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Sample records for cardiac pet-ct advanced

  1. Cardiac 82rubidium PET/CT: initial European experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, Ashley M.; Dickson, John C.; Kayani, Irfan; Endozo, Raymondo; Blanchard, Patty; Shastry, Manu; Prvulovich, Elizabeth; Waddington, Wendy A.; Ben-Haim, Simona; Bomanji, Jamshed B.; Ell, Peter J.; Speechly-Dick, Marie-Elsya; McEwan, Jean R.

    2007-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion with PET/CT has advantages over conventional SPECT. We describe our initial European experience using 82 Rubidium-PET/CT, as part of a clinical myocardial perfusion service. We studied the first 100 patients (64 male; 36 female, mean age = 60: SD +/-12.5y, mean body mass index = 30: SD +/-6.9kg/m 2 ) who underwent 82 Rubidium cardiac PET/CT in our institution. Thirty patients had recently undergone coronary angiography. Patients underwent imaging during adenosine infusion and at rest. Images were acquired over 5 minutes using a GE-PET/CT instrument. Image quality was described as good, adequate or inadequate. Images were reported patient-by-patient by a minimum of five nuclear medicine physicians. A segment-by-segment analysis (17-segment model) was also performed. Image quality was good in 77%, adequate 23% and inadequate 0%. There was no statistical difference in image quality between obese and non-obese patients (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.2864). 59% had normal perfusion studies, 29% had inducible ischaemia, 12% had myocardial infarction (11% with super added ischaemia). There was reduced 82 Rubidium uptake in 132/1700 segments during stress. There was reduced 82 Rubidium uptake at rest in 42/1700 segments. The 82 Rubidium PET/CT findings were consistent with the angiographic findings in 28/30 cases. We show that, even from initial use of 82 Rubidium, it is possible to perform myocardial perfusion studies quickly with good image quality, even in the obese. The PET findings correlated well in the third of the cases where angiography was available. As such, 82 Rubidium cardiac PET/CT is likely to be an exciting addition to the European nuclear physician/ cardiologist's radionuclide imaging arsenal. (orig.)

  2. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shyh-Jen [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jay [Institute of Radiological science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S.P. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: g39220003@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880, Sec.2, Chien-kuo Rd. Hualien 970, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tzung-Chi, E-mail: tzungchi.huang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, No.91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-21

    Background: Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications. Materials: Image quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan. Results: Radiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2{+-}4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95{+-}0.82 and 4.13{+-}0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53{+-}0.5 to 0.16{+-}0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols. Conclusion: The proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  3. FDG PET-CT findings of extra-thoracic sarcoid are associated with cardiac sarcoid: A rationale for using FGD PET-CT for cardiac sarcoid evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darshan C; Gunasekaran, Senthil S; Goettl, Christopher; Sweiss, Nadera J; Lu, Yang

    2017-07-05

    This retrospective study investigates the relationship between cardiac and extra-thoracic sarcoid findings on FDG PET-CT using a 72-hour pretest high-fat, high-protein, and very low-carbohydrate (HFHPVLC) diet. A total of 196 consecutive FDG PET-CT scans with 72-hour HFHPVLC diet preparation were performed between December 2014 and December 2015 in known sarcoid patients. Of these scans, 5 were excluded for non-adherence to diet preparation or underlying cancer. Cardiac and extra-thoracic sarcoid lesions were categorized and measured for radiotracer uptake. A total of 188 patients had 191 eligible FDG PET/CT scans (3 follow-up scans), of which there were 20 (10%) positive, 6 indeterminate (3%), and 165 (86%) negative for CS. Among the 20 scans positive for CS, 8 (40%) had findings of both cardiac and extra-thoracic sarcoid. Our study shows that 40% of CS patients also have FDG PET-CT findings of extra-thoracic sarcoid. This makes an intriguing case for FDG PET-CT use with pretest diet prep over cardiac MRI (CMR) for cardiac sarcoid evaluation, given that CMR is likely to overlook these extra-thoracic sites of disease.

  4. PET/CT: underlying physics, instrumentation, and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Espallardo, I

    Since it was first introduced, the main goal of PET/CT has been to provide both PET and CT images with high clinical quality and to present them to radiologists and specialists in nuclear medicine as a fused, perfectly aligned image. The use of fused PET and CT images quickly became routine in clinical practice, showing the great potential of these hybrid scanners. Thanks to this success, manufacturers have gone beyond considering CT as a mere attenuation corrector for PET, concentrating instead on design high performance PET and CT scanners with more interesting features. Since the first commercial PET/CT scanner became available in 2001, both the PET component and the CT component have improved immensely. In the case of PET, faster scintillation crystals with high stopping power such as LYSO crystals have enabled more sensitive devices to be built, making it possible to reduce the number of undesired coincidence events and to use time of flight (TOF) techniques. All these advances have improved lesion detection, especially in situations with very noisy backgrounds. Iterative reconstruction methods, together with the corrections carried out during the reconstruction and the use of the point-spread function, have improved image quality. In parallel, CT instrumentation has also improved significantly, and 64- and 128-row detectors have been incorporated into the most modern PET/CT scanners. This makes it possible to obtain high quality diagnostic anatomic images in a few seconds that both enable the correction of PET attenuation and provide information for diagnosis. Furthermore, nowadays nearly all PET/CT scanners have a system that modulates the dose of radiation that the patient is exposed to in the CT study in function of the region scanned. This article reviews the underlying physics of PET and CT imaging separately, describes the changes in the instrumentation and standard protocols in a combined PET/CT system, and finally points out the most important

  5. PET/MRI and PET/CT in advanced gynaecological tumours: initial experience and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Marcelo A.; Schulthess, Gustav von; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Freiwald-Chilla, Bianka [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Hauser, Nik [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Gynaecology, Baden (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Guerbet AG, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and PET/CT for staging and re-staging advanced gynaecological cancer patients as well as identify the potential benefits of each method in such a population. Twenty-six patients with suspicious or proven advanced gynaecological cancer (12 ovarian, seven cervical, one vulvar and four endometrial tumours, one uterine metastasis, and one primary peritoneal cancer) underwent whole-body imaging with a sequential trimodality PET/CT/MR system. Images were analysed regarding primary tumour detection and delineation, loco-regional lymph node staging, and abdominal/extra-abdominal distant metastasis detection (last only by PET/CT). Eighteen (69.2 %) patients underwent PET/MRI for primary staging and eight patients (30.8 %) for re-staging their gynaecological malignancies. For primary tumour delineation, PET/MRI accuracy was statistically superior to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Among the different types of cancer, PET/MRI presented better tumour delineation mainly for cervical (6/7) and endometrial (2/3) cancers. PET/MRI for local evaluation as well as PET/CT for extra-abdominal metastases had therapeutic consequences in three and one patients, respectively. PET/CT detected 12 extra-abdominal distant metastases in 26 patients. PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT for primary tumour delineation. No differences were found in detection of regional lymph node involvement and abdominal metastases detection. (orig.)

  6. Detectability of T Measurable diseases in advanced gastric cancer in FDG PET CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sun Young; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Young Chul; Jeong, Eugene; Kim, Seung Eun; Choe, Jae Gol

    2012-01-01

    Usefulness of FDG PET CT in monitoring response in locally advanced gastric cancer has been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the related factors to detect measurable diseases in advanced gastric cancer on FDG PET CT. We retrospectively reviewed 38 patients diagnosed as having advanced gastric cancer. We defined the measurable diseases when there was visualized tumor of which maximum standardized uptake value(SUVmax) was higher than 1.35*SUVmax of liver + 2*SD of liver SUV. We evaluated what kinds of factors from the clinicopathologic features were related to identifying measurable diseases. Of 38 patients with advanced gastric cancer, 18 (50%) had measurable tumors on FDG PET CT. Measurable tumors were significantly more frequent in well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (70.5% vs 35.3%, p<0.05), in the tumors located at antrum or angle (66.7% vs 29.4%, p<0.05) and in the elderly group (age of 55 years old or more, 72.0% vs 8.3%, p<0.001) than the others, respectively. By multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis was the only independent predictor for the measurable disease on FDG PET CT. We found that age at diagnosis, as well as histologic types and location of tumors, were the affecting factors to detect measurable disease on FDG PET CT in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Our study suggests that elderly patients of age of 55 years old or more can frequently have T measurable disease on FDG PET CT in advanced gastric cancer and FDG PET CT will be helpful to monitor measurable disease

  7. Impact of 18F-FDG-PET/CT on staging and irradiation of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paskeviciute, Brigita; Boelling, Tobias; Brinkmann, Markus; Rudykina, Ganna; Ernst, Iris; Willich, Normann; Koenemann, Stefan; Stegger, Lars; Schober, Otmar; Weckesser, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on planning of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, a total of 36 patients with LARC underwent a retroprospective PET/CT study for radiotherapy-planning purposes. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were defined in a retrospective analysis by a blinded reader. The hypothetical boost volume was defined primarily on CT alone, and afterwards on the fused PET/CT dataset. The CT- and PET/CT-based GTVs were quantitatively compared and percentage of overlap (OV%) was calculated and analyzed. The impact of PET/CT on radiation treatment planning and overall patient management was evaluated. PET/CT-GTVs were smaller than CT-GTVs (p < 0.05). PET/CT imaging resulted in a change of overall management for three patients (8 %). In 16 of 35 patients (46 %), PET/CT resulted in a need for modification of the usual target volumes (CT-PTV) because of detection of a geographic miss. FDG-PET/CT had significant impact on radiotherapy planning and overall treatment of patients with LARC. (orig.)

  8. Multimodal Registration of gated cardiac PET, CT and MR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baty, X.

    2007-07-01

    The research described in this manuscript deals with the multimodal registration of cardiac images from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Position Emission Tomography (PET) and Computerized Tomography (CT). All these modalities are gated to the Electrocardiogram (ECG) and provide information to evaluate cardiac function, and to diagnose and to follow-up cardiovascular pathologies. PET imaging allows the evaluation of ventricular function and MRI is a gold standard for the study of the left ventricular function. The goal of our registration process is to merge functional (from PET) and anatomical images (from CT and MRI). Our process is adapted to the modalities used and is divided in two steps: (i) a global rigid 3-dimensional model-based ICP (Iterative Closest Point) registration between CT and MR data and (ii) an iconic 2-dimensional registration based on Free Form Deformations and Mutual Information. This last step presents an original contribution by using a composite image of CT (which presents epicardic contours) and PET (where endocardic contours are partially visible) data to make mutual information more accurate in representing the similarity with the MR data. To speed up the whole process, we also present a transformation initialization scheme using displacement field obtained form MR data only. The obtained results have been evaluated by experts. (author)

  9. Chronic thyroiditis in patients with advanced breast carcinoma: metabolic and morphologic changes on PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateishi, Ukihide [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Gamez, Cristina; Yeung, Henry W.D.; Macapinlac, Homer A. [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Dawood, Shaheenah; Cristofanilli, Massimo [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Breast Medical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    To investigate clinical implications of FDG uptake in the thyroid glands in patients with advanced breast carcinoma by comparing metabolic and morphologic patterns on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). The institutional review board waived the requirement for informed consent. A retrospective analysis was performed in 146 women (mean age 54 years) with advanced breast carcinoma who received systemic treatment. All patients underwent PET-CT before and after treatment. All PET-CT studies were reviewed in consensus by two reviewers. Morphologic changes including volume and mean parenchymal density of the thyroid glands were evaluated. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were determined to evaluate metabolic changes. These parameters were compared between patients with chronic thyroiditis who received thyroid hormone replacement therapy and those who did not. Of the 146 patients, 29 (20%) showed bilaterally diffuse uptake in the thyroid glands on the baseline PET-CT scan. The SUVmax showed a linear relationship with volume (r = 0.428, p = 0.021) and the mean parenchymal density (r = -0.385, p = 0.039) of the thyroid glands. In 21 of the 29 patients (72%) with hypothyroidism who received thyroid hormone replacement therapy, the volume, mean parenchymal density, SUVmax, and TLG of the thyroid glands showed no significant changes. In contrast, 8 of the 29 patients (28%) who did not receive thyroid hormone replacement therapy showed marked decreases in SUVmax and TLG. Diffuse thyroid uptake on PET-CT represents active inflammation caused by chronic thyroiditis in patients with advanced breast carcinoma. Diffuse thyroid uptake may also address the concern about subclinical hypothyroidism which develops into overt disease during follow-up. (orig.)

  10. Heterogeneous response of cardiac sympathetic function to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure documented by 11[C]-hydroxy-ephedrine and PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitanio, Selene; Nanni, Cristina; Marini, Cecilia; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Martignani, Cristian; Dib, Bassam; Fuccio, Chiara; Boriani, Giuseppe; Picori, Lorena; Boschi, Stefano; Morbelli, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an accepted treatment in patients with end-stage heart failure. PET permits the absolute quantification of global and regional homogeneity in cardiac sympathetic innervation. We evaluated the variation of cardiac adrenergic activity in patients with idiopathic heart failure (IHF) disease (NYHA III–IV) after CRT using 11 C-hydroxyephedrine (HED) PET/CT. Methods: Ten IHF patients (mean age = 68; range = 55–81; average left ventricular ejection fraction 26 ± 4%) implanted with a resynchronization device underwent three HED PET/CT studies: PET 1 one week after inactive device implantation; PET 2, one week after PET 1 under stimulated rhythm; PET 3, at 3 months under active CRT. A dedicated software (PMOD 3.4 version) was used to estimate global and regional cardiac uptake of HED through 17 segment polar maps. Results: At baseline, HED uptake was heterogeneously distributed throughout the left ventricle with a variation coefficient of 18 ± 5%. This variable markedly decreased after three months CRT (12 ± 5%, p < 0.01). Interestingly, subdividing the 170 myocardial segments (17 segments of each patient multiplied by the number of patients) into two groups, according to the median value of tracer uptake expressed as % of maximal myocardial uptake (76%), we observed a different behaviour depending on baseline innervation: HED uptake significantly increased only in segments with “impaired innervation” (SUV 2.61 ± 0.92 at PET1 and 3.05 ± 1.67 at three months, p < 0.01). Conclusion: As shown by HED PET/CT uptake and distribution, improvement in homogeneity of myocardial neuronal function reflected a selective improvement of tracer uptake in regions with more severe neuronal damage. Advances in Knowledge: These finding supported the presence of a myocardial regional variability in response of cardiac sympathetic system to CRT and a systemic response involving remote tissues with rich adrenergic innervation

  11. Roles of posttherapy 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Yuan; Su, Tzu-Pei; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Chang, Yu-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2018-07-01

    To assess the clinical roles of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) performed 2-3 months after completion of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), along with pretherapy characteristics, in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix enrolled in a prospective randomized clinical trial. Posttherapy PET/CT in patients with advanced FIGO stage or positive pelvic or para-aortic lymph node (PALN) defined on pretherapy PET/CT was classified as positive, equivocal, or negative. Overall survival (OS) rates between patients with different PET/CT results are compared. Pretherapy characteristics are examined for association with posttherapy PET/CT results and for prognostic significance in patients with equivocal or negative PET/CT. PET/CT scans (n = 55) were positive, equivocal and negative in 9, 13 and 33 patients, respectively. All patients with positive scans were confirmed to have residual or metastatic disease and died despite salvage therapies. There is a significant OS difference between patients with positive and equivocal scans (P PET/CT (P = .033) and predicts a poorer survival in patients with equivocal or negative posttherapy PET/CT (P PET/CT 2-3 months posttherapy implies treatment failure and novel therapy is necessary to improve outcomes for such patients. A more intense posttherapy surveillance may be warranted in patients with positive pretherapy PALN.

  12. Clinical impact of FDG PET-CT on the management of patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, S.; Cooper, R.A.; Swift, S.E.; Thygesen, H.H.; Chowdhury, F.U.; Scarsbrook, A.F.; Patel, C.N.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the impact of staging FDG PET-CT on the initial management of patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (LACC) and any prognostic variables predicting survival. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing FDG PET-CT for staging of LACC in a single tertiary referral centre, between April 2008 and August 2011. Comparison was made between MRI and PET-CT findings and any subsequent impact on treatment intent or radiotherapy planning was evaluated. Results: Sixty-three patients underwent FDG PET-CT for initial staging of LACC. Major impact on management was found in 20 patients (32%), a minor impact in five (8%), and no impact in 38 (60%). In those patients where PET-CT had a major impact, 12 had more extensive local nodal involvement, five had occult metastatic disease, two had synchronous tumours, and one patient had equivocal lymph nodes on MRI characterized as negative. PET-positive nodal status at diagnosis was found to be a statistically significant predictor of relapse-free survival (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Staging FDG PET-CT has a major impact on the initial management of approximately one-third of patients with LACC by altering treatment intent and/or radiotherapy planning. PET-defined nodal status is a poor prognostic indicator. - Highlights: • Cervical carcinoma is one of the commonest cancers in women worldwide. • Locally advanced cervical carcinoma is usually treated with chemo-radiotherapy. • FDG PET-CT can have a major impact on management in up to one-third of patients. • It may alter treatment intent or radiotherapy-planning by detecting occult disease. • PET nodal status at diagnosis is an important predictor of relapse-free survival

  13. PET/CT Staging Followed by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Improves Treatment Outcome of Locally Advanced Pharyngeal Carcinoma: a matched-pair comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, Sacha; Studer, Gabriela; Seifert, Burkhardt; Huguenin, Pia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Davis, J Bernard; Lütolf, Urs M; Hany, Thomas F; Ciernik, I Frank

    2007-01-01

    Impact of non-pharmacological innovations on cancer cure rates is difficult to assess. It remains unclear, whether outcome improves with 2- [18-F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and integrated computer tomography (PET/CT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for curative treatment of advanced pharyngeal carcinoma. Forty five patients with stage IVA oro- or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were staged with an integrated PET/CT and treated with definitive chemoradiation with IMRT from 2002 until 2005. To estimate the impact of PET/CT with IMRT on outcome, a case-control analysis on all patients with PET/CT and IMRT was done after matching with eighty six patients treated between 1991 and 2001 without PET/CT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy with respect to gender, age, stage, grade, and tumor location with a ratio of 1:2. Median follow-up was eighteen months (range, 6–49 months) for the PET/CT-IMRT group and twenty eight months (range, 1–168 months) for the controls. PET/CT and treatment with IMRT improved cure rates compared to patients without PET/CT and IMRT. Overall survival of patients with PET/CT and IMRT was 97% and 91% at 1 and 2 years respectively, compared to 74% and 54% for patients without PET/CT or IMRT (p = 0.002). The event-free survival rate of PET/CT-IMRT group was 90% and 80% at 1 and 2 years respectively, compared to 72% and 56% in the control group (p = 0.005). PET/CT in combination with IMRT and chemotherapy for pharyngeal carcinoma improve oncological therapy of pharyngeal carcinomas. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these findings

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of PET-CT-guided management for locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A F; Hall, P S; Hulme, C T; Dunn, J A; McConkey, C C; Rahman, J K; McCabe, C; Mehanna, H

    2017-11-01

    A recent large United Kingdom (UK) clinical trial demonstrated that positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT)-guided administration of neck dissection (ND) in patients with advanced head and neck cancer after primary chemo-radiotherapy treatment produces similar survival outcomes to planned ND (standard care) and is cost-effective over a short-term horizon. Further assessment of long-term outcomes is required to inform a robust adoption decision. Here we present results of a lifetime cost-effectiveness analysis of PET-CT-guided management from a UK secondary care perspective. Initial 6-month cost and health outcomes were derived from trial data; subsequent incidence of recurrence and mortality was simulated using a de novo Markov model. Health benefit was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs reported in 2015 British pounds. Model parameters were derived from trial data and published literature. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the impact of uncertainty and broader National Health Service (NHS) and personal social services (PSS) costs on the results. PET-CT management produced an average per-person lifetime cost saving of £1485 and an additional 0.13 QALYs. At a £20,000 willingness-to-pay per additional QALY threshold, there was a 75% probability that PET-CT was cost-effective, and the results remained cost-effective over the majority of sensitivity analyses. When adopting a broader NHS and PSS perspective, PET-CT management produced an average saving of £700 and had an 81% probability of being cost-effective. This analysis indicates that PET-CT-guided management is cost-effective in the long-term and supports the case for wide-scale adoption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. FDG PET/CT radiomics for predicting the outcome of locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovinfosse, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland; Polus, Marc; Daele, Daniel van; Martinive, Philippe; Daenen, Frederic; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris; Koopmansch, Benjamin; Lambert, Frederic; Coimbra, Carla; Seidel, Laurence; Albert, Adelin; Delvenne, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of baseline 18 F-FDG PET/CT textural analysis in locally-advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Eighty-six patients with LARC underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT before treatment. Maximum and mean standard uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean), metabolic tumoral volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), histogram-intensity features, as well as 11 local and regional textural features, were evaluated. The relationships of clinical, pathological and PET-derived metabolic parameters with disease-specific survival (DSS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Cox regression analysis. Logistic regression was used to predict the pathological response by the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG) in the 66 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT). The median follow-up of patients was 41 months. Seventeen patients (19.7%) had recurrent disease and 18 (20.9 %) died, either due to cancer progression (n = 10) or from another cause while in complete remission (n = 8). DSS was 95% at 1 year, 93% at 2 years and 87% at 4 years. Weight loss, surgery and the texture parameter coarseness were significantly associated with DSS in multivariate analyses. DFS was 94 % at 1 year, 86 % at 2 years and 79 % at 4 years. From a multivariate standpoint, tumoral differentiation and the texture parameters homogeneity and coarseness were significantly associated with DFS. OS was 93% at 1 year, 87% at 2 years and 79% after 4 years. cT, surgery, SUVmean, dissimilarity and contrast from the neighborhood intensity-difference matrix (contrast NGTDM ) were significantly and independently associated with OS. Finally, RAS-mutational status (KRAS and NRAS mutations) and TLG were significant predictors of pathological response to nCRT (TRG 3-4). Textural analysis of baseline 18 F-FDG PET/CT provides strong independent predictors of survival in patients with LARC, with better predictive power than intensity- and volume

  16. FDG PET/CT radiomics for predicting the outcome of locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovinfosse, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland [University of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics CHU, Liege (Belgium); Polus, Marc; Daele, Daniel van [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Department of Gastro-enterology, Liege (Belgium); Martinive, Philippe [CHU and University of Liege, Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Daenen, Frederic [Centre Hospitalier Regional de la Citadelle, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Liege (Belgium); Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM, INSERM UMR 1101, Brest (France); Koopmansch, Benjamin; Lambert, Frederic [UniLab Liege, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Center for Human Genetic, Molecular Haemato-Oncology Unit, Liege (Belgium); Coimbra, Carla [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Department of Abdominal Surgery and Transplantation, Liege (Belgium); Seidel, Laurence; Albert, Adelin [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Department of Biostatistics and Medico-economic Information, Liege (Belgium); Delvenne, Philippe [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Department of Pathology, Liege (Belgium)

    2018-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT textural analysis in locally-advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Eighty-six patients with LARC underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT before treatment. Maximum and mean standard uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean), metabolic tumoral volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), histogram-intensity features, as well as 11 local and regional textural features, were evaluated. The relationships of clinical, pathological and PET-derived metabolic parameters with disease-specific survival (DSS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Cox regression analysis. Logistic regression was used to predict the pathological response by the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG) in the 66 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT). The median follow-up of patients was 41 months. Seventeen patients (19.7%) had recurrent disease and 18 (20.9 %) died, either due to cancer progression (n = 10) or from another cause while in complete remission (n = 8). DSS was 95% at 1 year, 93% at 2 years and 87% at 4 years. Weight loss, surgery and the texture parameter coarseness were significantly associated with DSS in multivariate analyses. DFS was 94 % at 1 year, 86 % at 2 years and 79 % at 4 years. From a multivariate standpoint, tumoral differentiation and the texture parameters homogeneity and coarseness were significantly associated with DFS. OS was 93% at 1 year, 87% at 2 years and 79% after 4 years. cT, surgery, SUVmean, dissimilarity and contrast from the neighborhood intensity-difference matrix (contrast{sub NGTDM}) were significantly and independently associated with OS. Finally, RAS-mutational status (KRAS and NRAS mutations) and TLG were significant predictors of pathological response to nCRT (TRG 3-4). Textural analysis of baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT provides strong independent predictors of survival in patients with LARC, with better predictive power than

  17. Clinical impact of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Ozcan, Cengiz; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical importance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT used in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis (IE). BACKGROUND: IE is a serious condition with a significant mortality. Besides the degree of valvular involvement, the progno......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical importance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT used in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis (IE). BACKGROUND: IE is a serious condition with a significant mortality. Besides the degree of valvular involvement...

  18. The role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in evaluation of early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amandeep; Seenu, Vathalaru; Mehta, Sada Nand [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Surgical disciplines, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Rakesh; Chawla, Madhavi; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Gupta, Sidharatha Datta [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Pathology, New Delhi (India)

    2009-06-15

    We evaluated the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the assessment of response after two cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for breast cancer. Twenty-three women with locally advanced breast cancer were included in this study. Early response to NACT was evaluated after two cycles using clinical examination, CT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT. Final histopathology following surgery after six cycles of NACT served as reference. Baseline PET/CT demonstrated a total of 26 lesions in 23 patients. The size of the primary tumor ranged from 1.90 cm to 11.60 cm, and the maximum value of the standardized uptake value of FDG (SUVmax) ranged from 3.6 to 38.6 (mean, 11.7). Post-chemotherapy PET/CT examinations were done after two cycles of NACT. The size of the primary tumor on follow-up PET/CT examinations ranged from 0.0 cm to 7.6 cm, and SUVmax ranged from 0.0 to 12.0 (mean, 3.96). On clinical, CT, and PET/CT examinations, 50% reduction in the parameters was taken as the cutoff value to differentiate between responders and non-responders. Post-NACT PET/CT demonstrated that 16 patients were responders and 7 non-responders. Among 16 responders on PET/CT scan, 14 were true positive and 2 were false positive when compared with histopathology. Among seven non-responder patients, six were true negative, and one was false negative. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of PET/CT in detecting responders were 93%, 75%, and 87%, respectively. In conclusion, 18F-FDG PET/CT can differentiate responders from non-responders with high accuracy after two cycles of NACT in patients with LABC. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  20. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis in patients with an implanted cardiac device: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graziosi, Maddalena; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Diemberger, Igor; Pasquale, Ferdinando; Ziacchi, Matteo; Biffi, Mauro; Martignani, Cristian; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rapezzi, Claudio; Nanni, Cristina; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Fanti, Stefano; Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pier Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is widely underdiagnosed or diagnosed after a major delay. The diagnosis is currently based on the modified DUKE criteria, where the only validated imaging technique is echocardiography, and remains challenging especially in patients with an implantable cardiac device. The aim of this study was to assess the incremental diagnostic role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in patients with an implanted cardiac device and suspected IE. We prospectively analysed 27 consecutive patients with an implantable device evaluated for suspected device-related IE between January 2011 and June 2013. The diagnostic probability of IE was defined at presentation according to the modified DUKE criteria. PET/CT was performed as soon as possible following the clinical suspicion of IE. Patients then underwent medical or surgical treatment based on the overall clinical evaluation. During follow-up, we considered: lead cultures in patients who underwent extraction, direct inspection and lead cultures in those who underwent surgery, and a clinical/instrumental reevaluation after at least 6 months in patients who received antimicrobial treatment or had an alternative diagnosis and were not treated for IE. After the follow-up period, the diagnosis was systematically reviewed by the multidisciplinary team using the modified DUKE criteria and considering the new findings. Among the ten patients with a positive PET/CT scan, seven received a final diagnosis of ''definite IE'', one of ''possible IE'' and two of ''IE rejected''. Among the 17 patients with a negative PET/CT scan, four were false-negative and received a final diagnosis of definite IE. These patients underwent PET/CT after having started antibiotic therapy (≥48 h) or had a technically suboptimal examination. In patients with a cardiac device, PET/CT increases the diagnostic accuracy of the modified Duke criteria for IE, particularly in the subset of patients with possible IE in whom it may help the clinician manage a

  1. Cardiac PET/CT for the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geronazzo, R.J.; Romero, R.L.; Campisi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is considered by de World Health Organization (WHO) to be pandemic. Eighty percent of the deaths occurs secondary to coronary artery disease, stroke and diabetes, thus they can be prevented. All of them are related to the same risk factors. Ischemic heart disease is the mayor cause of death in Argentina in the elderly population. Primary prevention strategies are essential in the health system. Hence, image complementary methods are very important to accomplish risk stratification, secondary prevention and pre-surgical evaluation. Nuclear cardiology has occupied this place through myocardial perfusion studies with radiopharmaceuticals, using SPECT (Single photon emission computed tomography) that have improved the level of sensitivity and specificity with ECG gated. Furthermore, positron emission tomography (PET) can evaluate relative myocardial perfusion, quantify absolute myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. With its capacity to quantify rest-peak stress left ventricular systolic function we can underscore for example “balance ischemia”. By using hybrid PET/CT, also we can get information of coronary artery calcium scoring and coronary angiography. Currently, with the available softwares, we can acquire images in List mode. It means, from a single acquisition, it allows multiple image reconstructions, along with the associated electrocardiographic phase. PET/CT uses radiopharmaceuticals with short physical half life, and in conjunction with the possibility of acquiring in 3D mode, the perfusion studies can be done in a short time and offers lower radiation exposure to the patient. The new softwares for routine correction of misalignments between transmission and emission images have helped to reduce the frequency of artifacts and improve diagnostic accuracy. Hybrid PET/CT technology allows functional evaluation of myocardial perfusion combined with anatomic characterization of the epicardial coronary arteries, thereby

  2. Unusual contiguous soft tissue spread of advanced malignant mesothelioma detected by FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu Yang; Edwards, Jamie; Williams, Hadyn; Hao, Zhong Lin; Khleif, Samir; Pucar, Darko [Medical College of Georgia at Augusta UniversityAugusta (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a tumor of mesodermal origin that arises from the serosa of the pleura, peritoneum, pericardium or tunica vaginalis. MPM is well known to have a poor prognosis with a median survival time of 12 months. Accurate diagnosis, staging and restaging of MPM are crucial with [18F] flurodeoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET/CT) playing an increasingly important role. Here we report a case of MPM with unusual contiguous soft tissue spread of the tumor along the dermal and fascial planes characterized by PET/CT. Given that the loco-regional tumor in the thorax was under control on PET/CT, the death of the patient was most likely associated with physiologic or metabolic causes associated with an extra-thoracic tumor.

  3. Impact of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT on surgical management in patients with advanced melanoma: an outcome based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forschner, Andrea; Keim, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Garbe, Claus [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Dermatology, Tuebingen (Germany); Olthof, Susann-Cathrin; Gueckel, Brigitte; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Martus, Peter [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Tuebingen (Germany); Vach, Werner [University Freiburg, Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, Freiburg (Germany); Fougere, Christian la [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the influence of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT on clinical decision making and outcome in advanced melanoma patients planned for radical metastasectomy. A cohort of 333 patients with mainly stage III/IV melanoma having a PET/CT for clinical reasons was prospectively enrolled in our oncologic PET/CT registry between 2013 and 2015. Referring physicians completed questionnaires regarding their intended management for each patient before and after PET/CT. Management changes after PET/CT were classified as major and minor changes. A subgroup of 107 patients (stage I, N = 5; stage II, N = 3; stage III, N = 42; stage IV, N = 57) was planned for complete metastasectomy initially, based on conventional imaging. Management changes and outcome were evaluated by linkage with the information obtained from patients' medical records. In 28 of 107 patients (26%), the surgical treatment plan remained unchanged after PET/CT. In 24 patients (22%), minor changes were performed, such as enlargement or reduction of the surgical field. In 55 patients (51%, 95% CI 42%-61%) major changes of the intended treatment plan occurred; of those, 20 patients (19%) were classified to be tumor-free with PET/CT, 32 patients (30%) were found to have multiple previously unrecognized metastases and had to be treated by systemic therapy, three patients (3%) had to be changed to palliative radiotherapy or isolated extremity perfusion. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) in patients with complete metastasectomy (N = 52) was 90% and 79%, respectively. Systemically treated patients (N = 32) resulted in 1-year OS of 72% and 2-year OS of 61%. Eleven of 32 patients (34%) with systemic therapy experienced a complete response. Until December 2016, all 20 patients classified as tumor-free by PET/CT were alive. The study confirms the high impact of PET/CT on clinical management in patients with advanced melanoma planned for radical metastasectomy. PET/CT resulted in frequent management changes

  4. Impact of "1"8F-FDG-PET/CT on surgical management in patients with advanced melanoma: an outcome based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forschner, Andrea; Keim, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Garbe, Claus; Olthof, Susann-Cathrin; Gueckel, Brigitte; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina; Martus, Peter; Vach, Werner; Fougere, Christian la

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of "1"8F-FDG-PET/CT on clinical decision making and outcome in advanced melanoma patients planned for radical metastasectomy. A cohort of 333 patients with mainly stage III/IV melanoma having a PET/CT for clinical reasons was prospectively enrolled in our oncologic PET/CT registry between 2013 and 2015. Referring physicians completed questionnaires regarding their intended management for each patient before and after PET/CT. Management changes after PET/CT were classified as major and minor changes. A subgroup of 107 patients (stage I, N = 5; stage II, N = 3; stage III, N = 42; stage IV, N = 57) was planned for complete metastasectomy initially, based on conventional imaging. Management changes and outcome were evaluated by linkage with the information obtained from patients' medical records. In 28 of 107 patients (26%), the surgical treatment plan remained unchanged after PET/CT. In 24 patients (22%), minor changes were performed, such as enlargement or reduction of the surgical field. In 55 patients (51%, 95% CI 42%-61%) major changes of the intended treatment plan occurred; of those, 20 patients (19%) were classified to be tumor-free with PET/CT, 32 patients (30%) were found to have multiple previously unrecognized metastases and had to be treated by systemic therapy, three patients (3%) had to be changed to palliative radiotherapy or isolated extremity perfusion. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) in patients with complete metastasectomy (N = 52) was 90% and 79%, respectively. Systemically treated patients (N = 32) resulted in 1-year OS of 72% and 2-year OS of 61%. Eleven of 32 patients (34%) with systemic therapy experienced a complete response. Until December 2016, all 20 patients classified as tumor-free by PET/CT were alive. The study confirms the high impact of PET/CT on clinical management in patients with advanced melanoma planned for radical metastasectomy. PET/CT resulted in frequent management changes, preventing

  5. Performance of highly sensitive cardiac troponin T assay to detect ischaemia at PET-CT in low-risk patients with acute coronary syndrome: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiec, Beata; Fournier, Stephane; Tapponnier, Maxime; Prior, John O; Monney, Pierre; Dunet, Vincent; Lauriers, Nathalie; Recordon, Frederique; Trana, Catalina; Iglesias, Juan-Fernando; Kawecki, Damian; Boulat, Olivier; Bardy, Daniel; Lamsidri, Sabine; Eeckhout, Eric; Hugli, Olivier; Muller, Olivier

    2017-07-10

    Highly sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT) assay has improved clinical decision-making for patients admitted with chest pain. However, this assay's performance in detecting myocardial ischaemia in a lowrisk population has been poorly documented. To assess hs-TnT assay's performance to detect myocardial ischaemia at positron emission tomography/CT (PET-CT) in low-risk patients admitted with chest pain. Patients admitted for chest pain with a nonconclusive ECG and negative standard cardiac troponin T results at admission and after 6 hours were prospectively enrolled. Their hs-TnT samples were at T0, T2 and T6. Physicians were blinded to hs-TnT results. All patients underwent a PET-CT at rest and during adenosine-induced stress. All patients with a positive PET-CT result underwent a coronary angiography. Forty-eight patients were included. Six had ischaemia at PET-CT. All of them had ≥1 significant stenosis at coronary angiography. Areas under the curve (95% CI) for predicting significant ischaemia at PET-CT using hs-TnT were 0.764 (0.515 to 1.000) at T0, 0.812(0.616 to 1.000) at T2 and 0.813(0.638 to 0.989) at T6. The receiver operating characteristicbased optimal cut-off value for hs-TnT at T0, T2 and T6 needed to exclude significant ischaemia at PET-CT was <4 ng/L. Using this value, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of hs-TnT to predict significant ischaemia were 83%/38%/16%/94% at T0, 100%/40%/19%/100% at T2 and 100%/43%/20%/100% at T6, respectively. Our findings suggest that in low-risk patients, using the hs-TnT assay with a cut-off value of 4 ng/L demonstrates excellent negative predictive value to exclude myocardial ischaemia detection at PET-CT, at the expense of weak specificity and positive predictive value. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01374607. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  6. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, Albert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Knuuti, Juhani

    2011-01-01

    . The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients...

  7. Role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis in patients with an implanted cardiac device: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziosi, Maddalena; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Diemberger, Igor; Pasquale, Ferdinando; Ziacchi, Matteo; Biffi, Mauro; Martignani, Cristian; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rapezzi, Claudio [Alma Mater-University of Bologna, and S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Cardiology Unit, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Nanni, Cristina; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Fanti, Stefano [Alma Mater-University of Bologna, and S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pier Luigi [Alma Mater-University of Bologna, and S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is widely underdiagnosed or diagnosed after a major delay. The diagnosis is currently based on the modified DUKE criteria, where the only validated imaging technique is echocardiography, and remains challenging especially in patients with an implantable cardiac device. The aim of this study was to assess the incremental diagnostic role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with an implanted cardiac device and suspected IE. We prospectively analysed 27 consecutive patients with an implantable device evaluated for suspected device-related IE between January 2011 and June 2013. The diagnostic probability of IE was defined at presentation according to the modified DUKE criteria. PET/CT was performed as soon as possible following the clinical suspicion of IE. Patients then underwent medical or surgical treatment based on the overall clinical evaluation. During follow-up, we considered: lead cultures in patients who underwent extraction, direct inspection and lead cultures in those who underwent surgery, and a clinical/instrumental reevaluation after at least 6 months in patients who received antimicrobial treatment or had an alternative diagnosis and were not treated for IE. After the follow-up period, the diagnosis was systematically reviewed by the multidisciplinary team using the modified DUKE criteria and considering the new findings. Among the ten patients with a positive PET/CT scan, seven received a final diagnosis of ''definite IE'', one of ''possible IE'' and two of ''IE rejected''. Among the 17 patients with a negative PET/CT scan, four were false-negative and received a final diagnosis of definite IE. These patients underwent PET/CT after having started antibiotic therapy (≥48 h) or had a technically suboptimal examination. In patients with a cardiac device, PET/CT increases the diagnostic accuracy of the modified Duke criteria for IE, particularly in the subset of

  8. Low-dose computed tomography scans with automatic exposure control for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Shu-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of automatic exposure control (AEC) in order to optimize low-dose computed tomography (CT) protocols for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). One PET/CT and one SPECT/CT were used to acquire CT images for four anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-year-old, 5-year-old and 10-year-old children and an adult. For the hybrid systems investigated in this study, the radiation dose and image quality of cardiac CT scans performed with AEC activated depend mainly on the selection of a predefined image quality index. Multiple linear regression methods were used to analyse image data from anthropomorphic phantom studies to investigate the effects of body size and predefined image quality index on CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT scans. The regression relationships have a coefficient of determination larger than 0.9, indicating a good fit to the data. According to the regression models, low-dose protocols using the AEC technique were optimized for patients of different ages. In comparison with the standard protocol with AEC activated for adult cardiac examinations used in our clinical routine practice, the optimized paediatric protocols in PET/CT allow 32.2, 63.7 and 79.2% CT dose reductions for anthropomorphic phantoms simulating 10-year-old, 5-year-old and 1-year-old children, respectively. The corresponding results for cardiac SPECT/CT are 8.4, 51.5 and 72.7%. AEC is a practical way to reduce CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT, but the AEC settings should be determined properly for optimal effect. Our results show that AEC does not eliminate the need for paediatric protocols and CT examinations using the AEC technique should be optimized for paediatric patients to reduce the radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  9. Comparison among conventional and advanced MRI, 18F-FDG PET/CT, phenotype and genotype in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Maria Consuelo; Mellai, Marta; Annovazzi, Laura; Melcarne, Antonio; Denysenko, Tetyana; Cassoni, Paola; Casalone, Cristina; Maurella, Cristiana; Grifoni, Silvia; Fania, Piercarlo; Cistaro, Angelina; Schiffer, Davide

    2017-10-31

    Glioblastoma (GB) is a highly heterogeneous tumor. In order to identify in vivo the most malignant tumor areas, the extent of tumor infiltration and the sites giving origin to GB stem cells (GSCs), we combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. Prior to dura opening and tumor resection, forty-eight biopsy specimens [23 of contrast-enhancing (CE) and 25 of non-contrast enhancing (NE) regions] from 12 GB patients were obtained by a frameless image-guided stereotactic biopsy technique. The highest values of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose maximum standardized uptake value ( 18 F-FDG SUV max ), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), Choline/Creatine (Cho/Cr), Choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) and Lipids/Lactate (LL) ratio have been observed in the CE region. They corresponded to the most malignant tumor phenotype, to the greatest molecular spectrum and stem cell potential. On the contrary, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the CE region were very variable. 18 F-FDG SUV max , Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratio resulted the most suitable parameters to detect tumor infiltration. In edematous areas, reactive astrocytes and microglia/macrophages were influencing variables. Combined MRI and 18 F-FDG PET/CT allowed to recognize the specific biological significance of the different identified areas of GB.

  10. Comparison of volumetric and functional parameters in simultaneous cardiac PET/MR: feasibility of volumetric assessment with residual activity from prior PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecke, C.; Brenneis, B.; Grothoff, M.; Gutberlet, M. [University Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Oppolzer, B.; Werner, P.; Jochimsen, T.; Sattler, B.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Foldyna, B. [University Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Massachusetts General Hospital - Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Lurz, P. [University Leipzig - Heart Center, Clinic for Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Leipzig (Germany); Lehmkuhl, L. [Herz- und Gefaess-Klinik GmbH, Radiologische Klinik, Bad Neustadt (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To compare cardiac left ventricular (LV) parameters in simultaneously acquired hybrid fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F] FDG) positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) in patients with residual tracer activity of upstream PET/CT. Twenty-nine patients (23 men, age 58±17 years) underwent cardiac PET/MRI either directly after a non-cardiac PET/CT with homogenous cardiac [18F] FDG uptake (n=20) or for viability assessment (n=9). Gated cardiac [18F] FDG PET and cine MR sequences were acquired simultaneously and evaluated blinded to the cross-imaging results. Image quality (IQ), end-diastolic (LVEDV), end-systolic volume (LVESV), ejection fraction (LVEF) and myocardial mass (LVMM) were measured. Pearson correlation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), regression and a Bland-Altman analysis were assessed. Except LVMM, volumetric and functional LV parameters demonstrated high correlations (LVESV: r=0.97, LVEDV: r=0.95, LVEF: r=0.91, LVMM: r=0.87, each p<0.05), but wide limits of agreement (LOA) for LVEDV (-25.3-82.5ml); LVESV (-33.1-72.7ml); LVEF (-18.9-14.8%) and LVMM (-78.2-43.2g). Intra- and interobserver reliability were very high (ICC≥0.95) for all parameters, except for MR-LVEF (ICC=0.87). PET-IQ (0-3) was high (mean: 2.2±0.9) with significant influence on LVMM calculations only. In simultaneously acquired cardiac PET/MRI data, LVEDV, LVESV and LVEF show good agreement. However, the agreement seems to be limited if cardiac PET/MRI follows PET/CT and only the residual activity is used. (orig.)

  11. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of unexpected extracardiac septic embolisms in patients with suspected cardiac endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Nanni, Cristina; Morigi, Joshua James; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Graziosi, Maddalena; Rapezzi, Claudio [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Cardiology, Bologna (Italy); Trapani, Filippo; Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pier Luigi [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Infective Diseases, Bologna (Italy); Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico [Azienda Ospedaliera S. Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Radiology, Neuroradiology, Medical Physics, Rovigo (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Acute infective endocarditis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Its outcome strongly depends on systemic embolization and extracardiac infections. When present, these conditions usually lead to a more aggressive therapeutic approach. However, the diagnosis of peripheral septic embolism is very challenging. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has proven to be accurate for the detection of inflammatory diseases and occult infections. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of extracardiac embolisms in the evaluation of patients with suspected valvular endocarditis (VE). Seventy-one patients with suspected infective endocarditis, enrolled between June 2010 and December 2012, underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT with the standard procedure on a dedicated PET/CT scanner. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. Of the 71 patients with suspicion of infective endocarditis, we found unexpected extracardiac findings in 17 patients (24 %) without any clinical suspicion. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. PET/CT detected unexpected extra sites of infection in 24 % of cases, leading to changes in therapeutic management in a very relevant percentage of patients. These findings may have important therapeutic implications. (orig.)

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of unexpected extracardiac septic embolisms in patients with suspected cardiac endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Nanni, Cristina; Morigi, Joshua James; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano; Graziosi, Maddalena; Rapezzi, Claudio; Trapani, Filippo; Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pier Luigi; Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Acute infective endocarditis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Its outcome strongly depends on systemic embolization and extracardiac infections. When present, these conditions usually lead to a more aggressive therapeutic approach. However, the diagnosis of peripheral septic embolism is very challenging. 18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has proven to be accurate for the detection of inflammatory diseases and occult infections. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of extracardiac embolisms in the evaluation of patients with suspected valvular endocarditis (VE). Seventy-one patients with suspected infective endocarditis, enrolled between June 2010 and December 2012, underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT with the standard procedure on a dedicated PET/CT scanner. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. Of the 71 patients with suspicion of infective endocarditis, we found unexpected extracardiac findings in 17 patients (24 %) without any clinical suspicion. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. PET/CT detected unexpected extra sites of infection in 24 % of cases, leading to changes in therapeutic management in a very relevant percentage of patients. These findings may have important therapeutic implications. (orig.)

  13. Post-treatment PET/CT and p16 status for predicting treatment outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer after definitive radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awan, Musaddiq J.; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min [Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lavertu, Pierre; Zender, Chad; Rezaee, Rod; Fowler, Nicole [University Hospitals, Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States); Karapetyan, Lilit; Gibson, Michael [University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wasman, Jay [University Hospitals, Department of Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Faulhaber, Peter [University Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To retrospectively review post-treatment (post-tx) FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and known p16 status, treated with definitive (chemo)radiation (RT). A total of 108 eligible patients had N2A or greater HNSCC treated with chemoRT from August 1, 2008, to February 28, 2015, with post-tx PET/CT within 6 months after RT. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank statistics, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used for statistical analysis. Median follow-up was 2.38 years. Sixty-eight (63.0%) patients had p16+ and 40 (37.0%) had p16- status. Two-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival were 93.4% and 77.8%, respectively. The negative predictive value (NPV) of PET/CT for local recurrence (LR) was 100%. The NPV for regional recurrence (RR) was 96.5% for all patients, 100% for p16+ patients, and 88.5% for p16- patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) of PET/CT for recurrence was 77.3% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+, and 78.6% for p16-. The PPV for LR was 72.7% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+ patients, and 72.7% for p16- patients. The PPV for RR was 50.0% for all patients, 33% for p16+, and 66.6% for p16-. Post-tx PET/CT and p16 status were independent predictors of recurrence-free survival (p < 0.01). Post-tx PET/CT predicts treatment outcomes in both p16 + and p16- patients, and does so independently of p16 status. P16- patients with negative PET have a 10% risk of nodal recurrence, and closer follow-up in these patients is warranted. (orig.)

  14. Prognostic significance of mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in PET/CT in advanced ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bats, Anne-Sophie; Lecuru, Fabrice [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Chirurgie Gynecologique et Cancerologique, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, INSERM UMR-S 747, Paris (France); Hugonnet, Florent; Faraggi, Marc [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France); Huchon, Cyrille [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Chirurgie Gynecologique et Cancerologique, Paris (France); Bensaid, Cherazade [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Chirurgie Gynecologique et Cancerologique, Paris (France); Pierquet-Ghazzar, Nadia [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in PET/CT for the staging of advanced ovarian cancer. We retrospectively evaluated patients managed for FIGO stage III/IV ovarian cancer between 1 January 2006 and 1 June 2009. Patients were included if they had undergone {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and surgery for initial staging. Exclusion criteria were age younger than 18 years, inability to undergo general anaesthesia, recurrent ovarian cancer, and borderline or nonepithelial malignancy. Whole-body PET/CT was performed after intravenous {sup 18}F-FDG injection. The location of abnormal hot spots and {sup 18}F-FDG maximal standard uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were recorded. We compared the complete cytoreduction and survival rates in groups defined based on mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and SUV{sub max} values. Kaplan-Meier curves of overall survival and disease-free survival were compared using the log-rank test. Hazard ratios with their 95% confidence intervals were computed. Adjusted hazard ratios were obtained using a multivariate Cox model. We included 53 patients, of whom 17 (32%) had increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Complete cytoreduction was achieved in 14 (87.5%) of the 16 patients managed with primary surgery and in 21 (75%) of the 28 patients managed with interval surgery. Complete cytoreduction was achieved significantly more often among patients without increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake (80.6% vs. 35.3%; p = 0.001). Disease-free survival was comparable between the two groups. By univariate analysis, overall mortality was significantly higher among patients with increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake (hazard ratio 5.70, 95% confidence interval 1.74-18.6). The only factor significantly associated with overall survival by multivariate analysis was complete cytoreduction (adjusted hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.89). Increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was common in patients

  15. Sources of attenuation-correction artefacts in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Sarah J; Hutton, Brian F

    2008-06-01

    Respiratory motion during myocardial perfusion imaging can cause artefacts in both positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images when mismatches between emission and transmission datasets arise. In this study, artefacts from different breathing motions were quantified in both modalities to assess key factors in attenuation-correction accuracy. Activity maps were generated using the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom for different respiratory cycles, which were projected, attenuation-corrected and reconstructed to form PET and SPECT images. Attenuation-correction was performed with maps at mismatched respiratory phases to observe the effect on the left-ventricular myocardium. Myocardial non-uniformity was assessed in terms of the standard deviation in scores obtained from the 17-segment model and changes in uniformity were compared for each mismatch and modality. Certain types of mismatch led to artefacts and corresponding increases in the myocardial non-uniformity. For each mismatch in PET, the increases in non-uniformity relative to an artefact-free image were as follows: (a) cardiac translation mismatch, 84% +/- 11%; (b) liver mismatch, 59% +/- 10%, (c) lung mismatch from diaphragm contraction, 28% +/- 8%; and (d) lung mismatch from chest-wall motion, 6% +/- 7%. The corresponding factors for SPECT were (a) 61% +/- 8%, (b) 34% +/- 8%, (c) -2% +/- 7)% and (d) -4% +/- 6%. Attenuation-correction artefacts were seen in PET and SPECT images, with PET being more severely affected. The most severe artefacts were produced from mismatches in cardiac and liver position, whereas lung mismatches were less critical. Both cardiac and liver positions must, therefore, be correctly matched during attenuation correction.

  16. 18F-FDG versus 11C-choline PET/CT for the imaging of advanced head and neck cancer after combined intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy: the time period during which PET/CT can reliably detect non-recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kimiteru; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Jyunkichi; Kubota, Kazuo; Morooka, Miyako; Shiibashi, Michio

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the usefulness of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 11 C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for detecting recurrences of advanced head and neck cancer after combined intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Additionally, we surveyed the time period during which an effective negative predictive value could be maintained after the first follow-up PET/CT examination and estimated the optimal timing of a second PET/CT examination for detecting late recurrences. Fifty-three subjects (36 men and 17 women; mean age: 59.4±11.5 years) with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were recruited. Post-treatment 18 F-FDG PET/CT and 11 C-choline examinations were performed in all patients between 8 and 12 weeks after combined intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The PET/CT images were evaluated using a patient-based analysis and a lesion-based analysis. All of the patients were prospectively followed for at least 9 months after the post-treatment PET/CT examination, with surveillance using conventional images (including CT and/or MRI) and a physical examination performed every 3 months. Recurrences, as determined using the patient-based analysis, were eventually confirmed in 18, 6 and 5 patients at 3, 4-6 and 7-9 months after the post-treatment PET/CT examination, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the 18F-FDG PET/CT and the 11C-choline PET/CT examinations to predict recurrence within 3 months were higher (FDG: 89 and 91%; choline: 83 and 80%, respectively) than for recurrence detection 6 months (FDG: 67 and 90%; choline: 62 and 76%, respectively) and 9 months later (FDG: 59 and 92%; choline: 55 and 75%, respectively). The lesion-based analysis showed that the maximum standardized uptake value of 18 F-FDG and 11 C-choline in the recurrent lesions were correlated with each other, compared with their relation in scar tissues (R 2 = 0.492 and 0

  17. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Activity Measured by 18F-FDG PET/CT in Patients with Advanced Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Jiyoun; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Jo, Kwan Hyeong; Lee, Jaehoon; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the potential prognostic value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with stage IIIC/IV endometrial cancer. Patients with stage IIIC/IV endometrial cancer who had undergone FDG PET/CT workup for staging were enrolled. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) measured from regions of interest (ROIs) of the primary tumor (SUVt) and lymph nodes (SUVn) were correlated with overall survival (OS). The SUVn was defined as the highest SUV max of the metastatic lymph nodes. Survival probability was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 42 patients with a median age of 55.5 years (range 32-76 years) were included. Twenty-nine percent (n =12) of patients were premenopausal and 71 % (n =30) were postmenopausal. The average SUVt was 12.9 (range 1.8-36.5), and the average SUVn was 7.3 (range 2.0-22.5). Median follow-up time was 25.9 months (range 1.84 months). Using a SUVt of 9.5 as a cutoff value, two groups with different rates were determined (P=0.026). In addition, patients with a low SUVn had significantly better OS than those with a high SUVn (P=0.003). Patients in the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) stage IV group with SUVt≥9.5 or SUVn≥7.3 showed a significantly longer OS than the other groups. FDG uptake of primary endometrial cancer and lymph nodes might be a prognostic factor in advanced endometrial cancer. More aggressive therapy could be considered in patients with stage IV endometrial cancer and high SUVt and/or high SUVn

  18. Para-aortic lymphadenectomy in advanced stage cervical cancer, a protocol for comparing safety, feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of surgical staging versus PET-CT; PALDISC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, Casper; Abbink, Karin; Rovers, Maroeska M; Bekkers, Ruud L M; Zusterzeel, Petra L M

    2018-01-01

    Currently, a PET-CT is used to assess the need for extended field radiotherapy of para-aortic lymph nodes (PALN) in International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2, IIA2-IVA (locally advanced stage) cervical cancer. A small study established a sensitivity and specificity estimate for PALN metastases of 50% (95% CI; 7-93%) and 83% (95% CI; 52-98%), respectively. Surgical staging of PALN may lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy. However, surgical staging of para-aortic lymph nodes in locally advanced stage cervical cancer is not common practice. Therefore, a phase 2 randomised controlled trial is needed to assess its safety and feasibility. In addition to standard imaging (MRI or CT scan) with PET-CT, 30 adult women with FIGO stage IB2, IIA2-IVA cervical cancer will be randomised to receive either surgical staging or usual PET-CT staging. Administering extended field radiotherapy will be based on lymphadenectomy results for the intervention group and on the PET-CT results for the control group. Follow-up visits at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will assess health-related quality of life and progression-free survival.Primary safety and feasibility outcomes of surgical staging will be assessed by calculating means with 95% confidence intervals for duration of surgery, number of complications, blood loss, nodal yield after para-aortic lymphadenectomy and treatment delay due to surgical staging. Secondary patient-centred outcomes on quality of life and first year survival will be documented and compared between the two groups. Estimates of sensitivity, specificity and negative and positive predictive values of MRI, PET-CT and surgical staging will be presented with 95% CI.. All analysis will be performed according to the intention to treat principle. This study will assess safety and feasibility, expressed as the number and severity of complications, effect on quality of life and the treatment delay due to surgically staging para-aortic lymph nodes in

  19. A knowledge-based method for reducing attenuation artefacts caused by cardiac appliances in myocardial PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamill, James J [Siemens Medical Solutions, Molecular Imaging, 810 Innovation Dr., Knoxville, TN (United States); Brunken, Richard C [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); Bybel, Bohdan [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); DiFilippo, Frank P [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); Faul, David D [Siemens Medical Solutions, Molecular Imaging, 810 Innovation Dr., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2006-06-07

    Attenuation artefacts due to implanted cardiac defibrillator leads have previously been shown to adversely impact cardiac PET/CT imaging. In this study, the severity of the problem is characterized, and an image-based method is described which reduces the resulting artefact in PET. Automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD) leads cause a moving-metal artefact in the CT sections from which the PET attenuation correction factors (ACFs) are derived. Fluoroscopic cine images were measured to demonstrate that the defibrillator's highly attenuating distal shocking coil moves rhythmically across distances on the order of 1 cm. Rhythmic motion of this magnitude was created in a phantom with a moving defibrillator lead. A CT study of the phantom showed that the artefact contained regions of incorrect, very high CT values and adjacent regions of incorrect, very low CT values. The study also showed that motion made the artefact more severe. A knowledge-based metal artefact reduction method (MAR) is described that reduces the magnitude of the error in the CT images, without use of the corrupted sinograms. The method modifies the corrupted image through a sequence of artefact detection procedures, morphological operations, adjustments of CT values and three-dimensional filtering. The method treats bone the same as metal. The artefact reduction method is shown to run in a few seconds, and is validated by applying it to a series of phantom studies in which reconstructed PET tracer distribution values are wrong by as much as 60% in regions near the CT artefact when MAR is not applied, but the errors are reduced to about 10% of expected values when MAR is applied. MAR changes PET image values by a few per cent in regions not close to the artefact. The changes can be larger in the vicinity of bone. In patient studies, the PET reconstruction without MAR sometimes results in anomalously high values in the infero-septal wall. Clinical performance of MAR is assessed by

  20. A knowledge-based method for reducing attenuation artefacts caused by cardiac appliances in myocardial PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamill, James J; Brunken, Richard C; Bybel, Bohdan; DiFilippo, Frank P; Faul, David D

    2006-01-01

    Attenuation artefacts due to implanted cardiac defibrillator leads have previously been shown to adversely impact cardiac PET/CT imaging. In this study, the severity of the problem is characterized, and an image-based method is described which reduces the resulting artefact in PET. Automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD) leads cause a moving-metal artefact in the CT sections from which the PET attenuation correction factors (ACFs) are derived. Fluoroscopic cine images were measured to demonstrate that the defibrillator's highly attenuating distal shocking coil moves rhythmically across distances on the order of 1 cm. Rhythmic motion of this magnitude was created in a phantom with a moving defibrillator lead. A CT study of the phantom showed that the artefact contained regions of incorrect, very high CT values and adjacent regions of incorrect, very low CT values. The study also showed that motion made the artefact more severe. A knowledge-based metal artefact reduction method (MAR) is described that reduces the magnitude of the error in the CT images, without use of the corrupted sinograms. The method modifies the corrupted image through a sequence of artefact detection procedures, morphological operations, adjustments of CT values and three-dimensional filtering. The method treats bone the same as metal. The artefact reduction method is shown to run in a few seconds, and is validated by applying it to a series of phantom studies in which reconstructed PET tracer distribution values are wrong by as much as 60% in regions near the CT artefact when MAR is not applied, but the errors are reduced to about 10% of expected values when MAR is applied. MAR changes PET image values by a few per cent in regions not close to the artefact. The changes can be larger in the vicinity of bone. In patient studies, the PET reconstruction without MAR sometimes results in anomalously high values in the infero-septal wall. Clinical performance of MAR is assessed by two

  1. High FDG uptake areas on pre-radiotherapy PET/CT identify preferential sites of local relapse after chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced oesophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calais, Jeremie; Lemarignier, Charles; Vera, Pierre [Henri Becquerel Cancer Center and Rouen University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rouen (France); University of Rouen, QuantIF-LITIS (Equipe d' Accueil 4108-FR CNRS 3638), Faculty of Medicine, Rouen (France); Dubray, Bernard [University of Rouen, QuantIF-LITIS (Equipe d' Accueil 4108-FR CNRS 3638), Faculty of Medicine, Rouen (France); Centre Henri Becquerel and Rouen University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Rouen (France); Nkhali, Lamyaa; Thureau, Sebastien; Modzelewski, Romain; Gardin, Isabelle [Henri Becquerel Cancer Center and Rouen University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rouen (France); University of Rouen, QuantIF-LITIS (Equipe d' Accueil 4108-FR CNRS 3638), Faculty of Medicine, Rouen (France); Centre Henri Becquerel and Rouen University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Rouen (France); Di Fiore, Frederic [Rouen University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Rouen (France); Rouen University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Henri Becquerel Cancer Center, IRON, Rouen (France); Michel, Pierre [Rouen University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Rouen (France)

    2015-05-01

    The high failure rates in the radiotherapy (RT) target volume suggest that patients with locally advanced oesophageal cancer (LAOC) would benefit from increased total RT doses. High 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) uptake (hotspot) on pre-RT FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has been reported to identify intra-tumour sites at increased risk of relapse after RT in non-small cell lung cancer and in rectal cancer. Our aim was to confirm these observations in patients with LAOC and to determine the optimal maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) threshold to delineate smaller RT target volumes that would facilitate RT dose escalation without impaired tolerance. The study included 98 consecutive patients with LAOC treated by chemoradiotherapy (CRT). All patients underwent FDG PET/CT at initial staging and during systematic follow-up in a single institution. FDG PET/CT acquisitions were coregistered on the initial CT scan. Various subvolumes within the initial tumour (30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 % SUV{sub max} thresholds) and in the subsequent local recurrence (LR, 40 and 90 % SUV{sub max} thresholds) were pasted on the initial CT scan and compared[Dice, Jaccard, overlap fraction (OF), common volume/baseline volume, common volume/recurrent volume]. Thirty-five patients had LR. The initial metabolic tumour volume was significantly higher in LR tumours than in the locally controlled tumours (mean 25.4 vs 14.2 cc; p = 0.002). The subvolumes delineated on initial PET/CT with a 30-60 % SUV{sub max} threshold were in good agreement with the recurrent volume at 40 % SUV{sub max} (OF = 0.60-0.80). The subvolumes delineated on initial PET/CT with a 30-60 % SUV{sub max} threshold were in good to excellent agreement with the core volume (90 % SUV{sub max}) of the relapse (common volume/recurrent volume and OF indices 0.61-0.89). High FDG uptake on pretreatment PET/CT identifies tumour subvolumes that are at greater risk of recurrence after CRT in

  2. Influence of PET/CT-introduction on PET scanning frequency and indications. Results of a multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A.; Eschmann, S.M.; Krause, B.J.; Roedel, R.; Tiling, R.; Weckesser, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: to evaluate the influence of the introduction of combined PET/CT scanners into clinical routine. This investigation addresses the quantitative changes between PET/CT and stand alone PET. Methods: the study included all examinations performed on stand alone PET- or PET/CT-scanners within 12 month prior to and after implementation of PET/CT. The final data analysis included five university hospitals and a total number of 15 497 exams. We distinguished exams on stand alone tomographs prior to and after installation of the combined device as well as PET/CT scans particularly with regard to disease entities. Various further parameters were investigated. Results: the overall number of PET scans (PET and PET/CT) rose by 146% while the number of scans performed on stand alone scanners declined by 22%. Only one site registered an increase in stand alone PET. The number of exams for staging in oncology increased by 196% while that of cardiac scans decreased by 35% and the number of scans in neurology rose by 47%. The use of scans for radiotherapy planning increased to 7% of all PET/CT studies. The increase of procedures for so-called classic PET oncology indications was moderate compared to the more common tumors. An even greater increase was observed in some rare entities. Conclusions: the introduction of PET/CT led to more than a doubling of overall PET procedures with a main focus on oncology. Some of the observed changes in scanning frequency may be caused by a rising availability of new radiotracers and advancements of competing imaging methods. Nevertheless the evident increase in the use of PET/CT for the most common tumour types demonstrates its expanding role in cancer staging. The combination of molecular and morphologic imaging has not only found its place but is still gaining greater importance with new developments in technology and radiochemistry. (orig.)

  3. Is metal artefact reduction mandatory in cardiac PET/CT imaging in the presence of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafarian, Pardis [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamiri, S.M.R. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammad R. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schindler, Thomas H. [Geneva University, Cardiovascular Center, Nuclear Cardiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Ratib, Osman [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    Cardiac PET/CT imaging is often performed in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads. However, metallic implants usually produce artefacts on CT images which might propagate to CT-based attenuation-corrected (CTAC) PET images. The impact of metal artefact reduction (MAR) for CTAC of cardiac PET/CT images in the presence of pacemaker, ICD and ECG leads was investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in phantom and clinical studies. The study included 14 patients with various leads undergoing perfusion and viability examinations using dedicated cardiac PET/CT protocols. The PET data were corrected for attenuation using both artefactual CT images and CT images corrected using the MAR algorithm. The severity and magnitude of metallic artefacts arising from these leads were assessed on both linear attenuation coefficient maps ({mu}-maps) and attenuation-corrected PET images. CT and PET emission data were obtained using an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and a dedicated heart phantom made in-house incorporating pacemaker and ICD leads attached at the right ventricle of the heart. Volume of interest-based analysis and regression plots were performed for regions related to the lead locations. Bull's eye view analysis was also performed on PET images corrected for attenuation with and without the MAR algorithm. In clinical studies, the visual assessment of PET images by experienced physicians and quantitative analysis did not reveal erroneous interpretation of the tracer distribution or significant differences when PET images were corrected for attenuation with and without MAR. In phantom studies, the mean differences between tracer uptake obtained without and with MAR were 10.16{+-}2.1% and 6.86{+-}2.1% in the segments of the heart in the vicinity of metallic ICD or pacemaker leads, and were 4.43{+-}0.5% and 2.98{+-}0.5% in segments far from the leads. Although the MAR algorithm was able to effectively improve

  4. TU-C-12A-09: Modeling Pathologic Response of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer to Chemo-Radiotherapy Using Quantitative PET/CT Features, Clinical Parameters and Demographics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H; Chen, W; Kligerman, S; D’Souza, W; Suntharalingam, M; Lu, W; Tan, S; Kim, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop predictive models using quantitative PET/CT features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Methods: This study included 20 patients who underwent tri-modality therapy (CRT + surgery) and had 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans before initiation of CRT and 4-6 weeks after completion of CRT but prior to surgery. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (SUVmax, tumor diameter, etc.); (2) clinical parameters (TNM stage, histology, etc.) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, using cross-validations to avoid model over-fitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed via area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated via confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). Using spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications), significantly better than using conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone. For groups with a large number of tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher accuracy than the LR model. Conclusion: The SVM model using all features including

  5. Early prediction of response to cetuximab and radiotherapy by FDG-PET/CT for the treatment of a locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Grybauskas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cetuximab (CTX is used for the concurrent treatment with radiotherapy (RT in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (HNSCC. There are no reliable clinical predictive markers of effectiveness of CTX at yet. We describe the clinical case of patient who received a CTX/RT to cure locoregionally advanced hypopharyngeal SCC. 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT was performed before the treatment and repeated 10 days after CTX induction dose. A repeated 18FDG-PET/CT scan showed dramatic decrease of metabolic parameters. Patient had a complete response after treatment and is still alive and cured after 5 years.

  6. Evaluation of early response to concomitant chemoradiotherapy by interim {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with locally advanced oesophageal carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuenca, Xavier; Hennequin, Christophe; Rivera, Sofia; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie [Saint Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, Paris (France); Denis Diderot University (Paris 7), Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [Saint Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Nuclear Medicine Department, Paris (France); Denis Diderot University (Paris 7), Paris (France); University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haut-Leveque Hospital, CHU Bordeaux (France); Vercellino, Laetitia [Saint Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Nuclear Medicine Department, Paris (France); Denis Diderot University (Paris 7), Paris (France); Gornet, Jean-Marc [Saint Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Gastroenterology Department, Paris (France); Denis Diderot University (Paris 7), Paris (France); Cattan, Pierre; Chirica, Mircea [Saint Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Surgery Department, Paris (France); Denis Diderot University (Paris 7), Paris (France); Quero, Laurent [Saint Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, Paris (France); Denis Diderot University (Paris 7), Paris (France)

    2013-04-15

    The best way to assess the response to chemoradiotherapy of locally advanced oesophageal carcinomas is not known. We used {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT to evaluate the metabolic response during chemoradiotherapy and tried to correlate this response to survival. Patients with biopsy-proven oesophageal carcinoma underwent FDG PET/CT with evaluation of the standardized uptake value (SUV) before any treatment (SUV1) and during chemoradiotherapy after two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (FU)/cisplatin and 20 Gy (SUV2). Metabolic response was defined as 1-(SUV2/SUV1). Surgery was discussed after 40 Gy and three cycles of chemotherapy. Results of interim PET were not considered for the therapeutic decision. Among 72 patients who underwent a first FDG PET/CT before any treatment, 59 (82 %) could receive the second FDG PET/CT examination. Median survival was 22.2 months with 1-year and 2-year survivals of 70 and 46 %, respectively. Nineteen patients (32 %) underwent surgery. Mean SUV1 and SUV2 were 12.3 {+-} 6.2 and 6 {+-} 4.1, respectively (p < 0.001). Using a cut-off for metabolic response of 50 %, sensitivity and specificity for survival were 0.7 and 0.58. The 2-year overall survival of good responders was 62 % as compared to 27 % for poor metabolic responders. A multivariate analysis was performed, including T and N stages, surgery, histology and metabolic response: only metabolic response was significantly (p = 0.009) associated with 2-year survival. Early evaluation of metabolic response had a great prognostic value and could help identify good responders to chemoradiotherapy. (orig.)

  7. Prognostic value of pretreatment 18F-FDG PET/CT and human papillomavirus type 16 testing in locally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsan, Din-Li; Lin, Chien-Yu; Huang, Chung-Guei; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wang, Hung-Ming; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Chun-Ta

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) positivity is associated with favourable survival in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We report here a study of the prognostic significance of 18 F-FDG PET/CT functional parameters and HPV-16 infection in OPSCC patients. We retrospectively analysed 60 patients with stage III or IV OPSCC who had had a pretherapy 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and had completed concurrent chemoradiotherapy (n = 58) or curative radiotherapy (n = 2). All patients were followed up for ≥24 months or until death. We determined total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) of the primary tumour and neck lymph nodes from the pretherapy 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan. Optimal cut-offs of the 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameters were obtained by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Pretherapy tumour biopsies were studied by polymerase chain reaction to determine HPV infection status. The pretherapy tumour biopsies were positive for HPV-16 in 12 patients (20.0 %). Cox regression analyses revealed HPV-16 positivity and tumour TLG >135.3 g to be independently associated with overall survival (p = 0.027 and 0.011, respectively). However, only tumour TLG >135.3 g was independently associated with progression-free survival, disease-free survival and locoregional control (p = 0.011, 0.001 and 0.034, respectively). A scoring system was formulated to define distinct overall survival groups using tumour TLG and HPV-16 status. Patients positive for HPV-16 and with tumour TLG ≤135.3 g experienced better survival than those with tumour TLG >135.3 g and no HPV infection (p = 0.001). Tumour TLG was an independent predictor of survival in patients with locally advanced OPSCC. A scoring system was developed and may serve as a risk stratification strategy for guiding therapy. (orig.)

  8. Textural features and SUV-based variables assessed by dual time point 18F-FDG PET/CT in locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vicente, Ana María; Molina, David; Pérez-Beteta, Julián; Amo-Salas, Mariano; Martínez-González, Alicia; Bueno, Gloria; Tello-Galán, María Jesús; Soriano-Castrejón, Ángel

    2017-12-01

    To study the influence of dual time point 18F-FDG PET/CT in textural features and SUV-based variables and their relation among them. Fifty-six patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) were prospectively included. All of them underwent a standard 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET-1) and a delayed acquisition (PET-2). After segmentation, SUV variables (SUVmax, SUVmean, and SUVpeak), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were obtained. Eighteen three-dimensional (3D) textural measures were computed including: run-length matrices (RLM) features, co-occurrence matrices (CM) features, and energies. Differences between all PET-derived variables obtained in PET-1 and PET-2 were studied. Significant differences were found between the SUV-based parameters and MTV obtained in the dual time point PET/CT, with higher values of SUV-based variables and lower MTV in the PET-2 with respect to the PET-1. In relation with the textural parameters obtained in dual time point acquisition, significant differences were found for the short run emphasis, low gray-level run emphasis, short run high gray-level emphasis, run percentage, long run emphasis, gray-level non-uniformity, homogeneity, and dissimilarity. Textural variables showed relations with MTV and TLG. Significant differences of textural features were found in dual time point 18F-FDG PET/CT. Thus, a dynamic behavior of metabolic characteristics should be expected, with higher heterogeneity in delayed PET acquisition compared with the standard PET. A greater heterogeneity was found in bigger tumors.

  9. Prognostic value of pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and human papillomavirus type 16 testing in locally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsan, Din-Li; Lin, Chien-Yu [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Huang, Chung-Guei [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Taipei (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Wang, Hung-Ming; Hsu, Cheng-Lung [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China)

    2012-11-15

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) positivity is associated with favourable survival in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We report here a study of the prognostic significance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT functional parameters and HPV-16 infection in OPSCC patients. We retrospectively analysed 60 patients with stage III or IV OPSCC who had had a pretherapy {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan and had completed concurrent chemoradiotherapy (n = 58) or curative radiotherapy (n = 2). All patients were followed up for {>=}24 months or until death. We determined total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the maximal standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the primary tumour and neck lymph nodes from the pretherapy {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan. Optimal cut-offs of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters were obtained by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Pretherapy tumour biopsies were studied by polymerase chain reaction to determine HPV infection status. The pretherapy tumour biopsies were positive for HPV-16 in 12 patients (20.0 %). Cox regression analyses revealed HPV-16 positivity and tumour TLG >135.3 g to be independently associated with overall survival (p = 0.027 and 0.011, respectively). However, only tumour TLG >135.3 g was independently associated with progression-free survival, disease-free survival and locoregional control (p = 0.011, 0.001 and 0.034, respectively). A scoring system was formulated to define distinct overall survival groups using tumour TLG and HPV-16 status. Patients positive for HPV-16 and with tumour TLG {<=}135.3 g experienced better survival than those with tumour TLG >135.3 g and no HPV infection (p = 0.001). Tumour TLG was an independent predictor of survival in patients with locally advanced OPSCC. A scoring system was developed and may serve as a risk stratification strategy for guiding therapy. (orig.)

  10. PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsy of FDG-avid metastatic bone lesions in patients with advanced lung cancer: a safe and effective technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wei; Hao, Bing; Chen, Hao-jun; Zhao, Long; Luo, Zuo-ming; Wu, Hua; Sun, Long [The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Minnan PET Center, Xiamen Cancer Hospital, Xiamen (China)

    2017-01-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT should be performed before a diagnostic biopsy site is chosen in patients with a high clinical suspicion of aggressive, advanced tumour. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in guiding biopsy of bone metastases in patients with advanced lung cancer. PET/CT-guided percutaneous core biopsies were performed in 51 consecutive patients with suspected lung cancer and {sup 18}F-FDG-avid bone lesions after whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans. Generally, one tissue sample was obtained from each patient. The final diagnoses were established on the basis of the histology results. The histopathological and molecular testing results were systematically evaluated. A total of 53 samples were obtained for histological examination or molecular testing as a second biopsy was required in two patients in whom the pathological diagnosis was unclear following the first biopsy. The pathological diagnosis and lung cancer classification were confirmed in 48 patients. The epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status was determined in 23 biopsies, and the mutation rate was 30.4 % (7/23). The anaplastic lymphoma kinase mutation status was determined in 19 biopsies, and the mutation rate was 31.6 % (6/19). Two of the 51 biopsies were positive for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and one was positive for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The first-time diagnostic success rate of biopsy was 96.1 % (49/51) and the overall diagnostic success rate and sensitivity were 100 %. All 51 patients were eventually confirmed as having stage IV disease. No serious complications were encountered and the average biopsy time was 30 min. PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsy of {sup 18}F-FDG-avid bone metastases is an effective and safe method that yields a high diagnostic success rate in the evaluation of hypermetabolic bone lesions in patients with suspected advanced lung cancer. (orig.)

  11. Cost-effectiveness of response evaluation after chemoradiation in patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer using 18F-FDG-PET-CT and/or diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuter, Marjolein Je; Schouten, Charlotte S; Castelijns, Jonas A; de Graaf, Pim; Comans, Emile Fi; Hoekstra, Otto S; de Bree, Remco; Coupé, Veerle Mh

    2017-04-11

    Considerable variation exists in diagnostic tests used for local response evaluation after chemoradiation in patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer. The yield of invasive examination under general anesthesia (EUA) with biopsies in all patients is low and it may induce substantial morbidity. We explored four response evaluation strategies to detect local residual disease in terms of diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness. We built a decision-analytic model using trial data of forty-six patients and scientific literature. We estimated for four strategies the proportion of correct diagnoses, costs concerning diagnostic instruments and the proportion of unnecessary EUA indications. Besides a reference strategy, i.e. EUA for all patients, we considered three imaging strategies consisting of 18 FDG-PET-CT, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI), or both 18 FDG-PET-CT and DW-MRI followed by EUA after a positive test. The impact of uncertainty was assessed in sensitivity analyses. The EUA strategy led to 96% correct diagnoses. Expected costs were €468 per patient whereas 89% of EUA indications were unnecessary. The DW-MRI strategy was the least costly strategy, but also led to the lowest proportion of correct diagnoses, i.e. 93%. The PET-CT strategy and combined imaging strategy were dominated by the EUA strategy due to respectively a smaller or equal proportion of correct diagnoses, at higher costs. However, the combination of PET-CT and DW-MRI had the highest sensitivity. All imaging strategies considerably reduced (unnecessary) EUA indications and its associated burden compared to the EUA strategy. Because the combined PET-CT and DW-MRI strategy costs only an additional €927 per patient, it is preferred over immediate EUA since it reaches the same diagnostic accuracy in detecting local residual disease while leading to substantially less unnecessary EUA indications. However, if healthcare resources are limited, DW-MRI is the strategy of choice because of lower

  12. Early and delayed prediction of axillary lymph node neoadjuvant response by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Vicente, Ana Maria; Soriano Castrejon, Angel; Jimenez Londono, German Andres [University General Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Ciudad Real (Spain); Leon Martin, Alberto [University General Hospital, Investigation Unit, Ciudad Real (Spain); Relea Calatayud, Fernanda [University General Hospital, Pathology Department, Ciudad Real (Spain); Munoz Sanchez, Maria del Mar [Virgen de la Luz Hospital, Oncology Department, Cuenca (Spain); Cruz Mora, Miguel Angel [Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Oncology Department, Toledo (Spain); Espinosa Aunion, Ruth [La Mancha Centro Hospital, Oncology Department, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    To determine the utility of {sup 18}F-FDG (FDG) PET/CT performed in an early and delayed phase during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the prediction of lymph node histopathological response in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. FDG PET/CT studies performed in 76 patients (mean age 53 years) at baseline (PET-1), after the second course of chemotherapy (PET-2) and after the last course of chemotherapy (PET-3) were prospectively analysed. Inclusion criteria were lymph node involvement detected by PET/CT and non-sentinel node biopsy before or after the baseline PET/CT scan. Following the recommendations of the 12th International Breast Conference (St. Gallen), the patients were divided into five subgroups in relation to biological prognostic factors by immunohistochemistry. For diagnosis visual and semiquantitative analyses was performed. Absence of detectable lymph node uptake on the PET-2 or PET-3 scan with respect to the PET-1 scan was considered metabolic complete response (mCR). Lymph nodes were histopathologically classified according the lymph node regression grade and in response groups as pathological complete response (pCR) or not pCR (type A/D or B/C of the Smith grading system, respectively). ROC analysis was performed to determine a cut-off value of Δ% SUV1-2 and SUV1-3 for prediction of nodal status after chemotherapy. An association between mCR and pCR was found (Cohen's kappa analysis), and associations between phenotypes and metabolic behaviour and the final histopathological status were also found. Lymph node pCR was seen in 34 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of PET-2 and PET-3 in establishing the final status of the axilla after chemotherapy were 52 %, 45 %, 50 % and 47 %, and 33 %, 84 %, 67 % and 56 %, respectively. No significant relationship was observed between mCR on PET-2 and PET-3 and pCR (p = 0.31 and 0.99, respectively). Lymph node metabolism on PET-1 was not able to predict

  13. PET/CT and histopathologic response to preoperative chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, C.; Loft, A.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared to histopathologic...

  14. PET/CT and Histopathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Charlotte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... of chemoradiation is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography....... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral(R) (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared...

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detection of advanced colorectal adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollub, M.J.; Grewal, R.K.; Panu, N.; Thipphavong, S.; Sohn, M.; Zheng, J.; Moskowitz, C.S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the accuracy of 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) in the detection of advanced colorectal adenomas. Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, patient consent was waived by the institutional review board. Combined FDG whole-body PET and computed tomography (CT) images (2000–2009) were re-read and compared with reports of complete colonoscopy performed up to 1 year after the PET examination. One or more areas of focal colonic uptake greater than the background indicated a positive PET result, irrespective of standardized uptake value (SUV). Lesion and patient-level measures of PET accuracy with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results: One hundred and eighty patients undergoing colonoscopy with or without biopsy underwent PET within 1 year prior to colonoscopy. There were 92 women and 88 men (mean age 63.3 years). Indications for PET were extent of disease and treatment response in all cases. Patients had non-colorectal cancer (n = 160) or colon cancer (n = 20). One hundred and fourteen FDG-avid lesions were present. In 33, there was no colonoscopic correlate. Two hundred and fifty-eight biopsies revealed tubular adenomas (n = 91, one with intra-mucosal cancer), tubulovillous adenomas (n = 28), adenocarcinoma (n = 37), inflammation (n = 22), hyperplastic polyps (n = 54), serrated adenoma (n = 5), metastatic disease (n = 5), normal/benign mucosa or submucosal benign tumors (n = 13) or miscellaneous (n = 3). Per-lesion performance of PET showed a sensitivity of 38% (95% CI: 31–46; 64/167) for all adenomas and carcinomas and 58% (95% CI: 49–67; 57/98) for lesions ≥10 mm. At the patient level, for all adenomas and carcinomas the sensitivity was 54% (95% CI: 44–63; 61/113), specificity 100% (pre-defined), positive predictive value (PPV) 100% (pre-defined), and negative predictive value (NPV) 56% (95% CI: 47–65; 67/119). For patients with advanced

  16. Calculation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT: 5D-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Jonny; Kero, Tanja; Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Widström, Charles; Flachskampf, Frank A; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-11-14

    Quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF) is of increasing interest in the clinical assessment of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). 15 O-water positron emission tomography (PET) is considered the gold standard for non-invasive MBF measurements. However, calculation of left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF) is not possible from standard 15 O-water uptake images. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the possibility of calculating LV volumes and LVEF from cardiac-gated parametric blood volume (V B ) 15 O-water images and from first pass (FP) images. Sixteen patients with mitral or aortic regurgitation underwent an eight-gate dynamic cardiac-gated 15 O-water PET/CT scan and cardiac MRI. V B and FP images were generated for each gate. Calculations of end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), stroke volume (SV) and LVEF were performed with automatic segmentation of V B and FP images, using commercially available software. LV volumes and LVEF were calculated with surface-, count-, and volume-based methods, and the results were compared with gold standard MRI. Using V B images, high correlations between PET and MRI ESV (r = 0.89, p  0.86, p dynamic 15 O-water PET is feasible and shows good correlation with MRI. However, the analysis method is laborious, and future work is needed for more automation to make the method more easily applicable in a clinical setting.

  17. {sup 18}F-alfatide PET/CT may predict short-term outcome of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Xiaohui [Shandong Cancer Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jinan, Shandong (China); University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan (China); Huang, Yong; Sun, Xiaorong; Ma, Li; Teng, Xuepeng; Lu, Hong [Shandong Cancer Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Jinan, Shandong (China); Gao, Song [Jining Infectious Diseases Hospital, Department of Oncology, Jining, Shandong (China); Wang, Suzhen; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu [Shandong Cancer Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-12-15

    The study aims to investigate the role of {sup 18}F-alfatide positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in predicting the short-term outcome of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighteen patients with advanced NSCLC had undergone {sup 18}F-alfatide PET/CT scans before CCRT and PET/CT parameters including maximum and mean standard uptake values (SUV{sub max}/SUV{sub mean}), peak standard uptake values (SUV{sub peak}) and tumor volume (TV{sub PET} and TV{sub CT}) were obtained. The SUV{sub max} of tumor and normal tissues (lung, blood pool and muscle) were measured, and their ratios were denoted as T/NT (T/NT{sub lung}, T/NT{sub blood} and T/NT{sub muscle}). Statistical methods included the Two-example t test, Wilcoxon rank-sum test, Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and logistic regression analyses. We found that SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, T/NT{sub lung}, T/NT{sub blood} and T/NT{sub muscle} were higher in non-responders than in responders (P = 0.0024, P = 0.016, P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P = 0.004). According to ROC curve analysis, the thresholds of SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, T/NT{sub lung}, T/NT{sub blood} and T/NT{sub muscle} were 5.65, 4.46, 7.11, 5.41, and 11.75, respectively. The five parameters had high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in distinguishing non-responders and responders. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that T/NT{sub lung} was an independent predictor of the short-term outcome of CCRT in patients with advanced NSCLC (P = 0.032). {sup 18}F-alfatide PET/CT may be useful in predicting the short-term outcome of CCRT in patients with advanced NSCLC. (orig.)

  18. A Case of Low-Grade Primary Cardiac Lymphoma with Pericardial Effusion Diagnosed by Combined 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) Imaging and Effusion Cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Hisanori; Tatewaki, Yasuko; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Shimomura, Hideo; Yamamoto, Shuzo; Terao, Chiaki; Totsune, Tomoko; Nakagawa, Manabu; Taki, Yasuyuki

    2018-03-14

    BACKGROUND Primary cardiac lymphoma is rare and can be an aggressive disease, depending on the grade. A case is reported of low-grade primary cardiac lymphoma associated with a pericardial effusion. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging was useful in the diagnosis and in evaluating the disease activity in this case. CASE REPORT A 72-year-old Japanese woman visited a general practitioner, complaining of dyspnea associated with cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis was performed, and Group V malignant cells were identified by cytology, suspicious for malignant lymphoma. Whole-body FDG-PET/CT scans showed no pleural effusion or lymph node metastasis supporting the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma diagnosed on pericardial effusion. The laboratory investigations showed that levels of serum soluble interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor (sIL-2R), a diagnostic and prognostic marker for malignant lymphoma, were not elevated (258 U/ml). A six-month follow-up FDG-PET/CT scan showed an increased volume of the pericardial effusion and mild but abnormal uptake diffusely in the pericardial space, and the sIL-2R was slightly elevated (860 U/ml). No abnormal FDG accumulation outside the retained pericardial effusion was noted, which was compatible with a clinical picture of low-grade primary cardiac lymphoma, and in a period of watchful waiting during the first two years later, the sIL-2R had reduced to 195 U/ml. CONCLUSIONS This is a rare case of low-grade primary cardiac lymphoma detected in a pericardial effusion, and highlights the utility of the FDG-PET/CT scan as a valuable diagnostic and follow-up modality.

  19. Efficacy of qualitative response assessment interpretation criteria at 18F-FDG PET-CT for predicting outcome in locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag; Swift, Sarah; Cooper, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of a standardized qualitative scoring system for treatment response assessment at 18F-FDG PET-CT in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma and correlate this with subsequent patient outcome. Ninety-six consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with radical chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in a single centre between 2011 and 2014 underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT approximately 3 months post-treatment. Tumour metabolic response was assessed qualitatively using a 5-point scale ranging from background level activity only through to progressive metabolic disease. Clinical and radiological (MRI pelvis) follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method (Mantel-Cox log-rank) and correlated with qualitative score using Chi-squared test. Forty patients (41.7 %) demonstrated complete metabolic response (CMR) on post-treatment PET-CT (Score 1/2) with 38 patients (95.0 %) remaining disease free after a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. Twenty-four patients (25.0 %) had indeterminate residual uptake (ID, Score 3) at primary or nodal sites after treatment, of these eight patients (33.3 %) relapsed on follow-up, including all patients with residual nodal uptake (n = 4). 11 of 17 patients (64.7 %) with significant residual uptake (partial metabolic response, PMR, Score 4) subsequently relapsed. In 15 patients (15.6 %) PET-CT demonstrated progressive disease (PD, Score 5) following treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a highly statistically significant difference in PFS and OS between patients with CMR, indeterminate uptake, PMR and PD (Log-rank, P < 0.0001). Chi-squared test demonstrated a highly statistically significant association between increasing qualitative score and risk of recurrence or death (P < 0.001). Use of a 5-point qualitative scoring system to assess metabolic response to CRT in locally advanced

  20. Efficacy of qualitative response assessment interpretation criteria at 18F-FDG PET-CT for predicting outcome in locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Level 1, Bexley Wing, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Level 1, Bexley Wing, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Swift, Sarah [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Cooper, Rachel [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Clinical Oncology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the utility of a standardized qualitative scoring system for treatment response assessment at 18F-FDG PET-CT in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma and correlate this with subsequent patient outcome. Ninety-six consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with radical chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in a single centre between 2011 and 2014 underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT approximately 3 months post-treatment. Tumour metabolic response was assessed qualitatively using a 5-point scale ranging from background level activity only through to progressive metabolic disease. Clinical and radiological (MRI pelvis) follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method (Mantel-Cox log-rank) and correlated with qualitative score using Chi-squared test. Forty patients (41.7 %) demonstrated complete metabolic response (CMR) on post-treatment PET-CT (Score 1/2) with 38 patients (95.0 %) remaining disease free after a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. Twenty-four patients (25.0 %) had indeterminate residual uptake (ID, Score 3) at primary or nodal sites after treatment, of these eight patients (33.3 %) relapsed on follow-up, including all patients with residual nodal uptake (n = 4). 11 of 17 patients (64.7 %) with significant residual uptake (partial metabolic response, PMR, Score 4) subsequently relapsed. In 15 patients (15.6 %) PET-CT demonstrated progressive disease (PD, Score 5) following treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a highly statistically significant difference in PFS and OS between patients with CMR, indeterminate uptake, PMR and PD (Log-rank, P < 0.0001). Chi-squared test demonstrated a highly statistically significant association between increasing qualitative score and risk of recurrence or death (P < 0.001). Use of a 5-point qualitative scoring system to assess metabolic response to CRT in locally advanced

  1. Clinical applications of PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Ha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of PET, PET/CT focusing on the technical aspects, PET radiopharmaceutical developments and current clinical applications as well. The newest technologic advances have been reviewed, including improved crystal design, acquisition modes, reconstruction algorithms, etc. These advancements will continue to improve contrast, decrease noise, and increase resolution. Combined PET/CT system provides faster attenuation correction and useful anatomic correlation to PET functional information. A number of new radiopharmaceuticals used for PET imaging have been developed, however, FDG have been considered as the principal PET radiotracer. The current clinical applications of PET and PET/CT are widespread and include oncology, cardiology and neurology. (author)

  2. Prediction of neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy response and survival using pretreatment [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Ji-In; Ha, Seunggyun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Keun-Wook [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye-Seung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho-Young [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate metabolic and textural parameters from pretreatment [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans for the prediction of neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy response and 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). We performed a retrospective review of 74 patients diagnosed with LARC who were initially examined with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT, and who underwent neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy followed by complete resection. The standardized uptake value (mean, peak, and maximum), metabolic volume (MV), and total lesion glycolysis of rectal cancer lesions were calculated using the isocontour method with various thresholds. Using three-dimensional textural analysis, about 50 textural features were calculated for PET images. Response to neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy, as assessed by histological tumour regression grading (TRG) after surgery and 3-year DFS, was evaluated using univariate/multivariate binary logistic regression and univariate/multivariate Cox regression analyses. MVs calculated using the thresholds mean standardized uptake value of the liver + two standard deviations (SDs), and mean standard uptake of the liver + three SDs were significantly associated with TRG. Textural parameters from histogram-based and co-occurrence analysis were significantly associated with TRG. However, multivariate analysis revealed that none of these parameters had any significance. On the other hand, MV calculated using various thresholds was significantly associated with 3-year DFS, and MV calculated using a higher threshold tended to be more strongly associated with 3-year DFS. In addition, textural parameters including kurtosis of the absolute gradient (GrKurtosis) were significantly associated with 3-year DFS. Multivariate analysis revealed that GrKurtosis could be a prognostic factor for 3-year DFS. Metabolic and textural parameters from initial [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans could be indexes to assess

  3. Effect of motion-induced PET-CT misalignment on cardiac function and myocardial blood flow measured using dynamic 15O-water PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubberink, Mark; Ebrahimi, M; Harms, Hans

    -CT misalignment on MBF, transmural MBF (MBFt), perfusable tissue fraction (PTF), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV) and left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) based on dynamic 15O-water scans. Methods: 10 patients underwent 6 min PET scans after injection of 400 MBq 15O-water at rest and during adenosine......Aim: Motion-induced PET-CT misalignment artifacts are common in myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurements with 82Rb and 13N-ammonia. For 15O-water, MBF is based on the clearance rate rather than uptake of the tracer. The clearance rate is determined by the shape of the time-activity curve, not its...... amplitude, and is thus not affected by attenuation correction errors. Hence, misalignment is hypothesized not to affect 15O-water-based MBF to any large extent, but it may affect cardiac function measures derived from 15O-water scans. The aim of the present work was to assess the effect of PET...

  4. How does PET/CT help in selecting therapy for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin

    2012-01-01

    investigating the use of PET/CT for early response-adapted therapy, with therapeutic stratification based on interim PET/CT results. Posttreatment PET/CT is a cornerstone of the revised response criteria and enables the selection of advanced-stage patients without the need for consolidation radiotherapy. Once...

  5. Calculation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT: 5D-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Nordström

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF is of increasing interest in the clinical assessment of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD. 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET is considered the gold standard for non-invasive MBF measurements. However, calculation of left ventricular (LV volumes and ejection fraction (EF is not possible from standard 15O-water uptake images. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the possibility of calculating LV volumes and LVEF from cardiac-gated parametric blood volume (V B 15O-water images and from first pass (FP images. Sixteen patients with mitral or aortic regurgitation underwent an eight-gate dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT scan and cardiac MRI. V B and FP images were generated for each gate. Calculations of end-systolic volume (ESV, end-diastolic volume (EDV, stroke volume (SV and LVEF were performed with automatic segmentation of V B and FP images, using commercially available software. LV volumes and LVEF were calculated with surface-, count-, and volume-based methods, and the results were compared with gold standard MRI. Results Using V B images, high correlations between PET and MRI ESV (r = 0.89, p  0.86, p < 0.001. Conclusion Calculation of LV volumes and LVEF from dynamic 15O-water PET is feasible and shows good correlation with MRI. However, the analysis method is laborious, and future work is needed for more automation to make the method more easily applicable in a clinical setting.

  6. Brain 18F-FDG, 18F-florbtaben PET/CT, 123I-FP-CIT SPECT and cardiac 123I-MBG imaging for diagnosis of a 'cerebral type' of Lewy Body disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gucht, Axel Van Der; Bélissant, Ophélie; Rabu, Corenti; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Bonnot-Lours, Sophie; Fénelon, Gilles; Itti, Emmanuel; De Langavant, Laurent Cleret

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year-old man was referred for fluctuating neuropsychiatric symptoms, featuring depression, delirious episodes, recurrent visual hallucinations and catatonic syndrome associated with cognitive decline. No parkinsonism was found clinically even under neuroleptic treatment. 18 F-FDG PET/CT showed hypometabolism in the posterior associative cortex including the occipital cortex, suggesting Lewy body dementia, but 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT was normal and cardiac 123 I-MIBG imaging showed no signs of sympathetic denervation. Alzheimer's disease was excluded by a normal 18 F-florbetaben PET/CT. This report suggests a rare case of α-synucleinopathy without brainstem involvement, referred to as 'cerebral type' of Lewy body disease

  7. The combination of 13N-ammonia and 18F-FDG whole-body PET/CT on the same day for diagnosis of advanced prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chang; Yu, Donglan; Shi, Xinchong; Luo, Ganhua; He, Qiao; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of 13N-ammonia and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET performed on the same day in the detection of advanced prostate cancer (PC) and its metastases. Patients and methods Twenty-six patients with high-risk PC [Gleason score 8–10 or prostate-specific antigen (PSA)>20 ng/ml or clinical tumor extension≥T2c] were recruited into the study. 13N-Ammonia and 18F-FDG PET/CT were performed on the same day (18F-FDG followed ammonia, with an interval of a minimum of 2 h). Lesions were interpreted as positive, negative, or equivocal. Patient-based and field-based performance characteristics for both imaging techniques were reported. Results There was significant correlation between 13N-ammonia and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of primary PC (κ=0.425, P=0.001) and no significant difference in sensitivity (60.2 vs. 54.5%) and specificity (100 vs. 83.3%). The maximum standard uptake values and corresponding target-to-background ratio values of the concordantly positive lesions in prostate glands in the two studies did not differ significantly (P=0.124 and 0.075, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of PET imaging using 13N-ammonia for lymph node metastases were 77.5 and 96.3%, respectively, whereas the values were 75 and 44.4% using 18F-FDG. The two modalities were highly correlated with respect to the detection of lymph nodes and bone metastases. Conclusion The concordance between the two imaging modalities suggests a clinical impact of 13N-ammonia PET/CT in advanced PC patients as well as of 18F-FDG. 13N-Ammonia is a useful PET tracer and a complement to 18F-FDG for detecting primary focus and distant metastases in PC. The combination of these two tracers on the same day can accurately detect advanced PC. PMID:26588068

  8. Textural features of pretreatment 18F-FDG PET/CT images: prognostic significance in patients with advanced T-stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Guei; Tsan, Din-Li; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Chien-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that total lesion glycolysis (TLG) may serve as a prognostic indicator in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We sought to investigate whether the textural features of pretreatment (18)F-FDG PET/CT images can provide any additional prognostic information over TLG and clinical staging in patients with advanced T-stage OPSCC. We retrospectively analyzed the pretreatment (18)F-FDG PET/CT images of 70 patients with advanced T-stage OPSCC who had completed concurrent chemoradiotherapy, bioradiotherapy, or radiotherapy with curative intent. All of the patients had data on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and were followed up for at least 24 mo or until death. A standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 was taken as a cutoff for tumor boundary. The textural features of pretreatment (18)F-FDG PET/CT images were extracted from histogram analysis (SUV variance and SUV entropy), normalized gray-level cooccurrence matrix (uniformity, entropy, dissimilarity, contrast, homogeneity, inverse different moment, and correlation), and neighborhood gray-tone difference matrix (coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity, and strength). Receiver-operating-characteristic curves were used to identify the optimal cutoff values for the textural features and TLG. Thirteen patients were HPV-positive. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that age, tumor TLG, and uniformity were independently associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). TLG, uniformity, and HPV positivity were significantly associated with overall survival (OS). A prognostic scoring system based on TLG and uniformity was derived. Patients who presented with TLG > 121.9 g and uniformity ≤ 0.138 experienced significantly worse PFS, DSS, and OS rates than those without (P 121.9 g or uniformity ≤ 0.138 were further divided according to age, and different PFS and DSS were observed. Uniformity extracted from the normalized gray

  9. 18F-FDG-PET/CT angiography in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis and cardiac device infection in adult patients with congenital heart disease and prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, María N; Dos-Subirà, L; Roque, Albert; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Cuéllar-Calabria, Hug; Pijuan Domènech, Antonia; Gonzàlez-Alujas, María T; Subirana-Domènech, M T; Miranda-Barrio, B; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; González-López, Juan J; Igual, Albert; Maisterra-Santos, Olga; García-Dorado, David; Castell-Conesa, Joan; Almirante, Benito; Escobar Amores, Manuel; Tornos, Pilar; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and cardiac device infection (CDI) are a major complication in the growing number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching adulthood. We aimed to evaluate the added value of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT angiography (PET/CTA) in the diagnosis of IE-CDI in adults with CHD and intravascular or intracardiac prosthetic material, in whom echocardiography (ECHO) and modified Duke Criteria (DC) have limitations because of the patients' complex anatomy. A prospective study was conducted in a referral center with multidisciplinary IE and CHD Units. PET/CTA and ECHO findings were compared in consecutive adult (≥18years) patients with CHD who have prosthetic material and suspected IE-CDI. The initial diagnosis using the DC and the diagnosis with the additional PET/CTA data (DC+PET/CTA) were compared with the final diagnostic consensus established by an expert team at three months. Between November-2012 and April-2017, 25 patients (15 men; median age 40years) were included. Cases were initially classified as definite in 8 (32%), possible in 14 (56%) and rejected in 3 (12%). DC+PET/CTA allowed reclassification of 12/14 (86%) cases initially identified as possible IE. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of DC at IE suspicion were 39.1%/83.3%/90.4%/25.5%/61.2%, respectively. The diagnostic performance increased significantly with addition of PET/CTA data: 87%/83.3%/95.4%/61.5%/85.1%, respectively. PET/CTA also provided an alternative diagnosis in 3 patients with rejected IE, and detected pulmonary embolisms in 3 patients. PET/CTA was a useful diagnostic tool in the complex group of adult patients with CHD who have cardiac or intravascular prosthetic material and suspected IE or CDI, providing added diagnostic value to the modified DC (increased sensitivity) and improving case classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical PET/CT imaging. Promises and misconceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czernin, J.; Auerbach, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    PET/CT is now established as the most important imaging tool in oncology. PET/CT stages and restages cancer with a higher accuracy than PET or CT alone. The sometimes irrational approach to combine state of the art PET with the highest end CT devices should give way to a more reasonable equipment design tailored towards the specific clinical indications in well-defined patient populations. The continuing success of molecular PET/CT now depends more upon advances in molecular imaging with the introduction of targeted imaging probes for individualized therapy approaches in cancer patients and less upon technological advances of imaging equipment. (orig.)

  11. Cardiac PET/CT for the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of coronary artery disease; PET/CT para el diagnóstico y la estratificación pronóstica de la enfermedad coronaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronazzo, R. J. [IMAC, Imagen Molecular, La Rioja (Argentina); Vicedecanato, Universidad Barceló, La Rioja (Argentina); Romero, R. L. [FLENI, Fundación Centro Diagnóstico Nuclear, La Rioja (Argentina); Campisi, R. [Diagnóstico Maipú, Fundación Centro Diagnóstico Nuclear, Pcia. Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Coronary artery disease is considered by de World Health Organization (WHO) to be pandemic. Eighty percent of the deaths occurs secondary to coronary artery disease, stroke and diabetes, thus they can be prevented. All of them are related to the same risk factors. Ischemic heart disease is the mayor cause of death in Argentina in the elderly population. Primary prevention strategies are essential in the health system. Hence, image complementary methods are very important to accomplish risk stratification, secondary prevention and pre-surgical evaluation. Nuclear cardiology has occupied this place through myocardial perfusion studies with radiopharmaceuticals, using SPECT (Single photon emission computed tomography) that have improved the level of sensitivity and specificity with ECG gated. Furthermore, positron emission tomography (PET) can evaluate relative myocardial perfusion, quantify absolute myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. With its capacity to quantify rest-peak stress left ventricular systolic function we can underscore for example “balance ischemia”. By using hybrid PET/CT, also we can get information of coronary artery calcium scoring and coronary angiography. Currently, with the available softwares, we can acquire images in List mode. It means, from a single acquisition, it allows multiple image reconstructions, along with the associated electrocardiographic phase. PET/CT uses radiopharmaceuticals with short physical half life, and in conjunction with the possibility of acquiring in 3D mode, the perfusion studies can be done in a short time and offers lower radiation exposure to the patient. The new softwares for routine correction of misalignments between transmission and emission images have helped to reduce the frequency of artifacts and improve diagnostic accuracy. Hybrid PET/CT technology allows functional evaluation of myocardial perfusion combined with anatomic characterization of the epicardial coronary arteries, thereby

  12. A routine PET/CT protocol with simple calculations for assessing cardiac amyloid using 18F-Florbetapir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Ryan Osborne

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac amyloidosis is a rare condition characterized by the deposition of well-structured protein fibrils, proteoglycans, and serum proteins as amyloid. Recent work has shown that it may be possible to use 18F-Florbetapir to image cardiac amyloidosis. Current methods for assessment include invasive biopsy techniques. This work enhances foundational work by Dorbala et al. by developing a routine imaging and analysis protocol using 18F-Florbetapir for cardiac amyloid assessment.Methods: Ten patients, 3 healthy controls and 7 amyloid positive patients, were imaged using 18F-Florbetapir to assess cardiac amyloid burden. Four of the patients also were imaged using 82Rb-Chloride to evaluate possible 18F-Florbetapir retention because of reduced myocardial blood flow. Quantitative methods using modeling, SUVs and SUV ratios were used to define a new streamlined clinical imaging protocol that could be used routinely and provide patient stratification.Results: Quantitative analysis of 18F-Florbetapir cardiac amyloid data were compiled from a 20 minute listmode protocol with data histogrammed into two static images at 0-5 minutes and, 10-15 min or 15-20 min. Data analysis indicated the use of SUVs or ratios of SUVs calculated from regions draw in the septal wall were adequate in identification of all healthy controls from amyloid positive patients in this small cohort. Additionally, we found that it may be possible to use this method to differentiate patients suffering from AL vs. TTR amyloid.Conclusions: This work builds on the seminal work by Dorbala et Al. by describing a short 18F-Florbetapir imaging protocol that is suitable for routine clinical use and uses a simple method for quantitative analysis of cardiac amyloid disease.

  13. A meta-analysis of 18F-FDG PET or PET/CT for the evaluation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Yun; Zhang Min; Guo Rui; Zhang Miao; Hu Jiajia; Li Biao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy and predictive value of 18 F-FDG PET or PET/CT in the assessment of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer by meta-analysis. Methods: Relevant studies were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane and Wanfang, in English or Chinese. To ensure the homogeneity of all included studies, selection criteria were established and all the studies were scored according to a quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS) table. The combined Se, Sp, LR, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and AUC of PET and other conventional imaging techniques were compared. The assessment standard of neoadjuvant chemotherapy by conventional imaging techniques is tumor size change. Funnel plot and analysis with meta-regression were performed to explore the source of heterogeneity. Results: Sixteen eligible studies were included with a total of 662 subjects. The combined results were: (1) PET: Se PET 86.1% (247/287), Sp PET 69.6% (261/375), LR + PET 3.18, LR - PET 0.23, DOR PET 17.26; (2) Other imaging techniques: Se d 57.2% (91/159), Sp d 48.5% (50/103), LR + d 1.07, LR - d 0.87, DOR d 1.30. ROC analysis showed that Q * values of PET (Q PET * ) and other imaging techniques (Q d * ) were 0.8058 and 0.5328, respectively. Funnel plot showed that publication bias was not the main source of heterogeneity. Meta-regression results suggested that the year of publication might be one of the sources of heterogeneity (P=0.05). Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that, in the assessment of treatment response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, FDG PET or PET/CT in monitoring the changes in glucose metabolism is more accurate than conventional imaging techniques in monitoring tumor size. (authors)

  14. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Activity Measured by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in Patients with Advanced Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Jiyoun; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Jo, Kwan Hyeong; Lee, Jaehoon; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We evaluated the potential prognostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with stage IIIC/IV endometrial cancer. Patients with stage IIIC/IV endometrial cancer who had undergone FDG PET/CT workup for staging were enrolled. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) measured from regions of interest (ROIs) of the primary tumor (SUVt) and lymph nodes (SUVn) were correlated with overall survival (OS). The SUVn was defined as the highest SUV{sub max} of the metastatic lymph nodes. Survival probability was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 42 patients with a median age of 55.5 years (range 32-76 years) were included. Twenty-nine percent (n =12) of patients were premenopausal and 71 % (n =30) were postmenopausal. The average SUVt was 12.9 (range 1.8-36.5), and the average SUVn was 7.3 (range 2.0-22.5). Median follow-up time was 25.9 months (range 1.84 months). Using a SUVt of 9.5 as a cutoff value, two groups with different rates were determined (P=0.026). In addition, patients with a low SUVn had significantly better OS than those with a high SUVn (P=0.003). Patients in the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) stage IV group with SUVt≥9.5 or SUVn≥7.3 showed a significantly longer OS than the other groups. FDG uptake of primary endometrial cancer and lymph nodes might be a prognostic factor in advanced endometrial cancer. More aggressive therapy could be considered in patients with stage IV endometrial cancer and high SUVt and/or high SUVn.

  15. Quantitative assessment of Zirconium-89 labeled cetuximab using PET/CT imaging in patients with advanced head and neck cancer: a theragnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Aniek J G; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; van Elmpt, Wouter; Winnepenninckx, Véronique J L; Heukelom, Jolien; Tesselaar, Margot E T; Vogel, Wouter V; Hoeben, Ann; Zegers, Catharina M L; Vugts, Daniëlle J; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Bartelink, Harry; Mottaghy, Felix M; Hoebers, Frank; Lambin, Philippe

    2017-01-17

    Biomarkers predicting treatment response to the monoclonal antibody cetuximab in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (LAHNSCC) are lacking. We hypothesize that tumor accessibility is an important factor in treatment success of the EGFR targeting drug. We quantified uptake of cetuximab labeled with Zirconium-89 (89Zr) using PET/CT imaging.Seventeen patients with stage III-IV LAHNSCC received a loading dose unlabeled cetuximab, followed by 10 mg 54.5±9.6 MBq 89Zr-cetuximab. PET/CT images were acquired either 3 and 6 or 4 and 7 days post-injection. 89Zr-cetuximab uptake was quantified using standardized uptake value (SUV) and tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), and correlated to EGFR immunohistochemistry. TBR was compared between scan days to determine optimal timing.Uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab varied between patients (day 6-7: SUVpeak range 2.5-6.2). TBR increased significantly (49±28%, p < 0.01) between first (1.1±0.3) and second scan (1.7±0.6). Between groups with a low and high EGFR expression a significant difference in SUVmean (2.1 versus 3.0) and SUVpeak (3.2 versus 4.7) was found, however, not in TBR. Data is available at www.cancerdata.org (DOI: 10.17195/candat.2016.11.1).In conclusion, 89Zr-cetuximab PET imaging shows large inter-patient variety in LAHNSCC and provides additional information over FDG-PET and EGFR expression. Validation of the predictive value is recommended with scans acquired 6-7 days post-injection.

  16. Fifteen different 18F-FDG PET/CT qualitative and quantitative parameters investigated as pathological response predictors of locally advanced rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffione, Anna Margherita; Ferretti, Alice; Grassetto, Gaia; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rampin, Lucia; Bondesan, Claudia; Rubello, Domenico; Bellan, Elena; Gava, Marcello; Capirci, Carlo; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate qualitative visual response and various PET quantification factors with the tumour regression grade (TRG) classification of pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) proposed by Mandard. Included in this retrospective study were 69 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). FDG PET/CT scans were performed at staging and after CRT (mean 6.7 weeks). Tumour SUVmax and its related arithmetic and percentage decrease (response index, RI) were calculated. Qualitative analysis was performed by visual response assessment (VRA), PERCIST 1.0 and response cut-off classification based on a new definition of residual disease. Metabolic tumour volume (MTV) was calculated using a 40 % SUVmax threshold, and the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) both before and after CRT and their arithmetic and percentage change were also calculated. We split the patients into responders (TRG 1 or 2) and nonresponders (TRG 3-5). SUVmax MTV and TLG after CRT, RI, ΔMTV% and ΔTLG% parameters were significantly correlated with pathological treatment response (p 3 , 23.4 cm 3 , 61.8 %, 81.4 % and 94.2 %, respectively. SUVmax after CRT had the highest ROC AUC (0.846), with a sensitivity of 86 % and a specificity of 80 %. VRA and response cut-off classification were also significantly predictive of TRG response (VRA with the best accuracy: sensitivity 86 % and specificity 55 %). In contrast, assessment using PERCIST was not significantly correlated with TRG. FDG PET/CT can accurately stratify patients with LARC preoperatively, independently of the method chosen to interpret the images. Among many PET parameters, some of which are not immediately obtainable, the most commonly used in clinical practice (SUVmax after CRT and VRA) showed the best accuracy in predicting TRG. (orig.)

  17. PET/CT and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; CNR, Milano; S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza; Di Muzio, N.; Picchio, M.; Bettinardi, V.; Gilardi, M.C.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; Fazio, F.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of PET/CT applications in radiotherapy, specifically its use in disease staging, patient selection, treatment planning and treatment evaluation. Diseases for which radiotherapy with radical intent is indicated will be considered, as well as those in which PET/CT may actually change the course of disease. The methodological and technological aspects of PET/CT in radiotherapy are discussed, focusing on the problem of target volume definition with CT and PET functional imaging and the problem of tumor motion with respect to imaging and dose delivery

  18. Utility of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a parallel study of a prospective randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Feng-Yuan; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Yang, Lan-Yan; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Hong, Ji-Hong; Lin, Gigin; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Wei-Yang; Huang, Shu-Hua; Huang, Yu-Erh; Peng, Nan-Jing; Chang, Yu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the usefulness of 18 F-FDG PET/CT performed before and during treatment for predicting treatment failure in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III/IVA or positive pelvic or paraaortic lymph node (LN) metastasis without other distant metastasis on PET/CT entering a randomized trial of CCRT (AGOG 09-001) were eligible. PET/CT scans were performed at baseline, during week 3 of CCRT and 2 - 3 months after CCRT. PET/CT parameters were correlated with sites of failure and overall survival (OS). The resulting predictors developed from the study cohort were validated on two independent datasets using area under the curve values, sensitivities and specificities. With a median follow-up of 54 months for survivors, 20 (36 %) of the 55 eligible patients were proven to have treatment failure. Sites of failure were local in five, regional in 11, and distant in 11. Four predictors for local failure, three for regional failure, and four for distant failures were identified. After validation with two independent cohorts of 31 and 105 patients, we consider the following as clinically useful predictors: pretreatment metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and during-treatment cervical tumour MTV for local failure; during-treatment SUVnode (maximum standardized uptake value of LNs) for regional and distant failure, and during-treatment MTV for distant failure. During-treatment SUVnode (P =.001) and cervical tumour MTVratio (P =.004) were independent significant predictors of OS by stepwise Cox regression. PET/CT imaging before and during treatment is useful for predicting failure sites and OS, making tailored therapeutic modifications feasible with potential outcome improvement during primary therapy. (orig.)

  19. Late infectious endocarditis of surgical patch closure of atrial septal defects diagnosed by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose gated cardiac computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnorat, Estelle; Seng, Piseth; Riberi, Alberto; Habib, Gilbert; Stein, Andreas

    2016-08-24

    In contrast to percutaneous atrial septal occluder device, surgical patch closure of atrial defects was known to be no infective endocarditis risk. We herein report the first case of late endocarditis of surgical patch closure of atrial septal defects occurred at 47-year after surgery. On September 2014, a 56-year-old immunocompetent French Caucasian man was admitted into the Emergency Department for 3-week history of headache, acute decrease of psychomotor performance and fever at 40 °C. The diagnosis has been evoked during his admission for the management of a brain abscess and confirmed using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose gated cardiac computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT). Bacterial cultures of surgical deep samples of brain abscess were positive for Streptococcus intermedius and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus as identified by the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and confirmed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patient was treated by antibiotics for 8 weeks and surgical patch closure removal. In summary, late endocarditis on surgical patch and on percutaneous atrial septal occluder device of atrial septal defects is rare. Cardiac imaging by the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose gated cardiac computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) could improve the diagnosis and care endocarditis on surgical patch closure of atrial septal defects while transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography remained difficult to interpret.

  20. Application of PET-CT for radiotherapy of the patient with carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia; Luo Quanyong; Yuan Zhibin

    2006-01-01

    PET-CT is an advanced imaging instrument combing anatomical and metabolic information into one. Combined with the radiation planning system, PET-CT is playing an increasingly important tool in the diagnosis and staging of malignant disease image-guided therapy planning, and treatment monitoring. Especially, PET-CT has a significant role in the delineation of tumor target volume, optimization of radiation planning. (authors)

  1. Radiomic biomarkers from PET/CT multi-modality fusion images for the prediction of immunotherapy response in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Qi, Jin; Lu, Hong; Schabath, Matthew; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Tunali, Ilke; Gillies, Robert James

    2018-02-01

    Purpose: Investigate the ability of using complementary information provided by the fusion of PET/CT images to predict immunotherapy response in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Materials and methods: We collected 64 patients diagnosed with primary NSCLC treated with anti PD-1 checkpoint blockade. Using PET/CT images, fused images were created following multiple methodologies, resulting in up to 7 different images for the tumor region. Quantitative image features were extracted from the primary image (PET/CT) and the fused images, which included 195 from primary images and 1235 features from the fusion images. Three clinical characteristics were also analyzed. We then used support vector machine (SVM) classification models to identify discriminant features that predict immunotherapy response at baseline. Results: A SVM built with 87 fusion features and 13 primary PET/CT features on validation dataset had an accuracy and area under the ROC curve (AUROC) of 87.5% and 0.82, respectively, compared to a model built with 113 original PET/CT features on validation dataset 78.12% and 0.68. Conclusion: The fusion features shows better ability to predict immunotherapy response prediction compared to individual image features.

  2. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in prosthetic infective endocarditis and cardiac implantable electronic device infection: comparison of different interpretation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Ballve, Ana; Jesus Perez-Castejon, Maria; Carreras-Delgado, Jose L. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), University of La Rioja, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, La Rioja (Spain); Sanchez-Enrique, Cristina; Vilacosta, Isidre; Vivas, David; Olmos, Carmen [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Madrid (Spain); Ferrer, Manuel E.F. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Research Unit, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve (PV) infective endocarditis (IE) and infection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in these patients and analyse the interpretation criteria. We included 41 patients suspected of having IE by the Duke criteria who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The criteria applied for classifying the findings as positive/negative for IE were: (a) visual analysis of only PET images with attenuation-correction (AC PET images); (b) visual analysis of both AC PET images and PET images without AC (NAC PET images); (c) qualitative analysis of NAC PET images; and (d) semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was considered positive for IE independently of the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake. The gold standard was the Duke pathological criteria (if tissue was available) or the decision of an endocarditis expert team after a minimum 4 months follow-up. We studied 62 areas with suspicion of IE, 28 areas (45 %) showing definite IE and 34 (55 %) showing possible IE. Visual analysis of only AC PET images showed poor diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 20 %, specificity 57 %). Visual analysis of both AC PET and NAC PET images showed excellent sensitivity (100 %) and intermediate specificity (73 %), focal uptake being more frequently associated with IE. The accuracy of qualitative analysis of NAC PET images depended on the threshold: the maximum sensitivity, specificity and accuracy achieved were 88 %, 80 %, 84 %, respectively. In the semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images, SUVmax was higher in areas of confirmed IE than in those without IE (∇SUVmax 2.2, p < 0.001). When FDG uptake was twice that in the liver, IE was always confirmed, and SUVmax 5.5 was the optimal threshold for IE diagnosis using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve 0.71). The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected IE of PVs

  3. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of "1"8F-FDG PET/CT in prosthetic infective endocarditis and cardiac implantable electronic device infection: comparison of different interpretation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Ballve, Ana; Jesus Perez-Castejon, Maria; Carreras-Delgado, Jose L.; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C.; Sanchez-Enrique, Cristina; Vilacosta, Isidre; Vivas, David; Olmos, Carmen; Ferrer, Manuel E.F.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve (PV) infective endocarditis (IE) and infection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of "1"8F-FDG PET/CT in these patients and analyse the interpretation criteria. We included 41 patients suspected of having IE by the Duke criteria who underwent "1"8F-FDG PET/CT. The criteria applied for classifying the findings as positive/negative for IE were: (a) visual analysis of only PET images with attenuation-correction (AC PET images); (b) visual analysis of both AC PET images and PET images without AC (NAC PET images); (c) qualitative analysis of NAC PET images; and (d) semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images. "1"8F-FDG PET/CT was considered positive for IE independently of the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake. The gold standard was the Duke pathological criteria (if tissue was available) or the decision of an endocarditis expert team after a minimum 4 months follow-up. We studied 62 areas with suspicion of IE, 28 areas (45 %) showing definite IE and 34 (55 %) showing possible IE. Visual analysis of only AC PET images showed poor diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 20 %, specificity 57 %). Visual analysis of both AC PET and NAC PET images showed excellent sensitivity (100 %) and intermediate specificity (73 %), focal uptake being more frequently associated with IE. The accuracy of qualitative analysis of NAC PET images depended on the threshold: the maximum sensitivity, specificity and accuracy achieved were 88 %, 80 %, 84 %, respectively. In the semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images, SUVmax was higher in areas of confirmed IE than in those without IE (∇SUVmax 2.2, p < 0.001). When FDG uptake was twice that in the liver, IE was always confirmed, and SUVmax 5.5 was the optimal threshold for IE diagnosis using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve 0.71). The value of "1"8F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected IE of PVs and CIEDs is

  4. Diagnostic and prognostic impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT in follicular lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Dortz, Ludovic; Garin, Etienne; Guibert, Sophie de; Houot, Roch; Bayat, Sahar; Cuggia, Marc; Devillers, Anne; Le Jeune, Florence; Bahri, Haifa; Barge, Marie-Luce; Rolland, Yan; Lamy, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in staging, prognosis evaluation and restaging of patients with follicular lymphoma. A retrospective study was performed on 45 patients with untreated biopsy-proven follicular lymphoma who underwent 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) and CT before and after chemoimmunotherapy induction treatment (rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). PET/CT detected more nodal (+51%) and extranodal (+89%) lesions than CT. PET/CT modified Ann Arbor staging in eight patients (18%). Five patients (11%) initially considered as being early stage (I/II) were eventually treated as advanced stage (III/IV). In this study, an initial PET/CT prognostic score was significantly more accurate than the Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index score in identifying patients with poor prognosis (i.e. patients with incomplete therapeutic response or early relapse). The accuracy of PET/CT for therapeutic response assessment was higher than that of CT (0.97 vs 0.64), especially due to its ability to identify inactive residual masses. In addition, post-treatment PET/CT was able to predict patients' outcomes. The median progression-free survival was 48 months in the PET/CT-negative group as compared with 17.2 months for the group with residual uptake (p -4 ). FDG PET/CT is useful for staging and assessing the prognosis and therapeutic response of patients with follicular lymphoma. (orig.)

  5. PET/CT in kidney and bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochev, P.; Klisarova, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: FDG PET/CT has traditionally been considered a method of limited use in tumors of the kidneys and excretory system. Major shortcoming of the method in kidney cancer is considered variable fixation and a more general lack of significant therapeutic alternatives that require early diagnosis of recurrence after nephrectomy. In the context of the modern methods of systemic anticancer therapy in kidney cancer, marking a significant success in terms of time to progression, the need of more detailed selection of the patients and the search methods for the early diagnosis and assessment of therapeutic response arises. While CT remains the primary method for the diagnosis of parenchymal metastases (lung, liver), the use of FDG PET/CT has a significant advantage in detecting of nodal metastasis, locoregional recurrence and bone metastasis. Interesting direction in the use of PET/CT remains the monitoring of therapeutic response to systemic therapy of metastatic kidney cancer. Unlike kidney cancer in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder (TCC), the application of FDG PET/CT is non- systematic and based on the specific clinical indications. As the main indicator can be observed the distant staging in locally advanced tumors and recurrences in restading after cystectomy. Besides the general advantages of PET/CT in terms of nodal and peritoneal involvement it should be noted that the role of the PET/CT in TCC is discussible. Application of FDG PET / CT in kidney cancer and TCC at this stage can not be considered as established, but while in TCCs, the method has sporadically application, mostly for specific clinical questions, the application in kidney cancer is significantly more systemic and in the context of systemic anti-tumor therapy allows early diagnosis and therapeutic approach modulation

  6. Should PET/CT be implemented in the routine imaging work-up of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? A prospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacicedo, Jon; Bilbao, Pedro [Cruces University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Barakaldo, Bizkaia (Basque Country) (Spain); BioCruces Health Research Institute, Bizkaia, Basque Country (Spain); Fernandez, Iratxe [Cruces University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Hoyo, Olga del; Hortelano, Eduardo [Cruces University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Barakaldo, Bizkaia (Basque Country) (Spain); Dolado, Ainara [Cruces University Hospital, Radiodiagnostic and Medical Imaging Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Gomez-Suarez, Javier [Cruces University Hospital, Otolaryngology Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Sancho, Aintzane [Cruces University Hospital, Medical Oncology Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Pijoan, Jose I. [BioCruces Health Research Institute, Bizkaia, Basque Country (Spain); Cruces University Hospital, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Barakaldo (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Alvarez, Julio [Cruces University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Espinosa, Jose M. [Cruces University Hospital, Medical Physics Department, Barakaldo (Spain); Gaafar, Ayman [Cruces University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Barakaldo (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the incremental staging information provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and its impact on management plans in patients with untreated stage III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We prospectively studied, between September 2011 and February 2013, 84 consecutive patients [median age 63.5 years (39-84); 73 men] with histologically confirmed HNSCC. First, based on a conventional work-up (physical examination, CT imaging of the head, neck and chest), the multidisciplinary Head and Neck Tumour Board documented the TNM stage and a management plan for each patient, outlining the modalities to be used, including surgery, radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy or a combination. After release of the PET/CT results, new TNM staging and management plans were agreed on by the multidisciplinary Tumour Board. Any changes in stage or intended management due to the PET/CT findings were then analysed. The impact on patient management was classified as: low (treatment modality, delivery and intent unchanged), moderate (change within the same treatment modality: type of surgery, radiation technique/dose) or high (change in treatment intent and/or treatment modality → curative to palliative, or surgery to chemoradiation or detection of unknown primary tumour or a synchronous second primary tumour). TNM stage was validated by histopathological analysis, additional imaging or follow-up. Accuracy of the conventional and PET/CT-based staging was compared using McNemar's test. Conventional and PET/CT stages were discordant in 32/84 (38 %) cases: the T stage in 2/32 (6.2 %), the N stage in 21/32 (65.7 %) and the M stage 9/32 (28.1 %). Patient management was altered in 22/84 (26 %) patients, with a moderate impact in 8 (9.5 %) patients and high impact in 14 (16.6 %) patients. PET/CT TNM classification was significantly more accurate (92.5 vs 73.7 %) than conventional staging with a p value < 0

  7. Should PET/CT be implemented in the routine imaging work-up of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? A prospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacicedo, Jon; Bilbao, Pedro; Fernandez, Iratxe; Hoyo, Olga del; Hortelano, Eduardo; Dolado, Ainara; Gomez-Suarez, Javier; Sancho, Aintzane; Pijoan, Jose I.; Alvarez, Julio; Espinosa, Jose M.; Gaafar, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incremental staging information provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and its impact on management plans in patients with untreated stage III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We prospectively studied, between September 2011 and February 2013, 84 consecutive patients [median age 63.5 years (39-84); 73 men] with histologically confirmed HNSCC. First, based on a conventional work-up (physical examination, CT imaging of the head, neck and chest), the multidisciplinary Head and Neck Tumour Board documented the TNM stage and a management plan for each patient, outlining the modalities to be used, including surgery, radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy or a combination. After release of the PET/CT results, new TNM staging and management plans were agreed on by the multidisciplinary Tumour Board. Any changes in stage or intended management due to the PET/CT findings were then analysed. The impact on patient management was classified as: low (treatment modality, delivery and intent unchanged), moderate (change within the same treatment modality: type of surgery, radiation technique/dose) or high (change in treatment intent and/or treatment modality → curative to palliative, or surgery to chemoradiation or detection of unknown primary tumour or a synchronous second primary tumour). TNM stage was validated by histopathological analysis, additional imaging or follow-up. Accuracy of the conventional and PET/CT-based staging was compared using McNemar's test. Conventional and PET/CT stages were discordant in 32/84 (38 %) cases: the T stage in 2/32 (6.2 %), the N stage in 21/32 (65.7 %) and the M stage 9/32 (28.1 %). Patient management was altered in 22/84 (26 %) patients, with a moderate impact in 8 (9.5 %) patients and high impact in 14 (16.6 %) patients. PET/CT TNM classification was significantly more accurate (92.5 vs 73.7 %) than conventional staging with a p value < 0

  8. Prognostic value of metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis in 18F-FDG PET/CT scans in locally advanced breast cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ballvé, A; García García-Esquinas, M; Salsidua-Arroyo, O; Serrano-Palacio, A; García-Sáenz, J A; Ortega Candil, A; Fuentes Ferrer, M E; Rodríguez Rey, C; Román-Santamaría, J M; Moreno, F; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    To determine whether metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) are able to predict recurrence risk in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients. Retrospective study of LABC patients who undertook neoadjuvant, local and adjuvant treatment and follow up. A 18 F-FDG PET/CT study for initial staging was performed analysing in this study different metabolic parameters (MTV, TLG, SUVmax and SUVmed) both in the primary tumour (T) as well as in axillary nodes (N) and whole-body (WB). Forty females were included between January 2010-2011; follow up until January 2015 was completed. The average follow-up was 46 months. Twenty percent presented recurrence: local disease (n=2) and distant metastasis (n=6); 3 patients died (38% of the patients which recurred and 7.5% from the total). SUVmax, MTV and TLG, in T, N and WB, were higher in those patients with recurrence. The MTV and TLG parameters in the tumour (T) were related to the recurrence rate (P=.020 and P=.028, respectively); whereas SUVmax in the lymph nodes (N) was significantly related (P=.008) to the recurrence rate. The best cut-off points to predict recurrence where: MTV T ≥19.3cm 3 , TLG T≥74.4g and SUVmax N≥13.8, being 10-12 times more likely to recidivate when these thresholds where exceeded. Tumour grade was the only clinical-pathological variable which was related to recurrence probability (p=.035). In this study of LABC patients the metabolic parameters which have a better relationship with recurrence rate are: MTV and TLG in the primary tumour, SUVmax in the regional lymph node disease and whole-body PET data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  9. Prognostic role of metabolic parameters of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scan performed during radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Myo; Forstner, Dion [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lin, Peter; Shon, Ivan Ho; Lin, Michael [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lee, Mark T. [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Bray, Victoria; Fowler, Allan [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Chicco, Andrew [Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Tieu, Minh Thi [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Department of Radiation Oncology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT performed in the third week (iPET) of definitive radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced mucosal primary head and neck squamous-cell-carcinoma (MPHNSCC). Seventy-two patients with MPHNSCC treated with radical RT underwent staging PET-CT and iPET. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesional glycolysis (TLG) of primary tumour (PT) and index node (IN) [defined as lymph node(s) with highest TLG] were analysed, and results were correlated with loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), metastatic failure-free survival(MFFS) and overall survival (OS), using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Optimal cutoffs (OC) were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves: SUV{sub max-PT} = 4.25 g/mL, MTV{sub PT} = 3.3 cm{sup 3}, TLG{sub PT} = 9.4 g, for PT, and SUV{sub max-IN} = 4.05 g/mL, MTV{sub IN} = 1.85 cm{sup 3} and TLG{sub IN} = 7.95 g for IN. Low metabolic values in iPET for PT below OC were associated with statistically significant better LRFS and DFS. TLG was the best predictor of outcome with 2-year LRFS of 92.7 % vs. 71.1 % [p = 0.005, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.03) and MTV (p = 0.022)], DFS of 85.9 % vs. 60.8 % [p = 0.005, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.025) and MTV (p = 0.018)], MFFS of 85.9 % vs. 83.7 % [p = 0.488, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.52) and MTV (p = 0.436)], and OS of 81.1 % vs. 75.0 % [p = 0.279, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.345) and MTV (p = 0.512)]. There were no significant associations between the percentage reduction of primary tumour metabolic parameters and outcomes. In patients with nodal disease, metabolic parameters below OC (for both PT and IN) were significantly associated with all oncological outcomes, while TLG was again the best predictor: LRFS of 84.0 % vs. 55.3 % (p = 0.017), DFS of 79.4 % vs. 38.6 % (p = 0.001), MFFS 86.4 % vs. 68.2 % (p = 0

  10. Innovations in PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin Klausen, T; Høgild Keller, S; Vinter Olesen, O

    2012-01-01

    especially as spatial resolution improves. Software based image fusion remains a complex issue outside the brain. State of the art image quality in a modern PET/CT system includes incorporation of point spread function (PSF) and time-of-flight (TOF) information into the reconstruction leading to the high...

  11. The pivotal role of FDG-PET/CT in modern medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Zhu, Hongyun June

    2014-01-01

    to the emergence of hybrid scanners combining PET with computed tomography (PET/CT). Molecular imaging has enormous potential for advancing biological research and patient care, and FDG-PET/CT is currently the most widely used technology in this domain. In this review, we discuss contemporary applications of FDG...

  12. [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT imaging of integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} levels in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withofs, Nadia; Hustinx, Roland [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Martinive, Philippe; Vanderick, Jean; Coucke, Philippe [CHU Liege, Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Bletard, Noella; Scagnol, Irene; Delvenne, Philippe [CHU Liege, Department of Pathology, Liege (Belgium); Mievis, Frederic; Giacomelli, Fabrice [University of Liege, CYCLOTRON Research Centre, Liege (Belgium); Cataldo, Didier [University of Liege, Laboratory of Tumour and Developmental Biology, GIGA-Research, Liege (Belgium); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Radiology Department, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Our primary objective was to determine if [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT performed at baseline and/or after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could predict tumour regression grade (TRG) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Secondary objectives were to compare baseline [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake, to evaluate the correlation between posttreatment [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} uptake and tumour microvessel density (MVD) and to determine if [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} and FDG PET/CT could predict disease-free survival. Baseline [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} and FDG PET/CT were performed in 32 consecutive patients (23 men, 9 women; mean age 63 ± 8 years) with LARC before starting any therapy. A posttreatment [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT scan was performed in 24 patients after the end of CRT (median interval 7 weeks, range 3 - 15 weeks) and before surgery (median interval 4 days, range 1 - 15 days). All LARC showed uptake of both [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} (SUV{sub max} 5.4 ± 1.5, range 2.7 - 9) and FDG (SUV{sub max} 16.5 ± 8, range 7.1 - 36.5). There was a moderate positive correlation between [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} and FDG SUV{sub max} (Pearson's r = 0.49, p = 0.0026). There was a moderate negative correlation between baseline [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} SUV{sub max} and the TRG (Spearman's r = -0.37, p = 0.037), and a [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} SUV{sub max} of >5.6 identified all patients with a complete response (TRG 0; AUC 0.84, 95 % CI 0.68 - 1, p = 0.029). In the 24 patients who underwent a posttreatment [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT scan the response index, calculated as [(SUV{sub max}1 - SUV{sub max}2)/SUV{sub max}1] x 100 %, was not associated with TRG. Post-treatment [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} uptake was not correlated with tumour MVD. Neither [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} nor FDG uptake predicted disease-free survival. Baseline [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} uptake was correlated with the pathological response in patients with LARC treated with CRT. However, the

  13. SU-F-I-31: Reproducibility of An Automatic Exposure Control Technique in the Low-Dose CT Scan of Cardiac PET/CT Exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M; Rosica, D; Agarwal, V; Di Carli, M; Dorbala, S [Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Two separate low-dose CT scans are usually performed for attenuation correction of rest and stress N-13 ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (PET/CT). We utilize an automatic exposure control (AEC) technique to reduce CT radiation dose while maintaining perfusion image quality. Our goal is to assess the reproducibility of displayed CT dose index (CTDI) on same-day repeat CT scans (CT1 and CT2). Methods: Retrospectively, we reviewed CT images of PET/CT studies performed on the same day. Low-dose CT utilized AEC technique based on tube current modulation called Smart-mA. The scan parameters were 64 × 0.625mm collimation, 5mm slice thickness, 0.984 pitch, 1-sec rotation time, 120 kVp, and noise index 50 with a range of 10–200 mA. The scan length matched with PET field of view (FOV) with the heart near the middle of axial FOV. We identified the reference slice number (RS) for an anatomical landmark (carina) and used it to estimate axial shift between two CTs. For patient size, we measured an effective diameter on the reference slice. The effect of patient positioning to CTDI was evaluated using the table height. We calculated the absolute percent difference of the CTDI (%diff) for estimation of the reproducibility. Results: The study included 168 adults with an average body-mass index of 31.72 ± 9.10 (kg/m{sup 2}) and effective diameter was 32.72 ± 4.60 cm. The average CTDI was 1.95 ± 1.40 mGy for CT1 and 1.97 ± 1.42mGy for CT2. The mean %diff was 7.8 ± 6.8%. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the table height and %diff CTDI. (r=0.82, p<0.001) Conclusion: We have shown for the first time in human subjects, using two same-day CT images, that the AEC technique in low-dose CT is reproducible within 10% and significantly depends on the patient centering.

  14. Dual time point 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET/CT: nodal staging in locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Vicente, A M; Soriano Castrejón, A; Cruz Mora, M Á; Ortega Ruiperez, C; Espinosa Aunión, R; León Martín, A; González Ageitos, A; Van Gómez López, O

    2014-01-01

    To assess dual time point 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose (18)(F)FDG PET-CT accuracy in nodal staging and in detection of extra-axillary involvement. Dual time point [(18)F] FDG PET/CT scan was performed in 75 patients. Visual and semiquantitative assessment of lymph nodes was performed. Semiquantitative measurement of SUV and ROC-analysis were carried out to calculate SUV(max) cut-off value with the best diagnostic performance. Axillary and extra-axillary lymph node chains were evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity of visual assessment was 87.3% and 75%, respectively. SUV(max) values with the best sensitivity were 0.90 and 0.95 for early and delayed PET, respectively. SUV(max) values with the best specificity were 1.95 and 2.75, respectively. Extra-axillary lymph node involvement was detected in 26.7%. FDG PET/CT detected extra-axillary lymph node involvement in one-fourth of the patients. Semiquantitative lymph node analysis did not show any advantage over the visual evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  15. The early predictive value of a decrease of metabolic tumor volume in repeated 18F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with concurrent radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wei; Liu, Bo; Fan, Min; Zhou, Tao; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Li, Hongsheng; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •The patients underwent the second FDG PET during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). •To our knowledge, this could be the first study showing that the repeated FDG PET during the early stage of CCRT has added value by being a prognostic factor for recurrence of the locally advanced NSCLC patients. •This is a result of continuous research. •The decrease of MTV was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. -- Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the value of [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F FDG PET/CT) to predict recurrence of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods: A total of 53 stage III NSCLC patients without diabetics or undergoing surgery were enrolled in the prospective study. Those patients were evaluated by FDG PET before and following 40 Gy radiotherapy (RT) with a concurrent cisplatin-based heterogeneous chemotherapy regimen. Semiquantitative assessment was used to determine maximum and mean SUVs (SUVmax/SUVmean) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of the primary tumor. The prognostic significance of PET/CT parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox regression analyses. The cutoffs of PET/CT parameters which have been determined by the previous study were used to separate the groups with Kaplan–Meier curves. Results: Recurrence rates at 1- and 2-years were 18.9% (10/53) and 50.9% (27/53) for all patients, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the only prognostic factor for recurrence was a decrease of MTV. Using the cutoff of 29.7%, a decrease of MTV can separate the patients into 2 groups with Kaplan–Meier curve successfully. Conclusion: The prospective study has reinforced the early predictive value of MTV in repeated 18 F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence in a subgroup of locally advanced NSCLC who underwent CCRT. A

  16. A First Report on [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT Imaging in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Withofs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An observational study was set up to assess the feasibility of [F18]FPRGD2 PET/CT for imaging patients with multiple myeloma (MM and to compare its detection rate with low dose CT alone and combined [F18]NaF/[F18]FDG PET/CT images. Four patients (2 newly diagnosed patients and 2 with relapsed MM were included and underwent whole-body PET/CT after injection of [F18]FPRGD2. The obtained images were compared with results of low dose CT and already available results of a combined [F18]NaF/[F18]FDG PET/CT. In total, 81 focal lesions (FLs were detected with PET/CT and an underlying bone destruction or fracture was seen in 72 (89% or 8 (10% FLs, respectively. Fewer FLs (54% were detected by [F18]FPRGD2 PET/CT compared to low dose CT (98% or [F18]NaF/[F18]FDG PET/CT (70% and all FLs detected with [F18]FPRGD2 PET were associated with an underlying bone lesion. In one newly diagnosed patient, more [F18]FPRGD2 positive lesions were seen than [F18]NaF/[F18]FDG positive lesions. This study suggests that [F18]FPRGD2 PET/CT might be less useful for the detection of myeloma lesions in patients with advanced disease as all FLs with [F18]FPRGD2 uptake were already detected with CT alone.

  17. Optimal FDG PET/CT volumetric parameters for risk stratification in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: results from the ACRIN 6668/RTOG 0235 trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salavati, Ali [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Duan, Fenghai [Brown University School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Sciences, Providence, RI (United States); Snyder, Bradley S. [Brown University School of Public Health, Center for Statistical Sciences, Providence, RI (United States); Wei, Bo [Emory University, Department of Biostatistics, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA (United States); Houshmand, Sina; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Khiewvan, Benjapa [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mahidol University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Opanowski, Adam [ACR Center for Research and Innovation, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Simone, Charles B. [University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology and the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St, Louis, MO (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-11-15

    In recent years, multiple studies have demonstrated the value of volumetric FDG-PET/CT parameters as independent prognostic factors in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to determine the optimal cut-off points of pretreatment volumetric FDG-PET/CT parameters in predicting overall survival (OS) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC and to recommend imaging biomarkers appropriate for routine clinical applications. Patients with inoperable stage IIB/III NSCLC enrolled in ACRIN 6668/RTOG 0235 were included. Pretreatment FDG-PET scans were quantified using semiautomatic adaptive contrast-oriented thresholding and local-background partial-volume-effect-correction algorithms. For each patient, the following indices were measured: metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), SUVmax, SUVmean, partial-volume-corrected TLG (pvcTLG), and pvcSUVmean for the whole-body, primary tumor, and regional lymph nodes. The association between each index and patient outcome was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Optimal cut-off points were estimated using recursive binary partitioning in a conditional inference framework and used in Kaplan-Meier curves with log-rank testing. The discriminatory ability of each index was examined using time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and corresponding area under the curve (AUC(t)). The study included 196 patients. Pretreatment whole-body and primary tumor MTV, TLG, and pvcTLG were independently prognostic of OS. Optimal cut-off points were 175.0, 270.9, and 35.5 cm{sup 3} for whole-body TLG, pvcTLG, and MTV, and were 168.2, 239.8, and 17.4 cm{sup 3} for primary tumor TLG, pvcTLG, and MTV, respectively. In time-dependent ROC analysis, AUC(t) for MTV and TLG were uniformly higher than that of SUV measures over all time points. Primary tumor and whole-body parameters demonstrated similar patterns of separation for those patients above versus below the optimal cut

  18. PET CT imaging: the Philippine experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Jonas Y.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the most discussed fusion imaging is PET CT. Fusion technology has tremendous potential in diagnostic imaging to detect numerous conditions such as tumors, Alzheimer's disease, dementia and neural disorders. The fusion of PET with CT helps in the localization of molecular abnormalities, thereby increasing diagnostic accuracy and differentiating benign or artefact lesions from malignant diseases. It uses a radiotracer called fluro deoxyglucose that gives a clear distinction between pathological and physiological uptake. Interest in this technology is increasing and additional clinical validation are likely to induce more health care providers to invest in combined scanners. It is hope that in time, a better appreciation of its advantages over conventional and traditional imaging modalities will be realized. The first PET CT facility in the country was established at the St. Luke's Medical Center in Quezon City in 2008 and has since then provided a state-of-the art imaging modality to its patients here and those from other countries. The paper will present the experiences so far gained from its operation, including the measures and steps currently taken by the facility to ensure optimum workers and patient safety. Plans and programs to further enhance the awareness of the Filipino public on this advanced imaging modality for an improved health care delivery system may also be discussed briefly. (author)

  19. Risk-related 18F-FDG PET/CT and new diagnostic strategies in patients with solitary pulmonary nodule: the ITALIAN multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadafora, Marco; Pace, Leonardo; Evangelista, Laura; Mansi, Luigi; Del Prete, Francesco; Saladini, Giorgio; Miletto, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Guerra, Luca; Pepe, Giovanna; Peluso, Giuseppina; Nicolai, Emanuele; Storto, Giovanni; Ferdeghini, Marco; Giordano, Alessandro; Farsad, Mohsen; Schillaci, Orazio; Gridelli, Cesare; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2018-05-05

    Diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) is an important public health issue and 18 F-FDG PET/CT has proven to be more effective than CT alone. Pre-test risk stratification and clinical presentation of SPN could affect the diagnostic strategy. A relevant issue is whether thoracic segmental (s)-PET/CT could be implemented in patients with SPN. This retrospective multicenter study compared the results of FDG whole-body (wb)-PET/CT to those of s-PET/CT. 18 F-FDG PET/CT of 502 patients, stratified for pre-test cancer risk, were retrospectively analyzed. The thoracic part of wb-PET/CT, considered s-PET/CT, was compared to wb-PET/CT. Clinical and PET/CT variables were investigated for SPN characterization as well as for identification of patients in whom s-PET/CT could be performed. Histopathology or follow-up data were used as a reference. In the study population, 36% had malignant, 35% benign, and 29% indeterminate SPN. 18 F-FDG uptake indicative of thoracic and extra-thoracic lesions was detectable in 13% and 3% of the patients. All patients with extra-thoracic metastases (n = 13) had thoracic lymph node involvement and highest 18 F-FDG uptake at level of SPN (negative predictive value 100%). Compared to wb-PET/CT, s-PET/CT could save about 2/3 of 18 F-FDG dose, radiation exposure or scan-time, without affecting the clinical impact of PET/CT. Pre-test probability of malignancy can guide the diagnostic strategy of 18 FDG-PET/CT in patients with SPN. In subjects with low-intermediate pretest probability s-PET/CT imaging might be planned in advance, while in those at high risk and with thoracic lymph node involvement a wb-PET/CT is necessary.

  20. Performance of FDG PET/CT in the clinical management of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groheux, David; Espié, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Hindié, Elif

    2013-02-01

    In this analysis, the role of metabolic imaging with fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in breast cancer is reviewed. The analysis was limited to recent works by using state-of-the-art positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) technology. The strengths and limitations of FDG PET/CT are examined in various clinical settings, and the following questions are answered: Is FDG PET/CT useful to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions? Can FDG PET/CT replace sentinel node biopsy for axillary staging? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in initial staging of inflammatory or locally advanced breast cancer? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in initial staging of clinical stage IIA and IIB and primary operable stage IIIA breast cancer? How does FDG PET/CT compare with conventional techniques in the restaging of cancer in patients who are suspected of having disease recurrence? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in the assessment of early response to neoadjuvant therapy and of response to therapy for metastatic disease? Some recommendations for clinical practice are given.

  1. Brain {sup 18}F-FDG, {sup 18}F-florbtaben PET/CT, {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT and cardiac {sup 123}I-MBG imaging for diagnosis of a 'cerebral type' of Lewy Body disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gucht, Axel Van Der; Bélissant, Ophélie; Rabu, Corenti; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Bonnot-Lours, Sophie; Fénelon, Gilles; Itti, Emmanuel [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, AP-HP, Henri-Mondor Teaching Hospital, Crteil (France); De Langavant, Laurent Cleret [Cognitive Neurology Unit, H. Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France)

    2016-09-15

    A 67-year-old man was referred for fluctuating neuropsychiatric symptoms, featuring depression, delirious episodes, recurrent visual hallucinations and catatonic syndrome associated with cognitive decline. No parkinsonism was found clinically even under neuroleptic treatment. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed hypometabolism in the posterior associative cortex including the occipital cortex, suggesting Lewy body dementia, but {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT was normal and cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging showed no signs of sympathetic denervation. Alzheimer's disease was excluded by a normal {sup 18}F-florbetaben PET/CT. This report suggests a rare case of α-synucleinopathy without brainstem involvement, referred to as 'cerebral type' of Lewy body disease.

  2. The Predictive Value of Early In-Treatment 18F-FDG PET/CT Response to Chemotherapy in Combination with Bevacizumab in Advanced Nonsquamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanij, Edwin A; Natroshvili, Tinatin; Timmer-Bonte, Johanna N H; Oyen, Wim J G; van der Drift, Miep A; Bussink, Johan; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de

    2017-08-01

    18 F-FDG PET/CT is potentially applicable to predict response to chemotherapy in combination with bevacizumab in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: In 25 patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC, 18 F-FDG PET/CT was performed before treatment and after 2 wk, at the end of the second week of first cycle carboplatin-paclitaxel and bevacizumab (CPB) treatment. Patients received up to a total of 4 cycles of CPB treatment. Maintenance treatment with bevacizumab monotherapy was continued until progressive disease without significant treatment-related toxicities of first-line treatment. In the case of progressive disease, bevacizumab was combined with erlotinib. SUV corrected for lean body mass (SUL and SUL peak ) were obtained. PERCIST were used for response evaluation. These semiquantitative parameters were correlated with progression-free survival and overall survival (OS). Results: Metabolic response, defined by a significant reduction in SUL peak of 30% or more after 2 wk of CPB, was predictive of progression-free survival and OS. For partial metabolic responders ( n = 19), the median OS was 22.8 mo. One-year and 2-y OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. Nonmetabolic responders ( n = 6) (stable metabolic disease or progressive disease) showed a median OS of 4.4 mo (1-y and 2-y OS was 33% and 0%, respectively) ( P predictive of outcome to first-line chemotherapy with bevacizumab in patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC. This enables identification of patients at risk of treatment failure, permitting treatment alternatives such as early switch to a different therapy. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  3. PET-CT in endocrinology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parysow, O.; Jager, V.; Racioppi, S.; Mollerach, A.M.; Collaud, C.; Arma, I.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT scans have reached an important place in the evaluation of endocrine tumors. The metabolic marker 18F-FDG is the most widespread over the world, and, for the time being, it is the only one available in our country. The limitations of this technique in Endocrinology include high differentiation and low aggressiveness of most endocrine tumors, and low detection rate for low cellularity and/or small lesions. Indications for PET/CT scan in these tumors should be precise, due to the fact that not all of these lesions are significantly glucose-avid and to extract the maximum diagnostic efficacy of this modality to achieve the optimum diagnostic accuracy. The most important indication is DTC with high Tg levels and negative 131-Iodine scans. It is advisable to indicate a PET/CT scan in patients with Tg > 10 ng/ml and stimulated TSH (endogenous or exogenous). The aim is to locate recurrences and metastases in order to remove them, either surgically or by any other therapy alternative to 131 I. Due to higher uptake in more aggressive lesions, this study has a high prognostic value. In patients with high Tg levels, negative 131 I scan, and abnormal FDG uptake, the practitioner must act more aggressively in order to remove the pathologic foci, while with a negative FDG -PET scan, the conduct can be expectant, with periodic follow-up. The introduction of other positron-emitting tracers like 124-Iodine, is likely to yield superior quality images and provide better diagnoses. FDG has a limited efficiency in neuroendocrine tumors, unless they show a significant level of dedifferentiation. The scan is indicated in MTC, when calcitonin levels are above 1000 pg/ml, in order to locate the tumor sites. With the introduction of more specific positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, such as 18F-DOPA, 68Ga DOTA, 11C methomidate, 11C-hydroxytryptophan and others, it will be possible to study the metabolic-molecular behavior of these tumors with a more accurate approach. (author) [es

  4. Fifteen different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT qualitative and quantitative parameters investigated as pathological response predictors of locally advanced rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffione, Anna Margherita [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, PET Unit, Rovigo (Italy); Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, SOC Medicina Nucleare, Rovigo (Italy); Ferretti, Alice [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, PET Unit, Rovigo (Italy); Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Medical Physics Department, Rovigo (Italy); Grassetto, Gaia; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rampin, Lucia; Bondesan, Claudia; Rubello, Domenico [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, PET Unit, Rovigo (Italy); Bellan, Elena; Gava, Marcello [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Medical Physics Department, Rovigo (Italy); Capirci, Carlo [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Radiotherapy Department, Rovigo (Italy); Colletti, Patrick M. [University of Southern California, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this study was to correlate qualitative visual response and various PET quantification factors with the tumour regression grade (TRG) classification of pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) proposed by Mandard. Included in this retrospective study were 69 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). FDG PET/CT scans were performed at staging and after CRT (mean 6.7 weeks). Tumour SUVmax and its related arithmetic and percentage decrease (response index, RI) were calculated. Qualitative analysis was performed by visual response assessment (VRA), PERCIST 1.0 and response cut-off classification based on a new definition of residual disease. Metabolic tumour volume (MTV) was calculated using a 40 % SUVmax threshold, and the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) both before and after CRT and their arithmetic and percentage change were also calculated. We split the patients into responders (TRG 1 or 2) and nonresponders (TRG 3-5). SUVmax MTV and TLG after CRT, RI, {Delta}MTV% and {Delta}TLG% parameters were significantly correlated with pathological treatment response (p < 0.01) with a ROC curve cut-off values of 5.1, 2.1 cm{sup 3}, 23.4 cm{sup 3}, 61.8 %, 81.4 % and 94.2 %, respectively. SUVmax after CRT had the highest ROC AUC (0.846), with a sensitivity of 86 % and a specificity of 80 %. VRA and response cut-off classification were also significantly predictive of TRG response (VRA with the best accuracy: sensitivity 86 % and specificity 55 %). In contrast, assessment using PERCIST was not significantly correlated with TRG. FDG PET/CT can accurately stratify patients with LARC preoperatively, independently of the method chosen to interpret the images. Among many PET parameters, some of which are not immediately obtainable, the most commonly used in clinical practice (SUVmax after CRT and VRA) showed the best accuracy in predicting TRG. (orig.)

  5. FDG PET/CT in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Henrik; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD), covering 1.2 of Denmark's 5.6 million inhabitants, established a task force to (1) retrieve literature evidence for the clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and provide consequent recommendations and further to (2) compare the actual...... use of PET/CT in the RSD with these recommendations. This article summarizes the results. METHODS: A Work Group appointed a professional Subgroup which made Clinician Groups conduct literature reviews on six selected cancers responsible for 5,768 (62.6 %) of 9,213 PET/CT scans in the RSD in 2012...... use of PET/CT and literature-based recommendations was high in the first five mentioned cancers in that 96.2 % of scans were made for grade A or B indications versus only 22.2 % in gynaecological cancers. CONCLUSION: Evidence-based usefulness was reported in five of six selected cancers; evidence...

  6. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia O, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  7. Myocardial blood flow quantification by Rb-82 cardiac PET/CT: A detailed reproducibility study between two semi-automatic analysis programs.

    OpenAIRE

    Dunet, V.; Klein, R.; Allenbach, G.; Renaud, J.; deKemp, R.A.; Prior, J.O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several analysis software packages for myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification from cardiac PET studies exist, but they have not been compared using concordance analysis, which can characterize precision and bias separately. Reproducible measurements are needed for quantification to fully develop its clinical potential. Methods Fifty-one patients underwent dynamic Rb-82 PET at rest and during adenosine stress. Data were processed with PMOD and FlowQuant (Lortie model). MBF and m...

  8. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  9. How to use PET/CT in the evaluation of response to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decazes, Pierre; Thureau, Sébastien; Dubray, Bernard; Vera, Pierre

    2017-11-28

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality for many cancers. Tumor response after radiotherapy determines the subsequent steps of the patient's management (surveillance, adjuvant or salvage treatment and palliative care). Tumor response assessed during radiotherapy offers a promising opportunity to adapt the treatment plan to reduced / increased target volume, to specifically target sub-volumes with relevant biological characteristics (metabolism, hypoxia, proliferation ...) and to further spare the organs at risk. In addition to its role in the diagnosis and the initial staging, Positron Emission Tomography combined with a Computed Tomography (PET/CT) provides functional information and is therefore attractive to evaluate tumor response. To review the published data addressing PET/CT as an evaluation tool in irradiated tumors. Reports on PET/CT acquired at various times (during radiotherapy, after initial (chemo-)radiotherapy, after definitive radiotherapy and during posttreatment follow-up) in solid tumors (lung, head-and-neck, cervix, esophagus, prostate and rectum) were collected and reviewed. Various tracers and technical are also discussed. 18F-FDG PET/CT has a well-established role in clinical routine after definitive chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancers. 18F-choline PET/CT is indicated in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure. 18F-FDG PET/CT is optional in many others circumstances and the clinical benefits of assessing tumor response with PET/CT remain a field of very active research. The combination of PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) may prove to be valuable in irradiated rectal and cervix cancers. Tumor response can be evaluated by PET/CT with clinical consequences in multiple situations, notably in head and neck and prostate cancers, after radiotherapy. Further clinical evaluation for most cancers is still needed, possibly in association to MRI.

  10. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin; PET y PET/CT en tumor de origen indeterminado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  11. Semi-quantitative analysis of post-transarterial radioembolization 90Y Microsphere position emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) images in advance liver malignancy: Comparison with 99mTc macroaggregated albumin (MAA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Seung Hong; Kim, Sung Eun; Cho, Jae Hyuk; Park, Ju Kyung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Choe, Jae Gol; Eo, Jae Seon; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Eun Sub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation between pretreatment planning technetium-99m ( 99 mTc) macroaggregated albumin (MAA) SPECT images and posttreatment transarterial radioembolization (TARE) yttirum-90 ( 90 Y) PET/CT images by comparing the ratios of tumor-to-normal liver counts. Fifty-two patients with advanced hepatic malignancy who underwent 90 Y microsphere radioembolization from January 2010 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had undergone 99 mTc MAA intraarterial injection SPECT for a pretreatment evaluation of microsphere distribution and therapy planning. After the administration of 90 Y microspheres, the patients underwent posttreatment 90 Y PET/CT within 24 h. For semiquantitative analysis, the tumor-to-normal uptake ratios in 90 Y PET/CT (TNR-yp) and 99 mTc MAA SPECT (TNR-ms) as well as the tumor volumes measured in angiographic CT were obtained and analyzed. The relationship of TNR-yp and TNR-ms was evaluated by Spearman's rank correlation and Wilcoxon's matched pairs test. In a total of 79 lesions of 52 patients, the distribution of microspheres was well demonstrated in both the SPECT and PET/CT images. A good correlation was observed of between TNR-ms and TNR-yp (rho value = 0.648, p < 0.001). The TNR-yp (median 2.78, interquartile range 2.43) tend to show significantly higher values than TNR-ms (median 2.49, interquartile range of 1.55) (p = 0.012). The TNR-yp showed weak correlation with tumor volume (rho = 0.230, p = 0.041). The 99mTc MAA SPECT showed a good correlation with 90 Y PET/CT in TNR values, suggesting that 99 mTc MAA can be used as an adequate pretreatment evaluation method. However, the 99 mTc MAA SPECT image consistently shows lower TNR values compared to 90Y PET/CT, which means the possibility of underestimation of tumorous uptake in the partition dosimetry model using 99 mTc MAA SPECT. Considering that 99 mTc MAA is the only clinically available surrogate marker

  12. Semi-quantitative analysis of post-transarterial radioembolization {sup 90}Y Microsphere position emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) images in advance liver malignancy: Comparison with {sup 99m}Tc macroaggregated albumin (MAA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Seung Hong; Kim, Sung Eun; Cho, Jae Hyuk; Park, Ju Kyung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Choe, Jae Gol [Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Jae Seon; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Eun Sub [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation between pretreatment planning technetium-99m ({sup 99}mTc) macroaggregated albumin (MAA) SPECT images and posttreatment transarterial radioembolization (TARE) yttirum-90 ({sup 90}Y) PET/CT images by comparing the ratios of tumor-to-normal liver counts. Fifty-two patients with advanced hepatic malignancy who underwent {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization from January 2010 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had undergone {sup 99}mTc MAA intraarterial injection SPECT for a pretreatment evaluation of microsphere distribution and therapy planning. After the administration of {sup 90}Y microspheres, the patients underwent posttreatment {sup 90}Y PET/CT within 24 h. For semiquantitative analysis, the tumor-to-normal uptake ratios in {sup 90}Y PET/CT (TNR-yp) and {sup 99}mTc MAA SPECT (TNR-ms) as well as the tumor volumes measured in angiographic CT were obtained and analyzed. The relationship of TNR-yp and TNR-ms was evaluated by Spearman's rank correlation and Wilcoxon's matched pairs test. In a total of 79 lesions of 52 patients, the distribution of microspheres was well demonstrated in both the SPECT and PET/CT images. A good correlation was observed of between TNR-ms and TNR-yp (rho value = 0.648, p < 0.001). The TNR-yp (median 2.78, interquartile range 2.43) tend to show significantly higher values than TNR-ms (median 2.49, interquartile range of 1.55) (p = 0.012). The TNR-yp showed weak correlation with tumor volume (rho = 0.230, p = 0.041). The 99mTc MAA SPECT showed a good correlation with {sup 90}Y PET/CT in TNR values, suggesting that {sup 99}mTc MAA can be used as an adequate pretreatment evaluation method. However, the {sup 99}mTc MAA SPECT image consistently shows lower TNR values compared to 90Y PET/CT, which means the possibility of underestimation of tumorous uptake in the partition dosimetry model using {sup 99}mTc MAA SPECT. Considering that

  13. Myocardial blood flow quantification by Rb-82 cardiac PET/CT: A detailed reproducibility study between two semi-automatic analysis programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunet, Vincent; Klein, Ran; Allenbach, Gilles; Renaud, Jennifer; deKemp, Robert A; Prior, John O

    2016-06-01

    Several analysis software packages for myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification from cardiac PET studies exist, but they have not been compared using concordance analysis, which can characterize precision and bias separately. Reproducible measurements are needed for quantification to fully develop its clinical potential. Fifty-one patients underwent dynamic Rb-82 PET at rest and during adenosine stress. Data were processed with PMOD and FlowQuant (Lortie model). MBF and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) polar maps were quantified and analyzed using a 17-segment model. Comparisons used Pearson's correlation ρ (measuring precision), Bland and Altman limit-of-agreement and Lin's concordance correlation ρc = ρ·C b (C b measuring systematic bias). Lin's concordance and Pearson's correlation values were very similar, suggesting no systematic bias between software packages with an excellent precision ρ for MBF (ρ = 0.97, ρc = 0.96, C b = 0.99) and good precision for MFR (ρ = 0.83, ρc = 0.76, C b = 0.92). On a per-segment basis, no mean bias was observed on Bland-Altman plots, although PMOD provided slightly higher values than FlowQuant at higher MBF and MFR values (P < .0001). Concordance between software packages was excellent for MBF and MFR, despite higher values by PMOD at higher MBF values. Both software packages can be used interchangeably for quantification in daily practice of Rb-82 cardiac PET.

  14. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging, restaging, and treatment response assessment of male breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groheux, David; Hindié, Elif; Marty, Michel; Espié, Marc; Rubello, Domenico; Vercellino, Laetitia; Bousquet, Guilhem; Ohnona, Jessica; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Merlet, Pascal; Misset, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Male breast cancer (BC) is a rare disease, with patterns different from those found in women. Most tumors are detected at more advanced stages than in women. The aim of this study was to analyze the performance of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) in staging, restaging, and therapy response assessment. Methods: We performed a systematic analysis in the database of Saint-Louis Hospital to identify male patients with BC referred for PET/CT. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT findings considered suspicious for malignancy were compared to biopsy results, further work-up and/or patient follow-up of at least 6 months. Performances of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT were compared to that of conventional imaging (CI) using the McNemar test. The impact of PET/CT on management was evaluated. Results: During 6 consecutive years, among 12,692 18 F-FDG-PET/CT oncology studies, 30 were performed in 15 men with BC: 7 examinations for initial staging, 11 for restaging, and 12 for response assessment. Tumors profile was ER+ and one had HER2 overexpression. PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy to detect distant metastases were 100%, 67%, 86%, 100% and 89%, respectively. PET/CT was more informative than CI in 40% of studies (p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval: 3.26 – 40%). Findings from 18 F-FDG-PET/CT led to modification in the planned treatment in 13/30 cases (43%). Conclusion: Although all the tumors were ER+, primary lesions and metastases were diagnosed with high sensitivity. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT seems to be a powerful imaging method to perform staging, restaging and treatment response assessment in male patients with BC

  15. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in staging, restaging, and treatment response assessment of male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, David, E-mail: dgroheux@yahoo.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Hindié, Elif [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, CHU Bordeaux, University Bordeaux-Segalen, Bordeaux (France); Marty, Michel [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Centre for Therapeutic Innovation, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Espié, Marc [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Rubello, Domenico [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria della Misericordia, Rovigo Hospital, Rovigo (Italy); Vercellino, Laetitia [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Bousquet, Guilhem [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); INSERM U728, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Ohnona, Jessica; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Merlet, Pascal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Misset, Jean-Louis [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Male breast cancer (BC) is a rare disease, with patterns different from those found in women. Most tumors are detected at more advanced stages than in women. The aim of this study was to analyze the performance of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) in staging, restaging, and therapy response assessment. Methods: We performed a systematic analysis in the database of Saint-Louis Hospital to identify male patients with BC referred for PET/CT. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT findings considered suspicious for malignancy were compared to biopsy results, further work-up and/or patient follow-up of at least 6 months. Performances of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT were compared to that of conventional imaging (CI) using the McNemar test. The impact of PET/CT on management was evaluated. Results: During 6 consecutive years, among 12,692 {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT oncology studies, 30 were performed in 15 men with BC: 7 examinations for initial staging, 11 for restaging, and 12 for response assessment. Tumors profile was ER+ and one had HER2 overexpression. PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy to detect distant metastases were 100%, 67%, 86%, 100% and 89%, respectively. PET/CT was more informative than CI in 40% of studies (p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval: 3.26 – 40%). Findings from {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT led to modification in the planned treatment in 13/30 cases (43%). Conclusion: Although all the tumors were ER+, primary lesions and metastases were diagnosed with high sensitivity. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT seems to be a powerful imaging method to perform staging, restaging and treatment response assessment in male patients with BC.

  16. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  17. Patterns of failure after use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in integration of extended-field chemo-IMRT and 3D-brachytherapy plannings for advanced cervical cancers with extensive lymph node metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Horng, Cheng-Fang; Lee, Pei-Ing; Chen, Fong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The study is to evaluate the patterns of failure, toxicities and long-term outcomes of aggressive treatment using 18 F-FDG PET/CT-guided chemoradiation plannings for advanced cervical cancer with extensive nodal extent that has been regarded as a systemic disease. We retrospectively reviewed 72 consecutive patients with 18 F-FDG PET/CT-detected widespread pelvic, para-aortic and/or supraclavicular lymph nodes treated with curative-intent PET-guided cisplatin-based extended-field dose-escalating intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and adaptive high-dose-rate intracavitary 3D-brachytherapy between 2002 and 2010. The failure sites were specifically localized by comparing recurrences on fusion of post-therapy recurrent 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans to the initial PET-guided radiation plannings for IMRT and brachytherapy. The median follow-up time for the 72 patients was 66 months (range, 3–142 months). The 5-year disease-free survival rate calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method for the patients with extensive N1 disease with the uppermost PET-positive pelvic-only nodes (26 patients), and the patients with M1 disease with the uppermost PET-positive para-aortic (31 patients) or supraclavicular (15 patients) nodes was 78.5 %, and 41.8–50 %, respectively (N1 vs. M1, p = 0.0465). Eight (11.1 %), 18 (25.0 %), and 3 (4.2 %) of the patients developed in-field recurrence, out-of-field and/or distant metastasis, and combined failure, respectively. The 6 (8.3 %) local failures around the uterine cervix were all at the junction between IMRT and brachytherapy in the parametrium. The rate of late grade 3/4 bladder and bowel toxicities was 4.2 and 9.7 %, respectively. When compared to conventional pelvic chemoradiation/2D-brachytherapy during 1990–2001, the adoption of 18 F-FDG PET-guided extended-field dose-escalating chemoradiation plannings in IMRT and 3D-brachytherapy after 2002 appeared to provide higher disease-free and overall survival rates with acceptable toxicities in

  18. ⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT detects heart metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Sundin, Anders; Falhammar, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to the myocardium are rare and generally seen in patients with widespread metastatic NET disease. The objectives of this investigation were to describe the frequency of intracardiac metastases in ileal NET patients examined by (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT and to describe the cases in detail. All (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT examinations performed at the Karolinska University Hospital since 2010 until April 2012 were reviewed. In all, 128 out of 337 examinations were in patients with ileal NETs. Four patients had seven myocardiac metastases, yielding a frequency of 4.3 % in patients with ileal NETs. One patient had cardiac surgery while three were treated with somatostatin analogs. The cardiac metastases did not affect the patients' activity of daily life. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT is an established imaging modality in identifying cardiac metastases in ileal NETs. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the true clinical value of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT in detecting cardiac metastases in both ileal and non-ileal NETs.

  19. PET/CT applications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan Perfecto; Martínez Ramírez, Aldo; Baum, Richard Paul

    2017-01-01

    PET means Positron Emission Tomography, it is a nuclear medicine technique in which radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters are used to obtain biochemical-metabolic images of the human body. The use of PET / CT contributes to obtain multimodal images that combine anatomical and metabolic information, allowing a more reliable diagnosis of a tumor or local or distant metastases in an organ or tissue. Other multimodal devices combine metabolic imaging with nuclear magnetic resonance. PET/CT is mainly used in Oncology (85-90%), Neurology, Cardiology, Inflammation and Infection although it is currently also used in different medical and surgical pathologies. The present work is aimed at showing what PET/CT is and how useful it is in Oncology. (author)

  20. Discordant Findings of Skeletal Metastasis Between Tc99m MDP Bone Scans and F18 FDG PET/CT Imaging for Advanced Breast and Lung Cancers—Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wen Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Tc99m methyl diphosphate (MDP bone scintigraphy provides high-sensitivity detection of skeletal metastasis from breast and lung cancers in regular follow-up. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, based on the glucose metabolism of malignant cells, plays a role in describing rumor growth, proliferation of neoplasm and the extent of metastasis. In general, concordant findings of skeletal metastasis are seen on both types of image, especially in cases of breast and lung cancer. However, there were extremely discordant findings of skeletal metastasis between bone scans and F18 FDG PET/CT imaging in two cases among 300 consecutive F18 FDG PET/CT follow-up exams of patients with malignancies, during the past year, in our center. Both cases, one of breast cancer and one of lung cancer, had negative bone scintigraphic findings, but a diffusely high grade of F18 FDG avid marrow infiltration in the axial spine, leading to the diagnosis of stage IV disease in both cases. Owing to variant genetic aberrance of malignance, F18 FDG PET/CT reveals direct evidence of diffuse, rapid neoplasm metabolism in the bone marrow of the spine, but not of secondary osteoblastic reactions in vivo. F18 FDG PET/CT should always be employed in the follow-up of patients with malignancies.

  1. Is PET/CT efficient tool to evaluate the response after stereotactic radiation therapy for pancreas cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo

    2005-01-01

    In pancreas cancer, to evaluate the efficacy of PET/CT as tool to check the response after stereotactic radiation therapy and to define functional imaging role of PET/CT as alterative tool of computed tomography. From November 2003 to December 2004, among locally advanced pancreas cancer patients treated by stereotactic radiation therapy using CyberKnife(CK), 14 were evaluated by PET/CT before and after treatment. Four patients took PET/CT one month after CK, 4 patients 2 months after CK, and 6 patients 3 months after CK as the first evaluation of treatment. All of patients were also evaluated by CT or CA19-9 tumor antigen with the range of 1-2 months after CK. In addition of PET/CT to CT, lymph node metastasis were revealed as positive in 4 patients who had negative finding on CT. Furthermore, patients who showed partial or complete response on PET/CT findings that checked within 3 months after CK have significantly longer median survival time than patients who showed no response or disease progression(13 months and 9 months, respectively). Responses based on CA19-9 tumor antigen or CT, however, showed no significant difference in terms of median survival time. PET/CT can provide more information for lymph node metastasis compared to CT alone. It is very helpful for delineation of tumor extent for CK planning. And initial response on PET/CT scan could be a significant prognostic factor rather than response on CA19-9 level or CT. In the future, more study is necessary to evaluate if PET/CT could substitute CT and finally CT could be omitted during follow-up period after CK

  2. PET/CT versus bone marrow biopsy in the initial evaluation of bone marrow infiltration in various pediatric malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Claudia P; Cuglievan, Branko; Zapata, Catalina M; Olavarrieta, Raquel; Raskin, Scott; Desai, Kavita; De Angulo, Guillermo

    2018-02-01

    Accurate staging is essential in the prognosis and management of pediatric malignancies. Current protocols require screening for marrow infiltration with bone marrow biopsy (BMB) as the gold standard. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is commonly used to complete the staging process and can also be used to evaluate marrow infiltration. To compare PET-CT and BMB in the initial evaluation of bone marrow infiltration in pediatric cancers. We retrospectively reviewed new cases of EWS, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, and lymphoma diagnosed between January 2009 and October 2014. Each case had undergone both PET-CT and BMB within 4 weeks without treatment in the interval between screening modalities. We reviewed 69 cases. Bone marrow infiltration was demonstrated in 34 cases by PET-CT and in 18 cases by BMB. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of PET-CT were both 100%. Interestingly, the cases in which infiltration was not detected on BMB had an abnormal marrow signal on PET-CT focal or distant to iliac crest. PET-CT has a high sensitivity when assessing marrow infiltration in pediatric malignancies. Advances in radiologic modalities may obviate the use of invasive, painful, and costly procedures like BMB. Furthermore, biopsy results are limited by insufficient tissue or the degree of marrow infiltration (diffuse vs. focal disease). PET-CT can improve the precision of biopsy when used as a guiding tool. This study proposes the use of PET-CT as first-line screening for bone marrow infiltration to improve the accuracy of staging in new diagnoses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. PET/CT in Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2018-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important component of the management of lymphoma patients. Most lymphomas are metabolically active and accumulate 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Positron emission tomography with computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging using FDG is used routinely in staging and treatment...

  4. FDG PET/CT in oncology: 'raising the bar'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, C.N. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Churchill Hospital, Oxford Radcliffe NHS Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom); Goldstone, A.R.; Chowdhury, F.U. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Scarsbrook, A.F., E-mail: andrew.scarsbrook@leedsth.nhs.u [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    Integrated positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has revolutionized oncological imaging in recent years and now has a firmly established role in a variety of tumour types. There have been simultaneous step-wise advances in scanner technology, which are yet to be exploited to their full potential in clinical practice. This article will review these technological developments and explore how refinements in imaging protocols can further improve the accuracy and efficacy of PET/CT in oncology. The promises, and limitations, of emerging oncological applications of FDG PET/CT in radiotherapy planning and therapy response assessment will be explored. Potential future developments, including the use of FDG PET probes in oncological surgery, advanced data analysis techniques, and the prospect of integrated PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) will be highlighted.

  5. Choline-PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer; Cholin-PET/CT zur Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd Joachim [Klinik- und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Treiber, U.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Klinik fuer Urologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives are increasingly being used for imaging of prostate cancer. The value of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies and demonstrates an increasing importance. Primary prostate cancer can be detected with moderate sensitivity using PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives - the differentiation between benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is not always possible. At the present time [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT is not recommended in the primary setting but may be utilized in clinically suspected prostate cancer with repeatedly negative prostate biopsies, in preparation of a focused re-biopsy. Promising results have been obtained for the use of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in patients with biochemical recurrence. The detection rate of choline PET and PET/CT for local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with a biochemical recurrence shows a linear correlation with PSA values at the time of imaging and reaches about 75% in patients with PSA > 3 ng/mL. At PSA values below 1 ng/mL, the recurrence can be diagnosed with choline PET/CT in approximately 1/3 of the patients. PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]choline derivates can be helpful for choosing a therapeutic strategy in the sense of an individualized treatment: since an early diagnosis of recurrence is crucial to the choice of optimal treatment. The localization of the site of recurrence - local recurrence, lymph node metastasis or systemic dissemination - has important influence on the therapy regimen. (orig.)

  6. 18F-FDG PET/CT in Neurolymphomatosis: Report of 3 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canh, Nguyen Xuan; Tan, Ngo Van; Tung, Tran Thanh; Son, Nguyen Truong; Maurea, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis is a rare manifestation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by infiltration of peripheral nerves, nerve roots, plexus and cranial nerves by malignant lymphocytes. This report presents positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)imaging with 2-deoxy-2- 18 F-fluoro-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) in 3 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with nerve infiltration, including one newly diagnosed lymphoma, one recurrent lymphoma in previous nerve lesions and one newly recurrent lymphoma. PET/CT could reveal the affected neural structures including cranial nerves, spinal nerve roots, brachial plexus, cervicothoracic ganglion, intercostal nerves, branches of the vagus nerve, lumbosacral plexus and sciatic nerves. There was relative concordance between PET/CT and MRI in detection of affected cranial nerves. PET/CT seemed to be better than MRI in detection of affected peripheral nerves. 18 F-FDG PET/CT was a whole-body imaging technique with the ability to reveal the affected cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots and plexus in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A thorough understanding of disease and use of advanced imaging modalities will increasingly detect neurolymphomatosis

  7. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  8. PET/CT in lymphoma patients; PET-CT bei Lymphompatienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinert, H.C. [Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Switzerland)

    2004-11-01

    First results of PET/CT in Hodgkin's disease (HD) and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are reported. From March 2001 to August 2004 822 PET/CT were performed at our clinic in lymphoma patients for primary staging, restaging after therapy, and diagnosis of recurrence. For coregistration non contrast-enhanced low-dose CT were used. Due to the exact anatomic localization of {sup 18}F-FDG accumulating lesions equivocal or false positive PET findings are avoided. In comparison to contrast enhanced CT, PET/CT has a higher sensitivity and specificity in patients with HD and aggressive NHL. Integration of PET/CT in treatment planning of radiation therapy optimizes the field volume. Even in the initial phase of clinical evaluation, PET/CT has proven useful in staging and restaging of lymphoma. The exact anatomic localization of the PET findings is essential for a precise report, for treatment planning of radiation therapy, and for planning surgical biopsy. (orig.) [German] Erste Ergebnisse der PET-CT bei Morbus Hodgkin (HD) und den aggressiven Non-Hodgkin-Lymphomen (NHL) werden beschrieben. Von Maerz 2001 bis August 2004 wurden 822 PET-CT bei Lymphompatienten zum primaeren Staging, zum Restaging nach Therapie und zur Rezidivdiagnostik an unserer Klinik durchgefuehrt. Fuer die Koregistration wurde ein Low-dose-CT ohne i.v.-Kontrastmittel verwendet. Durch die exakte anatomische Zuordnung der {sup 18}F-FDG aufnehmenden Laesionen wurden unklare oder falsch-positive PET-Befunde vermieden. Die PET-CT erzielte im Vergleich zur KM-verstaerkten CT eine hoehere Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet bei Patienten mit HD und aggressiven NHL. Die Integration der PET-CT in die Planung der Strahlentherapie fuehrte zu einer Optimierung der Feldgrenzen. Die PET-CT hat sich bereits in der Phase der initialen klinischen Evaluation als wertvoll beim Staging und Restaging von Lymphomen erwiesen. Die exakte anatomische Zuordnung der PET-Informationen ist fuer eine sichere Befundung

  9. The continual innovation of commercial PET/CT solutions in nuclear cardiology: Siemens Healthineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendriem, Bernard; Reed, Jessie; McCullough, Kathryn; Khan, Mohammad Raza; Smith, Anne M; Thomas, Damita; Long, Misty

    2018-04-10

    Cardiac PET/CT is an evolving, non-invasive imaging modality that impacts patient management in many clinical scenarios. Beyond offering the capability to assess myocardial perfusion, inflammatory cardiac pathologies, and myocardial viability, cardiac PET/CT also allows for the non-invasive quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Recognizing the need for an enhanced comprehension of coronary physiology, Siemens Healthineers implemented a sophisticated solution for the calculation of MBF and MFR in 2009. As a result, each aspect of their innovative scanner and image-processing technology seamlessly integrates into an efficient, easy-to-use workflow for everyday clinical use that maximizes the number of patients who potentially benefit from this imaging modality.

  10. Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT for discrimination of tumors of the optic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenstein, Annemarie; Haug, Alexander R; Miller, Christina; Hintschich, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Symptomatic tumors of the optic nerve pathway may endanger vision. They are difficult to classify by imaging alone and biopsy may damage visual function. Tumor pathology influences treatment decision and a diagnostic tool with a high sensitivity and specificity would therefore be invaluable. We hypothesized that Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT may help in discriminating optic nerve tumors as uptake of somatostatin is elevated in meningiomas. Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT was used to examine 13 patients with ambiguous, symptomatic lesions of the optic pathway for treatment planning. The presence or absence of meningioma was validated by histopathology or supplementary diagnostic work-up. Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT identified 10 meningiomas (en plaque = 1, optic nerve sheath = 4, sphenoidal = 5) correctly via increased SSTR (somatostatin receptor) expression (mean SUVmax (maximum standardized uptake value) = 14.3 ± 15.4). 3 tumors did not show elevated Ga-68-DOTA-TATE uptake (SUVmax = 2.1 ± 1.0). Subsumizing all clinical-radiological follow-up tools available, these lesions were classified as an intracerebral metastasis of an advanced gastric carcinoma, histologically proven inflammatory collagenous connective tissue and presumed leukemic infiltration of a newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this case series, Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT demonstrated both a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Yet, the golden standard of histopathology was only available in a subset of patients included. Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT proved to be a valuable diagnostic tool for the correct classification of equivocal, symptomatic tumors of the anterior optic pathway requiring therapy. PET/CT results influenced therapy decision essentially in all cases.

  11. PET/CT和CT在局部晚期肺癌新辅助化疗后淋巴结再分期中的比较研究%Evaluation of PET/CT versus CT in the mediastinal lymph node restaging of locally advanced lung cancer after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武雅琴; 冯冬杰; 许林; 蒋峰

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价PET/CT和CT在局部晚期(N2)非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)新辅助化疗后淋巴结再分期中的敏感性、特异性和准确性.方法 将2005年11月至2010年5月118例经细胞学或病理学确诊的N2期NSCLC患者随机分为PET/CT组和CT组,每组59例,在新辅助化疗后分别行PET/CT和CT检查,对评价为缓解或稳定的病例根据显像结果评判纵隔淋巴结的转移情况,并与术后病理诊断相比较,从而对患者进行再分期.结果 CT组45例患者和PET/CT组51例患者评价为缓解或稳定.PET/CT组对N2期NSCLC新辅助化疗后淋巴结再分期的敏感性和特异性分别为87.5%、88.2%,明显高于CT组的56.0%和68.9%;PET/CT和CT的诊断准确性分别为85.0%和69.5%.CT组纵隔淋巴结分期的诊断相符率为66.7%,低于PET/CT组的85.7%.结论 PET/CT对于N2期NSCLC新辅助化疗后淋巴结的准确再分期有重要价值,其敏感性、特异性、准确性及纵隔淋巴结分期的诊断相符率均高于CT.%Objective To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/CT versus CT in the restating of locally advanced (N2) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods One hundred and eighteen patients with cytology or pathology confirmed N2 stage NSCLC enrolled in this study were randomly divided into 2 groups (PET/CT and CT group) with 59 cases in each group. After the completion of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, we used the PET/CT or CT to restage the mediastinal nodal lesions by comparing the corresponding pathologic staging for those whom confirmed with response or stable disease. Results Forty-five cases in CT group and fifty-one in PET/CT group achieved response or stable disease. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging by PET/CT were 87. 5% , 88. 2% and 85. 0% , higher than 56.0% , 68.9% and 69. 5% in CT group. The diagnostic coincidence of mediastinal lymph node staging in PET/CT group was 85

  12. Assess PET/MR in diagnosis of disease in comparison with PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jianhua; Lim, Jason Chu-Chern; Loi, Hoi Yin; Totoman, John; Sinha, Arvind Kumar; Quek, Swee Titan; Townsend, David

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the performance of 18F-FDG whole body PET/MRI in comparison with PET/CT based on SUV. Anatomical location of lesion with Dixon MRI and additional value of advanced MRI technology such as diffusion weighted MR imaging in diagnosis of malignant disease will also be investigated.

  13. F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) influences management in patients with known or suspected pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Thomas W.; Kalff, Victor; Cherk, Martin H.; Yap, Kenneth SK.; Evans, Peter; Kelly, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To assess the impact on clinical management of PET/CT in patients with known or suspected pancreatic cancer. Methods: Between April 2006 and September 2008,25 PET/CT scans were performed using a dedicated PET/CT (22 scans) or a coincidence hybrid PET/CT camera (3 scans) in 23 patients with known or suspected pancreatic cancer. 17 scans were performed for initial evaluation and 8 for restaging of disease. The pre-PET/CT management plan and for intent were prospectively recorded in all cases. The post-PET/CT management plan was determined from the medical record and for discussions with treating clinicians. The impact of PET/CT on management was classified as High, Medium, Low or None, defined using ANZAPNM PET data collection project criteria. Follow-up was used to reconcile any discordance between PET/CT and conventional imaging. Results: Overall, PET/CT management impact was classified as high (n equal 7), medium (n equal 4), low (n equal 10) or none (n equal 4). Impact was either high or medium in l l/25 patients (44%) (95% confidence interval; 24 - 64%). Impact was high in 4/17 patients imaged for initial evaluation, predominantly by clarifying equivocal lesions on conventional imaging. In restaged patients, PET/CT impact was high in 3/8, and it correctly modified disease extent in 5/8. In the 16 discordant studies, PET/CT assessment was correct in 10, conventional imaging in 4 and there was insufficient information in 2. Conclusion: PET/CT has high or medium management impact in 44% of patients imaged for known or suspected pancreatic cancer, more commonly during restaging. Discordant PET/CT results were usually correct.

  14. FDG-PET/CT in oncology. German guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A.; Delbeke, D.; Kotzerke, J.; Minkov, V.; Reiser, M.; Willich, N.

    2007-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT examinations combine metabolic and morphologic imaging within an integrated procedure. Over the past decade PET/CT imaging has gained wide clinical acceptance in the field of oncology. This FDG-PET/CT guideline focuses on indications, data acquisition and processing as well as documentation of FDG-PET/CT examinations in oncologic patients within a clinical and social context specific to Germany. Background information and definitions are followed by examples of clinical and research applications of FDG-PET/CT. Furthermore, protocols for CT scanning (low dose and contrast-enhanced CT) and PET emission imaging are discussed. Documentation and reporting of examinations are specified. Image interpretation criteria and sources of errors are discussed. Quality control for FDG and PET/CT-systems, qualification requirements of personnel as well as legal aspects are presented. (orig.)

  15. The correlation between cell-free DNA and tumour burden was estimated by PET/CT in patients with advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, A D; Holdgaard, Paw; Spindler, K-L G

    2014-01-01

    Background:Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) circulating in the blood holds a possible prognostic value in malignant diseases. Under malignant conditions, the level of cfDNA increases but the biological mechanism remains to be fully understood. We aimed to examine the correlation between cfDNA and total tumour...... burden defined by positron emission tomography (PET) parameters.Methods:Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were enrolled into a prospective biomarker trial. Before treatment, plasma was extracted and the level of cfDNA was determined by qPCR. An (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F...... analysis. MTV>the median was associated with a significantly shorter OS (P=0.02). There was no significant difference in OS according to TLG (P=0.08).Conclusion:Cell-free DNA may not be a simple measure of tumour burden, but seems to reflect more complex mechanisms of tumour biology, making it attractive...

  16. Appropriateness criteria of FDG PET/CT in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    18 Fluorine-2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) is a well-established functional imaging method widely used in oncology. In this article, we have incorporated the various indications for 18 FDG PET/CT in oncology based on available evidence and current guidelines. Growing body of evidence for use of 18 FDG PET/CT in select tumors is also discussed. This article attempts to give the reader an overview of the appropriateness of using 18 F-FDG PET/CT in various malignancies

  17. Oral cancer diagnosed using PET/CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hee; Yang, Byoung Eun; Cho, Young Min [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Gon [Sam Anyang General Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    PET/CT is a new imaging technology that combines high-quality Position Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT). This imaging provides simultaneous anatomical and metabolic information. Therefore PET/CT is useful diagnostic modality for early detection og malignant tumor, accurate at aging, decision on therapeutic plan, monitoring response to therapy and rapid detection of recurrence. We report oral and maxillofacial cancers diagnosed by using PET/CT and the usefulness of PET/CT in the evaluation of postoperative recurrence.

  18. 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer: Evidence-based recommendations in initial staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresia Aroztegui, Ana Paula; García Vicente, Ana María; Alvarez Ruiz, Soledad; Delgado Bolton, Roberto Carlos; Orcajo Rincon, Javier; Garcia Garzon, Jose Ramon; de Arcocha Torres, Maria; Garcia-Velloso, Maria Jose

    2017-10-01

    Current guidelines do not systematically recommend 18F-FDG PET/CT for breast cancer staging; and the recommendations and level of evidence supporting its use in different groups of patients vary among guidelines. This review summarizes the evidence about the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging and the therapeutic and prognostic impact accumulated in the last decade. Other related aspects, such as the association of metabolic information with biology and prognosis are considered and evidence-based recommendations for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging are offered. We systematically searched MEDLINE for articles reporting studies with at least 30 patients related to clinical questions following the Problem/Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome framework. We critically reviewed the selected articles and elaborated evidence tables structuring the summarized information into methodology, results, and limitations. The level of evidence and the grades of recommendation for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in different contexts are summarized. Level III evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a weak recommendation in this population. In patients with locally advanced breast cancer, level II evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a strong recommendation in this population. In patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer, the metabolic information from baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT is associated with tumor biology and has prognostic implications, supported by level II evidence. In conclusion, 18F-FDG PET/CT is not recommended for staging all patients with early breast cancer, although evidence of improved regional and systemic staging supports its use in locally advanced

  19. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma; PET y PET/CT en melanoma maligno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  20. Nodal parameters of FDG PET/CT performed during radiotherapy for locally advanced mucosal primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma can predict treatment outcomes: SUVmean and response rate are useful imaging biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Peter [Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Liverpool BC, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Min, Myo; Forstner, Dion [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lee, Mark [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Holloway, Lois [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Bray, Victoria; Fowler, Allan [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic utility of nodal metabolic parameters derived from FDG PET/CT performed before radiotherapy (prePET) and during the third week of radiotherapy (iPET) in patients with mucosal primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (MPHNSCC). This analysis included 75 patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced node-positive MPHNSCC treated with radical radiotherapy and concurrent systemic therapy who underwent prePET and iPET: N1 11 patients, N2a 38, N2b 12, N2c 9, N3 5. The median follow-up was 28 months (9 - 70 months). The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesional glycolysis (TLG) of the index lymph node (node with the highest TLG) and the combined total lymph nodes, and their percentage reductions on iPET were determined, and the results were correlated with 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional, regional and distant metastatic failure-free survival (FFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Optimal cut-off values were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves. Cox regression univariate and multivariate analyses with clinical covariates were performed. Based on assessment of residual nodal metabolic burden during treatment, the iPET index node SUVmean (optimal cut-off value 2.95 g/ml) and the total node SUVmean (optimal cut-off value 3.25) were the best independent predictors of outcome in the multivariate analysis: index node SUVmean for DFS and OS p = 0.033 and 0.003, respectively, and the total node SUVmean for locoregional FFS, DFS and OS p = 0.028, 0.025 and 0.014, respectively. Based on the assessment of response rates during treatment, a reduction of more than 50 % in the total node TLG was the best biomarker for locoregional and regional FFS, DFS and OS in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.001, 0.016, 0.001 and 0.004, respectively), and reduction in the total node MTV for locoregional FFS, DFS and OS (p = 0.026, 0.003 and 0

  1. Correlating tumor metabolic progression index measured by serial FDG PET-CT, apparent diffusion coefficient measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and blood genomics to patient’s outcome in advanced colorectal cancer: the CORIOLAN study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleporte, Amelie; Charette, Nicolas; Machiels, Godelieve; Piccart, Martine; Flamen, Patrick; Hendlisz, Alain; Paesmans, Marianne; Garcia, Camilo; Vandeputte, Caroline; Lemort, Marc; Engelholm, Jean-Luc; Hoerner, Frederic; Aftimos, Philippe; Awada, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) may present various behaviours that define different courses of tumor evolution. There is presently no available tool designed to assess tumor aggressiveness, despite the fact that this is considered to have a major impact on patient outcome. CORIOLAN is a single-arm prospective interventional non-therapeutic study aiming mainly to assess the natural tumor metabolic progression index (TMPI) measured by serial FDG PET-CT without any intercurrent antitumor therapy as a prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) in patients with mCRC. Secondary objectives of the study aim to test the TMPI as a prognostic marker for progression-free survival (PFS), to assess the prognostic value of baseline tumor FDG uptake on PFS and OS, to compare TMPI to classical clinico-biological assessment of prognosis, and to test the prognostic value on OS and PFS of MRI-based apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and variation of vADC using voxel-based diffusion maps. Additionally, this study intends to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that correlate with progression of tumors and the OS of patients with mCRC. Consequently, this analysis will provide information about the signaling pathways that determine the natural and therapy-free course of the disease. Finally, it would be of great interest to investigate whether in a population of patients with mCRC, for which at present no known effective therapy is available, tumor aggressiveness is related to elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and to patient outcome. Tumor aggressiveness is one of the major determinants of patient outcome in advanced disease. Despite its importance, supported by findings reported in the literature of extreme outcomes for patients with mCRC treated with chemotherapy, no objective tool allows clinicians to base treatment decisions on this factor. The CORIOLAN study will characterize TMPI using FDG-PET-based metabolic imaging of patients with chemorefractory m

  2. Prospective evaluation of [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of standardized docetaxel first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced castration refractory prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M.; Krause, Bernd J. [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kundt, Guenther [Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Rostock (Germany); Retz, Margitta; Treiber, Uwe; Nawroth, Roman; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Thalgott, Mark [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Sakretz, Monique; Kurth, Jens [Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the value of [{sup 11}C] Choline PET/CT in monitoring early and late response to a standardized first-line docetaxel chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Thirty-two patients were referred for [{sup 11}C] Choline PET/CT before the start of docetaxel chemotherapy, after one and ten chemotherapy cycles (or - in case of discontinuation - after the last administered cycle) for therapy response assessment. [{sup 11}C] Choline uptake (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}), CT derived Houndsfield units (HU{sub max}, HU{sub mean}), and volume of bone, lung, and nodal metastases and local recurrence were measured semi-automatically at these timepoints. Change in SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, HU{sub max}, HU{sub mean,} and volume was assessed between PET 2 and 1 (early response assessment, ERA) and PET 3 and 1 (late response assessment, LRA) on a patient and lesion basis. Results of PET/CT were compared to clinically used RECIST 1.1 and clinical criteria based therapy response assessment including PSA for defining progressive disease (PD) and non-progressive disease (nPD), respectively. Relationships between changes of SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} (early and late) and changes of PSA{sub early} and PSA{sub late} were evaluated. Prognostic value of initial SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. In the patient-based ERA and LRA there were no statistically significant differences in change of choline uptake, HU, and volume between PD and nPD applying RECIST or clinical response criteria. In the lesion-based ERA, decrease in choline uptake of bone metastases was even higher in PD (applying RECIST criteria), whereas in LRA the decrease was higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There were only significant correlations between change in choline uptake and PSA in ERA in PD, in LRA no significant correlations were discovered. Initial SUV{sub max

  3. Prospective evaluation of [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of standardized docetaxel first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced castration refractory prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M.; Krause, Bernd J.; Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus; Kundt, Guenther; Retz, Margitta; Treiber, Uwe; Nawroth, Roman; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Thalgott, Mark; Sakretz, Monique; Kurth, Jens; Rummeny, Ernst J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the value of [ 11 C] Choline PET/CT in monitoring early and late response to a standardized first-line docetaxel chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Thirty-two patients were referred for [ 11 C] Choline PET/CT before the start of docetaxel chemotherapy, after one and ten chemotherapy cycles (or - in case of discontinuation - after the last administered cycle) for therapy response assessment. [ 11 C] Choline uptake (SUV max , SUV mean ), CT derived Houndsfield units (HU max , HU mean ), and volume of bone, lung, and nodal metastases and local recurrence were measured semi-automatically at these timepoints. Change in SUV max , SUV mean , HU max , HU mean, and volume was assessed between PET 2 and 1 (early response assessment, ERA) and PET 3 and 1 (late response assessment, LRA) on a patient and lesion basis. Results of PET/CT were compared to clinically used RECIST 1.1 and clinical criteria based therapy response assessment including PSA for defining progressive disease (PD) and non-progressive disease (nPD), respectively. Relationships between changes of SUV max and SUV mean (early and late) and changes of PSA early and PSA late were evaluated. Prognostic value of initial SUV max and SUV mean was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. In the patient-based ERA and LRA there were no statistically significant differences in change of choline uptake, HU, and volume between PD and nPD applying RECIST or clinical response criteria. In the lesion-based ERA, decrease in choline uptake of bone metastases was even higher in PD (applying RECIST criteria), whereas in LRA the decrease was higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There were only significant correlations between change in choline uptake and PSA in ERA in PD, in LRA no significant correlations were discovered. Initial SUV max and SUV mean were statistically significantly higher in nPD (applying clinical

  4. PET / MRI vs. PET / CT. Indications Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid techniques in Nuclear Medicine is currently a field in full development for diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. With the recent advent of PET / MRI much it speculated about whether or not it is superior to PET / CT especially in oncology. The Conference seeks to clarify this situation by dealing issues such as: State of the art technology PET / MRI; Indications Oncology; Some clinical cases. It concludes by explaining the oncological indications of both the real and current situation of the PET / MRI. (author)

  5. [Role of PET/CT in primitive non-small cell bronchopulmonary cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumia, Fdil; Leila, Achachi; Mohamed, Raoufi; Laila, Herrak; Mustapha, Elftouh

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary cancer is a real public health problem. Morphological imaging plays a central role in its diagnosis, staging as well as post-therapeutic assessment but it has some limitations. Metabolic imaging is a more recent technique which allows to significantly improve the overall imagery performance. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive and analytical study at the Ibn Sina Hospital and at the Military Hospital of instruction Mohammed V in Rabat over a period of 18 months, between September 2014 and February 2016, in order to evaluate the role of Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in the staging and restaging of non-small cell bronchopulmonary cancer. Initial staging showed a vast majority of locally advanced and metastatic stages: stage IV (40%), Stage IIIB (36%), Stage IIIA (16%), Stage II (8%). PET-CT allowed to detect new sites which were not initially seen on CT scan in 24 cases: 15 new ganglion sites, 8 new adrenal sites and 6 sites of bone lesions. PET/CT allowed to modify initial tumor stage in 60% of cases: upstaging in 23 patients (46%) and downstaging in 7 patients(14%). The initial stage remained unchanged in 40% of patients. Our study confirms the data from the literature concerning the superiority of PET-CT in comparison with CT scan, but only in the optimization of the non-small cell bronchopulmonary cancer management, in particular in locoregional and distant staging.

  6. Clinical impact of PET/CT imaging after adjuvant therapy in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Huan-Chun [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Oncology, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Chien-Yu [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taoyuan (China); Lee, Li-Yu [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Pathology, Taoyuan (China); Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taoyuan (China)

    2017-09-15

    This single-center retrospective study of prospectively collected data was aimed at comparing the clinical outcomes of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with symptomatic recurrences identified by PET/CT imaging following adjuvant therapy (Group A) versus those of cases with asymptomatic recurrences diagnosed through periodic post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance (Group B). We also sought to establish the priority of salvage therapy in the two study groups. We identified 111 patients with advanced resected OSCC who developed recurrences following adjuvant therapy (51 in Group A and 60 in Group B). Histopathology served as the gold standard for recurrent lesions. The impact of post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance was examined with Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The 2-year DSS and OS rates were marginally or significantly higher in Group B than in Group A (P = 0.073 and P = 0.025, respectively). Time-dependent ROC curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff values for time to positive PET/CT findings in relation to OS were 12 months for Group A and 9 months for Group B, respectively. Independent risk factors identified in multivariate analyses were used to devise two prognostic scoring systems for 2-year DSS and OS in each study group (all P < 0.001). Scheduled periodic PET/CT surveillance is a valuable tool for early detection of recurrent lesion(s) in asymptomatic OSCC patients who bear risk factors for disease recurrence. The presence of clinical symptoms and a short time to positive PET/CT findings were adverse prognostic factors for clinical outcome in patients with advanced OSCC. The priority of salvage therapy is discussed in each patient subgroup according to the devised prognostic scoring systems. (orig.)

  7. Using positron emission tomography (PET) response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST) 1.0 for evaluation of 2'-deoxy-2'-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose-PET/CT scans to predict survival early during treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fledelius, Joan; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Hjorthaug, Karin; Frøkiaer, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    The demand for early-response evaluation with 2'-deoxy-2'-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (F-18-FDG) positron emission tomography combined with whole body CT (PET/CT) is rapidly growing. This study was initiated to evaluate the applicability of the PET response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST 1.0) for response evaluation. We performed a retrospective study of 21 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who had undergone both a baseline and a follow-up F-18-FDG-PET/CT scan during their treatments. The scans were performed at our institution in the period September 2009 and March 2011 and were analysed visually and according to PERCIST 1.0 by one board-certified nuclear medicine physician. The response was compared with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The variation in key parameters affecting the F-18-FDG uptake was assessed. A kappa of 0.94 corresponding to an almost perfect agreement was found for the comparison of the visual evaluation with PERCIST. Patients with partial metabolic response and stable metabolic disease (as evaluated by PERCIST 1.0) had statistically significant longer median time to progression: 8.4 months (confidence interval (CI) 5.1-11.8 months) as compared with 2.7 months (CI 0-5.6 months) in patients classified with progression. The variation in uptake time between baseline and follow-up scans was more than the recommended 15 min in 48% of patients. PERCIST 1.0 is readily implementable and highly comparable with visual evaluation of response using early F-18-FDG-PET/CT scanning for locally advanced NSCLC patients. In spite of variations in parameters affecting F-18-FDG uptake, evaluation of F-18-FDG-PET/CT during treatment with PERCIST 1.0 is shown to separate non-responders from responders, each with statistically significant differences in both OS and PFS. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  8. Importance of PET/CT for imaging of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinel, F.G.; Schramm, N.; Graser, A.; Reiser, M.F.; Rist, C.; Haug, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) has emerged as a very useful imaging modality in the management of colorectal carcinoma. Data from the literature regarding the role of PET/CT in the initial diagnosis, staging, radiotherapy planning, response monitoring and surveillance of colorectal carcinoma is presented. Future directions and economic aspects are discussed. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET for colorectal cancer and endorectal ultrasound for rectal cancer. Combined FDG-PET/CT. While other imaging modalities allow superior visualization of the extent and invasion depth of the primary tumor, PET/CT is most sensitive for the detection of distant metastases of colorectal cancer. We recommend a targeted use of PET/CT in cases of unclear M staging, prior to metastasectomy and in suspected cases of residual or recurrent colorectal carcinoma with equivocal conventional imaging. The role of PET/CT in radiotherapy planning and response monitoring needs to be determined. Currently there is no evidence to support the routine use of PET/CT for colorectal screening, staging or surveillance. To optimally exploit the synergy between morphologic and functional information, FDG-PET should generally be performed as an integrated FDG-PET/CT with a contrast-enhanced CT component in colorectal carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  9. Anatomy and function: PET-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajander, Sami; Saraste, Antti; Ukkonen, Heikki; Knuuti, Juhani

    2010-05-01

    CT coronary angiography and perfusion PET form an attractive combination to study coronary artery lesions and their consequences in patients with coronary artery disease. Whereas CT provides non-invasive assessment of coronary lumen and wall, PET perfusion is a reliable method for the evaluation of myocardial flow. CT, although very capable of ruling out significant coronary artery disease, is less than satisfactory in assessing the actual significance of the detected lesions. PET imaging, despite its excellent sensitivity, fails to describe the exact anatomy of the epicardial vessels. By fusing image data from these two modalities, lesions can be accurately correlated with their physiological or anatomical counterparts. Hybrid PET-CT devices, now in wide clinical use, allow such fusion in a one-stop-shop study. Although still seeking its place in clinical scenarios, growing evidence suggests that hybrid PET-CT imaging of coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion can accurately - and non-invasively - assess the existence and degree of coronary artery disease.

  10. PET - CT, Diagnostic Priorities in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codorean, I.; Bugeag, G.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Cancer is one of the leading cause of death worldwide. Efficient therapy depends mainly on early detection of morbiduous process. It is known that cancer is starting at molecular level by a change of a gene which controls cell growth and behaviour, particularly by increased DNA synthesis and glucose local use as energetic background of anarchic cell multiplication. It has been proven that it takes a long period to time of 4-5 years to the moment when alterations of cell molecular structures have to expand to tissues and organs; for this reason, when detected by present available in our country diagnosis methods, including sectional techniques CT and MRI, cancer may not be cured. Surgical treatment, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may assure, in correlation with staging, a survival of no more than 4-5 years. The purpose of medical activity is early detection of cancer, before dissemination in other organs, to institute early, efficient therapy. Do we have such a detection technique? The answer is YES; its name is Fusion-Imaging PET-CT, largely introduced worldwide in clinical practice in last 5 years. Our presentation will show PET imaging principles; technologic bases of integrated PET-CT scanners, used positron radiotracers, protocol and clinic applications. We will present CT, PET and fusion images in detection and establishment of malignant substratum of solitary pulmonary nodules and other cancer types, post therapeutic staging and re-staging in lymphomas, breast cancer, uterine cervical cancer, gastric cancer and prostate cancer. (author)

  11. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming.

  12. Case report: PET/CT, a cautionary tale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jayson; Cook, Gary; Frank, John; Dina, Roberto; Livni, Naomi; Lynn, John; Fleming, William; Seckl, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The use of combined positron emission tomography/computerised tomography (PET/CT) scanners in oncology has been shown to improve the staging of tumours and the detection of relapses. However, mis-registration errors are increasingly recognised to be a common pitfall of PET/CT studies. We report a patient with a germ cell tumour of the testis, who underwent a PET/CT scan to detect the site of relapse with a view to surgical removal. However, the PET/CT scan mislocalised the tumour site to be within the T2 vertebral body. A subsequent endoscopic ultrasound scan however showed the tumour to be anterior to the vertebral body, which was confirmed at surgery. In this report, we highlight the artefactual mislocalisation errors which may occur with PET/CT imaging, and the need to review and verify these scans

  13. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J.E. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vos, Fidel J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssen, Marcel J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Dijk, Arie P.J. van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was 39 % and specificity was 93 %. The positive predictive value was 64 % and negative predictive value was 82 %. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18 %, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50 % (p = 0.181). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies. (orig.)

  14. PET and PET-CT. State of the art and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanti, Stefano; Franchi, Roberto; Battista, Giuseppe; Monetti, Nino; Canini, Romeo

    2005-01-01

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) enables the in vivo study of tissue metabolism, and thus is able to identify malignant tumours as hypermetabolic lesions by an increase in tracer uptake. Many papers have demonstrated both the relevant impact of FDG PET on staging of many cancers and the superior accuracy of the technique compared with conventional diagnostic methods for pre-treatment evaluation, therapy response evaluation and relapse identification. In particular PET was found useful in identifying lymph nodal and metastatic spread. thus altering patient management in more than 30% of cases. PET images, however, provide limited anatomical data, which in regions such as the head and neck, mediastinum and pelvic cavity is a significant drawback. The exact localization of lesions may also be difficult in some cases, on the basis of PET images alone. The introduction of combined PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners enables the almost simultaneous acquisition of transmission and emission images, thus obtaining optimal fusion images in a very short time. PET-CT fusion images enable lesions to be located, reducing false positive studies and increasing accuracy; the overall duration of examination may also be reduced. On the basis of both literature data and our experience we established the clinical indications when PET-CT may be particularly useful, in comparison with PET alone. It should also be underlined that the use of PET-CT is almost mandatory for new traces such as C-choline and C-methionine; these new tracers may be applied for studying tumours not assessable with FDG, such as prostate cancer. In conclusion PET-CT is at present the most advanced method for metabolic imaging, and is capable of precisely localizing and assessing tumours; fusion images reduce false positive and inconclusive studies, thus increasing diagnostic accuracy [it

  15. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J.E.; Vos, Fidel J.; Janssen, Marcel J.R.; Dijk, Arie P.J. van; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. 18 F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with 18 F-FDG PET/CT was 39 % and specificity was 93 %. The positive predictive value was 64 % and negative predictive value was 82 %. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased 18 F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18 %, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high 18 F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50 % (p = 0.181). 18 F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies. (orig.)

  16. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, T.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  17. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, T. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  18. Diagnostic and prognostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in recurrent germinal tumor carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Evangelista, Laura; Caobelli, Federico; Spallino, Marianna; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria; Midiri, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    unremarkable scan was associated also with a longer OS (98% after 2 years and 95% after 5 years, p = 0.02). At univariate Cox regression analysis, a pathological 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (HR = 24.3, CI 95% 14.1-40.6; p = 0.03) and lower OS (HR = 17.3 CI 95% 4,9-77; p < 0.001). Its prognostic value was confirmed also if tested against advanced disease at diagnosis and rising Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta (HCGB) or Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) (HR = 7.3 for STAGE III-PET+, p = 0.03; HR = 14.3 elevated HCGB-PET+, p = 0.02; HR 10.7 elevated AFP-PET+, p = 0.01) At multivariate analysis, only a pathological 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and advanced disease in terms of TNM staging were predictors of disease progression and OS. 18 F-FDG PET/CT showed incremental value over other variables both in predicting PFS (chi-square from 24 to 40, p < 0.001) and OS (chi-square from 32 to 38, p = 0.003). 18 F-FDG PET/CT has a very good diagnostic performance in patients with suspected recurrent GCT and has an important prognostic value in assessing the rate of PFS and OS. Furthermore, 18 F-FDG PET/CT impacted the therapeutic regimen in 23% of patients, thus providing a significant impact in the restaging process. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic and prognostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in recurrent germinal tumor carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo [IRCSS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); San Raffaele G. Giglio Institute, Department of Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Cefalu (Italy); Evangelista, Laura [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Unit, Padua (Italy); Caobelli, Federico [Basel University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Spallino, Marianna [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria [IRCSS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); Midiri, Massimo [San Raffaele G. Giglio Institute, Department of Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Cefalu (Italy); University of Palermo, Department of Radiology, DIBIMED, Palermo (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    38%, respectively; p = 0.02). An unremarkable scan was associated also with a longer OS (98% after 2 years and 95% after 5 years, p = 0.02). At univariate Cox regression analysis, a pathological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (HR = 24.3, CI 95% 14.1-40.6; p = 0.03) and lower OS (HR = 17.3 CI 95% 4,9-77; p < 0.001). Its prognostic value was confirmed also if tested against advanced disease at diagnosis and rising Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta (HCGB) or Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) (HR = 7.3 for STAGE III-PET+, p = 0.03; HR = 14.3 elevated HCGB-PET+, p = 0.02; HR 10.7 elevated AFP-PET+, p = 0.01) At multivariate analysis, only a pathological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan and advanced disease in terms of TNM staging were predictors of disease progression and OS. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed incremental value over other variables both in predicting PFS (chi-square from 24 to 40, p < 0.001) and OS (chi-square from 32 to 38, p = 0.003). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has a very good diagnostic performance in patients with suspected recurrent GCT and has an important prognostic value in assessing the rate of PFS and OS. Furthermore, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT impacted the therapeutic regimen in 23% of patients, thus providing a significant impact in the restaging process. (orig.)

  20. Towards truly integrated hardware fusion with PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, T.

    2005-01-01

    Combined PET/CT imaging is a non-invasive means of acquiring and reviewing both, the anatomy and the molecular pathways of a patient during a quasi-simultaneous examination. Since the introduction of the prototype PET/CT in 1998 this imaging technology has evolved rapidly. State-of-the-art PET/CT tomographs combine the latest technology in spiral, multi-slice CT and PET using novel scintillator materials and image reconstruction techniques. Together with novel patient positioning systems PET/CT tomographs allow to acquire complementary PET and CT data in a single exam with the best intrinsic co-registration. In addition to the hardware integration efforts have been made to integrate the acquisition and viewing software in PET/CT, thus making the diagnostic review and reporting more efficient. Based on the first clinical experiences and the technical evolution of combined imaging technology PET/CT has become a standard in diagnostic oncology. With high-performance imaging technology at hand today, standardized, high-quality PET/CT imaging protocols are needed to provide best oncology patient care. These protocols mandate the joint efforts of a multi-disciplinary team of physicians, physicists and radiochemists. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and bone scintigraphy for detection of bone metastases in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Steffen; Heusner, Till; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Univ. Hospital Essen, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)), email: steffen.hahn@uk-essen.de; Kuemmel, Sherko; Koeninger, Angelika (Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Univ. Hospital Essen, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)); Nagarajah, James; Mueller, Stefan; Boy, Christian; Bockisch, Andreas; Stahl, Alexander (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Essen, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany))

    2011-11-15

    Background Bone scintigraphy is the standard procedure for the detection of bone metastases in breast cancer patients. FDG-PET/CT has been reported to be a sensitive tool for tumor staging in different malignant diseases. However, its accuracy for the detection of bone metastases has not been compared to bone scintigraphy. Purpose To compare whole-body FDG-PET/CT and bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases on a lesion basis in breast cancer patients. Material and Methods Twenty-nine consecutive women (mean age 58 years, range 35-78 years) with histologically proven breast cancer were assessed with bone scintigraphy and whole-body FDG-PET/CT. Twenty-one patients (72%) were suffering from primary breast cancer and eight patients (28%) were in aftercare with a history of advanced breast cancer. Both imaging procedures were assessed for bone metastases by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician. Concordant readings between bone scintigraphy and FDG-PET/CT were taken as true. Discordant readings were verified with additional MRI imaging in all patients and follow-up studies in most patients. Results A total of 132 lesions were detected on bone scintigraphy, FDG-PET/CT or both. According to the reference standard, 70/132 lesions (53%) were bone metastases, 59/132 lesions (45%) were benign, and three lesions (2%) remained unclear. The sensitivity of bone scintigraphy was 76% (53/70) compared to 96% (67/70) for FDG-PET/CT. The specificity of bone scintigraphy and FDG-PET/CT was 95% (56/59) and 92% (54/59), respectively. According to the reference standard bone metastases were present in eight out of the 29 patients (28%), whereas 20 patients (69%) were free of bone metastases. One (3%) patient had inconclusive readings on both modalities as well as on MRI and follow-up studies. Bone scintigraphy and FDG-PET/CT correctly identified seven out of eight patients with bone metastases and 20 out of 20 patients free of metastases. Conclusion On a lesion

  2. PET-CT in the typification of unique pulmonary injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobos, P.; San Roman, Jose L.; Dalurzo, L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this document is to evaluate the usefulness of the PET-CT for the characterization of the unique pulmonary injuries. Retrospective analysis was made to patients with unique pulmonary injuries who carried out a PET-CT in the Italian Hospital between May of 2003 - March of 2005. Those patients with pulmonary outlying nodule, or unique pulmonary mass that had pathological anatomy of injury or follow-up through a computed tomography of thorax made with an interval of time not minor at 2 years of the PET-CT were included [es

  3. The effectiveness of FDG PET/CT for evaluation of intracardiac mass and pericardiac lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, H. S; Yun, M. J.; Lee, J. D

    2004-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography has been known to be useful in diagnosis and staging of malignancy. FDG PET has high sensitivity and easily detects malignant lesions that are missed and overlooked in anatomic imaging modality. We assessed the impact of FDG PET/CT compared to echocardiogram and enhanced CT scan. Five patients of intra- and pericardiac lesions were included in this study. All patients underwent PET/CT(GE Discovery ST), enhanced CT scan and echocardiogram. Two patients were non-small cell lung cancer, one of RV metastatic mass, the other of pericardial metastasis in RV region. One of melanoma with systemic metastases, had RA malignant masses. One of suspicious lung cancer and intracardiac mass, has proved to benign LA thrombosis. One of lymphoma showed suspicious cardiac mass, but revealed no abnormality in echocardiogram. FDG PET/CT is sensitive and useful method to detect intra- and pericardiac mass in patients with suspected malignancy. All patients except lymphoma were correctly diagnosed using FDG PET/ICT

  4. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... in PET/CT images. These results suggest that advanced therapies (such as SUV-based dose painting) will likely require breathing-adapted PET images and that the relevant SUV thresholds are yet to be investigated....

  5. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... uptake in PET/CT images. These results suggest that advanced therapies (such as SUV-based dose painting) will likely require breathing-adapted PET images and that the relevant SUV thresholds are yet to be investigated....

  6. TU-AB-202-07: A Novel Method for Registration of Mid-Treatment PET/CT Images Under Conditions of Tumor Regression for Patients with Locally Advanced Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, Hoda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI (United States); Zhang, Hong; Jin, Jian-Yyue; Kong, Feng-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, GRU Cancer Center, Augusta GA (United States); Chetty, Indrin J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Zhong, Hualiang

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In PET-guided adaptive radiotherapy (RT), changes in the metabolic activity at individual voxels cannot be derived until the duringtreatment CT images are appropriately registered to pre-treatment CT images. However, deformable image registration (DIR) usually does not preserve tumor volume. This may induce errors when comparing to the target. The aim of this study was to develop a DIR-integrated mechanical modeling technique to track radiation-induced metabolic changes on PET images. Methods: Three patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with adaptive radiotherapy under RTOG 1106. Two PET/CT image sets were acquired 2 weeks before RT and 18 fractions after the start of treatment. DIR was performed to register the during-RT CT to the pre-RT CT using a B-spline algorithm and the resultant displacements in the region of tumor were remodeled using a hybrid finite element method (FEM). Gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the during-RT PET/CT image sets and deformed using the 3D deformation vector fields generated by the CT-based registrations. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) was calculated using the pre- and during–RT image set. The quality of the PET mapping was evaluated based on the constancy of the mapped MTV and landmark comparison. Results: The B-spline-based registrations changed MTVs by 7.3%, 4.6% and −5.9% for the 3 patients and the correspondent changes for the hybrid FEM method −2.9%, 1% and 6.3%, respectively. Landmark comparisons were used to evaluate the Rigid, B-Spline, and hybrid FEM registrations with the mean errors of 10.1 ± 1.6 mm, 4.4 ± 0.4 mm, and 3.6 ± 0.4 mm for three patients. The hybrid FEM method outperforms the B-Spline-only registration for patients with tumor regression Conclusion: The hybrid FEM modeling technique improves the B-Spline registrations in tumor regions. This technique may help compare metabolic activities between two PET/CT images with regressing tumors. The author gratefully

  7. PET/CT. Dose-escalated image fusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Beyer, T.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate a gain in diagnostic accuracy by employing combined PET/CT instead of separate CT and PET imaging. However, whole-body PET/CT examinations result in a comparatively high radiation burden to patients and thus require a proper justification and optimization to avoid repeated exposure or over-exposure of patients. This review article summarizes relevant data concerning radiation exposure of patients resulting from the different components of a combined PET/CT examination and presents different imaging strategies that can help to balance the diagnostic needs and the radiation protection requirements. In addition various dose reduction measures are discussed, some of which can be adopted from CT practice, while others mandate modifications to the existing hard- and software of PET/CT systems. (orig.)

  8. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology......This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  9. Role of PET/CT for precision medicine in lung cancer: perspective of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Bennett S

    2017-12-01

    This article discusses the role of PET/CT in contributing to precision medicine in lung cancer, and provides the perspective of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) on this process. The mission and vision of SNMMI are listed, along with the guidance provided by SNMMI to promote best practice in precision medicine. Basic principles of PET/CT are presented. An overview of the use of PET/CT imaging in lung cancer is discussed. In lung cancer patients, PET/CT is vitally important for optimal patient management. PET/CT is essential in determining staging and re-staging of disease, detecting recurrent or residual disease, evaluating response to therapy, and providing prognostic information. PET/CT is also critically important in radiation therapy planning by determining the extent of active disease, including an assessment of functional tumor volume. The current approach in tumor imaging is a significant advance over conventional imaging. However, recent advances suggest that therapeutic response criteria in the near future will be based on metabolic characteristics and will include the evaluation of biologic characteristics of tumors to further enhance the effectiveness of precision medicine in lung cancer, producing improved patient outcomes with less morbidity.

  10. Detection of Extramedullary Multiple Myeloma in Liver by FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daeweung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Choi, Keum Ha; Kim, Chang Guhn

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old man with a painful mass lesion in the right shoulder that was detected by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Excisional biopsy revealed infiltration of plasma cells with anaplastic features, consistent with solitary plasmacytoma (PC). Serum analysis showed elevation of serum free lambda light chain levels (27.78 mg/l), with an abnormally high kappa:lambda ratio (2.33) and high total proteins (10.4 g/dl). Serum protein electrophoresis revealed an M spike in the gamma-globulin region (56.1 %=5.8 g/dl). Subsequently, 18 F-FDG PET/CT revealed another hypermetabolic mass in the right lobe of the liver. CT-guided biopsy of the liver lesion revealed plasma cell myeloma, consistent with multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma presenting as nodular liver masses is very rare in clinical practice. In a retrospective review of more than 2,000 patients, Talamo et al. reported only nine cases where there was nodular involvement of the liver by multiple myeloma. The organ most commonly involved was the liver, followed by pancreas, stomach, peritoneum with malignant ascites, colon, rectum, duodenum and ileum. Therefore, the literature published thus far has been limited to a few reports and case series. Among these reports, some had demonstrated the PET or PET/CT findings of nodular liver involvement of multiple myeloma. About 10 % of the solitary myelomas appeared as extramedullary PC or solitary PC of bone. In spite of the advances in therapy, the treatment of multiple myeloma is still palliative. However, solitary PC could be cured by resection or radiation therapy. Thus, differentiation between PC and multiple myeloma is essential in making a decision for the appropriate therapeutic regimen. 18 F-FDG PET/CT has the unique ability to detect and characterize malignant lesions in one single examination. Schirrmeister et al. reported that 18 F-FDG PET revealed

  11. Detection of Extramedullary Multiple Myeloma in Liver by FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daeweung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Choi, Keum Ha; Kim, Chang Guhn [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    We present the case of a 42-year-old man with a painful mass lesion in the right shoulder that was detected by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Excisional biopsy revealed infiltration of plasma cells with anaplastic features, consistent with solitary plasmacytoma (PC). Serum analysis showed elevation of serum free lambda light chain levels (27.78 mg/l), with an abnormally high kappa:lambda ratio (2.33) and high total proteins (10.4 g/dl). Serum protein electrophoresis revealed an M spike in the gamma-globulin region (56.1 %=5.8 g/dl). Subsequently, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT revealed another hypermetabolic mass in the right lobe of the liver. CT-guided biopsy of the liver lesion revealed plasma cell myeloma, consistent with multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma presenting as nodular liver masses is very rare in clinical practice. In a retrospective review of more than 2,000 patients, Talamo et al. reported only nine cases where there was nodular involvement of the liver by multiple myeloma. The organ most commonly involved was the liver, followed by pancreas, stomach, peritoneum with malignant ascites, colon, rectum, duodenum and ileum. Therefore, the literature published thus far has been limited to a few reports and case series. Among these reports, some had demonstrated the PET or PET/CT findings of nodular liver involvement of multiple myeloma. About 10 % of the solitary myelomas appeared as extramedullary PC or solitary PC of bone. In spite of the advances in therapy, the treatment of multiple myeloma is still palliative. However, solitary PC could be cured by resection or radiation therapy. Thus, differentiation between PC and multiple myeloma is essential in making a decision for the appropriate therapeutic regimen. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has the unique ability to detect and characterize malignant lesions in one single examination. Schirrmeister et al. reported that

  12. Preoperative PET/CT in early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernsdorf, M; Berthelsen, A K; Timmermans-Wielenga, Vera

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer.......The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer....

  13. Key technology PET/CT: usefulness, costs, expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoer, G.; Mohnike, W.

    2006-01-01

    PET/CT has been established as the most comprehensive imaging modality in oncology. This innovative method combines simplified examination techniques for whole body imaging, emphasizes the strength of nuclear medicine and combines these with radiological procedures. Further development of these combined imaging modalities requires to develop integrated diagnostic pathways, instruments of quality control and strategies to limit the number of examinations in order to assure the earliest and therapy relevant use of PET(/CT). (orig.)

  14. Dual tracer functional imaging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors using 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and 18F-FDG PET-CT: competitive or complimentary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naswa, Niraj; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Karunanithi, Sellam; Reddy, Rama Mohan; Patnecha, Manish; Lata, Sneh; Kumar, Rakesh; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT with F-FDG PET/CT in the patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Data of 51 patients with definite histological diagnosis of GEP-NET who underwent both Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT within a span of 15 days were selected for this retrospective analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated for Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT, and results were compared both on patientwise and regionwise analysis. Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT is superior to F-FDG PET-CT on patientwise analysis (P DOTA-NOC PET-CT is superior to F-FDG PET-CT only for lymph node metastases (P DOTA-NOC PET-CT detected more liver and skeletal lesions compared with F-FDG PET-CT, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, the results of combined imaging helped in selecting candidates who would undergo the appropriate mode of treatment, whether octreotide therapy or conventional chemotherapy Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT seems to be superior to F-FDG PET-CT for imaging GEP-NETs. However, their role seems to be complementary because combination of Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT in such patients helps demonstrate the total disease burden and segregate them to proper therapeutic groups.

  15. The usefulness of the combined PET-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kyosan

    2003-01-01

    Recently, combined PET-CT scanners that simultaneously reveal both anatomical and metabolic images within the body have been developed. The Siemens Biograph was the first PET-CT used in Japan and was installed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) at the end of March 2002. The Biograph system integrates Siemens PET (HR+) and spiral CT (SOMATOM Emotion Duo) technologies with a multimodality computer platform. The CT data obtained with PET-CT is also used for attenuation corrections of the PET images. The advantages of PET-CT for clinical use are much shorter study time for each patient, easy and precise alignment of the patient's lesion within the PET field of view, an increase in PET image quality due to the CT attenuation correction system which gives a higher spatial resolution and produces much less noise in the attenuation correction data, and an improvement in diagnostic accuracy provided by both functional and anatomic imaging. The Japanese government has not yet approved the marketing of PET-CT. We are continuing to investigate its usefulness. We expect that PET-CT will be a major diagnostic tool for oncology imaging in the near future. (authors)

  16. Clinical significance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT whole body imaging in detecting thyroid incidentaloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Ge; Li Biao; Zhang Miao; Xu Haoping; Jiang Xufeng; Wang Chao; Ge Guizhi; Shun Chengwei; Zhu Chengmo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT is a noninvasive whole-body imaging technique used to evaluate various types of malignancies. Recent advances have rapidly developed it into a diagnostic imaging modality in ontology. The aims of this study were two. One was to estimate the detection rate of thyroid indoleacetamide and the risk of thyroid malignancy by 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and the other Was to further understand whether the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) would be helpful in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid tumor. Methods: From June 2007 to January 2008, a total of 1190 subjects who had no previous history of thyroid cancer and had 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan were included. All had visual interpretation and semiquantitative analyses by SUV max at thyroid incidentalomas detected by FDG PET/CT. Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman relation analysis were used. Results: The prevalence of thyroid incidentaloma on 18 F-FDG PET/CT wag 2.1% (25/1190). Of these 25 tumors, 20 had histologically proven. Of these 20 tumors, 9 were benign and 11 were malignant (papillary carcinoma of thyroid gland in 9, follicular carcinoma of thyroid gland in 1, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma from lung cancer in 1). Therefore,the cancer risk of thyroid incidentaloma was 55% (11/20). Significantly higher SUV max in malignant than in benign nodules were observed (Kruskal-Wallis test,χ 2 =8.8, P max (3.0-46.0) and maximal diameter (1.0-4.2 cm) of nodule findings was insignificant (r=0.25, P>0.01). Conclusion: Thyroid incidentaloma detected by 18 F-FDG PET/CT has higher risk rate for thyroid malignancy.(authors)

  17. Observer variation in FDG PET-CT for staging of non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, Michael S. [St Thomas' Hospital, PET Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)]|[Southern Health, Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Smeeton, Nigel C. [King' s College London, Division of Health and Social Care Research, London (United Kingdom); Rankin, Sheila C.; Nunan, Tom; O' Doherty, Michael J. [St Thomas' Hospital, PET Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Error and variation in reporting remains one of the weakest features of clinical imaging despite enormous technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate agreement amongst experienced readers in staging non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with PET-CT. A series of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scans from 100 consecutive patients were reviewed independently by three experienced readers, with two readers reviewing each scan series a second time. Individual mediastinal lymph node stations were assessed as benign/inflammatory, equivocal or malignant, and AJCC N and M stage were also assigned. Kappa ({kappa}) was used to compare ratings from two categories and weighted kappa ({kappa}{sub w}) for three or more categories, and kappa values were interpreted according to the Landis-Koch benchmarks. Both intra- and interobserver agreement for N and M staging were high. For M staging there was almost perfect intra- and interobserver agreement ({kappa} = 0.90-0.93). For N staging, agreement was either almost perfect or substantial (intraobserver {kappa}{sub w} = 0.79, 0.91; interobserver {kappa}{sub w} = 0.75-0.81). Importantly, there was almost perfect agreement for N0/1 vs N2/3 disease ({kappa} = 0.80-0.97). Agreement for inferior and superior mediastinal nodes (stations 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9) was either almost perfect or substantial ({kappa}{sub w} = 0.71-0.88), but lower for hilar nodes (10; {kappa}{sub w} = 0.56-0.71). Interreporter variability was greatest for aortopulmonary nodes (5, 6; {kappa}{sub w} = 0.48-0.55). Amongst experienced reporters in a single centre, there was a very high level of agreement for both mediastinal nodal stage and detection of distant metastases with PET-CT. This supports the use of PET-CT as a robust imaging modality for staging NSCLC. (orig.)

  18. Observer variation in FDG PET-CT for staging of non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Michael S.; Smeeton, Nigel C.; Rankin, Sheila C.; Nunan, Tom; O'Doherty, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Error and variation in reporting remains one of the weakest features of clinical imaging despite enormous technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate agreement amongst experienced readers in staging non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with PET-CT. A series of 18 F-FDG PET-CT scans from 100 consecutive patients were reviewed independently by three experienced readers, with two readers reviewing each scan series a second time. Individual mediastinal lymph node stations were assessed as benign/inflammatory, equivocal or malignant, and AJCC N and M stage were also assigned. Kappa (κ) was used to compare ratings from two categories and weighted kappa (κ w ) for three or more categories, and kappa values were interpreted according to the Landis-Koch benchmarks. Both intra- and interobserver agreement for N and M staging were high. For M staging there was almost perfect intra- and interobserver agreement (κ = 0.90-0.93). For N staging, agreement was either almost perfect or substantial (intraobserver κ w = 0.79, 0.91; interobserver κ w = 0.75-0.81). Importantly, there was almost perfect agreement for N0/1 vs N2/3 disease (κ = 0.80-0.97). Agreement for inferior and superior mediastinal nodes (stations 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9) was either almost perfect or substantial (κ w = 0.71-0.88), but lower for hilar nodes (10; κ w = 0.56-0.71). Interreporter variability was greatest for aortopulmonary nodes (5, 6; κ w = 0.48-0.55). Amongst experienced reporters in a single centre, there was a very high level of agreement for both mediastinal nodal stage and detection of distant metastases with PET-CT. This supports the use of PET-CT as a robust imaging modality for staging NSCLC. (orig.)

  19. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhalisa, H., E-mail: dhalisa82@gmail.com; Rafidah, Z. [Kluster Oncology Science and Radiology, Advanced Medical Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Bertam, Penang (Malaysia); Mohamad, A. S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute, No 4 Jalan P7, Presint 7, Putrajaya (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  20. FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotter, Shane E.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Siegel, Barry A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of anal carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the anal canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved anal carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially more abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination

  1. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.; Zhao, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  2. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huiqian [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China and Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Udupa, Jayaram K., E-mail: jay@mail.med.upenn.edu; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A. [Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Zhao, Liming [Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 and Research Center of Intelligent System and Robotics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  3. Oncologic PET/CT: current status and controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, B.A.; Dehdashti, F.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of integrated PET/CT has dramatically increased the worldwide rate of growth for PET, predominantly for oncologic imaging with the glucose analog 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). A rapidly expanding body of literature demonstrates that the use FDG-PET/CT and the resultant ability to interpret coregistered and fused PET and CT images lead to improved observer confidence and improved diagnostic performance by comparison with PET alone, CT alone, and visually correlated PET and CT. The value of PET/CT is likely to be even greater with new PET radiopharmaceuticals under development, many of which produce PET images with even fewer anatomical landmarks than FDG images. PET/CT is also likely to lead to the resurrection of 18 F-fluoride as a principal agent for radionuclide bone imaging. There are a number of controversies related to PET/CT, including minimum training and experience requirements for interpreting physicians and defining new models for technical and professional reimbursement. (orig.)

  4. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J.; Straehler-Pohl, H.J.; Jaeger, U.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [de

  5. Influence of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT on therapy management in patients with stage III/IV malignant melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Susann-Cathrin; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Garbe, Claus [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Skin Cancer Programme, Department of Dermatology, Tuebingen (Germany); Fougere, Christian la [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the influence of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in comparison to CT alone on treatment decisions in patients with advanced melanoma and to analyse the 5-year survival data in comparison to literature data. Therapy management in 64 consecutive patients (primary staging n = 52; surveillance n = 12) with stage III/IV melanoma who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT between 2004 and 2005 in our department was retrospectively analysed. Treatment decisions were made by two dermatooncologists for each patient twice, first based on the CT results and then based on the PET/CT results. Therapy changes based on the PET/CT results were classified as ''major'' (e.g. change from metastasectomy to systemic therapy) or ''minor'' (e.g. change from first to second line chemotherapy). The 5-year survival data of different patient cohorts were calculated. In the 52 patients in the primary staging group, the results of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT led to therapy change in 59 % and a major therapy change in 52 %. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT led to the avoidance of futile operations in 13 patients with suspicious lesions on CT that were deemed nontumorous on PET/CT. In the 12 patients in the surveillance group, the results of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT led to therapy change in 33 % and a major change in 17 %. The 5-year survival rates were 30 % in the entire cohort, 34 % in the primary staging group, and 17 % in the surveillance group. A significant overall survival benefit was observed in patients in whom {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT excluded metastases or in whom metastases could be completely removed compared with patients who were not eligible for surgery (41 % vs. 10 %). Primary staging of patients with stage III/IV melanoma should be performed with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, leading to higher diagnostic accuracy and enabling individualized therapeutic management, especially optimal patient selection for metastasectomy. This strategy may extend long-term survival even in patients

  6. FDG-PET/CT and FLT-PET/CT for differentiating between lipid-poor benign and malignant adrenal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajo, Masatoyo; Jinguji, Megumi; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Yoshiura, Takashi [Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Kajiya, Yoriko; Tani, Atushi; Nakajo, Masayuki [Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan); Arimura, Hiroshi; Nishio, Yoshihiko [Kagoshima University, Department of Diabetes and Endocrine Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    To compare F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18-fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT examinations for differentiating between benign and malignant adrenal tumours. Thirty lipid-poor benign and 11 malignant tumours of 40 patients were included. FDG- and FLT-based indices including visual score, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and FDG adrenal lesion/liver SUVmax (A/L SUVmax) or FLT adrenal lesion/back muscle SUVmax (A/B SUVmax) ratio were compared between benign and malignant tumours using the Mann-Whitney's U or Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and their diagnostic performances were evaluated by means of the area under the curve (AUC) values derived from the receiver operating characteristic analysis. All indices were significantly higher in malignant than benign tumours on both images (p < 0.05 each). On FDG-PET/CT, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 91 %, 63 % and 71 % for visual score, 91 %, 67 % and 73 % for SUVmax, and 100 %, 70 % and 78 % for A/L SUVmax ratio, respectively. On FLT-PET/CT, they were 100 %, 97 % and 98 % for visual score, SUVmax and A/B SUVmax ratio, respectively. All FLT indices were significantly higher than those of FDG in AUC (p < 0.05 each). FLT-PET/CT may be superior to FDG-PET/CT in differentiating lipid-poor benign from malignant adrenal tumours because of higher specificity and accuracy. (orig.)

  7. The clinical application of PET/CT: a contemporary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Z.; Partridge, M.; Trapp, J.V.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners into a single PET CT scanner has resulted in significant improvements in the diagnosis and staging of disease, particularly in the field of oncology. A decade on from the publication of the details of the first PET/CT scanner, we review the technology and applications of the modality. We examine the design aspects of combining two different imaging types into a single scanner, and the artefacts produced such as attenuation correction, motion and CT truncation artefacts. The article also provides a discussion and literature review of the applications of PET/CT to date, covering detection of tumours, radiotherapy treatment planning, patient management, and applications external to the field of oncology.

  8. Evaluation of dosimetric techniques in positrons emission tomography and computerized tomography (PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Gabriella Montezano

    2014-01-01

    Among diagnostic techniques PET/CT is one of those with the highest dose delivery to the patient as a cause of external exposure to X-rays, and the use of a radiopharmaceutical that results in a high energy gamma emission. The dosimetry of these two components becomes important in order to optimize and justify the technique. Various dosimetric techniques are found in literature without a consensus of the best to use. With the advances in technological and consequent equipment configuration changes, upgrades and variation in methodologies, particularly in computed tomography, a standardization of these techniques is required. Previous studies show that CT is responsible for 70 % of the dose delivered to the patient in PET/CT examinations. Thus, many researchers have been focused on CT dose optimization protocols studies. This work analyzes the doses involved in a PET/CT oncology protocol by using an Alderson female anthropomorphic phantom in a public hospital of Rio de Janeiro city. The dose estimate for PET examination resulting from the use of 18 F - FDG radiopharmaceutical was conducted through dose factors published in ICRP 106; the dose for CT was estimated and compared by calculation of the absorbed doses to patients according to four methods: thermoluminescent dosimetry (TL0100) distributed in critical organs of the Alderson phantom; measurements of CTOI according to AAPM number 96; correction factor for effective diameter SSOE (AAPM Number 204); and simulation by ImPACT program For CT, the results in terms of effective dose presented (TLO, CTOI and ImPACT) ± 5 % maximum variations between methodologies. Considering medium absorbed dose (TLO, SSOE and ImPACT) the results differed in ± 7 % from each other. These findings demonstrate that parameters provided by the manufacturer on the console can be used to have a primary approach of both, absorbed and effective doses to the patient since that a quality assurance program of these parameters are adopted in

  9. Adenocarcinoma Prostate With Neuroendocrine Differentiation: Potential Utility of 18F-FDG PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT Over 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Tripathy, Sarthak; Datta Gupta, Shreya; Singhal, Abhinav; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is the upcoming imaging modality for staging, restaging and response assessment of prostate cancer. However, due to neuroendocrine differentiation in some of patients with prostate cancer, they express somatostatin receptors instead of prostate specific membrane antigen. This can be exploited and other modalities like Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and F-FDG PET/CT should be used in such cases for guiding management. We hereby discuss a similar case of 67-year-old man of adenocarcinoma prostate with neuroendocrine differentiation, which shows the potential pitfall of Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging and benefit of Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and F-FDG PET/CT in such cases.

  10. Development of ''Eminence STARGATE'' PET/CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Masato; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Amano, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    A PET/CT system, the combination of a PET (Positron Emission Tomography) system with an X-ray CT system, has been widely used in recent years. Our newly developed ''Eminence STARGATE'' PET/CT system allows the PET gantry and the X-ray CT gantry to move independently. This advantage provides high flexibility for PET examination and X-ray CT examination and also eases a patient's psychological anxiety about closed spaces. The system has a 16-slice X-ray CT scanner. (author)

  11. PET/CT in renal, bladder and testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Physician, Chief; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/CT is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in uro-oncology as well. In both bladder and renal cancer there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with only limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced in these malignancies. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder and testicular cancer. PMID:26099672

  12. PET or PET-CT with cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Taisong; Zhao Jinhua; Song Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    At present, cancer screening remains a lot of debate in contemporary medical practice. Many constitutes have done a lot of experiments in cancer screening. The same version is that recommendations and decisions regarding cancer screening should be based on reliable data, not self- approbation. Now, some institutes advocate 18 F-FDG PET or 18 F-FDG PET-CT for cancer screening, here, discussed status quo, potential financial, radiation safety and statistical data in 18 F-FDG PET or 18 F-FDG PET- CT cancer screening. (authors)

  13. The application of PET-CT in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Weijun; Feng Yanlin

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal neoplasm of uncertain malignant potential that arises predominantly in the gastrointestinal tract. Due to lack of specific physical signs, imagin g-x examination is an important auxiliary means in diagnosing gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Compared to other conventional imaging examinations, PET-CT has demonstrated unique superiority in staging, response evaluation and follow-up of gastrointestinal stromal tumor. And now it presents an overview of the application valuation of PET-CT and related imaging technology in gastrointestinal stromal tumor as follow. (authors)

  14. FDG PET/CT in children and adolescents with lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, Regine; Kurch, Lars; Montravers, Francoise; Mauz-Koerholz, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of FDG PET/CT applications in children and adolescents with lymphoma. Today, FDG PET is used for tailoring treatment intensity in children with Hodgkin lymphoma within the framework of international treatment optimisation protocols. In contrast, the role of this method in children with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is not well defined. This paper overviews clinical appearance and metabolic behaviour of the most frequent lymphoma subtypes in childhood. The main focus of the review is to summarise knowledge about the role of FDG PET/CT for initial staging and early response assessment. (orig.)

  15. Optimization of Protocol CT, PET-CT, whole body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Fredys Santos; Namias, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the acquisition protocols and processing existing of the CT PET/CT scanner for clinical use of Nuclear Diagnostic Center Foundation, a way to minimize the radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality properly. Dosimetric data of PET / CT service were surveyed and obtained the baseline against which we compare and define strategies and modifications to develop online. We selected transaxial up to the pulmonary hilum and liver slices as the anatomical regions of interest that led to the standardization of the study

  16. 18F-FDG-PET/CT Angiography for the Diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, A; Pizzi, M N; Cuéllar-Calàbria, H; Aguadé-Bruix, S

    2017-02-01

    This article reviews the current imaging role of 18 F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) combined with cardiac CT angiography (CTA) in infective endocarditis and discusses the strengths and limitations of this technique. The diagnosis of infective endocarditis affecting prosthetic valves and intracardiac devices is challenging because echocardiography and, therefore, the modified Duke criteria have well-recognized limitations in this clinical scenario. The high sensitivity of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT for the detection of infection associated with the accurate definition of structural damage by gated cardiac CTA in a combined technique (PET/CTA) has provided a significant increase in diagnostic sensitivity for the detection of IE. PET/CTA has proven to be a useful diagnostic tool in patients with suspected infective endocarditis. The additional information provided by this technique improves diagnostic performance in prosthetic valve endocarditis when it is used in combination with the Duke criteria. The findings obtained in PET/CTA studies have been included as a major criterion in the recently updated diagnostic algorithm in infective endocarditis guidelines.

  17. Initial experience with FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Cohade, Christian; Mourtzikos, Karen A.; Wahl, Richard L.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2006-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed FDG-PET/CT images in patients with breast cancer to determine whether PET/CT improved the level of diagnostic confidence as compared with PET and to compare PET/CT and CT findings at the location of suspected malignancies. The study included 75 patients with known breast cancer. The initial PET/CT study for each patient was retrospectively reviewed to determine whether improved diagnostic confidence (IDC) regarding lesion localization and characterization was observed with PET/CT as compared with PET alone. PET/CT and CT findings were compared regarding lesion characterization and staging in 69 of the 75 patients, and in the case of discordant findings, comparison with histological or informative follow-up results was also performed. Fifty of the 75 patients exhibited increased FDG uptake in a total of 95 regions. In the comparison of PET/CT and PET, PET/CT resulted in IDC in 30 (60%) of these 50 patients and in 52 (55%) of the 95 regions. In the comparison between PET/CT and CT in 69 patients, PET/CT demonstrated a significantly better accuracy than CT (P<0.05). PET/CT showed definitely positive findings in 60 regions with malignancies, among which CT exhibited positive findings in 43 (72%). PET/CT and CT accurately staged 59 (86%) and 53 (77%) of the 69 patients, respectively. (orig.)

  18. Prevalence of esophageal cancer during the pretreatment of hypopharyngeal cancer patients: Routinely performed esophagogastroduodenoscopy and FDG-PET/CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaminato, Shuichiro; Toriihara, Akira; Makino, Tomoko; Shibuya, Hitoshi [Dept. of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan)], Email: S.Nakaminato@gmail.com; Kawano, Tatsuyuki [Dept. of Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Kishimoto, Seiji [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Background. The prevalence of esophageal cancer accompanied by hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) is high and increasing rapidly in Asia. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the prevalence of esophageal cancer during the pretreatment of HPC patients who were routinely examined using esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and to discuss the utility of these examinations. Material and methods. Between September 2005 and September 2010, 33 patients with newly diagnosed HPC (all with squamous cell carcinoma) underwent EGD (after a conventional endoscopy, iodine staining was performed) and FDG-PET/CT examinations. We evaluated the prevalence of esophageal cancer among HPC patients according to the EGD findings and determined the sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT for the detection of esophageal primary tumors for each clinical T classification. Results. In 17 of the 33 patients (51.5%), 29 biopsy-proven esophageal squamous cell carcinomas were diagnosed using EGD. In eight of the 17 (47.1%) patients, two or more esophageal cancer lesions were diagnosed. Twenty-four of the 29 (82.8%) lesions were superficial esophageal cancers, and the remaining five (17.2%) lesions were advanced esophageal cancers. In six of the 29 (20.7%) esophageal cancer lesions that were detected using FDG-PET/CT, only one of the 29 (3.4%) lesions was evaluated as being equivocal; the remaining 22 (75.9%) lesions were not detected. The distribution of the clinical T classifications detected using FDG-PET/CT was as follows: T1a, 0/21 (0%); T1b, 1/3 (33%); and T3, 5/5 (100%). Conclusions. The prevalence of esophageal cancer during the pretreatment of HPC patients was 51.5%; this prevalence was higher than that in previous reports. We believe that the increasing proportion of superficial lesions (82.8%) detected using iodine staining and EGD may have led to the relatively high prevalence. FDG-PET/CT detected only 20.7% of the esophageal cancers

  19. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  20. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  1. Optimization of Protocol CT, PET-CT, whole body; Optimizacion de protocolo CT, en PET-CT, de cuerpo entero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Fredys Santos, E-mail: fsantos@ccss.sa.cr [Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (ACCPR/CCSS), San Jose (Costa Rica). Area Control de Calidade Y Proteccion Radiologica; Namias, Mauro, E-mail: mnamias@gmail.com [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (FCDN/CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Fundacion Centro Diagnostico Nuclear

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the acquisition protocols and processing existing of the CT PET/CT scanner for clinical use of Nuclear Diagnostic Center Foundation, a way to minimize the radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality properly. Dosimetric data of PET / CT service were surveyed and obtained the baseline against which we compare and define strategies and modifications to develop online. We selected transaxial up to the pulmonary hilum and liver slices as the anatomical regions of interest that led to the standardization of the study.

  2. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia O, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  3. PET/CT Atlas on Quality Control and Image Artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging has become a routine procedure in diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The clinical review of both PET and PET/CT images requires a thorough understanding of the basics of image formation as well as an appreciation of variations of inter-patient and intra-patient image appearance. Such variations may be caused by variations in tracer accumulation and metabolism, and, perhaps more importantly, by image artefacts related to methodological pitfalls of the two modalities. This atlas on quality control (QC) and PET/CT artefacts provides guidance on typical image distortions in clinical PET/CT usage scenarios. A number of cases are presented to provide nuclear medicine and radiology professionals with an assortment of examples of possible image distortions and errors in order to support the correct interpretation of images. About 70 typical PET and PET/CT cases, comprised of image sets and cases, have been collected in this book, and all have been catalogued and have explanations as to the causes of and solutions to each individual image problem. This atlas is intended to be used as a guide on how to take proper QC measures, on performing situation and problem analysis, and on problem prevention. This book will be especially useful to medical physicists, physicians, technologists and service engineers in the clinical field

  4. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2011-01-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is becoming increasingly available as an imaging modality in veterinary medicine. The purpose of this study was to report semiquantitative standard uptake values (SUV) of malignant and nonmalignant tissues...

  5. [PET/CT: protocol aspects and legal controversies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorospe Sarasúa, L; Vicente Bártulos, A; González Gordaliza, C; García Poza, J; Lourido García, D; Jover Díaz, R

    2008-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) in a single scanner (PET/CT) allows anatomic and metabolic images to be fused and correlated with a high degree of accuracy; this represents a very important landmark in the history of medicine and especially in the area of diagnostic imaging. Nevertheless, the implementation, startup, and operation of a PET/CT scanner presents particularly interesting challenges, because it involves the integration of two well-established and consolidated techniques (CT and PET, which provide complementary information) that have traditionally been carried out in the context of two different specialties (radiology and nuclear medicine). The rapid diffusion of this new integrated technology raises a series of questions related to the optimal protocols for image acquisition, the supervision of the examinations, image interpretation, and reporting, as well as questions related to the legal competence and responsibility of the specialists involved in a PET/CT study. The objective of this article is to approach these aspects from a constructive perspective and to stimulate the dialog between the specialties of radiology and nuclear medicine, with the aim of maximizing the diagnostic potential of PET/CT and thus of providing better care for patients.

  6. Effective dose and cancer risk in PET/CT exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Gabriella M.; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de

    2013-01-01

    Due to the use of radiopharmaceutical positron-emitting in PET exam and realization of tomography by x-ray transmission in CT examination, an increase of dose with hybrid PET/CT technology is expected. However, differences of doses have been reported in many countries for the same type of procedure. It is expected that the dose is an influent parameter to standardize the protocols of PET/CT. This study aimed to estimate the effective doses and absorbed in 65 patients submitted to oncological Protocol in a nuclear medicine clinic in Rio de Janeiro, considering the risk of induction of cancer from the scan. The CT exam-related doses were estimated with a simulator of PMMA and simulated on the lmPACT resistance, which for program effective dose, were considered the weight factors of the lCRP 103. The PET exam doses were estimated by multiplying the activity administered to the patient with the ICRP dose 80 factors. The radiological risk for cancer incidence were estimated according to the ICRP 103. The results showed that the effective dose from CT exam is responsible for 70% of the effective total in a PET/CT scan. values of effective dose for the PET/CT exam reached average values of up to 25 mSv leading to a risk of 2, 57 x 10 -4 . Considering that in staging of oncological diseases at least four tests are performed annually, the total risk comes to 1,03x 10 -3

  7. FDG-PET/CT in Skeletal Muscle: Pitfalls and Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-07-01

    FDG-PET/CT is an integral part of modern-day practice of medicine. By detecting increased cellular metabolism, FDG-PET/CT can help us detect infection, inflammatory disorders, or tumors, and also help us in prognostication of patients. However, one of the most important challenges is to correctly differentiate the abnormal uptake that is potentially pathologic from the physiological uptake. So while interpreting a PET/CT, one must be aware of normal biodistribution and different physiological variants of FDG uptake. Skeletal muscles constitute a large part of our body mass and one of the major users of glucose. Naturally, they are often the site of increased FDG uptake in a PET study. We as a nuclear medicine physician must be aware of all the pitfalls of increased skeletal muscle uptake to differentiate between physiological and pathologic causes. In this review, we have discussed the different causes and patterns of physiological FDG uptake in skeletal muscles. This knowledge of normal physiological variants of FDG uptake in the skeletal muscles is essential for differentiating pathologic uptake from the physiological ones. Also, we reviewed the role of FDG-PET/CT in various benign and malignant diseases involving skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance characteristics of 3D GSO PET/CT scanner (Philips GEMINI PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Byeong Il; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2004-01-01

    Philips GEMINI is a newly introduced whole-body GSO PET/CT scanner. In this study, performance of the scanner including spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, noise equivalent count ratio (NECR) was measured utilizing NEMA NU2-2001 standard protocol and compared with performance of LSO, BGO crystal scanner. GEMINI is composed of the Philips ALLEGRO PET and MX8000 D multi-slice CT scanners. The PET scanner has 28 detector segments which have an array of 29 by 22 GSO crystals (4*6*20 mm), covering axial FOV of 18 cm. PET data to measure spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and NECR were acquired in 3D mode according to the NEMA NU2 protocols (coincidence window: 8 ns, energy window : 409∼664 keV). For the measurement of spatial resolution, images were reconstructed with FBP using ramp filter and an iterative reconstruction algorithm, 3D RAMLA. Data for sensitivity measurement were acquired using NEMA sensitivity phantom filled with F-18 solution and surrounded by 1∼5 aluminum sleeves after we confirmed that dead time loss did not exceed 1%. To measure NECR and scatter fraction, 1110 MBq of F-18 solution was injected into a NEMA scatter phantom with a length of 70 cm and dynamic scan with 20-min frame duration was acquired for 7 half-lives. Oblique sinograms were collapsed into transaxial slices using single slice rebinning method, and true to background (scatter + random) ratio for each slice and frame was estimated. Scatter fraction was determined by averaging the true to background ratio of last 3 frames in which the dead time loss was below 1%. Transverse and axial resolutions at 1 cm radius were (1) 5.3 and 6.5 mm (FBP), (2) 5.1 and 5.9 mm (3D RAMLA). Transverse radial, transverse tangential, and axial resolution at 10 cm were (1) 5.7, 5.7, and 7.0 mm (FBP), (2) 5.4, 5.4, and 6.4 mm (3D RAMLA). Attenuation free values of sensitivity were 3,620 counts/sec/MBq at the center of transaxial FOV and 4,324 counts/sec/MBq at 10 cm offset

  9. PET/CT diagnostic of colo-rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straciuc, O.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Objective: Presenting the advantages of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/ CT) examination, using the radiotracer fluorure 18-deoxyglucose (FDG) in colo-rectal cancer diagnostic. Basics of the method will be also presented. Introduction: FDG PET/CT is recognized as the most efficient diagnostic imaging weapon in colorectal cancer, enable too comprehend all the 3 targets needed for staging of colo-rectal cancers: 1)Detection and evaluation of primary tumor (T) and recurrence; 2) Lymphadenopathy (N); 3)Metastatic disease (M). Assessment of treatment response during and after therapy, follow up and radiotherapy planning are also indications for PET/CT. There are two essential advantages of the method: 1)The whole body examination; 2)The complementary morphological information offered by CT and functional information offered by PET. Material and methods: Study of a total of 394 patients diagnosed with colo-rectal cancer of the total of 4125 investigated by PET/CT in Diagnosztika Pozitron center of Oradea, between 01.06.2008 - 06.06.2012. All cases had documented preoperative or postoperative histopathologic evaluation. We used a Siemens Biograph 16 device and only FDG as radiotracer, injected intravenously at a dose of 0.1-0.15 mCi /kg. Standard protocol of examination was performed at 60 minutes after FDG injection. CT acquisition consists of 'low dose' from vertex to thighs, followed by PET acquisition in 7 to 8 beds. Results: We followed the performance of PET/CT diagnostic in staging and restaging of colorectal cancer compared with other imaging methods. 141 patients had negative examinations. 107 patients were diagnosed with locally recurrent lesions, lymphadenopathy and/ or metastases. Compared with the results of previous imaging new metabolically active lesions were detected in 87 patients by PET/CT and suspected lesions were denied in 48 patients. Significant clinically cases are presented. Conclusions: The data obtained by PET

  10. An exploratory study of volumetric analysis for assessing tumor response with (18)F-FAZA PET/CT in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Gerald S M A; Bollineni, Vikram R; Hiltermann, Thijo J N; Sijtsema, Nanna M; Fischer, Alexander; Bongaerts, Alphons H H; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J M

    2016-12-01

    Hypoxia is associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is randomly distributed within malignancies. Characterization of changes in intratumoral hypoxic regions is possible with specially developed PET tracers such as (18)F-fluoroazomycin arabinoside ((18)F-FAZA) while tumor metabolism can be measured with 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). The purpose of this study was to study the effects of chemotherapy on (18)F-FAZA and (18)F-FDG uptake simultaneously in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients At baseline and after the second chemotherapy cycle, both PET/CT with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FAZA was performed in seven patients with metastasized NSCLC. (18)F-FAZA and (18)F-FDG scans were aligned with deformable image registration using Mirada DBx. The primary tumors were contoured, and on the (18)F-FDG scan, volumes of interest (VOI) were drawn using a 41 % adaptive threshold technique. Subsequently, the resulting VOI was transferred to the (18)F-FAZA scan. (18)F-FAZA maximum tumor-to-background (T/Bgmax) ratio and the fractional hypoxic volume (FHV) were assessed. Measurements were corrected for partial volume effects. Finally, a voxel-by-voxel analysis of the primary tumor was performed to assess regional uptake differences. In the primary tumor of all seven patients, median (18)F-FDG standard uptake value (SUVmax) decreased significantly (p = 0.03). There was no significant decrease in (18)F-FAZA uptake as measured with T/Bgmax (p = 0.24) or the FHV (p = 0.35). Additionally, volumetric voxel-by-voxel analysis showed that low hypoxic tumors did not significantly change in hypoxic status between baseline and two cycles of chemotherapy, whereas highly hypoxic tumors did. Individualized volumetric voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed that hypoxia and metabolism were not associated before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Tumor hypoxia and metabolism are independent dynamic events as measured by (18)F-FAZA PET and (18)F

  11. Decreased occipital lobe metabolism by FDG-PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnes, Lilja; Nalluri, Abhinav; Cohen, Jesse; Jones, Krystyna M.; Zan, Elcin; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Venkatesan, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare brain metabolism patterns on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT in anti–NMDA receptor and other definite autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and to assess how these patterns differ between anti–NMDA receptor neurologic disability groups. Methods: Retrospective review of clinical data and initial dedicated brain FDG-PET/CT studies for neurology inpatients with definite AE, per published consensus criteria, treated at a single academic medical center over a 10-year period. Z-score maps of FDG-PET/CT were made using 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projections in comparison to age group–matched controls. Brain region mean Z scores with magnitudes ≥2.00 were interpreted as significant. Comparisons were made between anti–NMDA receptor and other definite AE patients as well as among patients with anti–NMDA receptor based on modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at the time of FDG-PET/CT. Results: The medial occipital lobes were markedly hypometabolic in 6 of 8 patients with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis and as a group (Z = −4.02, interquartile range [IQR] 2.14) relative to those with definite AE (Z = −2.32, 1.46; p = 0.004). Among patients with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis, the lateral and medial occipital lobes were markedly hypometabolic for patients with mRS 4–5 (lateral occipital lobe Z = −3.69, IQR 1; medial occipital lobe Z = −4.08, 1) compared with those with mRS 0–3 (lateral occipital lobe Z = −0.83, 2; p occipital lobe Z = −1.07, 2; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Marked medial occipital lobe hypometabolism by dedicated brain FDG-PET/CT may serve as an early biomarker for discriminating anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis from other AE. Resolution of lateral and medial occipital hypometabolism may correlate with improved neurologic status in anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis. PMID:29159205

  12. SU-E-J-254: Evaluating the Role of Mid-Treatment and Post-Treatment FDG-PET/CT in Predicting Progression-Free Survival and Distant Metastasis of Anal Cancer Patients Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H; Wang, J; Chuong, M; D’Souza, W; Choi, W; Lu, W; Latifi, K; Hoffe, S; Moros, E; Saeed, Nadia; Tan, S; Shridhar, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of mid-treatment and post-treatment FDG-PET/CT in predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and distant metastasis (DM) of anal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 17 anal cancer patients treated with CRT were retrospectively studied. The median prescription dose was 56 Gy (range, 50–62.5 Gy). All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before and after CRT. 16 of the 17 patients had an additional FDG-PET/CT image at 3–5 weeks into the treatment (denoted as mid-treatment FDG-PET/CT). 750 features were extracted from these three sets of scans, which included both traditional PET/CT measures (SUVmax, SUVpeak, tumor diameters, etc.) and spatialtemporal PET/CT features (comprehensively quantify a tumor’s FDG uptake intensity and distribution, spatial variation (texture), geometric property and their temporal changes relative to baseline). 26 clinical parameters (age, gender, TNM stage, histology, GTV dose, etc.) were also analyzed. Advanced analytics including methods to select an optimal set of predictors and a model selection engine, which identifies the most accurate machine learning algorithm for predictive analysis was developed. Results: Comparing baseline + mid-treatment PET/CT set to baseline + posttreatment PET/CT set, 14 predictors were selected from each feature group. Same three clinical parameters (tumor size, T stage and whether 5-FU was held during any cycle of chemotherapy) and two traditional measures (pre- CRT SUVmin and SUVmedian) were selected by both predictor groups. Different mix of spatial-temporal PET/CT features was selected. Using the 14 predictors and Naive Bayes, mid-treatment PET/CT set achieved 87.5% accuracy (2 PFS patients misclassified, all local recurrence and DM patients correctly classified). Post-treatment PET/CT set achieved 94.0% accuracy (all PFS and DM patients correctly predicted, 1 local recurrence patient misclassified) with logistic regression, neural network or

  13. SU-E-J-254: Evaluating the Role of Mid-Treatment and Post-Treatment FDG-PET/CT in Predicting Progression-Free Survival and Distant Metastasis of Anal Cancer Patients Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Wang, J; Chuong, M; D’Souza, W; Choi, W; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Latifi, K; Hoffe, S; Moros, E [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Saeed, Nadia [Brwon University, Providence, RI (United States); Tan, S [Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan (China); Shridhar, R [Florida Hospital, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of mid-treatment and post-treatment FDG-PET/CT in predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and distant metastasis (DM) of anal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 17 anal cancer patients treated with CRT were retrospectively studied. The median prescription dose was 56 Gy (range, 50–62.5 Gy). All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before and after CRT. 16 of the 17 patients had an additional FDG-PET/CT image at 3–5 weeks into the treatment (denoted as mid-treatment FDG-PET/CT). 750 features were extracted from these three sets of scans, which included both traditional PET/CT measures (SUVmax, SUVpeak, tumor diameters, etc.) and spatialtemporal PET/CT features (comprehensively quantify a tumor’s FDG uptake intensity and distribution, spatial variation (texture), geometric property and their temporal changes relative to baseline). 26 clinical parameters (age, gender, TNM stage, histology, GTV dose, etc.) were also analyzed. Advanced analytics including methods to select an optimal set of predictors and a model selection engine, which identifies the most accurate machine learning algorithm for predictive analysis was developed. Results: Comparing baseline + mid-treatment PET/CT set to baseline + posttreatment PET/CT set, 14 predictors were selected from each feature group. Same three clinical parameters (tumor size, T stage and whether 5-FU was held during any cycle of chemotherapy) and two traditional measures (pre- CRT SUVmin and SUVmedian) were selected by both predictor groups. Different mix of spatial-temporal PET/CT features was selected. Using the 14 predictors and Naive Bayes, mid-treatment PET/CT set achieved 87.5% accuracy (2 PFS patients misclassified, all local recurrence and DM patients correctly classified). Post-treatment PET/CT set achieved 94.0% accuracy (all PFS and DM patients correctly predicted, 1 local recurrence patient misclassified) with logistic regression, neural network or

  14. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study...... was to validate automated methods for extracting FSV directly from dynamic PET studies for two different tracers and to examine potential scanner hardware bias. Methods: 21 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner (scanner I). In addition, 8...... subjects underwent a dynamic 6 min 15O-water PET scan followed by a 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a GE Discovery ST PET/CT scanner (scanner II). The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic...

  15. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18 F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18 F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18 F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management

  16. (18)F-FDG PET-CT simulation for non-small-cell lung cancer: effect in patients already staged by PET-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Gerard G; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J; Stewart, David P; Cosgrove, Vivian P; Eakin, Ruth L; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H; Young, V A Linda; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Hounsell, Alan R

    2010-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV(CT) to GTV(FUSED) was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  17. 18F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV CT to GTV FUSED was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  18. PET-CT in the evaluation of metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, A.M.; Fulham, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent two PET-CT scans for the evaluation of metastatic breast cancer. A radical left mastectomy with axillary dissection (1 of 43 nodes positive) followed by chemotherapy, was performed in 1998. She represented in October 2003 with a left supraclavicular fossa mass. This was confirmed to be recurrent breast cancer on FNAB. She was considered for a radical neck dissection and the surgeon requested a PET scan. Other imaging at this time included a normal bone scan and CT brain. CT neck/chest/abdomen/pelvis showed soft tissue thickening in the left lower neck. The PET-CT scan showed multiple glucose avid lesions in the sternum, mediastinum and neck lymph nodes as well as a small lesion in the proximal left femur consistent with extensive metastatic disease. Surgery was cancelled and Femara chemotherapy commenced. Femara was stopped in March 2004 and the patient began alternative therapies. In October 2004 she presented to her surgeon with new back and chest pain. CT of the neck/chest/abdomen/pelvis showed a soft tissue mass in the upper sternum and a lymph node at the base of the neck highly suspicious for metastatic disease. There were also 2 suspicious lung nodules and a lesion in the proximal left femur reported as an osteoid osteoma. Wholebody PET-CT scans were performed on a Siemens LSO Biograph, 60mins after the injection of 350Mbq of Fl 8-Fag, with arms at the patient's side and head in the field-of-view. On both occasions the patient had to pay for the scan. On the 2004 PET-CT scan, the CT brain revealed multiple hyperdense lesions consistent with hemorrhagic metastases. In addition, there were innumerable glucose avid foci involving viscera, nodes and skeleton consistent with disseminated disease. Our case illustrates: (i) the value of PET in the management of metastatic breast cancer; (ii) the improved accuracy of PET-CT in delineating sites of disease; (iii) the issues of head movement in PET-CT and. (iv) the problem with lack of

  19. Detection of unknown primary neuroendocrine tumours (CUP-NET) using 68Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Vikas; Baum, Richard P.; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano; Hommann, Merten; Hoersch, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    This bi-centric study aimed to determine the role of receptor PET/CT using 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC in the detection of undiagnosed primary sites of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and to understand the molecular behaviour of the primarily undiagnosed tumours. Overall 59 patients (33 men and 26 women, age: 65 ± 9 years) with documented NET and unknown primary were enrolled. PET/CT was performed after injection of approximately 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) of 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUV max ) were calculated and compared with SUV max in known pancreatic NET (pNET) and ileum/jejunum/duodenum (SI-NET). The results of PET/CT were also correlated with CT alone. In 35 of 59 patients (59%), 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT localised the site of the primary: ileum/jejunum (14), pancreas (16), rectum/colon (2), lungs (2) and paraganglioma (1). CT alone (on retrospective analyses) confirmed the findings in 12 of 59 patients (20%). The mean SUV max of identified previously unknown pNET and SI-NET were 18.6 ± 9.8 (range: 7.8-34.8) and 9.1 ± 6.0 (range: 4.2-27.8), respectively. SUV max in patients with previously known pNET and SI-NET were 26.1 ± 14.5 (range: 8.7-42.4) and 11.3 ± 3.7 (range: 5.6-17.9). The SUV max of the unknown pNET and SI-NET were significantly lower (p 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT, 6 of 59 patients were operated and the primary was removed (4 pancreatic, 1 ileal and 1 rectal tumour) resulting in a management change in approximately 10% of the patients. In the remaining 29 patients, because of the far advanced stage of the disease (due to distant metastases), the primary tumours were not operated. Additional histopathological sampling was available from one patient with bronchial carcinoid (through bronchoscopy). Our data indicate that 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is highly superior to 111 In-OctreoScan (39% detection rate for CUP according to the literature) and can play a major role in the management of patients with CUP-NET. (orig.)

  20. Detection of unknown primary neuroendocrine tumours (CUP-NET) using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikas; Baum, Richard P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET/CT, Bad Berka (Germany); Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Hommann, Merten [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Bad Berka (Germany); Hoersch, Dieter [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Oncology and Endocrinology, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    This bi-centric study aimed to determine the role of receptor PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC in the detection of undiagnosed primary sites of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and to understand the molecular behaviour of the primarily undiagnosed tumours. Overall 59 patients (33 men and 26 women, age: 65 {+-} 9 years) with documented NET and unknown primary were enrolled. PET/CT was performed after injection of approximately 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were calculated and compared with SUV{sub max} in known pancreatic NET (pNET) and ileum/jejunum/duodenum (SI-NET). The results of PET/CT were also correlated with CT alone. In 35 of 59 patients (59%), {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT localised the site of the primary: ileum/jejunum (14), pancreas (16), rectum/colon (2), lungs (2) and paraganglioma (1). CT alone (on retrospective analyses) confirmed the findings in 12 of 59 patients (20%). The mean SUV{sub max} of identified previously unknown pNET and SI-NET were 18.6 {+-} 9.8 (range: 7.8-34.8) and 9.1 {+-} 6.0 (range: 4.2-27.8), respectively. SUV{sub max} in patients with previously known pNET and SI-NET were 26.1 {+-} 14.5 (range: 8.7-42.4) and 11.3 {+-} 3.7 (range: 5.6-17.9). The SUV{sub max} of the unknown pNET and SI-NET were significantly lower (p < 0.05) as compared to the ones with known primary tumour sites; 19% of the patients had high-grade and 81% low-grade NET. Based on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT, 6 of 59 patients were operated and the primary was removed (4 pancreatic, 1 ileal and 1 rectal tumour) resulting in a management change in approximately 10% of the patients. In the remaining 29 patients, because of the far advanced stage of the disease (due to distant metastases), the primary tumours were not operated. Additional histopathological sampling was available from one patient with bronchial carcinoid (through bronchoscopy). Our data indicate that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is

  1. Comparison of CT and integrated PET-CT based radiation therapy planning in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlivan, Berrin; Topkan, Erkan; Onal, Cem; Nursal, Gul Nihal; Yuksel, Oznur; Dolek, Yemliha; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Yavuz, Ali Aydin

    2009-01-01

    When combined with adequate tumoricidal doses, accurate target volume delineation remains to be the one of the most important predictive factors for radiotherapy (RT) success in locally advanced or medically inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients. Recently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) has demonstrated significant improvements in diagnosis and accurate staging of MPM. However, role of additional PET data has not been studied in RT planning (RTP) of patients with inoperable MPM or in those who refuse surgery. Therefore, we planned to compare CT with co-registered PET-CT as the basis for delineating target volumes in these patients group. Retrospectively, the CT and co-registered PET-CT data of 13 patients with histologically proven MPM were utilized to delineate target volumes separately. For each patient, target volumes (gross tumor volume [GTV], clinical target volume [CTV], and planning target volume [PTV]) were defined using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. The PTV was measured in two ways: PTV1 was CTV plus a 1-cm margin, and PTV2 was GTV plus a 1-cm margin. We analyzed differences in target volumes. In 12 of 13 patients, compared to CT-based delineation, PET-CT-based delineation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the mean GTV, CTV, PTV1, and PTV2. In these 12 patients, mean GTV decreased by 47.1% ± 28.4%, mean CTV decreased by 38.7% ± 24.7%, mean PTV1 decreased by 31.1% ± 23.1%, and mean PTV2 decreased by 40.0% ± 24.0%. In 4 of 13 patients, hilar lymph nodes were identified by PET-CT that was not identified by CT alone, changing the nodal status of tumor staging in those patients. This study demonstrated the usefulness of PET-CT-based target volume delineation in patients with MPM. Co-registration of PET and CT information reduces the likelihood of geographic misses, and additionally, significant reductions observed in target volumes may potentially allow escalation of RT dose beyond

  2. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.; Brodin, N. P.; Bjork-Eriksson, T.

    2015-01-01

    ) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). RESULTS: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target...... or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: (18)F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11...... patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT....

  3. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiza Barbosa, F. de; Delso, G.; Voert, E.E.G.W. ter; Huellner, M.W.; Herrmann, K.; Veit-Haibach, P.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies.

  4. Evaluation of PET/CT combined with HRCT in differentiating malignant from benign solitary pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Quanxu; Zhu Renjuan; Liu Qingwei; Lv Shouchen; Yao Shuzhan; Li Xin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT combined with high resolution CT (HRCT) to differentiate solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). Methods: 25 patients with 27 SPN were examined with 18 F-FDG PET/CT and HRCT, all of them were proved pathologically or by follow-up. The differential diagnosis of SPN were made using visual method and semi-quantitative method on PET/CT and morphological characteristics on HRCT. The results of 18 F-FDG PET/CT and 18 F-FDG PET/CT combined with HRCT were compared with pathological results. Results: 15 were malignant and 12 benign among the 27 SPN. 14 SPN were positive on PET/CT among 15 malignant SPN with only one negative less than 10 mm in size. 3 benign were positive on PET/CT, but 2 of them were correctly diagnosed as benign by PET/CT combined with HRCT. The specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy of 18 F-FDG PET/CT combined with HRCT were higher than that of PET/CT (91.7%, 93.3%, 91.7% and 93.7% vs 75.0%, 82.4%, 90.0% and 85.2% ). The sensitivity of PET/CT combined with HRCT and PET/CT alone was same (93.3%). Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET/CT combined with HRCT is a effective no-invasive method in differentiating malignant SPN from benign. (authors)

  5. PET/CT staging of T1-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, K. A.; Steinmann, C. H.; Von Schulthess, G. K.; Steinert, H. C.; Sukumar, V. P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Purpose: To evaluate the value of PET/CT in detecting occult metastases in patients with T 1 -stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Method: Patients with proven NSCLC and T 1 -stage ( c m) were retrospectively analyzed. In all patients a whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan for initial staging was performed. The PET/CT findings were compared with all available clinical information, intra-operative findings and the histopathological results. Results: 95 patients (39 men, 56 women; age range, 19-85 years) were analyzed in our study. PET/CT in 68-95 patients correctly excluded mediastinal and distant metastases. In 17/95 patients (18%) mediastinal lymph-node metastases were proven (N 2 n=15; N 3 n=2). PET/CT correctly detected in 10/17 patients (58.8%) mediastinal nodal disease. The smallest mediastinal lymph-node metastasis detected by PET/CT had a size of 0.7 c m. In 7 patients PET/CT missed N 2 -stage. In three of these patients the SUVmax of the primary was c m. Only in one missed N 2 -stage metastasis was sized > 1.0 c m. The tumor histology (adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma) and location of the primary (central, periphery) did not influence the missed N 2 -stage by PET/CT. PET/CT diagnosed correctly N 3 -stage in 2 patients. 10/95 patients (10.5%) had distant metastases. PET/CT detected unknown M 1 -stage in 4/10 patients. In one patient a metastasis of the parietal pleura was missed by PET/CT. Conclusion: In our study, 28% patients with T 1 -stage NSCLC showed mediastinal or distant metastases. PET/CT was efficient in the detection of occult metastases. However, the sensitivity of PET/CT in mediastinal staging was only 64%.

  6. PET/CT for staging and follow-up of pediatric nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheuk, Daniel K.L. [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Hong Kong, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Pokfulam (China); Sabin, Noah D.; Hossain, Moinul; Krasin, Matthew J.; Shulkin, Barry L. [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Wozniak, Amy [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Naik, Mihir [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Texas Health Science Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, San Antonio, TX (United States); Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); Hematology/Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    While FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in adult patients has documented advantages and disadvantages compared with conventional imaging, to our knowledge, no studies of FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of NPC in pediatric patients have been performed. In this investigation, we studied the utility of FDG PET/CT in children with NPC. The study group comprised 18 children with biopsy-proven NPC who underwent FDG PET/CT and MRI (total 38 pairs of images). All baseline and follow-up FDG PET/CT and MRI studies were independently reviewed for restaging of disease. The concordance between FDG PET/CT and MRI in T, N, and overall staging was 29%, 64%, and 43%, respectively. Compared with MRI, FDG PET/CT yielded lower T and overall staging and showed less cervical and retropharyngeal lymphadenopathy. The concordance between follow-up FDG PET/CT and MRI was 79% overall and 100% 9 months after therapy. In patients who achieved complete remission, FDG PET/CT showed disease clearance 3-6 months earlier than MRI. There were no false-positive or false-negative FDG PET/CT scans during follow-up. FDG PET/CT may underestimate tumor extent and regional lymphadenopathy compared with MRI at the time of diagnosis, but it helps to detect metastases and clarify ambiguous findings. FDG PET/CT is sensitive and specific for follow-up and enables earlier determination of disease remission. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging modality for the evaluation and monitoring of NPC in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  7. PET/CT Facility at Radiation Medicine Centre, BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghel, Nawab Singh; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) integrated with Computed Tomography in a single unit (PET/CT) has become an established and valued imaging modality in the clinical arena. Integrated PET/CT has been shown to be more accurate for lesion localisation and characterisation than either PET or CT alone. Image fusion brings together two image datasets with the intention of registering them as closely as possible. Generally, the two image datasets would have been produced on different types of medical imaging devices. Various problems can evolve when using two geographically remote imaging devices. To overcome this, in recent times there has been a move towards the integration of the two medical imaging devices into one physical unit. The use of one imaging unit to produce two different image datasets is known as hybrid imaging

  8. System immune response to vaccination on FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingos, Mark; Howard, Stephanie; Giaclone, Micholas; Kozono, David; Jacene, Heather [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A patient with newly diagnosed right lung cancer had transient 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid left axillary lymph nodes and intense splenic FDG uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). History revealed that the patient received a left-sided influenza vaccine 2-3 days before the examination. Although inflammatory FDG uptake in ipsilateral axillary nodes is reported, to our knowledge, this is the first report of visualization of the systemic immune response in the spleen related to the influenza vaccination on FDG-PET/CT. The history, splenic uptake and time course on serial FDG-PET/CT helped to avoid a false-positive interpretation for progressing lung cancer and alteration of the radiation therapy plan.

  9. FDG PET/CT imaging as a biomarker in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Paris-Est Creteil University, LYSA Imaging, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Gallamini, Andrea [Nice University, Research, Innovation and Statistic Department, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Scientific Research Committee, S. Croce Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Younes, Anas [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Lymphoma Service, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FDG PET/CT has changed the management of FDG-avid lymphoma and is now recommended as the imaging technique of choice for staging and restaging. The need for tailoring therapy to reduce toxicity in patients with a favourable outcome and for improving treatment in those with high-risk factors requires accurate diagnostic methods and a new prognostic algorithm to identify different risk categories. New drugs are used in relapsed/refractory patients. The role of FDG PET/CT as a biomarker in this context is summarized in this review. New trends in FDG metabolic imaging in lymphoma are addressed including metabolic tumour volume measurement at staging and integrative PET which combines PET data with clinical and molecular markers or other imaging techniques. The quantitative approach for response assessment which is under investigation and is used in large ongoing trials is compared with visual criteria. The place of FDG in the era of targeted therapy is discussed. (orig.)

  10. Regulatory requirements for designing PET-CT facility in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Pankaj

    2010-01-01

    In India, cyclotron-produced radionuclides are gaining importance in molecular imaging in Nuclear Medicine (NM) departments. The importance of this modality among others is due to the fact that it provides valuable clinical information, which was lacking in other available modalities. Presently, every well-established hospital would like to procure Medical Cyclotron or positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) facility in their NM department. Because cyclotron-produced radionuclides have higher energy than the other routinely used radionuclides for diagnosis, it becomes essential for the user to know about the regulatory requirement and radiation safety precautions that one has to take for the installation of this new modality in their premises. The various stages of approval of PET-CT facility by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) and important steps that one has to know/follow before planning for this new facility are summarized

  11. Peritoneal Lymphomatosis Imaged by F-18 FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Se Ryeon; Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Sun Young; Choe, Jae Gol

    2010-01-01

    Peritoneal lymphomatosis is uncommon, but when encountered is associated with aggressive histological subtypes of high-grade lymphoma, such as small-cell, large-cell, mixed large and small cell, non-cleaved, lymphoblastic Burkitt-like, and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. The CT findings of peritoneal lymphomatosis are linear or nodular peritoneal thickening, retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, omental and mesenteric involvement with streak-like infiltrations or a bulky mass, bowel wall thickening, hepatosplenomegaly, and ascites. The authors reports report the first FDG PET/CT images of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of small bowel origin associated with peritoneal lymphomatosis in a 69-year-old man. The lesions demonstrated intense FDG uptake in PET/CT images.

  12. System immune response to vaccination on FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingos, Mark; Howard, Stephanie; Giaclone, Micholas; Kozono, David; Jacene, Heather

    2016-01-01

    A patient with newly diagnosed right lung cancer had transient 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid left axillary lymph nodes and intense splenic FDG uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). History revealed that the patient received a left-sided influenza vaccine 2-3 days before the examination. Although inflammatory FDG uptake in ipsilateral axillary nodes is reported, to our knowledge, this is the first report of visualization of the systemic immune response in the spleen related to the influenza vaccination on FDG-PET/CT. The history, splenic uptake and time course on serial FDG-PET/CT helped to avoid a false-positive interpretation for progressing lung cancer and alteration of the radiation therapy plan

  13. GIANT CELL AORTITIS DIAGNOSED WITH PET/CT - PARANEOPLASTIC SYNDROME?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakula, Marija; Cerovec, Mislav; Mayer, Miroslav; Huić, Dražen; Anić, Branimir

    2016-05-01

    Vasculitides are heterogenic group of autoimmune connective tissue diseases which often present difficulties in early diagnosing. Giant cell arteritis is vasculitis of large and medium arteries. It predominantly presents with symptoms of affection of the external carotid artery branches. Furthermore, the only symptoms can be constitutional. In clinical practice, vasculitides are sometimes considered as paraneoplastic, but no definite association with malignancies has been established and the mechanisms are still debated. The gold standard for diagnosing giant cell arteritis is a positive temporal artery biopsy, but the results can often be false negative. Additionally, more than half of the patients have aorta and its main branches affected. Considering aforementioned, imaging studies are essential in confirming large-vessel vasculitis, amongst which is highly sensitive PET/CT. We present the case of a 70-year-old female patient with constitutional symptoms and elevated sedimentation rate. After extensive diagnostic tests, she was admitted to our Rheumatology unit. Aortitis of the abdominal aorta has been confirmed by PET/CT and after the introduction of glucocorticoids the disease soon went into clinical and laboratory remission. Shortly after aortitis has been diagnosed, lung carcinoma was revealed of which the patient died. At the time of the comprehensive diagnostics, there was no reasonable doubt for underlying malignoma. To the best of our knowledge, there are no recent publications concerning giant cell arteritis and neoplastic processes in the context of up-to-date non-invasive diagnostic methods (i.e. PET/CT). In the light of previous research results, we underline that the sensitivity of PET/CT is not satisfactory when estimating cancer dissemination in non-enlarged lymph nodes and that its value can at times be overestimated.

  14. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, E. Ronan; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0–0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0–0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0–0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0–0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient

  15. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, E. Ronan, E-mail: ronan@ronanryan.com; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Hsu, Meier [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  16. Colorectal cancer: before and after PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Roman, Jose

    2008-01-01

    The author makes reference to the fundamental and growing role of images in the detection, localization, staging and control in colorectal cancer therapy. He points out the main reasons why the combined method PET-CT has meant to a great progress in diagnostic imaging and compares its diagnostic capacity and cost-benefit with other methods. Also, he makes a brief review of some technical aspects [es

  17. Usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in recurrent basal cell carcinoma: Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, S; Perlaza, P; Puig, S; Prats, E; Vidal-Sicart, S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the case of a patient with left periorbital infiltrating basal cell carcinoma treated with surgical excision in October 2010. Surgery included orbital exenteration and reconstruction using skin graft and radiotherapy. In May 2013 a MR imaging showed a mass in the left orbital fossa, suggesting a recurrence in the graft. A basal cell carcinoma recurrence with perineural invasion was confirmed in the biopsy. On (18)F-FDG PET/CT performed, a hypermetabolic activity was observed in the left periorbital area with extension to surrounding sinus and bones. The use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma has not been fully explored due to the rarity of this entity. This case demonstrates the usefulness of this technique to determine the extent of non-melanocytic recurrent skin tumors, and its value in the staging and treatment control, supporting the incorporation of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the management of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. PET/CT and vascular disease: Current concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti Filho, Jose Leite Gondim; Souza Leao Lima, Ronaldo de [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Radiology, Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Souza Machado Neto, Luiz de [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Kayat Bittencourt, Leonardo, E-mail: lkayat@terra.com.br [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Radiology, Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cortes Domingues, Romeu [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa da [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Radiology, Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Since its introduction in 2001, positron emission tomography associated to computed tomography (PET/CT) has been established as a standard tool in cancer evaluation. Being a multimodality imaging method, it combines in a single session the sensitivity granted by PET for detection of molecular targets within the picomolar range, with an underlying submilimetric resolution inherent to CT, that can precisely localize the PET findings. In this last decade, there have been new insights regarding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, particularly about plaque rupture and vascular remodeling. This has increased the interest for research on PET/CT in vascular diseases as a potential new diagnostic tool, since some PET molecular targets could identify diseases before the manifestation of gross anatomic features. In this review, we will describe the current applications of PET/CT in vascular diseases, emphasizing its usefulness in the settings of vasculitis, aneurysms, vascular graft infection, aortic dissection, and atherosclerosis/plaque vulnerability. Although not being properly peripheral vascular conditions, ischemic cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease will be briefly addressed as well, due to their widespread prevalence and importance.

  19. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic 11C-acetate PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    Objectives: Dynamic PET with 11C-acetate can be used to quantify myocardial blood flow and oxidative metabolism, the latter of which is used to calculate myocardial external efficiency (MEE). Calculation of MEE requires forward stroke volume (FSV) data. FSV is affected by cardiac loading conditions......, potentially introducing bias if measured with a separate modality. The aim of this study was to develop and validate methods for automatically extracting FSV directly from the dynamic PET used for measuring oxidative metabolism. Methods: 16 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min PET scan on a Siemens Biograph...... TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner after bolus injection of 399±27 MBq of 11C-acetate. The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was derived by automatic extrapolation of the down-slope of the TAC. FSV...

  20. Diagnostic and prognostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in recurrent germinal tumor carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Evangelista, Laura; Caobelli, Federico; Spallino, Marianna; Gianolli, Luigi; Midiri, Massimo; Picchio, Maria

    2018-01-01

    longer OS (98% after 2 years and 95% after 5 years, p = 0.02). At univariate Cox regression analysis, a pathological 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (HR = 24.3, CI 95% 14.1-40.6; p = 0.03) and lower OS (HR = 17.3 CI 95% 4,9-77; p < 0.001). Its prognostic value was confirmed also if tested against advanced disease at diagnosis and rising Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta (HCGB) or Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) (HR = 7.3 for STAGE III-PET+, p = 0.03; HR = 14.3 elevated HCGB-PET+, p = 0.02; HR 10.7 elevated AFP-PET+, p = 0.01) At multivariate analysis, only a pathological 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and advanced disease in terms of TNM staging were predictors of disease progression and OS. 18 F-FDG PET/CT showed incremental value over other variables both in predicting PFS (chi-square from 24 to 40, p < 0.001) and OS (chi-square from 32 to 38, p = 0.003). 18 F-FDG PET/CT has a very good diagnostic performance in patients with suspected recurrent GCT and has an important prognostic value in assessing the rate of PFS and OS. Furthermore, 18 F-FDG PET/CT impacted the therapeutic regimen in 23% of patients, thus providing a significant impact in the restaging process.

  1. Spect-CT and PET: CT in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Shoukat H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: With the advancement and evolution in medical technology notably imaging there has been a sea change in the overall management strategy of most of the cancers of human body. The present day functional, imaging with PET and MRI enables us to pick up a tumour at its cellular stage. Molecular imaging and nanotechnology have further added to this expanding armamentarium of cancer imaging and treatment. Thyroid cancer is one such cancer where the cutting edge biotechnology has dramatically changed the management profile of a disease. Thyroid cancer can safely be classified as one of the cancers which if optimally managed is curable. Hybrid and fusion imaging like SPECT-CT and PET-CT with their superior sensitivity and specificity have greatly improved the accuracy of disease detection and reduced drastically the false positive disease sites. Disease not detected by conventional planar imaging can now be detected and also anatomically localized using hybrid imaging modalities of SPECT-CT and PET-CT. An accurate detection and precise localization improves image interpretation and a treatment optimization in the curable cancer of thyroid

  2. New perspective in high tech radiotherapy planning using PET/CT images (Radiation oncologist's view on PET/CT usage)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjieva, T.; Bildirev, N.; Koleva, I.; Zahariev, Z.; Vasileva, V.; Encheva, E.; Sultanov, B.

    2010-01-01

    Biological images provided by 18F-FDG PET in combination with structural X ray picture currently offer the most accurate available information on tumour staging, curative antitumour effect for prognosis, impairment of organ function after treatment, as well as primary tumour detection in unknown primary metastatic disease. The authors as radiation oncologists critically have analyzed numerous clinical trials and two guidelines to prove PET/ CT benefit in radiotherapy practice. At present they found lack of scientific evidence to confirm that patient outcomes are superior as a result of the use of PET in RT planning. PET/CT offers a best image for tumour delineation only in some cases of lung cancer, mediastinal lymph nodes and malignant lymphomas. 11C methionin PET adds additional information on postoperative MRI image for brain tumours. Inflammation as postradiation phenomenon, as well as physiological organ movements leads to false-positive PET signal. High tech radiotherapy methods require delineation on precise images given after multidisciplinary team expertise - a practice that is possible only in clinical trials, These unsolved problems have raised many ethical challenges in medical, scientific and social aspect, if wide and routine use of FDG-PET u PET/CT is advocated. (authors)

  3. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 ± 0.80 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 ± 1.22 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy

  4. Clinical application of early PET-CT imaging after radiofrequency ablation of liver neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhaoyu; Chang Zhihui; Lu Zaiming; Xin Jun; Wang Xiaoming; Guo Qiyong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application of early 18 F-FDG PET-CT imaging after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic malignancies. Methods: Fifteen patients with liver tumors (five hepatocellular carcinoma, ten colorectal cancer liver metastasis) underwent RFA as part of clinical management. The lesions were all hypermetabolic on PET-CT performed within 2 weeks prior to RFA. All subjects underwent 18 F-FDG PET-CT (early PET-CT) within 24 hours after RFA. Total photopenia, focal uptake, and rim-shaped uptake were regarded as complete ablation, residual tumor, and inflammation, respectively. Follow-up PET-CT scans were performed as the reference standard. Results: Twelve patients showed total photopenia at the ablation site on the early PET-CT scan, and in all of these patients, total photopenia at the ablation sites was seen on the follow-up PET-CT scans. Two patients had focal uptake at the ablation sites on the early PET-CT scan, and both of these foci increased in size and intensity, which were compatible with residual tumors at the time of ablation. Only one patient had rim-shaped uptake on the early PET-CT scan. The rim-shaped uptake disappeared on PET-CT performed 3 months later, which indicated the nature of inflammation. Conclusions: There is infrequent inflammatory uptake at the RFA site of liver tumors on 18 F-FDG PET-CT if scanning is performed within 24 hours after ablation. Thus, early PET- CT has the potential to evaluate the efficacy of an RFA procedure by indicating tumor-free as total photopenia and residual tumors as focal uptake. (authors)

  5. Staging of untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma with PET/CT: comparison with conventional imaging work-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Shu-Hang; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Feng-Yuan; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Liao, Chun-Ta; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Chin, Shu-Chyn; Hsu, Cheng-Lung

    2009-01-01

    We prospectively compared PET/CT and conventional imaging for initial staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A total of 111 patients with histologically proven NPC were investigated with PET/CT and conventional imaging (head-and-neck MRI, chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound, and bone scan) before treatment. The respective findings were reviewed independently and then compared with each other. With regard to T staging, PET/CT showed a discrepancy with head-and-neck MRI in 36 (32.4%) of the study subjects. With regard to N staging, PET/CT showed a discrepancy with head-and-neck MRI in 15 (13.5%) patients. Among the discordant cases, MRI was superior in demonstrating tumor involvement in the parapharyngeal space, skull base, intracranial area, sphenoid sinus, and retropharyngeal nodes while PET/CT was superior in demonstrating neck nodal metastasis. PET/CT disclosed 13 of 16 patients with distant malignancy compared with four patients disclosed by conventional imaging work-up. The false-positive rate of PET/CT was 18.8%. PET/CT correctly modified M staging in eight patients (7.2%) and disclosed a second primary lung malignancy in one patient (0.9%). In NPC patients, MRI appears to be superior to PET/CT for the assessment of locoregional invasion and retropharyngeal nodal metastasis. PET/CT is more accurate than MRI for determining cervical nodal metastasis and should be the better reference for the neck status. PET/CT has an acceptable diagnostic yield and a low false-positive rate for the detection of distant malignancy and can replace conventional work-up to this aim. PET/CT and head-and-neck MRI are suggested for the initial staging of NPC patients. (orig.)

  6. Detection of Thyroid Metastasis pf Renal Transitional Cell Carcinoma Using FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Il; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Jin [Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Jin Ho [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    A 69 year old man who was diagnosed with renal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) underwent F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting recurrence after chemotherapy. FDG PET/CT revealed multiple new hypermetabolic lesions in many places, including the right thyroid gland. Biopsy of the thyroid lesion was performed,and a diagnosis of metastatic TCC was made. We could detect thyroid metastasis of renal TCC by FDG PET/CT.

  7. Quantitative accuracy of denoising techniques applied to dynamic 82Rb myocardial blood flow PET/CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    with suspected ischemic heart disease underwent a dynamic 7 minute 82Rb scan under resting and adenosine induced hyperaemic conditions after injection of 1100 MBq of 82Rb on a GE Discovery 690 PET/CT. Dynamic images were filtered using HighlY constrained backPRojection (HYPR) and a Hotelling filter of which...... the latter was evaluated using a range of 4 to 7 included factors and for both 2D and 3D filtering. Data were analyzed using Cardiac VUer and obtained MBF values were compared with those obtained when no denoising of the dynamic data was performed. Results: Both HYPR and Hotelling denoising could...

  8. Rise of the machines : cyclotrons and radiopharmaceuticals in the PET-CT-MR golden age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Full text: One particularly inspiring narrative in the evolution of medical imaging over 35 years begins with the introduction of quassi-routine production of 18F, enabled by advances in reliability of (medical) cyclotrons; invention of the 'molecule of the century' [18F]FOG and its robust synthesis; comprehending betrayal of major tumour-cell types by their glucose avidity; astounding advances in PET scanners (recently, time-of-flight); and marriage of anatomic with functional 3-D imaging as PET/CT or (recently) PET/MR. Though the explosion in PET is identified historically with diagnostic oncology plus quantitation of nuclear medicine, plus the collateral leverage of advances in CT and MR, other potentially transformative opportunities (pre-diagnosis or quantifying treatment response) are emerging in dementia and diabetes-as exemplars of PET-addressable mass afflictions-driven by advances in specificity/sensitivity of targeting molecules. PET delivers femto-M functional sensitivity (e.g.; receptor-targeting)-several magnitude-orders of narrow-context superiority over MR or CT-exemplified by the rapid rise of solid-targetry metallo-PET (64Cu, 89Zr), and concomitantly, preclinical radioimmuno micro-PET/CT/SPECT imaging. Though [11 C ] PET has elucidated brain, prostate and other cell +/- tumour mechanisms, realistic clinical rollout demands longer halflife [18F]-labelling. [18F] innovations beyond [18F]FDG elucidate numerous metabolisms, including choline, hypoxia, apoptosis and amino-acid, and notably will soon provide a routine-clinical [18F]-alternative to [11 C] based beta-amyloid dementia diagnosis. Frontier PET is constrained by cost/dose, shackled to 'twentieth century' technologies-cyclotron, hotcell and synthesis unit. Example is [18F] bone scintigraphy; acknowledged as clinically superior to [99mTc]MOP, its widespread implementation awaits cheaper isotope, accessible PET/CT scanners, and maybe 'true' shortage of [99mTc]. Generator-sourced 68 Ga-PET is

  9. 18F-FDG PET/CT in paediatric lymphoma: comparison with conventional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, Kevin; Cross, Siobhan; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano; Onikul, Ella; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In children with Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the ability of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT and conventional imaging (CI) to detect malignant lesions and predict poor lesion response to therapy was assessed and compared. A retrospective review of findings reported on PET/CT and CI was performed using a lesion-based analysis of 16 lymph node and 8 extra-nodal regions. Lesions were defined by histopathological findings or follow-up > 6 months. The study included 209 PET/CT scans with a valid CI comparator. A total of 5,014 regions (3,342 lymph node, 1,672 extra-nodal) were analysed. PET/CT performed significantly better than CI in the detection of malignant lesions with sensitivity and specificity of 95.9 and 99.7% compared to 70.1 and 99.0%, respectively. For predicting poor lesion response to therapy, PET/CT had fewer false-positive lesions than CI. The specificity for predicting poor lesion response to treatment for PET/CT was 99.2% compared to 96.9% for CI. PET/CT was the correct modality in 86% of lesions with discordant findings. PET/CT is more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood lymphoma and in predicting poor lesion response to treatment. In lesions with discordant findings, PET/CT results are more likely to be correct. (orig.)

  10. FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Ryusuke; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Yoshida, Tamiko; Ishihara, Keiichi; Kiriyama, Tomonari; Hakozaki, Kenta; Yanagihara, Keiko; Lida, Shinya; Tsuchiya, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Background. An advantage of PET/CT has been demonstrated for diagnosis of several tumor entities. In patients with breast cancer, early diagnosis and accurate restaging of recurrence after surgery is important for selection of the most appropriate therapeutic strategy. Purpose. To evaluate the accuracy of integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), for follow-up of patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer. Material and Methods. Forty-seven patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer underwent PET/CT. The PET and PET/CT images were interpreted without knowledge of the results of other diagnostic modalities, and compared with each other with reference to the final diagnosis. Results. Twenty-five (53%) patients suffered tumor recurrence. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of PET/CT were 96%, 91%, 92%, 95%, and 94%, respectively. In comparison with PET, PET/CT had a higher sensitivity and accuracy (96% vs. 80% and 94% vs. 81%, respectively). The difference in diagnostic accuracy between PET/CT and PET was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The present findings indicate that PET/CT is an accurate, sensitive and reliable modality for screening and detection of breast cancer recurrence. PET/CT appears to be an effective surveillance tool, as it is able to cover the whole body in a single procedure and shows good performance

  11. Combined early dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT and conventional whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT provide one-stop imaging for detecting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Bo; Wu, Hu-Bing; Wang, Quan-Shi; Zhou, Wen-Lan; Tian, Ying; Li, Hong-Sheng; Ji, Yun-Hai; Lv, Liang

    2015-06-01

    It is widely accepted that conventional (18)F-FDG PET/CT (whole-body static (18)F-FDG PET/CT, WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT) has a low detection rate for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We prospectively assessed the role of early dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT (ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT) and WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT in detecting HCC, and we quantified the added value of ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT to WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Twenty-two patients with 37 HCC tumors (HCCs) who underwent both a liver ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT (performed simultaneously with a 5.5 MBq/kg (18)F-FDG bolus injection and continued for 240 s) and a WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT were enrolled in the study. The WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT and ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were positive in 56.7% (21/37) and 78.4% (29/37) HCCs, respectively (PPET/CT in conjunction with WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT (one-stop (18)F-FDG PET/CT) improved the positive detection rates of WB and ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT alone from 56.7% and 78.4% to 91.9% (34/37) (P0.05, respectively). One-stop (18)F-FDG PET/CT appears to be useful to improve WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT for HCC detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Usefulness of 18F fluoride PET/CT in breast cancer patients with osteosclerotic bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seok Ho; Kim, Ku Sang; Kang, Seok Yun; Song, Hee Sung; Jo, Kyung Sook; Lee, Su Jin; Yoon, Joon Kee; An, Young Sil; Choi, Bong Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Bone metastasis is an important factor for the treatment and prognosis of breast cancer patients. Whole body bone scintigraphy (WBBS) can evaluate skeletal metastases, and 18 F FDG PET/CT seems to exhibit high specificity and accuracy in detecting bone metastases. However, there is a limitation of 18 F FDG PET in assessing sclerotic bone metastases because some lesions may be undetectable. Recent studies showed that 18 F fluoride PET/CT is more sensitive than WBBS in detecting bone metastases. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness of 18 F fluoride PET/CT by comparing it with WBBS and 18 F FDG PET/CT in breast cancer patients with osteosclerotic skeletal metastases. Nine breast cancer patients with suspected bone metastases (9 females; mean age ± SD, 55.6±10.0 years) underwent 99m Tc MDP WBBS, 18 F FDG PET/CT and 18 F fluoride PET/CT. Lesion based analysis of five regions of the skeletons(skull, vertebral column, thoracic cage, pelvic bones and long bones of extremities) and patient based analysis were performed. 18 F fluoride PET/CT, 18 F FDG PET/CT and WBBS detected 49, 20 and 25 true metastases, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 18 F fluoride PET/CT were 94.2%, 46.3%, 57.7% and 91.2%, respectively. Most true metastatic lesions of 18 F fluoride PET/CT had osteosclerotic change (45/49, 91.8%), and only four lesions showed osteolytic change. Most lesions on 18 F FDG PET/CT also demonstrated osteosclerotic change (17/20, 85.0%) with three osteolytic lesions. All true metastatic lesions detected on WBBS and 18 F FDG PET/CT were identified on 18 F fluoride PET/CT. 18 F FDG PET/CT in detecting osteosclerotic metastatic lesions. 18 F fluoride PET/CT might be useful in evaluating osteosclerotic metastases in breast cancer patients

  13. PET/CT in sarcoidosis associated with oncological disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, C.; Servente, L.; Valuntas, L.; García Fontes, L.; Engler, H.

    2017-01-01

    Purposes: To describe the radiological findings of sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like reactions in cancer patients being monitored by positron emission computed tomography (PET/CT). Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 18 PET/CT studies performed over 3 years in patients with lymphomas and solid tumours who presented with hypermetabolic hiliar-mediastinal adenopathies. The morphological pattern of these adenopathies, the distribution, and in some cases the association with pulmonary nodules, might suggest sarcoidosis as a differential diagnosis. Results: Oncological diseases corresponded to breast (4), prostate (3), ovary (2), and others (9). The adenopathies were classified in 7 of the 18 patients as benign after histological confirmation of sarcoidosis, anthracosis or sarcoid-like reaction. The evolutionary behaviour in 5 patients was compatible with benign lesions. The biopsy of 2 patients indicated secondary lesions and malignancy was confirmed by the evolution of the 4 remaining cases. There was a total of 12 (66%) benign lesions. Discussion: Sarcoidosis must be suspected in the presence of hypermetabolic hiliar-mediastinal adenopathies with a characteristic morphological pattern and pulmonary changes. However, biopsy is required to rule out oncological recurrence. The use of new PET/CT markers for differential diagnosis represents a challenge. Aminoacid synthesis tracers such as “1”8F-fluorothymidine (FLT) and “1”8F-fluoromethyltyrosine (FMT) are useful in the differentiation between malignancy and granulomatous diseases in oncologic patients. Conclusion: The differential diagnosis of sarcoidosis should be considered in the presence of bilateral symmetric mediastinal hilum lymphadenopathies. (authors) [es

  14. FDG-PET/CT imaging of elastofibroma dorsi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yumiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Kayo; Senda, Michio; Sakamoto, Setsu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the characteristics of FDG uptake in elastofibroma dorsi using integrated PET/CT. From 10,261 oncology FDG-PET/CT scans performed over a 2-year period, findings suggestive of elastofiboma dorsi were observed in 46 FDG-PET/CT scans of 34 patients. As 20 patients had bilateral lesions and 14 had unilateral lesions, a total of 75 elastofibroma dorsi lesions on images were identified in this study. For visual analysis of intensity of FDG uptake, a four-point grading system was used: grade 0 for no uptake, grade 1 for less uptake than the liver, grade 2 for uptake comparable to the liver, and grade 3 for intense uptake greater than the liver. For quantitative analysis, the standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. The relationships between SUV and age, blood glucose level, lesion size, and related symptoms were also assessed. Among the 75 lesions, 4 had an uptake grade of 0, 41 had grade 1, 25 had grade 2, and 5 had grade 3. The mean SUV (±SD) of the 75 lesions was 2.0 ± 0.63 (range 0-5.1). The Pearson correlation coefficient test indicated a weak positive correlation between SUV and lesion size and no correlation between SUV and either age or blood glucose level. The SUVs of patients with symptoms due to the disease and patients without symptoms were almost the same. Mild and moderate uptake of FDG is frequently observed in elastofibroma dorsi, which should not be misinterpreted as abnormal accumulation observed in malignant lesions. (orig.)

  15. FDG-PET/CT imaging of elastofibroma dorsi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yumiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Kayo [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of PET Diagnosis, Kobe (Japan); Senda, Michio [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Sakamoto, Setsu [Dokkyo Medical University Hospital, Department of PET Center, Mibu (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the characteristics of FDG uptake in elastofibroma dorsi using integrated PET/CT. From 10,261 oncology FDG-PET/CT scans performed over a 2-year period, findings suggestive of elastofiboma dorsi were observed in 46 FDG-PET/CT scans of 34 patients. As 20 patients had bilateral lesions and 14 had unilateral lesions, a total of 75 elastofibroma dorsi lesions on images were identified in this study. For visual analysis of intensity of FDG uptake, a four-point grading system was used: grade 0 for no uptake, grade 1 for less uptake than the liver, grade 2 for uptake comparable to the liver, and grade 3 for intense uptake greater than the liver. For quantitative analysis, the standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. The relationships between SUV and age, blood glucose level, lesion size, and related symptoms were also assessed. Among the 75 lesions, 4 had an uptake grade of 0, 41 had grade 1, 25 had grade 2, and 5 had grade 3. The mean SUV ({+-}SD) of the 75 lesions was 2.0 {+-} 0.63 (range 0-5.1). The Pearson correlation coefficient test indicated a weak positive correlation between SUV and lesion size and no correlation between SUV and either age or blood glucose level. The SUVs of patients with symptoms due to the disease and patients without symptoms were almost the same. Mild and moderate uptake of FDG is frequently observed in elastofibroma dorsi, which should not be misinterpreted as abnormal accumulation observed in malignant lesions. (orig.)

  16. Patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis on FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussan, Michael; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Mekinian, Arsène; Khafagy, Abrahim; Nicolas, Patrick; Vessieres, Annie; Brauner, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to describe patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) on FDG-PET/CT. Methods: All patients with a diagnosis of TB and who underwent FDG-PET/CT between January 2009 and June 2010 were included. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed. TB was proven either on bacteriological or histopathological studies (n = 13) or on a clinical and imaging basis (n = 3). Results: Sixteen patients (11 men; median age 56, range 22–84 years) were included. Two distinct patterns were identified. In the lung pattern (9/16), patients had predominantly pulmonary symptoms (6/9 patients, 67%) with a parenchymal involvement: uptakes on lung consolidation ± cavitation surrounded by micronodules. Mediastino-hilar lymph nodes were slightly enlarged (15 mm, 10–27) with moderate uptake (3.9, 2.5–13.4). In the lymphatic pattern (7/16), patients had predominantly systemic symptoms (5/7 cases, 71%) and all had extra-thoracic involvement. Mediastino-hilar lymph nodes were more enlarged (30 mm, 18–35, p = 0.03) and with higher uptake (6.8, 5.7–16.8, p = 0.034) than in the lung pattern. Conclusion: We identified two distinct patterns of pulmonary TB on FDG-PET/CT. The lung pattern related to a restricted and slight hypermetabolic infection and the lymphatic pattern related to a systemic and intense infection. Combined interpretation of PET and CT findings improves the specificity of images, especially for the lung pattern

  17. Patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis on FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soussan, Michael, E-mail: michael.soussan@avc.aphp.fr [Université Paris 13, Faculté de médecine SMBH, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Avicenne, 125 rue de Stalingrad, 93000 Bobigny (France); Brillet, Pierre-Yves [Université Paris 13, Faculté de médecine SMBH, Department of Radiology, CHU Avicenne, 125 rue de Stalingrad, 93000 Bobigny (France); Mekinian, Arsène [Université Paris 13, Faculté de médecine SMBH, Department of Internal Medicine, Hôpital Jean Verdier, Bondy (France); Khafagy, Abrahim [Université Paris 13, Faculté de médecine SMBH, Department of Radiology, CHU Avicenne, 125 rue de Stalingrad, 93000 Bobigny (France); Nicolas, Patrick [Université Paris 13, Faculté de médecine SMBH, Department of Pharmacology, CHU Avicenne, 125 rue de Stalingrad, 93000 Bobigny (France); Vessieres, Annie [Université Paris 13, Faculté de médecine SMBH, Department of Bacteriology, CHU Avicenne, 125 rue de Stalingrad, 93000 Bobigny (France); Brauner, Michel [Université Paris 13, Faculté de médecine SMBH, Department of Radiology, CHU Avicenne, 125 rue de Stalingrad, 93000 Bobigny (France)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: This study aims to describe patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) on FDG-PET/CT. Methods: All patients with a diagnosis of TB and who underwent FDG-PET/CT between January 2009 and June 2010 were included. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed. TB was proven either on bacteriological or histopathological studies (n = 13) or on a clinical and imaging basis (n = 3). Results: Sixteen patients (11 men; median age 56, range 22–84 years) were included. Two distinct patterns were identified. In the lung pattern (9/16), patients had predominantly pulmonary symptoms (6/9 patients, 67%) with a parenchymal involvement: uptakes on lung consolidation ± cavitation surrounded by micronodules. Mediastino-hilar lymph nodes were slightly enlarged (15 mm, 10–27) with moderate uptake (3.9, 2.5–13.4). In the lymphatic pattern (7/16), patients had predominantly systemic symptoms (5/7 cases, 71%) and all had extra-thoracic involvement. Mediastino-hilar lymph nodes were more enlarged (30 mm, 18–35, p = 0.03) and with higher uptake (6.8, 5.7–16.8, p = 0.034) than in the lung pattern. Conclusion: We identified two distinct patterns of pulmonary TB on FDG-PET/CT. The lung pattern related to a restricted and slight hypermetabolic infection and the lymphatic pattern related to a systemic and intense infection. Combined interpretation of PET and CT findings improves the specificity of images, especially for the lung pattern.

  18. Role of respiratory-gated PET/CT for pancreatic tumors: A preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuya, Takeo; Tateishi, Ukihide; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Nishiyama, Yuji; Hata, Masaharu; Inoue, Tomio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to ascertain role of respiratory-gated PET/CT for accurate diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Materials and methods: Prior to clinical study, the phantom study was performed to evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on lesion quantification. Twenty-two patients (mean age 65 years) with pancreatic tumors were enrolled. Pathological diagnoses by surgical specimens consisted of pancreatic cancer (n = 15) and benign intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN, n = 7). Whole-body scan of non-respiratory-gated PET/CT was performed at first, and subsequent respiratory-gated PET/CT for one bed position was performed. All PET/CT studies were performed prior to surgery. The SUV max obtained by non-respiratory-gated PET/CT and respiratory-gated PET/CT, and percent difference in SUVmax (%SUVmax) were compared. Results: The profile curve of 5 respiratory bin image was most similar to that of static image. The third bin of 5 respiratory bin image showed highest FWHM (24.0 mm) and FWTM (32.7 mm). The mean SUVmax of pancreatic cancer was similar to that of benign IPMN on non-respiratory-gated PET/CT (p = 0.05), whereas significant difference was found between two groups on respiratory-gated PET/CT (p = 0.016). The mean %SUV of pancreatic cancer was greater than that of benign IPMN (p < 0.0001). Identification of the primary tumor in pancreatic head (n = 13, 59%) was improved by using respiratory-gated PET/CT because of minimal affection of physiological accumulation in duodenum. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated PET/CT is a feasible technique for evaluation of pancreatic tumors and allows more accurate identification of pancreatic tumors compared with non-respiratory-gated PET/CT

  19. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  20. The application of 18F-FDG PET/CT for exploring the metastatic carcinoma of spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dangfan; Guan Yihui; Zhao Jun; Zuo Chuantao; Lin Xiangtong; Dai Jiazhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT for diagnosing the metastatic carcinoma of spleen. Methods: Retrospectively reviewed all the 8 cases with splenic metastases diagnosed by PET/CT, and compared the diagnostic result of PET/CT with that of CT alone, that of PET alone, that of B-ultrasonic scan and that of clinical information, all the diagnoses were refered to the confirmation by the clinical findings during follow-up. Results: All the 8 cases of splenic metastases diagnosed by PET/CT were proved by follow-up. PET revealed 6, CT revealed 4 and B-ultrasonic scan only 1. PET/CT did not miss either of the 2 splenic metastases had been diagnosed before PET/CT. Conclusions: PET/CT determined the location of the splenic metastases better than CT alone or PET alone did. PET/CT could increase the detection rate of splenic metastases. (authors)

  1. (18) F-FDG PET/CT for planning external beam radiotherapy alters therapy in 11% of 581 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Loft-Jakobsen, Annika; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (18) F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) used in radiotherapy planning for extra-cerebral malignancy may reveal metastases to distant sites that may affect the choice of therapy. AIM: To investigate the role of FDG PET/CT on treatment strategy changes induced by the use of PET/CT as part...... planning in our institution in the year 2008. All PET/CT scans were performed with the patient in treatment position with the use of immobilization devices according to the intended radiotherapy treatment. All scans were evaluated by a nuclear medicine physician together with a radiologist to delineate PET......% of the patients for whom the PET/CT simulation scan revealed unexpected dissemination, radiotherapy was given - changed (n = 38) or unchanged (n = 13) according to the findings on the FDG PET/CT. CONCLUSION: Unexpected dissemination on the FDG PET/CT scanning performed for radiotherapy planning caused a change...

  2. Clinical value of FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected recurrent ovarian cancer: is there an impact of FDG PET/CT on patient management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Ahmet; Ustaalioglu, Bala Basak Oven; Seker, Mesut; Salepci, Taflan; Gumus, Mahmut; Canpolat, Nesrin; Tekinsoy, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of FDG PET/CT in patients with suspected ovarian cancer recurrence as compared with diagnostic CT, and to assess the impact of the results of FDG PET/CT on treatment planning. Included in this retrospective study were 60 patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer who had previously undergone primary debulking surgery and had been treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Diagnostic CT and FDG PET/CT imaging were performed for all patients as clinically indicated. The changes in the clinical management of patients according to the results of FDG PET/CT were also analysed. FDG PET/CT was performed in 21 patients with a previously negative or indeterminate diagnostic CT scan, but an elevated CA-125 level, and provided a sensitivity of 95% in the detection of recurrent disease. FDG PET/CT revealed recurrent disease in 19 patients. In 17 of 60 patients, the indication for FDG PET/CT was an elevated CA-125 level and an abnormal diagnostic CT scan to localize accurately the extent of disease. FDG PET/CT scans correctly identified recurrent disease in 16 of the 17 patients, a sensitivity of 94.1%. Moreover, FDG PET/CT was performed in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of ovarian cancer recurrence, an abnormal diagnostic CT scan, but a normal CA-125 level. In this setting, FDG PET/CT correctly confirmed recurrent disease in seven patients providing a sensitivity of 100% in determining recurrence. In four patients, FDG PET/CT was carried out for the assessment of treatment response. Three of four scans were classified as true-negative indicating a complete response. In the other patient, FDG PET/CT identified progression of disease. In total, 45 (75%) of the 60 patients had recurrent disease, in 14 (31.1%) documented by histopathology and in 31 (68.9%) on clinical follow-up, while 15 (25%) had no evidence of recurrent disease. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive value

  3. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte Dahl; Petersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg

    2018-01-01

    (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. Methods: PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmax) by two independent examiners......, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Results: Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed...... in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut...

  4. Early PET/CT after radiofrequency ablation in colorectal cancer liver metastases: is it useful?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-yu; CHANG Zhi-hui; LU Zai-ming; GUO Qi-yong

    2010-01-01

    Background Morphologic imaging after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver metastases is hampered by an inflammatory response in the ablation margin, making the identification of local tumor progression (LTP) difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of early 18F-FDG PET/CT scanning to monitor the effectiveness of RFA in colorectal liver metastases.Methods Twelve patients with 20 metastases were treated with RFA for colorectal liver metastases. They underwent PET/CT within 2 weeks before RFA and within 24 hours after RFA (so termed "early PET/CT"). PET/CT was repeated at 1, 3, and 6 months, and then every 6 months after ablation. The standard of reference was based on available clinical and radiological follow-up data.Results Early PET/CT revealed total photopenia in 16 RFA-treated metastases, which were found to be without residual tumor on the final PET/CT scan. Three RFA-treated metastases with focal uptake were identified as local tumor progression, which necessitated further treatment. One RFA-treated metastasis with rim-shaped uptake was regarded as inflammation. The results of the early PET/CT scanning were consistent with the findings of the final follow-up. Conclusions PET/CT performed within 24 hours after RFA can effectively detect whether residual tumor exists for colorectal cancer liver metastases. The results can guide further treatment, and may improve the efficacy of RFA.

  5. Metal artifact reduction of CT scans to improve PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Vos, Charlotte S.; Arens, Anne I.J.; Hamill, James J.; Hofmann, Christian; Panin, Vladimir Y.; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.; Visser, Eric P.; De Geus-Oei, Lioe Fee

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, different metal artifact reduction methods have been developed for CT. These methods have only recently been introduced for PET/CT even though they could be beneficial for interpretation, segmentation, and quantification of the PET/CT images. In this study, phantom and patient scans

  6. Metal Artifact Reduction of CT Scans to Improve PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, C.S. van der; Arens, A.I.J.; Hamill, J.J.; Hofmann, C.; Panin, V.Y.; Meeuwis, A.P.W.; Visser, E.P.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, different metal artifact reduction methods have been developed for CT. These methods have only recently been introduced for PET/CT even though they could be beneficial for interpretation, segmentation, and quantification of the PET/CT images. In this study, phantom and patient scans

  7. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy......Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy...

  8. How to study optimal timing of PET/CT for monitoring of cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vach, Werner; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Fischer, Barbara Malene Bjerregaard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The use of PET/CT for monitoring treatment response in cancer patients after chemo- or radiotherapy is a very promising approach to optimize cancer treatment. However, the timing of the PET/CT-based evaluation of reduction in viable tumor tissue is a crucial question. We investigated how...

  9. FDG PET/CT in initial staging and early response to chemotherapy assessment of paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eugene, T.; Ansquer, C.; Oudoux, A.; Carlier, T.; Kraeber-Bodere, T.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Corradini, N.; Thomas, C.; Dupas, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the impact of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), in comparison with conventional imaging modalities (CIM), for initial staging and early therapy assessment in paediatric rhabdomyosarcoma. Patients and methods: Prior to treatment, 18 patients (age range, 9 months to 18 years) with histologically proven rhabdomyosarcoma underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to CIM (magnetic resonance imaging of primary site, whole body CT and bone scintigraphy). After three courses of chemotherapy, 12 patients underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to CIM. RECIST criteria and visual analysis of FDG uptake were used for assessment of response. The standard of reference was determined by an interdisciplinary tumor board based on imaging material, histopathology and follow-up data (median = 5 years). Results: PET/CT sensitivity was superior to CIM's concerning lymph node involvement (100% versus 83%, respectively) and metastases detection (100% versus 50%, respectively). PET/CT results changed therapeutic management in 11% of cases. After three courses of chemotherapy, the rate of complete response was 66% with PET/CT versus 8% with CIM. Five percent of patients relapsed during follow-up (median = 5 years). Conclusion: This study confirms that PET/CT depicts important additional information in initial staging of paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas and suggests a superior prognostic value of PET/CT in early response to chemotherapy assessment. (authors)

  10. PET/CT and dedicated PET in breast cancer: Implications for classification, staging, and response monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, B.B.

    2013-01-01

    De PET-CT, een scan die gebruik maakt van radioactiviteit om tumoren in beeld te brengen, is een zinvol instrument voor beeldvorming van patiënten met borstkanker, met name van patiënten met een tumor groter dan drie centimeter of tumor-positieve lymfeklieren. De PET-CT is vooral van waarde voor de

  11. Clinical PET/CT Atlas: A Casebook of Imaging in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has evolved since its introduction into the commercial market more than a decade ago. It is now a key procedure, particularly in oncological imaging. Over the last years in routine clinical service, PET/CT has had a significant impact on diagnosis, treatment planning, staging, therapy, and monitoring of treatment response and has therefore played an important role in the care of cancer patients. The high sensitivity from the PET component and the specificity of the CT component give this hybrid imaging modality the unique characteristics that make PET/CT, even after over 10 years of clinical use, one of the fastest growing imaging modalities worldwide. This publication combines over 90 comprehensive cases covering all major indications of fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET/CT as well as some cases of clinically relevant special tracers. The cases provide an overview of what the specific disease can look like in PET/CT, the typical pattern of the disease’s spread as well as likely pitfalls and teaching points. This PET/CT Atlas will allow professionals interested in PET/CT imaging to embrace the variety of oncological imaging by providing clinically relevant teaching files on the effectiveness and diagnostic quality of FDG-PET/CT imaging in routine applications

  12. Evaluation of bone metastases with 18 F- Sodium fluoride PET/CT; initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez C, N.; Serna M, J.A.; Quiroz C, O.; Quinzanos, F.; Valenzuela, J.; Ramirez A, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The study of NaF-18 PET/CT is the modality with bigger sensitivity and specificity for the bony metastases detection. This additional value of the NaF-18 PET/CT can have a beneficent impact in the clinical handling of the patients with prostate cancer with high risk. (Author)

  13. Efficacy of FDG PET/CT Imaging for Venous Thromboembolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning; Iversen, Else Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In recent years, several case reports have described venous thromboembolism (VTE) on FDG PET/CT. In this short communication, we present results from a proof-of-concept pilot study aimed at providing some preliminary data on the efficacy of FDG PET/CT in prospective patients with suspected...

  14. PET-CT in the evaluation of sarcomas of soft tissues; PET-CT en la evaluacion de sarcomas de tejidos blandos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna M, J A; Quiroz C, O; Sanchez C, N; Diaz V, G [Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    {sup 18} F-FDG PET-CT is an image modality of great utility in the evaluation of primary or recurrent lesions of soft tissues. It is necessary to determine the cost-benefit of the different image modalities, although one waits that by means of a better diagnostic, statification and the determination of the grade of malignancy, the PET-CT nowadays can reduce the cost and the complications of the invasive diagnostic methods. (Author)

  15. Design and shielding calculation for a PET/CT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Escuela, J. M.; Palau San Pedro, A.; Lopez Diaz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the AAPM Task Group Report No. 108, the NCRP Report No. 147 recommendations and the Cuban's local regulations for nuclear medicine practice were carried out the safety planning and design of a new PET/CT facility for the Nuclear Medicine Department of 'Hermanos Ameijeiras' Hospital. It should be installed in the top floor of the NM building (3th floor), occupied by offices, classrooms and ancillaries areas, meanwhile in the second floor is working the conventional nuclear medicine department. The radiation doses were evaluated in areas of the second, third and quarter floor taking into account the pet isotope, the workload, the occupancy factors of each place, the use factors of different sources and the dose reduction factors, warranty the accomplish of the Cuban dose restrictions associated to the nuclear medicine practice. In each point of calculation was considered the contribution from each source to the total dose, as well as the contribution of the CT in the adjacent room to the imaging room. For the proper facility design was considered the transmission factors of the existing barriers, and calculated the new ones to be added between each source and the estimation point, keeping in mind the space limitations. The PET/CT design plan meet all the needs, the development of the project is consistent with the mission of the facility and the radiation protection regulations of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  16. PET-CT for nuclear medicine diagnostics of multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A.

    2014-01-01

    Functional or morphofunctional imaging modalities are used in myeloma patients for the diagnosis and therapy management within research protocols. Despite new staging criteria, which take into account the viability of a myeloma lesion, positron emission tomography (PET) is not used routinely. The impact of PET is therefore open. The role of PET and PET computed tomography (PET-CT) for the diagnosis and therapy management is discussed. The use of PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) allows the measurement of viable myeloma lesions and correlates with the stage of disease. A negative FDG examination correlates with a better prognosis. Furthermore, the number of focal lesions as well as the whole functional volume of myeloma lesions in FDG have a prognostic impact. Several studies have demonstrated the impact of FDG for the assessment of therapy monitoring and show that FDG is an earlier indicator for therapy response as compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CT component of the new hybrid systems allows the assessment of osteolytic lesions in CT and their viability in FDG. The combination of PET with an MRT scanner allows the simultaneous measurement of bone marrow infiltration, focal lesions and their viability. The use of modern hybrid scanners, such as PET-CT and PET-MRT facilitates the simultaneous measurement of viable myeloma lesions, osteolytic lesions and bone marrow infiltration in the whole body; therefore, it is expected that these imaging modalities will play a greater role both in diagnosis and therapy management. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiological control of a microPET/CT laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, Daniele M.; Sanches, Matias P.; Carneiro, Janete C.G.G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the radiological control of a research laboratory in order to satisfy national standards and international recommendations. The microPET/CT laboratory in IPEN uses an Albira system for research purposes in small animals. This study focuses mainly to carry out an initial radiological evaluation and the exposure situation related with the task. The assessment of workplace conditions and individual exposures constitutes as integral part of the operational monitoring programme. Initially, the radiometric survey in laboratory has been carried out using an ionization chamber Radcal 9010 (10 x 5 - 1800). In addition, nine monitoring points with potential exposure were selected, where thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLDs, of CaSO 4 :Dy, were positioned. The occupationally exposed workers were monthly evaluated for external exposures using TL dosimeters, worn on the surface of the body. For internal exposure, the evaluated period was approximately one year starting on April 2014. The average effective dose of the occupationally exposed workers did not exceed 2.4 mSv in the year of 2014, which is equal to the recording level. The workplace, microPET/CT laboratory, is classified as supervised area and the monitoring results in the evaluated period, are within the dose limits established by national standard, as well as the values obtained in individual control. (author)

  18. An attenuation correction method for PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ue, Hidenori; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    In PET/CT systems, accurate attenuation correction can be achieved by creating an attenuation map from an X-ray CT image. On the other hand, respiratory-gated PET acquisition is an effective method for avoiding motion blurring of the thoracic and abdominal organs caused by respiratory motion. In PET/CT systems employing respiratory-gated PET, using an X-ray CT image acquired during breath-holding for attenuation correction may have a large effect on the voxel values, especially in regions with substantial respiratory motion. In this report, we propose an attenuation correction method in which, as the first step, a set of respiratory-gated PET images is reconstructed without attenuation correction, as the second step, the motion of each phase PET image from the PET image in the same phase as the CT acquisition timing is estimated by the previously proposed method, as the third step, the CT image corresponding to each respiratory phase is generated from the original CT image by deformation according to the motion vector maps, and as the final step, attenuation correction using these CT images and reconstruction are performed. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using 4D-NCAT phantoms, and good stability of the voxel values near the diaphragm was observed. (author)

  19. Hepatosplenic Candidiasis Detected by 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Bertoli, Mattia; Petrilli, Giulia; Bertagna, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosplenic candidiasis is a fungal infection, which mostly affects patients with hematologic malignancies such as leukemia. The pathogenesis of this infection is not clear yet, and the liver is the most commonly affected organ. Diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis can be only established via biopsy, since computed tomography (CT) scan, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yield non-specific results. The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography /computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis remains undetermined, considering a few evidences in the literature. In this case report, we present the case of a 47-year-old patient, affected by acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy, resulting in the development of neutropenia and fever following the last cycle. The 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan showed some foci of intense FDG uptake in the liver and spleen. The subsequent diagnostic investigations (i.e., abdominal CT scan and biopsy) were suggestive of hepatosplenic candidiasis. The patient was started on antifungal treatment with fluconazole. After one month, the clinical conditions were resolved, and the subsequent abdominal CT scan was negative

  20. FDG PET/CT features of ovarian metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, K., E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.j [Department of PET Diagnosis, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Suzuki, K. [Department of PET Diagnosis, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Senda, M. [Department of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Kita, M. [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Onishi, Y.; Maeda, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Ohno, Y.; Sugimura, K. [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Aim: To assess the characteristics of [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in cases of ovarian metastasis using positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Materials and methods: Twelve patients with 16 ovarian metastases arising from colon cancer (n = 6), breast cancer (n = 4), gastric cancer (n = 3), and pancreatic cancer (n = 3) who underwent FDG-PET/CT examination were included in this study. The effect of lesion size and morphological pattern (predominantly solid or cystic) on FDG uptake was evaluated using the quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). Results: The mean maximum SUV for the 16 lesions was 4.6 {+-} 2.4 (range 1.8 {approx} 9.9). The Pearson correlation coefficient test showed no significant correlation between maximum SUV and lesion size (r = 0.21, p = 0.42). The maximum SUV of solid (n = 5) and cystic (n = 11) lesions was 5.5 {+-} 2.7 and 4.3 {+-} 2.2, respectively, and the difference was not significant (p = 0.43). Breast cancer showed the highest maximum SUV (6.4 {+-} 3.6), followed by colon cancer (5.3 {+-} 1.4), gastric cancer (3.3 {+-} 0.5), and pancreatic cancer (2.2 {+-} 0.6). Conclusion: Ovarian metastases show a variable maximum SUV with mild to intense FDG uptake.

  1. Radiological control of a microPET/CT laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, Daniele M.; Sanches, Matias P.; Carneiro, Janete C.G.G., E-mail: dms.danica@gmail.com.br, E-mail: msanches@ipen.br, E-mail: janetgc@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the radiological control of a research laboratory in order to satisfy national standards and international recommendations. The microPET/CT laboratory in IPEN uses an Albira system for research purposes in small animals. This study focuses mainly to carry out an initial radiological evaluation and the exposure situation related with the task. The assessment of workplace conditions and individual exposures constitutes as integral part of the operational monitoring programme. Initially, the radiometric survey in laboratory has been carried out using an ionization chamber Radcal 9010 (10 x 5 - 1800). In addition, nine monitoring points with potential exposure were selected, where thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLDs, of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, were positioned. The occupationally exposed workers were monthly evaluated for external exposures using TL dosimeters, worn on the surface of the body. For internal exposure, the evaluated period was approximately one year starting on April 2014. The average effective dose of the occupationally exposed workers did not exceed 2.4 mSv in the year of 2014, which is equal to the recording level. The workplace, microPET/CT laboratory, is classified as supervised area and the monitoring results in the evaluated period, are within the dose limits established by national standard, as well as the values obtained in individual control. (author)

  2. FDG PET/CT features of ovarian metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, K.; Suzuki, K.; Senda, M.; Kita, M.; Onishi, Y.; Maeda, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Ohno, Y.; Sugimura, K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess the characteristics of [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in cases of ovarian metastasis using positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Materials and methods: Twelve patients with 16 ovarian metastases arising from colon cancer (n = 6), breast cancer (n = 4), gastric cancer (n = 3), and pancreatic cancer (n = 3) who underwent FDG-PET/CT examination were included in this study. The effect of lesion size and morphological pattern (predominantly solid or cystic) on FDG uptake was evaluated using the quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). Results: The mean maximum SUV for the 16 lesions was 4.6 ± 2.4 (range 1.8 ∼ 9.9). The Pearson correlation coefficient test showed no significant correlation between maximum SUV and lesion size (r = 0.21, p = 0.42). The maximum SUV of solid (n = 5) and cystic (n = 11) lesions was 5.5 ± 2.7 and 4.3 ± 2.2, respectively, and the difference was not significant (p = 0.43). Breast cancer showed the highest maximum SUV (6.4 ± 3.6), followed by colon cancer (5.3 ± 1.4), gastric cancer (3.3 ± 0.5), and pancreatic cancer (2.2 ± 0.6). Conclusion: Ovarian metastases show a variable maximum SUV with mild to intense FDG uptake.

  3. PET-CT findings in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica without symptoms of cranial ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Petersen, Alexander; Voss, Anne; Laustrup, Helle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is an inflammatory disorder that affects the lderly. At present, evidence is limited regarding the usefulness of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in the diagnosis of PMR. This study aimed to compare patient characteristics...... and symptoms with PET-CT findings in a Danish population of PMR patients without clinical symptoms of giant cell arteritis. Methods: The medical records of 50 Danish PET-CT-scanned patients with PMR were reviewed. Symptoms, characteristics and PET-CT findings were registered from the medical records. Results...... of the following three locations: the shoulder, the hip and the spinous processes. Vascular FDG uptake was seen in 7% of the patients. No significant correlations between any symptoms and any PET-CT findings were found. C-reactive protein was significantly lower in patients receiving glucocorticoids...

  4. Comparison of the 68Ga-DOTATATA PET/CT, FDG PET/CT, and MIBG SPECT/CT in the Evaluation of Suspected Primary Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hongli; Li, Fang; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhenghua; Li, Wei; Huo, Li; Zhang, Jingjing

    2017-07-01

    Anatomical imaging modalities including CT and MRI are the mainstay of evaluation of primary pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma. However, nuclear medicine imaging is frequently necessary to determine the nature of the lesions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess which commonly used nuclear medicine modality might have a better diagnostic value in this clinical setting. Eight patients who had been suspected of having either primary pheochromocytoma or primary paraganglioma and 1 patient with known pheochromocytoma were included in the analysis. Among the 8 patients without known diagnosis, 7 had been suggested by anatomical imaging modalities, whereas one of them presented with initial negative anatomical imaging interpretation. All of 9 patients underwent Ga-DOTATATA PET/CT, FDG PET/CT, and MIBG SPECT/CT for further evaluation. The imaging findings were compared with postsurgical pathology and follow-up. Both Ga-DOTATATA PET/CT and MIBG SPECT/CT accurately identified 9 primary tumors, whereas FDG PET/CT showed increased activity in 8 of 9 primary tumors. Both Ga-DOTATATA and FDG PET/CT are able to detect associated extra-adrenal lesions not shown on MIBG study in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome. Ga-DOTATATA PET/CT could be the nuclear medicine imaging choice to evaluate suspected primary pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, especially in the situation of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome.

  5. Philips Gemini TF64 PET/CT Acceptance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González Gonzalez, Joaquín J.; Calderón Marin, Carlos F.; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Machado Tejeda, Adalberto; González Correa, Héctor J.

    2016-01-01

    The Philips Gemini TF64 is the first PET/CT scanner installed in Cuba at the Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology in 2014. It is a third generation fully tridimensional whole body PET scanner with time-of-flight (TOF) technology combined with a 64-slice Brilliance CT scanner. The CT detector module contains 672x64 solid state detector, incorporating GOS scintillators, optical diodes and electronic signal channels arranged in 64 side by side arcs, with 672 detectors in each arc. There are sixteen 0.75 mm individual detector elements around the center and four 1.5 mm elements at each end, resulting in a 24 mm total detection length. The PET detector consists of 28 pixelar modules of a 23x44 array of 4x4x22 mm3 of LYSO crystals arranged in an Anger-logic detector design. The hardware coincidence-timing window for this scanner is set at 4 ns and delayed coincidence window technique is used to estimate the random coincidences in collected data. In this study the performance characteristics of PET/CT scanner were measured as part of the program tests of acceptance for clinical use.Methodology. The performance characteristics of CT scanner were evaluated by manufacturer protocol using Philips system performance phantom. Some additional geometrical tests were performed by the user. The intrinsic measurements of energy resolution as well as timing resolution, which define the TOF performance of PET scanner, were performed following the recommendations of manufacturer using 18 F. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, counting rate performance, image quality and accuracy were measured according to the NEMA NU-2 2007 procedures. Additionally, to characterize the effect of TOF reconstruction on lesion contrast and noise, the standard NEMA torso phantom was reconstructed with and without TOF capability. The accuracy of PET/CT image registration was tested according to the manufacturer protocol using an image alignment calibration holder with 6 point sources of 22

  6. 18F-FAZA PET/CT in the Preoperative Evaluation of NSCLC: Comparison with 18F-FDG and Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, Paola; Bettinardi, Valentino; Fallanca, Federico; Incerti, Elena; Compierchio, Antonia; Rossetti, Francesca; Coliva, Angela; Savi, Annarita; Doglioni, Claudio; Negri, Giampiero; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria

    2018-01-01

    To assess the capability of 18F-FAZA PET/CT in identifying intratumoral hypoxic areas in early and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and to compare 18FFAZA PET/CT with 18F-FDG PET/CT and histopathological biomarkers and to investigate whether the assessment of tumour to blood (T/B) and tumour to muscle (T/M) ratios provide comparable information regarding the hypoxic fractions of the tumour. Seven patients with NSCLC were prospectively enrolled (3 men, 4 women; median age: 71 years; range 63-80). All patients underwent to 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FAZA PET/CT before surgery. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was used to evaluate 18FFDG PET/CT images, while 18F-FAZA PET/CT images have been interpreted by using tumour-toblood (T/B) and tumour-to-muscle (T/M) ratio. Surgery was performed in all patients; immunohistochemical analysis for hypoxia biomarkers was performed on histologic tumor samples. All lung lesions showed intense 18F-FDG uptake (mean SUVmax: 7.35; range: 2.35-25.20). A faint 18F-FAZA uptake was observed in 6/7 patients (T/B < 1.2) while significant uptake was present in the remaining 1/7 (T/B and T/M=2.24). On both 2 and 4 h imaging after injection, no differences were observed between T/M and T/B (p=0.5), suggesting that both blood and muscle are equivalent in estimating the background activity for image analysis. Immunohisotchemical analysis showed low or absent staining for hypoxia biomarkers in 3 patients (CA-IX and GLUT-1: 0%; HIF-1α: mean 3.3%; range 0-10). Two patients showed staining for HIF-1α of 5%, with CA-IX being 60% and 30%, respectively and GLUT-1 being 30% and 80%, respectively; in 1/7 HIF-1α was 10%, CA-IX was 50% and GLUT-1 was 90%. In one patient a higher percentage of HIF-1α and CA-IX (20% and 70%, respectively) positive cells was present, with GLUT-1 being 30%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper assessing hypoxia and glucose metabolism in comparison with immunohistochemistry

  7. Value of integrated PET/CT in clinical staging of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Guan Yihui; Zuo Chuantao; Hua Fengchun; Lin Xiangtong

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of combined fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in patients with lung cancer, and to compare the results of PET/CT with those of FDG PET and CT alone. Methods: Forty-two patients were studied in this group. 3D whole body images were acquired using Siemens Biograph Sensetionl6 PET/CT scanner. Attenuation corrected PET images, CT and fusion images were interpreted. Reports were compared for each patient including identified the number of lesions, their anatomical localization and certainty of diagnosis. Results: PET/CT increased the number of lesions reported as being definitely abnormal or normal (+22%). In 12 patients (28.6%), the PET/CT report positively impacted surgical management when compared to the PET report alone. 6 patients were correctly downstaged negating further treatment or imaging, 3 patient was upstaged to inoperable and in another 3 ones improved localization by PET/CT led to an altered surgical incision with decreased morbidity. Lesion-based evaluation showed sensitivity for regional lymph node involvement of 61% for CT alone, 88% for FDG PET alone, and 96% for integrated PET/CT imaging respectively. In addition, PET/CT could identify some benign disease, including lung tuberculosis, cyst of liver and kidney, calculus etc. Conclusion: PET/CT improves anatomical localization and increases the certainty in reporting abnormal and normal lesions. PET/CT imaging is superior to CT alone and has additional benefit over FDG PET alone, and is accurate in clinical staging for lung cancer. (authors)

  8. FDG PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Susan E.; Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shulkin, Barry L.; McCarville, M.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric malignant bone tumor, frequently surgically managed with limb salvage rather than amputation. Local recurrences are seen in up to 9% of osteosarcoma patients, with CT and MRI imaging often limited by metal artifacts. To describe the [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences with correlation to findings on other imaging modalities. A retrospective review of pediatric osteosarcoma patients imaged with FDG PET/CT was performed in patients with pathologically proven local recurrences. FDG PET/CT findings were reviewed and correlated with available comparison imaging studies. Ten local osteosarcoma recurrences in eight pediatric osteosarcoma patients were imaged with FDG PET/CT. All eight patients had a local recurrence after limb salvage; two patients had a second local recurrence after amputation. All local recurrences were seen with FDG PET/CT, demonstrating solid (n=5) or peripheral/nodular (n=5) FDG uptake patterns. Maximum standard uptake values (SUVs) ranged from 3.0 to 15.7. In five recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and MRI, MRI was limited or nondiagnostic in three. In four recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and bone scan, the bone scan was negative in three. Local osteosarcoma recurrences are well visualized by FDG PET/CT, demonstrating either solid or peripheral/nodular FDG uptake with a wide range of maximum SUVs. FDG PET/CT demonstrates the full extent of local recurrences, while MRI can be limited by artifact from metallic hardware. PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than bone scan in detecting local osteosarcoma recurrences. (orig.)

  9. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  10. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-18

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  11. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manca, Gianpiero; Volterrani, Duccio [University Hospital of Pisa, Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Vanzi, Eleonora [University Hospital of Siena, Service of Medical Physics, Siena (Italy); Rubello, Domenico; Grassetto, Gaia [Santa Maria della Misericordia Rovigo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy); Giammarile, Francesco [Faculte Charles Merieux, Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Hospitalier and Biophysique, Lyon (France); Wong, Ka Kit [University of Michigan Hospital, Nuclear Medicine/Radiology Department, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Perkins, Alan C. [University of Nottingham, Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Medicine, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Colletti, Patrick M. [Southern University of California, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited ''quantification'' to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of ''true'' quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and ''personalized'' quantification techniques. (orig.)

  12. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection impact on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax, CT volumetric and KRAS-based parameters of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Claudio V. [Instituto de Radiomedicina, Department of Radiation Oncology, Santiago (Chile); School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, Felipe A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Ferrer, Carlos [Hospital Provincial de Castellon, Institute of Oncology, Castellon de la Plana (Spain); School of Medicine Cardenal Herrera-CEU University, Castellon de la Plana (Spain); Alvarez, Emilio [School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Pathology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Carreras, Jose L. [School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madrid (Spain); Ochoa, Enrique [Hospital Provincial de Castellon, Institute of Oncology, Castellon de la Plana (Spain)

    2014-10-01

    It has long been debated whether human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are associated with rectal cancer. The gene products of HCMV and EBV contribute to cell-cycle progression, mutagenesis, angiogenesis and immune evasion. The aim of this prospective study was to analyse the association between infection of a tumour by HCMV and EBV and clinical, histological, metabolic ({sup 18}F-FDG uptake), volumetric (from CT) and molecular (KRAS status) features and long-term outcomes in a homogeneously treated group of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. HCMV and EBV were detected in pretreatment biopsies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to explore associations between viral infection and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). We analysed 37 patients with a median follow-up of 74 months (range 5-173 months). Locoregional control, OS and DFS at 5 years were 93 %, 74 % and 71 %, respectively. Patients with HCMV/EBV coinfection had a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value than patients without viral coinfection (p = 0.02). Significant differences were also observed in staging and percentage relative reduction in tumour volume between patients with and without HCMV infection (p < 0.01) and EBV infection (p < 0.01). KRAS wildtype status was significantly more frequently observed in patients with EBV infection (p <0.01) and HCMV/EBV co-infection (p = 0.04). No significant differences were observed in OS or DFS between patients with and without EBV infection (p = 0.88 and 0.73), HCMV infection (p = 0.84 and 0.79), and EBV/CMV coinfection (p = 0.24 and 0.39). This pilot study showed that viral infections were associated with metabolic staging differences, and differences in the evolution of metabolic and volumetric parameters and KRAS mutations. Further findings of specific features will help determine the best candidates for metabolic and volumetric staging and

  13. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection impact on 18F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax, CT volumetric and KRAS-based parameters of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Claudio V.; Calvo, Felipe A.; Ferrer, Carlos; Alvarez, Emilio; Carreras, Jose L.; Ochoa, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    It has long been debated whether human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are associated with rectal cancer. The gene products of HCMV and EBV contribute to cell-cycle progression, mutagenesis, angiogenesis and immune evasion. The aim of this prospective study was to analyse the association between infection of a tumour by HCMV and EBV and clinical, histological, metabolic ( 18 F-FDG uptake), volumetric (from CT) and molecular (KRAS status) features and long-term outcomes in a homogeneously treated group of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. HCMV and EBV were detected in pretreatment biopsies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to explore associations between viral infection and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). We analysed 37 patients with a median follow-up of 74 months (range 5-173 months). Locoregional control, OS and DFS at 5 years were 93 %, 74 % and 71 %, respectively. Patients with HCMV/EBV coinfection had a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value than patients without viral coinfection (p = 0.02). Significant differences were also observed in staging and percentage relative reduction in tumour volume between patients with and without HCMV infection (p < 0.01) and EBV infection (p < 0.01). KRAS wildtype status was significantly more frequently observed in patients with EBV infection (p <0.01) and HCMV/EBV co-infection (p = 0.04). No significant differences were observed in OS or DFS between patients with and without EBV infection (p = 0.88 and 0.73), HCMV infection (p = 0.84 and 0.79), and EBV/CMV coinfection (p = 0.24 and 0.39). This pilot study showed that viral infections were associated with metabolic staging differences, and differences in the evolution of metabolic and volumetric parameters and KRAS mutations. Further findings of specific features will help determine the best candidates for metabolic and volumetric staging and

  14. The role of 18FDG, 18FDOPA PET/CT and 99mTc bone scintigraphy imaging in Erdheim–Chester disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Gómez, F.J., E-mail: javier191185@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Virgen del Rocío Universitary Hospital, Seville (Spain); Acevedo-Báñez, I.; Martínez-Castillo, R.; Tirado-Hospital, J.L.; Cuenca-Cuenca, J.I.; Pachón-Garrudo, V.M.; Álvarez-Pérez, R.M.; García-Jiménez, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Virgen del Rocío Universitary Hospital, Seville (Spain); Rivas-Infante, E. [Department of Pathology, Virgen del Rocío Universitary Hospital, Seville (Spain); García-Morillo, J.S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Virgen del Rocío Universitary Hospital, Seville (Spain); Borrego-Dorado, I. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Virgen del Rocío Universitary Hospital, Seville (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocitosis, characterized by multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltration by foamy histiocytes. Etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown and only about 500 cases are related in the literature. • Multifocal nature of involvement in ECD can produce a wide variety of clinical signs. In our experience, neurological involvement is associated with mortality in all cases. Characteristic long bone osteosclerosis was a quasi-pathognomonic finding in bone scintigraphy. • To the best of our knowledge, the 18FDOPA-PET/CT not seem useful in the initial staging of ECD based on a single case report. • Bone scintigraphy and the 18FDG-PET/CT that were particularly useful in despite systemic involvement, locate the optimum site for biopsy and treatment response evaluation. In this context, a baseline 18FDG-PET/CT with an optional bone scintigraphy may help in monitoring the disease and could be considered when patients were incidentally diagnosed and periodically follow-up 18FDG-PET/CT must be performed in the follow up to evaluate the treatment response. - Abstract: Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocitosis, characterized by multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltration by foamy histiocytes that stain positively for CD68 marker but not express CD1a and S100 proteins. Etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown and only about 500 cases are related in the literature. Multisystemic involvement leads to a wide variety of clinical manifestations that results in a poor prognosis although recent advances in treatment. We present the clinical, nuclear medicine findings and therapeutic aspects of a serie of 6 patients with histopathological diagnosis of ECD, who have undergone both bone scintigraphy (BS) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET/CT scans in our institution. A complementary 18F-fluorodopa (18FDOPA)-PET/CT was performed in one case. Three different

  15. The role of 18FDG, 18FDOPA PET/CT and 99mTc bone scintigraphy imaging in Erdheim–Chester disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Gómez, F.J.; Acevedo-Báñez, I.; Martínez-Castillo, R.; Tirado-Hospital, J.L.; Cuenca-Cuenca, J.I.; Pachón-Garrudo, V.M.; Álvarez-Pérez, R.M.; García-Jiménez, R.; Rivas-Infante, E.; García-Morillo, J.S.; Borrego-Dorado, I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocitosis, characterized by multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltration by foamy histiocytes. Etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown and only about 500 cases are related in the literature. • Multifocal nature of involvement in ECD can produce a wide variety of clinical signs. In our experience, neurological involvement is associated with mortality in all cases. Characteristic long bone osteosclerosis was a quasi-pathognomonic finding in bone scintigraphy. • To the best of our knowledge, the 18FDOPA-PET/CT not seem useful in the initial staging of ECD based on a single case report. • Bone scintigraphy and the 18FDG-PET/CT that were particularly useful in despite systemic involvement, locate the optimum site for biopsy and treatment response evaluation. In this context, a baseline 18FDG-PET/CT with an optional bone scintigraphy may help in monitoring the disease and could be considered when patients were incidentally diagnosed and periodically follow-up 18FDG-PET/CT must be performed in the follow up to evaluate the treatment response. - Abstract: Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocitosis, characterized by multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltration by foamy histiocytes that stain positively for CD68 marker but not express CD1a and S100 proteins. Etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown and only about 500 cases are related in the literature. Multisystemic involvement leads to a wide variety of clinical manifestations that results in a poor prognosis although recent advances in treatment. We present the clinical, nuclear medicine findings and therapeutic aspects of a serie of 6 patients with histopathological diagnosis of ECD, who have undergone both bone scintigraphy (BS) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET/CT scans in our institution. A complementary 18F-fluorodopa (18FDOPA)-PET/CT was performed in one case. Three different

  16. Clinical significance of VEGFR-2 and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax pretreatment score in predicting the long-term outcome of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Claudio V. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, Felipe A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Alvarez, Emilio; Peligros, Isabel [School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Pathology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Alfonso, Pilar [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Medical Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Ferrer, Carlos; Ochoa, Enrique [Hospital Provincial de Castellon, Institute of Oncology, Castellon de la Plana (Spain); Herranz, Rafael [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Carreras, Jose L. [School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), epidermal growth factor receptor-1 (EGFR), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) stimulate key processes involved in tumor progression and are important targets for cancer drugs. {sup 18}F-FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) is a marker of tumor metabolic activity. The purpose of this study was to measure SUVmax combined with VEGFR-2, EGFR and COX-2 proteins in pretreatment tumor biopsies from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving intensive neoadjuvant treatment and to correlate the findings with clinical outcome. VEGFR-2, EGFR and COX-2 were measured using the immunoreactive score (IRS). SUVmax (median 8.4) was quantified in tumors with molecular overexpression (IRS {>=}3 + SUVmax {>=} 8.4 indicating active tumors; SUVmax <8.4 indicating inactive tumors). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to explore associations between tumor markers, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The study group comprised 38 patients with a median follow-up of 69.3 months (range 4.5 - 92 months). Multivariate analysis showed that active tumors (overexpressing VEGFR-2, high SUVmax) were associated with worse DFS (HR 4.73, 95 % CI 1.18 - 22.17; p = 0.04) and OS (HR 4.28, 95 % CI 1.04 - 20.12; p = 0.05). Active tumors overexpressing VEGFR-2 are associated with a worse overall outcome in patients with rectal cancer treated with induction chemotherapy followed by pelvic chemoradiation and surgery. The optimal diagnostic cut-off level for this novel biomarker association should be investigated. Evaluation in a clinical trial is required to determine whether selected patients could benefit from a VEGFR-targeting drug. (orig.)

  17. Predicting neo-adjuvant chemotherapy response and progression-free survival of locally advanced breast cancer using textural features of intratumoral heterogeneity on F-18 FDG PET/CT and diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Kim, Yemi; Chung, Jin; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2018-03-30

    Predicting response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and survival in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is important. This study investigated the prognostic value of tumor heterogeneity evaluated with textural analysis through F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We enrolled 83 patients with LABC who had completed NAC and curative surgery. Tumor texture indices from pretreatment FDG PET and DWI were extracted from histogram analysis and 7 different parent matrices: co-occurrence matrix, the voxel-alignment matrix, neighborhood intensity difference matrix, intensity size-zone matrix (ISZM), normalized gray-level co-occurrence matrix (NGLCM), neighboring gray-level dependence matrix (NGLDM), and texture spectrum matrix. The predictive values of textural features were tested regarding both pathologic NAC response and progression-free survival. Among 83 patients, 46 were pathologic responders, while 37 were nonresponders. The PET texture indices from 7 parent matrices, DWI texture indices from histogram, and 1 parent matrix (NGLCM) showed significant differences according to NAC response. On multivariable analysis, number nonuniformity of PET extracted from the NGLDM was an independent predictor of pathologic response (P = .009). During a median follow-up period of 17.3 months, 14 patients experienced recurrence. High-intensity zone emphasis (HIZE) and high-intensity short-zone emphasis (HISZE) from PET extracted from ISZM were significant textural predictors (P = .011 and P = .033). On Cox regression analysis, only HIZE was a significant predictor of recurrence (P = .027), while HISZE showed borderline significance (P = .107). Tumor texture indices are useful for NAC response prediction in LABC. Moreover, PET texture indices can help to predict disease recurrence. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Evaluation of primary prostate cancer using 11C-methionine-PET/CT and 18F-FDG-PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiiba, Masato; Ishihara, Keiichi; Kimura, Go; Kuwako, Tomoyuki; Yoshihara, Hisashi; Yoshihara, Naohisa; Sato, Hidetaka; Kondo, Yukihiro; Tsuchiya, Shin-ichi; Kumita, Shin-ichiro

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the capability of (11)C-methionine (MET)-PET/CT and (18)F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D: -glucose (FDG)-PET/CT to diagnose primary prostate cancer using recently developed Gemini TF PET/CT (Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH). Twenty men who had been referred for a diagnostic work-up for prostate cancer were enrolled in this study. MET- and FDG-PET/CT by high-resolution mode were carried out on the same day prior to prostate biopsy and each maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was compared with the pathological findings. The regions of interest (about 100 mm(2) small round) were placed at standard 6 points of the peripheral zone and 4 points in the apex of the transitional zone in cases that had undergone biopsy of the internal gland. We summed two scores if a specimen had inhomogeneous Gleason scores (e.g. GS 7; 4 + 3) and doubled the score when the Gleason score was the same (e.g. GS 8; 4 × 2). We divided the tumors into three groups. If the summed Gleason score of the specimens was 5 or less, they were grouped as NG (no grade with the Gleason score). If the summed Gleason score was 6 or 7, the tumors were defined as LG (low Gleason score group), and if the summed Gleason score was 8, 9 or 10, the tumors were classified as HG (high Gleason score group). The mean SUVmax was calculated and one-way analysis of variance or Kruskal-Wallis test and the Tukey post hoc test were performed for statistical comparisons. The capabilities of MET and FDG for diagnosing prostate cancer were evaluated through analysis of the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The cut-off levels of SUVmax for the highest accuracy were determined by the results of the ROC analysis, and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. The PET images, obtained with Gemini TF PET/CT, allowed visual identification of anatomical locations within the prostate gland. Among the mean SUVmax of MET, FDG early phase and

  19. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism: a blinded evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Charlotte Dahl; Petersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Detlefsen, Sönke; Brusgaard, Klaus; Rasmussen, Lars; Melikyan, Maria; Ekström, Klas; Globa, Evgenia; Rasmussen, Annett Helleskov; Hovendal, Claus; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2018-02-01

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3-octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV max ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV max cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged.

  20. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism. A blinded evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl Christiansen, Charlotte; Helleskov Rasmussen, Annett; Petersen, Henrik; Lerberg Nielsen, Anne; Detlefsen, Soenke; Brusgaard, Klaus; Rasmussen, Lars; Hovendal, Claus; Melikyan, Maria; Ekstroem, Klas; Globa, Evgenia; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2018-01-01

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3 -octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV max ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV max cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p < 0.03). In patients subjected to surgery, localization of the focal lesion was correct in 91%, and 100%, by 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged. (orig.)

  1. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism. A blinded evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl Christiansen, Charlotte; Helleskov Rasmussen, Annett [Hans Christian Andersen Children' s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Petersen, Henrik; Lerberg Nielsen, Anne [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Detlefsen, Soenke [University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Odense (Denmark); Brusgaard, Klaus [Odense University Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Odense (Denmark); Rasmussen, Lars; Hovendal, Claus [Odense University Hospital, Department of Abdominal Surgery, Odense (Denmark); Melikyan, Maria [Endocrine Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ekstroem, Klas [Karolinska Hospital, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Globa, Evgenia [MOH of Ukraine, Ukrainian Center of Endocrine Surgery, Endocrine Organs and Tissue Transplantation, Kyiv (Ukraine); Christesen, Henrik Thybo [Hans Christian Andersen Children' s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Odense Pancreas Center (OPAC), Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Odense C (Denmark)

    2018-02-15

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3 -octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV{sub max} ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV{sub max} cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p < 0.03). In patients subjected to surgery, localization of the focal lesion was correct in 91%, and 100%, by 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged. (orig.)

  2. Dual time point 18FDG-PET/CT versus single time point 18FDG-PET/CT for the differential diagnosis of pulmonary nodules - A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yinzhong; Lei, Junqiang; Tian, Jinhui; Zhai, Yanan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is one of the most common cancer types in the world. An accurate diagnosis of lung cancer is crucial for early treatment and management. Purpose: To perform a comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance of dual time point 18F-fluorodexyglucose position emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and single time point 18FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules. Material and Methods: PubMed (1966-2011.11), EMBASE (1974-2011.11), Web of Science (1972-2011.11), Cochrane Library (-2011.11), and four Chinese databases; CBM (1978-2011.11), CNKI (1994-2011.11), VIP (1989-2011.11), and Wanfang Database (1994-2011.11) were searched. Summary sensitivity, summary specificity, summary diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), and summary positive likelihood ratios (LR+) and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) were obtained using Meta-Disc software. Summary receiver-operating characteristic (SROC) curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of dual time point 18FDG-PET/CT and single time point 18FDG-PET/CT. Results: The inclusion criteria were fulfilled by eight articles, with a total of 415 patients and 430 pulmonary nodules. Compared with the gold standard (pathology or clinical follow-up), the summary sensitivity of dual time point 18FDG-PET/CT was 79% (95%CI, 74.0 - 84.0%), and its summary specificity was 73% (95%CI, 65.0-79.0%); the summary LR+ was 2.61 (95%CI, 1.96-3.47), and the summary LR- was 0.29 (95%CI, 0.21 - 0.41); the summary DOR was 10.25 (95%CI, 5.79 - 18.14), and the area under the SROC curve (AUC) was 0.8244. The summary sensitivity for single time point 18FDG-PET/CT was 77% (95%CI, 71.9 - 82.3%), and its summary specificity was 59% (95%CI, 50.6 - 66.2%); the summary LR+ was 1.97 (95%CI, 1.32 - 2.93), and the summary LR- was 0.37 (95%CI, 0.29 - 0.49); the summary DOR was 6.39 (95%CI, 3.39 - 12.05), and the AUC was 0.8220. Conclusion: The results indicate that dual time point 18FDG-PET/CT and single

  3. Comparison of CT and PET/CT for biopsy guidance in oncological patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerci, Juliano J.; Bogoni, Mateos; Cunha Pereira, Carlos; Cerci, Rodrigo J.; Krauzer, Cassiano; Vicente Vitola, Joao; Tabacchi, Elena; Fanti, Stefano; Delbeke, Dominique; Giacometti Sakamoto, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    To compare FDG PET/CT and CT for the guidance of percutaneous biopsies with histological confirmation of lesions. We prospectively evaluated 323 patients of whom 181 underwent FDG PET/CT-guided biopsy (total 188 biopsies) and 142 underwent CT-guided biopsy (total 146 biopsies). Biopsies were performed using the same PET/CT scanner with a fluoroscopic imaging system. Technical feasibility, clinical success and complication rates in the two groups were evaluated. Of the 188 biopsies with PET/CT guidance, 182 (96.8%) were successful with conclusive tissue samples obtained and of the 146 biopsies with CT guidance, 137 (93.8%) were successful. Therefore, 6 of 188 biopsies (3.1%) with PET/CT guidance and 9 of 146 (6.1%) with CT guidance were inconclusive (p = 0.19). Due to inconclusive histological results, 4 of the 188 lesions (2.1%) were rebiopsied with PET/CT guidance and 3 of 146 lesions (2.0%) were rebiopsied with CT guidance. Histology demonstrated that 142 of 188 lesions (75.5%) were malignant, and 40 (21.2%) were benign in the PET/CT-guided group, while 89 of 146 lesions (60.9%) were malignant and 48 (32.8%) were benign in the CT-guided group (p = 0.004 and 0.01, respectively). Patients with a histological diagnosis of benign lesion had no recurrence of disease with a minimum of 6 months follow-up. Of the 188 PET/CT-guided biopsies, 6 (3.1%) were repeat biopsies due to a previous nondiagnostic CT-guided biopsy performed in a different diagnostic centre. The interval between the two biopsies was less than a month in all cases. Histology revealed five malignant lesions and one benign lesion among these. The complication rate in the PET/CT-guided biopsy group was 12.7% (24 of 188), while in the CT-guided group, was 9.5% (14 of 146, p = 0.26). Therefore, there was no significant difference in complication rates between PET/CT and CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsy is already known to be a feasible and accurate method in the diagnostic work-up of suspected malignant

  4. Comparison of CT and PET/CT for biopsy guidance in oncological patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerci, Juliano J.; Bogoni, Mateos; Cunha Pereira, Carlos; Cerci, Rodrigo J.; Krauzer, Cassiano; Vicente Vitola, Joao [Quanta - Diagnostico e Terapia, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Tabacchi, Elena; Fanti, Stefano [University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine Department, Bologna (Italy); Delbeke, Dominique [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Giacometti Sakamoto, Danielle [Byori - Laboratorio de Patologia, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2017-08-15

    To compare FDG PET/CT and CT for the guidance of percutaneous biopsies with histological confirmation of lesions. We prospectively evaluated 323 patients of whom 181 underwent FDG PET/CT-guided biopsy (total 188 biopsies) and 142 underwent CT-guided biopsy (total 146 biopsies). Biopsies were performed using the same PET/CT scanner with a fluoroscopic imaging system. Technical feasibility, clinical success and complication rates in the two groups were evaluated. Of the 188 biopsies with PET/CT guidance, 182 (96.8%) were successful with conclusive tissue samples obtained and of the 146 biopsies with CT guidance, 137 (93.8%) were successful. Therefore, 6 of 188 biopsies (3.1%) with PET/CT guidance and 9 of 146 (6.1%) with CT guidance were inconclusive (p = 0.19). Due to inconclusive histological results, 4 of the 188 lesions (2.1%) were rebiopsied with PET/CT guidance and 3 of 146 lesions (2.0%) were rebiopsied with CT guidance. Histology demonstrated that 142 of 188 lesions (75.5%) were malignant, and 40 (21.2%) were benign in the PET/CT-guided group, while 89 of 146 lesions (60.9%) were malignant and 48 (32.8%) were benign in the CT-guided group (p = 0.004 and 0.01, respectively). Patients with a histological diagnosis of benign lesion had no recurrence of disease with a minimum of 6 months follow-up. Of the 188 PET/CT-guided biopsies, 6 (3.1%) were repeat biopsies due to a previous nondiagnostic CT-guided biopsy performed in a different diagnostic centre. The interval between the two biopsies was less than a month in all cases. Histology revealed five malignant lesions and one benign lesion among these. The complication rate in the PET/CT-guided biopsy group was 12.7% (24 of 188), while in the CT-guided group, was 9.5% (14 of 146, p = 0.26). Therefore, there was no significant difference in complication rates between PET/CT and CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsy is already known to be a feasible and accurate method in the diagnostic work-up of suspected malignant

  5. {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT as an imaging tool for early prediction of pathological response in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crippa, Flavio; Padovano, Barbara; Alessi, Alessandra; Bombardieri, Emilio; Pascali, Claudio; Bogni, Anna [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Agresti, Roberto; Maugeri, Ilaria; Rampa, Mario; Martelli, Gabriele [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Breast Surgery Unit; Sandri, Marco [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Molecular Targeting Unit; Mariani, Gabriella; Bianchi, Giulia; De Braud, Filippo [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Medical Oncology Unit; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Pathology Unit; Trecate, Giovanna [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Radiology-RMI Unit

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated whether {sup 18}F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT PET) can predict the final postoperative histopathological response in primary breast cancer after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). In this prospective cohort study of 15 patients with locally advanced operable breast cancer, FLT PET evaluations were performed before NCT, after the first cycle of NCT, and at the end of NCT. All patients subsequently underwent surgery. Variables from FLT PET examinations were correlated with postoperative histopathological results. At baseline, median of maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) in the groups showing a complete pathological response (pCR) + residual cancer burden (RCB) I, RCB II or RCB III did not differ significantly for the primary tumour (5.0 vs. 2.9 vs. 8.9, p = 0.293) or for axillary nodes (7.9 vs. 1.6 vs. 7.0, p = 0.363), whereas the Spearman correlation between SUV{sub max} and Ki67 proliferation rate index was significant (r = 0.69, p < 0.001). Analysis of the relative percentage change of SUV{sub max}in the primary tumour (∇SUVT{sub max}(t{sub 1})) and axillary nodes (∇SUVN{sub max}(t{sub 1})) after the first NCT cycle showed that the power of ∇SUVT{sub max}(t{sub 1}) to predict pCR + RCB I responses (AUC = 0.91, p < 0.001) was statistically significant, whereas ∇SUVN{sub max}(t{sub 1}) had a moderate ability (AUC = 0.77, p = 0.119) to separate subjects with ΔSUVT{sub max}(t{sub 1}) > -52.9 % into two groups: RCB III patients and a heterogeneous group that included RCB I and RCB II patients. A predictive score μ based on ΔSUVT{sub max}(t{sub 1}) and ΔSUVN{sub max}(t{sub 1}) parameters is proposed. The preliminary findings of the present study suggest the potential utility of FLT PET scans for early monitoring of response to NCT and to formulate a therapeutic strategy consistent with the estimated efficacy of NCT. However, these results in a small patient population

  6. Incremental diagnostic utility of gastric distension FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Brest University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brest (France); Duong, Cuong P.; Cabalag, Carlos S. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Surgical Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Parameswaran, Bimal K.; Callahan, Jason [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    To assess the diagnostic utility of gastric distension (GD) FDG PET/CT in both patients with known gastric malignancy and those not known to have gastric malignancy but with incidental focal FDG uptake in the stomach. This retrospective analysis included 88 patients who underwent FDG PET/CT following GD with hyoscine N-butylbromide (Buscopan registered) and water ingestion as part of routine clinical evaluation between 2004 and 2014. FDG PET/CT scans before and after GD were reported blinded to the patient clinical details in 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy and 39 patients who underwent GD following incidental suspicious gastric uptake. The PET findings were validated by a composite clinical standard. In the 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy, GD improved PET detection of the primary tumour (from 80 % to 90 %). PET evaluation of tumour extent was concordant with endoscopic/surgical reports in 31 % (interpreter 1) and 45 % (interpreter 2) using pre-GD images and 73 % and 76 % using GD images. Interobserver agreement also improved with GD (κ = 0.29 to 0.69). Metabolic and morphological quantitative analysis demonstrated a major impact of GD in normal gastric wall but no significant effect in tumour, except a minor increase in SUV related to a delayed acquisition time. The tumour to normal stomach SUVmax ratio increased from 3.8 ± 2.9 to 9.2 ± 8.6 (mean ± SD) with GD (p < 0.0001), facilitating detection and improved assessment of the primary tumour. In 25 (64 %) of the 39 patients with incidental suspicious gastric uptake, acquisition after GD correctly excluded a malignant process. In 10 (71 %) of the remaining 14 patients with persistent suspicious FDG uptake despite GD, malignancy was confirmed and in 3 (21 %) an active but benign pathology was diagnosed. GD is a simple way to improve local staging with FDG PET in patients with gastric malignancy. In the setting of incidental suspicious gastric

  7. Incremental diagnostic utility of gastric distension FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Duong, Cuong P.; Cabalag, Carlos S.; Parameswaran, Bimal K.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic utility of gastric distension (GD) FDG PET/CT in both patients with known gastric malignancy and those not known to have gastric malignancy but with incidental focal FDG uptake in the stomach. This retrospective analysis included 88 patients who underwent FDG PET/CT following GD with hyoscine N-butylbromide (Buscopan registered) and water ingestion as part of routine clinical evaluation between 2004 and 2014. FDG PET/CT scans before and after GD were reported blinded to the patient clinical details in 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy and 39 patients who underwent GD following incidental suspicious gastric uptake. The PET findings were validated by a composite clinical standard. In the 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy, GD improved PET detection of the primary tumour (from 80 % to 90 %). PET evaluation of tumour extent was concordant with endoscopic/surgical reports in 31 % (interpreter 1) and 45 % (interpreter 2) using pre-GD images and 73 % and 76 % using GD images. Interobserver agreement also improved with GD (κ = 0.29 to 0.69). Metabolic and morphological quantitative analysis demonstrated a major impact of GD in normal gastric wall but no significant effect in tumour, except a minor increase in SUV related to a delayed acquisition time. The tumour to normal stomach SUVmax ratio increased from 3.8 ± 2.9 to 9.2 ± 8.6 (mean ± SD) with GD (p < 0.0001), facilitating detection and improved assessment of the primary tumour. In 25 (64 %) of the 39 patients with incidental suspicious gastric uptake, acquisition after GD correctly excluded a malignant process. In 10 (71 %) of the remaining 14 patients with persistent suspicious FDG uptake despite GD, malignancy was confirmed and in 3 (21 %) an active but benign pathology was diagnosed. GD is a simple way to improve local staging with FDG PET in patients with gastric malignancy. In the setting of incidental suspicious gastric

  8. Metastatic Breast Lesion to the Falx Detected with PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Chester; Schuster, David M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Intracranial dural metastasis is increasingly encountered in imaging. Autopsies conducted on patients with advanced metastatic disease demonstrate dural involvement in 9% of cases, with breast and prostate cancer the most common primaries. Awareness of this entity and imaging appearances is especially important in evaluating malignancies prone to dural metastasis. A 57-year-old woman with a strong family history of breast cancer initially presented after self-detection of a right breast lump. Subsequent mammogram and biopsies yielded a diagnosis of right infiltrating ductal carcinoma with a positive lymph node as well as left invasive lobular carcinoma. Initial staging PET-CT (not shown) at the time of diagnosis demonstrated no abnormal FDG uptake remote from the breast. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was instituted, and a PET-CT was obtained to evaluate disease response, demonstrating an approximately 1.8 cm hypermetabolic intra-cranial mass, localized to the region of the anterior corpus callosum on axian PET (Fig. 1a), axial fused PET-CT (Fig. 1b), and sagittal fused PET-CT (Fig. 1c) with a maximum SUV of 15.9. There was associated bifrontal vasogenic edema (Fig. 1d) on the CT demonstrated on brain windows. Marked progression of disease was noted elsewhere, including hypermetabolic adenopathy and skeletal disease. A contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was obtained demonstrating extensive T1 hypointensity, T2, and FLAIR (Fig. 2a) hyperintensity in the bilateral paramedian frontallobes representing vasogenic edema. Post-contrast imaging demonstrated three solidly enhancing masses in the areas of described vasogenic edema, one large extra-axial and two sub-centimeter parenchymal lesions. The large extra-axial and two sub-centimeter parenchymal lesions. The large extra-axial mass demonstrated homogeneous solid enhancement, in the midline anteriorly centered on the falx, just superior to the anterior corpus callosum. This measured 1.7cm transverse x 3.1cm AP x 2.4cm

  9. Deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT versus free breathing PET/CT and respiratory gating PET for reference. Evaluation in 95 patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Ohtake, Eiji; Inoue, Tomio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define the factors that correlate with differences in maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and free breathing (FB) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT admixed with respiratory gating (RG) PET for reference. Patients (n=95) with pulmonary lesions were evaluated at one facility over 33 months. After undergoing whole-body PET/CT, a RG PET and FB PET/CT scans were obtained, followed by a DIBH PET/CT scan. All scans were recorded using a list-mode dynamic collection method with respiratory gating. The RG PET was reconstructed using phase gating without attenuation correction; the FB PET was reconstructed from the RG PET sinogram datasets with attenuation correction. Respiratory motion distance, breathing cycle speed, and waveform of RG PET were recorded. The SUV max of FB PET/CT and DIBH PET/CT were recorded: the percent difference in SUV max between the FB and DIBH scans was defined as the %BH-index. The %BH-index was significantly higher for lesions in the lower lung area than in the upper lung area. Respiratory motion distance was significantly higher in the lower lung area than in the upper lung area. A significant relationship was observed between the %BH-index and respiratory motion distance. Waveforms without steady end-expiration tended to show a high %BH-index. Significant inverse relationships were observed between %BH-index and cycle speed, and between respiratory motion distance and cycle speed. Decrease in SUV max of FB PET/CT was due to tumor size, distribution of lower lung, long respiratory movement at slow breathing cycle speeds, and respiratory waveforms without steady end-expiration. (author)

  10. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  11. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  12. 18F-DG PET/CT in detection of recurrence and metastasis of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the value of 18F-DG PET/CT in detecting recurrence and/or metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC).METHODS: Combined visual analysis with semiquantitative analysis, the 18F-DG PET/CT wholebody imaging results and the corresponding clinical data of 68 postoperative CRC patients including 48 male and 20 female with average age of 58.1 were analyzed retrospectively.RESULTS: Recurrence and/or metastasis were confirmed in 56 patients in the clinical follow-up after the PET/CT imaging. The sensitivity of PET/CT diagnosis of CRC recurrence and/or metastasis was 94.6%, and the specificity was 83.3%. The positive predictive value (PPV)was 96.4% and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 76.9%. PET/CT imaging detected one or more occult malignant lesions in 8 cases where abdominal/pelvic CT and/or ultrasonography showed negative findings, and also detected more lesions than CT or ultrasonography did in 30.4% (17/56) cases. Recurrence and/or metastasis was detected in 91.7% (22/24) cases with elevated serum CEA levels by 18F-DG PET/CT imaging.CONCLUSION: 18F-DG PET/CT could detect the recurrence and/or metastasis of CRC with high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Performance of FDG-PET/CT for diagnosis of recurrent uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Koji; Yamasaki, Erena; Domeki, Yasushi; Kaji, Yasushi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2008-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the accuracy of integrated FDG-PET/CT, compared with PET alone, for diagnosis of suspected recurrence of uterine cervical cancer. Fifty-two women who had undergone treatment for histopathologically proven cervical cancer received PET/CT with suspected recurrence. PET-alone and integrated PET/CT images were evaluated by two different experienced radiologists by consensus for each investigation. A final diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology, radiological imaging, and clinical follow-up for over 1 year. Patient-based analysis showed that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of PET/CT were 92.0% (23/25), 92.6% (25/27), and 92.3% (48/52), respectively, while for PET, the corresponding figures were 80.0% (20/25), 77.8% (21/27), and 78.8% (41/52), respectively. PET/CT resolved the false-positive PET results due to hypermetabolic activity of benign/inflammatory lesions and physiological variants, and was able to detect lung metastasis, local recurrence, peritoneal dissemination, para-aortic lymph node metastasis, and pelvic lymph node metastasis missed by PET alone. However, tiny local recurrence and lymph node metastasis could not be detected even by PET/CT. FDG-PET/CT is a useful complementary modality for providing good anatomic and functional localization of sites of recurrence during follow-up of patients with cervical cancer. (orig.)

  14. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannas, Peter; Weber, Christoph; Adam, Gerhard; Derlin, Thorsten; Lambert, Joerg; Mester, Janos; Klutmann, Susanne; Leypoldt, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) constitute a challenging diagnostic problem, as the underlying tumour often remains unidentified for a long time, even with frequent conventional diagnostic procedures. For appropriate patient management timely identification of the tumour is critical. We evaluated the value of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT in the investigation of PNS. The case notes of 46 consecutive patients with clinically suspected PNS who underwent 18 F-FDG-PET/CT were reviewed retrospectively and the performance of PET/CT for detecting underlying tumours was assessed. PET/CT detected foci of increased 18 F-FDG uptake in 10 out of 46 patients. In six of these 10 patients combined PET/CT identified the underlying disease: four patients suffered from PNS; vasculitic and local metastatic disease was detected in two other patients. Based on our results, we believe that the role of positron emission tomography in the detection of occult neoplasms in patients with PNS has been overestimated in the past. In clinical practice, PNS is far more often suspected than proven. In our study combined PET/CT identified malignancy as the underlying cause of suspected PNS in only 8.7% (4/46). We believe that combined PET/CT should be reserved for stringently selected patients with a high clinical index of suspicion for PNS and after conventional imaging techniques fail to detect a tumour. (orig.)

  15. Role of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Recurrent Ovary Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O, Joo Hyun; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Choi, Woo Hee; Lee, Won Hyoung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To date, anatomical imaging modalities of the pelvis and tumor markers have been the mainstay of surveillance for recurrent ovary cancer. This study aimed to assess the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in evaluation of ovary cancer recurrences, especially in comparison with enhanced CT and tumor marker CA 125. 73 patients who had PET/CT scan for restaging of confirmed ovary cancer, and additional imaging with enhanced CT of the pelvis within one month were included. CA 125 level was available in all patients. From the PET/CT images, maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of suspected recurrence sites were recorded. Confirmation was available through re-operation or biopsy in 26 cases, and clinical assessment with series of follow-up images in 47. PET/CT had 93% sensitivity and 88% specificity for detecting recurrent ovary cancer. Enhanced CT of pelvis had sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 88%, and CA 125 50% and 95%. PET/CT has higher sensitivity for detecting recurrent ovary cancer compared to enhanced CT though the differences were not significant. PET/CT has significantly higher sensitivity than CA 125. However, the three tests all agreed in only 43% of the recurrence cases, and recurrence should be suspected when any of the tests, especially PET/CT, show positive findings.

  16. Role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Recurrent Ovary Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O, Joo Hyun; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Choi, Woo Hee; Lee, Won Hyoung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo

    2008-01-01

    To date, anatomical imaging modalities of the pelvis and tumor markers have been the mainstay of surveillance for recurrent ovary cancer. This study aimed to assess the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in evaluation of ovary cancer recurrences, especially in comparison with enhanced CT and tumor marker CA 125. 73 patients who had PET/CT scan for restaging of confirmed ovary cancer, and additional imaging with enhanced CT of the pelvis within one month were included. CA 125 level was available in all patients. From the PET/CT images, maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of suspected recurrence sites were recorded. Confirmation was available through re-operation or biopsy in 26 cases, and clinical assessment with series of follow-up images in 47. PET/CT had 93% sensitivity and 88% specificity for detecting recurrent ovary cancer. Enhanced CT of pelvis had sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 88%, and CA 125 50% and 95%. PET/CT has higher sensitivity for detecting recurrent ovary cancer compared to enhanced CT though the differences were not significant. PET/CT has significantly higher sensitivity than CA 125. However, the three tests all agreed in only 43% of the recurrence cases, and recurrence should be suspected when any of the tests, especially PET/CT, show positive findings

  17. PET/CT scanning guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Xue-lian, E-mail: duxuelian23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: melody23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Sheng, Xiu-gui, E-mail: jnsd2000@yahoo.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Qing-shui, E-mail: lqs1966@126.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Wang, Cong, E-mail: jnwc1981@hotmail.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: jnyh2200@sina.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical contribution of positron emission tomography using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and integrated computer tomography (FDG-PET/CT) guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight patients with recurrent ovarian cancer from 2003 to 2008 were retrospectively studied. In these patients, 28 received PET/CT guided IMRT (PET/CT-IMRT group), and 30 received CT guided IMRT (CT-IMRT group). Treatment plans, tumor response, toxicities and survival were evaluated. Results: Changes in GTV delineation were found in 10 (35.7%) patients based on PET-CT information compared with CT data, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the metastasis tumor. PET/CT guided IMRT improved tumor response compared to CT-IMRT group (CR: 64.3% vs. 46.7%, P = 0.021; PR: 25.0% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.036). The 3-year overall survival was significantly higher in the PET-CT/IMRT group than control (34.1% vs. 13.2%, P = 0.014). Conclusions: PET/CT guided IMRT in recurrent ovarian cancer patients improved the delineation of GTV and reduce the likelihood of geographic misses and therefore improve the clinical outcome.

  18. (18F) FDG PET/CT in patients with fever of unknown origin: AIIMS experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazar, A.H.; Naswa, N.; Ramya, S.; Patnecha, M.; Bangkim, Chandra K.H.; Kumar, R.; Bandopadhyay, G.P.; Bal, C.S.; Malhotra, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to assess the value of ( 18 F) FDG PET/CT in evaluation of patients with Fever of Unknown Origin (FUO). We retrospectively analysed clinical data and ( 18 F) FDG PET scan of 48 patients over a period of 1 year. These patients met the revised definition criteria of FUO (febrile illness of greater than 3 weeks duration, temperature greater than 38.3 C and no diagnosis after appropriate in-patient or out-patient evaluation). Most of the patients recruited in this study had normal clinical and radiological examination. ( 18 F) FDG PET was helpful in making a diagnosis in 24 patients. An infective/inflammatory cause of FUO was found in thirteen (27%) patients, a neoplasm in six (12.5%) patients, autoimmune cause in five (10.4%) patients. A definitive diagnosis could not be made in twenty four (50%) patients. Out of these 24 patients, 15 had normal PET/CT study, 9 had positive PET/CT findings but they lost in follow up and 2 died within 1 month of PET/CT study without any diagnosis. ( 18 F) FDG PET/CT is a useful tool for evaluation of patients with FUO. It provides important diagnostic clues not suggested by other conventional imaging modalities. Patients with positive PET/CT findings but no definitive diagnosis should be followed up further to improve utility of PET/CT

  19. PET-CT in oncological patients: analysis of informal care costs in cost-benefit assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlacchio, Antonio; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Schillaci, Orazio; Chegai, Fabrizio; Tosti, Daniela; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Guazzaroni, Manlio; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    The authors analysed the impact of nonmedical costs (travel, loss of productivity) in an economic analysis of PET-CT (positron-emission tomography-computed tomography) performed with standard contrast-enhanced CT protocols (CECT). From October to November 2009, a total of 100 patients referred to our institute were administered a questionnaire to evaluate the nonmedical costs of PET-CT. In addition, the medical costs (equipment maintenance and depreciation, consumables and staff) related to PET-CT performed with CECT and PET-CT with low-dose nonenhanced CT and separate CECT were also estimated. The medical costs were 919.3 euro for PET-CT with separate CECT, and 801.3 euro for PET-CT with CECT. Therefore, savings of approximately 13% are possible. Moreover, savings in nonmedical costs can be achieved by reducing the number of hospital visits required by patients undergoing diagnostic imaging. Nonmedical costs heavily affect patients' finances as well as having an indirect impact on national health expenditure. Our results show that PET-CT performed with standard dose CECT in a single session provides benefits in terms of both medical and nonmedical costs.

  20. PET-CT detection rate of primary breast cancer lesions. Correlation with the clinicopathological factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tomoko; Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Fukuma, Eisuke

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and forty lesions of primary breast cancer underwent positron emission tomography (PET)-CT between June 2006 and May 2007. The PET-CT detection rate of primary breast cancer lesions was 72.1%. The detection rate was 52.1% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm, 92.8% for invasive breast cancers >20 mm, and these results were significant. In the present study, no significant relationship was observed between tumor types, however, invasive lobular carcinoma showed a lower detection rate, 58.3%. The PET-CT results were not significantly affected by either estrogen and progesterone receptors or distant metastasis. A significant correlation regarding the detection rate of PET-CT was found with HER2 status, tumor grade, and axillary lymph node status. The detection rate was 100% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm when the interval between prior diagnostic Mammotome biopsies and PET-CT was less than 3 weeks, 18.8% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm when the interval was more than 3 weeks, and these results were significant. Mammotome biopsies may therefore affect the detection rate of PET-CT. Invasive cancers ≤20 mm showed a low detection rate, therefore, it is considered to be insufficient to use PET-CT for the detection of early breast cancer. (author)

  1. PET/CT Imaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T; Goldsmith, Stanley J

    2011-01-01

    disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Antiprostate-specific membrane antigen RIT demonstrates......Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis...... of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in the imaging of prostate cancer...

  2. Detection of Cancer with PET and PET/CT in Asymptomatic Volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Ji In; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Choi, Yoon Ho; Cho, Han Byoul; Shim, Jae Yong

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the diagnostic performance of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT for cancer detection in asymptomatic health-check examinees. This study consisted of 5091 PET or PET/CT conducted as part of annual health examination at one hospital from March 1998 to February 2008. To find the incidence of cancers, medical records of the subjects were thoroughly reviewed for a follow-up period of one year. The patterns of formal readings of PET and PET/CT were analyzed to assess the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection. The histopathology and stage of the cancers were evaluated in relation to the results of PET. Eighty-six cancers (1.7%) were diagnosed within one year after PET or PET/CT. When PET and PET/CT results were combined, the sensitivity was 48.8% and specificity was 81.1% for cancer detection. PET only had a sensitivity of 46.2% and a specificity of 81.4%, and PET/CT only had a sensitivity of 75.0% and a specificity of 78.5% respectively. There were no significant differences in cancer site, stage and histopathology between PET positive and PET negative cancers. In 19.3% of formal readings of PET and PET/CT, further evaluation to exclude malignancy or significant disease was recommended. Head and neck area and upper gastrointestinal tract were commonly recommended sites for further evaluation. PET and PET/CT showed moderate performance for detecting cancers in asymptomatic adults in this study. More experience and further investigation are needed to overcome limitations of PET and PET/CT for cancer screening

  3. Detection ability of FDG-PET/CT comparing with other imaging modalities in multiple myeloma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Lee, Tae Hyun; Pai, Moon Sun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by bone marrow infiltration with malignant plasma cells. It is important to detect involving bone for diagnosis and management of MM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic ability and limitation of 18F-FDG-PET/CT (PET/CT) comparing other imaging modalities (separated PET and CT, whole body plain X-ray (XR), bone scintigraphy (BS), and MRI) in MM. Twenty PET/CT scans were performed in 16 patients (M: F=6: 10, median age=59 y). PET/CT findings were compared with available other images (n of CT=21, XR=21, BS=8, and MRI=5). Concordance with more than 2 image modalities, laboratory data, symptom, and biopsies were used for diagnosis of detected lesions. PET/CT revealed 256 of total 287 sites (sensitivity, 89.2%; accuracy, 84.8%). The sensitivity and accuracy of separating PET, CT, and XR were 86.3%, 70.4%; 47.4%, 50.3%; and 72.8%, 72.4%, respectively. Available BS identified 67 of 202 sites (sensitivity, 33.2%; accuracy, 44.0%). MRI detected 20 of 24 sites (sensitivity, 83.3%; accuracy, 36.3%). False positive rate (FP) of PET, XR, and MRI was as high as 87.8%, 95.1%, and 100%. PET for rib lesion identified 9 of 10 patients (90.0%) but for skull lesion only 4 of 7 patients (57.2%) with underestimation. 5 patients in MRI showed diffuse marrow signal change but only 3 had marrow involvement. But PET/CT showed higher accuracy than MRI. PET/CT was the most useful tool for detecting involving bone of MM comparing with other imaging modalities. Moreover, PET/CT is expected to overcome the limitations for the small osteolytic bone lesions with diffuse FDG uptake on PET

  4. Role of choline PET/CT in guiding target volume delineation for irradiation of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.M.; Kurth, J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Gocke, C.; Kuhnt, T.; Hildebrandt, G. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Krause, B.J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Choline PET/CT has shown limitations for the detection of primary prostate cancer and nodal metastatic disease, mainly due to limited sensitivity and specificity. Conversely in the restaging of prostate cancer recurrence, choline PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the detection of local regional and nodal recurrence with an impact on therapy management. This review highlights current literature on choline PET/CT for radiation treatment planning in primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Due to limited sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between benign and malignant prostatic tissues in primary prostate cancer, there is little enthusiasm for target volume delineation based on choline PET/CT. Irradiation planning for the treatment of single lymph node metastases on the basis of choline PET/CT is controversial due to its limited lesion-based sensitivity in primary nodal staging. In high-risk prostate cancer, choline PET/CT might diagnose lymph node metastases, which potentially can be included in the conventional irradiation field. Prior to radiation treatment of recurrent prostate cancer, choline PET/CT may prove useful for patient stratification by excluding distant disease which would require systemic therapy. In patients with local recurrence, choline PET/CT can be used to delineate local sites of recurrence within the prostatic resection bed allowing a boost to PET-positive sites. In patients with lymph node metastases outside the prostatic fossa and regional metastatic lymph nodes, choline PET/CT might influence radiation treatment planning by enabling extension of the target volume to lymphatic drainage sites with or without a boost to PET-positive lymph nodes. Further clinical randomized trials are required to assess treatment outcomes following choline-based biological radiation treatment planning in comparison with conventional radiation treatment planning. (orig.)

  5. Clinical Significance of Focal Breast Lesions Incidentally Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Seok; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence and malignant risk of focal breast lesions incidentally detected by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Various PET/CT findings of the breast lesions were also analyzed to improve the differentiation between benign from malignant focal breast lesions. The subjects were 3,768 consecutive 18 F-FDG PET/CT exams performed in adult females without a history of breast cancer. A focal breast lesion was defined as a focal 18 F-FDG uptake or a focal nodular lesion on CT image irrespective of 18 F-FDG uptake in the breasts. The maximum SUV and CT pattern of focal breast lesions were evaluated, and were compared with final diagnosis. The incidence of focal breast lesions on PET/CT in adult female subjects was 1.4% (58 lesions in 53 subjects). In finally confirmed 53 lesions of 48 subjects, 11 lesions of 8 subjects (20.8%) were proven to be malignant. When the PET/CT patterns suggesting benignancy (maximum attenuation value > 75 HU or 20) were added as diagnostic criteria of PET/CT to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions along with maximum SUV, the area under ROC curve of PET/CT was significantly increased compared with maximum SUV alone (0.680±0.093 vs. 0.786±0.076, p 18 F-FDG PET/CT is not low, deserving further diagnostic confirmation. Image interpretation considering both 18 F-FDG uptake and PET/CT pattern may be helpful to improve the differentiation from malignant and benign focal breast lesion

  6. Clinical feasibility of {sup 90}Y digital PET/CT for imaging microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Binzel, Katherine; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Wuthrick, Evan J. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of next generation solid-state digital photon counting PET/CT (dPET/CT) technology and imaging findings in patients following {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in comparison with standard of care (SOC) bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT (bSPECT/CT). Five patients underwent SOC {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung imaging immediately following routine radioembolization with 3.5 ± 1.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres. All patients also underwent dPET/CT imaging at 29 ± 11 h following radioembolization. Matched pairs comparison was used to compare image quality, image contrast and {sup 90}Y biodistribution between dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images. Volumetric assessments of {sup 90}Y activity using different isocontour thresholds on dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images were also compared. Digital PET/CT consistently provided better visual image quality and {sup 90}Y-to-background image contrast while depicting {sup 90}Y biodistribution than bSPECT/CT. Isocontour volumetric assessment using a 1% threshold precisely outlined {sup 90}Y activity and the treatment volume on dPET/CT images, whereas a more restrictive 20% threshold on bSPECT/CT images was needed to obtain comparable treatment volumes. The use of a less restrictive 10% threshold isocontour on bSPECT/CT images grossly overestimated the treatment volume when compared with the 1% threshold on dPET/CT images. Digital PET/CT is clinically feasible for the assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization, and provides better visual image quality and image contrast than routine bSPECT/CT with comparable acquisition times. With further optimization and clinical validation, dPET technology may allow faster and more accurate imaging-based assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using 11C-ITMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Wagarsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Oda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4- 11 C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ( 11 C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for 11 C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for 11 C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for 11 C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of 11 C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  8. [Evaluation of new technologies PET/CT nuclear imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldes, Maria Rosário

    2010-01-01

    of Todos-os-Santos. The Hospital Garcia de Orta must have also 1 PET, what will avoid the patients from the Setúbal district to come to Lisbon. The HC of Coimbra and the HC of Ocidental Lisbon must have 1 PET in order to cover the population of the Centre Region and of Lisbon Region. The HC of VN de Gaia, the Hospital Pedro Hispano, Matosinhos, and the Hospital of Guimarães, must have 1 PET due to the population density of the North Region. The New Central Hospitals of Evora and Faro must also have 1 PET and the New Hospital of Braga. The estimation of diabetes, type 2, has been made using the minimum prevalence of 3%. The prevention of cardiac illness in the population of 50 years need with diabetes, type 2, must be done with PET annual examinations in the Hospital, referred by the family doctor in the health centre. The screening colorectal has not a tradition in Portugal. Sun L et al (2008) mention that according to criteria of specificity, sensibility and precision PET/CT presents higher advantages in the colorectal screening. It has been estimated that it must be done in 10% of the adults of 50 years and more with annual examinations in the Hospital, referred by the family doctor in the health centre. The use of PET in cancer treatment must be done only in the cancer of mama; cáncer colorectal; cancer of esofagus; cancer of head and neck; lung cancer; linfoma; melanoma; and Solitary Pulmonary Nodules; cancer of thyroid; cancer cervical . Those types of cancer are 46,7 % of total cancer mortality. The use of PET in cardiology in CAD is also important. If the prevalence of CAD is less than 70% PET has a lower value per QALY. The number foreseen of examinations is of about 3114 examinations/ year. The application of Pet in acute chest pain makes that the localization of PET must be done near the Emergency Department. Mowatt, G. et al. (2008) conclude that, based in some studies of Acute Chest Pain there is an evidence of prognostic that the use of 64-slice CT

  9. Focal Colonic FDG Activity with PET/CT: Guidelines for Recommendation of Colonoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tianye; Behr, Spencer; Khan, Sana; Osterhoff, Robert; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2015-01-01

    Focal 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) colonic activity can be incidentally seen in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. Its clinical significance is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of focal FDG activity in PET/CT scans by correlating the imaging findings to colonoscopy results, and come up with some guidelines for recommendation of follow-up colonoscopy. A total of 133 patients who underwent both 18F-FDG PET/CT for different onc...

  10. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...

  11. PET/CT-guided interventional procedures: rationale, justification, initial study, and research plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.; Rahill, J.; Cleary, K. [Computer Aided Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR), Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Petrillo, S.; Earl-Graef, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Georgetown Univ. Hospital, MedStar Health, Washington, DC (United States); Banovac, F.; Levy, E. [Computer Aided Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR), Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Georgetown Univ. Hospital, MedStar Health, Washington, DC (United States); Shekhar, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) are becoming increasingly important for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Clinically relevant changes can sometimes be seen on PET that are not seen on other imaging modalities. However, PET is not suitable for guiding biopsy as the images are not obtained in real-time. Therefore, our research group has begun developing a concept for PET/CT-guided interventional procedures. This paper presents the rationale for this concept, outlines our research plan, and includes an initial study to evaluate the relative sensitivity of CT and PET/CT in detecting suspicious lesions. (orig.)

  12. FDG PET/CT findings in a case of myositis ossificans circumscripta of the forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Larousserie, Frédérique; Babinet, Antoine; Zylbersztein, Christophe; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Kerrou, Khaldoun

    2011-01-01

    Myositis ossificans circumscripta (MOC) is a rare benign neoplasm located in soft tissues that, most of the time, appears after a local trauma. The positive diagnosis of MOC may be challenging on CT or MRI findings. We report on an atypical case of a spontaneous nontraumatic MOC in a 54-year-old man, located in the longus supinatus muscle diagnosed with MRI and F-18 FDG PET/CT findings. Rarely described F-18 FDG PET/CT features in MOC are presented. Pattern of avid FDG focus on PET/CT, that may wrongly suggest osteosarcoma, is presented.

  13. Regional PET/CT after water gastric inflation for evaluating loco-regional disease of gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho; So, Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to improve diagnostic accuracy of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT for gastric cancer with water gastric inflation. Materials and methods: 44 gastric cancer patients (M:F = 30:14, age ± std = 62.1 ± 14.5y) were enrolled before surgery. Fifty minutes after injection of FDG (0.14 mCi/kg body weight), whole body PET/CT was performed first and then regional PET/CT over gastric area was obtained 80 min post FDG injection after water gastric inflation. Diagnostic accuracies for loco-regional lesions were compared between whole body and regional PET/CT. Results: 48 primary tumors (23 EGC and 25 AGC) and 348 LN stations (61 metastatic and 287 benign) in 44 patients were investigated. Primary tumor sensitivity of whole body PET/CT (50% = 24/48) was significantly improved by regional PET/CT (75% = 36/48, p < 0.005). Sensitivity of whole body PET/CT (24.6% = 15/61) for LN metastasis was also significantly improved by regional PET/CT (36.1% = 22/61, p < 0.01), whereas specificity of whole body PET/CT (99.3% = 285/287) was not compromised by regional PET/CT (98.3% = 282/287, p > 0.05). Higher primary tumor FDG uptake in regional PET/CT indicated shorter progress-free survival (p = 0.0003). Conclusion: Diagnostic accuracy of whole body PET/CT for loco-regional disease of gastric cancer could be significantly improved by regional PET/CT after water gastric inflation and prognosis could be effectively predicted by primary tumor FDG uptake in regional PET/CT

  14. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively

  15. Impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT on the management of adrenocortical carcinoma: analysis of 106 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Satoshi; Macapinlac, Homer A.; Chuang, Hubert H. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Balachandran, Aparna [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Habra, Mouhammed Amir [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, Houston, TX (United States); Phan, Alexandria T. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Bassett, Roland L. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy. Limited data are available about on value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in ACC. We evaluated the impact of PET/CT on the management of ACC. We performed a retrospective review in patients with ACC who had undergone PET/CT. The impact of PET/CT on the management plan was evaluated by comparing the findings on PET/CT to the findings on contrast-enhanced CT. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each form of imaging were calculated. The correlations between PET/CT parameters, including maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), total lesion glycolysis, and decline in SUV{sub max} after chemotherapy, and clinical outcome were evaluated. Included in the analysis were 106 patients with 180 PET/CT scans. Of the 106 patients, 7 underwent PET/CT only for initial staging, 84 underwent PET/CT only for restaging, and 15 underwent PET/CT for both initial staging and restaging. PET/CT changed the management plan in 1 of 22 patients (5 %) at initial staging and 9 of 99 patients (9 %) at restaging. In 5 of the patients in whom PET/CT changed the management plan, PET/CT showed response to chemotherapy but contrast-enhanced CT showed stable disease. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 100 %, 100 %, and 100 % for PET/CT at initial staging; 92.6 %, 100 %, and 96.4 % for CT at initial staging; 98.4 %, 100 %, and 99.5 % for PET/CT at restaging; and 96.8 %, 98.6 %, and 98.0 % for CT at restaging, respectively. No PET/CT parameters were associated with survival at either initial diagnosis or recurrence. PET/CT findings could substantially change the management plan in a small proportion of patients with ACC. Although lesion detection was similar between PET/CT and CT, PET/CT may be preferred for chemotherapeutic response assessment because it may predict response before anatomic changes are detected on CT. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT with [18F]NaF PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in metastatic prostate cancer patients prior to radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprimny, Christian; Svirydenka, Anna; Fritz, Josef; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Nilica, Bernhard; Decristoforo, Clemens; Haubner, Roland; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Buxbaum, Sabine; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2018-05-16

    , 18 F-NaF PET/CT detects a higher number of pathologic bone lesions in advanced stage PC patients scheduled for radionuclide therapy. Our data suggest that 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET should be combined with 18 F-NaF PET in PC patients with skeletal metastases for restaging prior to initiation or modification of therapy.

  17. Determination of the dose in eyes lens by TLD, in PET/CT by technicians in PET/CT service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Emiliano A.

    2013-01-01

    This work was supported, on the one hand, in a part of the project ORAMED which consisted of a design of a TLD dosimeter for measurements of Hp (3) in areas close to the lens, for interventional radiology physicians. On the other hand, Berhens work proposes using calibrated TLDs Hp (0.07) and Hp (10) to estimate Hp (3) crystal. This resulted in dosimeters calibrated using Hp (10) slab, and mount them on glasses, to estimate the dose to the lens of the technical staff of the Service PET / CT. The value obtained 29mSv/year of Lens Dose Equivalent exceeds the recommended limit. We also demonstrate that, under the current working conditions, the values of Hp (3) reported from whole body dosimeter does not represent faithfully the lens dose

  18. PET-CT for nuclear medicine diagnostics of multiple myeloma; PET-CT in der nuklearmedizinischen Diagnostik des multiplen Myeloms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Klinische Kooperationseinheit Nuklearmedizin, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Functional or morphofunctional imaging modalities are used in myeloma patients for the diagnosis and therapy management within research protocols. Despite new staging criteria, which take into account the viability of a myeloma lesion, positron emission tomography (PET) is not used routinely. The impact of PET is therefore open. The role of PET and PET computed tomography (PET-CT) for the diagnosis and therapy management is discussed. The use of PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) allows the measurement of viable myeloma lesions and correlates with the stage of disease. A negative FDG examination correlates with a better prognosis. Furthermore, the number of focal lesions as well as the whole functional volume of myeloma lesions in FDG have a prognostic impact. Several studies have demonstrated the impact of FDG for the assessment of therapy monitoring and show that FDG is an earlier indicator for therapy response as compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CT component of the new hybrid systems allows the assessment of osteolytic lesions in CT and their viability in FDG. The combination of PET with an MRT scanner allows the simultaneous measurement of bone marrow infiltration, focal lesions and their viability. The use of modern hybrid scanners, such as PET-CT and PET-MRT facilitates the simultaneous measurement of viable myeloma lesions, osteolytic lesions and bone marrow infiltration in the whole body; therefore, it is expected that these imaging modalities will play a greater role both in diagnosis and therapy management. (orig.) [German] Funktionelle oder morphologisch-funktionelle bildgebende Verfahren werden in der Diagnostik und im Therapiemanagement des multiplen Myeloms (MM) primaer fuer wissenschaftliche Zwecke eingesetzt. Ein routinemaessiger klinischer Einsatz ist trotz neuer Stadieneinteilung nicht erfolgt. Die Wertigkeit der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) ist noch offen. Die Rolle von PET und PET-CT fuer die Diagnostik und das

  19. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N P; Björk-Eriksson, T; Birk Christensen, C; Kiil-Berthelsen, A; Aznar, M C; Hollensen, C; Markova, E; Munck af Rosenschöld, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of including fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in the planning of paediatric radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Target volumes were first delineated without and subsequently re-delineated with access to 18F-FDG PET scan information, on duplicate CT sets. RT plans were generated for three-dimensional conformal photon RT (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The results were evaluated by comparison of target volumes, target dose coverage parameters, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). Results: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target volumes, target dose coverage, irradiated volumes, estimated NTCP or SC risk, neither for IMPT nor 3DCRT. Conclusion: Our results imply that the inclusion of PET/CT scans in the RT planning process could have considerable impact for individual patients. There were no general trends of increasing or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. Advances in knowledge: 18F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11 patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT. PMID:25494657

  20. Management of epithelial ovarian cancer from diagnosis to restaging: an overview of the role of imaging techniques with particular regard to the contribution of 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Alessandra; Grassetto, Gaia; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rampin, Lucia; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Colletti, Patrick M; Perkins, Alan C; Fagioli, Giorgio; Rubello, Domenico

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is a major form of cancer affecting women in the western world. The silent nature of this disease results in late presentation at an advanced stage in many patients. It is therefore important to assess the role of imaging techniques in the management of these patients. This article presents a review of the literature on the role of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in the different stages of management of epithelial ovarian cancer. Moreover, a comparison with other imaging techniques has been made and the relationship between (18)F-PET/CT and the assay of serum CA-125 levels has been discussed.

  1. Prospective evaluation of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT in differentiated thyroid cancer patients with raised thyroglobulin and negative 131I-whole body scan: comparison with 18F-FDG PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Parveen; Lata, Sneh; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with negative 131 I-whole body scan (WBS) along with serially increasing serum thyroglobulin (Tg), and compare the same with 18 F-FDG PET-CT. Sixty two DTC patients with serially rising Tg levels and negative 131 I-WBS were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 18 F-FDG PET-CT within an interval of two weeks. PET-CT analysis was done on a per-patient basis, location wise and lesion wise. All PET-CT lesions were divided into four categories-local, nodal, pulmonary and skeletal. Histopathology and/or serial serum Tg level, clinical and imaging follow up (minimum-1 year) were used as a reference standard. Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT demonstrated disease in 40/62 (65 %) patients and 18 F-FDG PET-CT in 45/62 (72 %) patients, with no significant difference on McNemar analysis (p = 0.226). Per-patient sensitivity and specificity of 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT was 78.4 %, 100 %, and for 18 F-FDG PET-CT was 86.3 %, 90.9 %, respectively. Out of 186 lesions detected by both PET-CTs, 121/186 (65 %) lesions were seen on 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 168/186 (90.3 %) lesions on 18 F-FDG PET-CT (p 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 18 F-FDG PET-CT for detection of local disease (k = 0.92), while moderate agreement was noted for nodal and pulmonary disease (k = 0.67). 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT changed management in 21/62 (34 %) patients and 18 F-FDG PET-CT in 17/62 (27 %) patients. Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT is inferior to 18 F-FDG PET-CT on lesion based but not on patient based analysis for detection of recurrent/residual disease in DTC patients with negative WBS scan and elevated serum Tg levels. It can also help in selection of potential candidates for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  2. The use of fused PET/CT images for patient selection and radical radiotherapy target volume definition in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: Results of a prospective study with mature survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Everitt, Sarah; Bayne, Mike; Ball, David; Plumridge, Nikki; Binns, David; Herschtal, Alan; Cruickshank, Deborah; Bressel, Mathias; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study investigated the impact of radiotherapy (RT)-planning FDG-PET/CT on management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Patients still eligible for radical RT after conventional staging underwent RT-planning PET/CT and, if disease was still treatable to 60 Gy, they entered our planning study, where visually-contoured tumour volumes derived with and without PET information were compared. If PET/CT detected advanced disease, palliative therapy was given. Overall survival (OS) for palliative and curative patients was compared. Results: Of 76 eligible patients, only 50 (66%) received radical chemoRT after PET/CT while 26 (34%) received palliative therapies because PET/CT detected advanced disease. Without PET, FDG-avid tumour would reside outside the planning target volume (PTV) in 36% of radical cases and in 25% 95% prescribed dose. OS for all patients was 56.8% and 24.9% at 1 and 4 years, respectively. OS for patients given chemoRT was 77.5% and 35.6% at 1 and 4 years, respectively and was 32% for stage IIIA patients at 4 years. OS for patients treated palliatively was inferior (P < 0.001); 16.3% and 4.1% at 1 and 4 years, respectively. Conclusions: Planning PET/CT frequently changed management and was associated with excellent survival. Survival data from this study were presented in part at the 2011 World Lung Cancer Conference, Amsterdam and planning data at the 2010 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Chicago

  3. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a rare case of Stewart-Treves syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Friberg, Lars; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to illustrate the possible applications of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in chronic extremity lymphedema and its complications....

  4. Value of PET/CT in the approach to head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curioni, Otavio Alberto; Amar, Ali; Viana, Debora [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Service of Head and Neck Surgery and Otorhynolaryngology; Souza, Ricardo Pires de [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Service of Radiology; Rapoport, Abrao [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dedivitis, Rogerio Aparecido [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMUSP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Group of Larynx and Hypopharynx; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Brandao, Lenine Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMUSP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the role of PET/CT in the approach to patients with head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of medical records and PET/CT images of 63 patients with head and neck cancer. Results: Alterations were observed in 76% of the cases. Out of these cases, 7 (11%) were considered as false-positive, with SUV < 5.0. PET/CT demonstrated negative results in 15 cases (24%). Among the 14 cases where the method was utilized for staging, 3 (22%) had their stages changed. Conclusion: PET/CT has shown to be of potential value in the routine evaluation of patients with head and neck cancer, but further studies of a higher number of cases are required to define a protocol for utilization of the method. (author)

  5. Clinical Application of F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) in Malignancy of Unknown Origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Il

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of primary origin site in the management of malignancy of unknown origin (MUO) is the most important issue. According to the histopathologic subtype of primary lesion, specialized treatment can be given and survival gain is expected. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) has been estimated as useful in detection of primary lesion with high sensitivity and moderate specificity. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) study before conventional studies is also recommended because it has high diagnostic performance compared to conventional studies. Although there has few data, F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) is expected to be useful in diagnosis of recurrence, restaging, evaluation of treatment effect, considering that PET (PET/CT) has been reported as useful in other malignancies

  6. Evaluation of thymic tumors with 18F-FDG PET-CT - A pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Punit; Singhal, Abhinav; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Kumar, Rakesh; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Thymic tumors represent a broad spectrum of neoplastic disorders and pose considerable diagnostic difficulties. A non-invasive imaging study to determine the nature of thymic lesions can have significant impact on management of such tumors. 18F-flurorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has shown promising results in characterization of thymic tumors. The objective of this article is to provide an illustrative tutorial highlighting the clinical utility of 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging in patients with thymic tumors. We have pictorially depicted the 18F-FDG PET-CT salient imaging characteristics of various thymic tumors, both epithelial and non-epithelial. Also discussed is the dynamic physiology of thymus gland which is to be kept in mind when evaluating thymic pathology on 18F-FDG PET-CT, as it can lead to interpretative pitfalls

  7. FDG and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the imaging of prosthetic joint infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Sabire Yilmaz; Asa, Sertac; Ozhan, Meftune; Sager, M.S.; Halac, Metin; Kabasakal, Levent; Soenmezoglu, Kerim; Kanmaz, Bedii [University of Istanbul, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Aksaray, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [University of Istanbul, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Istanbul (Turkey); Erkan, Melih Engin [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Duzce (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    The demand for arthroplasty is rapidly growing as a result of the ageing of the population. Although complications such as heterotrophic ossification, fracture and dislocation are relatively rare, differentiating aseptic loosening, the most common complication of arthroplasty from infection, is a major challenge for clinicians. Radionuclide imaging is currently the imaging modality of choice since it is not affected by orthopaedic hardware. Whereas FDG PET/CT imaging has been widely used in periprosthetic infection, it cannot discriminate aseptic from septic inflammation. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of FDG PET/CT and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the diagnosis of periprosthetic infection. Of 54 patients with painful joint arthroplasty who were imaged by FDG PET/CT for diagnosis of periprosthetic infection examined, 46 (36 women, 10 men; mean age 61.04 ± 12.2 years, range 32 - 89 years) with 54 painful joint prostheses (19 hip, 35 knee) with grade 2 (above liver uptake) FDG accumulation on FDG PET/CT were included in the study and these 46 patients also underwent FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT. Final diagnoses were made by histopathological-microbiological culture or clinical follow-up. The final diagnosis showed infection in 15 (28 %) and aseptic loosening in 39 (72 %) of the 54 prostheses. FDG PET/CT was found to have a positive predictive value of 28 % (15/54). Since patients with no FDG uptake on FDG PET/CT were excluded from the study, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy could not be calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT were 93.3 % (14/15), 97.4 % (38/39), 93.3 % and 97.4 %, respectively. Since FDG is not specific to infection, the specificity of FDG PET/CT was very low. FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT with its high specificity may be a useful method and better than labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in periprosthetic infection

  8. The impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, Siew C.; Groves, Ashley M.; Kayani, Irfan; Menezes, Leon; Gacinovic, Svetislav; Du, Yong; Bomanji, Jamshed B.; Ell, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) versus dedicated contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) in the detection of metastatic liver disease. All patients that presented to our Institution with suspected metastatic liver disease who underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT and CECT within 6 weeks of each other, were retrospectively analyzed, covering a 5-year period. One hundred and thirty-one patients (67 men, 64 women; mean age 62) were identified. Seventy-five had colorectal carcinoma and 56 had other malignancies. The performance of CECT and that of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT in detecting liver metastases were compared. The ability of each to detect local recurrence, extrahepatic metastases and to alter patient management was recorded. The final diagnosis was based on histology, clinical and radiological follow-up (mean 23 months). In detecting hepatic metastases, 18 F-FDG-PET/CT yielded 96% sensitivity and 75% specificity, whilst CECT showed 88% sensitivity and 25% specificity. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and CECT were concordant in 102 out of 131 patients (78%). In the colorectal group 18 F-FDG-PET/CT showed 94% sensitivity and 75% specificity, whilst CECT had 91% sensitivity and 25% specificity. In the noncolorectal group 18 F-FDG-PET/CT showed 98% sensitivity and 75% specificity whilst CECT had 85% sensitivity and 25% specificity. Overall, 18 F-FDG-PET/CT altered patient management over CECT in 25% of patients. CECT did not alter patient management over 18 F-FDG-PET/CT alone in any patients. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT performed better in detecting metastatic liver disease than CECT in both colorectal and noncolorectal malignancies, and frequently altered patient management. The future role of CECT in these patients may need to be re-evaluated to avoid potentially unnecessary duplication of investigation where 18 F-PET/CT is readily available. (orig.)

  9. PET/CT in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma using [{sup 18}F]fluorocholine: preliminary comparison with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, Jean-Noel; Gutman, Fabrice; Kerrou, Khaldoun; Grahek, Dany; Montravers, Francoise [Hopital Tenon, AP-HP, et Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Fartoux, Laetitia; Poupon, Raoul; Rosmorduc, Olivier [Hopital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP, et Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Department of Hepatology, Paris (France); Grange, Jean-Didier [Hopital Tenon, AP-HP, et Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Department of Hepatology, Paris (France); Ganne, Nathalie [Hopital Jean Verdier, AP-HP, Department of Hepatology, Bondy (France)

    2006-11-15

    The diagnostic accuracy of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is insufficient to characterise hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in liver masses and to diagnose all cases of recurrent HCC. HCC has been reported to take up [{sup 11}C]acetate, but routine use of this tracer is difficult. Choline is another tracer of lipid metabolism, present in large amounts in HCC. In a proof-of-concept study, we evaluated [{sup 18}F]fluorocholine (FCH) uptake by HCC and compared FCH PET/CT with FDG PET/CT. Twelve patients with newly diagnosed (n=8) or recurrent HCC (n=4) were prospectively enrolled. HCC was assessed by histology in eight cases and by American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) criteria in four cases. All patients underwent whole-body PET/CT 10 min after injection of 4 MBq/kg FCH. Within 1 week, 9 of the 12 patients also underwent whole-body FDG PET/CT 1 h after injection of 5 MBq/kg FDG. The per-patient analysis showed a detection rate of 12/12 using FCH PET/CT for both newly diagnosed and recurrent HCC. The median signal to noise ratio was 1.5{+-}0.38. There was a trend towards a higher FCH SUV{sub max} in well-differentiated HCC (15.6{+-}7.9 vs 11.9{+-}0.9, NS). Of the nine patients who underwent FCH and FDG PET/CT, all nine were positive with FCH whereas only five were positive with FDG. FCH provides a high detection rate for HCC, making it potentially useful in the initial evaluation of HCC or in the detection of recurrent disease. The favourable result of this proof-of-concept study opens the way to a phase III prospective study. (orig.)

  10. Prognostic impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT staging and of pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, D.; Merlet, P. [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris Cedex 10 (France); University of Paris VII, B2T Doctoral School, Institut Universitaire d' Hematologie, Paris (France); Giacchetti, S.; Hamy, A.S.; Espie, M. [Saint-Louis Hospital, Breast Diseases Unit, Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Delord, M. [Institut Universitaire d' Hematologie, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Paris (France); Roquancourt, A. de [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Hindie, E. [University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haut-Leveque Hospital, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2014-11-29

    Mortality is high in patients with locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), especially in those with residual tumour after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The aim of this study was to determine if pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT staging and pathological findings after NAC could together allow stratification of patients into prognostic groups. Initial staging with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was performed prospectively in 85 consecutive patients with stage II/III TNBC. Correlations between PET findings and disease-specific survival (DSS) were examined. In patients without distant metastases on PET staging, the impact of pathological response to NAC on DSS was examined. Patterns of recurrence were also analysed. {sup 18}F-DG PET/CT revealed distant metastases in 11 of 85 patients (12.9 %). Among 74 M0 patients, 23 (31.1 %) showed a pathological complete response (pCR) at surgery, while 51 had residual invasive disease (no pCR). DSS differed considerably among the three groups of patients (log-rank P <.001): among patients with occult metastases on baseline PET/CT, 2-year DSS was 18.2 %, and among patients without initial metastases on PET/CT, 5-year DSS was 61.3 % in patients without pCR after NAC and 95.2 % in those with pCR. Of the 51 patients who did not achieve pCR, 21 relapsed (17 developed distant metastases). The sites of distant recurrence were: lung/pleura (nine patients), brain (eight patients), liver (six patients), distant lymph nodes (six patients) and bone (five patients). In patients with clinical stage II/III TNBC, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT findings at initial staging and pathological response at the end of NAC allow three groups of patients with quite different prognoses to be defined. Extraskeletal recurrences predominated. Specific follow-up strategies in patients with TNBC who do not achieve pCR deserve investigation. (orig.)

  11. Identification of Distant Metastatic Disease in Uterine Cervical and Endometrial Cancers with FDG PET/CT: Analysis from the ACRIN 6671/GOG 0233 Multicenter Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Michael S; Atri, Mostafa; Bandos, Andriy I; Mannel, Robert S; Gold, Michael A; Lee, Susanna I

    2018-04-01

    Purpose To assess the accuracy of staging positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in detecting distant metastasis in patients with local-regionally advanced cervical and high-risk endometrial cancer in the clinical trial by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and the Gynecology Oncology Group (GOG) (ACRIN 6671/GOG 0233) and to compare central and institutional reader performance. Materials and Methods In this prospective multicenter trial, PET/CT and clinical data were reviewed for patients enrolled in ACRIN 6671/GOG 0233. Two central readers, blinded to site read and reference standard, reviewed PET/CT images for distant metastasis. Central review was then compared with institutional point-of-care interpretation. Reference standard was pathologic and imaging follow-up. Test performance for central and site reviews of PET/CT images was calculated and receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed. Generalized estimating equations and nonparametric bootstrap procedure for clustered data were used to assess statistical significance. Results There were 153 patients with cervical cancer and 203 patients with endometrial cancer enrolled at 28 sites. Overall prevalence of distant metastasis was 13.7% (21 of 153) for cervical cancer and 11.8% (24 of 203) for endometrial cancer. Central reader PET/CT interpretation demonstrated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value of 54.8%, 97.7%, 79.3%, and 93.1% for cervical cancer metastasis versus 64.6%, 98.6%, 86.1%, and 95.4% for endometrial cancer, respectively. By comparison, local institutional review demonstrated sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and negative predictive value of 47.6%, 93.9%, 55.6%, and 91.9% for cervical cancer metastasis and 66.7%, 93.9%, 59.3%, and 95.5% for endometrial cancer, respectively. For central readers, the specificity and PPV of PET/CT detection of cervical and endometrial cancer metastases were all

  12. Clinical utility of F-18 FDG PET-CT in the initial evaluation of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Poul Henning; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Christensen, Janne Buck; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2016-10-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a resource-demanding imaging modality with increasing popularity in the workup of patients with suspected or proven lung cancer. To review the clinical usefulness of this imaging modality in the diagnosis, staging, and pre-operative evaluation, we conducted a systematic literature search, review, and quality assessment using the rapid evidence assessment toolkit and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine methodology. The literature search resulted in 4,208 records including 918 reviews, of which 139 met the predefined criteria and were read in full to identify relevant original articles on F-18 FDG PET-CT (1) in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (n = 14), (2) in curative-intent treatment trials (n = 9), and (3) in planning of invasive procedures (n = 18). We found the following important results from the literature review: 1) PET-CT can rule out malignancy in most solitary pulmonary nodules due to high sensitivity (recommendation level A). 2) PET-CT reduces the number of futile treatment trials (recommendation level A). 3) The sensitivity of PET-CT in general is insufficient to rule out mediastinal lymph node metastasis (recommendation level A). ᅟ 1) With few exceptions, solitary pulmonary nodules can safely be considered benign if the PET-CT scan is negative. Exceptions consist of small (PET-CT scan has excluded occult distant metastases. 3) In general, lymph node metastasis in the mediastinum cannot be ruled out on the basis of a negative PET-CT, and confirmative invasive staging should be performed in most patients before mediastinal metastasis is confirmed or ruled out.

  13. Clinical utility of F-18 FDG PET-CT in the initial evaluation of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Poul Henning [Vejle Hospital, Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Vejle (Denmark); Holdgaard, Paw Christian [Vejle Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vejle (Denmark); Christensen, Janne Buck [Odense University Hospital/University of Southern Denmark, Department of Quality and Research/HTA, Odense University Hospital and Medical Research Library, Odense (Denmark); Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    2016-10-15

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a resource-demanding imaging modality with increasing popularity in the workup of patients with suspected or proven lung cancer. To review the clinical usefulness of this imaging modality in the diagnosis, staging, and pre-operative evaluation, we conducted a systematic literature search, review, and quality assessment using the rapid evidence assessment toolkit and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine methodology. The literature search resulted in 4,208 records including 918 reviews, of which 139 met the predefined criteria and were read in full to identify relevant original articles on F-18 FDG PET-CT (1) in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (n = 14), (2) in curative-intent treatment trials (n = 9), and (3) in planning of invasive procedures (n = 18). We found the following important results from the literature review: (1) PET-CT can rule out malignancy in most solitary pulmonary nodules due to high sensitivity (recommendation level A). (2) PET-CT reduces the number of futile treatment trials (recommendation level A). (3) The sensitivity of PET-CT in general is insufficient to rule out mediastinal lymph node metastasis (recommendation level A). (1) With few exceptions, solitary pulmonary nodules can safely be considered benign if the PET-CT scan is negative. Exceptions consist of small (<1 cm) and non-solid, solitary pulmonary nodules. These abnormalities should be followed up by CT in a structured programme. (2) No curative-intent treatment should be commenced until a PET-CT scan has excluded occult distant metastases. (3) In general, lymph node metastasis in the mediastinum cannot be ruled out on the basis of a negative PET-CT, and confirmative invasive staging should be performed in most patients before mediastinal metastasis is confirmed or ruled out. (orig.)

  14. PET/CT-guided interventions: Indications, advantages, disadvantages and the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Garnon, Julien; Shaygi, Behnam; Koch, Guillaume; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Caudrelier, Jean; Addeo, Pietro; Bachellier, Philippe; Namer, Izzie Jacques; Gangi, Afshin

    2018-02-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) represents an emerging imaging guidance modality that has been applied to successfully guide percutaneous procedures such as biopsies and tumour ablations. The aim of the present narrative review is to report the indications, advantages and disadvantages of PET/CT-guided procedures in the field of interventional oncology and to briefly describe the experience gained with this new emerging technique while performing biopsies and tumor ablations.

  15. Standardised uptake values from PET/CT images: comparison with conventional attenuation-corrected PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souvatzoglou, M.; Ziegler, S.I.; Martinez, M.J.; Dzewas, G.; Schwaiger, M.; Bengel, F.; Busch, R.

    2007-01-01

    In PET/CT, CT-derived attenuation factors may influence standardised uptake values (SUVs) in tumour lesions and organs when compared with stand-alone PET. Therefore, we compared PET/CT-derived SUVs intra-individually in various organs and tumour lesions with stand-alone PET-derived SUVs. Thirty-five patients with known or suspected cancer were prospectively included. Sixteen patients underwent FDG PET using an ECAT HR+scanner, and subsequently a second scan using a Biograph Sensation 16PET/CT scanner. Nineteen patients were scanned in the reverse order. All images were reconstructed with an iterative algorithm (OSEM). Suspected lesions were grouped as paradiaphragmatic versus distant from the diaphragm. Mean and maximum SUVs were also calculated for brain, lung, liver, spleen and vertebral bone. The attenuation coefficients (μ values) used for correction of emission data (bone, soft tissue, lung) in the two data sets were determined. A body phantom containing six hot spheres and one cold cylinder was measured using the same protocol as in patients. Forty-six lesions were identified. There was a significant correlation of maximum and mean SUVs derived from PET and PET/CT for 14 paradiaphragmatic lesions (r=0.97 respectively; p<0.001 respectively) and for 32 lesions located distant from the diaphragm (r=0.87 and r=0.89 respectively; p<0.001 respectively). No significant differences were observed in the SUVs calculated with PET and PET/CT in the lesions or in the organs. In the phantom, radioactivity concentration in spheres calculated from PET and from PET/CT correlated significantly (r=0.99; p<0.001). SUVs of cancer lesions and normal organs were comparable between PET and PET/CT, supporting the usefulness of PET/CT-derived SUVs for quantification of tumour metabolism. (orig.)

  16. PET/CT for the staging and follow-up of patients with malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppel, T.D.; Krause, B.J.; Heusner, T.A.; Boy, C.; Bockisch, A.; Antoch, G.

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) complement each other's strengths in integrated PET/CT. PET is a highly sensitive modality to depict the whole-body distribution of positron-emitting biomarkers indicating tumour metabolic activity. However, conventional PET imaging is lacking detailed anatomical information to precisely localise pathologic findings. CT imaging can readily provide the required morphological data. Thus, integrated PET/CT represents an efficient tool for whole-body staging and functional assessment within one examination. Due to developments in system technology PET/CT devices are continually gaining spatial resolution and imaging speed. Whole-body imaging from the head to the upper thighs is accomplished in less than 20 min. Spatial resolution approaches 2-4 mm. Most PET/CT studies in oncology are performed with 18 F-labelled fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). FDG is a glucose analogue that is taken up and trapped within viable cells. An increased glycolytic activity is a characteristic in many types of cancers resulting in avid accumulation of FDG. These tumours excel as 'hot spots' in FDG-PET/CT imaging. FDG-PET/CT proved to be of high diagnostic value in staging and restaging of different malignant diseases, such as colorectal cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, malignant lymphomas, and many more. The standard whole-body coverage simplifies staging and speeds up decision processes to determine appropriate therapeutic strategies. Further development and implementation of new PET-tracers in clinical routine will continually increase the number of PET/CT indications. This promotes PET/CT as the imaging modality of choice for working-up of the most common tumour entities as well as some of the rare malignancies.

  17. FDG PET/CT for therapeutic response monitoring in multi-site non-respiratory tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Tian; Yong Xiao; Bin Chen; Jun Xia; Hong Guan; Qunyi Deng

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) can produce positive signals during 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scanning. Until now, there has been no better method than clinical assessment to evaluate the therapeutic response of non-respiratory TB (NRTB). Purpose: To retrospectively assess the ability of FDG PET/CT to evaluate the response to anti-TB treatment in patients with NRTB. Material and Methods: Three patients with multi-site NRTB underwent repeat PET/CT scans during anti-TB treatment. Changes in maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the TB lesions on PET/CT images were analyzed between two scans. Initial PET/CT scans were performed before the start of anti-TB treatment, and later scans were performed after completion of the treatment. Results: Patient 1, a 63-year-old female, and patient 2, a 50-year-old male, were diagnosed as multi-site NRTB by biopsy. Patient 3, a 37-year-old male was diagnosed clinically. These patients demonstrated multiple FDG-avid lesions in whole body on initial PET/CT images. The highest SUVmax of patient 1, 2, and 3 were 13.6, 17.7, and 13.9 separately. After completion of the treatment, all positive signals of patient 1, 2, and 3 decreased to undetectable value on repeated PET/CT scans with intervals of 318 days, 258 days, and 182 days separately. Conclusion: FDG PET/CT scan may be useful for monitoring responses to anti-TB treatment in patients with NRTB

  18. Study on the application of PET-CT in gynecology tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Gynecology tumors seriously threatened the health of female. With the development of imageology, PET, a functionality examination method, has been widely used in the early diagnosis and monitoring of curative effect in gynecology tumors. PET-CT has the good future in its development because it combined with the advantage of functional and structural imaging. The characters and application of PET-CT in gynecology tumors were reviewed in this paper. (author)

  19. The diagnostic value of PET/CT scanning in patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Roed, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical value of PET/CT as a supplement to FIGO staging in patients with cervical cancer stage >or=1B. METHODS: This prospective study included 120 consecutive patients. After staging, a whole-body PET/CT scan was performed and these examinations were divided into two....../CT scanning for newly diagnosed cervical cancer FIGO stage >or=1B has a high sensitivity and specificity, and can be a valuable supplement to the FIGO staging procedure....

  20. PET/CT-guided biopsies of metabolically active bone lesions: applications and clinical impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaeser, Bernd; Wartenberg, Jan; Weitzel, Thilo; Krause, Thomas [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Wiskirchen, Jakub [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmid, Ralph A. [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Mueller, Michel D. [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    In a minority of cases a definite diagnosis and stage grouping in cancer patients is not possible based on the imaging information of PET/CT. We report our experience with percutaneous PET/CT-guided bone biopsies to histologically verify the aetiology of hypermetabolic bone lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 20 consecutive patients who underwent multimodal image-guided bone biopsies using a dedicated PET/CT system in a step-by-step technique. Technical and clinical success rates of PET/CT-guided biopsies were evaluated. Questionnaires were sent to the referring physicians to assess the impact of biopsies on patient management and to check the clinical need for PET/CT-guided biopsies. Clinical indications for biopsy were to histologically verify the aetiology of metabolically active bone lesions without a morphological correlate confirming the suspicion of metastases in 15 patients, to determine the origin of suspected metastases in 3 patients and to evaluate the appropriateness of targeted therapy options in 2 patients. Biopsies were technically successful in all patients. In 19 of 20 patients a definite histological diagnosis was possible. No complications or adverse effects occurred. The result of PET/CT-guided bone biopsies determined a change of the planned treatment in overall 56% of patients, with intramodality changes, e.g. chemotherapy with palliative instead of curative intent, and intermodality changes, e.g. systemic therapy instead of surgery, in 22 and 50%, respectively. PET/CT-guided bone biopsies are a promising alternative to conventional techniques to make metabolically active bone lesions - especially without a distinctive morphological correlate - accessible for histological verification. PET/CT-guided biopsies had a major clinical impact in patients who otherwise cannot be reliably stage grouped at the time of treatment decisions. (orig.)

  1. Clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in acute complicated pyelonephritis - results from an observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Chih-Hsing [Mackay Memorial Hospital at Taipei, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei (China); Tseng, Jing-Ren; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging and Translation, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Lee, Ming-Hsun [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Biostatistics Unit, Clinical Trial Center, Taoyuan (China)

    2018-03-15

    Acute complicated pyelonephritis (ACP) is an upper urinary tract infection associated with coexisting urinary tract abnormalities or medical conditions that could predispose to serious outcomes or treatment failures. Although CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are frequently used in patients with ACP, the clinical value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has not been systematically investigated. This single-center retrospective study was designed to evaluate the potential usefulness of FDG PET/CT in patients with ACP. Thirty-one adult patients with ACP who underwent FDG PET/CT were examined. FDG PET/CT imaging characteristics, including tracer uptake patterns, kidney volumes, and extrarenal imaging findings, were reviewed in combination with clinical data and conventional imaging results. Of the 31 patients, 19 (61%) showed focal FDG uptake. The remaining 12 study participants showed a diffuse FDG uptake pattern. After volumetric approximation, the affected kidneys were found to be significantly enlarged. Patients who showed a focal uptake pattern had a higher frequency of abscess formation requiring drainage. ACP patients showing diffuse tracer uptake patterns had a more benign clinical course. Seven patients had suspected extrarenal coinfections, and FDG PET/CT successfully confirmed the clinical suspicion in five cases. FDG PET/CT was as sensitive as CT in identifying the six patients (19%) who developed abscesses. Notably, FDG PET/CT findings caused a modification to the initial antibiotic regimen in nine patients (29%). FDG PET/CT may be clinically useful in the assessment of patients with ACP who have a progressive disease course. (orig.)

  2. Clinical utility of F-18 FDG PET-CT in the initial evaluation of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Poul Henning; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Christensen, Janne Buck; Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a resource-demanding imaging modality with increasing popularity in the workup of patients with suspected or proven lung cancer. To review the clinical usefulness of this imaging modality in the diagnosis, staging, and pre-operative evaluation, we conducted a systematic literature search, review, and quality assessment using the rapid evidence assessment toolkit and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine methodology. The literature search resulted in 4,208 records including 918 reviews, of which 139 met the predefined criteria and were read in full to identify relevant original articles on F-18 FDG PET-CT (1) in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (n = 14), (2) in curative-intent treatment trials (n = 9), and (3) in planning of invasive procedures (n = 18). We found the following important results from the literature review: (1) PET-CT can rule out malignancy in most solitary pulmonary nodules due to high sensitivity (recommendation level A). (2) PET-CT reduces the number of futile treatment trials (recommendation level A). (3) The sensitivity of PET-CT in general is insufficient to rule out mediastinal lymph node metastasis (recommendation level A). (1) With few exceptions, solitary pulmonary nodules can safely be considered benign if the PET-CT scan is negative. Exceptions consist of small (<1 cm) and non-solid, solitary pulmonary nodules. These abnormalities should be followed up by CT in a structured programme. (2) No curative-intent treatment should be commenced until a PET-CT scan has excluded occult distant metastases. (3) In general, lymph node metastasis in the mediastinum cannot be ruled out on the basis of a negative PET-CT, and confirmative invasive staging should be performed in most patients before mediastinal metastasis is confirmed or ruled out. (orig.)

  3. PET-CT in the evaluation of sarcomas of soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna M, J.A.; Quiroz C, O.; Sanchez C, N.; Diaz V, G.

    2007-01-01

    18 F-FDG PET-CT is an image modality of great utility in the evaluation of primary or recurrent lesions of soft tissues. It is necessary to determine the cost-benefit of the different image modalities, although one waits that by means of a better diagnostic, statification and the determination of the grade of malignancy, the PET-CT nowadays can reduce the cost and the complications of the invasive diagnostic methods. (Author)

  4. Incidental Detection of Urinary Leakage on FDG PET/CT Imaging for Staging of Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Weung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn

    2016-03-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with right flank pain and dysuria. An abdominal CT scan detected a gastric malignancy and hydronephrosis with urinary leakage of the right kidney. Percutaneous nephrostomy was performed on the right kidney. F-FDG PET/CT for staging the gastric malignancy revealed additional urinary leakage of the contralateral kidney. The interest in this case is the incidental detection of unexpected urinary leakage during an oncologic assessment with FDG PET/CT.

  5. Application of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wenlan; Wu Hubing; Wang Quanshi; Ye Xianghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of 18 F-fluorode-oxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT for staging and re-staging cervical cancer cases. Methods: This retrospective study included 88 patients. Of the 88 patients, 19 were primary cervical cancer, 11 were benign cervical tumor and 58 were cervical cancer patients with post-treatment surveillance. All had either whole body or abdominal-pelvic FDG PET/CT imaging. The diagnosis was established according to the pathologic results of surgery or biopsy, and(or) multi-modality imaging and clinical follow-up for at least six months. Results: For initial diagnosis of cervical cancer, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET/CT were 17/19 (89.5%), 10/11 (90.9%) and 27/30(90.0%) respectively. For re-staging cervical cancer, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET/CT were 10/11 (90. 9%), 47/47 (100. 0%) and 57/58 (98.3%) respectively. In all, 41 had metastases. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET/ CT detecting metastases were 92.7%, 88.9% and 90.9% respectively. Of the metastatic sites, 66.3% were abdominal-pelvic lymph nodes, 26.8% of the metastatic lymph nodes were detected with diameters less than 1.0 cm. Twenty-two of twenty seven (28.6%) patients were identified to have extra-pelvic lesions after PET/CT and were then changed their treatment plans. Conclusions: 18 F-FDG PET/CT is useful in staging and re-staging cervical cancer patients. PET/CT is of great value in identifying small lesions and also in detecting extra-pelvic lesions. (authors)

  6. Combined 18F-NaF and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the Evaluation of Sarcoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tatianie; Mosci, Camila; von Eyben, Rie; Mittra, Erik; Ganjoo, Kristen; Biswal, Sandip; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Iagaru, Andrei

    2015-09-01

    The combined administration of F-NaF and F-FDG in a single PET/CT scan has the potential to improve patient convenience and cancer detection. Here we report the use of this approach for patients with sarcomas. This is a retrospective review of 21 patients (12 men, 9 women; age, 19-66 years) with biopsy-proven sarcomas who had separate F-NaF PET/CT, F-FDG PET/CT, and combined F-NaF/F-FDG PET/CT scans for evaluation of malignancy. Two board-certified nuclear medicine physicians and 1 board-certified musculoskeletal radiologist were randomly assigned to review the scans. Results were analyzed for sensitivity and specificity, using linear regression and receiver operating characteristics. A total of 13 patients had metastatic disease on F-NaF PET/CT, F-FDG PET/CT, and combined F-NaF/F-FDG PET/CT. Skeletal disease was more extensive on the F-NaF PET/CT scan than on the F-FDG PET/CT in 3 patients, whereas in 1 patient, F-FDG PET/CT showed skeletal disease and the F-NaF PET/CT was negative. Extraskeletal lesions were detected on both F-FDG and combined F-NaF/F-FDG PET/CT in 20 patients, with 1 discordant finding in the lung. The combined F-NaF/F-FDG PET/CT scan allows for accurate evaluation of sarcoma patients. Further evaluation of this proposed imaging modality is warranted to identify the most suitable clinical scenarios, including initial treatment strategy and evaluation of response to therapy.

  7. Role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Sharma, Punit; Karunanithi, Sellam; Naswa, Niraj; Lata, Sneh; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Garg, Pramod [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, New Delhi (India); Sharma, Raju; Thulkar, Sanjay [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India)

    2011-11-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA(0)-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC) positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) for detection and staging of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Twenty patients with clinically suspected and/or histopathologically proven pancreatic NET underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT imaging for staging and /or localisation of primary lesion. They also underwent contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and 8 patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. SUVmax of primary and metastatic lesions were measured. Results were verified with histopathology for primary tumour and with clinical follow up/MRI and /or biopsy for metastatic disease. Results of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT were compared to CECT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT correctly localised primary in all 20, CECT in 15 and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT in 2 patients. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT demonstrated metastases in 13 patients, CECT in 7 and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT in 2. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT emerged as the best investigation with 100% sensitivity and PPV for detecting primary tumour and metastatic disease. The detection rate of CECT was lower than {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT, both for primary tumour (20vs.15) or metastatic disease (13vs.7). {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT performed poorly for primary and metastasis. Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT is a very useful imaging investigation for diagnosing and staging pancreatic NET. (orig.)

  8. The value of 18F-DOPA PET-CT in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma: comparison with 18F-FDG PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beheshti, Mohsen; Poecher, Sigrid; Vali, Reza; Nader, Michael; Langsteger, Werner; Waldenberger, Peter; Broinger, Gabriele; Kohlfuerst, Susanne; Pirich, Christian; Dralle, Henning

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to compare the value of DOPA PET-CT with FDG PET-CT in the detection of malignant lesions in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Twenty-six consecutive patients (10 men, 16 women, mean age 59 ± 14 years) with elevated calcitonin levels were evaluated in this prospective study. DOPA and FDG PET-CT modalities were performed within a maximum of 4 weeks (median 7 days) in all patients. The data were evaluated on a patient- and lesion-based analysis. The final diagnosis of positive PET lesions was based on histopathological findings and/or imaging follow-up studies (i.e., DOPA and/or FDG PET-CT) for at least 6 months (range 6-24 months). In 21 (21/26) patients at least one malignant lesion was detected by DOPA PET, while only 15 (15/26) patients showed abnormal FDG uptake. DOPA PET provided important additional information in the follow-up assessment in seven (27%) patients which changed the therapeutic management. The patient-based analysis of our data demonstrated a sensitivity of 81% for DOPA PET versus 58% for FDG PET, respectively. In four (4/26) postoperative patients DOPA and FDG PET-CT studies were negative in spite of elevated serum calcitonin and CEA levels as well as abnormal pentagastrin tests. Overall 59 pathological lesions with abnormal tracer uptake were seen on DOPA and/or FDG PET studies. In the final diagnosis 53 lesions proved to be malignant. DOPA PET correctly detected 94% (50/53) of malignant lesions, whereas only 62% (33/53) of malignant lesions were detected with FDG PET. DOPA PET-CT showed superior results to FDG PET-CT in the preoperative and follow-up assessment of MTC patients. Therefore, we recommend DOPA PET-CT as a one-stop diagnostic procedure to provide both functional and morphological data in order to select those patients who may benefit from (re-)operation with curative intent as well as guiding further surgical procedures. (orig.)

  9. PET-CT in Staging, Response Evaluation, and Surveillance of Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanarajasingam, Gita; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thompson, Carrie A

    2016-05-01

    Lymphoma represents a broad spectrum of diseases with diverse biology, clinical behavior, and imaging features. Functional imaging with 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) is widely recognized as the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for patients with lymphoma and is used as part of staging, response evaluation, and surveillance in patients with Hodgkin (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Recent efforts at standardizing the conduct and consensus interpretation of PET-CT have facilitated its use in patients on clinical studies and beyond. The role of PET-CT has been affirmed in some clinical situations, such as staging and end-of-treatment evaluation in Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and in the evaluation of aggressive transformation of an indolent lymphoma. However, the role of functional imaging in other histologies and clinical settings is not as clear given the higher rate of false positive results and the costs inherent to PET-CT. There is little evidence to suggest its utility or impact on outcome in most indolent lymphomas, or in the setting of post-treatment surveillance. In addition, there remains controversy about the value of PET-CT in early response assessment during active therapy, particularly in DLBCL. This review will evaluate the evidence surrounding the role of PET-CT in staging, response evaluation and surveillance of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  10. Clinical utility of F-18 FDG PET-CT in the initial evaluation of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Poul Henning; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Buck Christensen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    the predefined criteria and were read in full to identify relevant original articles on F-18 FDG PET-CT (1) in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (n = 14), (2) in curative-intent treatment trials (n = 9), and (3) in planning of invasive procedures (n = 18). RESULTS: We found the following important...... results from the literature review: 1) PET-CT can rule out malignancy in most solitary pulmonary nodules due to high sensitivity (recommendation level A). 2) PET-CT reduces the number of futile treatment trials (recommendation level A). 3) The sensitivity of PET-CT in general is insufficient to rule out...... by CT in a structured programme. 2) No curative-intent treatment should be commenced until a PET-CT scan has excluded occult distant metastases. 3) In general, lymph node metastasis in the mediastinum cannot be ruled out on the basis of a negative PET-CT, and confirmative invasive staging should...

  11. Clinical Applications of FDG PET and PET/CT in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Al-Ibraheem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG PET plays an increasing role in diagnosis and management planning of head and neck cancer. Hybrid PET/CT has promoted the field of molecular imaging in head and neck cancer. This modality is particular relevant in the head and neck region, given the complex anatomy and variable physiologic FDG uptake patterns. The vast majority of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT applications in head and neck cancer related to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Clinical applications of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in head and neck cancer include diagnosis of distant metastases, identification of synchronous 2nd primaries, detection of carcinoma of unknown primary and detection of residual or recurrent disease. Emerging applications are precise delineation of the tumor volume for radiation treatment planning, monitoring treatment, and providing prognostic information. The clinical role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in N0 disease is limited which is in line with findings of other imaging modalities. MRI is usually used for T staging with an intense discussion concerning the preferable imaging modality for regional lymph node staging as PET/CT, MRI, and multi-slice spiral CT are all improving rapidly. Is this review, we summarize recent literature on 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT imaging of head and neck cancer.

  12. Effect of Attenuation Correction on Regional Quantification Between PET/MR and PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teuho, Jarmo; Johansson, Jarkko; Linden, Jani

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A spatial bias in brain PET/MR exists compared with PET/CT, because of MR-based attenuation correction. We performed an evaluation among 4 institutions, 3 PET/MR systems, and 4 PET/CT systems using an anthropomorphic brain phantom, hypothesizing that the spatial bias would be minimized....../MR systems, CTAC was applied as the reference method for attenuation correction. RESULTS: With CTAC, visual and quantitative differences between PET/MR and PET/CT systems were minimized. Intersystem variation between institutions was +3.42% to -3.29% in all VOIs for PET/CT and +2.15% to -4.50% in all VOIs...... for PET/MR. PET/MR systems differed by +2.34% to -2.21%, +2.04% to -2.08%, and -1.77% to -5.37% when compared with a PET/CT system at each institution, and these differences were not significant (P ≥ 0.05). CONCLUSION: Visual and quantitative differences between PET/MR and PET/CT systems can be minimized...

  13. High impact of FDG-PET/CT in diagnostic strategies for ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zytoon, Ashraf Anas; Murakami, Koji; Eid, Hazem; El-Gammal, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic malignancies. FDG-PET/CT was proven to be accurate for identification of primary ovarian tumors, regional lymph nodes, and distant metastases. Purpose: To evaluate ovarian masses at FDG-PET/CT in correlation with histopathologic findings. Material and Methods: Ninety-eight patients underwent whole body FDG-PET/CT examination. Eighty-six patients with primary ovarian cancer and 12 patients with metastatic disease to the ovaries were included. Results: PET/CT imaging was true-positive in 87/94 patients with malignant tumors. In 4/4 patients with benign tumors, PET/CT results were true-negative, with sensitivity of 92.6%, specificity 100%, total test accuracy 92.9%. Fifty-seven patients were diagnosed as stage IV ovarian cancer with distant metastasis. Conclusion: The anatomical/functional examination by FDG-PET/CT was proven to be valuable in increasing the diagnostic accuracy that can help improve patient management

  14. Monitoring and analysis PET/CT workplace radioactivity level in Shanghai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bin; Gao Linfeng; Qian Aijun; Yao Jie; Shen Jinfu; Ji Guiyi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To understand the PET/CT basic information in Shanghai, through monitoring radioactivity level of PET/CT workplace, to get the radiological protection information about PET/CT place. Methods: Through the γ radiation air absorbed dose rate and the β surface contamination to investigate PET/CT medical institutions in Shanghai. Results: By the end of 2011, there were 13 sets of PET/CT. Detecting show that γ radiation air absorbed dose rate is at relatively higher level in waiting room and the injection rooms, the date of waiting room door was up to 19552 nSv/h, the maximum value of injection room desk surface was 6136 nSv/h, the middle of injection room was up to 5408 nSv/h. Any date was certain the limits of national standard of β surface contamination, the middle of in the injection room. It is still higher on the window and wastes barrel. Conclusion: The radiation protection of PET/CT workplace is proper, surface contamination levels can be controlled within in the standard limits, but there are a blank of limits about nuclear medicine place of γ radiation absorbed dose rate air in the national standard, and external exposure protection is still the key of radiation protection. (authors)

  15. MR imaging versus PET/CT for evaluation of pancreatic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belião, Sara, E-mail: sara.beliao@clix.pt [Department of Radiology Hospital S. Francisco Xavier, Estrada do Forte do Alto do Duque, 1495-005 Lisbon (Portugal); Ferreira, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandratavaresferreira@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital D. Estefânia, Rua Jacinta Marto, 1169-045 Lisbon (Portugal); Vierasu, Irina, E-mail: Ortansa-Irina.Vierasu@ulb.ac.be [Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Blocklet, Didier, E-mail: dblockle@ulb.ac.be [Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Goldman, Serge, E-mail: petscan@ulb.ac.be [Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Metens, Thierry, E-mail: tmetens@ulb.ac.be [Service de Radiologie – Imagerie par Resonance Magnétique, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Matos, Celso, E-mail: cmatos@ulb.ac.be [Service de Radiologie – Imagerie par Resonance Magnétique, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven patients (15 women/12 men, mean age 56.5 years) with MR imaging and PET/CT studies performed to differentiate benign and malignant pancreatic lesions were identified between October 2008 and October 2010. Both MR and PET/CT data sets were retrospectively and blindly evaluated by two independent readers (4 readers total) with different degrees of experience, using a visual five-point score system. The results were correlated with final diagnosis obtained by histopathology. Results: 17 patients had malignant diseases and 10 patients had benign diseases. Depending on the observer, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of MRI varied between 88–94%, 50–80%, 75–89% and 71–89% respectively. Sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values and negative predictive values of PET/CT were 73%, 56%, 73% and 56% respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of MR for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic lesions was 74–89%, compared with 67% for PET/CT. The weighted Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.47 at MR and 0.53 at PET/CT. Conclusion: MRI achieved higher sensitivity and specificity in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic lesions.

  16. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari; Sakai, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. • ED and WB FDG-PET/ CT helps to assess patients with RCC • ED FDG-PET/CT enabled differentiation between CCC and N-CCC • FDG accumulation in the WB phase reflects tumour aggressiveness • Management of RCC is improved by ED and WB FDG-PET/CT.

  17. TU-G-201-01: What Therapy Physicists Need to Know About CT and PET/CT: Terminology and Latest Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, C. [St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This session will update therapeutic physicists on technological advancements and radiation oncology features of commercial CT, MRI, and PET/CT imaging systems. Also described are physicists’ roles in every stage of equipment selection, purchasing, and operation, including defining specifications, evaluating vendors, making recommendations, and optimal and safe use of imaging equipment in radiation oncology environment. The first presentation defines important terminology of CT and PET/CT followed by a review of latest innovations, such as metal artifact reduction, statistical iterative reconstruction, radiation dose management, tissue classification by dual energy CT and spectral CT, improvement in spatial resolution and sensitivity in PET, and potentials of PET/MR. We will also discuss important technical specifications and items in CT and PET/CT purchasing quotes and their impacts. The second presentation will focus on key components in the request for proposal for a MRI simulator and how to evaluate vendor proposals. MRI safety issues in radiation Oncology, including MRI scanner Zones (4-zone design), will be discussed. Basic MR terminologies, important functionalities, and advanced features, which are relevant to radiation therapy, will be discussed. In the third presentation, justification of imaging systems for radiation oncology, considerations in room design and construction in a RO department, shared use with diagnostic radiology, staffing needs and training, clinical/research use cases and implementation, will be discussed. The emphasis will be on understanding and bridging the differences between diagnostic and radiation oncology installations, building consensus amongst stakeholders for purchase and use, and integrating imaging technologies into the radiation oncology environment. Learning Objectives: Learn the latest innovations of major imaging systems relevant to radiation therapy Be able to describe important technical specifications of CT, MRI

  18. TU-G-201-01: What Therapy Physicists Need to Know About CT and PET/CT: Terminology and Latest Developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, C.

    2015-01-01

    This session will update therapeutic physicists on technological advancements and radiation oncology features of commercial CT, MRI, and PET/CT imaging systems. Also described are physicists’ roles in every stage of equipment selection, purchasing, and operation, including defining specifications, evaluating vendors, making recommendations, and optimal and safe use of imaging equipment in radiation oncology environment. The first presentation defines important terminology of CT and PET/CT followed by a review of latest innovations, such as metal artifact reduction, statistical iterative reconstruction, radiation dose management, tissue classification by dual energy CT and spectral CT, improvement in spatial resolution and sensitivity in PET, and potentials of PET/MR. We will also discuss important technical specifications and items in CT and PET/CT purchasing quotes and their impacts. The second presentation will focus on key components in the request for proposal for a MRI simulator and how to evaluate vendor proposals. MRI safety issues in radiation Oncology, including MRI scanner Zones (4-zone design), will be discussed. Basic MR terminologies, important functionalities, and advanced features, which are relevant to radiation therapy, will be discussed. In the third presentation, justification of imaging systems for radiation oncology, considerations in room design and construction in a RO department, shared use with diagnostic radiology, staffing needs and training, clinical/research use cases and implementation, will be discussed. The emphasis will be on understanding and bridging the differences between diagnostic and radiation oncology installations, building consensus amongst stakeholders for purchase and use, and integrating imaging technologies into the radiation oncology environment. Learning Objectives: Learn the latest innovations of major imaging systems relevant to radiation therapy Be able to describe important technical specifications of CT, MRI

  19. A dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner: Evaluation of basic performance characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Van Kampen, Will; Stolin, Alexander V; Gong, Wenbo; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Martone, Peter F; Smith, Mark F; Sarment, David; Clinthorne, Neal H; Perna, Mark

    2018-04-01

    Application of advanced imaging techniques, such as PET and x ray CT, can potentially improve detection of breast cancer. Unfortunately, both modalities have challenges in the detection of some lesions. The combination of the two techniques, however, could potentially lead to an overall improvement in diagnostic breast imaging. The purpose of this investigation is to test the basic performance of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT. The PET component consists of a rotating pair of detectors. Its performance was evaluated using the NEMA NU4-2008 protocols. The CT component utilizes a pulsed x ray source and flat panel detector mounted on the same gantry as the PET scanner. Its performance was assessed using specialized phantoms. The radiation dose to a breast during CT imaging was explored by the measurement of free-in-air kerma and air kerma measured at the center of a 16 cm-diameter PMMA cylinder. Finally, the combined capabilities of the system were demonstrated by imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom. Overall, performance of the PET component is comparable to many pre-clinical and other dedicated breast-PET scanners. Its spatial resolution is 2.2 mm, 5 mm from the center of the scanner using images created with the single-sliced-filtered-backprojection algorithm. Peak NECR is 24.6 kcps; peak sensitivity is 1.36%; the scatter fraction is 27%. Spatial resolution of the CT scanner is 1.1 lp/mm at 10% MTF. The free-in-air kerma is 2.33 mGy, while the PMMA-air kerma is 1.24 mGy. Finally, combined imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom illustrated the potential utility of the dual-modality images produced by the system. The basic performance characteristics of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner are good, demonstrating that its performance is similar to current dedicated PET and CT scanners. The potential value of this system is the capability to produce combined duality-modality images that could improve detection of breast disease. The next stage in development of this system

  20. PET/CT and MR imaging in myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Michael E. [University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Badros, Ashraf Z. [University of Maryland, Department of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-01-15

    Myeloma is the most common primary bone malignancy. It accounts for 10% of all hematological malignancies and 1% of all cancers. In the United States, there are an estimated 16,000 new cases and over 11,000 deaths yearly due to myeloma. Plasma cell dyscrasias manifest themselves in a variety of forms that range from MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance) and smoldering myeloma that require no therapy, to the ''malignant'' form of multiple myeloma. The role of imaging in the management of myeloma includes: an assessment of the extent of intramedullary bone disease, detection of any extramedullary foci, and severity of the disease at presentation; the identification and characterization of complications; subsequent assessment of disease status. This review will focus on the use of PET/CT and MR imaging for myeloma patients at the time of initial diagnosis and for follow-up management, based on current reports in the literature and our practice at the Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, USA. (orig.)

  1. Quality control in PET/CT systems. Experiences and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geworski, Lilli; Fitz, Eduard; Knoop, Bernd; Karwarth, Cornelia; Plotkin, Michail

    2010-01-01

    Today, in most cases PET examinations are performed using PET/CT hybrid systems. While acceptance testing and routine control of the basic modalities PET and CT, respectively, are described by appropriate regulations, corresponding instructions with regard to the interface connecting both are still missing. This interface includes the adjustment of gantries and patient bed to each other as well as the energy scaling of attenuation coefficients from CT energy to 511 keV. Measurements checking the mechanical adjustment (determination of off-set parameters) are performed following manufacturer's recommendation, with a typical frequency twice a year. On a Biograph 16 (Siemens, Inc.), these measurements were systematically extended to a weekly frequency over an observation period of 10 months, supplemented by measurements with additional load to the patient bed (up to 135 kg), and different vertical bed positions. The results show, that for the construction tested additional off-set measurements for routine control extending well beyond manufacturer's recommendation are not necessary. The energy scaling of attenuation coefficients is depending on methodological aspects and software implementation, and therefore is not part of routine control. On the contrary, the development of appropriate methods for acceptance testing to assess and to determine the mechanical adjustment in all its degrees of freedom as well as the accuracy of attenuation corrected emission data is urgently needed. (orig.)

  2. Retrospective data-driven respiratory gating for PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleyer, Paul J; O'Doherty, Michael J; Barrington, Sally F; Marsden, Paul K

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory motion can adversely affect both PET and CT acquisitions. Respiratory gating allows an acquisition to be divided into a series of motion-reduced bins according to the respiratory signal, which is typically hardware acquired. In order that the effects of motion can potentially be corrected for, we have developed a novel, automatic, data-driven gating method which retrospectively derives the respiratory signal from the acquired PET and CT data. PET data are acquired in listmode and analysed in sinogram space, and CT data are acquired in cine mode and analysed in image space. Spectral analysis is used to identify regions within the CT and PET data which are subject to respiratory motion, and the variation of counts within these regions is used to estimate the respiratory signal. Amplitude binning is then used to create motion-reduced PET and CT frames. The method was demonstrated with four patient datasets acquired on a 4-slice PET/CT system. To assess the accuracy of the data-derived respiratory signal, a hardware-based signal was acquired for comparison. Data-driven gating was successfully performed on PET and CT datasets for all four patients. Gated images demonstrated respiratory motion throughout the bin sequences for all PET and CT series, and image analysis and direct comparison of the traces derived from the data-driven method with the hardware-acquired traces indicated accurate recovery of the respiratory signal.

  3. The Road to the Common PET/CT Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassalski, Antoni; Moszynski, Marek; Szczesniak, Tomasz; Wolski, Dariusz; Batsch, Tadeusz

    2007-10-01

    Growing interest in the development of dual modality positron emission/X-rays tomography (PET/CT) systems prompts researchers to face a new challenge: to acquire both the anatomical and functional information in the same measurement, simultaneously using the same detection system and electronics. The aim of this work was to study a detector consisting of LaBr3, LSO or LYSO pixel crystals coupled to an avalanche photodiode (APD). The measurements covered tests of the detectors in PET and CT modes, respectively. The measurements included the determination of light output, energy resolution, the non-proportionality of the light yield and the time resolution for 511 keV annihilation quanta; analysis also included characterizing the PET detector, and determining the dependence of counting rate versus mean current of the APD in the X-ray detection. In the present experiment, the use of counting and current modes in the CT detection increases the dynamic range of the measured dose of X-rays by a factor of 20, compared to the counting mode alone.

  4. Use of PET and PET/CT for Radiation Therapy Planning: IAEA expert report 2006-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacManus, Michael; Nestle, Ursula; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Carrio, Ignasi; Messa, Cristina; Belohlavek, Otakar; Danna, Massimo; Inoue, Tomio; Deniaud-Alexandre, Elizabeth; Schipani, Stefano; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Dondi, Maurizio; Jeremic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a significant advance in cancer imaging with great potential for optimizing radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning and thereby improving outcomes for patients. The use of PET and PET/CT in RT planning was reviewed by an international panel. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized two synchronized and overlapping consultants' meetings with experts from different regions of the world in Vienna in July 2006. Nine experts and three IAEA staff evaluated the available data on the use of PET in RT planning, and considered practical methods for integrating it into routine practice. For RT planning, 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was the most valuable pharmaceutical. Numerous studies supported the routine use of FDG-PET for RT target volume determination in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). There was also evidence for utility of PET in head and neck cancers, lymphoma and in esophageal cancers, with promising preliminary data in many other cancers. The best available approach employs integrated PET/CT images, acquired on a dual scanner in the radiotherapy treatment position after administration of tracer according to a standardized protocol, with careful optimization of images within the RT planning system and carefully considered rules for contouring tumor volumes. PET scans that are not recent or were acquired without proper patient positioning should be repeated for RT planning. PET will play an increasing valuable role in RT planning for a wide range of cancers. When requesting PET scans, physicians should be aware of their potential role in RT planning.

  5. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic value of FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Picchio, Maria; Gianolli, Luigi; Zattoni, Fabio; Spallino, Marianna; Saladini, Giorgio; Evangelista, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was 1) to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), 2) to assess the impact of FDG PET/CT on treatment decision-making, and 3) to estimate the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in the restaging process among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). From the FDG PET/CT databases of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, and the Veneto Institute of Oncology in Padua, Italy, we selected 104 patients with a certain diagnosis of RCC after surgery, and for whom at least 24 months of post-surgical FDG PET/CT, clinical, and instrumental follow-up data was available. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET/CT were assessed by histology and/or other imaging as standard of reference. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify predictors of outcome. FDG PET/CT resulted in a positive diagnosis in 58 patients and a negative diagnosis in 46 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 74 % and 80 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings influenced therapeutic management in 45/104 cases (43 %). After a median follow-up period of 37 months (± standard deviation 12.9), 51 (49 %) patients had recurrence of disease, and 26 (25 %) had died. In analysis of OS, positive versus negative FDG PET/CT was associated with worse cumulative survival rates over a 5-year period (19 % vs. 69 %, respectively; p <0.05). Similarly, a positive FDG PET/CT correlated with a lower 3-year PFS rate. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive scan, alone or in combination with disease stage III-IV or nuclear grading 3-4, was associated with high risk of progression (multivariate analysis = hazard ratios [HRs] of 4.01, 3.7, and 2.8, respectively; all p < 0.05). FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool both in treatment decision-making and for

  6. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic value of FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Picchio, Maria; Gianolli, Luigi [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); Zattoni, Fabio [University of Padua, Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, Urology Clinic, Padua (Italy); Spallino, Marianna [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Saladini, Giorgio; Evangelista, Laura [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Padua, Italy, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of our study was 1) to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), 2) to assess the impact of FDG PET/CT on treatment decision-making, and 3) to estimate the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in the restaging process among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). From the FDG PET/CT databases of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, and the Veneto Institute of Oncology in Padua, Italy, we selected 104 patients with a certain diagnosis of RCC after surgery, and for whom at least 24 months of post-surgical FDG PET/CT, clinical, and instrumental follow-up data was available. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET/CT were assessed by histology and/or other imaging as standard of reference. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify predictors of outcome. FDG PET/CT resulted in a positive diagnosis in 58 patients and a negative diagnosis in 46 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 74 % and 80 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings influenced therapeutic management in 45/104 cases (43 %). After a median follow-up period of 37 months (± standard deviation 12.9), 51 (49 %) patients had recurrence of disease, and 26 (25 %) had died. In analysis of OS, positive versus negative FDG PET/CT was associated with worse cumulative survival rates over a 5-year period (19 % vs. 69 %, respectively; p <0.05). Similarly, a positive FDG PET/CT correlated with a lower 3-year PFS rate. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive scan, alone or in combination with disease stage III-IV or nuclear grading 3-4, was associated with high risk of progression (multivariate analysis = hazard ratios [HRs] of 4.01, 3.7, and 2.8, respectively; all p < 0.05). FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool both in treatment decision-making and for

  7. Treatment response evaluation with 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-NaF PET/CT in multiple myeloma patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, J; Goldschmidt, H; Wagner, B; Haberkorn, U; Kopka, K; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the combined use of the radiotracers 18 F-FDG and 18 F-NaF in treatment response evaluation of a group of multiple myeloma (MM) patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) by means of static (whole-body) and dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT). Thirty-four patients with primary, previously untreated MM scheduled for treatment with HDT followed by ASCT were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent PET/CT scanning with 18 F-FDG and 18 F-NaF before and after therapy. Treatment response by means of PET/CT was assessed according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 1999 criteria. The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculation, and quantitative analysis based on two-tissue compartment modelling and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). An analysis was possible in 29 patients: three with clinical complete response (CR) and 26 with non-CR (13 patients near complete response-nCR, four patients very good partial response-VGPR, nine patients partial response-PR). After treatment, 18 F-FDG PET/CT was negative in 14/29 patients and positive in 15/29 patients, showing a sensitivity of 57.5 % and a specificity of 100 %. According to the EORTC 1999 criteria, 18 F-FDG PET/CT-based treatment response revealed CR in 14 patients ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT CR), PR in 11 patients ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT PR) and progressive disease in four patients ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT PD). In terms of 18 F-NaF PET/CT, 4/29 patients (13.8 %) had a negative baseline scan, thus failed to depict MM. Regarding the patients for which a direct lesion-to-lesion comparison was feasible, 18 F-NaF PET/CT depicted 56 of the 129 18 F-FDG positive lesions (43 %). Follow-up 18 F-NaF PET/CT showed persistence of 81.5 % of the baseline 18 F-NaF positive MM lesions after treatment, despite the fact that 64

  8. 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters as imaging biomarkers in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, is visual analysis of PET and contrast enhanced CT better than the numbers?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendi, A.Tuba, E-mail: ayse.kendi@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Corey, Amanda [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Magliocca, Kelly R. [Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nickleach, Dana C. [Biostatistics & Bioinformatics Shared Resource at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Galt, James [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Biostatistics & Bioinformatics Shared Resource at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); El-Deiry, Mark W.; Wadsworth, J. Trad [Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hudgins, Patricia A. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Saba, Nabil F. [Hematology Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Schuster, David M. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    multivariable analysis, patients with high (≥ median) tumor SUV max (OR 6.3), SUV mean (OR 6.3), MTV (OR 19.0), TLG (OR 19.0), SAM (OR 11.7) and N SAM (OR 19.0) had high pathological T-stage (T3/T4) (p < 0.05). Ring/heterogeneous pattern on CECT qualitative assessment was associated with worse DMFS and OS. Conclusion: High PET/CT parameters were associated with pathologically advanced T stage (T3/T4). Qualitative assessment of CECT has prognostic value. PET/CT parameters did not predict clinical outcome.

  9. 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters as imaging biomarkers in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, is visual analysis of PET and contrast enhanced CT better than the numbers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendi, A.Tuba; Corey, Amanda; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Nickleach, Dana C.; Galt, James; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; El-Deiry, Mark W.; Wadsworth, J. Trad; Hudgins, Patricia A.; Saba, Nabil F.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    multivariable analysis, patients with high (≥ median) tumor SUV max (OR 6.3), SUV mean (OR 6.3), MTV (OR 19.0), TLG (OR 19.0), SAM (OR 11.7) and N SAM (OR 19.0) had high pathological T-stage (T3/T4) (p < 0.05). Ring/heterogeneous pattern on CECT qualitative assessment was associated with worse DMFS and OS. Conclusion: High PET/CT parameters were associated with pathologically advanced T stage (T3/T4). Qualitative assessment of CECT has prognostic value. PET/CT parameters did not predict clinical outcome

  10. Standard Operating Procedures for PET/CT: A Practical Approach for Use in Adult Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) have revolutionized the care of cancer patients in developed countries and are increasingly being adopted in emerging economies. PET has been, and still is, one of the fastest growing fields in medical imaging. There are several reasons for the rapid development of this imaging technology. As the populations of many countries continue to age, cancer constitutes a major health problem, with increasing incidence worldwide. In developed countries where heart disease is the primary cause of mortality, cancer is a close second and may eventually overtake it. Proper cancer management requires highly accurate imaging to characterize, stage, restage, assess response to therapy, prognosticate and detect recurrence. Such information is critical in a disease that often requires the correct initial treatment in order to improve the chance of successfully curing the patient. The ability to provide, in a single imaging session, detailed anatomical and metabolic/functional information, which has a powerful synergistic effect that is greater than the sum of the two individual techniques, has established PET/CT as an indispensable imaging procedure in the management of many different types of cancer. The quality and reliability of the images acquired on a PET/CT scanner depend on the quality of the imaging technique. This publication addresses this important aspect of PET/CT imaging, namely, how to perform an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT scan in an adult patient with cancer. Although there are several publications and guidelines on different protocols for PET/CT imaging using FDG, the aim here is to provide a comprehensive overview that can be used both by new PET/CT centres in the process of starting up and by established imaging centres for updating older protocols. Written by experts from several continents, the book provides an up to date, evidence based and comprehensive overview

  11. Preliminary experience on the use of PET/CT in the management of pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, Pilar; Hirsch, Steffen; Levine, Daniel S; Taj, Mary M

    2017-12-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-known complication following prolonged immunosuppression. Contrary to other lymphomas, there is no standardized imaging approach to assess PTLD either at staging or for response to therapy. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an imaging modality that has proven to be useful in lymphoma. However, there is still limited data concerning its use in pediatric PTLD. Our study evaluates the use of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD at our institution. To assess the role of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD, we reviewed the pediatric patients with PTLD who had undergone PET/CT at our institution between 2000 and 2016. Nine patients were identified. Six had PET/CT at diagnosis. All lesions seen on CT were identified with PET/CT. Fourteen PET/CTs were done during treatment. Eight PET/CTs were negative, including three where CT showed areas of uncertain significance. In these cases, PET/CT helped us to stop treatment and the patients remain in remission after a long follow-up (mean 74.3 months; range 12.4-180.9 months). PET/CT revealed additional disease in two cases, therefore treatment was intensified. Six biopsies and close follow-up was done to confirm PET/CT results. In one case, PET/CT did not identify central nervous system involvement demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging. PET/CT may have an important role in the staging and follow-up of pediatric PTLD. In our cohort, PET/CT was helpful in staging and assessing treatment response and in clarifying equivocal findings on other imaging modalities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Functional testicular evaluation using PET/CT with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierickx, Lawrence Oliver; Zerdoud, Slimane; Filleron, Thomas; Brillouet, Severine; Huyghe, Eric; Delauney, Boris; Bujan, Louis; Plante, Pierre; Nogueira, Daniela; Montagut, Jacques; Courbon, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    PET/CT using 18 F-FDG is a well-established diagnostic examination in oncology, cardiology and neurology. The clinical significance of nontumoral testicular uptake of FDG is unknown. Functional testicular imaging may have important clinical applications in the diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility. The aim of this study was to determine the andrological value of a FDG PET/CT in analysing testicular function, by correlating the PET/CT data with the sperm parameters. Retrospective analysis of FDG PET/CT in 20 consecutive cancer patients without testicular pathology in whom two semen samples had been obtained for analysis before any chemotherapy. FDG PET/CT parameters were the mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean), used for measuring the intensity of uptake, and the functional testicular volume (FV). For statistical analysis, a Spearman's rank correlation test and a Mann-Whitney test were used. Of 20 patients (mean age 22 years), 18 had provided two sperm samples for cryopreservation. Sperm concentration was above 20 x 10 6 /ml in 55% of the patients. The intensity of uptake and the FV were correlated with the total sperm count, the sperm concentration and motility (p < 0.05). The difference in SUVmean between the two testes showed an inverse correlation with sperm concentration (p = 0.036). Normospermic and oligospermic men had significant differences in: (1) mean SUVmean, (2) mean FV, and (3) the difference in intensity of uptake between the testes (p < 0.05). This is the first report on the andrological value of FDG PET/CT in analysing nontumoral testicular function. This pilot study showed a significant correlation between intensity of uptake of FDG and testicular FV with the main sperm parameters. PET/CT with FDG could become a useful new tool in assisted reproductive technologies and other andrological or urological applications. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated aspects were spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, count rate performance, image quality, count loss and random events correction accuracy. The findings of this study demonstrated superior sensitivity (~ 4 folds) of PET scanner in PET/MR compared to PET/CT system. Image quality test exhibited higher contrast in PET/MR (~ 9%) compared with PET/CT. The scatter fraction of PET/MR was 43.4% at noise equivalent count rate (NECR) peak of 218 kcps and the corresponding activity concentration was 17.7 kBq/cc. Whereas the scatter fraction of PET/CT was found as 39.2% at NECR peak of 72 kcps and activity concentration of 24.3 kBq/cc. The percentage error of the random event correction accuracy was 3.4% and 3.1% in PET/MR and PET/CT, respectively. It was concluded that PET/MR system is about 4 times more sensitive than PET/CT, and the contrast of hot lesions in PET/MR was ~ 9% higher than PET/CT. These outcomes also emphasize the possibility to achieve excellent clinical PET images with low administered dose and/or a short acquisition time in PET/MR.

  14. Respiratory Motion Management in PET/CT: Applications and Clinical Usefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Luca; Ponti, Elena De; Morzenti, Sabrina; Spadavecchia, Chiara; Crivellaro, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Breathing movement can introduce heavy bias in both image quality and quantitation in PET/CT. The aim of this paper is a review of the literature to evaluate the benefit of respiratory gating in terms of image quality, quantification and lesion detectability. A review of the literature published in the last 10 years and dealing with gated PET/CT technique has been performed, focusing on improvement in quantification, lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy in neoplastic lesion. In addition, the improvement in the definition of radiotherapy planning has been evaluated. There is a consistent increase of the Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) in gated PET images when compared to ungated ones, particularly for lesions located in liver and in lung. Respiratory gating can also increase sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/CT. Gated PET/CT can be used for radiation therapy planning, reducing the uncertainty in target definition, optimizing the volume to be treated and reducing the possibility of "missing" during the dose delivery. Moreover, new technologies, able to define the movement of lesions and organs directly from the PET sinogram, can solve some problems that currently are limiting the clinical use of gated PET/CT (i.e.: extended acquisition time, radiation exposure). The published literature demonstrated that respiratory gating PET/CT is a valid technique to improve quantification, lesion detectability of lung and liver tumors and can better define the radiotherapy planning of moving lesions and organs. If new technical improvements for motion compensation will be clinically validated, gated technique could be applied routinely in any PET/CT scan. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Evaluation of Schmorl's nodes using F-18 FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, H.-Y.; Ding, H.-J.; Chen, Y.-K.; Kao, C.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the image findings of Schmorl's nodes on combined 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT). Materials and methods: Twelve patients who were diagnosed with Schmorl's nodes and had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG PET/CT were retrospectively recruited for this study. The period between the MRI and the FDG PET/CT examinations was within 1 week. The demographic data and clinical history were reviewed. The relationship between MRI findings and the values of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on FDG PET/CT was analysed. Results: The mean values of early and delayed SUVmax of Schmorl's nodes without MRI enhancement were 1.14 ± 0.28 and 1.09 ± 0.32. The mean values of early and delayed SUVmax of Schmorl's nodes with MRI enhancement were 1.73 ± 0.49 and 1.75 ± 0.54. There were significant differences in the early and delayed SUVmax between Schmorl's nodes with and without perifocal enhancement on MRI with Wilcoxon's rank-sum test (p = 0.012; p = 0.006). There was a trend of positive correlation, although not statistically significant, between delayed SUVmax on FDG PET/CT and age in Schmorl's nodes with Spearman’s rank correlation (B = 0.86, p = 0.056). Conclusions: Schmorl's nodes demonstrated low to moderate uptake on FDG PET/CT images. Schmorl's nodes with perifocal enhancement on MRI result in higher FDG uptake. The possibility of false positives caused by Schmorl's nodes should be considered when interpreting FDG PET/CT images of bone metastases, especially in the aging population.

  16. Characterizing bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin's lymphoma by FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kagna, Olga; Dann, Eldad J.; Ben-Barak, Ayelet; Israel, Ora

    2014-01-01

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is superior to iliac bone marrow biopsy (iBMB) for detection of bone marrow involvement (BMI) in staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The present study aims to characterize the patterns and distribution of BMI in HL as determined by FDG-PET/CT. Reports of FDG-PET/CT studies performed for staging of HL were reviewed. BMI was defined as positive iBMB and/or foci of pathological FDG uptake in the skeleton that behaved in concordance with other sites of lymphoma in studies following chemotherapy. Number of FDG uptake foci, their specific location in the skeleton and the presence of corresponding lesions in the CT component of the study, and stage according to the Ann Arbor staging system, were recorded. The study included 473 patients. iBMB was performed in 336 patients. Nine patients had positive iBMB (9/336, 3 %). Seventy-three patients (73/473, 15 %) had FDG-PET/CT-defined BMI. The BM was the only extranodal site of HL in 52/473 patients (11 %). Forty-five patients had three or more foci of pathological skeletal FDG uptake (45/73, 62 %). Sixty-four patients (64/73, 88 %) had at least one uptake focus in the pelvis or vertebrae. In 60 patients (60/73, 82 %), the number of skeletal FDG uptake foci without corresponding CT lesions was equal to or higher than the number of foci with morphological abnormalities. FDG-PET/CT demonstrated BMI in 15 % of patients with newly diagnosed HL. Diagnosis of BMI in HL by FDG-PET/CT was more sensitive than iBMB with potential upstage in 11 % of patients. The most common pattern of FDG-PET/CT BMI was multifocal (at least three foci) skeletal FDG uptake, with at least one focus in the pelvis or vertebrae and no corresponding CT lesions. (orig.)

  17. Survival outcomes in patients with cervical cancer after inclusion of PET/CT in staging procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Henrik Villibald [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Section for Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [University of Copenhagen, The Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), Copenhagen (Denmark); Hoegdall, Claus [University of Copenhagen, Department of Gynecology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Engelholm, Svend Aage [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-11-15

    In cancer of the uterine cervix, lymph node metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. Even so, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) does not take into account diagnostic results of methods such as PET/CT, since these are not readily available everywhere. As undetected lymph node metastases can lead to undertreatment, any difference in the underlying prevalence of false-negative scans between CT and PET/CT may be reflected in treatment outcomes. This study investigated survival outcomes in node-negative patients before and after the introduction of PET/CT. This was a single-institution retrospective analysis of 301 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of cervical cancer. The patients were receiving chemoradiotherapy with curative intent according to the standard protocol of the department for patients without lymph node metastases as assessed by pretreatment CT or PET/CT. Patients were stratified into two groups: PET/CT and non-PET/CT. Patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were acquired from the treatment database. Significant differences of 23 % (95 % CI 17 - 29 %), 19 % (95 % CI 13 - 25 %) and 12 % (95 % CI 6 - 18 %) in 5-year overall, disease-free and disease-specific survival, respectively, were observed between the two patient groups. The difference remained significant in univariate and multivariate analyses of overall survival (hazard ratio 0.61, 95 % CI 0.42 - 0.89; p = 0.010), including age, FIGO stage, performance status, BMI, and histopathology. Inclusion of PET/CT in the preradiotherapy diagnostic protocol may lead to nodal stage migration not reflected in the FIGO stage. It was found to be a significant covariate, and could lead to selection bias that needs to be taken into account when designing and reporting on clinical trials. (orig.)

  18. PET/CT in staging of the high risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergero, M.A.; David, C.; Dipatto, F.; Popeneciu, V.; Ríos, L.; Faccio, F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In the last decade multimodal management of the high risk prostate cancer (HRPC) is a therapeutic option in selected patients and the staging of these patients depends on the current diagnostic methods (DM) which have low diagnostic accuracy for detecting metastasis (MTS). The positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) would have a greater diagnostic accuracy and it is presented as a better DM for staging prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this article is present 2 patients in whom PET/CT modified the therapeutic decision and conduct a literature review. Materials and methods: 2 patients with HRPC who performed PET/CT and it modified the therapeutic behavior were described and a systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, Embase, SciELO and Cochrane answering the question: has PET/CT a place in HRPC staging? Results: TPET/CT has a sensitivity and specificity between 19% to 100% and 67% to 98,5 %, respectively, in assessing nodal involvement by PC and between 84% to 96% and 92.3% to 100%, respectively, in assessing bone involvement by PC. Besides PET/CT allowed to modify the therapeutic behavior between 20% to 40% of the patients with PC. Conclusions: PET/CT has good specificity and moderate sensitivity for detecting lymph node MTS and good sensitivity and specificity for detecting bone MTS. Besides PET/CT modified the therapeutic behavior in 1/3 of cases and it allowed us to modify the therapeutic behavior in our series. (authors) [es

  19. Functional testicular evaluation using PET/CT with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierickx, Lawrence Oliver; Zerdoud, Slimane; Filleron, Thomas; Brillouet, Severine [Institut Claudius Regaud, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); Huyghe, Eric; Delauney, Boris; Bujan, Louis; Plante, Pierre [CHU Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Nogueira, Daniela; Montagut, Jacques [I.F.R.E.A.R.E.S., Toulouse (France); Courbon, Frederic [Institut Claudius Regaud, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); CHU Toulouse, Toulouse (France)

    2012-01-15

    PET/CT using {sup 18}F-FDG is a well-established diagnostic examination in oncology, cardiology and neurology. The clinical significance of nontumoral testicular uptake of FDG is unknown. Functional testicular imaging may have important clinical applications in the diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility. The aim of this study was to determine the andrological value of a FDG PET/CT in analysing testicular function, by correlating the PET/CT data with the sperm parameters. Retrospective analysis of FDG PET/CT in 20 consecutive cancer patients without testicular pathology in whom two semen samples had been obtained for analysis before any chemotherapy. FDG PET/CT parameters were the mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean), used for measuring the intensity of uptake, and the functional testicular volume (FV). For statistical analysis, a Spearman's rank correlation test and a Mann-Whitney test were used. Of 20 patients (mean age 22 years), 18 had provided two sperm samples for cryopreservation. Sperm concentration was above 20 x 10{sup 6}/ml in 55% of the patients. The intensity of uptake and the FV were correlated with the total sperm count, the sperm concentration and motility (p < 0.05). The difference in SUVmean between the two testes showed an inverse correlation with sperm concentration (p = 0.036). Normospermic and oligospermic men had significant differences in: (1) mean SUVmean, (2) mean FV, and (3) the difference in intensity of uptake between the testes (p < 0.05). This is the first report on the andrological value of FDG PET/CT in analysing nontumoral testicular function. This pilot study showed a significant correlation between intensity of uptake of FDG and testicular FV with the main sperm parameters. PET/CT with FDG could become a useful new tool in assisted reproductive technologies and other andrological or urological applications. (orig.)

  20. Survival outcomes in patients with cervical cancer after inclusion of PET/CT in staging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Henrik Villibald; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Hoegdall, Claus; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2015-01-01

    In cancer of the uterine cervix, lymph node metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. Even so, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) does not take into account diagnostic results of methods such as PET/CT, since these are not readily available everywhere. As undetected lymph node metastases can lead to undertreatment, any difference in the underlying prevalence of false-negative scans between CT and PET/CT may be reflected in treatment outcomes. This study investigated survival outcomes in node-negative patients before and after the introduction of PET/CT. This was a single-institution retrospective analysis of 301 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of cervical cancer. The patients were receiving chemoradiotherapy with curative intent according to the standard protocol of the department for patients without lymph node metastases as assessed by pretreatment CT or PET/CT. Patients were stratified into two groups: PET/CT and non-PET/CT. Patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were acquired from the treatment database. Significant differences of 23 % (95 % CI 17 - 29 %), 19 % (95 % CI 13 - 25 %) and 12 % (95 % CI 6 - 18 %) in 5-year overall, disease-free and disease-specific survival, respectively, were observed between the two patient groups. The difference remained significant in univariate and multivariate analyses of overall survival (hazard ratio 0.61, 95 % CI 0.42 - 0.89; p = 0.010), including age, FIGO stage, performance status, BMI, and histopathology. Inclusion of PET/CT in the preradiotherapy diagnostic protocol may lead to nodal stage migration not reflected in the FIGO stage. It was found to be a significant covariate, and could lead to selection bias that needs to be taken into account when designing and reporting on clinical trials. (orig.)

  1. PET/CT in malignant melanoma: contrast-enhanced CT versus plain low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, Thomas; Schneider, Vera; Fougere, Christian la; Bartenstein, Peter; Weiss, Mayo; Melzer, Henriette Ingrid; Coppenrath, Eva; Berking, Carola

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) versus non-enhanced low-dose CT (NECT) in the staging of advanced malignant melanoma with 18 F-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In total, 50 18 F-FDG PET/CT examinations were performed in 50 patients with metastasized melanoma. For attenuation correction, whole-body NECT was performed followed by diagnostic CECT with contrast agent. For the whole-body PET, 18 F-FDG was applied. Criteria for evaluation were signs of vital tumour tissue (extent of lesions, contrast enhancement, maximum standardized uptake value >2.5). Findings suspicious for melanoma were considered lesions. NECT, CECT and 18 F-FDG PET were evaluated separately, followed by combined analysis of PET/NECT and PET/CECT. Findings were verified histologically and/or by follow-up (>6 months). Overall, 232 lesions were analysed, and 151 proved to be metastases. The sensitivity of NECT, CECT, PET, PET/NECT and PET/CECT was 62, 85, 90, 97 and 100%, and specificity was 52, 63, 88, 93 and 93%, respectively. Compared to CECT, NECT obtained additional false-negative results: lymph node (n = 19) and liver/spleen metastases (n = 9). Misinterpreted physiological structures mainly caused additional false-positive findings (n = 17). In combined analysis of PET/NECT, six false-positive [other tumours (n = 2), inflammatory lymph nodes (n = 2), inflammatory lung lesion (n = 1), blood vessel (n = 1)] and five false-negative findings [liver (n = 3), spleen (n = 1), lymph node metastases (n = 1)] remained. On PET/CECT, six false-positive [inflammatory lymph nodes (n = 3), other tumours (n = 2), inflammatory lung lesion (n = 1)] and no false-negative findings occurred. However, additional false findings on PET/NECT (6 of 232) did not change staging compared to PET/CECT. Our results indicate that it is justified to perform PET/NECT instead of PET/CECT for melanoma staging. (orig.)

  2. Comparative evaluation of 11C-MET PET-CT and MRI for GTV delineation in precision radiotherapy for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ru; Qian Liting; Wang Shicun; Liu Wei; Luo Wenguang; Zhang Hongbo; Li Guanghu; Hu Zhigang; Liu Lei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the difference between MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in the precision radiotherapy for gliomas. Methods: Six patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gliomas were selected for target delineation. Five physicians in our department were called to delineate the GTV based on the preoperative MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT images of these patients. The GTVs based on the two methods were compared. Results: There was no significant difference between the GTVs based on MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT (P=0.917), and their coefficients of variation were also similar (P=0.600). The coincidences of GTVs were different among the patients, with a maximum value of 73.0% and a minimum value of 51.8%. GTV showed no significant difference when defined by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT (P=0.709); the biggest difference was 27.66 cm 3 on PET-CT and 40.37 cm 3 on MRI. Conclusions: The boundaries of gliomas defined on MRI and PET-CT are different. The GTVs delineated by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT are similar, and the biggest difference on PET-CT is smaller than that on MRI, which suggests that 11 C-MET PET-CT is a more direct way for displaying GTV. (authors)

  3. Poor predictive value of positive interim FDG-PET/CT in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarovici, Julien; Petrovanu, Cynthia; Danu, Alina; Ferme, Christophe; Ribrag, Vincent; Ghez, David [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Hematology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Terroir, Marie [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Arfi-Rouche, Julia [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Radiology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Michot, Jean-Marie [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Drug Development (DITEP); Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Mussot, Sacha; Florea, Valentina [Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Le Plessis Robinson (France). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery; Ghigna, Maria-Rosa [Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Le Plessis Robinson (France). Dept. of Pathology; Dartigues, Peggy [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Pathology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France)

    2017-11-15

    Though commonly used to assess response to therapy, the prognostic value of interim FDG-PET/CT in Primary Mediastinal Large B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL) is unclear. We conducted a retrospective study on 36 consecutive patients treated at our institution for a PMBCL between 2006 and 2014. All patients with a positive interim FDG-PET/CT had undergone histological restaging consisting either in a surgical debulking of the residual lesion (15 patients) or a CT-guided core needle biopsy (two patients). All FDG-PET/CT were secondarily reviewed according to the more recent Deauville criteria. Interim FDG-PET/CT was considered positive in 17/36 patients using visual evaluation. Among these patients, 14 had a Deauville score of 4. Histological restaging was negative in all but one case, showing inflammation and/or fibrosis. After a median follow-up of 48.5 months, a total of five patients have relapsed, two patients in the positive FDG-PET/CT group, and three patients in the negative FDG-PET/CT group, respectively. These data indicate that a positive interim FDG-PET/CT does not reflect persistence of active disease in the vast majority of PMBCL cases. The relapse rate appears similar regardless of interim FDG-PET/CT results and interpretation criteria. This suggests that interim FDG-PET/CT has a poor positive predictive value, thus kt should be used with caution in PMBCL. (orig.)

  4. Modification of staging and treatment of head and neck cancer by FDG-PET/CT prior to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyuk, A.; University Hospital Dresden; Appold, S.; Zoephel, K.; Baumann, M.; University Hospital Dresden; Abolmaali, N.; University Hospital Dresden

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reliable tumor staging is a fundamental pre-requisite for efficient tumor therapy and further prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare head and neck cancer (HNC) staging before and after FDG-PET/CT, evaluating the stage modifications for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Patients and methods: A total of 102 patients with untreated primary HNC, who underwent conventional staging and staging including FDG-PET/CT before RT, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Blinded pre-FDG-PET/CT and post-FDG-PET/CT staging data were compared. The impact on patient management was tested by comparing the intention before and after FDG-PET/CT. Results: Significant modifications of T, N, and M stage as well as clinical stage were detected after inclusion of FDG-PET/CT data (p = 0.002, 0.0006, 0.001, 0.03, respectively). Overall, the implementation of FDG-PET/CT led to modification of RT intention decision in 14 patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT demonstrates essential influence on tumor staging in HNC patients scheduled for irradiation. Implementation of FDG-PET/CT in imaging protocol improves selection of candidates for curative and palliative RT and allows further optimization of treatment management and therapy intention. (orig.)

  5. Objective and subjective comparison of standard 2-D and fully 3-D reconstructed data on a PET/CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Klaus; Rüdy, Matthias; Treyer, Valerie; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Burger, Cyrill; Hany, Thomas F

    2007-07-01

    The relative advantage of fully 3-D versus 2-D mode for whole-body imaging is currently the focus of considerable expert debate. The nature of 3-D PET acquisition for FDG PET/CT theoretically allows a shorter scan time and improved efficiency of FDG use than in the standard 2-D acquisition. We therefore objectively and subjectively compared standard 2-D and fully 3-D reconstructed data for FDG PET/CT on a research PET/CT system. In a total of 36 patients (mean 58.9 years, range 17.3-78.9 years; 21 male, 15 female) referred for known or suspected malignancy, FDG PET/CT was performed using a research PET/CT system with advanced detector technology with improved sensitivity and spatial resolution. After 45 min uptake, a low-dose CT (40 mAs) from head to thigh was performed followed by 2-D PET (emission 3 min per field) and 3-D PET (emission 1.5 min per field) with both seven slices overlap to cover the identical anatomical region. Acquisition time was therefore 50% less (seven fields; 21 min vs. 10.5 min). PET data was acquired in a randomized fashion, so in 50% of the cases 2-D data was acquired first. CT data was used for attenuation correction. 2-D (OSEM) and 3-D PET images were iteratively reconstr