222 myocardial segments. Remote and adjacent regions had near-normal parameters of CS and CSR. Border-zone regions had intermediate CS (-9.0 ± 4.6 vs -5.9 ± 7.4, P < 0.001) and CSR (-86.4 ± 33.3 vs -73.5 ± 51.4, P < 0.001) severity compared with infarct regions. Patients with 'border-zone' peri-infarct regions had reduced very-low-frequency power on HRV analysis, which is a surrogate for ventricular arrhythmia risk (P = 0.03). Grid-tagged CMR-derived myocardial strain accurately characterises the mechanical characteristics of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region. Presence of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region correlated with a surrogate marker of heightened arrhythmia risk following STEMI. (orig.)

  10. Degree and distribution of left ventricular hypertrophy as a determining factor for elevated natriuretic peptide levels in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: insights from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Rang; Choi, Jin-Oh; Han, Hye Jin; Chang, Sung-A; Park, Sung-Ji; Lee, Sang-Chol; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Park, Seung Woo; Oh, Jae K

    2012-04-01

    Whether the left ventricular (LV) mass index (LVMI) and LV volumetric parameters are associated independently with natriuretic peptide levels is unclear in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Therefore, we investigated which parameters have an independent relationship with N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels in HCM patients using echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). A total of 103 patients with HCM (82 men, age 53 ± 12 years) were evaluated. Echocardiographic evaluations included left atrial volume index (LAVI) and early diastolic mitral inflow E velocity to early annular Ea velocity ratio (E/Ea). LVMI, maximal wall thickness and LV volumetric parameters were measured using CMR. The median value of NT-proBNP level was 387.0 pg/ml. The mean NT-proBNP level in patients with non-apical HCM (n = 69; 36 patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy, 11 with diffuse, and 22 with mixed type) was significantly higher than in those with apical HCM (n = 34, P < 0.001). NT-proBNP level was negatively correlated with LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) (r = -0.263, P = 0.007) and positively with LVMI (r = 0.225, P = 0.022) and maximal wall thickness (r = 0.495, P < 0.001). Among the echocardiographic variables, LAVI (r = 0.492, P < 0.001) and E/Ea (r = 0.432, P < 0.001) were correlated with NT-proBNP. On multivariable analysis, non-apical HCM, increased maximal wall thickness and LAVI were independently related with NT-proBNP. Severity of LV hypertrophy and diastolic parameters might be important in the elevation of NT-proBNP level in HCM. Therefore, further evaluation of these parameters in HCM might be warranted.

  11. Electro-mechanical characteristics of myocardial infarction border zones and ventricular arrhythmic risk: novel insights from grid-tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Dennis T.L.; Weightman, Michael J.; Baumert, Mathias; Tayeb, Hussam; Richardson, James D.; Puri, Rishi; Bertaso, Angela G.; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C.; Sanders, Prashanthan; Worthley, Matthew I. [University of Adelaide, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Royal Adelaide Hospital and Discipline of Medicine, SA (Australia); Worthley, Stephen G. [University of Adelaide, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Royal Adelaide Hospital and Discipline of Medicine, SA (Australia); Royal Adelaide Hospital, Cardiovascular Investigational Unit, SA (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    To investigate whether grid-tag myocardial strain evaluation can characterise 'border-zone' peri-infarct region and identify patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia as the peri-infarct myocardial zone may represent an important contributor to ventricular arrhythmia following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Forty-five patients with STEMI underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on days 3 and 90 following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Circumferential peak circumferential systolic strain (CS) and strain rate (CSR) were calculated from grid-tagged images. Myocardial segments were classified into 'infarct', 'border-zone', 'adjacent' and 'remote' regions by late-gadolinium enhancement distribution. The relationship between CS and CSR and these distinct myocardial regions was assessed. Ambulatory Holter monitoring was performed 14 days post myocardial infarction (MI) to estimate ventricular arrhythmia risk via evaluation of heart-rate variability (HRV). We analysed 1,222 myocardial segments. Remote and adjacent regions had near-normal parameters of CS and CSR. Border-zone regions had intermediate CS (-9.0 {+-} 4.6 vs -5.9 {+-} 7.4, P < 0.001) and CSR (-86.4 {+-} 33.3 vs -73.5 {+-} 51.4, P < 0.001) severity compared with infarct regions. Patients with 'border-zone' peri-infarct regions had reduced very-low-frequency power on HRV analysis, which is a surrogate for ventricular arrhythmia risk (P = 0.03). Grid-tagged CMR-derived myocardial strain accurately characterises the mechanical characteristics of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region. Presence of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region correlated with a surrogate marker of heightened arrhythmia risk following STEMI. (orig.)

  12. Magnitude and Time Course of Changes Induced by Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Unloading in Chronic Heart Failure: Insights into Cardiac Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Stavros G.; Wever-Pinzon, Omar; Selzman, Craig H.; Gilbert, Edward M.; Alharethi, Rami; Reid, Bruce B.; Saidi, Abdulfattah; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Stoker, Sandi; Davis, Erin S.; Movsesian, Matthew; Li, Dean Y.; Stehlik, Josef; Kfoury, Abdallah G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prospectively investigate the longitudinal effects of continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) unloading on myocardial structure and systolic and diastolic function. Background The magnitude, timeline and sustainability of changes induced by continuous-flow LVAD on the structure and function of the failing human heart are unknown. Methods Eighty consecutive patients with clinical characteristics consistent with chronic heart failure requiring implantation of a continuous-flow LVAD were prospectively enrolled. Serial echocardiograms (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months) and right heart catheterizations were performed after LVAD implant. Cardiac recovery was assessed on the basis of improvement in systolic and diastolic function indices on echocardiography that were sustained during LVAD turn-down studies. Results After 6 months of LVAD unloading, 34% of patients had a relative LVEF increase above 50% and 19% of patients, both ischemic and nonischemic, achieved an LVEF≥40%. LV systolic function improved as early as 30 days, the greatest degree of improvement was achieved by 6 months of mechanical unloading and persisted over the 1- year follow up. LV diastolic function parameters also improved as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading and this improvement persisted over time. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes decreased as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading (113 vs. 77ml/m2, p<0.01 and 92 vs. 60ml/m2, p<0.01, respectively). LV mass decreased as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading (114 vs. 95g/m2, p<0.05) and continued to do so over the 1-year follow-up but did not reach values below the normal reference range suggesting no atrophic remodeling after prolonged LVAD unloading. Conclusion Continuous-flow LVAD unloading induced in a subset of patients, both ischemic and nonischemic, early improvement in myocardial structure and systolic and diastolic function that was largely completed within 6 months, with no evidence of subsequent

  13. Differential diagnosis between early repolarization of athlete's heart and coved-type Brugada electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Leoni, Loira; Di Paolo, Fernando M; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Bauce, Barbara; Pelliccia, Antonio; Corrado, Domenico

    2015-02-15

    Early repolarization (ER) is typically observed in highly trained athletes as a physiologic consequence of increased vagal tone. The variant of anterior (V1 to V3) ER characterized by "domed" ST-segment elevation and negative T wave raises problems of differential diagnosis with the "coved-type" electrocardiographic pattern seen in Brugada syndrome (BS). This study was designed to identify electrocardiographic criteria for distinguishing athlete's ER from BS. The study compared the electrocardiographic tracings of 61 healthy athletes (80% men, median age 23 ± 8 years), showing "domed" ST-segment elevation and negative T wave in leads V1 to V3, with those of 92 consecutive age- and sex-matched BS patients with a "coved-type" electrocardiographic pattern. The electrocardiographic analysis focused on the ST-segment elevation at J point (STJ) and at 80 milliseconds after J point (ST₈₀). Athletes had a lower maximum amplitude of STJ (1.46 ± 0.7 vs 3.25 ± 0.6 mm, p 1) versus only 2 (3%) athletes (p <0.001). An upsloping ST-segment configuration (STJ/ST₈₀ <1) showed a sensitivity of 97%, a specificity of 100%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 98.7% for the diagnosis of ER. At multivariate analysis, STJ/ST₈₀ ratio remained the only independent predictor for ER (odds ratio 87, 95% confidence interval 19 to 357, p <0.001). In conclusion, the STJ/ST₈₀ ratio is a highly accurate electrocardiographic parameter for differential diagnosis between anterior ER of the athlete and BS. Our results may help in reducing the number of athletes who undergo expensive diagnostic workup or are unnecessarily disqualified from competition for changes that fall within the normal range of athlete's heart. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A meta-analysis on the prognostic significance of inferolateral early repolarization pattern in Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Stamatis; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Liu, Tong; Kalafateli, Maria; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Bürkle, Gerd; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Efremidis, Michael; Deftereos, Spyridon; Sideris, Antonios; Takagi, Masahiko; Yan, Gan-Xin; Ehrlich, Joachim R

    2018-01-01

    The early repolarization (ER) pattern has been linked to an increased risk for arrhythmic death in various clinical settings. There are limited and conflicting data regarding the prognostic significance of ER pattern in Brugada syndrome (BS). The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide a detailed analysis of the currently available studies regarding the arrhythmic risk in patients with BS and ER pattern. Current databases were searched until May 2015. A random-effect meta-analysis of the effect of ER pattern on the incidence of arrhythmic events in patients with BS was performed. Five studies were included comprising a total of 1375 patients with BS. An ER pattern was reported in 177 patients (12.8%). During follow-up (44.9-93 months), 143 patients (10.4%) suffered an arrhythmic event. Overall, BS patients with ER pattern displayed an increased risk of arrhythmic events compared to patients without ER (OR 3.29, 95% CI: 2.06 to 5.26, P pattern location. Inferior, lateral, or inferolateral ER pattern location was observed in 20.3%, 32.2%, and 48%, respectively. An inferolateral ER location conferred the higher arrhythmic risk (OR 4.87, 95% CI: 2.64 to 9.01, Ppattern is associated with a high risk of arrhythmic events in patients with BS. In particular, BS patients with inferolateral ER (global ER pattern) displayed the highest arrhythmic risk. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Constant DI pacing suppresses cardiac alternans formation in numerical cable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlochiver, S.; Johnson, C.; Tolkacheva, E. G.

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans describe the sequential alternation of the action potential duration (APD) and can develop during rapid pacing. In the ventricles, such alternans may rapidly turn into life risking arrhythmias under conditions of spatial heterogeneity. Thus, suppression of alternans by artificial pacing protocols, or alternans control, has been the subject of numerous theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies. Yet, previous attempts that were inspired by chaos control theories were successful only for a short spatial extent (implanted pacemakers, in order to reduce the risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Future research should be conducted in order to experimentally validate these promising results.

  16. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  17. Significance of electrocardiogram recording in high intercostal spaces in patients with early repolarization syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Tsukasa; Wada, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Ikutaro; Ishibashi, Kohei; Miyamoto, Koji; Okamura, Hideo; Noda, Takashi; Aiba, Takeshi; Takaki, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Shimizu, Wataru; Makiyama, Takeru; Kimura, Takeshi; Kamakura, Shiro; Kusano, Kengo

    2016-02-14

    Published reports regarding inferolateral early repolarization (ER) syndrome (ERS) before 2013 possibly included patients with Brugada-pattern electrocardiogram (BrP-ECG) recorded only in the high intercostal spaces (HICS). We investigated the significance of HICS ECG recording in ERS patients. Fifty-six patients showing inferolateral ER in the standard ECG and spontaneous ventricular fibrillation (VF) not linked to structural heart disease underwent drug provocation tests by sodium channel blockade with right precordial ECG (V1-V3) recording in the 2nd-4th intercostal spaces. The prevalence and long-term outcome of ERS patients with and without BrP-ECG in HICS were investigated. After 18 patients showing type 1 BrP-ECG in the standard ECG were excluded, 38 patients (34 males, mean age; 40.4 ± 13.6 years) were classified into four groups [group A (n = 6;16%):patients with ER and type 1 BrP-ECG only in HICS, group B (n = 5;13%):ERS with non-type 1 BrP-ECG only in HICS, group C (n = 8;21%):ERS with non-type 1 BrP-ECG in the standard ECG, and group D (n = 19;50%):ERS only, spontaneously or after drug provocation test]. During follow-up of 110.0 ± 55.4 months, the rate of VF recurrence including electrical storm was significantly higher in groups A (4/6:67%), B (4/5:80%), and C (4/8:50%) compared with D (2/19:11%) (A, B, and C vs. D, P < 0.05). Approximately 30% of the patients with ERS who had been diagnosed with the previous criteria showed BrP-ECG only in HICS. Ventricular fibrillation mostly recurred in patients showing BrP-ECG in any precordial lead including HICS; these comprised 50% of the ERS cohort. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Automatic Identification of the Repolarization Endpoint by Computing the Dominant T-wave on a Reduced Number of Leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, C; Agostinelli, A; Di Nardo, F; Fioretti, S; Burattini, L

    2016-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) T-wave endpoint (Tend) identification suffers lack of reliability due to the presence of noise and variability among leads. Tend identification can be improved by using global repolarization waveforms obtained by combining several leads. The dominant T-wave (DTW) is a global repolarization waveform that proved to improve Tend identification when computed using the 15 (I to III, aVr, aVl, aVf, V1 to V6, X, Y, Z) leads usually available in clinics, of which only 8 (I, II, V1 to V6) are independent. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if the 8 independent leads are sufficient to obtain a DTW which allows a reliable Tend identification. To this aim Tend measures automatically identified from 15-dependent-lead DTWs of 46 control healthy subjects (CHS) and 103 acute myocardial infarction patients (AMIP) were compared with those obtained from 8-independent-lead DTWs. Results indicate that Tend distributions have not statistically different median values (CHS: 340 ms vs. 340 ms, respectively; AMIP: 325 ms vs. 320 ms, respectively), besides being strongly correlated (CHS: ρ=0.97, AMIP: 0.88; Pautomatic Tend identification from DTW, the 8 independent leads can be used without a statistically significant loss of accuracy but with a significant decrement of computational effort. The lead dependence of 7 out of 15 leads does not introduce a significant bias in the Tend determination from 15 dependent lead DTWs.

  19. The use of variability of repolarization for monitoring of arrhythmic risk : "the rocking of the boat"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhoff, P.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of deaths in the western world are of cardiovascular origin. Approximately 60% of these cardiovascular deaths are sudden. Implantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has been proven effective in preventing sudden cardiac death in patients at increased risk. An ICD

  20. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also do muscle-strengthening exercises, such as lifting weights or other resistance training exercises, two or three ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and healthy weight ... the most benefits from cardiac rehabilitation, make sure your exercise and ...

  1. Cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as coronary heart disease, heart valve problems, pericarditis, cardiac tumors, or damage from a heart attack. ... Palpitations Heart Valve Disease Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Pacemakers Pericarditis Stress Testing RELATED NEWS April 26, 2013 | News ...

  2. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Esteves Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

  3. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

  4. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis. PMID:24826214

  5. EXPERIENCE OF USING A NON-SELECTIVE BETA-BLOCKER IN COMPLEX THERAPY OF REPOLARIZATION DISORDERS IN YOUNG ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Tikhomirov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the effectiveness of various schemes of correction of repolarization disorder syndrome, including with the use of beta-blockers, in young athletes of the initial training group.Materials and methods. At the first stage, 410 children involved in sports sections were examined. The average age of the examined was 12.22 ± 3.11 years. At the second stage, the athletes (boys of the initial training group were selected from the surveyed contingent, engaged in martial arts. The groups were formed: A – people with violation of myocardial repolarization processes (72 patients, the average age 10,50 ± 0,35 years, the control group – people without changes in an electrocardiogram (33 people, the average age 10.36 ± 0, 62 years old. All underwent an electrocardiographic study at rest and after physical activity on the Innomed HS80GL apparatus with analysis of the main indicators. The vegetative status and the state of adaptation were estimated by Kerdo index and adaptive potential by Baevsky. After the examination, the subgroup A1 (40 people was prescribed metabolic and antioxidant drugs. Additionally, in the subgroup A2 (32 people, a non-selective beta-blocker was included in the treatment regimen. The course of treatment is 10 days. The analysis of indicators was carried out in 10 days and in a month after the initiation treatment. Statistical processing was carried out in the program Statistica.Results. An earlier disappearance of cardialgia was determined in the subgroup A2 (p < 0.05, whereas in the subgroup A1, 5% of patients had complaints not only at the end of the course, but also a month later after the initiation treatment. The more rapid positive dynamics of the electrocardiographic pattern with a more stable result was observed with the prescription of a beta-blocker.Conclusion. It was proved the advisability of prescribing of beta-blockers in the treatment of beginning athletes with violation of myocardial repolarization

  6. THE EFFICACY OF MELDONIUM IN REDUCTION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL INSTABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abdullaev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study meldonium effect in the combination therapy for ventricular repolarization disorders and cardiac electrical instability in patients with ischemic stroke.Material and methods. Patients (n=46 with acute phase of ischemic stroke were included in a randomized, open-label, uncontrolled study. Patients were randomized into two groups. Group 1 patients (n=25 had been receiving meldonium (Mildronate;Grindex,Latvia;Pharmstandard,Russia, 1.0 g/day intravenously once daily, as a part of standard therapy for 10 days since admission to the hospital. Group 2 patients (n=21 had standard therapy alone. A standart 12-lead ECG, ventricular late potentials (VLP, 24-hour Holter monitoring, troponin test were performed at the baseline and after 10 days.Results. Patients of the group 1 as compared to the group 2 demonstrated more significant positive effect on the clinical condition of patients with ischemic stroke, ventricular repolarization, reduction of frequency (from 3.7±0.5 to 2.1±0.4; p<0.05 and duration (from 6.6±1, 3 to 4.0±1.1 min; p<0.05 of painless myocardial ischemia episodes and VLP (from 48 to 32%.Conclusion. Adding meldonium to standard therapy in patients with acute phase of ischemic stroke can have a positive effect on the clinical condition, repolarization disorders on ECG, frequency of VLP and episodes of painless myocardial ischemia detection. This may have a positive effect on the electrical stability and prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. 

  7. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  8. Attenuated ventricular β-adrenergic response and reduced repolarization reserve in a rabbit model of chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jakob Dahl; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of pacing-induced heart failure (HF) are often associated with high acute mortality secondary to high pacing frequencies. The present study therefore exploits lower-frequency left ventricular pacing (300 beats per minute) in rabbits for 11 weeks to produce chronic HF with low acute...... in paced animals. Ventricular arrhythmias or sudden death was not observed. Isoproterenol increased heart rate similarly in both groups but showed a blunted QT-shortening effect in tachypaced rabbits compared with controls. Langendorff experiments revealed significant monophasic action potential duration...... prolonged monophasic action potential duration and increased short-term variability of repolarization in tachypaced hearts. A blunted monophasic action potential duration response was observed ex vivo in tachypaced hearts after isoproterenol. The HF rabbits showed structural, functional, and electrical...

  9. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussabah, Elhem; Zakhama, Lilia; Ksontini, Iméne; Ibn Elhadj, Zied; Boukhris, Besma; Naffeti, Sana; Thameur, Moez; Ben Youssef, Soraya

    2008-09-01

    PREREQUIS: Amyloidosis is a rare infiltrative disease characterized by multiple clinical features. Various organs are involved and the cardiovascular system is a common target of amyloidosis. Cardiac involvement may occur with or without clinical manifestations and is considered as a major prognostic factor. To analyze the clinical features of cardiac involvement, to review actual knowledgement concerning echocardiographic diagnostic and to evaluate recent advances in treatment of the disease. An electronic search of the relevant literature was carried out using Medline and Pubmed. Keys words used for the final search were amyloidosis, cardiopathy and echocardiography. We considered for analysis reviews, studies and articles between 1990 and 2007. Amyloidosis represents 5 to 10% of non ischemic cardiomyoparhies. Cardiac involvement is the first cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy witch must be evoked in front of every inexplained cardiopathy after the age of forty. The amyloid nature of cardiopathy is suggered if some manifestations were associated as a peripheric neuropathy, a carpal tunnel sydrome and proteinuria > 3g/day. Echocardiography shows dilated atria, a granular sparkling appearance of myocardium, diastolic dysfunction and thickened left ventricle contrasting with a low electric voltage. The proof of amyloidosis is brought by an extra-cardiac biopsy, the indications of endomyocardial biopsy are very limited. The identification of the amyloid nature of cardiopathy has an direct therapeutic implication: it indicates the use of digitalis, calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers. Today the treatment of amyloidosis remains very unsatisfactory especially in the cardiac involvement. An early diagnosis before the cardiac damage may facilitate therapy and improve prognosis.

  10. Heart rate, blood pressure and repolarization effects of an energy drink as compared to coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, R Matthew; Christmas, Kevin M; Patik, Jordan C; Bhella, Paul S

    2017-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of energy drinks on haemodynamic and cardiac physiology. Comparisons were made to coffee as well as water consumption. In Protocol #1 the caffeine content was normalized to body weight to represent a controlled environment. Heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac QTc interval were assessed in 15 participants, on 4 days, prior to and for 6·5 h postconsumption of (i) energy drink (2 mg caffeine per kg body weight; low dose), (ii) energy drink (3 mg caffeine per kg body weight; medium dose), (iii) coffee (2 mg caffeine per kg body weight) and (iv) 250 ml water. In Protocol #2, the beverages were consumed in volumes that they are purchased to represent real-life conditions. The aforementioned measurements were repeated in 15 participants following (i) 1 16 oz can of energy drink (16 oz Monster), (ii) 1 24 oz can of energy drink (24 oz Monster), (iii) 1 packet of Keurig K-Cup Starbucks coffee (coffee) and (iv) 250 ml water. The order of the beverages was performed in a randomized double-blinded fashion. For both protocols, QTc interval, heart rate and systolic blood pressure were unchanged in any condition (P>0·05). Diastolic blood pressure and mean blood pressure were slightly elevated in Protocol #1 (P0·05). These findings suggest that acute consumption of these commonly consumed beverages has no negative effect on cardiac QTc interval. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. FGF21 and cardiac physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ePlanavila

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21 production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPARα and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease.

  12. Pregnancy as a cardiac stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eunhee; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy occurs during pregnancy as a consequence of both volume overload and hormonal changes. Both pregnancy- and exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy are generally thought to be similar and physiological. Despite the fact that there are shared transcriptional responses in both forms of cardiac adaptation, pregnancy results in a distinct signature of gene expression in the heart. In some cases, however, pregnancy can induce adverse cardiac events in previously healthy women without any known cardiovascular disease. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of non-obstetric mortality during pregnancy. To understand how pregnancy can cause heart disease, it is first important to understand cardiac adaptation during normal pregnancy. This review provides an overview of the cardiac consequences of pregnancy, including haemodynamic, functional, structural, and morphological adaptations, as well as molecular phenotypes. In addition, this review describes the signalling pathways responsible for pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis. We also compare and contrast cardiac adaptation in response to disease, exercise, and pregnancy. The comparisons of these settings of cardiac hypertrophy provide insight into pregnancy-associated cardiac adaptation. PMID:24448313

  13. [The surface ECG in the diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias: the value of the right precordial leads].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, S

    2007-03-01

    The surface electrocardiogram (ECG) is a simple noninvasive method to assess the electrical activity of the heart and provides important information to identify patients with cardiac arrhythmias and increased arrhythmic risk. This brief review highlights cardiac conditions in which the right precordial leads recorded on the surface ECG during sinus rhythm or tachycardia are of important diagnostic and prognostic value. Epsilon waves seen in the right precordial ST segments are the electrocardiographic hallmark of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis of Brugada syndrome and risk stratification of affected patients are based on a coved-type >or=2 mm ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads. This typical ECG pattern may be present persistently, intermittently or only after administration of sodium-channel blockers. The early repolarization syndrome, most commonly seen in healthy young individuals, is characterized by a ST-segment elevation of 1 to 4 mm in the mid-precordial leads with a notched and elevated J point in lead V4. The precordial ECG T-wave repolarization pattern may be helpful in identifying the genotype in patients with suspected long QT syndrome. In patients with overt preexcitation, the surface leads V1 and V2 play a key role in localizing the site of bypass-tract insertion. Finally, the right precordial lead V1 is often crucial in the diagnosis of narrow and broad QRS-complex tachycardias.

  14. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiandra, O.; Espasandin, W.; Fiandra, H.

    1984-01-01

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  15. A computational investigation of cardiac caveolae as a source of persistent sodium current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Besse

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains, called caveolae, reveal that caveolae are reservoirs of recruitable sodium ion channels. Caveolar channels constitute a substantial and previously unrecognized source of sodium current in cardiac cells. In this paper we model for the first time caveolar sodium currents and their contributions to cardiac action potential morphology. We show that the beta-agonist-induced opening of caveolae may have substantial impacts on peak overshoot, maximum upstroke velocity, and ultimately conduction velocity. Additionally, we show that prolonged action potentials and the formation of potentially arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations, can arise if caveolae open intermittently throughout the action potential. Our simulations suggest that there may exist routes to delayed repolarization, and the arrhythmias associated with such delays, that are independent of channelopathies.

  16. Evaluation of the acute electrophysiologic effects of intravenous dronedarone, an amiodarone-like agent, with special emphasis on ventricular repolarization and acquired torsade de pointes arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduyn, S C; Vos, M A; Leunissen, H D; van Opstal, J M; Wellens, H J

    1999-02-01

    In the anesthetized dog with complete chronic AV block (CAVB), we evaluated and compared the acute electrophysiologic effects of dronedarone i.v. (Dron, 2 times 2.5 mg/kg/10 min) and amiodarone i.v. (Amio, 2 times 5 mg/kg/10 min). This canine model with a high sensitivity for acquired torsade de pointes (TdP) provides an ideal substrate to evaluate ventricular repolarization abnormalities. Six ECG leads and two endocardial monophasic action potential (MAP) recordings in the left and right ventricle (LV and RV) were simultaneously recorded to measure QT time, action-potential duration (APD), interventricular dispersion (deltaAPD = LV(APD) - RV(APD)), early afterdepolarizations (EADs), ectopic beats (EBs), and TdP. Measurements were made at the spontaneous idioventricular rhythm (IVR) and 1,000-ms steady-state pacing. To investigate its short-term, antiarrhythmic properties, Dron was given after almokalant (0.12 mg/kg)-induced TdP. Furthermore, in another set of experiments, oral Dron (20 mg/kg, b.i.d) was given for 3 weeks to conscious CAVB dogs. Dron, i.v., shortened ventricular repolarization (QT, 435 +/- 60 to 360 +/- 55; LV(APD) 395 +/- 75 to 335 +/- 60 ms; p Dron, i.v., suppressed the EADs, EBs, and TdP by a reduction and homogenization of repolarization (LV(APD), 505 +/- 110 to 455 +/- 80 ms, and deltaAPD, 110 +/- 55 to 65 +/- 40 ms). Long-term oral Dron increased the PP interval, CL-IVR, and QT(c) time. In contrast to oral treatment, Dron i.v. shortens ventricular repolarization parameters, resulting in suppression of EAD-dependent acquired TdP. The increased VERP/QT ratio after Dron i.v. may indicate an important second antiarrhythmic property.

  17. Cardiac alterations in human African trypanosomiasis (T.b. gambiense with respect to the disease stage and antiparasitic treatment.

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    Johannes A Blum

    Full Text Available In Human African Trypanosomiasis, neurological symptoms dominate and cardiac involvement has been suggested. Because of increasing resistance to the available drugs for HAT, new compounds are desperately needed. Evaluation of cardiotoxicity is one parameter of drug safety, but without knowledge of the baseline heart involvement in HAT, cardiologic findings and drug-induced alterations will be difficult to interpret. The aims of the study were to assess the frequency and characteristics of electrocardiographic findings in the first stage of HAT, to compare these findings to those of second stage patients and healthy controls and to assess any potential effects of different therapeutic antiparasitic compounds with respect to ECG changes after treatment.Four hundred and six patients with first stage HAT were recruited in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola and Sudan between 2002 and 2007 in a series of clinical trials comparing the efficacy and safety of the experimental treatment DB289 to the standard first stage treatment, pentamidine. These ECGs were compared to the ECGs of healthy volunteers (n = 61 and to those of second stage HAT patients (n = 56.In first and second stage HAT, a prolonged QTc interval, repolarization changes and low voltage were significantly more frequent than in healthy controls. Treatment in first stage was associated with repolarization changes in both the DB289 and the pentamidine group to a similar extent. The QTc interval did not change during treatment.Cardiac involvement in HAT, as demonstrated by ECG alterations, appears early in the evolution of the disease. The prolongation of the QTC interval comprises a risk of fatal arrhythmias if new drugs with an additional potential of QTC prolongation will be used. During treatment ECG abnormalities such as repolarization changes consistent with peri-myocarditis occur frequently and appear to be associated with the disease stage, but not with a specific drug.

  18. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the ... contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle of ...

  19. In Vivo and In Silico Investigation Into Mechanisms of Frequency Dependence of Repolarization Alternans in Human Ventricular Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Orini, Michele; Hanson, Ben; Hayward, Martin; Taggart, Peter; Lambiase, Pier D; Burrage, Kevin; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2016-01-22

    Repolarization alternans (RA) are associated with arrhythmogenesis. Animal studies have revealed potential mechanisms, but human-focused studies are needed. RA generation and frequency dependence may be determined by cell-to-cell variability in protein expression, which is regulated by genetic and external factors. To characterize in vivo RA in human and to investigate in silico using human models, the ionic mechanisms underlying the frequency-dependent differences in RA behavior identified in vivo. In vivo electrograms were acquired at 240 sites covering the epicardium of 41 patients at 6 cycle lengths (600-350 ms). In silico investigations were conducted using a population of biophysically detailed human models incorporating variability in protein expression and calibrated using in vivo recordings. Both in silico and in vivo, 2 types of RA were identified, with Fork- and Eye-type restitution curves, based on RA persistence or disappearance, respectively, at fast pacing rates. In silico simulations show that RA are strongly correlated with fluctuations in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium, because of strong release and weak reuptake. Large L-type calcium current conductance is responsible for RA disappearance at fast frequencies in Eye-type (30% larger in Eye-type versus Fork-type; Psilico, 2 types of RA are identified, with RA persistence/disappearance as frequency increases. In silico, L-type calcium current and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger current determine RA human cell-to-cell differences through intracellular and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium regulation. © 2015 The Authors.

  20. The cardiac glycoside ouabain activates NLRP3 inflammasomes and promotes cardiac inflammation and dysfunction.

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    Motoi Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides such as digoxin are Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitors that are widely used for the treatment of chronic heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias; however, recent epidemiological studies have suggested a relationship between digoxin treatment and increased mortality. We previously showed that nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3 inflammasomes, which regulate caspase-1-dependent interleukin (IL-1β release, mediate the sterile cardiovascular inflammation. Because the Na+/K+-ATPase is involved in inflammatory responses, we investigated the role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in the pathophysiology of cardiac glycoside-induced cardiac inflammation and dysfunction. The cardiac glycoside ouabain induced cardiac dysfunction and injury in wild-type mice primed with a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, although no cardiac dysfunction was observed in mice treated with either ouabain or LPS alone. Ouabain also induced cardiac inflammatory responses, such as macrophage infiltration and IL-1β release, when mice were primed with LPS. These cardiac manifestations were all significantly attenuated in mice deficient in IL-1β. Furthermore, deficiency of NLRP3 inflammasome components, NLRP3 and caspase-1, also attenuated ouabain-induced cardiac dysfunction and inflammation. In vitro experiments revealed that ouabain induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation as well as subsequent IL-1β release from macrophages, and this activation was mediated by K+ efflux. Our findings demonstrate that cardiac glycosides promote cardiac inflammation and dysfunction through NLRP3 inflammasomes and provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of cardiac glycosides.

  1. Cardiovascular action of insulin in health and disease: focus in endothelial L-arginine transport and cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián eDubó

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1 is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO. Insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involved increases of hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which contributes to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, the electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus, generating a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown a prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval. The long QT generated is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. The impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K+ (Ito and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5 or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP of K+ channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that the lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular

  2. Cardiac rhythm disturbance in athletes with cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome

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    Shahrjerdi Sh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome consists of mitral valve prolapse (MVP, anomalously located chordae tendinae of the left ventricle, or a combination of the two. MVP is marked by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during systole. The nonclassic form of MVP carries a low risk of complications. Patients with severe classic MVP can suffer from mitral regurgitation (MR, infective endocarditis, and, infrequently, sudden death from cardiac arrest. Anomalously located left ventricular chordae tendinae are fibrous or fibromuscular bands that stretch across the left ventricle from the septum to the free wall. They have been associated with murmurs and arrhythmias. The purpose of this study is to assess the performance, as measured by the physical working capacity (PWC170 and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max, in athletes with cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome. Methods: Of the 183 male athletes studied, 158 had cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome and 25 were normal, healthy controls. Their mean age was 16.23 (± 5.48 years and mean training time was 5.2 (±- 4.6 years. Athletes with cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome were divided to four groups. Group 1 consisted of those with MVP; Group 2 had patients with an additional cord in left ventricle; Group 3 was made up of athletes with a combination of MVP and additional cord; Group 4 contained athletes with a combination of MVP and MR. All sportsmen were studied by echocardiograph, veloergometer, and those with arrhythmias were studied and recorded using a Holter monitor. Results: The most common form of this syndrome in our study groups was MVP. The PWC170and VO2 max among the athletes with the combination of MVP+MR (Group 4 was lower than that of athletes in other groups (P<0.05. The most common arrhythmia among the athletes with anomalously located left ventricular chordae, Group 2, was Wolf

  3. Cardiac pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenik, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of a cardiac pacemaker is described which is characterized by particularly small dimensions, small weight and long life duration. The weight is under 100g, the specific weight under 1.7. Mass inertia forces which occur through acceleration and retardation processes, thus remain below the threshold values, above which one would have to reckon with considerable damaging of the surrounding body tissue. The maintaining of small size and slight weight is achieved by using an oscillator on COSMOS basis, where by considerably lower energy consumption, amongst others the lifetimes of the batteries used - a lithium anode with thionyl chloride electrolyte - is extended to over 5 years. The reliability can be increased by the use of 2 or more batteries. The designed dimension are 20x60x60 mm 3 . (ORU/LH) [de

  4. Cardiac safety of rasagiline, a selective monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor for the treatment of Parkinson's disease: a thorough QT/QTc study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendzelevski, Boaz; Sprenger, Craig R; Spiegelstein, Ofer; Rabinovich-Guilatt, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Rasagiline is a selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor, developed for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In compliance with current regulatory requirements, rasagiline underwent a thorough QT/QTc (TQT) study to assess its potential to prolong cardiac repolarization. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of clinical (1 mg/day) and supratherapeutic (2 mg/day and 6 mg/day) multiple oral doses of rasagiline on the baseline- and placebo-adjusted QTc interval (delta delta QTc (ddQTc)). Other electrocardiogram parameters, pharmacokinetic assessments, safety and tolerability as well as vital signs were investigated. This was a five-arm, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled, and parallel study in healthy subjects. Moxifloxacin (400 mg) positive control was included to demonstrate assay sensitivity. 247 of 250 randomized subjects completed the study. Time-matched analysis of ddQTc yielded two-sided 90% confidence intervals for all rasagiline doses below the 10 ms regulatory threshold, showing no effect on cardiac repolarization. Concentration-effect analysis demonstrated no relationships between rasagiline (and its metabolite 1-aminoindan), plasma concentrations, and ddQTc. The pharmacokinetic profile of rasagiline was consistent with previous studies. Adverse events were mild to moderate in intensity and were similar across all treatment groups. There were no clinically significant changes in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. This TQT study demonstrated a favorable cardiac safety profile of rasagiline.

  5. Complex T-wave morphology in body surface potential mapping in prediction of arrhythmic events in patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Petri; Husa, Terhi; Konttila, Teijo; Tierala, Ilkka; Mäkijärvi, Markku; Väänänen, Heikki; Toivonen, Lauri

    2009-04-01

    Heterogeneous ventricular repolarization is associated with sudden cardiac death after myocardial infarction (MI). This prospective study investigated repolarization disparity with parameters based on T-wave morphology in body surface potential mapping (BSPM) in the assessment of arrhythmia risk in patients with a recent MI and cardiac dysfunction. Patients (n = 158) had 120-lead BSPM and 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) registered soon after acute MI. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the T-wave and T-wave vector loop descriptors were applied to compute parameters describing T-wave morphology and its variation. The study endpoints were arrhythmic events and all-cause mortality. During a mean follow-up of 50 months, 30 patients (19%) died and 16 (10%) had an arrhythmic event. Most of the parameters differed significantly between patients with and without arrhythmic events. In univariate analysis, T-wave vector loop length (TLL) and PCA parameter PCA(3) in BSPM and TLL in ECG were significant predictors of arrhythmic events. In multivariate analysis including several clinical variables, these parameters also showed an independent prediction, with parameters in BSPM performing somewhat better. None of the parameters predicted all-cause mortality. Complex T-wave morphology in BSPM is a marker of arrhythmia propensity in patients with a recent MI and cardiac dysfunction.

  6. Contribution of two-pore K+ channels to cardiac ventricular action potential revealed using human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Sam; Wan, Xiaoping; Nassal, Drew M; Liu, Haiyan; Moravec, Christine S; Ramirez-Navarro, Angelina; Deschênes, Isabelle

    2017-06-01

    Two-pore K + (K 2p ) channels have been described in modulating background conductance as leak channels in different physiological systems. In the heart, the expression of K 2p channels is heterogeneous with equivocation regarding their functional role. Our objective was to determine the K 2p expression profile and their physiological and pathophysiological contribution to cardiac electrophysiology. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from humans were differentiated into cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs). mRNA was isolated from these cells, commercial iPSC-CM (iCells), control human heart ventricular tissue (cHVT), and ischemic (iHF) and nonischemic heart failure tissues (niHF). We detected 10 K 2p channels in the heart. Comparing quantitative PCR expression of K 2p channels between human heart tissue and iPSC-CMs revealed K 2p 1.1, K 2p 2.1, K 2p 5.1, and K 2p 17.1 to be higher expressed in cHVT, whereas K 2p 3.1 and K 2p 13.1 were higher in iPSC-CMs. Notably, K 2p 17.1 was significantly lower in niHF tissues compared with cHVT. Action potential recordings in iCells after K 2p small interfering RNA knockdown revealed prolongations in action potential depolarization at 90% repolarization for K 2p 2.1, K 2p 3.1, K 2p 6.1, and K 2p 17.1. Here, we report the expression level of 10 human K 2p channels in iPSC-CMs and how they compared with cHVT. Importantly, our functional electrophysiological data in human iPSC-CMs revealed a prominent role in cardiac ventricular repolarization for four of these channels. Finally, we also identified K 2p 17.1 as significantly reduced in niHF tissues and K 2p 4.1 as reduced in niHF compared with iHF. Thus, we advance the notion that K 2p channels are emerging as novel players in cardiac ventricular electrophysiology that could also be remodeled in cardiac pathology and therefore contribute to arrhythmias. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Two-pore K + (K 2p ) channels are traditionally regarded as merely background leak channels in myriad

  7. Effect of veliparib (ABT-888) on cardiac repolarization in patients with advanced solid tumors : a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munasinghe, Wijith; Stodtmann, Sven; Tolcher, Anthony; Calvo, Emiliano; Gordon, Michael; Jalving, Mathilde; de Vos-Geelen, Judith; Medina, Diane; Bergau, Dennis; Nuthalapati, Silpa; Hoffman, David; Shepherd, Stacie; Xiong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Veliparib (ABT-888) is an orally bioavailable potent inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and PARP-2. This phase 1 study evaluated the effect of veliparib on corrected QT interval using Fridericia's formula (QTcF). Eligible patients with advanced solid tumors received single-dose oral

  8. Prevalence and associated factors of early repolarization pattern in healthy young northeastern Thai men: A correlation study with Brugada electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarawate, Pattarapong; Chaosuwannakit, Narumol; Ruamcharoen, Yossavadee; Panthongviriyakul, Aunejit; Pongchaiyakul, Choowong; Tharaksa, Prapapan; Sripo, Temsiri; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    Background Early repolarization pattern (ERP) is characterized by J-point elevation with QRS notching or slurring in the terminal portion of the QRS complex. It may be associated with sudden death. Brugada syndrome (BS) is a genetic and fatal disease commonly found in northeastern Thai men. Data on the rate and predictors of ERP in Asian populations are limited. In addition, the correlation between ERP and BS has never been studied in an endemic area of BS. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of ERP and its associated factors in young, healthy male Asian subjects. Methods Between June 2011 and May 2012, 282 young, healthy men aged 20–45 years were enrolled at check-up clinics in Khon Kaen, Thailand. Subjects were divided into the ERP and non-ERP groups. Results There were 29 subjects with ERP (10.3%). The Sokolow–Lyon index was an independent factor for ERP with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.090 (95% CI: 1.027, 1.159). The Brugada ECG pattern was found in 11 (37.9%) subjects in the ERP group. The Brugada ECG pattern (non-type 1) was commonly found in lateral ERP patients. After the placement of high intercostal leads, the Brugada ECG pattern was dramatically increased compared with results obtained during standard ECG lead placement. Conclusions The ERP rate in young, healthy men from northeastern Thailand was 10.3%. A higher Sokolow–Lyon index was the only independent factor associated with ERP. Subjects with ERP should be examined with high intercostal leads to uncover Brugada ECG. PMID:26336562

  9. The role of autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanfang; Xu, Jin; He, Lu; Peng, Lijun; Zhong, Qiaoqing; Chen, Linxi; Jiang, Zhisheng

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is conserved in nature from lower eukaryotes to mammals and is an important self-cannibalizing, degradative process that contributes to the elimination of superfluous materials. Cardiac hypertrophy is primarily characterized by excess protein synthesis, increased cardiomyocyte size, and thickened ventricular walls and is a major risk factor that promotes arrhythmia and heart failure. In recent years, cardiomyocyte autophagy has been considered to play a role in controlling the hypertrophic response. However, the beneficial or aggravating role of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy remains controversial. The exact mechanism of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy requires further study. In this review, we summarize the controversies associated with autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy and provide insights into the role of autophagy in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that future studies should emphasize the relationship between autophagy and the different stages of cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the autophagic flux and selective autophagy. Autophagy will be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27084518

  10. Cardiac regeneration therapy: connections to cardiac physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Naofumi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    Without heart transplantation, a large number of patients with failing hearts worldwide face poor outcomes. By means of cardiomyocyte regeneration, cardiac regeneration therapy is emerging with great promise as a means for restoring loss of cardiac function. However, the limited success of clinical trials using bone marrow-derived cells and myoblasts with heterogeneous constituents, transplanted at a wide range of cell doses, has led to disagreement on the efficacy of cell therapy. It is therefore essential to reevaluate the evidence for the efficacy of cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy, focusing on targets, materials, and methodologies. Meanwhile, the revolutionary innovation of cardiac regeneration therapy is sorely needed to help the millions of people who suffer heart failure from acquired loss of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac regeneration has been used only in limited species or as a developing process in the rodent heart; now, the possibility of cardiomyocyte turnover in the human heart is being revisited. In the pursuit of this concept, the use of cardiac stem/progenitor stem cells in the cardiac niche must be focused to usher in a second era of cardiac regeneration therapy for the severely injured heart. In addition, tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming will advance the next era of treatment that will enable current cell-based therapy to progress to "real" cardiac regeneration therapy. Although many barriers remain, the prevention of refractory heart failure through cardiac regeneration is now becoming a realistic possibility.

  11. Fibroblast proliferation alters cardiac excitation conduction and contraction: a computational study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, He-qing; Xia, Ling; Shou, Guo-fa; Zang, Yun-liang; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of cardiac fibroblast proliferation on cardiac electric excitation conduction and mechanical contraction were investigated using a proposed integrated myocardial-fibroblastic electromechanical model. At the cellular level, models of the human ventricular myocyte and fibroblast were modified to incorporate a model of cardiac mechanical contraction and cooperativity mechanisms. Cellular electromechanical coupling was realized with a calcium buffer. At the tissue level, electrical excitation conduction was coupled to an elastic mechanics model in which the finite difference method (FDM) was used to solve electrical excitation equations, and the finite element method (FEM) was used to solve mechanics equations. The electromechanical properties of the proposed integrated model were investigated in one or two dimensions under normal and ischemic pathological conditions. Fibroblast proliferation slowed wave propagation, induced a conduction block, decreased strains in the fibroblast proliferous tissue, and increased dispersions in depolarization, repolarization, and action potential duration (APD). It also distorted the wave-front, leading to the initiation and maintenance of re-entry, and resulted in a sustained contraction in the proliferous areas. This study demonstrated the important role that fibroblast proliferation plays in modulating cardiac electromechanical behaviour and which should be considered in planning future heart-modeling studies. PMID:24599687

  12. Genetic variation for cardiac dysfunction in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A Ocorr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common diseases may be attributed to combinations of variant alleles, but there are few model systems where the interactions among such variants can be studied in controlled genetic crosses. While association studies are designed to detect common polymorphisms of moderate effect, new approaches are required to characterize the impact on disease of interactions among rare alleles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that wild populations of Drosophila melanogaster harbor rare polymorphisms of major effect (RAME that predispose flies to a specific disease phenotype, age-dependent cardiac dysfunction. A screen of fifty inbred wild-type lines revealed a continuous spectrum of pacing-induced heart failure that generally increases in frequency with age. High-speed video analysis of the inbred lines with high rates of inducible heart failure indicates specific defects in cardiac function, including arrhythmias and contractile disorders ('cardiomyopathies'. A combination of bulked segregant analysis and single feature polymorphism (SFP detection localizes one of the cardiac susceptibility loci to the 97C interval on the fly genome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Wild-type Drosophila, like humans, are predisposed to cardiac dysfunction. Identification of factors associated with these naturally occurring cardiac traits promises to provide important insights into the epidemiology of cardiac disease.

  13. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, A.S.; Asghari-Roodsari, A.; Tan, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  14. Modeling Human Cardiac Hypertrophy in Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Ovchinnikova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of cardiovascular diseases. The mechanisms behind the development and regulation of cardiac hypertrophy in the human setting are poorly understood, which can be partially attributed to the lack of a human cardiomyocyte-based preclinical test system recapitulating features of diseased myocardium. The objective of our study is to determine whether human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs subjected to mechanical stretch can be used as an adequate in vitro model for studying molecular mechanisms of cardiac hypertrophy. We show that hESC-CMs subjected to cyclic stretch, which mimics mechanical overload, exhibit essential features of a hypertrophic state on structural, functional, and gene expression levels. The presented hESC-CM stretch approach provides insight into molecular mechanisms behind mechanotransduction and cardiac hypertrophy and lays groundwork for the development of pharmacological approaches as well as for discovering potential circulating biomarkers of cardiac dysfunction. : In this article, Berezikov, van der Meer, and colleagues used stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes to model human cardiac hypertrophy. Their approach provides novel insights into molecular mechanisms behind mechanotransduction and cardiac hypertrophy and lays groundwork for the development of new pharmacological approaches as well as for discovering new potential circulating biomarkers of cardiac dysfunction. Keywords: stem cells, human cardiomyocytes, hypertrophy, in vitro disease modeling, cardiomyocytes stretch response, mechanotransduction

  15. Novel experimental results in human cardiac electrophysiology: measurement of the Purkinje fibre action potential from the undiseased human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Norbert; Szél, Tamás; Jost, Norbert; Tóth, András; Gy Papp, Julius; Varró, András

    2015-09-01

    Data obtained from canine cardiac electrophysiology studies are often extrapolated to the human heart. However, it has been previously demonstrated that because of the lower density of its K(+) currents, the human ventricular action potential has a less extensive repolarization reserve. Since the relevance of canine data to the human heart has not yet been fully clarified, the aim of the present study was to determine for the first time the action potentials of undiseased human Purkinje fibres (PFs) and to compare them directly with those of dog PFs. All measurements were performed at 37 °C using the conventional microelectrode technique. At a stimulation rate of 1 Hz, the plateau potential of human PFs is more positive (8.0 ± 1.8 vs 8.6 ± 3.4 mV, n = 7), while the amplitude of the spike is less pronounced. The maximal rate of depolarization is significantly lower in human PKs than in canine PFs (406.7 ± 62 vs 643 ± 36 V/s, respectively, n = 7). We assume that the appreciable difference in the protein expression profiles of the 2 species may underlie these important disparities. Therefore, caution is advised when canine PF data are extrapolated to humans, and further experiments are required to investigate the characteristics of human PF repolarization and its possible role in arrhythmogenesis.

  16. Cardiac gated ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  17. Diagnosis of Right Ventricular Cardiac Insufficiency in the Acute Bronchial Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.А. Kondratiev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to define the informative clinical-echocardiographic diagnostic signs for the development of right ventricular cardiac insufficiency in children in the acute bronchial asthma, 64 patients aged 5 to 17 years were examined. During investigations of pathologic changes in the cardiovascular system followed by mathematic processing of diagnostic symptoms using sequential analysis by Wald, there has been shown a high informative significance of a number of signs for the diagnosis of right ventricular cardiac insufficiency in children in the acute bronchial asthma, namely: elevation of systolic pressure in the pulmonary artery, enlargement of the echocardiographic sizes of right ventricular and right atrial cavities, isovolumic relaxation time of the right ventricle; tachycardia or bradycardia, hyperkinetic type of hemodynamics, disorders of ventricular repolarization according to electrocardiography data. Presence of the informative diagnostic signs of right ventricular cardiac insufficiency in a sick child in the acute bronchial asthma enables to diagnose this complication with the probability of 90 % and more and to carry out appropriate correction of the therapy.

  18. Contribution of small conductance K+ channels to sinoatrial node pacemaker activity: insights from atrial-specific Na+ /Ca2+ exchange knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Angelo G; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Heidi; Zaini, Audrey; Kim, Brian; Yue, Xin; Philipson, Kenneth D; Goldhaber, Joshua I

    2017-06-15

    Repolarizing currents through K + channels are essential for proper sinoatrial node (SAN) pacemaking, but the influence of intracellular Ca 2+ on repolarization in the SAN is uncertain. We identified all three isoforms of Ca 2+ -activated small conductance K + (SK) channels in the murine SAN. SK channel blockade slows repolarization and subsequent depolarization of SAN cells. In the atrial-specific Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger (NCX) knockout mouse, cellular Ca 2+ accumulation during spontaneous SAN pacemaker activity produces intermittent hyperactivation of SK channels, leading to arrhythmic pauses alternating with bursts of pacing. These findings suggest that Ca 2+ -sensitive SK channels can translate changes in cellular Ca 2+ into a repolarizing current capable of modulating pacemaking. SK channels are a potential pharmacological target for modulating SAN rate or treating SAN dysfunction, particularly under conditions characterized by abnormal increases in diastolic Ca 2+ . Small conductance K + (SK) channels have been implicated as modulators of spontaneous depolarization and electrical conduction that may be involved in cardiac arrhythmia. However, neither their presence nor their contribution to sinoatrial node (SAN) pacemaker activity has been investigated. Using quantitative PCR (q-PCR), immunostaining and patch clamp recordings of membrane current and voltage, we identified all three SK isoforms (SK1, SK2 and SK3) in mouse SAN. Inhibition of SK channels with the specific blocker apamin prolonged action potentials (APs) in isolated SAN cells. Apamin also slowed diastolic depolarization and reduced pacemaker rate in isolated SAN cells and intact tissue. We investigated whether the Ca 2+ -sensitive nature of SK channels could explain arrhythmic SAN pacemaker activity in the atrial-specific Na + /Ca 2+ exchange (NCX) knockout (KO) mouse, a model of cellular Ca 2+ overload. SAN cells isolated from the NCX KO exhibited higher SK current than wildtype (WT) and apamin

  19. Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa Insight is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal of the Africa Institute of South Africa. It is accredited by the South African National Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and is indexed in the International Bibliography of Social Science (IBSS). It is a multi-disciplinary journal primarily focusing on African ...

  20. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  1. Kv2 Channel Regulation of Action Potential Repolarization and Firing Patterns in Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons and Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin W.

    2014-01-01

    Kv2 family “delayed-rectifier” potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and action potentials. In both rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E produced near-saturating block of a component of current typically constituting ∼60–80% of the total delayed-rectifier current. GxTX-1E also reduced A-type potassium current (IA), but much more weakly. In SCG neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes and voltage clamp experiments using action potential waveforms showed that Kv2 channels carry ∼55% of the total outward current during action potential repolarization despite activating relatively late in the spike. In CA1 neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes evoked from −70 mV, but not −80 mV, likely reflecting a greater role of Kv2 when other potassium channels were partially inactivated at −70 mV. In both CA1 and SCG neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels produced dramatic depolarization of interspike voltages during repetitive firing. In CA1 neurons and some SCG neurons, this was associated with increased initial firing frequency. In all neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels depressed maintained firing because neurons entered depolarization block more readily. Therefore, Kv2 channels can either decrease or increase neuronal excitability depending on the time scale of excitation. PMID:24695716

  2. Evolution of Early Repolarization Patterns after 5 Years in a Military Population at Low Cardiovascular Risk and Practical Implications in Military Medical Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinsonneau, Ulric; Pangnarind-Heinz, Vanida; Paleiron, Nicolas; Heinz, Louis Marie; Rohel, Guenole; Piquemal, Marie; Castellant, Philippe; Abalea, Jerome; Mansourati, Jacques; Paule, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The French military population is a young and athletic population with a high prevalence of early repolarization patterns (ERP) compared to the general population. Screening of military officers at risk of sudden death (SD) is a priority in military medical expertise. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of ERP and its evolution over a period of 5 years in a specific asymptomatic population, free of heart disease and cardiovascular risk factors. From March to December 2008, we prospectively collected the electrocardiograms (ECGs) of military officers enlisted into the submarine forces of France. For 5 years (until 2012), the military officers included in the study underwent a clinical examination twice per year. A new ECG was carried out 5 years after the initial one. A total of 250 male subjects were included (mean age 22.87 ± 0.5 years). The prevalence of ERP was 19.2%. The most common appearance was an elevation of a slurring type J point (31/48 or 64.5%) in inferolateral leads (18/48 or 37.8%). After 5 years, the prevalence of ERP was identical to that of the previous period (19.2%) with no change in appearance, distribution, and amplitude in 47 subjects (97.9%). Repolarization changed in two patients (one occurrence of ERP and one disappearance). During the 5 years of follow-up, the subjects remained asymptomatic ERP is common in our population of young, athletic, and asymptomatic military officers and changes little in 5 years. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Hyperplastic Cardiac Sarcoma Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood A. Shariff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumors with a median survival of 6–12 months. Data suggest that an aggressive multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome. We present the case of a male who underwent resection of cardiac sarcoma three times from the age of 32 to 34. This report discusses the malignant nature of cardiac sarcoma and the importance of postoperative multidisciplinary care.

  4. Biomimetic material strategies for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Venugopal, J. [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kai, Dan [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2011-04-08

    Cardiovascular disease precedes many serious complications including myocardial infarction (MI) and it remains a major problem for the global community. Adult mammalian heart has limited ability to regenerate and compensate for the loss of cardiomyocytes. Restoration of cardiac function by replacement of diseased myocardium with functional cardiomyocytes is an intriguing strategy because it offers a potential cure for MI. Biomaterials are fabricated in nanometer scale dimensions by combining the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical aspects of material for potential tissue engineering (TE) applications. Synthetic polymers offer advantageous in their ability to tailor the mechanical properties, and natural polymers offer cell recognition sites necessary for cell, adhesion and proliferation. Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) aim for the development of a bioengineered construct that can provide physical support to the damaged cardiac tissue by replacing certain functions of the damaged extracellular matrix and prevent adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after MI. Electrospun nanofibers are applied as heart muscle patches, while hydrogels serve as a platform for controlled delivery of growth factors, prevent mechanical complications and assist in cell recruitment. This article reviews the applications of different natural and synthetic polymeric materials utilized as cardiac patches, injectables or 3D constructs for cardiac TE. Smart organization of nanoscale assemblies with synergistic approaches of utilizing nanofibers and hydrogels could further advance the field of cardiac tissue engineering. Rapid innovations in biomedical engineering and cell biology will bring about new insights in the development of optimal scaffolds and methods to create tissue constructs with relevant contractile properties and electrical integration to replace or substitute the diseased myocardium.

  5. Modulation of the cardiac sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter by the renin angiotensin aldosterone system: pathophysiological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giusti, Verónica C; Ciancio, María C; Orlowski, Alejandro; Aiello, Ernesto A

    2013-01-01

    The sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) is one of the major alkalinizing mechanisms in the cardiomyocytes. It has been demonstrated the existence of at least two functional isoforms, one that promotes the co-influx of 1 molecule of Na(+) per 1 molecule of HCO(-) 3 (electroneutral isoform; NBCn1) and the other one that generates the co-influx of 1 molecule of Na(+) per 2 molecules of HCO(-) 3 (electrogenic isoform; NBCe1). Both isoforms are important to maintain intracellular pH (pH i ) and sodium concentration ([Na(+)] i ). In addition, NBCe1 generates an anionic repolarizing current that modulates the action potential duration (APD). The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the modulation of almost all physiological cardiac functions and is also involved in the development and progression of cardiac diseases. It was reported that angiotensin II (Ang II) exhibits an opposite effect on NBC isoforms: it activates NBCn1 and inhibits NBCe1. The activation of NBCn1 leads to an increase in pH i and [Na(+)] i , which indirectly, due to the stimulation of reverse mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), conduces to an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. On the other hand, the inhibition of NBCe1 generates an APD prolongation, potentially representing a risk of arrhythmias. In the last years, the potentially altered NBC function in pathological scenarios, as cardiac hypertrophy and ischemia-reperfusion, has raised increasing interest among investigators. This review attempts to draw the attention on the relevant regulation of NBC activity by RAAS, since it modulates pH i and [Na(+)] i , which are involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, the damage produced by ischemia-reperfusion and the generation of arrhythmic events, suggesting a potential role of NBC in cardiac diseases.

  6. Giant cardiac myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlis, Peter; Lim, Eu Jin; Gow, Paul J; Seevanayagam, Siven; Calafiore, Paul; Chan, Robert K

    2007-10-01

    Although cardiac myxomas remain an uncommon group of malignancies, they are the most common form of primary cardiac tumour. Clinical presentations can be varied with local cardiac haemodynamic consequences, valvular insufficiency or even embolic phenomena. We present a case of a 46-year-old man with chronic abdominal pain and discuss a number of diagnostic challenges that were confronted up until a definitive diagnosis of cardiac myxoma was made. The resultant outcome was excellent with the patient achieving complete recovery from long term disabling symptoms.

  7. Cardiac event monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ECG) - ambulatory; Continuous electrocardiograms (EKGs); Holter monitors; Transtelephonic event monitors ... attached. You can carry or wear a cardiac event monitor up to 30 days. You carry the ...

  8. Gender peculiarities of cardiac performance in children with bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratiev V.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By the data of clinical-instrumental examination there was performed comparative assessment of gender differences in cardiac performance of 54 patients aged 5-15 years with persisting form of partially controlled atopic bronchial asthma in inter-attack period of disease. Children were divided in two groups depending on gender - 28 boys and 26 girls. Group of comparison included 52 healthy children - 26 girls and 26 boys. In the girls in the inter-attack period of asthma reliably more often than in the boys there were revealed ventilation disturbance in the lungs by obstructive type; this promoted rise of pressure in the pulmonary artery. Herewith only in girls in 15,4% of cases there was revealed arterial pulmonary hypertension of a mild form. By the data of echocardiography in girls with bronchial asthma as compared with boys more expressed dilatation both of the right and left ventricles of the heart was observed. Average means of left ventricle contractility both in girls and boys in the inter-attack period of bronchial asthma were reliably decreased (р<0,01 as compared with healthy children, but in girl-patients as compared with boys these deviations were more significant. In the majority of such cases (in girls – 73,9%, in boys – 53,8% decrease of contractile myocardium function was caused by presence of metabolic disorders in the form of repolarization changes of ventricular complex ob electrocardiogram. Investigations performed showed presence of some gender differences in cardiac performance in bronchial asthma children which should be considered in the course of treatment.

  9. Calmodulin is essential for cardiac IKS channel gating and assembly: impaired function in long-QT mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamgar, Liora; Ma, Lijuan; Schmitt, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    The slow IKS K+ channel plays a major role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential and consists of the assembly of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes produce the long-QT syndrome, a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Here, we show that long-QT mutations...... located in the KCNQ1 C terminus impair calmodulin (CaM) binding, which affects both channel gating and assembly. The mutations produce a voltage-dependent macroscopic inactivation and dramatically alter channel assembly. KCNE1 forms a ternary complex with wild-type KCNQ1 and Ca(2+)-CaM that prevents...... inactivation, facilitates channel assembly, and mediates a Ca(2+)-sensitive increase of IKS-current, with a considerable Ca(2+)-dependent left-shift of the voltage-dependence of activation. Coexpression of KCNQ1 or IKS channels with a Ca(2+)-insensitive CaM mutant markedly suppresses the currents and produces...

  10. Association of cardiac and vascular changes with ambient PM2.5 in diabetic individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buse John B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objective Exposure to fine airborne particles (PM2.5 has been shown to be responsible for cardiovascular and hematological effects, especially in older people with cardiovascular disease. Some epidemiological studies suggest that individuals with diabetes may be a particularly susceptible population. This study examined effects of short-term exposures to ambient PM2.5 on markers of systemic inflammation, coagulation, autonomic control of heart rate, and repolarization in 22 adults (mean age: 61 years with type 2 diabetes. Methods Each individual was studied for four consecutive days with daily assessments of plasma levels of blood markers. Cardiac rhythm and electrocardiographic parameters were examined at rest and with 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitors. PM2.5 and meteorological data were measured daily on the rooftop of the patient exam site. Data were analyzed with models adjusting for season, weekday, meteorology, and a random intercept. To identify susceptible subgroups, effect modification was analyzed by clinical characteristics associated with insulin resistance as well as with oxidative stress and by medication intake. Results Interleukin (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha showed a significant increase with a lag of two days (percent change of mean level: 20.2% with 95%-confidence interval [6.4; 34.1] and 13.1% [1.9; 24.4], respectively in association with an increase of 10 μg/m3 in PM2.5. Obese participants as well as individuals with elevated glycosylated hemoglobin, lower adiponectin, higher ferritin or with glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype showed higher IL-6 effects. Changes in repolarization were found immediately as well as up to four days after exposure in individuals without treatment with a beta-adrenergic receptor blocker. Conclusions Exposure to elevated levels of PM2.5 alters ventricular repolarization and thus may increase myocardial vulnerability to arrhythmias. Exposure to PM2.5 also

  11. Cardiac rhythm, St-t wave-forms, and common electrocardiographic variants among healthy Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Aliyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cardiac rhythm depends on the source and mode of spread of the generated impulse. ST-T segment represents the repolarization phase of the action potential. Racial variability has been established in the morphology of the ST segment among the adult population and four waveforms has been described among Nigerian adults which are different from that of Caucasian adults; therefore, there may be differences among the pediatric population. Materials and Methods: This study was a further review of the electrocardiograph (ECG of 650 apparently healthy primary school children aged 5-15 years, in Kano metropolis. Twelve-lead ECG was recorded, and interpretation was manually done. The subjects were categorized into three age groups namely 5-7, 8-11, and 12-15 years, respectively. The ST segment morphology was classified using Araoye′s criteria. Results: Early repolarization changes were recorded in the 12-15 years age-group. The presence of ECG variants such as T-wave inversion in precordial leads V 1 -V 3 was reported and left axis deviation was documented in 0.4% of the 5-7 years age-group. Type I morphology was common in leads I, II, aVF, V 5 , V 6 . Type II morphology was common in leads I, II, V 4 R, V 5 , V 6 , while Type III morphology was common in leads V 4 R, V 5 , V 6 but Type IV morphology was seen mostly in V 1 . Conclusion: ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads is a common finding in the pediatric ECG among Nigerian children; furthermore, T-wave inversion is also common in the right precordial leads and may extend way beyond precordial lead V 2 unlike in Caucasians.

  12. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  13. [Advances in cardiac pacing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carranza, María-José Sancho-Tello; Fidalgo-Andrés, María Luisa; Ferrer, José Martínez; Mateas, Francisco Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of the current status of remote monitoring and follow-up involving cardiac pacing devices and of the latest developments in cardiac resynchronization therapy. In addition, the most important articles published in the last year are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Acebutolol in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-20

    Apr 20, 1974 ... the cardiac output at rest and on exercise is not altered by the administration of acebutolol, and in patients with coronary artery disease, intravenous acebutolol produces a small fall in cardiac index, stroke index and in the parameters which are used to measure left ventricular. contractilityYo. We have used ...

  15. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cardiac Catheterization KidsHealth / For Kids / Cardiac Catheterization What's in this article? What Is ...

  16. Regression of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy: Signaling Pathways and Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jianglong; Kang, Y. James

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a key risk factor for heart failure. It is associated with increased interstitial fibrosis, cell death and cardiac dysfunction. The progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy has long been considered as irreversible. However, recent clinical observations and experimental studies have produced evidence showing the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Left ventricle assist devices used in heart failure patients for bridging to transplantation not only improve peripheral circulation but also often cause reverse remodeling of the geometry and recovery of the function of the heart. Dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper can reverse pathological cardiac hypertrophy in mice. Angiogenesis is essential and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a constitutive factor for the regression. The action of VEGF is mediated by VEGF receptor-1, whose activation is linked to cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase-1 (PKG-1) signaling pathways, and inhibition of cyclic GMP degradation leads to regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Most of these pathways are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor. Potential therapeutic targets for promoting the regression include: promotion of angiogenesis, selective enhancement of VEGF receptor-1 signaling pathways, stimulation of PKG-1 pathways, and sustention of hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity. More exciting insights into the regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy are emerging. The time of translating the concept of regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy to clinical practice is coming. PMID:22750195

  17. Regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy: signaling pathways and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jianglong; Kang, Y James

    2012-09-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a key risk factor for heart failure. It is associated with increased interstitial fibrosis, cell death and cardiac dysfunction. The progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy has long been considered as irreversible. However, recent clinical observations and experimental studies have produced evidence showing the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Left ventricle assist devices used in heart failure patients for bridging to transplantation not only improve peripheral circulation but also often cause reverse remodeling of the geometry and recovery of the function of the heart. Dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper can reverse pathological cardiac hypertrophy in mice. Angiogenesis is essential and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a constitutive factor for the regression. The action of VEGF is mediated by VEGF receptor-1, whose activation is linked to cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase-1 (PKG-1) signaling pathways, and inhibition of cyclic GMP degradation leads to regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Most of these pathways are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor. Potential therapeutic targets for promoting the regression include: promotion of angiogenesis, selective enhancement of VEGF receptor-1 signaling pathways, stimulation of PKG-1 pathways, and sustention of hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity. More exciting insights into the regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy are emerging. The time of translating the concept of regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy to clinical practice is coming. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  19. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  20. Hypothyroidism and its rapid correction alter cardiac remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Hajje

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular effects of mild and overt thyroid disease include a vast array of pathological changes. As well, thyroid replacement therapy has been suggested for preserving cardiac function. However, the influence of thyroid hormones on cardiac remodeling has not been thoroughly investigated at the molecular and cellular levels. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of hypothyroidism and thyroid replacement therapy on cardiac alterations. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: a control (n = 10 group and a group treated with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU (n = 20 to induce hypothyroidism. Ten of the 20 rats in the PTU group were then treated with L-thyroxine to quickly re-establish euthyroidism. The serum levels of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin 6 (IL6 and pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, were significantly increased in hypothyroid rats; elevations in cardiac stress markers, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP and cardiac troponin T (cTnT were also noted. The expressions of cardiac remodeling genes were induced in hypothyroid rats in parallel with the development of fibrosis, and a decline in cardiac function with chamber dilation was measured by echocardiography. Rapidly reversing the hypothyroidism and restoring the euthyroid state improved cardiac function with a decrease in the levels of cardiac remodeling markers. However, this change further increased the levels of inflammatory and fibrotic markers in the plasma and heart and led to myocardial cellular infiltration. In conclusion, we showed that hypothyroidism is related to cardiac function decline, fibrosis and inflammation; most importantly, the rapid correction of hypothyroidism led to cardiac injuries. Our results might offer new insights for the management of hypothyroidism-induced heart disease.

  1. Hypothyroidism and its rapid correction alter cardiac remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajje, Georges; Saliba, Youakim; Itani, Tarek; Moubarak, Majed; Aftimos, Georges; Farès, Nassim

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of mild and overt thyroid disease include a vast array of pathological changes. As well, thyroid replacement therapy has been suggested for preserving cardiac function. However, the influence of thyroid hormones on cardiac remodeling has not been thoroughly investigated at the molecular and cellular levels. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of hypothyroidism and thyroid replacement therapy on cardiac alterations. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: a control (n = 10) group and a group treated with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) (n = 20) to induce hypothyroidism. Ten of the 20 rats in the PTU group were then treated with L-thyroxine to quickly re-establish euthyroidism. The serum levels of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL6) and pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), were significantly increased in hypothyroid rats; elevations in cardiac stress markers, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were also noted. The expressions of cardiac remodeling genes were induced in hypothyroid rats in parallel with the development of fibrosis, and a decline in cardiac function with chamber dilation was measured by echocardiography. Rapidly reversing the hypothyroidism and restoring the euthyroid state improved cardiac function with a decrease in the levels of cardiac remodeling markers. However, this change further increased the levels of inflammatory and fibrotic markers in the plasma and heart and led to myocardial cellular infiltration. In conclusion, we showed that hypothyroidism is related to cardiac function decline, fibrosis and inflammation; most importantly, the rapid correction of hypothyroidism led to cardiac injuries. Our results might offer new insights for the management of hypothyroidism-induced heart disease.

  2. Shock wave compression and self-generated electric field repolarization in ferroelectric ceramics Pb0.99[(Zr0.90Sn0.10)0.96Ti0.04]0.98Nb0.02O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dongdong; Du Jinmei; Gu Yan; Feng Yujun

    2012-01-01

    The shock wave induced depoling current of Pb 0.99 [(Zr 0.90 Sn 0.10 ) 0.96 Ti 0.04 ] 0.98 Nb 0.02 O 3 ceramics was investigated with a system composed of a resistive load and an unpoled ceramic. Disparity in the depoling current was explained by considering the drawing charge effect of unpoled ceramic. The drawing effect for poled ceramics was analysed by developing a model incorporating a time- and electric-field-dependent repolarization. This model predicts that the high-impedance current eventually becomes higher than the short-circuit current, which is consistent with the experimental results in the literature. This work indicates that both the repolarization of uncompressed ceramics caused by the self-generated electric field and depolarization of compressed ceramics caused by the shock wave govern the output current. (paper)

  3. Imaging for cardiac electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Desjardins

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical cardiac electrophysiology is the study of the origin and treatment of arrhythmia. There has been considerable recent development in this field, where imaging has had a transformational impact. In this invited review, we offer a global overview of the most important developments in the use of imaging in cardiac electrophysiology. We first describe the radiological imaging modalities involved in cardiac electrophysiology, to assess cardiac anatomy, function and scar. We then introduce an imaging modality with which readers are probably unfamiliar (electroanatomical mapping [EAM], but which is routinely used by electrophysiologists to plan and guide cardiac mapping and cardiac ablation therapy by catheter, a therapy which can reduce or even cure arrhythmia. We identify the limitations of EAM and describe how radiological imaging modalities can complement this technique. We then describe and illustrate how imaging has helped the diagnosis of arrhythmogenic conditions, and how imaging is used to plan and guide clinical cardiac electrophysiologic procedures and assess their results and complications. We focus on the two most common arrhythmias for which imaging has the greatest impact: atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia.

  4. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mankad MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series. They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1 thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2 cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3 primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  5. The role of ion channelopathies in sudden cardiac death: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claire A; Huang, Christopher L-H; Matthews, Gareth D K

    2013-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) following ventricular tachyarrhythmias constitutes an important clinical cause of mortality; 4% of cases may involve ion channel-mediated cellular excitation in structurally normal hearts. Alterations in such processes could disturb action potential conduction, depolarization/ repolarization gradients, or Ca(2+) homeostasis with potential arrhythmogenic consequences. Although SCD may be the first presentation of arrhythmic syndromes, patients may present to the general physician with symptoms of palpitations or hemodynamic compromise, including dizziness, seizure, or syncope, particularly following exertion. In all inherited cardiac death syndromes, first-degree relatives should be referred to a cardiologist and should undergo testing appropriate for the condition. While management of patients at risk of SCD largely centers on risk stratification and, if necessary, insertion of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, there are a number of other, pharmacological, treatments being developed. Furthermore, as the genetic basis of these diseases becomes established, genetic testing will form an increasingly important part of diagnosis, and gene-specific therapy is an area under investigation. This article bridges the gap between molecular medicine and clinical practice by reviewing recent developments in the pathophysiological understanding of SCD, and their implications for the management of patients with these complex diseases.

  6. Electrophysiological predictors of sudden cardiac death on physical exercise test in young athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balykova, L. A.; Kotlyarov, A. A.; Ivyanskiy, S. A.; Shirokova, A. A.; Miheeva, K. A.; Makarov, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of sudden death of young athletes continues to be actual. Among its reasons, primary electric myocardium diseases along with organic heart troubles (cardiomyopathies, cordites, anomalies of coronary arteries) take an important place. The most frequent variant of channelopathesis long QT syndrome (LQTS). Both inherited and acquired LQTS may be the reason of sudden cardiac death during physical activity and have to be revealed prior to sports admission. LQTS diagnostics in young athletes become problematic due to secondary exercise-related QT prolongation. Physical load test may reveal myocardium electric instability and enhance LQTS diagnostics accuracy without genetic testing. The aim was to study electrophysiological parameters of myocardium repolarization and reveal the signs of electrical instability as predictors of the life-threatening arrhythmias in young athletes during physical exercise test. In conclusion, electrophysiological myocardium parameters during physical exercise test noted to be markers of electrical myocardial instability and in combination with the other Schwartz criteria, was evidenced the inherited or acquired LQTS. QTc prolongation in athletes at the peak of exercise as well as in early recovery period were noted to be additional predictor life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in young athletes

  7. Characterization of microminipigs as an in vivo experimental model for cardiac safety pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchitra Matsukura

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We pharmacologically characterized microminipigs as an in vivo experimental model by assessing cardiovascular effects of pilsicainide, verapamil and E-4031, which can preferentially inhibit cardiac Na+, Ca2+ and K+ channels, respectively. Intravenous infusion of 1 mg/kg of pilsicainide (n = 4, 0.1 mg/kg of verapamil (n = 4 and 0.01 followed by 0.1 mg/kg of E-4031 (n = 5 over 10 min decreased the heart rate, mean blood pressure and ventricular contractility. Moreover, pilsicainide prolonged the PR interval, QRS width and QTc; verapamil prolonged the PR interval, but shortened the QRS width and QTc; and E-4031 prolonged the QTc, whereas no substantial change was detected in the PR interval or QRS width. Peak plasma concentrations of pilsicainide, verapamil and E-4031 in microminipigs were 1.7–4.8 times higher than those expected in humans and dogs, possibly due to smaller effective volume of drug distribution. The extent of the drug-induced cardiovascular responses was generally greater in microminipigs than in humans and dogs, which could be explained by the following possibilities; namely unique pharmacokinetic profile, less great reflex-mediated increase of sympathetic tone and/or smaller repolarization reserve in microminipigs. These information may make it feasible to apply this new-type animal to a tool for assessing cardiac safety profiles of new chemical entities.

  8. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt

    2012-01-01

    cardiac rehabilitation programme. Methods: From 1 September 2002 to 31 December 2005, 388 first-incidence MI patients ≤75 years were hospitalised. Register check for newly hospitalised MI patients, screening interview, and systematic referral were conducted by a project nurse. Patients were referred...... to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality...

  9. Cardiac Procedures and Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Procedure Does A stent is a wire mesh tube used to prop open an artery during ... a Heart Attack • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources My Cardiac Coach What ...

  10. Defining the Cardiac Fibroblast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Malina J.; Tallquist, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis remains an important health concern, but the study of fibroblast biology has been hindered by a lack of effective means for identifying and tracking fibroblasts. Recent advances in fibroblast-specific lineage tags and reporters have permitted a better understanding of these cells. After injury multiple cell types have been implicated as the source for extracellular matrix producing cells, but emerging studies suggest that resident cardiac fibroblasts contribute substantially to the remodeling process. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding cardiac fibroblast origin and identity. Our understanding of cardiac fibroblast biology and fibrosis is still developing and will expand profoundly in the next few years, with many of the recent findings regarding fibroblast gene expression and behavior laying down the groundwork for interpreting the purpose and utility of these cells before and after injury. PMID:27746422

  11. Cardiac Catheterization (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, the doctor might call for a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan or a CAT scan . ... first couple of days. This means no heavy lifting (more than 10 pounds) and no sports. After ...

  12. Cardiac Catheterization (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor may also call for a cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan or a CT (computerized tomography) ... first couple of days. This means no heavy lifting (nothing over 10 pounds) and no sports. After ...

  13. Cardiac biomarkers in Neonatology

    OpenAIRE

    Vijlbrief, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the role for cardiac biomarkers in neonatology was investigated. Several clinically relevant results were reported. In term and preterm infants, hypoxia and subsequent adaptation play an important role in cardiac biomarker elevation. The elevated natriuretic peptides are indicative of abnormal function; elevated troponins are suggestive for cardiomyocyte damage. This methodology makes these biomarkers of additional value in the treatment of newborn infants, separate or as a co...

  14. Cardiac imaging in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority

  15. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  16. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  17. The Effects of Nicorandil and Nifekalant, Which Were Injected into the Pericardial Space, for Transmural Dispersion of Repolarization in the Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Ito, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some studies have reported that transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR is involved in the onset of ventricular arrhythmia. We investigated the effects of nicorandil (NIC and nifekalant (NIF injected into the pericardial space, on TDR and T waves in the pig. Methods and Results: We injected NIC 4 or 8 mg and NIF 50 or 100 mg at intervals into the pericardial space for eleven pigs. The effects of these drugs were investigated on the effective refractory period (ERP between the endocardial and epicardial myocardial cells, as well as on QT time, QT peak-end (QTcpe as an index of TDR, and T waveforms, respectively. QTcpe increased from 91 ± 21 to 116 ± 19 msec, 2.8 min after injection of NIC (p < 0.01, although corrected QT (QTc interval did not changed. But 5.5 min after injection, QTc decreased while QTcpe recovered. T wave amplitude significantly increased, and epicardium ERP decreased. When NIF was injected, TDR decreased from 55 ± 10 msec to 44 ± 8 msec (p < 0.01 although QTc did not change. In a later phase, QTc increased (p < 0.01 and QTcpe recovered. T wave amplitude rapidly decreased and became negative. Conclusion: Injected into the pericardial space, NIC and NIF brought about certain changes in ERP, QT and T waveform. Furthermore, NIC increased TDR while NIF decreased TDR.

  18. Evaluation of cardiac function in active and hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; McEwen, Margaret-Mary; Robbins, Charles T; Felicetti, Laura; Christensen, William F

    2003-10-15

    To evaluate cardiac function parameters in a group of active and hibernating grizzly bears. Prospective study. 6 subadult grizzly bears. Indirect blood pressure, a 12-lead ECG, and a routine echocardiogram were obtained in each bear during the summer active phase and during hibernation. All measurements of myocardial contractility were significantly lower in all bears during hibernation, compared with the active period. Mean rate of circumferential left ventricular shortening, percentage fractional shortening, and percentage left ventricular ejection fraction were significantly lower in bears during hibernation, compared with the active period. Certain indices of diastolic function appeared to indicate enhanced ventricular compliance during the hibernation period. Mean mitral inflow ratio and isovolumic relaxation time were greater during hibernation. Heart rate was significantly lower for hibernating bears, and mean cardiac index was lower but not significantly different from cardiac index during the active phase. Contrary to results obtained in hibernating rodent species, cardiac index was not significantly correlated with heart rate. Cardiac function parameters in hibernating bears are opposite to the chronic bradycardic effects detected in nonhibernating species, likely because of intrinsic cardiac muscle adaptations during hibernation. Understanding mechanisms and responses of the myocardium during hibernation could yield insight into mechanisms of cardiac function regulation in various disease states in nonhibernating species.

  19. Period doubling cascades of limit cycles in cardiac action potential models as precursors to chaotic early Afterdepolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Philipp; Bulelzai, M A K; Erhardt, André H

    2017-04-04

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs) are pathological voltage oscillations during the repolarization phase of cardiac action potentials (APs). EADs are caused by drugs, oxidative stress or ion channel disease, and they are considered as potential precursors to cardiac arrhythmias in recent attempts to redefine the cardiac drug safety paradigm. The irregular behaviour of EADs observed in experiments has been previously attributed to chaotic EAD dynamics under periodic pacing, made possible by a homoclinic bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the deterministic AP system of differential equations. In this article we demonstrate that a homoclinic bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the action potential model is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for the genesis of chaotic EADs. We rather argue that a cascade of period doubling (PD) bifurcations of limit cycles in the full AP system paves the way to chaotic EAD dynamics across a variety of models including a) periodically paced and spontaneously active cardiomyocytes, b) periodically paced and non-active cardiomyocytes as well as c) unpaced and spontaneously active cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, our bifurcation analysis reveals that chaotic EAD dynamics may coexist in a stable manner with fully regular AP dynamics, where only the initial conditions decide which type of dynamics is displayed. EADs are a potential source of cardiac arrhythmias and hence are of relevance both from the viewpoint of drug cardiotoxicity testing and the treatment of cardiomyopathies. The model-independent association of chaotic EADs with period doubling cascades of limit cycles introduced in this article opens novel opportunities to study chaotic EADs by means of bifurcation control theory and inverse bifurcation analysis. Furthermore, our results may shed new light on the synchronization and propagation of chaotic EADs in homogeneous and heterogeneous multicellular and cardiac tissue preparations.

  20. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  1. Particulate matter induces cardiac arrhythmias via dysregulation of carotid body sensitivity and cardiac sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Lang, Gabriel D; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Huang, Yong; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Peng, Ying-Jie; Svensson, Eric C; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Lang, Roberto M; Linares, Jered D; Breysse, Patrick N; Geyh, Alison S; Samet, Jonathan M; Lussier, Yves A; Dudley, Samuel; Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Garcia, Joe G N

    2012-04-01

    The mechanistic links between exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) pollution and the associated increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, particularly in people with congestive heart failure (CHF), have not been identified. To advance understanding of this issue, genetically engineered mice (CREB(A133)) exhibiting severe dilated cardiomyopathic changes were exposed to ambient PM collected in Baltimore. CREB(A133) mice, which display aberrant cardiac physiology and anatomy reminiscent of human CHF, displayed evidence of basal autonomic aberrancies (compared with wild-type mice) with PM exposure via aspiration, producing significantly reduced heart rate variability, respiratory dysynchrony, and increased ventricular arrhythmias. Carotid body afferent nerve responses to hypoxia and hyperoxia-induced respiratory depression were pronounced in PM-challenged CREB(A133) mice, and denervation of the carotid bodies significantly reduced PM-mediated cardiac arrhythmias. Genome-wide expression analyses of CREB(A133) left ventricular tissues demonstrated prominent Na(+) and K(+) channel pathway gene dysregulation. Subsequent PM challenge increased tyrosine phosphorylation and nitration of the voltage-gated type V cardiac muscle α-subunit of the Na(+) channel encoded by SCN5A. Ranolazine, a Na(+) channel modulator that reduces late cardiac Na(+) channel currents, attenuated PM-mediated cardiac arrhythmias and shortened PM-elongated QT intervals in vivo. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the epidemiologic findings in susceptibility of human CHF populations to PM exposure. Our results suggest a multiorgan pathobiology inherent to the CHF phenotype that is exaggerated by PM exposure via heightened carotid body sensitivity and cardiac Na(+) channel dysfunction.

  2. Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST

    OpenAIRE

    Dolansky, Mary A.; Zullo, Melissa; Boxer, Rebecca; Moore, Shirley M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients recovering from cardiac events are increasingly using postacute care, such as home health care and skilled nursing facility services. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self- Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity wal...

  3. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  4. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... for the situation at hand. Due to challenging circumstances, the cost assessment turned out to be ex-post and top-down. RESULTS: Cost per treatment sequence is estimated to be approximately euro 976, whereas the incremental cost (compared with usual care) is approximately euro 682. The cost estimate is uncertain...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  5. Cardiac optogenetics : using light to monitor cardiac physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Charlotte D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41375491X; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Knöpfel, Thomas; de Boer, Teun P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481878X

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of cardiac excitation and its coupling to contraction is largely based on ex vivo studies utilising fluorescent organic dyes to assess cardiac action potentials and signal transduction. Recent advances in optogenetic sensors open exciting new possibilities for cardiac

  6. Liposomal TriCurin, A Synergistic Combination of Curcumin, Epicatechin Gallate and Resveratrol, Repolarizes Tumor-Associated Microglia/Macrophages, and Eliminates Glioblastoma (GBM and GBM Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Mukherjee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a deadly brain tumor with a current mean survival of 12–15 months. Despite being a potent anti-cancer agent, the turmeric ingredient curcumin (C has limited anti-tumor efficacy in vivo due to its low bioavailability. We have reported earlier a strategy involving the use two other polyphenols, epicatechin gallate (E from green tea and resveratrol (R from red grapes at a unique, synergistic molar ratio with C (C:E:R: 4:1:12.5, termed TriCurin to achieve superior potency against HPV+ tumors than C alone at C:E:R (μM: 32:8:100 (termed 32 μM+ TriCurin. We have now prepared liposomal TriCurin (TrLp and demonstrated that TrLp boosts activated p53 in cultured GL261 mouse GBM cells to trigger apoptosis of GBM and GBM stem cells in vitro. TrLp administration into mice yielded a stable plasma concentration of 210 nM C for 60 min, which, though sub-lethal for cultured GL261 cells, was able to cause repolarization of M2-like tumor (GBM-associated microglia/macrophages to the tumoricidal M1-like phenotype and intra-GBM recruitment of activated natural killer cells. The intratumor presence of such tumoricidal immune cells was associated with concomitant suppression of tumor-load, and apoptosis of GBM and GBM stem cells. Thus, TrLp is a potential onco-immunotherapeutic agent against GBM tumors.

  7. QT and JT dispersion and cardiac performance in children with neonatal Bartter syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacihamdioglu, Duygu Ovunc; Fidanci, Kursat; Kilic, Ayhan; Gok, Faysal; Topaloglu, Rezan

    2013-10-01

    QT dispersion and JT dispersion are simple noninvasive arrhythmogenic markers that can be used to assess the homogeneity of cardiac repolarization. The aim of this study was to assess QT and JT dispersion and their relation with left ventricular systolic and diastolic functions in children with Bartter syndrome (BS). Nine neonatal patients with BS (median age 9.7 years) and 20 controls (median age 8 years) were investigated at rest. Both study and control subjects underwent electrocardiography (ECG) in which the interval between two R waves and QT intervals, corrected QT, QT dispersion, corrected QT dispersion, JT, corrected JT, JT dispersion and corrected JT dispersion were measured with 12-lead ECG. Two-dimensional, Doppler echocardiographic examinations were performed. Patients and controls did not differ for gender and for serum levels of potassium, magnesium, and calcium (p > 0.05). Both study and control subjects had normal echocardiographic examination and baseline myocardial performance indexes. The QT dispersion and JT dispersion were significantly prolonged in patients with BS compared to those of the controls {37.5 ms [interquartile range (IQR) 32.5-40] vs. 25.5 ms (IQR 20-30), respectively, p = 0.014 and 37.5 ms (IQR 27.5-40) vs. 22.5 ms (IQR 20-30), respectively, p = 0.003}. Elevated QT and JT dispersion during asymptomatic and normokalemic periods may be risk factors for the development of cardiac complications and arrhythmias in children with BS. In these patients the need for systematic cardiac screening and management protocol is extremely important for effective prevention.

  8. Cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Möller Petrun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developments in the measuring of cardiac output and other haemodynamic variables are focused on the so-called minimally invasive methods. The aim of these methods is to simplify the management of high-risk and haemodynamically unstable patients. Due to the need of invasive approach and the possibility of serious complications the use of pulmonary artery catheter has decreased. This article describes the methods for measuring cardiac output, which are based on volume measurement (Fick method, indicator dilution method, pulse wave analysis, Doppler effect, and electrical bioimpedance.

  9. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  10. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  11. Neonatal cardiac emergencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal cardiac emergencies. The neonatal period is one that fills many generalists with fear – this article will help to dispel these concerns. George A Comitis, MB ChB, DCH (SA), DA (SA), FCPaed (SA), Cert Cardiology (SA) Paed. Consultant, Paediatric Cardiology Service of the Western Cape, Red Cross War Memorial ...

  12. Nonexercise cardiac stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, J.L.; Baldwin, T.

    1989-01-01

    Many patients who require evaluation for coronary artery disease are unable to undergo exercise stress testing because of physiologic or psychological limitations. Drs Vacek and Baldwin describe three alternative methods for assessment of cardiac function in these patients, all of which have high levels of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. 23 references

  13. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Bruce Spottiswoode has a BSc in Electrical Engineering from the University of the Witwatersrand and a PhD in Biomedical Engineering on cardiac MRI from the. University of Cape Town. He has worked on developing electronics for the CSIR, on MRI image reconstruction for Siemens, and on X-ray imaging ...

  14. Sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez; Lachica, E

    1992-01-01

    The study deals with the comparison of morphological, histochemical and biochemical methods applied to the detection of myocardial infarction in 150 medico-legal autopsies performed at the Institute of Forensic Pathology in Copenhagen. The study also included an NBT (formazan) test of cardiac cross...

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  16. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery...

  17. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura X.; Arany, Zolt

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal ‘invasion’ profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  18. Nonlinear diffusion and thermo-electric coupling in a two-variable model of cardiac action potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, A.; Loppini, A.; Ruiz-Baier, R.; Ippolito, A.; Camassa, A.; La Camera, A.; Emmi, E.; Di Perna, L.; Garofalo, V.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.

    2017-09-01

    This work reports the results of the theoretical investigation of nonlinear dynamics and spiral wave breakup in a generalized two-variable model of cardiac action potential accounting for thermo-electric coupling and diffusion nonlinearities. As customary in excitable media, the common Q10 and Moore factors are used to describe thermo-electric feedback in a 10° range. Motivated by the porous nature of the cardiac tissue, in this study we also propose a nonlinear Fickian flux formulated by Taylor expanding the voltage dependent diffusion coefficient up to quadratic terms. A fine tuning of the diffusive parameters is performed a priori to match the conduction velocity of the equivalent cable model. The resulting combined effects are then studied by numerically simulating different stimulation protocols on a one-dimensional cable. Model features are compared in terms of action potential morphology, restitution curves, frequency spectra, and spatio-temporal phase differences. Two-dimensional long-run simulations are finally performed to characterize spiral breakup during sustained fibrillation at different thermal states. Temperature and nonlinear diffusion effects are found to impact the repolarization phase of the action potential wave with non-monotone patterns and to increase the propensity of arrhythmogenesis.

  19. The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Christia, Panagiota; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2014-02-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by net accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cardiac interstitium, and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. This review discusses the cellular effectors and molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Although activated myofibroblasts are the main effector cells in the fibrotic heart, monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes, mast cells, vascular cells and cardiomyocytes may also contribute to the fibrotic response by secreting key fibrogenic mediators. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, reactive oxygen species, mast cell-derived proteases, endothelin-1, the renin/angiotensin/aldosterone system, matricellular proteins, and growth factors (such as TGF-β and PDGF) are some of the best-studied mediators implicated in cardiac fibrosis. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cardiac fibrotic alterations may be reversible. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for initiation, progression, and resolution of cardiac fibrosis is crucial to design anti-fibrotic treatment strategies for patients with heart disease.

  20. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  1. Utility of the exercise electrocardiogram testing in sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Marwan M; Hotait, Mostafa; Tseng, Zian H

    2014-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) remains a major public health problem. Current established criteria identifying those at risk of sudden arrhythmic death, and likely to benefit from implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are neither sensitive nor specific. Exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) testing was traditionally used for information concerning patients' symptoms, exercise capacity, cardiovascular function, myocardial ischemia detection, and hemodynamic responses during activity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We conducted a systematic review of MEDLINE on the utility of exercise ECG testing in SCD risk stratification. Exercise testing can unmask suspected primary electrical diseases in certain patients (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia or concealed long QT syndrome) and can be effectively utilized to risk stratify patients at an increased (such as early repolarization syndrome and Brugada syndrome) or decreased risk of SCD, such as the loss of preexcitation on exercise testing in asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Exercise ECG testing helps in SCD risk stratification in patients with and without arrhythmogenic hereditary syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Fetal cardiac assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    The better understanding of fetal cardiovascular physiology coupled with improved technology for non-invasive study of the fetus now enable much more detailed assessment of fetal cardiac status than by heart rate alone. Even the latter, relatively simple, measurement contains much more information than was previously realized. It is also increasingly clear that no single measurement will provide the answer to all clinical dilemmas either on cardiac function or the welfare of the fetus as a whole. There are obvious clinical advantages in measuring several variables from one signal and the measurement of heart rate, heart rate variation and waveform from the ECG in labour is a potentially useful combination. Systolic time intervals or flow measurements could easily be added or used separately by combining real-time and Doppler ultrasound probes

  3. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerson, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book begins with a review of the radionuclide methods available for evaluating cardiac perfusion and function. The authors discuss planar and tomographic thallium myocardial imaging, first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiography, and imaging with infarct-avid tracers. Several common but more specialized procedures are then reviewed: nonogemetric measurement of left ventricular volume, phase (Fourier) analysis, stroke volume ratio, right ventricular function, and diastolic function. A separate chapter is devoted to drug interventions and in particular the use of radionuclide ventriculography to monitor doxorubicin toxicity and therapy of congestive heart failure. The subsequent chapters provide a comprehensive guide to test selection, accuracy, and results in acute myocardial infarction, in postmyocardial infarction, in chronic coronary artery disease, before and after medical or surgical revascularization, in valvular heart disease, in cardiomyopathies, and in cardiac trauma.

  4. Integration of genomics, proteomics, and imaging for cardiac stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hyung J.; Wilson, Kitch O.; Huang, Mei; Wu, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy is beginning to mature as a valid treatment for heart disease. As more clinical trials utilizing stem cells emerge, it is imperative to establish the mechanisms by which stem cells confer benefit in cardiac diseases. In this paper, we review three methods - molecular cellular imaging, gene expression profiling, and proteomic analysis - that can be integrated to provide further insights into the role of this emerging therapy. (orig.)

  5. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul

    2004-01-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect

  6. [Microvolt T-wave alternans as a novel method of analysis of changes of repolarization phase and detection of latent electrical instability of the myocardium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarinova, A A; Treshkur, T V; Parmon, E V

    2011-01-01

    This review considers of modern concepts of microvolt T-wave alternans (TWA): its pathophysiological basis at cellular level, particulars of quantitative analysis of TWA, modulating effects of autonomic nervous system and drugs, prognostic efficacy in predicting susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmia in comparison with other modern prognostic factors of sudden cardiac death.

  7. Measure of synchrony in the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Salavatian, Siamak; Jacquemet, Vincent; Beaumont, Eric; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Recent multielectrode array recordings in ganglionated plexi of canine atria have opened the way to the study of population dynamics of intrinsic cardiac neurons. These data provide critical insights into the role of local processing that these ganglia play in the regulation of cardiac function. Low firing rates, marked non-stationarity, interplay with the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and artifacts generated by myocardial activity create new constraints not present in brain recordings for which almost all neuronal analysis techniques have been developed. We adapted and extended the jitter-based synchrony index (SI) to (1) provide a robust and computationally efficient tool for assessing the level and statistical significance of SI between cardiac neurons, (2) estimate the bias on SI resulting from neuronal activity possibly hidden in myocardial artifacts, (3) quantify the synchrony or anti-synchrony between neuronal activity and the phase in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. The method was validated on firing time series from a total of 98 individual neurons identified in 8 dog experiments. SI ranged from −0.14 to 0.66, with 23 pairs of neurons with SI > 0.1. The estimated bias due to artifacts was typically <1%. Strongly cardiovascular- and pulmonary-related neurons (SI > 0.5) were found. Results support the use of jitter-based SI in the context of intrinsic cardiac neurons. (paper)

  8. Blunt and Penetrating Cardiac Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellister, Seth A; Dennis, Bradley M; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Patients with traumatic cardiac injuries can present with wide variability in their severity of illness. The most severe will present in cardiac arrest, whereas the most benign may be altogether asymptomatic; most will fall somewhere in between. Management of cardiac injuries largely depends on mechanism of injury and patient physiology. Understanding the spectrum of injuries and their associated manifestations can help providers react more quickly and initiate potentially life-saving therapies more efficiently when time is critical. This article discusses the workup and management of both blunt and penetrating cardiac injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildtrup, Mads; Shattock, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal, hereditary, neurodegenerative disorder best known for its clinical triad of progressive motor impairment, cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. Although a disease of the central nervous system, mortality surveys indicate that heart disease is a leading cause of death. The nature of such cardiac abnormalities remains unknown. Clinical findings indicate a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction - dysautonomia - which may be a result of pathology of the central autonomic network. Dysautonomia can have profound effects on cardiac health, and pronounced autonomic dysfunction can be associated with neurogenic arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Significant advances in the knowledge of neural mechanisms in cardiac disease have recently been made which further aid our understanding of cardiac mortality in Huntington's disease. Even so, despite the evidence of aberrant autonomic activity the potential cardiac consequences of autonomic dysfunction have been somewhat ignored. In fact, underlying cardiac abnormalities such as arrhythmias have been part of the exclusion criteria in clinical autonomic Huntington's disease research. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac function in Huntington's disease patients is warranted. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to clarify how the autonomic nervous system is controlled and regulated in higher, central areas of the brain - and how these regions may be altered in neurological pathology, such as Huntington's disease. Ultimately, research will hopefully result in an improvement of management with the aim of preventing early death in Huntington's disease from cardiac causes.

  10. Can Functional Cardiac Age be Predicted from ECG in a Normal Healthy Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd; Starc, Vito; Leban, Manja; Sinigoj, Petra; Vrhovec, Milos

    2011-01-01

    In a normal healthy population, we desired to determine the most age-dependent conventional and advanced ECG parameters. We hypothesized that changes in several ECG parameters might correlate with age and together reliably characterize the functional age of the heart. Methods: An initial study population of 313 apparently healthy subjects was ultimately reduced to 148 subjects (74 men, 84 women, in the range from 10 to 75 years of age) after exclusion criteria. In all subjects, ECG recordings (resting 5-minute 12-lead high frequency ECG) were evaluated via custom software programs to calculate up to 85 different conventional and advanced ECG parameters including beat-to-beat QT and RR variability, waveform complexity, and signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG parameters. The prediction of functional age was evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis using the best 5 univariate predictors. Results: Ignoring what were ultimately small differences between males and females, the functional age was found to be predicted (R2= 0.69, P < 0.001) from a linear combination of 5 independent variables: QRS elevation in the frontal plane (p<0.001), a new repolarization parameter QTcorr (p<0.001), mean high frequency QRS amplitude (p=0.009), the variability parameter % VLF of RRV (p=0.021) and the P-wave width (p=0.10). Here, QTcorr represents the correlation between the calculated QT and the measured QT signal. Conclusions: In apparently healthy subjects with normal conventional ECGs, functional cardiac age can be estimated by multiple linear regression analysis of mostly advanced ECG results. Because some parameters in the regression formula, such as QTcorr, high frequency QRS amplitude and P-wave width also change with disease in the same direction as with increased age, increased functional age of the heart may reflect subtle age-related pathologies in cardiac electrical function that are usually hidden on conventional ECG.

  11. Characterization of microminipigs as an in vivo experimental model for cardiac safety pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Suchitra; Nakamura, Yuji; Cao, Xin; Wada, Takeshi; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Ando, Kentaro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    We pharmacologically characterized microminipigs as an in vivo experimental model by assessing cardiovascular effects of pilsicainide, verapamil and E-4031, which can preferentially inhibit cardiac Na + , Ca 2+ and K + channels, respectively. Intravenous infusion of 1 mg/kg of pilsicainide (n = 4), 0.1 mg/kg of verapamil (n = 4) and 0.01 followed by 0.1 mg/kg of E-4031 (n = 5) over 10 min decreased the heart rate, mean blood pressure and ventricular contractility. Moreover, pilsicainide prolonged the PR interval, QRS width and QTc; verapamil prolonged the PR interval, but shortened the QRS width and QTc; and E-4031 prolonged the QTc, whereas no substantial change was detected in the PR interval or QRS width. Peak plasma concentrations of pilsicainide, verapamil and E-4031 in microminipigs were 1.7-4.8 times higher than those expected in humans and dogs, possibly due to smaller effective volume of drug distribution. The extent of the drug-induced cardiovascular responses was generally greater in microminipigs than in humans and dogs, which could be explained by the following possibilities; namely unique pharmacokinetic profile, less great reflex-mediated increase of sympathetic tone and/or smaller repolarization reserve in microminipigs. These information may make it feasible to apply this new-type animal to a tool for assessing cardiac safety profiles of new chemical entities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved bioavailability of targeted Curcumin delivery efficiently regressed cardiac hypertrophy by modulating apoptotic load within cardiac microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Aramita; Rana, Santanu; Banerjee, Durba; Mitra, Arkadeep; Datta, Ritwik; Naskar, Shaon; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis acts as a prime modulator of cardiac hypertrophy leading to heart failure, a major cause of human mortality worldwide. Recent therapeutic interventions have focussed on translational applications of diverse pharmaceutical regimes among which, Curcumin (from Curcuma longa) is known to have an anti-hypertrophic potential but with limited pharmacological efficacies due to low aqueous solubility and poor bioavailability. In this study, Curcumin encapsulated by carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) nanoparticle conjugated to a myocyte specific homing peptide was successfully delivered in bioactive form to pathological myocardium for effective regression of cardiac hypertrophy in a rat (Rattus norvegicus) model. Targeted nanotization showed higher cardiac bioavailability of Curcumin at a low dose of 5 mg/kg body weight compared to free Curcumin at 35 mg/kg body weight. Moreover, Curcumin/CMC-peptide treatment during hypertrophy significantly improved cardiac function by downregulating expression of hypertrophy marker genes (ANF, β-MHC), apoptotic mediators (Bax, Cytochrome-c) and activity of apoptotic markers (Caspase 3 and PARP); whereas free Curcumin in much higher dose showed minimal improvement during compromised cardiac function. Targeted Curcumin treatment significantly lowered p53 expression and activation in diseased myocardium via inhibited interaction of p53 with p300-HAT. Thus attenuated acetylation of p53 facilitated p53 ubiquitination and reduced the apoptotic load in hypertrophied cardiomyocytes; thereby limiting cardiomyocytes' need to enter the regeneration cycle during hypertrophy. This study elucidates for the first time an efficient targeted delivery regimen for Curcumin and also attributes towards probable mechanistic insight into its therapeutic potential as a cardio-protective agent for regression of cardiac hypertrophy. - Highlights: • Cardiomyocyte targeted Curcumin/CMC-peptide increases bioavailability of the drug. • Curcumin

  13. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  14. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed physical activity plays a major role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease, and as with any other form of treatment its benefits must be weighed against its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac ...

  15. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation......) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence...

  16. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressure Survey, and CSI Smart Heart App. A total of 848 delegates/faculties attended this conference against a total of 1140 people registered for the meeting.

  17. Single ventricle cardiac defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, B.; Turkmen, N.; Fedakar, R.; Cetin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. (author)

  18. ECG of the month. Irregular rhythm in a 25-year-old man with three prior cardiac operations. Coarse atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response, left anterior fascicular block, left ventricular hypertrophy with repolarization abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glancy, D Luke; Ahmed, Jameel; Ayalloore, Siby G; LeLorier, Paul A; Diwan, Pranav M; Helmcke, Frederick R

    2013-01-01

    The patient underwent closure of an atrial septal defect at age 3, had a leaking "mitral" valve repaired at age 9, and at age 13 had a "mitral" valve replacement. He began taking warfarin sodium at that time and remained symptom-free until 10 days before his initial visit here when he presented to another hospital with dyspnea and palpitations. Treatment there consisted of lisinopril 10 mg qd, carvedilol 6.25 mg bid, aldactone 25 mg qd, furosemide 40 mg qd, digoxin 0.25 mg qd, and a continuation of warfarin sodium 7.5 mg qd. An echocardiogram showed a left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%. After diuresis, he was referred to our cardiology clinic. On his initial visit here, his heart rate was an irregular 120 beats/min, his blood pressure was 106/77 mmHg, and closing and opening snaps of a normally functioning mechanical mitral valvular prosthesis were heard. He was obese (height, 5' 9"; weight, 272 lbs). An electrocardiogram was recorded (Figure 1).

  19. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, M.S.; Ambudkar, I.S.; Young, E.P.; Naseem, S.M.; Heald, F.P.; Shamoo, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect on the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum of an atherogenic (1% cholesterol) diet fed during the neonatal vs the juvenile period of life was studied in Yorkshire swine. Male piglets were randomly assigned at birth to 1 of 4 groups: group I (control), group II (lactation feeding), group III (juvenile period feeding) and group IV (lactation and juvenile feeding). All animals were killed at 55 weeks of age and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) isolated for assay of calcium uptake, Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ ATPase activity, and lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The amount of cholesterol/mg SR protein and the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were higher in the animals fed during lactation (groups II and IV) and lower in those fed only during the juvenile period (group III). Phospholipid fatty acid patterns as measured by gas chromatography were unaltered in any group. Calcium uptake was markedly diminished in all experimental conditions: group II 47%, group III 65% and group IV 96%. Compared to the observed changes in calcium transport, the ATP hydrolytic activity was relatively less affected. Only in group IV a significant decrease (41%) was seen. Groups II and III show no change in ATP hydrolytic activity. The decrease in calcium uptake and altered cholesterol/phospholipid ratio without effect on ATP hydrolytic activity is consistent with an uncoupling of calcium transport related to the atherogenic diet in early life. (author)

  20. Nonischemic Left Ventricular Scar as a Substrate of Life-Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death in Competitive Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rigato, Ilaria; De Lazzari, Manuel; Susana, Angela; Niero, Alice; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Migliore, Federico; Rizzo, Stefania; Giorgi, Benedetta; De Conti, Giorgio; Sarto, Patrizio; Serratosa, Luis; Patrizi, Giampiero; De Maria, Elia; Pelliccia, Antonio; Basso, Cristina; Schiavon, Maurizio; Bauce, Barbara; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano; Corrado, Domenico

    2016-07-01

    The clinical profile and arrhythmic outcome of competitive athletes with isolated nonischemic left ventricular (LV) scar as evidenced by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance remain to be elucidated. We compared 35 athletes (80% men, age: 14-48 years) with ventricular arrhythmias and isolated LV subepicardial/midmyocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (group A) with 38 athletes with ventricular arrhythmias and no LGE (group B) and 40 healthy control athletes (group C). A stria LGE pattern with subepicardial/midmyocardial distribution, mostly involving the lateral LV wall, was found in 27 (77%) of group A versus 0 controls (group C; P<0.001), whereas a spotty pattern of LGE localized at the junction of the right ventricle to the septum was respectively observed in 11 (31%) versus 10 (25%; P=0.52). All athletes with stria pattern showed ventricular arrhythmias with a predominant right bundle branch block morphology, 13 of 27 (48%) showed ECG repolarization abnormalities, and 5 of 27 (19%) showed echocardiographic hypokinesis of the lateral LV wall. The majority of athletes with no or spotty LGE pattern had ventricular arrhythmias with a predominant left bundle branch block morphology and no ECG or echocardiographic abnormalities. During a follow-up of 38±25 months, 6 of 27 (22%) athletes with stria pattern experienced malignant arrhythmic events such as appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator shock (n=4), sustained ventricular tachycardia (n=1), or sudden death (n=1), compared with none of athletes with no or LGE spotty pattern and controls. Isolated nonischemic LV LGE with a stria pattern may be associated with life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden death in the athlete. Because of its subepicardial/midmyocardial location, LV scar is often not detected by echocardiography. © 2016 The Authors.

  1. Levothyroxine improves abnormal cardiac bioenergetics in subclinical hypothyroidism: a cardiac magnetic resonance spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathil, Asgar; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Blamire, Andrew M; Razvi, Salman; Newton, Julia L; Taylor, Roy; Weaver, Jolanta U

    2015-04-01

    It is well established that subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is associated with mild cardiac dysfunction, but it is unknown whether there is an underlying impairment of cardiac bioenergetic function. The objective of the study was to quantify the cardiac phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate ratio (PCr to ATP) in SCH, compared with healthy controls, and to measure the effect of 6 months of levothyroxine treatment. This was a 6-month, prospective, case-controlled interventional study. The PCr to ATP ratio was measured using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in subjects with SCH at baseline and after levothyroxine therapy (1.6 μg/kg · d) and compared with age- and gender-matched euthyroid controls. All subjects were free of overt heart disease. Twenty-one subjects with SCH (normal free T4 and serum TSH between 4.1 and 10 mIU/L) and 17 controls were matched for age (mean age 40.5 vs 43.3 y) and sex (females 81% vs 82%) but differed in mean TSH (6.5 vs 2.1 mIU/L, P levothyroxine treatment, the PCr to ATP ratio improved (from 1.74 ± 0.24 to 1.91 ± 0.26, P = .004) and approached controls (borderline loss of significance, P = .051). On multivariate analysis, SCH was independently associated with a reduced PCr to ATP ratio, even after adjusting for confounding variables (body mass index and fasting glucose) (P = .001). Our results demonstrate early cardiac bioenergetic impairment in SCH, which is reversible with levothyroxine therapy. This mechanistic insight provides justification for longitudinal trials to determine whether improvement in bioenergetic function improves cardiovascular outcome.

  2. Functional cardiac imaging by random access microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eCrocini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the development of voltage sensitive dyes and Ca2+ sensors in combination with innovative microscopy techniques allowed researchers to perform functional measurements with an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. At the moment, one of the shortcomings of available technologies is their incapability of imaging multiple fast phenomena while controlling the biological determinants involved. In the near future, ultrafast deflectors can be used to rapidly scan laser beams across the sample, performing optical measurements of action potential and Ca2+ release from multiple sites within cardiac cells and tissues. The same scanning modality could also be used to control local Ca2+ release and membrane electrical activity by activation of caged compounds and light-gated ion channels. With this approach, local Ca2+ or voltage perturbations could be induced, simulating arrhythmogenic events, and their impact on physiological cell activity could be explored. The development of this optical methodology will provide fundamental insights in cardiac disease, boosting new therapeutic strategies, and, more generally, it will represent a new approach for the investigation of the physiology of excitable cells.

  3. Sudden cardiac death and pump failure death prediction in chronic heart failure by combining ECG and clinical markers in an integrated risk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Julia; Orini, Michele; Mincholé, Ana; Monasterio, Violeta; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Bayés de Luna, Antonio; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) and pump failure death (PFD) are common endpoints in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, but prevention strategies are different. Currently used tools to specifically predict these endpoints are limited. We developed risk models to specifically assess SCD and PFD risk in CHF by combining ECG markers and clinical variables. The relation of clinical and ECG markers with SCD and PFD risk was assessed in 597 patients enrolled in the MUSIC (MUerte Súbita en Insuficiencia Cardiaca) study. ECG indices included: turbulence slope (TS), reflecting autonomic dysfunction; T-wave alternans (TWA), reflecting ventricular repolarization instability; and T-peak-to-end restitution (ΔαTpe) and T-wave morphology restitution (TMR), both reflecting changes in dispersion of repolarization due to heart rate changes. Standard clinical indices were also included. The indices with the greatest SCD prognostic impact were gender, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, left ventricular ejection fraction, TWA, ΔαTpe and TMR. For PFD, the indices were diabetes, NYHA class, ΔαTpe and TS. Using a model with only clinical variables, the hazard ratios (HRs) for SCD and PFD for patients in the high-risk group (fifth quintile of risk score) with respect to patients in the low-risk group (first and second quintiles of risk score) were both greater than 4. HRs for SCD and PFD increased to 9 and 11 when using a model including only ECG markers, and to 14 and 13, when combining clinical and ECG markers. The inclusion of ECG markers capturing complementary pro-arrhythmic and pump failure mechanisms into risk models based only on standard clinical variables substantially improves prediction of SCD and PFD in CHF patients.

  4. Differences in sino-atrial and atrio-ventricular function with age and sex attributable to the Scn5a+/- mutation in a murine cardiac model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevaratnam, K; Zhang, Y; Guzadhur, L; Duehmke, R M; Lei, M; Grace, A A; Huang, C L-H

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the interacting effects of age and sex on electrocardiographic (ECG) features of Scn5a(+/-) mice modelling Brugada syndrome. Recordings were performed on anaesthetized wild-type (WT) and Scn5a(+/-) mice and differences attributable to these risk factors statistically stratified. Scn5a(+/-) exerted sex-dependent effects upon sino-atrial function that only became apparent with age. RR intervals were greater in old male than in old female Scn5a(+/-). Atrio-ventricular (AV) conduction was slower in young female mice, whether WT and Scn5a(+/-), than the corresponding young male WT and Scn5a(+/-). However, PR intervals lengthened with age in male but not in female Scn5a(+/-) giving the greatest PR intervals in old male Scn5a(+/-) compared with either old male WT or young male Scn5a(+/-) mice. In contrast, PR intervals were similar in old female Scn5a(+/-) and in old female WT. QTc was prolonged in Scn5a(+/-) compared with WT, and female Scn5a(+/-) compared with female WT. Age-dependent alterations in durations of ventricular repolarization relative to WT affected male but not female Scn5a(+/-). Thus, T-wave durations were greater in old male Scn5a(+/-) compared with old male WT, but indistinguishable between old female Scn5a(+/-) and old female WT. Finally, analysis for combined interactions of genotype, age and sex demonstrated no effects on P wave and QRS durations and QTc intervals. We demonstrate for the first time that age, sex and genotype exert both independent and interacting ECG effects. The latter suggest alterations in cardiac pacemaker function, atrio-ventricular conduction and ventricular repolarization greatest in ageing male Scn5a(+/-).

  5. Small-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Current Is Activated During Hypokalemia and Masks Short-Term Cardiac Memory Induced by Ventricular Pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Wei-Chung; Ko, Jum-Suk; Yin, Dechun; Chang, Po-Cheng; Rubart, Michael; Weiss, James N; Everett, Thomas H; Lin, Shien-Fong; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    2015-10-13

    Hypokalemia increases the vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation. We hypothesize that the apamin-sensitive small-conductance calcium-activated potassium current (IKAS) is activated during hypokalemia and that IKAS blockade is proarrhythmic. Optical mapping was performed in 23 Langendorff-perfused rabbit ventricles with atrioventricular block and either right or left ventricular pacing during normokalemia or hypokalemia. Apamin prolonged the action potential duration (APD) measured to 80% repolarization (APD80) by 26 milliseconds (95% confidence interval [CI], 14-37) during normokalemia and by 54 milliseconds (95% CI, 40-68) during hypokalemia (P=0.01) at a 1000-millisecond pacing cycle length. In hypokalemic ventricles, apamin increased the maximal slope of APD restitution, the pacing cycle length threshold of APD alternans, the pacing cycle length for wave-break induction, and the area of spatially discordant APD alternans. Apamin significantly facilitated the induction of sustained ventricular fibrillation (from 3 of 9 hearts to 9 of 9 hearts; P=0.009). Short-term cardiac memory was assessed by the slope of APD80 versus activation time. The slope increased from 0.01 (95% CI, -0.09 to 0.12) at baseline to 0.34 (95% CI, 0.23-0.44) after apamin (P<0.001) during right ventricular pacing and from 0.07 (95% CI, -0.05 to 0.20) to 0.54 (95% CI, 0.06-1.03) after apamin infusion (P=0.045) during left ventricular pacing. Patch-clamp studies confirmed increased IKAS in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes during hypokalemia (P=0.038). Hypokalemia activates IKAS to shorten APD and maintain repolarization reserve at late activation sites during ventricular pacing. IKAS blockade prominently lengthens the APD at late activation sites and facilitates ventricular fibrillation induction. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Sudden cardiac death and pump failure death prediction in chronic heart failure by combining ECG and clinical markers in an integrated risk model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orini, Michele; Mincholé, Ana; Monasterio, Violeta; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Bayés de Luna, Antonio; Martínez, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death (SCD) and pump failure death (PFD) are common endpoints in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, but prevention strategies are different. Currently used tools to specifically predict these endpoints are limited. We developed risk models to specifically assess SCD and PFD risk in CHF by combining ECG markers and clinical variables. Methods The relation of clinical and ECG markers with SCD and PFD risk was assessed in 597 patients enrolled in the MUSIC (MUerte Súbita en Insuficiencia Cardiaca) study. ECG indices included: turbulence slope (TS), reflecting autonomic dysfunction; T-wave alternans (TWA), reflecting ventricular repolarization instability; and T-peak-to-end restitution (ΔαTpe) and T-wave morphology restitution (TMR), both reflecting changes in dispersion of repolarization due to heart rate changes. Standard clinical indices were also included. Results The indices with the greatest SCD prognostic impact were gender, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, left ventricular ejection fraction, TWA, ΔαTpe and TMR. For PFD, the indices were diabetes, NYHA class, ΔαTpe and TS. Using a model with only clinical variables, the hazard ratios (HRs) for SCD and PFD for patients in the high-risk group (fifth quintile of risk score) with respect to patients in the low-risk group (first and second quintiles of risk score) were both greater than 4. HRs for SCD and PFD increased to 9 and 11 when using a model including only ECG markers, and to 14 and 13, when combining clinical and ECG markers. Conclusion The inclusion of ECG markers capturing complementary pro-arrhythmic and pump failure mechanisms into risk models based only on standard clinical variables substantially improves prediction of SCD and PFD in CHF patients. PMID:29020031

  7. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  8. Pediatric Cardiac Surgery In Eritrea.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teams consisted of volunteer physicians from Germany, Italy and Switzerland including cardiac surgeons, pediatric cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, pediatric intensivists, perfusionists, and other nursing staff. Each mission has routinely included at least 18 health professionals of different category to maximize the.

  9. Diagnostic value of cardiac cineangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Man Chung; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Im, Chung Gie; Yoo, Shi Joon

    1979-01-01

    Cineangiography is essential and excellent tool for evaluation of anatomy and pathophysiology of heart disease. 114 cases of cardiac cineangiography were analyzed. The following conditions are easily interpreted and diagnosed accurately by cineangiography. 1. Valvular insufficiency, especially small amount. 2. Valve motion, shape analysis. 3. Detection of shunt. 4. Ventricle wall movement. 5. Complexed congenita cardiac anomaly. 6. Coronary artery stenosis.

  10. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). STUDY POPULATION: Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutane...

  11. Neuromuscular diseases after cardiac transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateen, Farrah J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter K.; Daly, Richard C.; Edwards, Brooks S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac transplantation is a therapeutic option in end-stage heart failure. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease is known to occur in cardiac transplant recipients but has not been fully characterized. METHODS: This retrospective cohort review reports the PNS-related concerns of 313

  12. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  13. BACE1 modulates gating of KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) and cardiac delayed rectifier KCNQ1/KCNE1 (IKs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agsten, Marianne; Hessler, Sabine; Lehnert, Sandra; Volk, Tilmann; Rittger, Andrea; Hartmann, Stephanie; Raab, Christian; Kim, Doo Yeon; Groemer, Teja W; Schwake, Michael; Alzheimer, Christian; Huth, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) proteins form a homotetrameric channel, which produces a voltage-dependent K(+) current. Co-assembly of KCNQ1 with the auxiliary β-subunit KCNE1 strongly up-regulates this current. In cardiac myocytes, KCNQ1/E1 complexes are thought to give rise to the delayed rectifier current IKs, which contributes to cardiac action potential repolarization. We report here that the type I membrane protein BACE1 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1), which is best known for its detrimental role in Alzheimer's disease, but is also, as reported here, present in cardiac myocytes, serves as a novel interaction partner of KCNQ1. Using HEK293T cells as heterologous expression system to study the electrophysiological effects of BACE1 and KCNE1 on KCNQ1 in different combinations, our main findings were the following: (1) BACE1 slowed the inactivation of KCNQ1 current producing an increased initial response to depolarizing voltage steps. (2) Activation kinetics of KCNQ1/E1 currents were significantly slowed in the presence of co-expressed BACE1. (3) BACE1 impaired reconstituted cardiac IKs when cardiac action potentials were used as voltage commands, but interestingly augmented the IKs of ATP-deprived cells, suggesting that the effect of BACE1 depends on the metabolic state of the cell. (4) The electrophysiological effects of BACE1 on KCNQ1 reported here were independent of its enzymatic activity, as they were preserved when the proteolytically inactive variant BACE1 D289N was co-transfected in lieu of BACE1 or when BACE1-expressing cells were treated with the BACE1-inhibiting compound C3. (5) Co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) supported our hypothesis that BACE1 modifies the biophysical properties of IKs by physically interacting with KCNQ1 in a β-subunit-like fashion. Strongly underscoring the functional significance of this interaction, we detected BACE1 in human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and murine cardiac tissue and observed

  14. Cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding-Barclay, Michael A; Stern, Jessica; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder, which is associated with many different medical complications as a result of the weight loss and malnutrition that characterise this illness. It has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. A large portion of deaths are attributable to the cardiac abnormalities that ensue as a result of the malnutrition associated with anorexia nervosa. In this review, the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa will be discussed. A comprehensive literature review on cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa was carried out. There are structural, functional, and rhythm-type changes that occur in patients with anorexia nervosa. These become progressively significant as ongoing weight loss occurs. Cardiac changes are inherent to anorexia nervosa and they become more life-threatening and serious as the anorexia nervosa becomes increasingly severe. Weight restoration and attention to these cardiac changes are crucial for a successful treatment outcome.

  15. [Maternal cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatkowska-Freund, Małgorzata; Ciach, Katarzyna; Kowalewska-Włas, Agnieszka; Preis, Krzysztof

    2005-12-01

    Perinatal care of women with cardiac arrhythmias is very important for every obstetrician. Maternal heart disease complicates 0.2 to 4% of pregnancies. The purpose of this study was to analyze the course of pregnancy, delivery and postpartum period pregnant women with cardiac arrhythmias We analyzed 14 pregnant women with cardiac arrhythmias. hospitalized in the Department of Obstetrics of Medical University of Gdańsk, 1998-2003. Time of delivery, weight and length of neonates in patients with cardiac arrhythmias was presented. Delivery and postpartum period were uncomplicated in all the patients and no stimulation was used. In two women with congenital complete atrio-ventricular block dicavital heart stimulator was applied. All patients and infants were discharged from hospital in good condition. We found no cardiological complications during pregnancy in patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Cardiac asystole in partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C A; Fish, D R

    2000-06-01

    Literature review shows many anecdotal case reports of cardiac asystole in ictal recordings of partial seizures. We have reviewed our data from the last five years, of patients who are being assessed for epilepsy surgery and found 2 out of more than 1,500 complex partial seizures, recorded in 589 consecutive patients, showing a significant period of asystole (13 and 15 seconds). Our previous studies of cardiac and respiratory parameters during partial seizures showed that a central apnoea occurred in 39%. It is probable that sudden death during seizures is due to the interaction of both cardiac and respiratory irregularities. Although rare (occurrence cardiac asystole occurring in an epilepsy monitoring unit highlights the need for resuscitation equipment to be readily available and for trained nursing staff. Furthermore, it is important to recognize that the semiology of seizures may be affected by the consequences of secondary cardiac asystole.

  17. New insights into cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Hove, Jens D; Dixen, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy designates a cardiac dysfunction, which includes reduced cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, and presence of electrophysiological abnormalities in particular prolongation of the QT interval. Several pathophysiological mechanisms including reduced...... beta-receptor function seem involved in the autonomic and cardiac dysfunction. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be revealed by tissue Doppler imaging but is best demasked by physical or pharmacological stress. Liver transplantation may revert cardiac dysfunction but surgery and shunt insertion may also...

  18. Sleep inspires insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ullrich; Gais, Steffen; Haider, Hilde; Verleger, Rolf; Born, Jan

    2004-01-22

    Insight denotes a mental restructuring that leads to a sudden gain of explicit knowledge allowing qualitatively changed behaviour. Anecdotal reports on scientific discovery suggest that pivotal insights can be gained through sleep. Sleep consolidates recent memories and, concomitantly, could allow insight by changing their representational structure. Here we show a facilitating role of sleep in a process of insight. Subjects performed a cognitive task requiring the learning of stimulus-response sequences, in which they improved gradually by increasing response speed across task blocks. However, they could also improve abruptly after gaining insight into a hidden abstract rule underlying all sequences. Initial training establishing a task representation was followed by 8 h of nocturnal sleep, nocturnal wakefulness, or daytime wakefulness. At subsequent retesting, more than twice as many subjects gained insight into the hidden rule after sleep as after wakefulness, regardless of time of day. Sleep did not enhance insight in the absence of initial training. A characteristic antecedent of sleep-related insight was revealed in a slowing of reaction times across sleep. We conclude that sleep, by restructuring new memory representations, facilitates extraction of explicit knowledge and insightful behaviour.

  19. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Ejmalian, G.

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is an intrinsically tool that provide a unique and unparalleled approach for clinicians and researchers to interrogate the heart noninvasively. The ability to label substances of physiological interest with positron-emitting radioisotopes has permitted insight into normal blood flow and metabolism and the alterations that occur with disease states. Positron emission tomography of the heart has evolved as a unique, noninvasive approach for the assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and function. Because of the intrinsic quantitative nature of positron emission tomography measurements as well as the diverse compounds that can be labeled with positron- emitting radioisotopes, studies with positron emission tomography have provided rich insight into the physiology of the heart under diverse conditions

  20. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  1. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20-60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3-65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Cardiac Rehabilitation Series: Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L.; Bennett, Stephanie; Ardern, Chris I.; Clark, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Canada. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has a long robust history here, and there are established clinical practice guidelines. While the effectiveness of CR in the Canadian context is clear, only 34% of eligible patients participate, and strategies to increase access for under-represented groups (e.g., women, ethnic minority groups) are not yet universally applied. Identified CR barriers include lack of referral and physician recommendation, travel and distance, and low perceived need. Indeed there is now a national policy position recommending systematic inpatient referral to CR in Canada. Recent development of 30 CR Quality Indicators and the burgeoning national CR registry will enable further measurement and improvement of the quality of CR care in Canada. Finally, the Canadian Association of CR is one of the founding members of the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, to promote CR globally. PMID:24607018

  3. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both...... supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia......, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society...

  4. Mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noedir A. G. Stolf

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessment of incidence and behavior of mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation. METHODS: From 1985 to 1999, 214 cardiac transplantations were performed, 12 (5.6% of the transplanted patients developed confirmed mediastinitis. Patient's ages ranged from 42 to 66 years (mean of 52.3±10.0 years and 10 (83.3% patients were males. Seven (58.3% patients showed sternal stability on palpation, 4 (33.3% patients had pleural empyema, and 2 (16.7% patients did not show purulent secretion draining through the wound. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was the infectious agent identified in the wound secretion or in the mediastinum, or both, in 8 (66.7% patients. Staphylococcus epidermidis was identified in 2 (16.7% patients, Enterococcus faecalis in 1 (8.3% patient, and the cause of mediastinitis could not be determined in 1 (8.3% patient. Surgical treatment was performed on an emergency basis, and the extension of the débridement varied with local conditions. In 2 (16.7% patients, we chose to leave the surgical wound open and performed daily dressings with granulated sugar. Total sternal resection was performed in only 1 (8.3% patient. Out of this series, 5 (41.7% patients died, and the causes of death were related to the infection. Autopsy revealed persistence of mediastinitis in 1 (8.3% patient. CONCLUSION: Promptness in diagnosing mediastinitis and precocious surgical drainage have changed the natural evolution of this disease. Nevertheless, observance of the basic precepts of prophylaxis of infection is still the best way to treat mediastinitis.

  5. Cardiac syncope in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massin, Martial M; Malekzadeh-Milani, Sophie; Benatar, Avram

    2007-02-01

    To assess the epidemiology of cardiac syncope in children and evaluate the guidelines on its management. We analyzed the etiology to syncope and diagnostic workup in consecutive pediatric patients presenting with syncope in our emergency departments or cardiac outpatient clinics between 1997 and 2005, and who were subsequently diagnosed as having cardiac syncope. A primary cardiac cause was identified in 11 syncopal patients presenting to the emergency room and 14 patients to the cardiac clinic: supraventricular tachyarrhythmia in 9, ventricular tachyarrhythmia in 10, pacemaker dysfunction in 2, and isolated cases of sick sinus syndrome, hypoxic spell, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and primary pulmonary hypertension. Some elements suggested potential cardiac disease as a cause of syncope in all cases. The resting electrocardiogram and the echocardiogram were interpreted as positive and relevant to the diagnosis in 17 and 3 patients, respectively. Exercise electrocardiogram and Holter recording provided diagnostic information previously not seen on the resting electrocardiogram in six and three patients, respectively. Three children have died and one child has neurological sequelae following resuscitation. Our data support the premise that careful history taking with special focus on the events leading up to syncope, as well as a complete physical examination, can guide practitioners in discerning which syncopal children need further cardiac investigations. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Is it Safe? Adverse drug effects and cardiac arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varkevisser, R.

    2014-01-01

    The potentially life-threatening polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia Torsade de Pointes (TdP) generally occurs in the setting of delayed ventricular repolarization, as reflected on the ECG by a prolonged QT interval. A growing number of drugs are associated with QT prolongation and/or TdP, as a

  7. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  8. Fetal cardiac rhabdomyoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Ghavami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary manifestation of cardiac tumors in embryonic period is a very rare condition. Cardiac rhabdomyomas most frequently arise in the ventricular myocardium, they may also occur in the atria and the epicardial surface. In spite of its benign nature, the critical location of the tumor inside the heart can lead to lethal arrhythmias and chamber obstruction. Multiple rhabdomyomas are strongly associated with tuberous sclerosis which is associated with mental retardation and epilepsy of variable severity. Ultrasonography as a part of routine prenatal screening, is the best method for the diagnosis of cardiac rhabdomyomas. In the review of articles published in Iran, fetal cardiac rhabdomyoma was not reported. Case presentation: We report a case of cardiac rhabdomyoma on a 24-year-old gravid 1, referred to Day Medical Imaging Center for routine evaluation of fetal abnormalities at 31 weeks of her gestational age. Ultrasonographic examination displayed a homogenous echogenic mass (13×9mm, originating from the left ventricle of the fetal heart. It was a normal pregnancy without any specific complications. Other organs of the fetus were found normal and no cardiac abnormalities were appeared. No Pericardial fluid effusion was found. The parents did not have consanguineous marriage. They did not also have any specific disease such as tuberous sclerosis. Conclusion: The clinical features of cardiac rhabdomyomas vary widely, depending on the location, size, and number of tumors in the heart. Although cardiac rhabdomyoma is a benign tumor in many affected fetuses, an early prenatal diagnosis of the tumor is of great significance in making efficient planning and providing adequate follow up visits of the patients and the complications such as, heart failure and outlet obstruction of cardiac chambers.

  9. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzke, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net

  10. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  11. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  12. Tissue and Animal Models of Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Karim; Li, Yingxin; Sager, Philip T.; Houser, Steven R.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) is a common cause of death in patients with structural heart disease, genetic mutations or acquired disorders affecting cardiac ion channels. A wide range of platforms exist to model and study disorders associated with SCD. Human clinical studies are cumbersome and are thwarted by the extent of investigation that can be performed on human subjects. Animal models are limited by their degree of homology to human cardiac electrophysiology including ion channel expression. Most commonly used cellular models are cellular transfection models, which are able to mimic the expression of a single ion channel offering incomplete insight into changes of the action potential profile. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived Cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) resemble, but are not identical, to adult human cardiomyocytes, and provide a new platform for studying arrhythmic disorders leading to SCD. A variety of platforms exist to phenotype cellular models including conventional and automated patch clamp, multi-electrode array, and computational modeling. iPSC-CMs have been used to study Long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and other hereditary cardiac disorders. Although iPSC-CMs are distinct from adult cardiomyocytes, they provide a robust platform to advance the science and clinical care of SCD. PMID:26044252

  13. Inverse correlation between cardiac injury and cardiac anxiety: A potential role for communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M.H.C.T.; Voshaar, R.C.O.; van Deelen, F.M.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; Pop, G.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety in cardiac patients is associated with worsened cardiac course. An acute coronary syndrome (ACS) might evoke specific cardiac anxiety. We explored the characteristics associated with cardiac anxiety in ACS patients. Methods: We assessed cardiac anxiety in 237 patients

  14. Inverse Correlation Between Cardiac Injury and Cardiac Anxiety A Potential Role for Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Maria H. C. T.; Oude Voshaar, Richard; van Deelen, Femke M.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; Pop, Gheorghe; Speckens, Anne E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety in cardiac patients is associated with worsened cardiac course. An acute coronary syndrome (ACS) might evoke specific cardiac anxiety. We explored the characteristics associated with cardiac anxiety in ACS patients. Methods: We assessed cardiac anxiety in 237 patients

  15. Inverse correlation between cardiac injury and cardiac anxiety: a potential role for communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, M.H.C.T. van; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Deelen, F.M. van; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van; Pop, G.A.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General anxiety in cardiac patients is associated with worsened cardiac course. An acute coronary syndrome (ACS) might evoke specific cardiac anxiety. We explored the characteristics associated with cardiac anxiety in ACS patients. METHODS: We assessed cardiac anxiety in 237 patients

  16. Novel Approaches for the Use of Cardiac/Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Mirhedayati Roudsari, MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the novel imaging technology of cardiac computed tomography (CT not only permit detailed assessment of cardiac anatomy but also provide insight into cardiovascular physiology. Foremost, coronary CT angiography (CCTA enables direct noninvasive examination of both coronary artery stenoses and atherosclerotic plaque characteristics. Calculation of computational fluid dynamics by cardiac CT allows the noninvasive estimation of fractional flow reserve, which increases the diagnostic accuracy for detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. In addition, a combination of myocardial CT perfusion and CCTA can provide simultaneous anatomical and functional assessment of coronary artery disease. Finally, detailed anatomical evaluation of atrial, ventricular, and valvular anatomy provides diagnostic information and guidance for procedural planning, such as for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The clinical applications of cardiac CT will be extended with the development of these novel modalities.

  17. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  18. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  19. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  20. Recent developments in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, D J

    1995-10-01

    Indications for cardiac pacing continue to expand. Pacing to improve functional capacity, which is now common, relies on careful patient selection and technical improvements, such as complex software algorithms and diagnostic capabilities.

  1. Acute electrical and hemodynamic effects of multisite left ventricular pacing for cardiac resynchronization therapy in the dyssynchronous canine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploux, Sylvain; Strik, Marc; van Hunnik, Arne; van Middendorp, Lars; Kuiper, Marion; Prinzen, Frits W

    2014-01-01

    Multisite left ventricular (multi-LV) epicardial pacing has been proposed as an alternative to conventional single-site LV (single-LV) pacing to increase the efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy. To compare the effects of multi-LV versus single-LV pacing in dogs with left bundle branch block (LBBB). Studies were performed in 9 anaesthetized dogs with chronic LBBB using 7 LV epicardial electrodes. Each electrode was tested alone and in combination with 1, 2, 3, and 6 other electrodes, the sequence of which was chosen on the basis of practical real-time electrical mapping to determine the site of the latest activation. LV total activation time (LVTAT) and dispersion of repolarization (DRep) were measured by using approximately 100 electrodes around the ventricles. LV contractility was assessed as the maximum derivative of left ventricular pressure (LVdP/dtmax ). Single-LV pacing provided, on average, a -4.0% ± 9.3% change in LVTAT and 0.2% ± 13.7% change in DRep. Multi-LV pacing markedly decreased both LVTAT and DRep in a stepwise fashion to reach -41.3% ± 5% (P Heart Rhythm Society Published by Heart Rhythm Society All rights reserved.

  2. Appetite Suppressants, Cardiac Valve Disease and Combination Pharmacotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a major health problem associated with significant morbidity, mortality and economic burden. Although obesity and drug addiction are typically considered distinct clinical entities, both diseases involve dysregulation of biogenic amine neuron systems in the brain. Thus, research efforts to develop medications for treating drug addiction can contribute insights into the pharmacotherapy for obesity. Here we review the neurochemical mechanisms of selected stimulant medications used in the treatment of obesity, as well as issues related to fenfluramine-associated cardiac valvulopathy. In particular, we discuss the evidence that cardiac valve disease involves activation of mitogenic 5-HT2B receptors by norfenfluramine, the major metabolite of fenfluramine. Advances in medication discovery suggest that novel molecular entities that target two different neurochemical mechanisms, i.e. “combination pharmacotherapy”, will yield efficacious anti-obesity medications with reduced adverse side-effects. PMID:19092640

  3. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Cardiac misconceptions in healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Neil; Patience, Fiona; Maclean, Elizabeth; Corrigall, Helen; Bradbury, Ian; Thompson, David R; Atherton, Iain; Leslie, Stephen J

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac misconceptions are common and may have a detrimental effect on patients. Such misconceptions may be introduced or reinforced by vague and inconsistent advice from healthcare staff and can adversely affect health outcomes. To assess whether level of cardiac misconceptions significantly differs between groups of healthcare staff based on occupation. The 22-item York cardiac beliefs questionnaire (YCBQ) was administered to a convenience sample of healthcare staff (n = 263) in direct contact with cardiac patients. Data was also collected on the occupation of healthcare staff and years worked. Medical staff had the lowest mean score (17.5, CI 15.6-19.4), indicating fewest misconceptions, and unqualified healthcare workers had the highest mean score (32.1, CI 28.4-35.7). Analysis by ANOVA indicated differences between staff groups to be statistically significant (F = 17.66, p misconception score (Pearson's r = - 0.243, p misconceptions in different groups of healthcare staff. Education to correct cardiac misconceptions should be particularly targeted at unqualified healthcare staff. The importance of maintaining appropriate ratios of qualified to unqualified healthcare staff in the care of cardiac patients is supported by this study.

  5. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm

    2014-01-01

    genetic testing for DM1. Information on incident cardiac diseases was obtained from the NPR. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cardiac disease compared with the background population, overall and according to selected diagnostic subgroups (cardiomyopathy, heart failure, conduction...... disorders, arrhythmias, and device implantation). In the DM cohort, SIR for any cardiac disease was 3.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-3.86]; for a cardiac disease belonging to the selected subgroups 6.91 (95% CI: 5.93-8.01) and for other cardiac disease 2.59 (95% CI: 2.03-3.25). For a cardiac disease...... belonging to the selected subgroups, the risk was particularly high in the first year after DM diagnosis [SIR 15.4 (95% CI: 10.9-21.3)] but remained significantly elevated in subsequent years [SIR 6.07 (95% CI: 5.11-7.16]). The risk was higher in young cohort members [e.g. 20-39 years: SIR 18.1 (95% CI: 12...

  6. Sudden Cardiac Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Jabbari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to describe the use of pharmacotherapy in a nationwide cohort of young patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD). Background Several drugs have been associated with an increased risk of SCD and sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). It remains unclear how....... Autopsy was performed in 55%. Overall, 58% of SCD cases (n = 786) received at least 1 drug within 90 days before death. The most common drugs were analgesic drugs (n = 239; 18%), antihypertensive drugs (n = 234; 17%), and antibiotic drugs (n = 218; 16%). After multivariable adjustment, prescription...... of “brugadogenic” drugs or >1 QT-prolonging drug was associated with an increased risk of SADS compared with explained SCD (odds ratio: 2.16 [95% confidence interval: 1.12 to 4.17] and 2.91 [95% confidence interval: 1.46 to 5.81], respectively). Conclusions Pharmacotherapy was identified in 58% of the SCD cases...

  7. Cardiac output during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P.; Sørensen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from...... the right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported...... a progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0...

  8. Risk factors and the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy on cardiac and non-cardiac mortality in MADIT-CRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkiomaki, Juha S; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Kutyifa, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To understand modes of death and factors associated with the risk for cardiac and non-cardiac deaths in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) vs. implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which may help clarify...... the action and limitations of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in relieving myocardial dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT), during 4 years of follow-up, 169 (9.3%) of 1820 patients died of known...... causes, 108 (63.9%) deemed cardiac, and 61 (36.1%) non-cardiac. In multivariate analysis, increased baseline creatinine was significantly associated with both cardiac and non-cardiac deaths [hazard ratio (HR) 2.97, P

  9. Implantable cardiac monitors in high-risk post-infarction patients with cardiac autonomic dysfunction and moderately reduced left ventricular ejection fraction: Design and rationale of the SMART-MI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Wolfgang; Rizas, Konstantinos D; Stülpnagel, Lukas von; Vdovin, Nikolay; Massberg, Steffen; Kääb, Stefan; Bauer, Axel

    2017-08-01

    Most deaths after myocardial infarction (MI) occur in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >35%, for whom no specific prophylactic strategies exist. Deceleration capacity (DC) of heart rate and periodic repolarization dynamics (PRD) are noninvasive electrophysiological markers depending on the vagal and sympathetic tone. The combination of abnormal DC and/or PRD identifies a new high-risk group among postinfarction patients with LVEF 36%-50%. This new high-risk group has similar characteristics with respect to prognosis and patient numbers to those of the established high-risk group identified by LVEF ≤ 35%. The SMART-MI trial is an investigator-initiated randomized prospective multicenter trial that tests the efficacy of implantable cardiac monitors (ICM) in this new high-risk group. The study will enroll approximately 1,600 survivors of acute MI with sinus rhythm and an LVEF of 35%-50% in 17 centers in Germany who will be tested for presence of cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Four hundred patients with either abnormal DC (≤2.5 ms) and/or PRD (≥5.75deg 2 ) will be randomized in a 1:1 fashion to intensive follow-up via telemonitoring using an ICM device (experimental arm) or conventional follow-up (control arm). For the ICM arm, specific treatment paths have been developed according to current guidelines. The primary end point is time to detection of predefined serious arrhythmic events during follow-up, including atrial fibrillation ≥6minutes, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (cycle length≤320 ms; ≥40 beats), atrioventricular block ≥IIb, and sustained ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. The median follow-up period is 18months with a minimum follow-up of 6months. The effect of remote monitoring on clinical outcomes will be tested as secondary outcome measure (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02594488). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute and Chronic Changes and Predictive Value of Tpeak-Tend for Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Cong; Hua, Wei; Cai, Chi; Ding, Li-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Min; Fan, Xiao-Han; Zhao, Yun-Zi; Zhang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prolongation of the Tpeak-Tend (TpTe) interval as a measurement of transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) is an independent risk factor for chronic heart failure mortality. However, the cardiac resynchronization therapy's (CRT) effect on TDR is controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate CRTs acute and chronic effects on repolarization dispersion. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between TpTe changes and ventricular arrhythmia. Methods: The study group consisted of 101 patients treated with CRT-defibrillator (CRT-D). According to whether TpTe was shortened, patients were grouped at immediate and 1-year follow-up after CRT, respectively. The echocardiogram index and ventricular arrhythmia were observed and compared in these subgroups. Results: For all patients, TpTe slightly increased immediately after CRT-D implantation, and then decreased at the 1-year follow-up (from 107 ± 23 to 110 ± 21 ms within 24 h, to 94 ± 24 ms at 1-year follow-up, F = 19.366, P < 0.001). No significant difference in the left ventricular reverse remodeling and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) episodes between the TpTe immediately shortened and TpTe immediately nonshortened groups. However, patients in the TpTe at 1-year shorten had a higher rate of the left ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling (65% vs. 44%, χ2 = 4.495, P = 0.038) and less VT/VF episodes (log-rank test, χ2 = 10.207, P = 0.001) compared with TpTe 1-year nonshortened group. TpTe immediately after CRT-D independently predicted VT/VF episodes at 1-year follow-up (hazard ratio [HR], 1.030; P = 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with TpTe shortened at 1-year after CRT had a higher rate of LV reverse remodeling and less VT/VF episodes. The acute changes of TpTe after CRT have minimal value on mechanical reverse remodeling and ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:27625093

  11. Acute and Chronic Changes and Predictive Value of Tpeak-Tend for Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Cong; Hua, Wei; Cai, Chi; Ding, Li-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Min; Fan, Xiao-Han; Zhao, Yun-Zi; Zhang, Shu

    2016-09-20

    Prolongation of the Tpeak-Tend (TpTe) interval as a measurement of transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) is an independent risk factor for chronic heart failure mortality. However, the cardiac resynchronization therapy's (CRT) effect on TDR is controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate CRTs acute and chronic effects on repolarization dispersion. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between TpTe changes and ventricular arrhythmia. The study group consisted of 101 patients treated with CRT-defibrillator (CRT-D). According to whether TpTe was shortened, patients were grouped at immediate and 1-year follow-up after CRT, respectively. The echocardiogram index and ventricular arrhythmia were observed and compared in these subgroups. For all patients, TpTe slightly increased immediately after CRT-D implantation, and then decreased at the 1-year follow-up (from 107 ± 23 to 110 ± 21 ms within 24 h, to 94 ± 24 ms at 1-year follow-up, F = 19.366,P< 0.001). No significant difference in the left ventricular reverse remodeling and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) episodes between the TpTe immediately shortened and TpTe immediately nonshortened groups. However, patients in the TpTe at 1-year shorten had a higher rate of the left ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling (65% vs. 44%, χ2 = 4.495, P = 0.038) and less VT/VF episodes (log-rank test, χ2 = 10.207, P = 0.001) compared with TpTe 1-year nonshortened group. TpTe immediately after CRT-D independently predicted VT/VF episodes at 1-year follow-up (hazard ratio [HR], 1.030; P = 0.001). Patients with TpTe shortened at 1-year after CRT had a higher rate of LV reverse remodeling and less VT/VF episodes. The acute changes of TpTe after CRT have minimal value on mechanical reverse remodeling and ventricular arrhythmia.

  12. Cardiac output monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews Lailu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive and non-invasive methods of estimation of cardiac output (CO were developed to overcome the limitations of invasive nature of pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC and direct Fick method used for the measurement of stroke volume (SV. The important minimally invasive techniques available are: oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM, the derivative Fick method (using partial carbon dioxide (CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution, lithium indicator dilution, pulse contour and pulse power analysis. Impedance cardiography is probably the only non-invasive technique in true sense. It provides information about haemodynamic status without the risk, cost and skill associated with the other invasive or minimally invasive techniques. It is important to understand what is really being measured and what assumptions and calculations have been incorporated with respect to a monitoring device. Understanding the basic principles of the above techniques as well as their advantages and limitations may be useful. In addition, the clinical validation of new techniques is necessary to convince that these new tools provide reliable measurements. In this review the physics behind the working of ODM, partial CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution and lithium dilution techniques are dealt with. The physical and the physiological aspects underlying the pulse contour and pulse power analyses, various pulse contour techniques, their development, advantages and limitations are also covered. The principle of thoracic bioimpedance along with computation of CO from changes in thoracic impedance is explained. The purpose of the review is to help us minimize the dogmatic nature of practice favouring one technique or the other.

  13. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ching Hsueh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL has rarely been reported in Chinese populations. PCL mostly occurs in the right atrium. The clinical manifestations may be variable and are attributed to its location, the presence of congestive heart failure, pericardial effusion, arrhythmia, and cardiomegaly. The prognosis is usually poor because it is usually found too late and therefore, clinicians should be aware of PCL. Imaging examinations are the best methods for initial diagnosis and include echocardiography, computed tomography (CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and radioisotope scan. However, the final diagnosis is made by pathology, such as cytologic examination of the effusive fluid and tissue biopsy. Because the tumors are difficult to resect, the main treatment for the disease is chemotherapy, which can be successful. Here, we report a 58-year-old man who had a tumor measuring 8 × 5 cm in the right atrium. By clinical staging, including chest X-ray, echocardiography, CT scan of the abdomen, MRI of the heart, whole body tumor Gallium scan, and gastrointestinal series, no metastatic lesion or involvement was found in other parts of the body. Pathologic findings including cytology of pericardial effusion and heart tumor biopsy revealed the case as a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. After chemotherapy with COP (cyclophosphamide + vincristine + prednisone and CHOPBE (COP + doxorubicin + bleomycin + etoposide regimens, the intracardiac tumor had disappeared, but the patient survived for 12 months in total, despite additional radiotherapy over the pericardial lesions. It was presumed that because the tumor was very large and involved all 3 layers of the heart, it did not respond as well to the therapy as expected.

  14. Effects of pioglitazone on cardiac ion currents and action potential morphology in canine ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistamás, Kornél; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Hegyi, Bence; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Váczi, Krisztina; Bárándi, László; Horváth, Balázs; Szebeni, Andrea; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Kecskeméti, Valéria; Nánási, Péter P

    2013-06-15

    Despite its widespread therapeutical use there is little information on the cellular cardiac effects of the antidiabetic drug pioglitazone in larger mammals. In the present study, therefore, the concentration-dependent effects of pioglitazone on ion currents and action potential configuration were studied in isolated canine ventricular myocytes using standard microelectrode, conventional whole cell patch clamp, and action potential voltage clamp techniques. Pioglitazone decreased the maximum velocity of depolarization and the amplitude of phase-1 repolarization at concentrations ≥3 μM. Action potentials were shortened by pioglitazone at concentrations ≥10 μM, which effect was accompanied with significant reduction of beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration. Several transmembrane ion currents, including the transient outward K(+) current (Ito), the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa), the rapid and slow components of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr and IKs, respectively), and the inward rectifier K(+) current (IK1) were inhibited by pioglitazone under conventional voltage clamp conditions. Ito was blocked significantly at concentrations ≥3 μM, ICa, IKr, IKs at concentrations ≥10 μM, while IK1 at concentrations ≥30 μM. Suppression of Ito, ICa, IKr, and IK1 has been confirmed also under action potential voltage clamp conditions. ATP-sensitive K(+) current, when activated by lemakalim, was effectively blocked by pioglitazone. Accordingly, action potentials were prolonged by 10 μM pioglitazone when the drug was applied in the presence of lemakalim. All these effects developed rapidly and were readily reversible upon washout. In conclusion, pioglitazone seems to be a harmless agent at usual therapeutic concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Trpm4 gene invalidation leads to cardiac hypertrophy and electrophysiological alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Demion

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: TRPM4 is a non-selective Ca2+-activated cation channel expressed in the heart, particularly in the atria or conduction tissue. Mutations in the Trpm4 gene were recently associated with several human conduction disorders such as Brugada syndrome. TRPM4 channel has also been implicated at the ventricular level, in inotropism or in arrhythmia genesis due to stresses such as ß-adrenergic stimulation, ischemia-reperfusion, and hypoxia re-oxygenation. However, the physiological role of the TRPM4 channel in the healthy heart remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate the role of the TRPM4 channel on whole cardiac function with a Trpm4 gene knock-out mouse (Trpm4-/- model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Morpho-functional analysis revealed left ventricular (LV eccentric hypertrophy in Trpm4-/- mice, with an increase in both wall thickness and chamber size in the adult mouse (aged 32 weeks when compared to Trpm4+/+ littermate controls. Immunofluorescence on frozen heart cryosections and qPCR analysis showed no fibrosis or cellular hypertrophy. Instead, cardiomyocytes in Trpm4-/- mice were smaller than Trpm4+/+with a higher density. Immunofluorescent labeling for phospho-histone H3, a mitosis marker, showed that the number of mitotic myocytes was increased 3-fold in the Trpm4-/-neonatal stage, suggesting hyperplasia. Adult Trpm4-/- mice presented multilevel conduction blocks, as attested by PR and QRS lengthening in surface ECGs and confirmed by intracardiac exploration. Trpm4-/-mice also exhibited Luciani-Wenckebach atrioventricular blocks, which were reduced following atropine infusion, suggesting paroxysmal parasympathetic overdrive. In addition, Trpm4-/- mice exhibited shorter action potentials in atrial cells. This shortening was unrelated to modifications of the voltage-gated Ca2+ or K+ currents involved in the repolarizing phase. CONCLUSIONS: TRPM4 has pleiotropic roles in the heart, including the regulation of conduction and cellular

  16. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation reduces cardiac events over five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Julie

    2011-01-01

    In people with coronary artery disease, does an expanded cardiac rehabilitation program reduce cardiac deaths, myocardial infarctions, and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease? Randomised, controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis. A University hospital in Sweden. People aged less than 75 years who had had a recent myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass grafts were eligible to participate. Severe co-morbidities were exclusion criteria. Randomisation of 224 participants allocated 111 to undergo expanded cardiac rehabilitation and 113 to a control group. Both groups received standard cardiac rehabilitation, including physical training, education, group and individual counselling, and support to cease smoking. All participants received appropriate preventive medications. In addition, the intervention group received 20 group sessions of stress management, 3 sessions of cooking and diet counselling by a dietician, and a 5-day stay at a 'patient hotel' with several activities including physical training and information. Although other outcomes were reported at the conclusion of 1-year follow-up, the outcomes at the 5-year follow-up were rates of cardiac events: cardiovascular death, acute myocardial infarction, and readmission to a hospital due to other cardiovascular causes. All participants were followed up via national registers of health and mortality. During the 5-year follow-up, 53 (48%) participants in the expanded cardiac rehabilitation group and 68 (60%) participants in the control group had a cardiac event (hazard ratio 0.69, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.99). This difference was mainly due to only 12 (11%) participants having non-fatal myocardial infarctions in the treatment group versus 23 (20%) in the control group (hazard ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.97). The number of hospitalisations and the number of days of hospitalisation were both significantly fewer in the treatment group than in the control group. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation

  17. Electrophysiological characteristics of pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and its influence on ventricular arrhythmias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Chen

    had significantly lower potassium current densities (IPeak, Ito, IKur, Iss, and IK1 at different parts of the heart than the control group (P < 0.01, and there were significant differences in the half-inactivation voltage (V1/2 and the inactivation-recovery time constant (τ of Ito and IKur at different parts of the heart (P < 0.01 between the surgery group and the control group. In addition, the surgery group had significantly lower densities of IPeak, Ito, and IKur in cells of the endo-myocardium (P < 0.05, and the changes showed obvious spatial heterogeneity.Changes in the current density and function of potassium channels contributed to irregular repolarization in cardiac hypertrophy, and the spatially heterogeneous changes of the channels may increase the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias that accompany cardiac hypertrophy.

  18. Perioperative Rosuvastatin in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Jayaram, Raja; Jiang, Lixin; Emberson, Jonathan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Qi; Du, Juan; Guarguagli, Silvia; Hill, Michael; Chen, Zhengming; Collins, Rory; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-05-05

    Complications after cardiac surgery are common and lead to substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Meta-analyses of small randomized trials have suggested that perioperative statin therapy can prevent some of these complications. We randomly assigned 1922 patients in sinus rhythm who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery to receive perioperative rosuvastatin (at a dose of 20 mg daily) or placebo. The primary outcomes were postoperative atrial fibrillation within 5 days after surgery, as assessed by Holter electrocardiographic monitoring, and myocardial injury within 120 hours after surgery, as assessed by serial measurements of the cardiac troponin I concentration. Secondary outcomes included major in-hospital adverse events, duration of stay in the hospital and intensive care unit, left ventricular and renal function, and blood biomarkers. The concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein after surgery were lower in patients assigned to rosuvastatin than in those assigned to placebo (PSTICS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01573143.).

  19. Comparing Methods for Cardiac Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeser, Karin; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2018-01-01

    tomography (CT) angiography. Sixty-two patients, scheduled for elective heart surgery, were included; 1 was subsequently excluded for logistic reasons. Inclusion criteria were coronary artery bypass surgery (N = 42) and aortic valve replacement (N = 19). Exclusion criteria were chronic atrial fibrillation...... of the left ventricular outflow tract. METHODS: The primary aim was a systematic comparison of CO with Doppler-derived 3D TEE and CO by thermodilution in a broad population of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A subanalysis was performed comparing cross-sectional area by TEE with cardiac computed......, left ventricular ejection fraction below 0.40 and intracardiac shunts. Nineteen randomly selected patients had a cardiac CT the day before surgery. All images were stored for blinded post hoc analyses, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess agreement between measurement methods, defined as the bias...

  20. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2012-01-01

    Early investigations in the late 1890s and early 1900s documented cardiac enlargement in athletes with above-normal exercise capacity and no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Such findings have been reported for more than a century and continue to intrigue scientists and clinicians. It is well recognized that repetitive participation in vigorous physical exercise results in significant changes in myocardial structure and function. This process, termed exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR), is characterized by structural cardiac changes including left ventricular hypertrophy with sport-specific geometry (eccentric vs concentric). Associated alterations in both systolic and diastolic functions are emerging as recognized components of EICR. The increasing popularity of recreational exercise and competitive athletics has led to a growing number of individuals exhibiting these findings in routine clinical practice. This review will provide an overview of EICR in athletes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Neurological Outcome; Cardiac Arrest; Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest; Brain Anoxia Ischemia; Hypoxia, Brain; Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain; Cardiac Arrest With Successful Resuscitation; Cardiac Arrest, Out-Of-Hospital; Brain Injuries

  2. New and emerging biomarkers in left ventricular systolic dysfunction--insight into dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Deepa M; Sam, Flora

    2013-08-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by deteriorating cardiac performance, impaired contraction and dilation of the left ventricle (or both ventricles). Blood markers--known as "biomarkers"--allow insight into underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms and biologic pathways while predicting outcomes and guiding heart failure management and/or therapies. In this review, we provide an alternative approach to conceptualize heart failure biomarkers: the cardiomyocyte, its surrounding microenvironment, and the macroenvironment, integrating these entities which may impact cellular processes involved in the pathogenesis and/or propagation of DCM. Newer biomarkers of left ventricular systolic dysfunction can be categorized under: (a) myocyte stress and stretch, (b) myocyte apoptosis, (c) cardiac interstitium, (d) inflammation, (e) oxidative stress, (f) cardiac energetics, (g) neurohormones, and (h) renal biomarkers. Biomarkers provide insight into the pathogenesis of DCM while predicting and potentially providing prognostic information in these patients with heart failure.

  3. An airline cardiac arrest program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, M F; Donaldson, E; Geddes, J S

    1997-11-04

    As many as 1000 lives are lost annually from cardiac arrest in commercial aircraft. Ventricular fibrillation (VF), the most common mechanism, can be treated effectively only with prompt defibrillation, whereas the current policy of most airlines is to continue cardiopulmonary resuscitation pending aircraft diversion. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of making semiautomatic external defibrillators (AEDs) available for use on airline passengers with cardiac arrest. AEDs were installed on international Qantas aircraft and at major terminals, selected crew were trained in their use, and all crew members were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Supervision was provided by medical volunteers or (remotely) by airline physicians. During a 64-month period, AEDs were used on 109 occasions: 63 times for monitoring an acutely ill passenger and 46 times for cardiac arrest. Twenty-seven episodes of cardiac arrest occurred in aircraft, often (11 of 27 [41%]) unwitnessed, and they were usually (21 of 27 [78%]) associated with asystole or pulseless idioventricular rhythm. All 19 arrests in terminals were witnessed; VF was present in 17 (89%). Overall, defibrillation was initially successful in 21 of 23 cases (91%). Long-term survival from VF was achieved in 26% (2 of 6 in aircraft and 4 of 17 in terminals). The ability to monitor cardiac rhythm aided decisions on diversion, which was avoided in most passengers with asystole or idioventricular rhythm. AEDs in aircraft and terminals, with appropriate crew training, are helpful in the management of cardiac emergencies. Survival from VF is practicable and is comparable with the most effective prehospital ambulance emergency services. Costly aircraft diversions can be avoided in clearly futile situations, enhancing the cost-effectiveness of the program.

  4. Cardiac index in atrio- and interventricular delay optimized cardiac resynchronization therapy and cardiac contractility modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumampos J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is an established therapy for heart failure patients and improves quality of life in patients with sinus rhythm, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, left bundle branch block and wide QRS duration. Since approximately sixty percent of heart failure patients have a normal QRS duration they do not benefit or respond to the CRT. Cardiac contractility modulation (CCM releases nonexcitatoy impulses during the absolute refractory period in order to enhance the strength of the left ventricular contraction. The aim of the investigation was to evaluate differences in cardiac index between optimized and nonoptimized CRT and CCM devices versus standard values. Impedance cardiography, a noninvasive method was used to measure cardiac index (CI, a useful parameter which describes the blood volume during one minutes heart pumps related to the body surface. CRT patients indicate an increase of 39.74 percent and CCM patients an improvement of 21.89 percent more cardiac index with an optimized device.

  5. Mechanisms Involving Ang II and MAPK/ERK1/2 Signaling Pathways Underlie Cardiac and Renal Alterations during Chronic Undernutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Acácio, Amaury; Luzardo, Ricardo; Sampaio, Luzia S.; Luna-Leite, Marcia A.; Lara, Lucienne S.; Einicker-Lamas, Marcelo; Panizzutti, Rogério; Madeira, Caroline; Vieira-Filho, Leucio D.; Castro-Chaves, Carmen; Ribeiro, Valdilene S.; Paixão, Ana D. O.; Medei, Emiliano; Vieyra, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have correlated protein restriction associated with other nutritional deficiencies with the development of cardiovascular and renal diseases. The driving hypothesis for this study was that Ang II signaling pathways in the heart and kidney are affected by chronic protein, mineral and vitamin restriction. Methodology/Principal Findings Wistar rats aged 90 days were fed from weaning with either a control or a deficient diet that mimics those used in impoverished regions worldwide. Such restriction simultaneously increased ouabain-insensitive Na+-ATPase and decreased (Na++K+)ATPase activity in the same proportion in cardiomyocytes and proximal tubule cells. Type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT1R) was downregulated by that restriction in both organs, whereas AT2R decreased only in the kidney. The PKC/PKA ratio increased in both tissues and returned to normal values in rats receiving Losartan daily from weaning. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway restored Na+-ATPase activity in both organs. The undernourished rats presented expanded plasma volume, increased heart rate, cardiac hypertrophy, and elevated systolic pressure, which also returned to control levels with Losartan. Such restriction led to electrical cardiac remodeling represented by prolonged ventricular repolarization parameters, induced triggered activity, early after-depolarization and delayed after-depolarization, which were also prevented by Losartan. Conclusion/Significance The mechanisms responsible for these alterations are underpinned by an imbalance in the PKC- and PKA-mediated pathways, with participation of angiotensin receptors and by activation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. These cellular and molecular alterations culminate in cardiac electric remodeling and in the onset of hypertension in adulthood. PMID:24983243

  6. Renal Denervation Decreases Susceptibility to Arrhythmogenic Cardiac Alternans and Ventricular Arrhythmia in a Rat Model of Post-Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Nan Chang, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Several studies have shown the beneficial effect of renal denervation (RDN in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmia, especially in the setting of heart failure (HF. However, the underlying mechanism of antiarrhythmic effect of RDN is unknown. Arrhythmogenic cardiac alternans, particularly spatially discordant repolarization alternans, characterized by simultaneous prolongation and shortening of action potential duration (APD in different myocardial regions, is central to the genesis of ventricular fibrillation in HF. Whether RDN decreases the susceptibility to arrhythmogenic cardiac alternans in HF has never been addressed before. The authors used a rat model of post-myocardial infarction HF and dual voltage-calcium optical mapping to investigate whether RDN could attenuate arrhythmogenic cardiac alternans that predisposes to ventricular arrhythmias, as well as the hemodynamic effect of RDN in HF. The HF rats had increased body weights, dilated hearts, and lower blood pressure. The HF rats also had longer ventricular APDs and a delay in the decay of the calcium transient, typical electrophysiological features of human HF. Susceptibility to calcium transient alternans, APD alternans, and spatially discordant APD alternans was increased in the HF hearts. RDN significantly attenuated a delay in the decay of the calcium transient, calcium transient and APD alternans, and importantly, the discordant APD alternans, and thereby decreased the incidence of induced ventricular arrhythmia in HF. RDN did not further decrease blood pressure in HF rats. In conclusion, RDN improves calcium cycling and prevents spatially discordant APD alternans and ventricular arrhythmia in HF. RDN does not aggravate hemodynamics in HF. Key Words: alternans, arrhythmia mechanism, heart failure, renal denervation

  7. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient......, drugs with a proven significant positive effect on mortality and morbidity rates in heart failure patients all increase plasma potassium concentration. Thus, it may prove beneficial to pay more attention to hypokalemia and to maintain plasma potassium levels in the upper normal range. The more at risk...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  8. Measuring Cardiac Output during Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, Carlo; Cattadori, Gaia

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac output is a key parameter in the assessment of cardiac function, and its measurement is fundamental to the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic evaluation of all heart diseases. Until recently, cardiac output determination during exercise had been only possible through invasive methods, which were not practical in the clinical setting. Because [Formula: see text]o 2 is cardiac output times arteriovenous content difference, evaluation of cardiac output is usually included in its measurement. Because of the difficulty of directly measuring peak exercise cardiac output, indirect surrogate parameters have been proposed, but with only modest clinical usefulness. Direct measurement of cardiac output can now be made by several noninvasive techniques, such as rebreathing inert gases, impedance cardiology, thoracic bioreactance, estimated continuous cardiac output technology, and transthoracic echocardiography coupled to cardiopulmonary exercise testing, which allow more definitive results and better understanding of the underlying physiopathology.

  9. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  10. Inside PixInsight

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Warren A

    2016-01-01

    In this book, Warren Keller reveals the secrets of astro-image processing software PixInsight in a practical and easy to follow manner, allowing the reader to produce stunning astrophotographs from even mediocre data. As the first comprehensive post-processing platform to be created by astro-imagers for astro-imagers, it has for many, replaced the generic graphics editors as the software of choice. With clear instructions from Keller, astrophotographers can get the most from its tools to create amazing images. Capable of complex post-processing routines, PixInsight is also an advanced pre-processing software, through which astrophotographers calibrate and stack their exposures into completed master files.This is the most comprehensive resource on PixInsight to date. With screenshots to help illustrate the process, it is a vital guide.

  11. Cardiac symptoms before sudden cardiac death caused by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Thomas Hadberg; Risgaard, Bjarke; Jabbari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a frequent cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among the young (SCDY). The aim of this study was to characterize symptoms before SCDY due to HCM. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through review of all death certificates, we identified all SCDs in Danes aged 1-35 years...

  12. Dreaming and insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Edwards

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years. Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996 therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams. The need to distinguish ‘aha’ experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from ‘aha’ experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared.

  13. Dreaming and insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher L.; Ruby, Perrine M.; Malinowski, Josie E.; Bennett, Paul D.; Blagrove, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years). Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996) therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams (ATD). The need to distinguish “aha” experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from “aha” experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared. PMID:24550849

  14. OpenGL Insights

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Get Real-World Insight from Experienced Professionals in the OpenGL Community With OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL, real-time rendering is becoming available everywhere, from AAA games to mobile phones to web pages. Assembling contributions from experienced developers, vendors, researchers, and educators, OpenGL Insights presents real-world techniques for intermediate and advanced OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL developers. Go Beyond the Basics The book thoroughly covers a range of topics, including OpenGL 4.2 and recent extensions. It explains how to optimize for mobile devices, explores the design

  15. New insights into defibrillation of the heart from realistic simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trayanova, Natalia A; Rantner, Lukas J

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac defibrillation, as accomplished nowadays by automatic, implantable devices, constitutes the most important means of combating sudden cardiac death. Advancing our understanding towards a full appreciation of the mechanisms by which a shock interacts with the heart, particularly under diseased conditions, is a promising approach to achieve an optimal therapy. The aim of this article is to assess the current state-of-the-art in whole-heart defibrillation modelling, focusing on major insights that have been obtained using defibrillation models, primarily those of realistic heart geometry and disease remodelling. The article showcases the contributions that modelling and simulation have made to our understanding of the defibrillation process. The review thus provides an example of biophysically based computational modelling of the heart (i.e. cardiac defibrillation) that has advanced the understanding of cardiac electrophysiological interaction at the organ level, and has the potential to contribute to the betterment of the clinical practice of defibrillation.

  16. Moderate-Intensity Exercise Affects Gut Microbiome Composition and Influences Cardiac Function in Myocardial Infarction Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuheng Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise is commonly regarded as protective against cardiovascular disease (CVD. Recent studies have reported that exercise alters the gut microbiota and that modification of the gut microbiota can influence cardiac function. Here, we focused on the relationships among exercise, the gut microbiota and cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI. Four-week-old C57BL/6J mice were exercised on a treadmill for 4 weeks before undergoing left coronary artery ligation. Cardiac function was assessed using echocardiography. Gut microbiomes were evaluated post-exercise and post-MI using 16S rRNA gene sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq platform. Exercise training inhibited declines in cardiac output and stroke volume in post-MI mice. In addition, physical exercise and MI led to alterations in gut microbial composition. Exercise training increased the relative abundance of Butyricimonas and Akkermansia. Additionally, key operational taxonomic units were identified, including 24 lineages (mainly from Bacteroidetes, Barnesiella, Helicobacter, Parabacteroides, Porphyromonadaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Ureaplasma that were closely related to exercise and cardiac function. These results suggested that exercise training improved cardiac function to some extent in addition to altering the gut microbiota; therefore, they could provide new insights into the use of exercise training for the treatment of CVD.

  17. Genetic testing for inheritable cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepesváry, Eszter; Kaski, Juan Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac channelopathies are linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death. This article reviews the clinical characteristics and genetic basis of common cardiac ion-channel diseases, highlights some genotype-phenotype correlations, and summarizes genetic testing for inheritable cardiac channelopathies.

  18. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness,

  19. Childhood cancer survivors: cardiac disease & social outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, E.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is divided in two parts; Cardiac health problems and healthcare consumption & social outcomes in CCS. The general aims of part 1 creates optimal conditions for the evaluation of cardiac events in 5-year childhood cancer survivors, evaluation of the long term risk of cardiac events, and to

  20. Modeling Defibrillation of the Heart: Approaches and Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trayanova, Natalia; Constantino, Jason; Ashihara, Takashi; Plank, Gernot

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac defibrillation, as accomplished nowadays by automatic, implantable devices (ICDs), constitutes the most important means of combating sudden cardiac death. While ICD therapy has proved to be efficient and reliable, defibrillation is a traumatic experience. Thus, research on defibrillation mechanisms, particularly aimed at lowering defibrillation voltage, remains an important topic. Advancing our understanding towards a full appreciation of the mechanisms by which a shock interacts with the heart is the most promising approach to achieve this goal. The aim of this paper is to assess the current state-of-the-art in ventricular defibrillation modeling, focusing on both numerical modeling approaches and major insights that have been obtained using defibrillation models, primarily those of realistic ventricular geometry. The paper showcases the contributions that modeling and simulation have made to our understanding of the defibrillation process. The review thus provides an example of biophysically based computational modeling of the heart (i.e., cardiac defibrillation) that has advanced the understanding of cardiac electrophysiological interaction at the organ level and has the potential to contribute to the betterment of the clinical practice of defibrillation. PMID:22273793

  1. Current Perspectives in Cardiac Laterality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Campione

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The heart is the first organ to break symmetry in the developing embryo and onset of dextral looping is the first indication of this event. Looping is a complex process that progresses concomitantly to cardiac chamber differentiation and ultimately leads to the alignment of the cardiac regions in their final topology. Generation of cardiac asymmetry is crucial to ensuring proper form and consequent functionality of the heart, and therefore it is a highly regulated process. It has long been known that molecular left/right signals originate far before morphological asymmetry and therefore can direct it. The use of several animal models has led to the characterization of a complex regulatory network, which invariably converges on the Tgf-β signaling molecule Nodal and its downstream target, the homeobox transcription factor Pitx2. Here, we review current data on the cellular and molecular bases of cardiac looping and laterality, and discuss the contribution of Nodal and Pitx2 to these processes. A special emphasis will be given to the morphogenetic role of Pitx2 and to its modulation of transcriptional and functional properties, which have also linked laterality to atrial fibrillation.

  2. The cardiac patient in Ramadan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting. PMID:27144139

  3. [Acute cardiac failure in pheochromocytoma.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønler, Morten; Munk, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (P) is an endocrine catecholamine-secreting tumor. Classical symptoms like hypertension, attacks of sweating, palpitations, headache and palor are related to catecholamine discharge. We provide a case of P in a 71 year-old man presenting with acute cardiac failure, severe reduction...

  4. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... death. The familia:l form is milder. The cardiac lesion commonly consists of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy of either ventricle or abnor- malities of the ECG.' The obstructive lesion may be pro- gressive ... that the more severe cases would be unable to bear child- ren, even if they lived long enough.

  5. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  6. Africa Insight: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Africa Insight is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal of the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA). It is accredited by the South African National Department of Higher Education and Training and is indexed in the International Bibliography of Social Science. AISA is a statutory research body focusing on ...

  7. New Insights into Obesity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 12. New Insights into Obesity. D D Bansal Ravneet Kaur Boparai. Research News Volume 8 Issue 12 December 2003 pp 92-93. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/12/0092-0093 ...

  8. Africa Insight: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Africa Insight is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal of the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA). It is accredited by the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and is indexed in the International Bibliography of Social Science (IBSS). It is a multi-disciplinary journal primarily focusing on African ...

  9. Imaging: Insight Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Richard L., II; Cotrell, Howard W.

    Imaging is the process of creating mental pictures that can be scanned as people would scan a current event. It is a real, powerful personal process, which has been used in medicine, science, health care, sports, creativity, education, and other areas. On a day-to-day level, imaging can be used to engineer insights regarding self-concept,…

  10. The Power of Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-08

    joint government and industry conference in Australia . And last month in the United Kingdom, defense representatives from four nations ( Australia ...cooperation that is the hallmark of the International Performance Management Council. There now are six nations in the Council: Australia , Canada...reported,” but managed. From Oversight to Insight The earned value reform objectives supported the larger acquisition reform objectives introduced by the

  11. [Poor insight and psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotakos, O

    2017-01-01

    A variety of phenomena might be considered as reflecting impaired insight in psychosis, like failure to recognize signs, symptoms or disease, failure to derive appropriate cognitive representations, despite recognition of the disease, and misattribution of the source or cause of the disease. The unawareness of tardive dyskinesia symptoms in schizophrenic patients points that self-awareness deficits in schizophrenia may be domain specific. Poor insight is an independent phenomenological and a prevalent feature in psychotic disorders in general, and in schizophrenia in particular, but we don't know yet if delusions in schizophrenia are the result of an entirely normal attempt to account for abnormal perceptual experiences or a product of abnormal experience but of normal reasoning. The theoretical approaches regarding impaired insight include the disturbed perceptual input, the impaired linkage between thought and emotion and the breakdown of the process of self-monitoring and error checking. The inability to distinguish between internally and externally generated mental events has been described by the metarepresentation theory. This theory includes the awareness of ones' goals, which leads to disorders of willed action, the awareness of intention, which leads to movement disorders, and the awareness of intentions of others, which leads to paranoid delusions. The theory of metarepresentation implies mainly output mechanisms, like the frontal cortex, while the input mechanism implies posterior brain systems, including the parietal lobe. There are many similarities between the disturbances of awareness seen in schizophrenia and those seen as a result of known neurological impairment. Neuropsychological models of impaired insight typically attribute the disturbance to any of a variety of core deficits in the processing of information. In this respect, lack of insight is on conceptual par with alogia, apraxia or aphasia in reflecting disturbed cognitive processing. In

  12. EHD3-Dependent Endosome Pathway Regulates Cardiac Membrane Excitability and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Musa, Hassan; Liu, Bin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Alecusan, Joe; Wright, Patrick; Li, Jingdong; Billman, George E.; Boyden, Penelope A.; Gyorke, Sandor; Band, Hamid; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac function is dependent on the coordinate activities of membrane ion channels, transporters, pumps, and hormone receptors to dynamically tune the membrane electrochemical gradient in response to acute and chronic stress. While our knowledge of membrane proteins has rapidly advanced over the past decade, our understanding of the subcellular pathways governing the trafficking and localization of integral membrane proteins is limited, and essentially unstudied in vivo. In heart, to our knowledge, there are no in vivo mechanistic studies that directly link endosome-based machinery with cardiac physiology. Objective Define the in vivo roles of endosome-based cellular machinery for cardiac membrane protein trafficking, myocyte excitability, and cardiac physiology. Methods and Results We identify the endosome-based EHD3 pathway as essential for cardiac physiology. EHD3−/− hearts display structural and functional defects including bradycardia and rate variability, conduction block, and blunted response to adrenergic stimulation. Mechanistically, EHD3 is critical for membrane protein trafficking, as EHD3−/− myocytes display reduced expression/localization of Na/Ca exchanger and Cav1.2 with a parallel reduction in INCX and ICa,L. Functionally, EHD3−/− myocytes show increased sarcoplasmic reticulum [Ca], increased spark frequency, and reduced expression/localization of ankyrin-B, a binding partner for EHD3 and Na/Ca exchanger. Finally, we show that in vivo EHD3−/− defects are due to cardiac-specific roles of EHD3 as mice with cardiac-selective EHD3 deficiency demonstrate both structural and electrical phenotypes. Conclusions These data provide new insight into the critical role of endosome-based pathways in membrane protein targeting and cardiac physiology. EHD3 is a critical component of protein trafficking in heart and is essential for the proper membrane targeting of select cellular proteins that maintain excitability. PMID:24759929

  13. Cardiac c-Kit Biology Revealed by Inducible Transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, Natalie A; Firouzi, Fareheh; Broughton, Kathleen M; Ilves, Kelli; Nguyen, Kristine P; Payne, Christina R; Sacchi, Veronica; Monsanto, Megan M; Casillas, Alexandria R; Khalafalla, Farid G; Wang, Bingyan J; Ebeid, David; Alvarez, Roberto; Dembitsky, Walter P; Bailey, Barbara A; van Berlo, Jop H; Sussman, Mark A

    2018-04-10

    Rationale: Biological significance of c-Kit as a cardiac stem cell marker and role(s) of c-Kit+ cells in myocardial development or response to pathologic injury remain unresolved due to varied and discrepant findings. Alternative experimental models are required to contextualize and reconcile discordant published observations of cardiac c-Kit myocardial biology and provide meaningful insights regarding clinical relevance of c-Kit signaling for translational cell therapy. Objective: Demonstration of c-Kit myocardial biology through combined studies of both human and murine cardiac cells. Advancing understanding of c-Kit myocardial biology through creation and characterization of a novel, inducible transgenic c-Kit reporter mouse model that overcomes limitations inherent to knock-in reporter models, providing perspective to reconcile disparate viewpoints on c-Kit biology in the myocardium. Methods and Results: In vitro studies confirm a critical role for c-Kit signaling in both cardiomyocytes and cardiac stem cells. Activation of c-Kit receptor promotes cell survival and proliferation in stem cells and cardiomyocytes of either human or murine origin. For creation of the mouse model, the cloned mouse c-Kit promoter drives Histone2B-EGFP (H2BEGFP) expression in a doxycycline inducible transgenic reporter line. The combination of c-Kit transgenesis coupled to H2BEGFP readout provides sensitive, specific, inducible, and persistent tracking of c-Kit promoter activation. Tagging efficiency for EGFP+/c-Kit+ cells is similar between our transgenic versus a c-Kit knock-in mouse line, but frequency of c-Kit+ cells in cardiac tissue from the knock-in model is 55% lower than our transgenic line. The c-Kit transgenic reporter model reveals intimate association of c-Kit expression with adult myocardial biology. Both cardiac stem cells and a subpopulation of cardiomyocytes express c-Kit in uninjured adult heart, upregulating c-Kit expression in response to pathologic stress

  14. Hyperpolarized metabolic MR in the study of cardiac function and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, M. H.; Søgaard, L. V.; Madsen, Pia Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    signal from a biological molecule of interest by more than 10,000 times, making it possible to measure its cellular uptake and conversion in specific enzymatic pathways in real time. We review the role of hyperpolarized MR in identifying changes in cardiac metabolism in vivo, and present the extensive...... literature on hyperpolarized pyruvate that has been used to characterize cardiac disease in various in vivo models, such as myocardial ischemia, hypertension, diabetes, hyperthyroidism and heart failure. The technical aspects of the technique are presented as well as the challenges of translating...... the technique into clinical practice. Hyperpolarized MR has the prospect of transforming diagnostic cardiology by offering new insights into cardiac disease and potentially even to contribute to personalized therapy based on a thorough understanding of the individual intracellular metabolism....

  15. Reciprocal analyses in zebrafish and medaka reveal that harnessing the immune response promotes cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Lei; Marín-Juez, Rubén; Moura, Pedro Luís; Kuenne, Carsten; Lai, Jason Kuan Han; Tsedeke, Ayele Taddese; Guenther, Stefan; Looso, Mario; Stainier, Didier Yr

    2017-06-20

    Zebrafish display a distinct ability to regenerate their heart following injury. However, this ability is not shared by another teleost, the medaka. In order to identify cellular and molecular bases for this difference, we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses following cardiac cryoinjury. This comparison points to major differences in immune cell dynamics between these models. Upon closer examination, we observed delayed and reduced macrophage recruitment in medaka, along with delayed neutrophil clearance. To investigate the role of immune responses in cardiac regeneration, we delayed macrophage recruitment in zebrafish and observed compromised neovascularization, neutrophil clearance, cardiomyocyte proliferation and scar resolution. In contrast, stimulating Toll-like receptor signaling in medaka enhanced immune cell dynamics and promoted neovascularization, neutrophil clearance, cardiomyocyte proliferation and scar resolution. Altogether, these data provide further insight into the complex role of the immune response during regeneration, and serve as a platform to identify and test additional regulators of cardiac repair.

  16. Air pollution and adverse cardiac remodeling: clinical effects and basic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonggang; Goodson, Jamie M; Zhang, Bo; Chin, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has long been known to trigger cardiovascular events, primarily through activation of local and systemic inflammatory pathways that affect the vasculature. Detrimental effects of air pollution exposure on heart failure and cardiac remodeling have also been described in human populations. Recent studies in both human subjects and animal models have provided insights into the basic physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a role in adverse cardiac remodeling. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between air pollution and cardiovascular disease, describe the clinical effects of air pollution exposure on cardiac remodeling, describe the basic mechanisms that affect remodeling as described in human and animal systems and will discuss future areas of investigation.

  17. The Role of Exercise in Cardiac Aging: From Physiology to Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jason; Rhee, James; Chaudhari, Vinita; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2016-01-22

    Aging induces structural and functional changes in the heart that are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and impaired functional capacity in the elderly. Exercise is a diagnostic and therapeutic tool, with the potential to provide insights into clinical diagnosis and prognosis, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which aging influences cardiac physiology and function. In this review, we first provide an overview of how aging impacts the cardiac response to exercise, and the implications this has for functional capacity in older adults. We then review the underlying molecular mechanisms by which cardiac aging contributes to exercise intolerance, and conversely how exercise training can potentially modulate aging phenotypes in the heart. Finally, we highlight the potential use of these exercise models to complement models of disease in efforts to uncover new therapeutic targets to prevent or treat heart disease in the aging population. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  19. Cardiac troponin: an emerging cardiac biomarker in animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal V. Undhad

    Full Text Available Analysis of cardiac troponin I (cTn I and T (cTnT are considered the “gold standard” for the non-invasive diagnosis of myocardial injury in human and animals. It has replaced traditionally used cardiac biomarkers such as myoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and CK-MB due to its high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of myocardial injury. Cardiac troponins are proteins that control the calcium-mediated interaction between actin and myosin, allowing contraction at the sarcomere level. Concentration of the cTn can be correlated microscopic lesion and loss of immunolabeling in myocardium damage. Troponin concentration remains elevated in blood for 1-2wks so that wide window is available for diagnosis of myocardial damage. The cTn test has >95% specificity and sensitivity and test is less time consuming (10 to 15 minutes and less costly (INR 200 to INR 500. [Vet. World 2012; 5(8.000: 508-511

  20. World energy insight 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    The World Energy Insight 2011 is the official publication of the World Energy Council. It includes interviews, articles and case studies from a distinguished panel of World Energy Council Officers, CEOs, government ministers, academics and opinion formers from all areas of the energy sector and provides perspectives from around the globe. Government, industry and NGO's offer both policy and technology perspectives. The insights within this publication add to the work that WEC is doing to provide the forum for energy leaders, along with the on-going WEC studies and programmes on Energy Policies, 2050 Energy Scenarios, Energy Resources & Technologies, Energy for Urban Innovation, Rules Of Energy Trade and Global Energy Access.

  1. Evidence of cardiac involvement in the fetal inflammatory response syndrome: disruption of gene networks programming cardiac development in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Timothy; MacDonald, James W; Srinouanpranchanh, Sengkeo; Bammler, Theodor K; Merillat, Sean; Boldenow, Erica; Coleman, Michelle; Agnew, Kathy; Baldessari, Audrey; Stencel-Baerenwald, Jennifer E; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Green, Richard R; Gale, Michael J; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M

    2018-04-01

    Most early preterm births are associated with intraamniotic infection and inflammation, which can lead to systemic inflammation in the fetus. The fetal inflammatory response syndrome describes elevations in the fetal interleukin-6 level, which is a marker for inflammation and fetal organ injury. An understanding of the effects of inflammation on fetal cardiac development may lead to insight into the fetal origins of adult cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the fetal inflammatory response syndrome is associated with disruptions in gene networks that program fetal cardiac development. We obtained fetal cardiac tissue after necropsy from a well-described pregnant nonhuman primate model (pigtail macaque, Macaca nemestrina) of intrauterine infection (n=5) and controls (n=5). Cases with the fetal inflammatory response syndrome (fetal plasma interleukin-6 >11 pg/mL) were induced by either choriodecidual inoculation of a hypervirulent group B streptococcus strain (n=4) or intraamniotic inoculation of Escherichia coli (n=1). RNA and protein were extracted from fetal hearts and profiled by microarray and Luminex (Millipore, Billerica, MA) for cytokine analysis, respectively. Results were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Statistical and bioinformatics analyses included single gene analysis, gene set analysis, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, Valencia, CA), and Wilcoxon rank sum. Severe fetal inflammation developed in the context of intraamniotic infection and a disseminated bacterial infection in the fetus. Interleukin-6 and -8 in fetal cardiac tissues were elevated significantly in fetal inflammatory response syndrome cases vs controls (P1.5-fold change, Pfetal heart (analysis of variance). Altered expression of select genes was validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction that included several with known functions in cardiac injury, morphogenesis, angiogenesis

  2. Update on INSIGHTS Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed; Eric Burgett

    2011-09-01

    INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

  3. Africa Insight: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home · Journals · Africa Insight · About · Log In · Register · Advanced Search · By Author · By Title. Issues. Current Issue · Archives · Open Journal Systems · Help. ISSN: 1995-641X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  4. Transgenic insights linking pitx2 and atrial arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Diego; Chinchilla, Ana; Aránega, Amelia E

    2012-01-01

    Pitx2 is a homeobox transcription factor involved in left-right signaling during embryogenesis. Disruption of left-right signaling in mice within its core nodal/lefty cascade, results in impaired expression of the last effector of the left-right cascade, Pitx2, leading in many cases to absence or bilateral expression of Pitx2 in lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). Loss of Pitx2 expression in LPM results in severe cardiac malformations, including right cardiac isomerism. Pitx2 is firstly expressed asymmetrically in the left but not right LPM, before the cardiac crescent forms, and subsequently, as the heart develops, becomes confined to the left side of the linear heart tube. Expression of Pitx2 is remodeled during cardiac looping, becoming localized to the ventral portion of the developing ventricular chambers, while maintaining a distinct left-sided atrial expression. The importance of Pitx2 during cardiogenesis has been illustrated by the complex and robust cardiac defects observed on systemic deletion of Pitx2 in mice. Lack of Pitx2 expression leads to embryonic lethality at mid-term, and Pitx2-deficient embryos display isomeric hearts with incomplete closure of the body wall. However, whereas the pivotal role of Pitx2 during cardiogenesis is well sustained, its putative role in the fetal and adult heart is largely unexplored. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic variants highly associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Among them are genetic variants located on chromosome 4q25 adjacent to PITX2. Since then several transgenic approaches have provided evidences of the role of the homeobox transcription factor PITX2 and atrial arrhythmias. Here, we review new insights into the cellular and molecular links between PITX2 and AF.

  5. Transgenic insights linking Pitx2 and atrial arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego eFranco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pitx2 is a homeobox transcription factor involved in left–right signaling during embryogenesis. Disruption of left–right signaling in mice within its core nodal/lefty cascade, results in impaired expression of the last effector of the left–right cascade, Pitx2, leading in many cases to absence or bilateral expression of Pitx2 in lateral plate mesoderm (LPM. Loss of Pitx2 expression in LPM results in severe cardiac malformations, including right cardiac isomerism. Pitx2 is firstly expressed asymmetrically in the left but not right LPM, before the cardiac crescent forms, and subsequently, as the heart develops, becomes confined to the left side of the linear heart tube. Expression of Pitx2 is remodeled during cardiac looping, becoming localized to the ventral portion of the developing ventricular chambers, while maintaining a distinct left-sided atrial expression. The importance of Pitx2 during cardiogenesis has been illustrated by the complex and robust cardiac defects observed on systemic deletion of Pitx2 in mice. Lack of Pitx2 expression leads to embryonic lethality at mid-term, and Pitx2-deficient embryos display isomeric expression profile resulting in Pitx2 expression within both first and second heart fields during cardiogenesis, hearts and incomplete closure of the body wall. However, whereas the pivotal role of Pitx2 during cardiogenesis is well sustained, its putative role in the foetal and adult heart is largely unexplored. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic variants highly associated with atrial fibrillation (AF. Among them are genetic variants located on chromosome 4q25 adjacent to PITX2. Since then several transgenic approaches have provided evidences of the role of the homeobox transcription factor PITX2 and atrial arrhythmias. Here, we review new insights into the cellular and molecular links between PITX2 and atrial fibrillation.

  6. Sudden cardiac death in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Camilo Pellegrino dos Santos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The most accepted definition of sudden cardiac death nowadays is an unexplained death occurred suddenly within one hour of symptom onset. If it was not witnessed, individuals need to had been observed for at least 24 hours before the event and should be discarded the possibility of non cardiac causes of sudden death, pulmonary embolism or extensive malignancy. The term athlete refers to individuals of any age who participate in collective or individual regular physical activity, as well as physical training program for regular competitions. The sudden death of a young athlete, whether amateur or professional, especially during competitions, is always dramatic, with strong negative social impact and in the media. The fact that sports are recommended as a formula for longevity and quality of life makes these events a cause for concern in sports and society in general.

  7. Massage therapy after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Amy T; Sundt, Thoralf M; Cutshall, Susanne M; Bauer, Brent A

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac surgery presents a life-saving and life-enhancing opportunity to hundreds of thousands of patients each year in the United States. However, many patients face significant challenges during the postoperative period, including pain, anxiety, and tension. Mounting evidence demonstrates that such challenges can impair immune function and slow wound healing, in addition to causing suffering for the patient. Finding new approaches to mitigate these challenges is necessary if patients are to experience the full benefits of surgery. Massage therapy is a therapy that has significant evidence to support its role in meeting these needs. This paper looks at the data surrounding the use of massage therapy in cardiac surgery patients, with a special focus on the experience at Mayo Clinic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiac blood pool emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itti, R.; Philippe, L.; Lorgeron, J.M.; Charbonnier, B.; Raynaud, P.; Brochier, M.

    1983-01-01

    After blood pool labeling using technetium-99m, a series of cardiac pictures is acquired during the rotation of a gamma-camera about the patient. Computer processing leads to reconstruction of various tomographic slices from the original planar projection. Electrocardiographic gating selects the different phases of the cardiac cycle. Individual slices through the left ventricular region are added in order to provide ''thick'' slices on which global and regional parameters of the left ventricular function can be determined. Due to the proportionality existing between count rates and labeled blood volumes, any geometrical model can be avoided. The delineation of regions of interest for count integration is made easier due to the absence of superimposition of structures; no correction for background is necessary. Tomography thus appears to be more consistent and more accurate than the classical methods using planar projections. In addition, right ventricular morphological and kinetic studies can be performed in the same conditions as for the left ventricle [fr

  9. Cardiac surgery in the parturient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Shobana; Cook, Christopher R; Collard, Charles D

    2009-03-01

    Heart disease is the primary cause of nonobstetric mortality in pregnancy, occurring in 1%-3% of pregnancies and accounting for 10%-15% of maternal deaths. Congenital heart disease has become more prevalent in women of childbearing age, representing an increasing percentage (up to 75%) of heart disease in pregnancy. Untreated maternal heart disease also places the fetus at risk. Independent predictors of neonatal complications include a maternal New York Heart Association heart failure classification >2, anticoagulation use during pregnancy, smoking, multiple gestation, and left heart obstruction. Because cardiac surgical morbidity and mortality in the parturient is higher than nonpregnant patients, most parturients with cardiac disease are first managed medically, with cardiac surgery being reserved when medical management fails. Risk factors for maternal mortality during cardiac surgery include the use of vasoactive drugs, age, type of surgery, reoperation, and maternal functional class. Risk factors for fetal mortality include maternal age >35 yr, functional class, reoperation, emergency surgery, type of myocardial protection, and anoxic time. Nonetheless, acceptable maternal and fetal perioperative mortality rates may be achieved through such measures as early preoperative detection of maternal cardiovascular decompensation, use of fetal monitoring, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester. Additionally, fetal morbidity may be reduced during cardiopulmonary bypass by optimizing maternal oxygen-carrying capacity and uterine blood flow. Current maternal bypass recommendations include: 1) maintaining the pump flow rate >2.5 L x min(-1) x m(-2) and perfusion pressure >70 mm Hg; 2) maintaining the hematocrit > 28%; 3) using normothermic perfusion when feasible; 4) using pulsatile flow; and 5) using alpha-stat pH management.

  10. The paediatrician and cardiac auscultation

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Douglas L

    2003-01-01

    The cardiac auscultation (CA) skills of paediatric residents and office-based paediatricians have recently been shown to be suboptimal. CA is known to have a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, and is inexpensive. New teaching aids and availability of surrogate patient heart sounds and murmurs now allow most physicians to acquire CA skills. These teaching aids should be available in all medical schools and in all postgraduate paediatric training programs. While the relationship betwee...

  11. Neurological Complications of Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Gottesman, Rebecca F.; McKhann, Guy M.; Hogue, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    Neurological injury resulting from cardiac surgery has a range of manifestations from focal neurological deficit to encephalopathy or coma. As the safety of drug-eluting stents comes into question, more patients will likely undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery. These projections, along with the growing proportions of elderly patients and those with comorbidities, portend the potential for rising rates of perioperative neurological complications. The risk for neurological injury may be...

  12. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    1999-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to 201 Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with 201 Tl. Quantitative assessment of 99m Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by 123 I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. 23 I-BMIPP (ρ-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, 99m Tc perfusion agents, 123 I-MIBG and 23 I-BMIPP and in associated clinical application to the various cardiac diseases

  13. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki [Yokohama Rosai Hospital (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to {sup 201}Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with {sup 201}Tl. Quantitative assessment of {sup 99m}Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. {sup 123}I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by {sup 123}I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. {sup 23}I-BMIPP ({rho}-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, {sup 99m}Tc perfusion agents, {sup 123}I-MIBG and {sup 23}I-BMIPP and in associated clinical

  14. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen, S.V; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV...

  15. Enhancing Lifestyle Change in Cardiac Patients Through the Do CHANGE System ("Do Cardiac Health: Advanced New Generation Ecosystem"): Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibović, Mirela; Broers, Eva; Piera-Jimenez, Jordi; Wetzels, Mart; Ayoola, Idowu; Denollet, Johan; Widdershoven, Jos

    2018-02-08

    Promoting a healthy lifestyle (eg, physical activity, healthy diet) is crucial for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiac disease in order to decrease disease burden and mortality. The current trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the Do Cardiac Health: Advanced New Generation Ecosystem (Do CHANGE) service, which is developed to assist cardiac patients in adopting a healthy lifestyle and improving their quality of life. Cardiac patients (ie, people who have been diagnosed with heart failure, coronary artery disease, and/or hypertension) will be recruited at three pilot sites (Badalona Serveis Assistencials, Badalona, Spain [N=75]; Buddhist Tzu Chi Dalin General Hospital, Dalin, Taiwan [N=100] and Elisabeth-TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg, The Netherlands [N=75]). Patients will be assisted by the Do Something Different (DSD) program to change their unhealthy habits and/or lifestyle. DSD has been developed to increase behavioral flexibility and subsequently adopt new (healthier) habits. In addition, patients' progress will be monitored with a number of (newly developed) devices (eg, Fitbit, Beddit, COOKiT, FLUiT), which will be integrated in one application. The Do CHANGE trial will provide us with new insights regarding the effectiveness of the proposed intervention in different cultural settings. In addition, it will give insight into what works for whom and why. The Do CHANGE service integrates new technologies into a behavior change intervention in order to change the unhealthy lifestyles of cardiac patients. The program is expected to facilitate long-term, sustainable behavioral change. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03178305; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03178305 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6wfWHvuyU). ©Mirela Habibović, Eva Broers, Jordi Piera-Jimenez, Mart Wetzels, Idowu Ayoola, Johan Denollet, Jos Widdershoven. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 08.02.2018.

  16. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, Rebecca F; McKhann, Guy M; Hogue, Charles W

    2008-11-01

    Neurological injury resulting from cardiac surgery has a range of manifestations from focal neurological deficit to encephalopathy or coma. As the safety of drug-eluting stents comes into question, more patients will likely undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery. These projections, along with the growing proportions of elderly patients and those with comorbidities, portend the potential for rising rates of perioperative neurological complications. The risk for neurological injury may be determined by the type of procedure, by patient-specific characteristics, and by the extent of cerebral embolization and hypoperfusion during and after surgery. Changes in surgical techniques, including the use of off-pump surgery, have not decreased rates of brain injury from cardiac surgery. When appropriate, modern neuroimaging techniques should be used in postoperative patients to confirm diagnosis, to provide information on potential etiology, to direct appropriate therapy, and to help in prognostication. Management of postoperative medications and early use of rehabilitation services is a recommended strategy to optimize the recovery for individuals with neurological injury after cardiac surgery.

  17. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  18. Clinical Trials in Cardiac Arrest and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Lessons from the Past and Ideas for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Frontera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Elevated intracranial pressure that occurs at the time of cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to inadequate cerebral blood flow, which may mimic the brain injury cascade that occurs after cardiac arrest. Insights from clinical trials in cardiac arrest may provide direction for future early brain injury research after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Methods. A search of PubMed from 1980 to 2012 and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify published and ongoing randomized clinical trials in aneurysmal SAH and cardiac arrest patients. Only English, adult, human studies with primary or secondary mortality or neurological outcomes were included. Results. A total of 142 trials (82 SAH, 60 cardiac arrest met the review criteria (103 published, 39 ongoing. The majority of both published and ongoing SAH trials focus on delayed secondary insults after SAH (70%, while 100% of cardiac arrest trials tested interventions within the first few hours of ictus. No SAH trials addressing treatment of early brain injury were identified. Twenty-nine percent of SAH and 13% of cardiac arrest trials showed outcome benefit, though there is no overlap mechanistically. Conclusions. Clinical trials in SAH assessing acute brain injury are warranted and successful interventions identified by the cardiac arrest literature may be reasonable targets of the study.

  19. Mast Cells: Key Contributors to Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Levick

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, increased numbers of mast cells have been associated with fibrosis in numerous cardiac pathologies, implicating mast cells in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Subsequently, several approaches have been utilised to demonstrate a causal role for mast cells in animal models of cardiac fibrosis including mast cell stabilising compounds, rodents deficient in mast cells, and inhibition of the actions of mast cell-specific proteases such as chymase and tryptase. Whilst most evidence supports a pro-fibrotic role for mast cells, there is evidence that in some settings these cells can oppose fibrosis. A major gap in our current understanding of cardiac mast cell function is identification of the stimuli that activate these cells causing them to promote a pro-fibrotic environment. This review will present the evidence linking mast cells to cardiac fibrosis, as well as discuss the major questions that remain in understanding how mast cells contribute to cardiac fibrosis.

  20. Cementoenamel junction: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharidi Laxman Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The location and nature of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ are more than descriptive terms used simply to describe some aspects of tooth morphology; however, CEJ gains a lot of clinical significance due to various measurements dependent on it. It may be necessary to determine the location and pathological changes occurring at CEJ to make a diagnosis and treat diseases pertaining to epithelial attachment and gingival margin. However, the information related to CEJ is not discussed commonly. Hence, the present review paper provides an insight on CEJ in both primary and permanent dentition.

  1. Genomic insights into tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galagan, James E

    2014-05-01

    Prevalent since pre-history, human tuberculosis - caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis - remains a major source of death worldwide. Moreover, increasing drug resistance poses the threat of disease resurgence. However, the expanding application of genomic techniques is providing new avenues for combating this old foe. Whole-genome sequencing, comparative genomics and systems biology are generating new insights into the origins and ongoing evolution of M. tuberculosis, as well as the molecular basis for its pathogenicity. These have important implications for our perspective of the disease, development of new drugs and vaccines, and treatment of patients using existing therapeutics.

  2. Heart to heart: a programme for children on a cardiac ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Gabrielle; Redshaw, Sarah; Wilson, Valerie; Dengler, Lexi

    This paper presents three research case studies of children who have had surgery for a cardiac condition and discusses the experiences of the children and their families through their responses to the Heart Beads programme, as well as the insights gained by staff. The Children's Hospital at Westmead has a significant population of children with cardiac conditions. For many of these, diagnosis signals the beginning of a long, arduous journey with multiple procedures and admissions. The hospital has a family-centred care focus, and the cardiac ward undertook a project to implement and progress changes consistent with this approach. Staff developed the Heart Beads programme to enhance the care of children being treated for cardiac conditions. The programme involves children receiving distinct beads specific to each cardiac procedure, treatment, or event in recognition of their experience. A total of 7 staff members and 11 families were interviewed and particular stories were noted by staff. The case studies presented illustrated how nursing staff were able to recognize potential improvements to care and acknowledge the experiences of patients and families. Assumptions questioned as a result of the programme related to the complexity of the child's condition and gender. The death of a child and the acknowledgement of the child's life is also considered. Heart Beads allowed staff to reflect on the positive aspects of the care they provided.

  3. (31)P cardiac magnetic resonance spectroscopy during leg exercise at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudsmith, Lucy E; Tyler, Damian J; Emmanuel, Yaso; Petersen, Steffen E; Francis, Jane M; Watkins, Hugh; Clarke, Kieran; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    Investigation of phosphorus ((31)P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy under stress conditions provides a non-invasive tool to examine alterations in cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism that may not be evident at rest. Our aim was to establish cardiac (31)P MR spectroscopy during leg exercise at 3T. The increased field strength should provide a higher signal to noise ratio than at lower field strengths. Furthermore, relatively high temporal resolution at a sufficiently fine spatial resolution should be feasible. (31)P MR spectra were obtained with a 3D acquisition weighted chemical shift imaging sequence in 20 healthy volunteers at rest, during dynamic physiological leg exercise and after recovery at 3T. Haemodynamic measurements were made throughout and the rate pressure product calculated. With exercise, the mean heart rate increased by 73%, achieving a mean increase in rate pressure product of 115%. The corrected PCr/ATP ratio for subjects at rest was 2.02 +/- 0.43, exercise 2.14 +/- 0.67 (P = 0.54 vs. rest) and at recovery 2.03 +/- 0.52 (P = 0.91 vs. rest, P = 0.62 vs. exercise). A cardiac (31)P MR spectroscopy physiological exercise-recovery protocol is feasible at 3T. There was no significant change in high-energy cardiac phosphate metabolite concentrations in healthy volunteers at rest, during physiological leg exercise or during recovery. When applied to patients with heart disease, this protocol should provide insights into physiological and pathological cardiac metabolism.

  4. Galnt1 Is Required for Normal Heart Valve Development and Cardiac Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, E; Stevens, Sharon R.; Guan, Yu; Springer, Danielle A.; Anderson, Stasia A.; Starost, Matthew F.; Patel, Vyomesh; Ten Hagen, Kelly G.; Tabak, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart valve defects in humans occur in approximately 2% of live births and are a major source of compromised cardiac function. In this study we demonstrate that normal heart valve development and cardiac function are dependent upon Galnt1, the gene that encodes a member of the family of glycosyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) responsible for the initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation. In the adult mouse, compromised cardiac function that mimics human congenital heart disease, including aortic and pulmonary valve stenosis and regurgitation; altered ejection fraction; and cardiac dilation, was observed in Galnt1 null animals. The underlying phenotype is aberrant valve formation caused by increased cell proliferation within the outflow tract cushion of developing hearts, which is first detected at developmental stage E11.5. Developing valves from Galnt1 deficient animals displayed reduced levels of the proteases ADAMTS1 and ADAMTS5, decreased cleavage of the proteoglycan versican and increased levels of other extracellular matrix proteins. We also observed increased BMP and MAPK signaling. Taken together, the ablation of Galnt1 appears to disrupt the formation/remodeling of the extracellular matrix and alters conserved signaling pathways that regulate cell proliferation. Our study provides insight into the role of this conserved protein modification in cardiac valve development and may represent a new model for idiopathic valve disease. PMID:25615642

  5. Cardiac tamponade: contrast reflux as an indicator of cardiac chamber equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauta Foeke Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic hemopericardium remains a rare entity; it does however commonly cause cardiac tamponade which remains a major cause of death in traumatic blunt cardiac injury. Objectives We present a case of blunt chest trauma complicated by cardiac tamponade causing cardiac chamber equalization revealed by reflux of contrast. Case report A 29-year-old unidentified male suffered blunt chest trauma in a motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a periaortic hematoma and hemopericardium. Significant contrast reflux was seen in the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins suggesting a change in cardiac chamber pressures. After intensive treatment including cardiac massage this patient expired of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Reflux of contrast on CT imaging can be an indicator of traumatic cardiac tamponade.

  6. Cardiac-specific ablation of glutaredoxin 3 leads to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental and clinical investigations have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is increased during cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Excess ROS can directly impair cardiac contraction through modification of Ca2+ handling proteins or activate multiple effectors and sig...

  7. Sensing Cardiac Electrical Activity With a Cardiac Myocyte--Targeted Optogenetic Voltage Indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang Liao, Mei-Ling; de Boer, Teun P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481878X; Mutoh, Hiroki; Raad, Nour; Richter, Claudia; Wagner, Eva; Downie, Bryan R; Unsöld, Bernhard; Arooj, Iqra; Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Döker, Stephan; Luther, Stefan; Guan, Kaomei; Wagner, Stefan; Lehnart, Stephan E; Maier, Lars S; Stühmer, Walter; Wettwer, Erich; van Veen, Toon|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229701310; Morlock, Michael M; Knöpfel, Thomas; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Monitoring and controlling cardiac myocyte activity with optogenetic tools offer exciting possibilities for fundamental and translational cardiovascular research. Genetically encoded voltage indicators may be particularly attractive for minimal invasive and repeated assessments of cardiac

  8. Complexity analysis of experimental cardiac arrhythmia

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Binbin; Binczak, Stéphane; Jacquir, Sabir; Pont, Oriol; Yahia, Hussein

    2014-01-01

    International audience; To study the cardiac arrhythmia, an in vitro experimental model and Multielectrodes Array (MEA) are used. This platform serves as an intermediary of the electrical activities of cardiac cells and the signal processing / dynamics analysis. Through it the extracellular potential of cardiac cells is acquired, allowing a real-time monitoring / analyzing. Since MEA has 60 electrodes / channels dispatched in a rectangular region, it allows real-time monitoring and signal acq...

  9. Physiotherapy-supervised mobilization and exercise following cardiac surgery: a national questionnaire survey in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Möller, Margareta

    2010-08-25

    duration of exercises and recommendations for sternal precautions reinforced for the healing period differ between physiotherapists. This survey provides an initial insight into physiotherapy management in Sweden. Comparison with surveys in other countries is warranted to improve the physiotherapy management and postoperative recovery of the cardiac surgery patient.

  10. Action Potential Shortening and Impairment of Cardiac Function by Ablation of Slc26a6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirish, Padmini; Ledford, Hannah A; Timofeyev, Valeriy; Thai, Phung N; Ren, Lu; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Park, Seojin; Lee, Jeong Han; Dai, Gu; Moshref, Maryam; Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Chen, Wei Chun; Timofeyeva, Maria Valeryevna; Jian, Zhong; Shimkunas, Rafael; Izu, Leighton T; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Chen-Izu, Ye; Yamoah, Ebenezer N; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2017-10-01

    Intracellular pH (pH i ) is critical to cardiac excitation and contraction; uncompensated changes in pH i impair cardiac function and trigger arrhythmia. Several ion transporters participate in cardiac pH i regulation. Our previous studies identified several isoforms of a solute carrier Slc26a6 to be highly expressed in cardiomyocytes. We show that Slc26a6 mediates electrogenic Cl - /HCO 3 - exchange activities in cardiomyocytes, suggesting the potential role of Slc26a6 in regulation of not only pH i , but also cardiac excitability. To test the mechanistic role of Slc26a6 in the heart, we took advantage of Slc26a6 knockout ( Slc26a6 -/ - ) mice using both in vivo and in vitro analyses. Consistent with our prediction of its electrogenic activities, ablation of Slc26a6 results in action potential shortening. There are reduced Ca 2+ transient and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ load, together with decreased sarcomere shortening in Slc26a6 -/ - cardiomyocytes. These abnormalities translate into reduced fractional shortening and cardiac contractility at the in vivo level. Additionally, pH i is elevated in Slc26a6 -/ - cardiomyocytes with slower recovery kinetics from intracellular alkalization, consistent with the Cl - /HCO 3 - exchange activities of Slc26a6. Moreover, Slc26a6 -/ - mice show evidence of sinus bradycardia and fragmented QRS complex, supporting the critical role of Slc26a6 in cardiac conduction system. Our study provides mechanistic insights into Slc26a6, a unique cardiac electrogenic Cl - /HCO 3 - transporter in ventricular myocytes, linking the critical roles of Slc26a6 in regulation of pH i , excitability, and contractility. pH i is a critical regulator of other membrane and contractile proteins. Future studies are needed to investigate possible changes in these proteins in Slc26a6 -/ - mice. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Lysyl oxidase overexpression accelerates cardiac remodeling and aggravates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Guadall, Anna; Orriols, Mar; Navas, Miquel; Aguiló, Silvia; de Diego, Alicia; Navarro, María A; García-Dorado, David; Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) controls matrix remodeling, a key process that underlies cardiovascular diseases and heart failure; however, a lack of suitable animal models has limited our knowledge with regard to the contribution of LOX to cardiac dysfunction. Here, we assessed the impact of LOX overexpression on ventricular function and cardiac hypertrophy in a transgenic LOX (TgLOX) mouse model with a strong cardiac expression of human LOX. TgLOX mice exhibited high expression of the transgene in cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, which are associated with enhanced LOX activity and H 2 O 2 production and with cardiofibroblast reprogramming. LOX overexpression promoted an age-associated concentric remodeling of the left ventricle and impaired diastolic function. Furthermore, LOX transgenesis aggravated angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction, which triggered a greater fibrotic response that was characterized by stronger collagen deposition and cross-linking and high expression of fibrotic markers. In addition, LOX transgenesis increased the Ang II-induced myocardial inflammatory infiltrate, exacerbated expression of proinflammatory markers, and decreased that of cardioprotective factors. Mechanistically, LOX overexpression enhanced oxidative stress and potentiated the Ang II-mediated cardiac activation of p38 MAPK while reducing AMPK activation. Our findings suggest that LOX induces an age-dependent disturbance of diastolic function and aggravates Ang II-induced hypertrophy, which provides novel insights into the role of LOX in cardiac performance.-Galán, M., Varona, S., Guadall, A., Orriols, M., Navas, M., Aguiló, S., de Diego, A., Navarro, M. A., García-Dorado, D., Rodríguez-Sinovas, A., Martínez-González, J., Rodriguez, C. Lysyl oxidase overexpression accelerates cardiac remodeling and aggravates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy. © FASEB.

  12. Penetrating cardiac injury following sewing needle ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobnach, Sanju; Castillo, Franco; Blanco Vinent, René; Kahn, Delawir; Bhyat, Ahmed

    2011-07-01

    Penetrating cardiac injuries are common in South Africa. Reports describing traumatic lesions to the heart caused by caudo-cranial migration of ingested foreign bodies are however extremely rare. Delayed presentation and intervention are associated with poor outcome in these patients; cardiac tamponade remains the most serious complication. We present the case of a 19 year-old man who sustained a left ventricular injury after intentionally swallowing eight sewing needles. The impacted needle was removed through a median sternotomy and the patient recovered uneventfully. Copyright © 2011 Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling for Insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen Matthern

    2007-04-01

    System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.

  14. Spatially Discordant Alternans and Arrhythmias in Tachypacing-Induced Cardiac Myopathy in Transgenic LQT1 Rabbits: The Importance of IKs and Ca2+ Cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lau

    Full Text Available Remodeling of cardiac repolarizing currents, such as the downregulation of slowly activating K+ channels (IKs, could underlie ventricular fibrillation (VF in heart failure (HF. We evaluated the role of Iks remodeling in VF susceptibility using a tachypacing HF model of transgenic rabbits with Long QT Type 1 (LQT1 syndrome.LQT1 and littermate control (LMC rabbits underwent three weeks of tachypacing to induce cardiac myopathy (TICM. In vivo telemetry demonstrated steepening of the QT/RR slope in LQT1 with TICM (LQT1-TICM; pre: 0.26±0.04, post: 0.52±0.01, P<0.05. In vivo electrophysiology showed that LQT1-TICM had higher incidence of VF than LMC-TICM (6 of 11 vs. 3 of 11, respectively. Optical mapping revealed larger APD dispersion (16±4 vs. 38±6 ms, p<0.05 and steep APD restitution in LQT1-TICM compared to LQT1-sham (0.53±0.12 vs. 1.17±0.13, p<0.05. LQT1-TICM developed spatially discordant alternans (DA, which caused conduction block and higher-frequency VF (15±1 Hz in LQT1-TICM vs. 13±1 Hz in LMC-TICM, p<0.05. Ca2+ DA was highly dynamic and preceded voltage DA in LQT1-TICM. Ryanodine abolished DA in 5 out of 8 LQT1-TICM rabbits, demonstrating the importance of Ca2+ in complex DA formation. Computer simulations suggested that HF remodeling caused Ca2+-driven alternans, which was further potentiated in LQT1-TICM due to the lack of IKs.Compared with LMC-TICM, LQT1-TICM rabbits exhibit steepened APD restitution and complex DA modulated by Ca2+. Our results strongly support the contention that the downregulation of IKs in HF increases Ca2+ dependent alternans and thereby the risk of VF.

  15. Mouse ECG findings in aging, with conduction system affecting drugs and in cardiac pathologies: Development and validation of ECG analysis algorithm in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merentie, Mari; Lipponen, Jukka A; Hedman, Marja; Hedman, Antti; Hartikainen, Juha; Huusko, Jenni; Lottonen-Raikaslehto, Line; Parviainen, Viktor; Laidinen, Svetlana; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-12-01

    Mouse models are extremely important in studying cardiac pathologies and related electrophysiology, but very few mouse ECG analysis programs are readily available. Therefore, a mouse ECG analysis algorithm was developed and validated. Surface ECG (lead II) was acquired during transthoracic echocardiography from C57Bl/6J mice under isoflurane anesthesia. The effect of aging was studied in young (2-3 months), middle-aged (14 months) and old (20-24 months) mice. The ECG changes associated with pharmacological interventions and common cardiac pathologies, that is, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and progressive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), were studied. The ECG raw data were analyzed with an in-house ECG analysis program, modified specially for mouse ECG. Aging led to increases in P-wave duration, atrioventricular conduction time (PQ interval), and intraventricular conduction time (QRS complex width), while the R-wave amplitude decreased. In addition, the prevalence of arrhythmias increased during aging. Anticholinergic atropine shortened PQ time, and beta blocker metoprolol and calcium-channel blocker verapamil increased PQ interval and decreased heart rate. The ECG changes after AMI included early JT elevation, development of Q waves, decreased R-wave amplitude, and later changes in JT/T segment. In progressive LVH model, QRS complex width was increased at 2 and especially 4 weeks timepoint, and also repolarization abnormalities were seen. Aging, drugs, AMI, and LVH led to similar ECG changes in mice as seen in humans, which could be reliably detected with this new algorithm. The developed method will be very useful for studies on cardiovascular diseases in mice. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  16. [Ca2+]i Elevation and Oxidative Stress Induce KCNQ1 Protein Translocation from the Cytosol to the Cell Surface and Increase Slow Delayed Rectifier (IKs) in Cardiac Myocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Zankov, Dimitar P.; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Mei; Henderson, Scott C.; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2013-01-01

    Our goals are to simultaneously determine the three-dimensional distribution patterns of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 in cardiac myocytes and to study the mechanism and functional implications for variations in KCNQ1/KCNE1 colocalization in myocytes. We monitored the distribution patterns of KCNQ1, KCNE1, and markers for subcellular compartments/organelles using immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and confirmed the findings in ventricular myocytes by directly observing fluorescently tagged KCNQ1-GFP and KCNE1-dsRed expressed in these cells. We also monitored the effects of stress on KCNQ1-GFP and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remodeling during live cell imaging. The data showed that 1) KCNE1 maintained a stable cell surface localization, whereas KCNQ1 exhibited variations in the cytosolic compartment (striations versus vesicles) and the degree of presence on the cell surface; 2) the degree of cell surface KCNQ1/KCNE1 colocalization was positively correlated with slow delayed rectifier (IKs) current density; 3) KCNQ1 and calnexin (an ER marker) shared a cytosolic compartment; and 4) in response to stress ([Ca2+]i elevation, oxidative overload, or AT1R stimulation), KCNQ1 exited the cytosolic compartment and trafficked to the cell periphery in vesicles. This was accompanied by partial ER fragmentation. We conclude that the cellular milieu regulates KCNQ1 distribution in cardiac myocytes and that stressful conditions can increase IKs by inducing KCNQ1 movement to the cell surface. This represents a hitherto unrecognized mechanism by which IKs fulfills its function as a repolarization reserve in ventricular myocytes. PMID:24142691

  17. [Ca2+]i elevation and oxidative stress induce KCNQ1 protein translocation from the cytosol to the cell surface and increase slow delayed rectifier (IKs) in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Zankov, Dimitar P; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Mei; Henderson, Scott C; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2013-12-06

    Our goals are to simultaneously determine the three-dimensional distribution patterns of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 in cardiac myocytes and to study the mechanism and functional implications for variations in KCNQ1/KCNE1 colocalization in myocytes. We monitored the distribution patterns of KCNQ1, KCNE1, and markers for subcellular compartments/organelles using immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and confirmed the findings in ventricular myocytes by directly observing fluorescently tagged KCNQ1-GFP and KCNE1-dsRed expressed in these cells. We also monitored the effects of stress on KCNQ1-GFP and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remodeling during live cell imaging. The data showed that 1) KCNE1 maintained a stable cell surface localization, whereas KCNQ1 exhibited variations in the cytosolic compartment (striations versus vesicles) and the degree of presence on the cell surface; 2) the degree of cell surface KCNQ1/KCNE1 colocalization was positively correlated with slow delayed rectifier (IKs) current density; 3) KCNQ1 and calnexin (an ER marker) shared a cytosolic compartment; and 4) in response to stress ([Ca(2+)]i elevation, oxidative overload, or AT1R stimulation), KCNQ1 exited the cytosolic compartment and trafficked to the cell periphery in vesicles. This was accompanied by partial ER fragmentation. We conclude that the cellular milieu regulates KCNQ1 distribution in cardiac myocytes and that stressful conditions can increase IKs by inducing KCNQ1 movement to the cell surface. This represents a hitherto unrecognized mechanism by which IKs fulfills its function as a repolarization reserve in ventricular myocytes.

  18. Interaction between the Cardiac Rapidly (IKr) and Slowly (IKs) Activating Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels Revealed by Low K+-induced hERG Endocytic Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Tingzhong; Yang, Tonghua; Xu, Jianmin; Li, Wentao; Fridman, Michael D.; Fisher, John T.; Zhang, Shetuan

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization is controlled by the rapidly (IKr) and slowly (IKs) activating delayed rectifier potassium channels. The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) encodes IKr, whereas KCNQ1 and KCNE1 together encode IKs. Decreases in IKr or IKs cause long QT syndrome (LQTS), a cardiac disorder with a high risk of sudden death. A reduction in extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) induces LQTS and selectively causes endocytic degradation of mature hERG channels from the plasma membrane. In the present study, we investigated whether IKs compensates for the reduced IKr under low K+ conditions. Our data show that when hERG and KCNQ1 were expressed separately in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, exposure to 0 mm K+ for 6 h completely eliminated the mature hERG channel expression but had no effect on KCNQ1. When hERG and KCNQ1 were co-expressed, KCNQ1 significantly delayed 0 mm K+-induced hERG reduction. Also, hERG degradation led to a significant reduction in KCNQ1 in 0 mm K+ conditions. An interaction between hERG and KCNQ1 was identified in hERG+KCNQ1-expressing HEK cells. Furthermore, KCNQ1 preferentially co-immunoprecipitated with mature hERG channels that are localized in the plasma membrane. Biophysical and pharmacological analyses indicate that although hERG and KCNQ1 closely interact with each other, they form distinct hERG and KCNQ1 channels. These data extend our understanding of delayed rectifier potassium channel trafficking and regulation, as well as the pathology of LQTS. PMID:21844197

  19. T-wave area predicts response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with left bundle branch block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Elien B; Végh, Eszter M; Van Deursen, Caroline J M; Vernooy, Kevin; Singh, Jagmeet P; Prinzen, Frits W

    2015-02-01

    Chronic heart failure patients with a left ventricular (LV) conduction delay, mostly due to left bundle branch block (LBBB), generally derive benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). However, 30-50% of patients do not show a clear response to CRT. We investigated whether T-wave analysis of the ECG can improve patient selection. The study population comprised 244 CRT recipients with baseline 12-lead electrocardiogram recordings. Echocardiographic response after 6-month CRT was defined as a ≥5% increase in LV ejection fraction (LVEF). Vectorcardiograms (VCGs) were constructed from the measured 12-lead ECGs using an adapted Kors algorithm on digitized ECGs. Logistic regression models indicated repolarization variables as good predictors of CRT response. The VCG-derived T-wave area predicted CRT response (odds ratio [OR] per 10 μVs increase 1.172 [P < 0.001]) even better than QRS-wave area (OR = 1.116 [P = 0.001]). T-wave area had especially predictive value in the LBBB patient group (OR = 2.77 in LBBB vs. 1.09 in non-LBBB). This predictive value persisted after adjustment of multiple covariates, such as gender, ischemia, age, hypertension, coronary artery bypass graft, and the usage of diuretics and β-blockers. In LBBB patients, the increase in LVEF was 6.1 ± 9.7% and 11.3 ± 9.1% in patients with T-wave area below and above the median value, respectively (P < 0.01). In patients with LBBB morphology of the QRS complex, a larger baseline T-wave area is an important independent predictor of LVEF increase following CRT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The need for cardiac follow-up in adults with mild congenital cardiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Mascha; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Vogels, Ton; Zwinderman, Koos H.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. Pauline; Ottenkamp, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    To discuss the need for continuing cardiac surveillance in adults with hemodynamically insignificant congenital cardiac disease. In 82 patients with mild congenital cardiac malformations, aged from 17 to 32 years, we investigated the subjective health status, the health-related quality of life, any

  1. On the Design of an Efficient Cardiac Health Monitoring System Through Combined Analysis of ECG and SCG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Prasan Kumar; Thakkar, Hiren Kumar; Lin, Wen-Yen; Chang, Po-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Yih

    2018-01-28

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major public concern and socioeconomic problem across the globe. The popular high-end cardiac health monitoring systems such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography scan (CT scan), and echocardiography (Echo) are highly expensive and do not support long-term continuous monitoring of patients without disrupting their activities of daily living (ADL). In this paper, the continuous and non-invasive cardiac health monitoring using unobtrusive sensors is explored aiming to provide a feasible and low-cost alternative to foresee possible cardiac anomalies in an early stage. It is learned that cardiac health monitoring based on sole usage of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals may not provide powerful insights as ECG provides shallow information on various cardiac activities in the form of electrical impulses only. Hence, a novel low-cost, non-invasive seismocardiogram (SCG) signal along with ECG signals are jointly investigated for the robust cardiac health monitoring. For this purpose, the in-laboratory data collection model is designed for simultaneous acquisition of ECG and SCG signals followed by mechanisms for the automatic delineation of relevant feature points in acquired ECG and SCG signals. In addition, separate feature points based novel approach is adopted to distinguish between normal and abnormal morphology in each ECG and SCG cardiac cycle. Finally, a combined analysis of ECG and SCG is carried out by designing a Naïve Bayes conditional probability model. Experiments on Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved licensed ECG/SCG signals acquired from real subjects containing 12,000 cardiac cycles show that the proposed feature point delineation mechanisms and abnormal morphology detection methods consistently perform well and give promising results. In addition, experimental results show that the combined analysis of ECG and SCG signals provide more reliable cardiac health monitoring compared to the

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation and the therapeutic environment: the importance of physical, social, and symbolic safety for programme participation among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Erica J; Rolfe, Danielle E; Landry, Mireille; Sternberg, Leonard; Price, Jennifer A D

    2012-08-01

    To report an exploration of the multidimensionality of safety in cardiac rehabilitation programmes as perceived by women who were enrolled in the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative in Toronto, Canada. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women. Although cardiac rehabilitation is clinically effective, significantly fewer women than men participate in available programmes. The literature identifies factors affecting women's cardiac rehabilitation participation, and provides possible explanations for this gender disparity. Although safety is mentioned among the barriers to women's cardiac rehabilitation participation, the extent to which safety contributes to programme participation, completion, and maintenance remains under-explored in the cardiac rehabilitation literature. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to examine the role safety and place play for women engaged in cardiac prevention and rehabilitation at the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative. Methods.  From 2005-2006, 14 participants engaged in semi-structured, qualitative interviews lasting 30-90 minutes. Discussions addressed women's experiences at the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes were developed: 'Safety', which was sub-categorized according to physical, social, and symbolic interpretations of safety, 'searching for a sense of place', and 'confidence and empowerment'. Feeling physically, socially, and symbolically safe in one's cardiac rehabilitation environment may contribute to programme adherence and exercise maintenance for women. Focusing on comprehensive notions of safety in future cardiac rehabilitation research could offer insight into why many women do not maintain an exercise regimen in currently structured cardiac rehabilitation and community programmes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Cardiac disorders with psychosomatic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Bielejewska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychosomatic disorders can be described as psychosocial-derived organic disorders. The influence of depression, sleep disorders, quality of life, addictions, work environment, family situation, and stress on atrial fibrillation, palpitations, syncope, chest pain, coronary heart disease, and heart failure has been analysed in this paper. The correlation between psychosomatic disorders and the cardiovascular system has been shown. It allows us to conclude that an attending physician, while taking medical history of cardiac patients, should take into consideration factors that may have a negative impact on their mental health, which can be risk factors in the development or aggravation of an already present cardiovascular disease.

  4. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.......7) min(-1), P PET...

  5. FGF21 and Cardiac Physiopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Planavila, Anna; Redondo-Angulo, Ibon; Villarroya, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific resp...

  6. Cardiac leiomyosarcoma, a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Gill, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    In this case report we present the history of a patient admitted with recurrent pulmonary edema. Transesophageal chocardiography showed a tumour in the left atrium, occluding the ostium of the mitral valve and mimicking intermittent mitral stenosis. Cardiac surgery followed by pathological...... examination revealed that the tumour was a leiomyosarcoma. Images from the echocardiography as well as the pathological findings are shown and discussed. The present case report illustrates that atrial tumors comprise also sarcomas, suggesting the use of careful, rapid diagnostic procedures and treatment...

  7. [Cardiac effects of radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohinen, Suvi; Turpeinen, Anu; Skyttä, Tanja; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Because of increased life-expentancy cancer patients having undergone radiation therapy nowadays live longer, and late-appearing adverse effects are therefore playing a more significant role. Radiation therapy given to the chest is known to approximately double the risk of heart disease, the cumulative total radiation dose being the most important risk-increasing factor. The most significant adverse effects appear only years after the treatment. The mortality from late manifestations reduces the total benefit of radiation therapy. Patients with radiation therapy due to a cancer of the left breast or Hodgkin's lymphoma are particularly susceptible to cardiac effects. A safe radiation dose is not known.

  8. Response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Schiffer, Angélique A; Widdershoven, Jos W

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment for a subgroup of patients with advanced congestive heart failure and a prolonged QRS interval. Despite the majority of patients benefiting from CRT, 10-40% of patients do not respond to this treatment and are labeled as nonresponders....... Given that there is a lack of consensus on how to define response to CRT, the purpose of this viewpoint is to discuss currently used definitions and their shortcomings, and to provide recommendations as to how an expansion of the criteria for CRT response may be useful to clinicians....

  9. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? Updated:Mar 15,2018 People often use these ... The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men. What is cardiac arrest? Sudden cardiac ...

  10. Outsourcing/Offshoring Insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tate, Wendy; Bals, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    that these decisions are embedded in the same context – firms making governance and location decisions. Therefore, papers 1-4 primarily focus on offshoring, whereas paper 5 focuses on insourcing and paper 6 on reshoring. Their main findings are summarized in Table II. Research limitations/implications: Suggestions......Findings: Both the geographical and governance dimensions are part of the rightshoring decision which is an important conceptual foundation for this special issue, as it invited insightful pieces on all of these phenomena (e.g. outsourcing, insourcing, offshoring, reshoring), acknowledging...... for future research out of the six papers are summarized in Table III. There is ample opportunity to further shed light on these suggestions as well as to cover parts of the “rightshoring” framework presented, that remain less covered here (e.g. insourcing and/or reshoring). Practical implications: The array...

  11. Genetic Insights into Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Anne S; Chow, Eva WC; Waterworth, Dawn M; Brzustowicz, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Objective To outline new insights into the genetic etiology of schizophrenia. Methods We discuss several commonly held beliefs about the genetic issues in schizophrenia. Results The complex genetic nature of the illness poses a challenge for investigators seeking causative genetic mutations. Multiple independent research findings are, however converging to identify a relatively small number of chromosomal locations that appear to contain schizophrenia susceptibility genes. Also, a clinically relevant genetic subtype of schizophrenia (22qDS) has been identified. We are developing a better understanding of how schizophrenia relates to other psychiatric disorders. While investigations into the possible roles of dopaminergic and serotonergic systems continue, other approaches that do not require theories of the mechanism of illness are also being used to identify candidate susceptibility genes. Conclusions Research to date suggests that our understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia will soon be fundamentally altered by genetic approaches to this complex disease. PMID:11280081

  12. Insights on STEM Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  13. Osho - Insights on sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Sex is a mysterious phenomenon, which has puzzled even great sages. Human beings have researched and mastered the biology of sex. But that is not all. Sex needs to be understood from the spiritual perspective too. The vision of Osho is an enlightening experience in this regard. Out of the thousands of lectures, five lectures on sex made Osho most notorious. Born into a Jain family of Madhya Pradesh, Rajneesh, who later wanted himself to be called Osho, is a great master. He has spoken volumes on a wide range of topics ranging from sex to super-consciousness. His contributions in the area of sex are based on the principles of "Tantra" which has its origin from Buddhism. This article focuses on his life and insights on sex, which if understood properly, can be a stepping stone for enlightenment.

  14. Imaging: Guiding the Clinical Translation of Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Patricia K.; Lan, Feng; Wang, Yongming; Wu, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have been touted as the holy grail of medical therapy with promises to regenerate cardiac tissue, but it appears the jury is still out on this novel therapy. Using advanced imaging technology, scientists have discovered that these cells do not survive nor engraft long-term. In addition, only marginal benefit has been observed in large animal studies and human trials. However, all is not lost. Further application of advanced imaging technology will help scientists unravel the mysteries of stem cell therapy and address the clinical hurdles facing its routine implementation. In this review, we will discuss how advanced imaging technology will help investigators better define the optimal delivery method, improve survival and engraftment, and evaluate efficacy and safety. Insights gained from this review may direct the development of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:21960727

  15. A Case for Pharmacogenomics in Management of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Kandoi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the cardiac rhythm are quite prevalent in clinical practice. Though the variability in drug response between individuals has been extensively studied, this information has not been widely used in clinical practice. Rapid advances in the field of pharmacogenomics have provided us with crucial insights on inter-individual genetic variability and its impact on drug metabolism and action. Technologies for faster and cheaper genetic testing and even personal genome sequencing would enable clinicians to optimize prescription based on the genetic makeup of the individual, which would open up new avenues in the area of personalized medicine. We have systematically looked at literature evidence on pharmacogenomics markers for anti-arrhythmic agents from the OpenPGx consortium collection and reason the applicability of genetics in the management of arrhythmia. We also discuss potential issues that need to be resolved before personalized pharmacogenomics becomes a reality in regular clinical practice.

  16. Cardiac angiosarcoma: an unexpected diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Roberto Furst Crenitte

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare entity. The incidence through autopsy findings ranges between 0.001% and 0.03%. The disease usually presents with non-specific symptoms, although asymptomatic cases are frequent; therefore, diagnosis is unexpected and consequently delayed. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man with a recent onset cough and dyspnea. He sought medical care several times without receiving a definite diagnosis until a plain chest radiography was taken showing a mediastinal enlargement, which was the reason why he was hospitalized for clinical investigation. During the diagnostic workup, an echodopplercardiogram and a thoracic computed tomography were performed, showing a heterogeneous soft-tissue mass infiltrating the pericardium and the anterior atrial wall. Multiple and scattered pulmonary nodules were also present. A pulmonary nodule was biopsied, which revealed an angiosarcoma. The clinical features added to the radiological and histological findings permitted the diagnosis of right atrial angiosarcoma. The authors highlight the unexpected pattern in the presentation of cardiac tumors.

  17. Hemodynamics driven cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, Emily; Boselli, Francesco; Vermot, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical forces are instrumental to cardiovascular development and physiology. The heart beats approximately 2.6 billion times in a human lifetime and heart valves ensure that these contractions result in an efficient, unidirectional flow of the blood. Composed of endocardial cells (EdCs) and extracellular matrix (ECM), cardiac valves are among the most mechanically challenged structures of the body both during and after their development. Understanding how hemodynamic forces modulate cardiovascular function and morphogenesis is key to unraveling the relationship between normal and pathological cardiovascular development and physiology. Most valve diseases have their origins in embryogenesis, either as signs of abnormal developmental processes or the aberrant re-expression of fetal gene programs normally quiescent in adulthood. Here we review recent discoveries in the mechanobiology of cardiac valve development and introduce the latest technologies being developed in the zebrafish, including live cell imaging and optical technologies, as well as modeling approaches that are currently transforming this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Cardiac arrhythmia detection using photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradkar, Neeraj; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2017-07-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) cause a very large number of casualties around the world every year and cardiac arrhythmias contribute to significant proportion of CVD related deaths. Bedside cardiac activity monitors in hospitals are based on electrocardiogram (ECG) processing and are known to produce too many false alarms. Moving beyond bedside care, ECG is not very suitable for use in wearable devices. Photoplethysmography (PPG) on the other hand provides an inexpensive and more wearable device-friendly alternative. This work presents a technique to detect life threatening arrhythmias using only PPG waveforms. PhysioNet Challenge 2015 data is used to detect five types of arrhythmias namely, tachycardia, bradycardia, asystole, ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. A novel technique is employed to assign pulse quality index to every PPG pulse and highest quality portion of the signal is used for detection. Results indicate that PPG provides a viable alternative for conventional ECG based detection. An overall true positive rate (TPR) of 93% was achieved with true negative rate (TNR) of 53.78% suggesting that PPG is a viable option for arrhythmia detection.

  19. Acute alteration of cardiac ECG, action potential, IKr and the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K+ channel by PCB 126 and PCB 77

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mi-Hyeong; Park, Won Sun; Jo, Su-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been known as serious persistent organic pollutants (POPs), causing developmental delays and motor dysfunction. We have investigated the effects of two PCB congeners, 3,3′,4,4′-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77) and 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) on ECG, action potential, and the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K + current (I Kr ) of guinea pigs' hearts, and hERG K + current expressed in Xenopus oocytes. PCB 126 shortened the corrected QT interval (QTc) of ECG and decreased the action potential duration at 90% (APD 90 ), and 50% of repolarization (APD 50 ) (P 20 ). PCB 77 decreased APD 20 (P 90 , and APD 50 . The PCB 126 increased the I Kr in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes held at 36 °C and hERG K + current amplitude at the end of the voltage steps in voltage-dependent mode (P + current amplitude. The PCB 77 increased the diastolic Ca 2+ and decreased Ca 2+ transient amplitude (P 90 possibly by increasing I Kr , while PCB 77 decreased the APD 20 possibly by other modulation related with intracellular Ca 2+ . The present data indicate that the environmental toxicants, PCBs, can acutely affect cardiac electrophysiology including ECG, action potential, intracellular Ca 2+ , and channel activity, resulting in toxic effects on the cardiac function in view of the possible accumulation of the PCBs in human body. -- Highlights: ► PCBs are known as serious environmental pollutants and developmental disruptors. ► PCB 126 shortened QT interval of ECG and action potential duration. ► PCB 126 increased human ether-a-go-go-related K + current and I Kr . ► PCB 77 decreased action potential duration and increased intracellular Ca 2+ content. ► PCBs acutely change cardiac electrophysiology and rhythmicity.

  20. Insights into business student's book

    CERN Document Server

    Lannon, Michael; Trappe, Tonya

    1993-01-01

    With Challenging reading and listening texts from a range of authentic business sources, New Insights into Business will really engage your students. The thorough language and vocabulary syllabus together with the strong focus on business skills development gives students everything they need to function effectively in the workplace. New Insights into Business is a self-contained course and is also an ideal follow-on to First Insights into Business.

  1. Transdermal Nicotine Application Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction after Severe Thermal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Claassen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Severe burn trauma leads to an immediate and strong inflammatory response inciting cardiac dysfunction that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine whether transdermal application of nicotine could influence the burn-induced cardiac dysfunction via its known immunomodulatory effects. Material and Methods. A standardized rat burn model was used in 35 male Sprague Dawley rats. The experimental animals were divided into a control group, a burn trauma group, a burn trauma group with additional nicotine treatment, and a sham group with five experimental animals per group. The latter two groups received nicotine administration. Using microtip catheterization, functional parameters of the heart were assessed 12 or 24 hours after infliction of burn trauma. Results. Burn trauma led to significantly decreased blood pressure (BP values whereas nicotine administration normalized BP. As expected, burn trauma also induced a significant deterioration of myocardial contractility and relaxation parameters. After application of nicotine these adverse effects were attenuated. Conclusion. The present study showed that transdermal nicotine administration has normalizing effects on burn-induced myocardial dysfunction parameters. Further research is warranted to gain insight in molecular mechanisms and pathways and to evaluate potential treatment options in humans.

  2. The Living Scar – Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Injured Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Norris, Russell A; Kohl, Peter; Markwald, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac scars, often perceived as “dead” tissue, are very much alive, with heterocellular activity ensuring the maintenance of structural and mechanical integrity following heart injury. To form a scar, non-myocytes such as fibroblasts, proliferate and are recruited from intra- and extra-cardiac sources. Fibroblasts perform important autocrine and paracrine signalling functions. They also establish mechanical and, as is increasingly evident, electrical junctions with other cells. While fibroblasts were previously thought to act simply as electrical insulators, they may be electrically connected among themselves and, under certain circumstances, to other cells, including cardiomyocytes. A better understanding of these interactions will help target scar structure and function and facilitate the development of novel therapies aimed at modifying scar properties for patient benefit. This review explores available insight and recent concepts on fibroblast integration in the heart, and highlights potential avenues for harnessing their roles to optimise scar function following heart injury such as infarction, and therapeutic interventions such as ablation. PMID:26776094

  3. Sudden Cardiac Death in Children. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.V. Pshenichnaya

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the prevalence, terminology, classification of sudden cardiac death. A description of congenital structural heart diseases associated with a risk of sudden cardiac death is given. The issues of etiology and pathogenesis of life-threatening conditions are described in detail.

  4. Sudden Cardiac Death in Children. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.V. Pshenichnaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the dysplastic changes in musculo-valve structures of the heart, arrhythmias and conduction disorders, associated with a risk of sudden cardiac death. The diagnostic criteria for sudden cardiac death, the events of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, prevention of life-threatening conditions in children are provided.

  5. Cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam J; Rutten, Frans H; Kors, Jan A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias in asthma patients has not been fully elucidated. Adverse drug effects, particularly those of β2-mimetics, may play a role. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma is associated with the risk of cardiac arrhythmias...

  6. Cardiac MRI of the athlete's heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, N.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in pre-participation cardiovascular screening using the Lausanne protocol will ultimately lead to an increased use of cardiac MRI and MDCT in the cardiovascular work-up of athletes. The role of cardiac MRI is well established in the evaluation of cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, aortic

  7. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  8. Fetal Primary Cardiac Tumors During Perinatal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal primary cardiac tumors are rare, but they may cause complications, which are sometimes life threatening, including arrhythmias, hydrops fetalis, ventricular outflow/inflow obstruction, cardiac failure, and even sudden death. Among fetal primary cardiac tumors, rhabdomyomas are most common, followed by teratomas, fibromas, hemangiomas, and myxomas. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, has been reported to be an effective drug to cause tumor remission in three neonates with multiple cardiac rhabdomyomas. Neonatal cardiac surgery for the resection of primary cardiac tumors found by fetal echocardiography has been reported sporadically. However, open fetal surgery for pericardial teratoma resection, which was performed successfully via a fetal median sternotomy in one case report, could be a promising intervention to rescue these patients with large pericardial effusions. These recent achievements undoubtedly encourage further development in early management of fetal cardiac tumors. Owing to the rarity of fetal primary cardiac tumors, relevant information in terms of prenatal diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis remains to be clarified.

  9. Corticosteroids in cardiac surgery: a continuing controversy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac surgery leads to significant improvements in symptoms of cardiac disease and quality of life, but is still associated with a substantial risk of adverse events and postoperative disability. The perioperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) likely plays a role in the

  10. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  11. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new

  12. Is fetal cardiac function gender dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Oude Rengerink, K.; Mol, B. W.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    An increased nuchal translucency (NT) is more common in males. A delayed diastolic cardiac function maturation has been proposed to explain this and the reported gender-related differences in ductus venosus (DV) flow. To investigate gender-related differences in fetal cardiac function. One hundred

  13. Is fetal cardiac function gender dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Rengerink, K. Oude; Mol, B. W.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    Introduction An increased nuchal translucency (NT) is more common in males. A delayed diastolic cardiac function maturation has been proposed to explain this and the reported gender-related differences in ductus venosus (DV) flow. Objective To investigate gender-related differences in fetal cardiac

  14. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  15. Cardiac spindle cell hemangioma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, In Jae; Min, Kwang Sun; Jeon, Eui Yong; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Spindle cell hemangioma is an uncommon vascular lesion histologically resembling a cavernous hemangioma and Kaposi's sarcoma with a predilection for the extremities. There are no radiologic reports concerning cardiac spindle cell hemangioma in the current literature. We report here a case of cardiac spindle cell hemangioma.

  16. Tannin, oxalate, saponin, cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two species of cola, Cola nitida and Cola acuminate, were investigated for their possible relative contents of the secondary plant products:- tannin, oxalate, saponin, cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides. The two cola species gave low levels of tannin and oxalate but very high levels of cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides as ...

  17. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mohd Khairuddin Md; Faris Mohamad Fathil, Mohamad; Hashim, Uda

    2017-11-01

    Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI) is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) which have been considered as `gold standard'. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT). In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction) on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) biomarker.

  18. Cardiac fluid dynamics meets deformation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Ferro, Matteo; Stolfo, Davide; De Paris, Valerio; Lesizza, Pierluigi; Korcova, Renata; Collia, Dario; Tonti, Giovanni; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Pedrizzetti, Gianni

    2018-02-20

    Cardiac function is about creating and sustaining blood in motion. This is achieved through a proper sequence of myocardial deformation whose final goal is that of creating flow. Deformation imaging provided valuable contributions to understanding cardiac mechanics; more recently, several studies evidenced the existence of an intimate relationship between cardiac function and intra-ventricular fluid dynamics. This paper summarizes the recent advances in cardiac flow evaluations, highlighting its relationship with heart wall mechanics assessed through the newest techniques of deformation imaging and finally providing an opinion of the most promising clinical perspectives of this emerging field. It will be shown how fluid dynamics can integrate volumetric and deformation assessments to provide a further level of knowledge of cardiac mechanics.

  19. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Mohd Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI and cardiac troponin T (cTnT which have been considered as ‘gold standard’. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT. In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI biomarker.

  20. Association between dental caries and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Yasunori; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Ogawa, Masahiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Ken; Kimura, Takeshi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-04-01

    Oral infection contributes to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. We hypothesized that dental caries may be associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) of cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (785,591 cases of OHCA: 55.4% of cardiac origin and 44.6% of non-cardiac origin) to the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries between 2005 and 2011 in the 47 prefectures of Japan. In both the total population and males over 65 years, the number of cases of dental caries was significantly associated with the number of OHCA of total and cardiac origin from 2005 to 2011, but not those of non-cardiac origin. In the total population, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was not significantly associated with the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (total OHCA: r correlation coefficient=0.22, p=0.14; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.25, p=0.09; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=-0.002, p=0.99). Among male patients over 65 years, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was significantly associated with OHCA of total and cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin (total OHCA: r=0.47, p<0.001; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.37, p=0.01; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=0.28, p=0.054). While oral hygiene is important in all age groups, it may be particularly associated with OHCAs of cardiac origin in males over 65 years. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Major Cardiac Events After Non-cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Gabriela; Lopes, Ana; Reis, Pedro; Carvalho, Vasco; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando José

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular complications might be difficult to assess and are known to be associated with longer hospital stay and increased costs as well as higher morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictors for major cardiac events (MCE) after non-cardiac surgery. The study included 4398 patients who were admitted to the Surgical Intensive Care Unit between January 1, 2006 and July 19, 2013. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) were calculated, and all variables entered as parameters were evaluated independently. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent factors for MCE. A total of 107 people experienced MCE. The independent predictors for postoperative MCE were higher fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) (odds ratio [OR] 38.97; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 10.81-140.36), history of ischemic heart disease (OR 3.38; 95 % CI 2.12-5.39), history of congestive heart disease (OR 2.39; 95 % CI 1.49-3.85), history of insulin therapy for diabetes (OR 2.93; 95 % CI 1.66-5.19), and increased SAPS II (OR 1.03; 95 % CI 1.01-1.05). Having a MCE was associated with a longer length of stay in the surgical intensive care unit (OR 1.01, 95 % CI 1.00-1.01). FiO2, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart disease, insulin therapy for diabetes, SAPS II, and length of stay in the surgical intensive care unit were independent predictors for MCE.

  2. O insight em psiquiatria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida P. Cardoso

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O sinal de que algo está a acontecer contribui para que o paciente reconheça que alguma coisa de estranho se está a passar consigo. Este reconhecimento faz com que o sujeito possa desempenhar uma função activa e seja um elemento colaborante do seu processo de recuperação. Cada doença apresenta, contudo, diferentes sintomas, uma vez que cada doença psiquiátrica consiste em diferentes perturbações com diversos efeitos sobre o funcionamento mental. Desta maneira, o fenómeno do insight que é registado em cada doença é diferente e expressa-se sob diferentes formas, não somente devido às manifestações clínicas da doença mas também devido às características individuais do sujeito.

  3. Grigor Narekatsi's astronomical insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Samvel

    2015-07-01

    What stand out in the solid system of Gr. Narekatsi's naturalistic views are his astronomical insights on the material nature of light, its high speed and the Sun being composed of "material air". Especially surprising and fascinating are his views on stars and their clusters. What astronomers, including great Armenian academician V. Ambartsumian (scattering of stellar associations), would understand and prove with much difficulty thousand years later, Narekatsi predicted in the 10th century: "Stars appear and disappear untimely", "You who gather and scatter the speechless constellations, like a flock of sheep". Gr. Narekatsti's reformative views were manifested in all the spheres of the 10th century social life; he is a reformer of church life, great language constructor, innovator in literature and music, freethinker in philosophy and science. His ideology is the reflection of the 10th century Armenian Renaissance. During the 9th-10th centuries, great masses of Armenians, forced to migrate to the Balkans, took with them and spread reformative ideas. The forefather of the western science, which originated in the period of Reformation, is considered to be the great philosopher Nicholas of Cusa. The study of Gr. Narekatsti's logic and naturalistic views enables us to claim that Gr. Narekatsti is the great grandfather of European science.

  4. Cognitive insight: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, L S C; Sabbe, B G C; Oldenburg, J F E

    2017-07-01

    Cognitive insight is the ability to re-evaluate thoughts and beliefs in order to make thoughtful conclusions. It differs from clinical insight, as it focuses on more general metacognitive processes. Therefore, it could be relevant to diverse disorders and non-clinical subjects. There is a growing body of research on cognitive insight in individuals with and without psychosis. This review has summarised the current state of the art regarding this topic. We conclude that while cognitive insight in its current form seems valid for use in individuals with psychosis, it is less so for individuals without psychosis. Additionally, higher cognitive insight not always leads to better psychological functioning. For instance, higher levels of self-reflection are often associated with depressive mood. We therefore recommend the sub-components of cognitive insight to be studied separately. Also, it is unclear what position cognitive insight takes within the spectrum of metacognitive processes and how it relates to other self-related concepts that have been defined previously in literature. Combining future and past research on cognitive insight and its analogue concepts will help in the formation of a uniform definition that fits all subjects discussed here. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes as models for cardiac arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike eHoekstra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In younger patients, the majority of sudden cardiac deaths have an underlying Mendelian genetic cause. Over the last 15 years, enormous progress has been made in identifying the distinct clinical phenotypes and in studying the basic cellular and genetic mechanisms associated with the primary Mendelian (monogenic arrhythmia syndromes. Investigation of the electrophysiological consequences of an ion channel mutation is ideally done in the native cardiomyocyte environment. However, the majority of such studies so far have relied on heterologous expression systems in which single ion channel genes are expressed in non-cardiac cells. In some cases, transgenic mouse models haven been generated, but these also have significant shortcomings, primarily related to species differences.The discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotency as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC has generated much interest since it presents an opportunity to generate patient- and disease-specific cell lines from which normal and diseased human cardiomyocytes can be obtained These genetically diverse human model systems can be studied in vitro and used to decipher mechanisms of disease and identify strategies and reagents for new therapies. Here we review the present state of the art with respect to cardiac disease models already generated using IPSC technology and which have been (partially characterized.Human iPSC (hiPSC models have been described for the cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including LQT1, LQT2, LQT3-Brugada Syndrome, LQT8/Timothy syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. In most cases, the hiPSC-derived cardiomyoctes recapitulate the disease phenotype and have already provided opportunities for novel insight into cardiac pathophysiology. It is expected that the lines will be useful in the development of pharmacological agents for the management of these

  6. Natriuretic peptides in developing medaka embryos: implications in cardiac development by loss-of-function studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanishi, Hiroshi; Okubo, Kataaki; Nobata, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs), atrial NP (ANP) and B-type NP (BNP), and their receptor, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-A have attracted attention of many basic and clinical researchers because of their potent renal and cardiovascular actions. In this study, we used medaka, Oryzias latipes, as a model species to pursue the physiological functions of NPs because it is a suitable model for developmental analyses. Medaka has two ligands, BNP and C-type NP3 (CNP3) (but not ANP), that have greater affinity for the two O. latipes GC-A receptors (OLGC), OLGC7 and OLGC2, respectively. CNP3 is the ancestral molecule of cardiac NPs. Initially, we examined developmental expression of cardiac NP/receptor combinations, BNP/OLGC7 and CNP3/OLGC2, using quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. BNP and CNP3 mRNA increased at stages 25 (onset of ventricular formation) and 22 (appearance of heart anlage), respectively, whereas both receptor mRNAs increased at as early as stage 12. BNP/OLGC7 transcripts were found in arterial/ventricular tissues and CNP3/OLGC2 transcripts in venous/atrial tissues by in situ hybridization. Thus, BNP and CNP3 can act locally on cardiac myocytes in a paracrine/autocrine fashion. Double knockdown of BNP/OLGC7 genes impaired ventricular development by causing hypoplasia of ventricular myocytes as evidenced by reduced bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. CNP3 knockdown induced hypertrophy of atria and activated the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, it appears that BNP is important for normal ventricular, whereas CNP3 is important for normal atrial development and performance, a role usually taken by ANP in other vertebrates. The current study provides new insights into the role of cardiac NPs in cardiac development in vertebrates.

  7. Physicians' tacit and stated policies for determining patient benefit and referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W; Pezzo, Mark V; Beckie, Theresa M; Shahraki, Farnaz; Kentner, Amanda C; Grace, Sherry L

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of prescribing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients following heart surgery is well documented; however, physicians continue to underuse CR programs, and disparities in the referral of women are common. Previous research into the causes of these problems has relied on self-report methods, which presume that physicians have insight into their referral behavior and can describe it accurately. In contrast, the research presented here used clinical judgment analysis (CJA) to discover the tacit judgment and referral policies of individual physicians. The specific aims were to determine 1) what these policies were, 2) the degree of self-insight that individual physicians had into their own policies, 3) the amount of agreement among physicians, and 4) the extent to which judgments were related to attitudes toward CR. Thirty-six Canadian physicians made judgments and decisions regarding 32 hypothetical cardiac patients, each described on 5 characteristics (gender, age, type of cardiovascular procedure, presence/absence of musculoskeletal pain, and degree of motivation) and then completed the 19 items of the Attitude towards Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral scale. Consistent with previous studies, there was wide variation among physicians in their tacit and stated judgment policies, and self-insight was modest. On the whole, physicians showed evidence of systematic gender bias as they judged women as less likely than men to benefit from CR. Insight data suggest that 1 in 3 physicians were unaware of their own bias. There was greater agreement among physicians in how they described their judgments (stated policies) than in how they actually made them (tacit policies). Correlations between attitude statements and CJA measures were modest. These findings offer some explanation for the slow progress of efforts to improve CR referrals and for gender disparities in referral rates.

  8. Descartes, Cardiac Heat, and Alchemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitsch, Dorothea

    2016-11-01

    René Descartes (1596-1650) insisted on a heat and light theory to explain cardiac movement, and used concepts such as distillation of the vital spirits, fermentation in the digestive process, and fermentation in the circulation of the blood. I argue that his theory of the body as a heat-exchange system was based on alchemical and natural philosophical notions of fire and light expounded by precursors and contemporaries who included Jean D'Espagnet, Jean Fernel, Jan Baptist van Helmont, and Andreas Libavius. Descartes endeavoured to mechanise their approaches, creating a theory in which fire and heat, a legacy from thermal explanations of physiology, were transformed into alchemical fire, and then into mechanistic or physicalist heat.

  9. Multiscale measurement of cardiac energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Soyeon; Pham, Toan; Han, Jun-Chiew; Nielsen, Poul; Taberner, Andrew; Hickey, Anthony; Loiselle, Denis

    2013-09-01

    Herein we describe our laboratories' experimental methods for interrogating cardiac energetics at the organ (whole heart), tissue (trabecula) and perforated fibre (mitochondrial) levels. In whole heart and trabecula experiments, we focus on measuring pressure-volume (force-length) work and oxygen consumption (heat production) from which mechanical efficiency is derived. In both preparations (i.e. across scales differing by three orders of magnitude) we find efficiency values of 10%-15%. Mitochondrial experiments invoke a trio of titration protocols to yield information on oxygen consumption, ATP flux, membrane potential, electron leak and reactive oxygen species production, the latter two of which index energy transfer inefficiencies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Fractals analysis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohammed

    2005-09-06

    Heart rhythms are generated by complex self-regulating systems governed by the laws of chaos. Consequently, heart rhythms have fractal organization, characterized by self-similar dynamics with long-range order operating over multiple time scales. This allows for the self-organization and adaptability of heart rhythms under stress. Breakdown of this fractal organization into excessive order or uncorrelated randomness leads to a less-adaptable system, characteristic of aging and disease. With the tools of nonlinear dynamics, this fractal breakdown can be quantified with potential applications to diagnostic and prognostic clinical assessment. In this paper, I review the methodologies for fractal analysis of cardiac rhythms and the current literature on their applications in the clinical context. A brief overview of the basic mathematics of fractals is also included. Furthermore, I illustrate the usefulness of these powerful tools to clinical medicine by describing a novel noninvasive technique to monitor drug therapy in atrial fibrillation.

  11. Biomagnetic study of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenici, R R; Melillo, G

    1991-01-01

    Clinical magnetocardiographic mapping was initiated in the Cardiovascular Biomagnetism Unit of the Catholic University of Rome about 10 years ago. Since then several hundred patients have been investigated. However, the most interesting data have been collected after the development, in 1984, of the present laboratory configuration, which allows simultaneous MCG mapping and invasive electrophysiological procedures. Perspective studies have been carried out to validate the accuracy of MCG for localisation of arrhythmogenic structures and for early detection of patients at risk of sudden death. Although the diagnostic applicability of the method is still under evaluation, preliminary results are reported, concerning 120 patients, investigated between 1985 and 1990, with cardiac arrhythmias associated with ventricular pre-excitation, ischaemic heart disease or cardiomyopathies.

  12. Approach to cardiac resyncronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobreanu, Dan; Dagres, Nikolaos; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2012-01-01

    and completed the questions. Thirty-two per cent of the responding centres always use CRT in heart failure (HF) patients with New York Heart Association functional class II and QRS width >120 ms, and 55% of the responding centres demand additional criteria when indicating CRT, most often QRS width >150 ms (49......%) and echocardiographic criteria of asynchrony (34%). Only 10% of centres indicate CRT in all HF patients with QRS >120 ms and right bundle branch block, and 51% demand additional criteria, most frequently echocardiographic asynchrony parameters. The vast majority of centres also indicate CRT in patients with atrial...... fibrillation and standard criteria for CRT. In 24% of the centres, biventricular pacemaker (CRT-P) is implanted in all situations, unless there is an indication for secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death, while 10% always choose to implant a biventricular defibrillator (CRT-D). There are no clear...

  13. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen S.V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV node mimicking beta blockade can be therapeutic in the management of atrial fibrillation. G protein overexpression to modify the AV node also is experimental. Modification and expression of potassium channel genes altering the delayed rectifier potassium currents may permit better management of congenital long QT syndromes. Arrhythmias in a failing heart are due to abnormal calcium cycling. Potential targets for genetic modulation include the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, calsequestrin and sodium calcium exchanger.Lastly the ethical concerns need to be addressed.

  14. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Moritz Becher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice.

  15. Negative predictive value of cardiac troponin for predicting adverse cardiac events following blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Cameron S; deShazo, Matthew; Geraci, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac-specific troponins (Tns) are sensitive and specific markers of myocardial injury that have been shown to be predictive of outcomes in many cardiac and noncardiac conditions. We sought to determine whether normal cardiac Tn concentrations obtained during the first 24 hours following blunt chest trauma would predict good cardiac outcomes. A PubMed/MEDLINE search was performed to identify prospective studies in patients with blunt chest trauma in which serial cardiac TnT or TnI values were measured within 24 hours of admission and clinical outcomes assessed. Ten studies qualified for review. Studies that used the lower reference limit of Tn as the cutoff for cardiac injury showed 100% negative predictive value (NPV) for developing cardiac complications, whereas studies using higher Tn cutoffs showed wider variation in NPV (50%-98%). Cardiac Tn measured within 24 hours using the lower reference limit (LRL) as the cutoff appears to have excellent NPV for clinically significant adverse cardiac events. This could allow for early discharge after a 24-hour observation period in otherwise uncomplicated blunt chest trauma patients and avoid the need for more expensive cardiac imaging and additional resource utilization.

  16. Regulation of cardiac remodeling by cardiac Na/K-ATPase isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Catherine Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3. The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1 the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2 the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  17. Adipose-derived perivascular mesenchymal stromal/stem cells promote functional vascular tissue engineering for cardiac regenerative purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette-McAlmon, Justin; Blazeski, Adriana; Somers, Sarah; Kostecki, Geran; Tung, Leslie; Grayson, Warren L

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering approaches have the potential to regenerate functional myocardium with intrinsic vascular networks. This study compared the relative effects of human adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) and human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) in cocultures with neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCMs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At the same ratios of NRVCM:hASC and NRVCM:hDF, the hASC cocultures displayed shorter action potentials and maintained capture at faster pacing rates. Similarly, in coculture with HUVECs, hASC:HUVEC exhibited superior ability to support vascular capillary network formation relative to hDF:HUVEC. Based on these studies, a range of suitable cell ratios were determined to develop a triculture system. Six seeding ratios of NRVCM:hASC:HUVEC were tested and it was found that a ratio of 500:50:25 cells (i.e. 250,000:25,000:12,500 cells/cm 2 ) resulted in the formation of robust vascular networks while retaining action potential durations and propagation similar to pure NRVCM cultures. Tricultures in this ratio exhibited an average conduction velocity of 20 ± 2 cm/s, action potential durations at 80% repolarization (APD 80 ) and APD 30 of 122 ± 5 ms and 59 ± 4 ms, respectively, and maximum capture rate of 7.4 ± 0.6 Hz. The NRVCM control groups had APD 80 and APD 30 of 120 ± 9 ms and 51 ± 5 ms, with a maximum capture rate of 7.3 ± 0.2 Hz. In summary, the combination of hASCs in the appropriate ratios with NRVCMs and HUVECs can facilitate the formation of densely vascularized cardiac tissues that appear not to impact the electrophysiological function of cardiomyocytes negatively. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Impact of prolonged walking exercise on cardiac structure and function in cardiac patients versus healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, Nathalie Mm; Hopman, Maria Te; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Oxborough, David; George, Keith P; Thijssen, Dick Hj; Eijsvogels, Thijs Mh

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that endurance exercise can cause an acute transient decrease in cardiac function in healthy subjects. Whether this also occurs in cardiac patients is unknown. We investigated the impact of prolonged single day and three-day walking exercise on cardiac function and cardiac biomarkers between cardiac patients and healthy controls in an observational study. We recruited 10 cardiac patients (nine males, one female, 68 ± 5 years) and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (nine males, one female, 68 ± 4 years) to perform 30 or 40 km of walking exercise per day for three consecutive days. Cardiac function was examined using echocardiography and cardiac biomarkers (cardiac troponin and B-type natriuretic peptide) with blood samples. Data were collected before walking and directly after walking on day 1 and day 3. Post-exercise early systolic tissue contraction velocity of the left ventricle (p = 0.005) and global longitudinal left ventricle strain (P = 0.026) were increased in both groups compared with baseline. Post-exercise right ventricle peak early diastolic tissue filling velocity and systolic blood pressure/left ventricle end-systolic volume ratio decreased in both groups (p = 0.043 and p = 0.028, respectively). Post-exercise cardiac troponin levels increased (p = 0.045) but did not differ across groups (p = 0.60), whereas B-type natriuretic peptide levels did not change (p = 0.43). This study suggests that stable cardiac patients are capable of performing three days of prolonged walking exercise without clinically significant acute overall deterioration in cardiac function or more pronounced increase in cardiac biomarkers compared with healthy controls. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  19. Pharmacological bridge to cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisance, D; Dubois Rande, J L; Deleuze, P H; Hillion, M L; Duval, A M; Tavolaro, O; Romano, P; Castaigne, A; Tarral, A; Cachera, J P

    1989-01-01

    From September 1985 to August 1988, 32 patients were referred from various intensive care units throughout Paris for urgent cardiac transplantation or for a mechanical bridge to transplantation. At time of admission, under maximal sympathomimetic therapy, the cardiac index (CI) was 1.81 +/- 0.26 l/min per m2, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP 31 +/- 7 mmHg), systemic vascular resistances (SVR) 2053 +/- 469 dynes s cm-5. In 25, diuresis was less than 25 ml/h. Five were anuric. Prior to any final decision, a new inotropic agent, enoximone, was infused in addition to previous treatment as a 10 min bolus iv 1.5-2 mg/kg every 8 h. In 3, the situation further deteriorated, leading to a Jarvik 7-70 implantation within 12 h. In 29 however, within 3 h, the Cl increased to 2.69 +/- 0.56 as SVR dropped to 1410 +/- 453 and PCWP to 18 +/- 7. Diuresis increased to more than 100 ml/h in all. This permitted an indepth evaluation of the transplant candidates leading to contraindications to transplantation in 16. Nine patients could be weaned off iv enoximone. Four of these are still living (NYHA class III) with a follow up of 6-17 months. In 11, transplantation was performed within 2 days. Four died within a month, 2 with multiple organ failure. One patient died after 5 months. Six are back to normal life, NYHA class I (follow up 10 months-2.5 years). This protocol suggests that in patients with extreme heart failure, immediate survival may be increased by iv enoximone therapy, permitting a better selection of the recipients, more efficient pre-transplantation intensive care and consequently a decrease in the indications for a temporary mechanical bridge to a staged transplantation.

  20. Assessing quality in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer A.M. Nashef

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a the strong temporal, if not causal, link between the intervention and the outcome in cardiac surgery and therefore a link becomes established between operative mortality and the measurement of surgical performance. In Britain the law stipulates that data collected by any public body or using public funds must be made freely available. Tools and mechanisms we devise and develop are likely to form the models on which the quality of care is assessed in other surgical and perhaps medical specialties. Measuring professional performance should be done by the profession. To measure risk there are a number of scores as crude mortality is not enough. A very important benefit of assessing the risk of death is to use this knowledge in the determination of the indication to operate. The second benefit is in the assessment of the quality of care as risk prediction gives a standard against performance of hospitals and surgeons. Peer review and “naming and shaming” are two mechanisms to monitor quality. There are two potentially damaging outcomes from the publication of results in a league-table form: the first is the damage to the hospital; the second is to refuse to operate on high-risk patients. There is a real need for quality monitoring in medicine in general and in cardiac surgery in particular. Good quality surgical work requires robust knowledge of three crucial variables: activity, risk prediction and performance. In Europe, the three major specialist societies have agreed to establish the European Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Institute of Accreditation (ECTSIA. Performance monitoring is soon to become imperative. If we surgeons are not on board, we shall have no control on its final destination, and the consequences may be equally damaging to us and to our patients.

  1. ICD in cardiac resinhronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damijan Vokač

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with advanced heart failure bears bad prognosis, despite modern medical treatment year mortality rate spans from 30 up to 70%. Besides terminal heart failure the second most frequent cause is sudden death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias as ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Ventricular fibrillation is very frequent cause of mortality of terminal heart failure especially in ischemic subgroup. Clinical studies have presented improvement of heart function by use of biventricular stimulation of patients with advanced heart failure and intraventricular conduction defects as left bundle branch block. Method very successfully improves acute hemodynamic parameters due to resynchronization of septal and lateral wall of left ventricle and improves economy of the heart contraction. Although these effects are present immediately after implantation they persist also through longer period. Method improves quality of life and also decreases mortality rate proved by clinical studies. Despite successful therapy mortality rate due to sudden death remains high. Implantable cardioverters defibrillators successfully prevent sudden cardiac death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmia. They are successful due to straightforward recognition of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation and immediate electrical schock delivery. Cardiovertes defibrillators are successful in prevention of sudden cardiac death but they do not improve quality of life of heart failure patients like resynchronization therapy. Thus, combined therapy resynchronization and cardioverter defibrillator as a single implantable device has been developed.Conclusions: Due to very successful combined therapy the application of biventricular cardioverters defibrillators into clinical practice has increased. Implantation of biventricular cardioverter defibrillator is complex but very successful procedure. It is economically acceptable when proper indication has been stated. Large

  2. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne; Foghmar, Sussie; Eichhorst, Regina; Prescott, Eva; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Gislason, Gunnar H; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Gustafsson, Ida; Thomsen, Kristian K; Boye Hansen, Lene; Hammer, Signe; Viggers, Lone; Christensen, Bo; Kvist, Birgitte; Lindström Egholm, Cecilie; May, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date onward. Patient-level data are registered by clinicians at the time of entry to CR directly into an online system with simultaneous linkage to other central patient registers. Follow-up data are entered after 6 months. The main variables collected are related to key outcome and performance indicators of CR: referral and adherence, lifestyle, patient-related outcome measures, risk factor control, and medication. Program-level online data are collected every third year. Based on administrative data, approximately 14,000 patients with CHD are hospitalized at 35 hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations. The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD. Mandatory registration of data at both patient level as well as program level is done on the database. DHRD aims to systematically monitor the quality of CR over time, in order to improve the quality of CR throughout Denmark to benefit patients.

  3. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan eLi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  4. Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is rare and the clinical characteristics of this entity have been insufficiently elucidated. This article aims to describe the treatment options and the risk factors responsible for the maternal and feto-neonatal prognoses. A comprehensive search of the literature of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy was conducted and 44 articles with 51 patients were included in the present review. Transthoracic echocardiography was the most common diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of cardiac myxoma during pregnancy. Cardiac myxoma resection was performed in 95.9% (47/49); while no surgical resection was performed in 4.1% (2/49) patients (P=0.000). More patients had an isolated cardiac myxoma resection in comparison to those with a concurrent or staged additional cardiac operation [87.2% (41/47) vs. 12.8% (6/47), P=0.000]. A voluntary termination of the pregnancy was done in 7 (13.7%) cases. In the remaining 31 (60.8%) pregnant patients, cesarean section was the most common delivery mode representing 61.3% and vaginal delivery was more common accounting for 19.4%. Cardiac surgery was performed in the first, second and third trimester in 5 (13.9%), 14 (38.9%) and 17 (47.2%) patients, respectively. No patients died. In the delivery group, 20 (76.9%) neonates were event-free survivals, 4 (15.4%) were complicated and 2 (7.7%) died. Neonatal prognoses did not differ between the delivery modes, treatment options, timing of cardiac surgery and sequence of cardiac myxoma resection in relation to delivery. The diagnosis of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is important. Surgical treatment of cardiac myxoma in the pregnant patients has brought about favorable maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes in the delivery group, which might be attributable to the shorter operation duration and non-emergency nature of the surgical intervention. Proper timing of cardiac surgery and improved cardiopulmonary bypass conditions may result in even better maternal and feto-neonatal survivals.

  5. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...... positive and negative predictive values for both university (96%/99%) and nonuniversity centers (97%/99%). CONCLUSION: WDHR-CCTR provides ongoing prospective registration of all cardiac CTs performed in Western Denmark since 2008. Overall, the registry data have a high degree of completeness and validity...

  6. Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is rare and the clinical characteristics of this entity have been insufficiently elucidated. This article aims to describe the treatment options and the risk factors responsible for the maternal and feto-neonatal prognoses.Methods:A comprehensive search of the literature of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy was conducted and 44 articles with 51 patients were included in the present review.Results:Transthoracic echocardiography was the most common diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of cardiac myxoma during pregnancy. Cardiac myxoma resection was performed in 95.9% (47/49; while no surgical resection was performed in 4.1% (2/49 patients (P=0.000. More patients had an isolated cardiac myxoma resection in comparison to those with a concurrent or staged additional cardiac operation [87.2% (41/47 vs. 12.8% (6/47, P=0.000]. A voluntary termination of the pregnancy was done in 7 (13.7% cases. In the remaining 31 (60.8% pregnant patients, cesarean section was the most common delivery mode representing 61.3% and vaginal delivery was more common accounting for 19.4%. Cardiac surgery was performed in the first, second and third trimester in 5 (13.9%, 14 (38.9% and 17 (47.2% patients, respectively. No patients died. In the delivery group, 20 (76.9% neonates were event-free survivals, 4 (15.4% were complicated and 2 (7.7% died. Neonatal prognoses did not differ between the delivery modes, treatment options, timing of cardiac surgery and sequence of cardiac myxoma resection in relation to delivery.Conclusion:The diagnosis of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is important. Surgical treatment of cardiac myxoma in the pregnant patients has brought about favorable maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes in the delivery group, which might be attributable to the shorter operation duration and non-emergency nature of the surgical intervention. Proper timing of cardiac surgery and improved cardiopulmonary bypass conditions may result in

  7. Characterizing Cardiac Molecular Mechanisms of Mammalian Hibernation via Quantitative Proteogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, Katie L; Jagtap, Pratik; Johnson, James E; Griffin, Timothy J; Andrews, Matthew T

    2015-11-06

    This study uses advanced proteogenomic approaches in a nonmodel organism to elucidate cardioprotective mechanisms used during mammalian hibernation. Mammalian hibernation is characterized by drastic reductions in body temperature, heart rate, metabolism, and oxygen consumption. These changes pose significant challenges to the physiology of hibernators, especially for the heart, which maintains function throughout the extreme conditions, resembling ischemia and reperfusion. To identify novel cardioadaptive strategies, we merged large-scale RNA-seq data with large-scale iTRAQ-based proteomic data in heart tissue from 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) throughout the circannual cycle. Protein identification and data analysis were run through Galaxy-P, a new multiomic data analysis platform enabling effective integration of RNA-seq and MS/MS proteomic data. Galaxy-P uses flexible, modular workflows that combine customized sequence database searching and iTRAQ quantification to identify novel ground squirrel-specific protein sequences and provide insight into molecular mechanisms of hibernation. This study allowed for the quantification of 2007 identified cardiac proteins, including over 350 peptide sequences derived from previously uncharacterized protein products. Identification of these peptides allows for improved genomic annotation of this nonmodel organism, as well as identification of potential splice variants, mutations, and genome reorganizations that provides insights into novel cardioprotective mechanisms used during hibernation.

  8. High frequency stimulation of cardiac myocytes: A theoretical and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2014-12-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) has recently been identified as a novel approach for terminating life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. HFS elevates myocyte membrane potential and blocks electrical conduction for the duration of the stimulus. However, low amplitude HFS can induce rapidly firing action potentials, which may reinitiate an arrhythmia. The cellular level mechanisms underlying HFS-induced electrical activity are not well understood. Using a multiscale method, we show that a minimal myocyte model qualitatively reproduces the influence of HFS on cardiac electrical activity. Theoretical analysis and simulations suggest that persistent activation and de-inactivation of ionic currents, in particular a fast inward window current, underlie HFS-induced action potentials and membrane potential elevation, providing hypotheses for future experiments. We derive analytical expressions to describe how HFS modifies ionic current amplitude and gating dynamics. We show how fast inward current parameters influence the parameter regimes for HFS-induced electrical activity, demonstrating how the efficacy of HFS as a therapy for terminating arrhythmias may depend on the presence of pathological conditions or pharmacological treatments. Finally, we demonstrate that HFS terminates cardiac arrhythmias in a one-dimensional ring of cardiac tissue. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to characterize the influence of HFS on ionic current gating dynamics, provide new insight into HFS of the myocardium, and suggest mechanisms underlying HFS-induced electrical activity.

  9. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Signaling as a Therapeutic Target for Renal and Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg H. Tesch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR plays important roles in both physiological and pathological events. Blockade of MR signaling with MR antagonists (MRAs has been used clinically to treat kidney and cardiac disease associated with hypertension and other chronic diseases, resulting in suppression of fibrosis in these organs. However, the current use of steroidal MRAs has been limited by off target effects on other hormone receptors or adverse effects on kidney tubular function. In this review, we summarize recent insights into the profibrotic roles of MR signaling in kidney and cardiovascular disease. We review experimental in vitro data identifying the pathological mechanisms associated with MR signaling in cell types found in the kidney (mesangial cells, podocytes, tubular cells, macrophages, interstitial fibroblasts and heart (cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages. In addition, we demonstrate the in vivo importance of MR signaling in specific kidney and cardiac cell types by reporting the outcomes of cell type selective MR gene deletion in animal models of kidney and cardiac disease and comparing these findings to those obtained with MRAs treatment. This review also includes a discussion of the potential benefits of novel non-steroidal MRAs for targeting kidney and cardiac fibrosis compared to existing steroidal MRAs, as well as the possibility of novel combination therapies and cell selective delivery of MRAs.

  10. Notch Inhibition Enhances Cardiac Reprogramming by Increasing MEF2C Transcriptional Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes represents a potential means of restoring cardiac function after myocardial infarction, but so far this process remains inefficient and little is known about its molecular mechanisms. Here we show that DAPT, a classical Notch inhibitor, enhances the conversion of mouse fibroblasts into induced cardiac-like myocytes by the transcription factors GATA4, HAND2, MEF2C, and TBX5. DAPT cooperates with AKT kinase to further augment this process, resulting in up to 70% conversion efficiency. Moreover, DAPT promotes the acquisition of specific cardiomyocyte features, substantially increasing calcium flux, sarcomere structure, and the number of spontaneously beating cells. Transcriptome analysis shows that DAPT induces genetic programs related to muscle development, differentiation, and excitation-contraction coupling. Mechanistically, DAPT increases binding of the transcription factor MEF2C to the promoter regions of cardiac structural genes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the reprogramming process and may have important implications for cardiac regeneration therapies.

  11. Cardiac Electrophysiology: Normal and Ischemic Ionic Currents and the ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Basic cardiac electrophysiology is foundational to understanding normal cardiac function in terms of rate and rhythm and initiation of cardiac muscle contraction. The primary clinical tool for assessing cardiac electrical events is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which provides global and regional information on rate, rhythm, and electrical…

  12. Cardiac carcinoid: tricuspid delayed hyperenhancement on cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martos, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare condition in adults. Its diagnosis can be easily missed in a patient presenting to a primary care setting. We revised the advantages of using coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing this condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid heart disease and right heart failure using transthoracic Doppler-echocardiogram, cardiac MDCT and MRI. Cardiac echocardiogram revealed marked thickening and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with dilated right atrium and ventricle. Cardiac MDCT and MRI demonstrated fixation and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with delayed contrast hyperenhancement of the tricuspid annulus. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates fascinating imaging findings of cardiac carcinoid disease and highlights the increasing utility of contrast-enhanced MRI and cardiac MDCT in the diagnosis of this interesting condition.

  13. Cardiac tumours: non invasive detection and assessment by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, D.; Wainwright, R.; Brennand-Roper, D.; Deverall, P.; Sowton, E.; Maisey, M.

    1980-01-01

    Four patients with cardiac tumours were investigated by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging and echocardiography. Contrast angiocardiography was performed in three of the cases. Two left atrial tumours were detected by all three techniques. In one of these cases echocardiography alone showed additional mitral valve stenosis, but isotope imaging indicated tumour size more accurately. A large septal mass was detected by all three methods. In this patient echocardiography showed evidence of left ventricular outflow obstruction, confirmed at cardiac catheterisation, but gated isotope imaging provided a more detailed assessment of the abnormal cardiac anatomy. In the fourth case gated isotope imaging detected a large right ventricular tumour which had not been identified by echocardiography. Gated cardiac blood pool isotope imaging is a complementary technique to echocardiography for the non-invasive detection and assessment of cardiac tumours. (author)

  14. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwisler AD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ann-Dorthe Zwisler,1 Henriette Knold Rossau,1 Anne Nakano,2,3 Sussie Foghmar,4 Regina Eichhorst,5 Eva Prescott,6 Charlotte Cerqueira,7 Anne Merete Boas Soja,4 Gunnar H Gislason,8–10 Mogens Lytken Larsen,5 Ulla Overgaard Andersen,11 Ida Gustafsson,4 Kristian K Thomsen,12 Lene Boye Hansen,13 Signe Hammer,14 Lone Viggers,15 Bo Christensen,16 Birgitte Kvist,17 Cecilie Lindström Egholm,18 Ole May19 On behalf of the Working Group of Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation, Danish Society of Cardiology, and the Working Group of Cardiac Clinical Registries, Danish Society of Cardiology 1Danish Centre for Rehabilitation and Palliative Care, Odense University Hospital and University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 3Registry Support Centre (West – Clinical Quality Improvement & Health Informatics, Aarhus, 4Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 5Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 6Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 7Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 8Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, 9The Danish Heart Foundation, Copenhagen, 10The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, 11Department of Cardiology, Holbaek Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 12Department of Cardiology, Hospital of Southwest Jutland, Esbjerg, 13Department of Cardiology, Gentofte Hospital, Gentofte, 14Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, 15Department of Nutrition, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Holstebro, 16Department of General Medicine, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 17Department of Health Care and Prevention, Municipality of Frederikshavn, Frederikshavn, 18

  15. Cardiac channelopathies: genetic and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriel, Hugues; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V

    2013-03-15

    Channelopathies are diseases caused by dysfunctional ion channels, due to either genetic or acquired pathological factors. Inherited cardiac arrhythmic syndromes are among the most studied human disorders involving ion channels. Since seminal observations made in 1995, thousands of mutations have been found in many of the different genes that code for cardiac ion channel subunits and proteins that regulate the cardiac ion channels. The main phenotypes observed in patients carrying these mutations are congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), Brugada syndrome (BrS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), short QT syndrome (SQTS) and variable types of conduction defects (CD). The goal of this review is to present an update of the main genetic and molecular mechanisms, as well as the associated phenotypes of cardiac channelopathies as of 2012. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Air medical transport of cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essebag, Vidal; Halabi, Abdul R; Churchill-Smith, Michael; Lutchmedial, Sohrab

    2003-11-01

    The air medical transport of cardiac patients is a rapidly expanding practice. For various medical, social, and economic indications, patients are being flown longer distances at commercial altitudes, including international and intercontinental flights. There are data supporting the use of short-distance helicopter flights early in the course of a cardiac event for patients needing emergent transfer for percutaneous coronary intervention or aortocoronary bypass. When considering elective long-distance air medical transport of cardiac patients for social or economic reasons, it is necessary to weigh the benefits against the potential risks of flight. A few recent studies suggest that long-distance air medical transport is safe under certain circumstances. Current guidelines for air travel after myocardial infarction do not address the use of medical escorts or air ambulances equipped with intensive care facilities. Further research using larger prospective studies is needed to better define criteria for safe long-distance air medical transport of cardiac patients.

  17. Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Mid-1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, John D.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes a state-of-the-art cardiac rehabilitation program consisting of training and supervision in exercise, nutrition, and stress management. Inpatient, postdischarge, and late postdischarge regimens are presented. (MT)

  18. Targeting sodium channels in cardiac arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remme, Carol Ann; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for proper electrical conduction in the heart. During acquired pathological conditions and inherited sodium channelopathies, altered sodium channel function causes conduction disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias. Although the clinical,

  19. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting RCR and non-phosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation...

  20. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...... is based on determination of the left-ventricular endocardial and epicardial borders. Since manual border detection is laborious, automated segmentation is highly desirable as a fast, objective and reproducible alternative. Automated segmentation will thus enhance comparability between and within cardiac...... studies and increase accuracy by allowing acquisition of thinner MRI-slices. This abstract demonstrates that statistical models of shape and appearance, namely the deformable models: Active Appearance Models, can successfully segment cardiac MRIs....