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Sample records for cardiac outcomes trial

  1. Potential synergy between lipid-lowering and blood-pressure-lowering in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sever, Peter; Dahlöf, Björn; Poulter, Neil;

    2006-01-01

    A prespecified objective of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT) was to assess whether any synergistic effects were apparent between the lipid-lowering and blood-pressure-lowering regimens in preventing cardiovascular events.......A prespecified objective of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT) was to assess whether any synergistic effects were apparent between the lipid-lowering and blood-pressure-lowering regimens in preventing cardiovascular events....

  2. The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial lipid lowering arm: extended observations 2 years after trial closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R; Dahlof, Bjorn;

    2008-01-01

    Aims To determine the cardiovascular benefits in those originally assigned atorvastatin in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-2.2 years after closure of the lipid-lowering arm of the trial (ASCOT-LLA). Methods and results The Blood Pressure Lowering Arm of the ASCOT trial (ASCOT...... mortality, all cause mortality, development of chronic stable angina, heart failure, and peripheral arterial disease. By the end of ASCOT-LLA, there was a 36% relative risk reduction in primary events (n = 254) in favour of atorvastatin [hazard ratio (HR) 0.64, 95% CI: 0.50-0.83, P = 0.0005]. At the end...... essentially unchanged and in the case of all cause mortality, the risk reduction of 15% now achieved borderline statistical significance (P = 0.02). Conclusion Carry-over benefits from those originally assigned atorvastatin but no longer taking the drug may account for unchanged relative risk reductions...

  3. The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial: blood pressure-lowering limb: effects in patients with type II diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergren, Jan; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter S;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of two antihypertensive treatment strategies for the prevention of coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular events in the large subpopulation (n=5137) with diabetes mellitus in the blood pressure-lowering arm of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial...... by 48% (P=0.004) and noncoronary revascularization procedures by 57% (Pdeaths and nonfatal myocardial infarctions (the primary endpoint), which were reduced...... nonsignificantly by 8% (hazard ratio 0.92, confidence interval 0.74-1.15). CONCLUSION: In the large diabetic subgroup in the blood pressure-lowering arm of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial, the benefits of amlodipine-based treatment, compared with atenolol-based treatment, on the incidence of total...

  4. Effect of Metoprolol Versus Carvedilol on Outcomes in MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H; Ruwald, Anne-Christine H; Jøns, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to compare the effects of metoprolol and carvedilol in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study.......This study sought to compare the effects of metoprolol and carvedilol in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study....

  5. Excess pressure integral predicts cardiovascular events independent of other risk factors in the conduit artery functional evaluation substudy of Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-07-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial blood pressure waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (aged, 63±8 years) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation (CAFE) substudy of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT). Measurements of left ventricular mass index (n=862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (n=923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure were lower in people treated with amlodipine±perindopril than in those treated with atenolol±bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic blood pressure was similar. A total of 134 cardiovascular events accrued during a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of cardiovascular events after adjustment for age and sex, and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic blood pressure, central augmentation pressure, central pulse pressure, and integral of reservoir pressure were correlated with left ventricular mass index, but only XSPI, augmentation pressure, and central pulse pressure were associated positively with carotid artery intima media thickness. Associations between left ventricular mass index, XSPI, and integral of reservoir pressure and carotid artery intima media thickness and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction and independently predicts cardiovascular events and targets organ damage in a prospective clinical trial.

  6. Role of blood pressure and other variables in the differential cardiovascular event rates noted in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulter, Neil R; Wedel, Hans; Dahlöf, Björn;

    2005-01-01

    Results of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA) show significantly lower rates of coronary and stroke events in individuals allocated an amlodipine-based combination drug regimen than in those allocated an atenolol-based combination drug regimen (HR...... 0.86 and 0.77, respectively). Our aim was to assess to what extent these differences were due to significant differences in blood pressures and in other variables noted after randomisation....

  7. Ischaemic cardiac outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonism or factor Xa inhibition: results from the ROCKET AF trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Stevens, Susanna R.; White, Harvey D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Goodman, Shaun G.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Califf, Robert M.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Breithardt, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Aims We investigated the prevalence of prior myocardial infarction (MI) and incidence of ischaemic cardiovascular (CV) events among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Methods and results In ROCKET AF, 14 264 patients with nonvalvular AF were randomized to rivaroxaban or warfarin. The key efficacy outcome for these analyses was CV death, MI, and unstable angina (UA). This pre-specified analysis was performed on patients while on treatment. Rates are per 100 patient-years. Overall, 2468 (17%) patients had prior MI at enrollment. Compared with patients without prior MI, these patients were more likely to be male (75 vs. 57%), on aspirin at baseline (47 vs. 34%), have prior congestive heart failure (78 vs. 59%), diabetes (47 vs. 39%), hypertension (94 vs. 90%), higher mean CHADS2 score (3.64 vs. 3.43), and fewer prior strokes or transient ischaemic attacks (46 vs. 54%). CV death, MI, or UA rates tended to be lower in patients assigned rivaroxaban compared with warfarin [2.70 vs. 3.15; hazard ratio (HR) 0.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–1.00; P = 0.0509]. CV death, MI, or UA rates were higher in those with prior MI compared with no prior MI (6.68 vs. 2.19; HR 3.04, 95% CI 2.59–3.56) with consistent results for CV death, MI, or UA for rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in prior MI compared with no prior MI (P interaction = 0.10). Conclusion Prior MI was common and associated with substantial risk for subsequent cardiac events. Patients with prior MI assigned rivaroxaban compared with warfarin had a non-significant 14% reduction of ischaemic cardiac events. PMID:24132190

  8. A genotype-specific, randomized controlled behavioral intervention to improve the neuroemotional outcome of cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, D.; Kolassa, I.T.; Laubender, R.P.; Mansmann, U.; Hagl, C.; Roozendaal, B.; Quervain, D.J. de; Schelling, G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac surgery is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide with >700,000 surgeries in 2006 in the US alone. Cardiac surgery results in a considerable exposure to physical and emotional stress; stress-related disorders such as depression or post-traumatic stres

  9. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes after Pediatric Cardiac ECMO Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos eChrysostomou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To characterize the neurodevelopmental outcomes and identify factors associated with poor outcomes in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO. Methods: Five year retrospective review, including demographics, cardiac lesion and surgical complexity, reason for ECMO, ECMO complications, and neurodevelopmental status at discharge and latest follow-up. Neurodevelopmental status was determined through the Pediatric Overall Performance Category and Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category scales.Results: Overall ECMO survival was 73% at hospital discharge and 66% a t the latest follow-up. Most patients underwent CPR (43%, and the majority (53% had a significant disease complexity (Aristotle=4. Complications occurred in 42% of the ECMO runs, of which 12% were intracranial injuries. At hospital discharge, 75% of patients had normal to mild disability, improving to 81% at 2 years follow-up. At hospital discharge, moderate to severe disability was associated with CPR, plasma exchange or intracranial insults. After discharge, 23% showed improvement in neurologic status and 4% showed deterioration. Cerebral infarction was the only parameter associated with deterioration at the later follow-up stage.Conclusions: ECMO was successfully used in children with cardiac disease with 73% and 66% short and long-term survival respectively. Majority of the survivors had normal to mild neurodevelopmental disability and a significant portion showed neurologic improvement by the latest follow-up. Nevertheless, despite the grossly favorable outcomes standardized comprehensive neuropsychological testing is of paramount importance in all these patients.

  10. Predictors for outcome among cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrandt-Johansen, Ida Maria; Norsted, Kristine; Schmidt, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundIn the past decade, early treatment of cardiac arrest (CA) victims has been improved in several ways, leading to more optimistic over all prognoses. However, the global survival rate after out-of-hospital CA (OHCA) is still not more than 5-10%. With a better knowledge of the predictors...... determined the 90-day mortality and neurological outcome at discharge for CA patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH), in regard to determine the importance of the predictors for mortality and neurological outcome, with emphasize on combining initial rhythm and time to return of spontaneous...

  11. Hurricane Katrina: Impact on Cardiac Surgery Case Volume and Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bakaeen, Faisal G.; Huh, Joseph; Chu, Danny; Coselli, Joseph S.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Mattox, Kenneth L.; Wall, Matthew J.; Wang, Xing Li; Shenaq, Salwa A.; Atluri, Prasad V.; Awad, Samir S.; Berger, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina produced a surge of patient referrals to our facility for cardiac surgery. We sought to determine the impact of this abrupt volume change on operative outcomes. Using our cardiac surgery database, which is part of the Department of Veterans Affairs' Continuous Improvement in Cardiac Surgery Program, we compared procedural outcomes for all cardiac operations that were performed in the year before the hurricane (Year A, 29 August 2004–28 August 2005) and the year after (Year B...

  12. Early Open-Lung Ventilation Improves Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Left Cardiac Dysfunction Undergoing Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzan, Douglas W.; Gomes, Walter José; Rocco, Isadora S.; Viceconte, Marcela; Nasrala, Mara L. S.; Pauletti, Hayanne O.; Moreira, Rita Simone L.; Hossne Jr, Nelson A.; Arena, Ross; Guizilini, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare pulmonary function, functional capacity and clinical outcomes amongst three groups of patients with left ventricular dysfunction following off-pump coronary artery bypass, namely: 1) conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV); 2) late open lung strategy (L-OLS); and 3) early open lung strategy (E-OLS). Methods Sixty-one patients were randomized into 3 groups: 1) CMV (n=21); 2) L-OLS (n=20) initiated after intensive care unit arrival; and 3) E-OLS (n=20) initiated after intubation. Spirometry was performed at bedside on preoperative and postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, and 5. Partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and pulmonary shunt fraction were evaluated preoperatively and on POD1. The 6-minute walk test was applied on the day before the operation and on POD5. Results Both the open lung groups demonstrated higher forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second on PODs 1, 3 and 5 when compared to the CMV group (P<0.05). The 6-minute walk test distance was more preserved, shunt fraction was lower, and PaO2 was higher in both open-lung groups (P<0.05). Open-lung groups had shorter intubation time and hospital stay and also fewer respiratory events (P<0.05). Key measures were significantly more favorable in the E-OLS group compared to the L-OLS group. Conclusion Both OLSs (L-OLS and E-OLS) were able to promote higher preservation of pulmonary function, greater recovery of functional capacity and better clinical outcomes following off-pump coronary artery bypass when compared to conventional mechanical ventilation. However, in this group of patients with reduced left ventricular function, initiation of the OLS intra-operatively was found to be more beneficial and optimal when compared to OLS initiation after intensive care unit arrival. PMID:27982344

  13. Predictors of cardio pulmonary resuscitation outcome in postoperative cardiac children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bana Agha Nasser

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Higher heart rate, lower core body temperature, lower O2 saturation, and higher lactic acid measured 6 hours before arrest are possible predictors of poorer outcome and mortality following CPR in postoperative cardiac children.

  14. Relationship between labile plasma iron, liver iron concentration and cardiac response in a deferasirox monotherapy trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John C.; Glynos, Tara; Thompson, Alexis; Giardina, Patricia; Harmatz, Paul; Kang, Barinder P.; Paley, Carole; Coates, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    The US04 trial was a multicenter, open-label, single arm trial of deferasirox monotherapy (30–40 mg/kg/day) for 18 months. Cardiac iron response was bimodal with improvements observed in patients with mild to moderate initial somatic iron stores; relationship of cardiac response to labile plasma iron is now presented. Labile plasma iron was measured at baseline, six months, and 12 months. In patients having a favorable cardiac response at 18 months, initial labile plasma iron was elevated in only 31% of patients at baseline and no patient at six or 12 months. Cardiac non-responders had elevated labile plasma iron in 50% of patients at baseline, 50% patients at six months, and 38% of patients at 12 months. Risk of abnormal labile plasma iron and cardiac response increased with initial liver iron concentration. Persistently increased labile plasma iron predicts cardiac non-response to deferasirox but labile plasma iron suppression does not guarantee favorable cardiac outcome. Study registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00447694). PMID:21393329

  15. Cardiac dysfunction after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : Relationship with outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bilt, Ivo; Hasan, Djo; van den Brink, Renee; Cramer, Maarten-Jan; van der Jagt, Mathieu; van Kooten, Fop; Meertens, John; van den Berg, Maarten; Groen, Rob; ten Cate, Folkert; Kamp, Otto; Goette, Marco; Horn, Janneke; Groeneveld, Johan; Vandertop, Peter; Algra, Ale; Visser, Frans; Wilde, Arthur; Rinkel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether cardiac abnormalities after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) are associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and clinical outcome, independent from known clinical risk factors for these outcomes. METHODS: In a prospective, multicenter cohort study, we perfor

  16. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted.

  17. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  18. Cause and Long-Term Outcome of Cardiac Tamponade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Enrique, Cristina; Nuñez-Gil, Iván J; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; De Agustín, Alberto; Vivas, David; Palacios-Rubio, Julián; Vilchez, Jean Paul; Cecconi, Alberto; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening condition, whose current specific cause and outcome are unknown. Our purpose was to analyze it. We performed a retrospective observational study with prospective follow-up data including 136 consecutive patients admitted with diagnosis of cardiac tamponade, from 2003 to 2013. We thoroughly recorded variables as clinical features, drainage/pericardiocentesis, fluid characteristics, and long-term events (new cardiac tamponade ± death). The median age was 65 ± 17 years (55% men). In the baseline characteristics, 70% were no smokers, 12% were on anticoagulation, and 13 had suffered a previous myocardial infarction. In the preceding month, 15 patients had undergone a cardiac catheterization, 5 cardiac surgery, and 5 pacemaker insertion. Fever was observed in 16% of patients and 21% displayed other inflammatory symptoms. In 81% of patients, pericardiocentesis was needed. The fluid was hemorrhagic or a transudate in the majority, with positive cytology in 15% and bacteria in 3.7%. Main causes were malignancy (32%), infection (24%), idiopathic (16%), iatrogenic (15%), postmyocardial infarction (7%), uremic (4%), and other causes (2%). After a maximum follow-up of 10.4 years, cardiac tamponade recurred in 10% of the cases (62% in the neoplastic group) and the 48% of patients died (89% in the neoplastic cohort). In conclusion, most cardiac tamponades are due to malignancy, having this specific cause a poorer outcome, probably as a manifestation of an advanced disease. The rest of causes, after an aggressive intensive management, have a good prognosis, especially the iatrogenic.

  19. Cardiac asthma in elderly patients: incidence, clinical presentation and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Patrick

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac asthma is common, but has been poorly investigated. The objective was to compare the characteristics and outcome of cardiac asthma with that of classical congestive heart failure (CHF in elderly patients. Methods Prospective study in an 1,800-bed teaching hospital. Results Two hundred and twelve consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years presenting with dyspnea due to CHF (mean age of 82 ± 8 years were included. Findings of cardiac echocardiography and natriuretic peptides levels were used to confirm CHF. Cardiac asthma patients were defined as a patient with CHF and wheezing reported by attending physician upon admission to the emergency department. The CHF group (n = 137 and the cardiac asthma group (n = 75, differed for tobacco use (34% vs. 59%, p 2 (47 ± 15 vs. 41 ± 11 mmHg, p Conclusion Patients with cardiac asthma represented one third of CHF in elderly patients. They were more hypercapnic and experienced more distal airway obstruction. However, outcomes were similar.

  20. Outcome of penetrating cardiac injuries in southern Iran,Shiraz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mansour Janati; Shahram Bolandparvaz; Shirvan Salaminia; Hamed Ghoddusi Johari; Babak Sabet; Javad Kojuri

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Cardiac injuries are one of the most challenging injuries in the field of trauma surgery.Their management often requires immediate surgical intervention,excellent surgical technique and the ability to provide excellent postoperative critical care to patients.The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome and survival rate of patients with penetrating cardiac injury in southern Iran,Shiraz.Methods:From January 2001 to June 2007,medical records of all patients suffering from penetrating cardiac injuries were reviewed and their outcomes were investigated.The inclusion criterion was the presence of a confirmed penetrating cardiac injury intraoperatively or by autopsy.Patients with blunt cardiac injuries were excluded from the study.Results:The study consisted of 37 patients,including 1 gunshot wound (2.7%),35 stab wounds (94.6%) and 1 (2.7%)shotgun wound.The overall survival rate was 76% (28 in 37) and that in stab wound patients was 80%.The collected data of 9 expired patients revealed 11% death on arrival,67% hypotensive,and 22% normotensive considering physiologic presentation.Paired sample test showed significant correlation between mortality and electrocardiographic changes,amount of retained blood in pericardium,clinical stage and physiologic condition at presentation,as well as associated injury type (gunshot more than stab wound).Conclusion:Our results show that injury mechanism and initial cardiac rhythm are significant predictors of outcomes in patients with penetrating cardiac injuries.Besides,gunshot injury and exsanguination are the most important predictive variables of mortality.

  1. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCabe Chris

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. Conclusion The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942.

  2. Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest in an Adult Burn Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-07

    Outcomes after cardiac arrest in an adult burn center§,§§ Jonathan C. Wilton, Mark O. Hardin , John D. Ritchie, Kevin K. Chung, James K. Aden...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Wilton J. C., Hardin M. O., Ritchie J. D., Chung K. K., Aden J. K., Cancio L. C., Wolf S. E., White C. E., 5d

  3. Age of transfused blood is not associated with increased postoperative adverse outcome after cardiac surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenny, M

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that storage age of transfused red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with adverse outcome after cardiac surgery, and examined association between volume of RBC transfusions and outcome after cardiac surgery.

  4. Observer bias in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes.......To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes....

  5. A statistical analysis protocol for the time-differentiated target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTH48) clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Pettilä, Ville;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The TTH48 trial aims to determine whether prolonged duration (48 hours) of targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33 (±1) °C results in better neurological outcomes compared to standard duration (24 hours) after six months in comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients...... predetermine covariates for adjusted analyses and pre-specify sub-groups for sensitivity analyses. This pre-planned SAP will reduce analysis bias and add validity to the findings of this trial on the effect of length of TTM on important clinical outcomes after cardiac arrest. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical...

  6. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning and Outcomes of Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hausenloy, DJ; Candilio, L.; Evans, R.; Ariti, C.; Jenkins, DP; Kolvekar, S.; Knight, R.; Laing, C; J. Nicholas; Pepper, J.; Robertson, S; Clayton, T.; Yellon, DM; ERICCA Trial Investigators; GOSS, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether remote ischemic preconditioning (transient ischemia and reperfusion of the arm) can improve clinical outcomes in patients undergoing coronary-artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is not known. We investigated this question in a randomized trial. / METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, sham-controlled trial involving adults at increased surgical risk who were undergoing on-pump CABG (with or without valve surgery) with blood cardioplegia. After anesthesia induction and before ...

  7. The impact of anaemia and intravenous iron replacement therapy on outcomes in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Maurice; Klein, Andrew A; Richards, Toby

    2015-02-01

    Anaemia is common in patients with cardiac disease and also in those undergoing cardiac surgery. There is increasing evidence that preoperative anaemia is associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality following surgery. We performed a systematic literature review to assess the impact of anaemia and intravenous (IV) iron supplementation on outcomes in cardiac surgery. Sixteen studies examined preoperative anaemia in detail. One study examined the role of preoperative IV iron administration and a further three, the effect of postoperative iron supplementation on haemoglobin (Hb) levels and the need for transfusion. Preoperative anaemia was associated with higher mortality, more postoperative blood transfusions, longer intensive care unit (ICU) and total hospital stay and also a greater incidence of postoperative cardiovascular events. In the single study that examined preoperative IV iron in combination with erythropoietin treatment, there was decreased blood transfusion, shorter hospital stay and an increase in patient survival. However, this was a small retrospective cohort study, with the observation and treatment groups analysed over different time periods. Postoperative administration of IV iron therapy, either alone or in combination with erythropoietin, was not effective in raising Hb levels or reducing red cell concentrate transfusion. On the basis of currently available evidence, the effect of perioperative administration of IV iron to cardiac surgery patients, alone or in combination with erythropoietin, remains unproven. Well-designed and appropriately powered prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate perioperative iron supplementation in the context of cardiac surgery.

  8. Outcomes following cardiac surgery in patients with preoperative renal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Hunaid A; Armstrong, Lesley A; Modi, Amit; Barlow, Clifford W

    2014-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was that whether patients who are dependent on chronic dialysis have higher morbidity and mortality rates than the general population when undergoing cardiac surgery. These patients often require surgery in view of their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 278 relevant papers were identified using the below mentioned search, 16 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Dialysis-dependent (DD) patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve replacement have higher morbidity but acceptable outcomes. There is some evidence to show that outcomes after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) are better than after on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (ONCAB) and that results are worse in DD patients with diabetic nephropathy. Patients undergoing combined procedures have a higher mortality.

  9. Trastuzumab-Associated Cardiac Events at 8 Years of Median Follow-Up in the Herceptin Adjuvant Trial (BIG 1-01)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Azambuja, Evandro; Procter, Marion J.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Agbor-Tarh, Dominique; Metzger-Filho, Otto; Steinseifer, Jutta; Untch, Michael; Smith, Ian E.; Gianni, Luca; Baselga, Jose; Jackisch, Christian; Cameron, David A.; Bell, Richard; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Dowsett, Mitch; Gelber, Richard D.; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.; Suter, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To document the rate and outcome of trastuzumab-associated cardiac dysfunction in patients following 1 or 2 years of adjuvant therapy. Patients and Methods The Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial is a three-arm, randomized trial comparing 2 years or 1 year of trastuzumab with observation in 5,10

  10. Subjective and objective outcomes in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moustgaard, Helene; Bello, Segun; Miller, Franklin G

    2014-01-01

    providing a classification of clinical trial outcomes and a descriptive study of how outcomes were classified in 200 PubMed indexed clinical trial reports published in 2012. RESULTS: We identified 90 methodological publications with some form of a classification of outcomes. Three distinct definitions were...... "subjective outcome" and "objective outcome" are defined in methodological publications and clinical trial reports. To put this examination into perspective, we also provide an overview of how outcomes are classified more broadly. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A systematic review of methodological publications...

  11. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS......:We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two......%). Heterogeneity was moderate (I(2) = 46%, p = 0.02) and unexplained by metaregression. INTERPRETATION:We provide empirical evidence for observer bias in randomized clinical trials with subjective measurement scale outcomes. A failure to blind assessors of outcomes in such trials results in a high risk...

  12. Neurodevelopmental outcome after cardiac surgery utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen N Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Modulating the stress response and perioperative factors can have a paramount impact on the neurodevelopmental outcome of infants who undergo cardiac surgery utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass. Materials and Methods: In this single center prospective follow-up study, we evaluated the impact of three different anesthetic techniques on the neurodevelopmental outcomes of 19 children who previously underwent congenital cardiac surgery within their 1 st year of life. Cases were done from May 2011 to December 2013. Children were assessed using the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (5 th edition. Multiple regression analysis was used to test different parental and perioperative factors that could significantly predict the different neurodevelopmental outcomes in the entire cohort of patients. Results: When comparing the three groups regarding the major cognitive scores, a high-dose fentanyl (HDF patients scored significantly higher than the low-dose fentanyl (LDF + dexmedetomidine (DEX (LDF + DEX group in the quantitative reasoning scores (106 ± 22 vs. 82 ± 15 P = 0.046. The bispectral index (BIS value at the end of surgery for the -LDF group was significantly higher than that in LDF + DEX group (P = 0.011. For the entire cohort, a strong correlation was seen between the standard verbal intelligence quotient (IQ score and the baseline adrenocorticotropic hormone level, the interleukin-6 level at the end of surgery and the BIS value at the end of the procedure with an R 2 value of 0.67 and P < 0.04. There was an inverse correlation between the cardiac Intensive Care Unit length of stay and the full-scale IQ score (R = 0.4675 and P 0.027. Conclusions: Patients in the HDF group demonstrated overall higher neurodevelopmental scores, although it did not reach statistical significance except in fluid reasoning scores. Our results may point to a possible correlation between blunting the stress response and improvement of the neurodevelopmental

  13. Effect of antioxidant vitamin supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhou Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antioxidant vitamin (vitamin E, beta-carotene, and vitamin C are widely used for preventing major cardiovascular outcomes. However, the effect of antioxidant vitamin on cardiovascular events remains unclear. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched PubMed, EmBase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the proceedings of major conferences for relevant literature. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials that reported on the effects of antioxidant vitamin on cardiovascular outcomes as compared to placebo. Outcomes analyzed were major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac death, total death, and any possible adverse events. We used the I(2 statistic to measure heterogeneity between trials and calculated risk estimates for cardiovascular outcomes with random-effect meta-analysis. Independent extraction was performed by two reviewers and consensus was reached. Of 293 identified studies, we included 15 trials reporting data on 188209 participants. These studies reported 12749 major cardiovascular events, 6699 myocardial infarction, 3749 strokes, 14122 total death, and 5980 cardiac deaths. Overall, antioxidant vitamin supplementation as compared to placebo had no effect on major cardiovascular events (RR, 1.00; 95%CI, 0.96-1.03, myocardial infarction (RR, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.92-1.04, stroke (RR, 0.99; 95%CI, 0.93-1.05, total death (RR, 1.03; 95%CI, 0.98-1.07, cardiac death (RR, 1.02; 95%CI, 0.97-1.07, revascularization (RR, 1.00; 95%CI, 0.95-1.05, total CHD (RR, 0.96; 95%CI, 0.87-1.05, angina (RR, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.90-1.07, and congestive heart failure (RR, 1.07; 95%CI, 0.96 to 1.19. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Antioxidant vitamin supplementation has no effect on the incidence of major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke, total death, and cardiac death.

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation adapted to transient ischaemic attack and stroke (CRAFTS: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Catherine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary Heart Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease share many predisposing, modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle interventions and pharmacological therapy are recognised as the cornerstones of secondary prevention. Cochrane review has proven the benefits of programmes incorporating exercise and lifestyle counselling in the cardiac disease population. A Cochrane review highlighted as priority, the need to establish feasibility and efficacy of exercise based interventions for Cerebrovascular Disease. Methods A single blind randomised controlled trial is proposed to examine a primary care cardiac rehabilitation programme for adults post transient ischemic attack (TIA and stroke in effecting a positive change in the primary outcome measures of cardiac risk scores derived from Blood Pressure, lipid profile, smoking and diabetic status and lifestyle factors of habitual smoking, exercise and healthy eating participation. Secondary outcomes of interest include health related quality of life as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Stroke Specific Quality of Life scale and WONCA COOP Functional Health Status charts and cardiovascular fitness as measured by a sub-maximal fitness test. A total of 144 patients, over 18 years of age with confirmed diagnosis of ischaemic stroke or TIA, will be recruited from Dublin community stroke services and two tertiary T.I.A clinics. Exclusion criteria will include oxygen dependence, unstable cardiac conditions, uncontrolled diabetes, major medical conditions, claudication, febrile illness, pregnancy or cognitive impairment. Participants will be block-statified, randomly allocated to one of two groups using a pre-prepared computer generated randomisation schedule. Both groups will receive a two hour education class on risk reduction post stroke. The

  15. Role of prophylactic coronary revascularisation in improving cardiovascular outcomes during non-cardiac surgery: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahat, T; Nguyen, T; Latif, F

    2016-10-01

    Coronary revascularisation has been a topic of debate for over three decades in patients undergoing high-risk non-cardiac surgery. The paradigm shifted from routine coronary angiography toward stress test guided decision-making based on larger randomised trials. However, this paradigm is challenged by relatively newer data where routine coronary angiography and revascularisation is shown to improve perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. We review major studies performed over a long period including more contemporary data with regard to the 2014 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association as well as 2014 European Society of Cardiology guideline on perioperative cardiovascular evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

  16. Outcome of children with Pentalogy of Cantrell following cardiac surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Gorman, Clodagh S

    2012-02-01

    Although single individual reports have documented outcomes in children with pentalogy of are few data available for postoperative outcome of this cohort of patients after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the clinical details of patients with pentalogy of Cantrell managed at two centers. Two cardiac surgical institutions retrospectively studied all patients with pentalogy of Cantrell and significant congenital heart disease who underwent surgical intervention, excluding PDA ligation, between 1992 and 2004. Seven children with pentalogy of Cantrell underwent surgical intervention at a median age of 60 days (range, 1-11 months). Three patients had tetralogy of Fallot, two double outlet right ventricle, one patient had tricuspid atresia, and one patient a perimembranous ventricular septal defect. The mean duration of postoperative ventilation was 112.8 days (range, 4-335 days) but three patients required ventilation for more than 100 days. Patients who had a preoperative diaphragmatic plication required a longer duration of ventilation (mean = 186.5 days [range, 100-273 days] compared with mean = 132 days [range, 4-335 days]). Four patients survived, with three patients weaned from ventilation. Three patients had withdrawal of care following failure to wean from ventilation, following multisystem organ failure, and at the request of their parents. In conclusion, the postoperative care of children with pentalogy of Cantrell after cardiac surgery is often complicated by prolonged need for ventilatory support and multiple postoperative complications. Earlier surgical intervention does not necessarily reduce morbidity and mortality. These data may help in the counseling of parents prior to surgical intervention.

  17. Late Post-Conditioning with Sevoflurane after Cardiac Surgery--Are Surrogate Markers Associated with Clinical Outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Bonvini

    events in the 6-month period following cardiac surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation. However, there was a clear trend towards fewer interventions (less need for treatment, fewer hospital admissions associated with sevoflurane post-conditioning in patients experiencing any event. Such results might encourage launching large multicenter post-conditioning trials with clinical outcome defined as primary endpoint.

  18. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid T Berg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pack versus heat pack only. The primary outcome was pain intensity after the intervention period and 3 months after the last treatment session, measured by Visual Analogue Scale, 0 to 100. Secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Results: Treatment with deep friction massage and heat pack gave significant pain reduction compared to heat pack only (–17.6, 95% confidence interval: –30.5, –4.7; p < 0.01, and the reduction was persistent at 3 months’ follow-up (–15.2, 95% confidence interval: –28.5, –1.8; p = 0.03. Health-related quality of life improved in all three domains in patients with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: Deep friction massage combined with heat pack is an efficient treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

  19. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  20. Patient Outcomes of an International Telepediatric Cardiac Critical Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Andrea Victoria; Welchering, Nils; Bermon, Anderson; Castillo, Victor; Duran, Álvaro; Castro, Javier; Muñoz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: An optimal model for telemedicine use in the international care setting has not been established. Our objective was to describe variables associated with patient outcome during the implementation of an international pediatric cardiac critical care (PCCC) telemedicine program. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of clinical records and a telemedicine database of patients admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) at the Fundacion Cardiovascular de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Colombia, during the initial 10 months of our program, compared with patients admitted during a previous period. Information collected included demographic data, cardiac diagnosis and associated factors, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 classification, and perioperative events. Primary outcome was composed of CICU and hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were CICU and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: Of the 553 patients who were included, teleconsultation was done for 71 (12.4%), with a total of 156 encounters, including 19 for patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Three hundred twenty-one recommendations were given, and 42 real-time interventions were documented. RACHS-1 distribution was similar between study periods (p=0.427). Teleconsulted patients were significantly younger (44 versus 24 months; p=0.03) and had higher surgical complexity than nonteleconsulted patients (p=0.01). RACHS-1 adjusted hospital survival was similar between study periods. CICU and hospital LOS intervals were significantly shorter in the telemedicine period (10 versus 17 days [p=0.02] and 22 versus 28 days [p<0.001]). In surgical cases, preoperative CICU LOS was significantly shorter (3 versus 6 days; p<0.001). Variables associated with hospital mortality were higher RACHS-1 categories, lower weight, bypass time longer than 150 min, and use of circulatory arrest, as well as the presence of sepsis or necrotizing enterocolitis

  1. Outcome measures in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, Sabrina; Cudkowicz, Merit; Berry, James D

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease with an average survival of 3–5 years. While therapies for ALS remain limited, basic and translational ALS research has been host to numerous influential discoveries in recent years. These discoveries have led to a large pipeline of potential therapies that await testing in clinical trials. Until recently, ALS clinical trials have relied on a limited cadre of ‘traditional’ outcome measures, including survival and measures of function. These measures have proven useful, although imperfect, in Phase III ALS trials. However, their utility in early-phase ALS trials is limited. For these early trials, outcome measures focused on target engagement or biological pathway analysis might improve trial outcomes and better support the drug development process.

  2. A randomised clinical trial of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated for infective endocarditis—the CopenHeartIE trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Risom, Signe Stelling; Bundgaard, Henning; Gluud, Christian; Moons, Philip; Winkel, Per; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Norekvål, Tone Merete; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Infective endocarditis (IE) is among the most serious infectious diseases in the western world. Treatment requires lengthy hospitalisation, high-dosage antibiotic therapy and possible valve replacement surgery. Despite advances in treatment, the 1-year mortality remains at 20–40%. Studies indicate that patients experience persisting physical symptoms, diminished quality of life and difficulties returning to work up to a year postdischarge. No studies investigating the effects of rehabilitation have been published. We present the rationale and design of the CopenHeartIE trial, which investigates the effect of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated for IE. Methods and analysis We will conduct a randomised clinical trial to investigate the effects of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care on the physical and psychosocial functioning of patients treated for IE. The trial is a multicentre, parallel design trial with 1 : 1 individual randomisation to either the intervention or control group. The intervention consists of five psychoeducational consultations provided by specialised nurses and a 12-week exercise training programme. The primary outcome is mental health (MH) measured by the standardised Short Form 36 (SF-36). The secondary outcome is peak oxygen uptake measured by the bicycle ergospirometry test. Furthermore, a number of exploratory analyses will be performed. Based on sample size calculation, 150 patients treated for left-sided (native or prosthetic valve) or cardiac device endocarditis will be included in the trial. A qualitative and a survey-based complementary study will be undertaken, to investigate postdischarge experiences of the patients. A qualitative postintervention study will explore rehabilitation participation experiences. Ethics and dissemination The study complies with the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the regional research ethics committee (no H-1

  3. Single versus Serial Measurements of Neuron-Specific Enolase and Prediction of Poor Neurological Outcome in Persistently Unconscious Patients after Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - A TTM-Trial Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Stammet, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    were included from sites participating in the TTM-trial biobank sub study. NSE was measured at 24, 48 and 72 hours after ROSC and follow-up was concluded after 180 days. The primary end point was poor neurological function or death defined by a cerebral performance category score (CPC-score) of 3 to 5...

  4. A Framework for Designing Cluster Randomized Trials with Binary Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Martinez, Andres

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a frame work for approaching a power analysis for a CRT (cluster randomized trial) with a binary outcome. The authors suggest a framework in the context of a simple CRT and then extend it to a blocked design, or a multi-site cluster randomized trial (MSCRT). The framework is based on proportions, an…

  5. Patient reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials: is 'in-trial' guidance lacking? a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Kyte, DG; Draper, H; Ives, J.; Liles, C; Gheorghe, A.; Calvert, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on 'in-trial' activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting) and the management of 'concerning' PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant) appears to be lacking. The purpose of this revie...

  6. Centrifugal pump and roller pump in adult cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saczkowski, Richard; Maklin, Michelle; Mesana, Thierry; Boodhwani, Munir; Ruel, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Centrifugal pump (CP) and roller pump (RP) designs are the dominant main arterial pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Trials reporting clinical outcome measures comparing CP and RP are controversial. Therefore, a meta-analysis was undertaken to evaluate clinical variables from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Keyword searches were performed on Medline (1966-2011), EmBase (1980-2011), and CINAHL (1981-2011) for studies comparing RP and CP as the main arterial pump in adult CPB. Pooled fixed-effects estimates for dichotomous and continuous data were calculated as an odds ratio and weighted-mean difference, respectively. The P value was utilized to assess statistical significance (P pump-related malfunction or mishap. The meta-analysis of RCTs comparing CP and RP in adult cardiac surgery suggests no significant difference for hematological variables, postoperative blood loss, transfusions, neurological outcomes, or mortality.

  7. Outcome Measures in Clinical Trials for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Munster, Caspar E P; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J

    2017-02-09

    Due to the heterogeneous nature of the disease, it is a challenge to capture disease activity of multiple sclerosis (MS) in a reliable and valid way. Therefore, it can be difficult to assess the true efficacy of interventions in clinical trials. In phase III trials in MS, the traditionally used primary clinical outcome measures are the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the relapse rate. Secondary outcome measures in these trials are the number or volume of T2 hyperintense lesions and gadolinium-enhancing T1 lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. These secondary outcome measures are often primary outcome measures in phase II trials in MS. Despite several limitations, the traditional clinical measures are still the mainstay for assessing treatment efficacy. Newer and potentially valuable outcome measures increasingly used or explored in MS trials are, clinically, the MS Functional Composite and patient-reported outcome measures, and on MRI, brain atrophy and the formation of persisting black holes. Several limitations of these measures have been addressed and further improvements will probably be proposed. Major improvements are the coverage of additional functional domains such as cognitive functioning and assessment of the ability to carry out activities of daily living. The development of multidimensional measures is promising because these measures have the potential to cover the full extent of MS activity and progression. In this review, we provide an overview of the historical background and recent developments of outcome measures in MS trials. We discuss the advantages and limitations of various measures, including newer assessments such as optical coherence tomography, biomarkers in body fluids and the concept of 'no evidence of disease activity'.

  8. Outcome Measures for Clinical Drug Trials in Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Aman, Michael G; Novotny, Sherie; Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Lecavalier, Luc; Leonard, Elizabeth; Gadow, Kenneth D.; King, Bryan H; Pearson, Deborah A.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Chez, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper identifies instruments and measures that may be appropriate for randomized clinical trials in participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The Clinical Global Impressions scale was recommended for all randomized clinical trials. At this point, however, there is no “perfect” choice of outcome measure for core features of autism, although we will discuss five measures of potential utility. Several communication instruments are recommended, based in part on suitability across t...

  9. Near death experiences, cognitive function and psychological outcomes of surviving cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnia, S; Spearpoint, K; Fenwick, P B

    2007-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with a number of cognitive processes as well as long term psychological outcomes. Recent studies have indicated that approximately 10-20% of cardiac arrest survivors report cognitive processes, including the ability to recall specific details of their resuscitation from the period of cardiac arrest. In addition it has been demonstrated that these cognitive processes are consistent with the previously described near death experience and that those who have these experiences are left with long term positive life enhancing effects. There have also been numerous studies that have indicated that although the quality of life for cardiac arrest survivors is generally good, some are left with long term cognitive impairments as well as psychological sequelae such as post-traumatic stress disorder. This paper will review near death experiences, cognitive function and psychological outcomes in survivors of cardiac arrest.

  10. Automated external cardioversion defibrillation monitoring in cardiac arrest: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norvel Robert

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In-hospital cardiac arrest has a poor prognosis despite active electrocardiography monitoring. The initial rhythm of approximately 25% of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR events is pulseless ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF. Early defibrillation is an independent predictor of survival in CPR events caused by VT/VF. The automated external cardioverter defibrillator (AECD is a device attached by pads to the chest wall that monitors, detects, and within seconds, automatically delivers electric countershock to an appropriate tachyarrhythmia. Study Objectives • To evaluate safety of AECD monitoring in hospitalized patients. • To evaluate whether AECDs provide earlier defibrillation than hospital code teams. Methods The study is a prospective trial randomizing patients admitted to the telemetry ward to standard CPR (code team or standard CPR plus AECD monitoring (PowerHeart CRM. The AECD is programmed to deliver one 150 J biphasic shock to patients in sustained VT/VF. Data is collected using the Utstein criteria for cardiac arrest. The primary endpoint is time-to-defibrillation; secondary outcomes include neurological status and survival to discharge, with 3-year follow-up. Results To date, 192 patients have been recruited in the time period between 10/10/2006 to 7/20/2007. A total of 3,655 hours of telemetry data have been analyzed in the AECD arm. The AECD has monitored ambulatory telemetry patients in sinus rhythm, sinus tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter or fibrillation, with premature ventricular complexes and non-sustained VT without delivery of inappropriate shocks. One patient experienced sustained VT during AECD monitoring, who was successfully defibrillated (17 seconds after meeting programmed criteria. There are no events to report in the control arm. The patient survived the event without neurological complications. During the same time period, mean time to

  11. The Association Between Arterial Oxygen Tension and Neurological Outcome After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas J; Dodampahala, Kalani; Rosselot, Babette; Perman, Sarah M; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Goyal, Munish; Gaieski, David F; Grossestreuer, Anne V

    2017-03-01

    A number of observational studies have evaluated the association between arterial oxygen tensions and outcome after cardiac arrest with variable results. The objective of this study is to determine the association between arterial oxygen tension and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed using the Penn Alliance for Therapeutic Hypothermia registry. Adult patients who experienced return of spontaneous circulation after in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and had a partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) recorded within 48 hours were included. Our primary exposure of interest was PaO2. Hyperoxemia was defined as PaO2 > 300 mmHg, hypoxemia as PaO2 arterial oxygen tension measured within the first 48 hours after cardiac arrest and neurological outcome.

  12. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton;

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding...

  13. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton;

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding and k...

  14. Serial plasma choline measurements after cardiac arrest in patients undergoing mild therapeutic hypothermia: a prospective observational pilot trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Storm

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Choline is related to phospholipid metabolism and is a marker for global ischaemia with a small reference range in healthy volunteers. The aim of our study was to characterize the early kinetics of plasma free choline in patients after cardiac arrest. Additionally, we investigated the potential of plasma free choline to predict neurological outcome. METHODS: Twenty patients admitted to our medical intensive care unit were included in this prospective, observational trial. All patients were enrolled between May 2010 and May 2011. They received post cardiac arrest treatment including mild therapeutic hypothermia which was initiated with a combination of cold fluid and a feedback surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Sixteen blood samples per patient were analysed for plasma free choline levels within the first week after resuscitation. Choline was detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Most patients showed elevated choline levels on admission (median 14.8 µmol/L; interquartile range; IQR 9.9-20.1 which subsequently decreased. 48 hours after cardiac arrest choline levels in all patients reached subnormal levels at a median of 4.0 µmol/L (IQR 3-4.9; p = 0.001. Subsequently, choline levels normalized within seven days. There was no significant difference in choline levels when groups were analyzed in relation to neurological outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate a choline deficiency in the early postresucitation phase. This could potentially result in impaired cell membrane recovery. The detailed characterization of the early choline time course may aid in planning of choline supplementation trials. In a limited number of patients, choline was not promising as a biomarker for outcome prediction.

  15. Outcome after surgical repair of congenital cardiac malformations at school age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, R.E.A. van der; Maassen, B.A.M.; Walk, T.L.M.; Daniels, O.; Hulstijn-Dirkmaat, G.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the long-term physical, educational, behavioural, and emotional outcome of patients undergoing surgical correction of congenital cardiac disease at school age, and to investigate the relation, if any, between the outcome and comorbidity, age and sex, and level of complexity of

  16. Effect of perioperative beta blockade in patients with diabetes undergoing major non-cardiac surgery: randomised placebo controlled, blinded multicentre trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anne Benedicte; Wetterslev, Jørn; Gluud, Christian;

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the long term effects of perioperative blockade on mortality and cardiac morbidity in patients with diabetes undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Design Randomised placebo controlled and blinded multicentre trial. Analyses were by intention to treat. Setting University...... anaesthesia and surgical centres and one coordinating centre. Participants 921 patients aged > 39 scheduled for major non-cardiac surgery. Interventions 100 mg metoprolol controlled and extended release or placebo administered from the day before surgery to a maximum of eight perioperative days. Main outcome...... was 4.6 days in the metoprolol group and 4.9 days in the placebo group. Metoprolol significantly reduced the mean heart rate by 11% (95% confidence interval 9% to 13%) and mean blood pressure by 3% (1% to 5%). The primary outcome occurred in 99 of 462 patients in the metoprolol group (21%) and 93 of 459...

  17. Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest (ALASCA and the effectiveness of an early intervention service: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakx Wilbert GM

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac arrest survivors may experience hypoxic brain injury that results in cognitive impairments which frequently remain unrecognised. This may lead to limitations in daily activities and participation in society, a decreased quality of life for the patient, and a high strain for the caregiver. Publications about interventions directed at improving quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest are scarce. Therefore, evidence about effective rehabilitation programmes for cardiac arrest survivors is urgently needed. This paper presents the design of the ALASCA (Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest trial, a randomised, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effects of a new early intervention service for survivors of a cardiac arrest and their caregivers. Methods/design The study population comprises all people who survive two weeks after a cardiac arrest and are admitted to one of the participating hospitals in the Southern part of the Netherlands. In a two-group randomised, controlled clinical trial, half of the participants will receive an early intervention service. The early intervention service consists of several consultations with a specialised nurse for the patient and their caregiver during the first three months after the cardiac arrest. The intervention is directed at screening for cognitive problems, provision of informational, emotional and practical support, and stimulating self-management. If necessary, referral to specialised care can take place. Persons in the control group will receive the care as usual. The primary outcome measures are the extent of participation in society and quality of life of the patient one year after a cardiac arrest. Secondary outcome measures are the level of cognitive, emotional and cardiovascular impairment and daily functioning of the patient, as well as the strain for and quality of life of the caregiver. Participants and their caregivers will be followed

  18. Outcome of community-acquired pneumonia with cardiac complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eman Shebl

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Cardiac complications are common in the admitted patients with pneumonia and they are associated with increased pneumonia severity and increased cardiovascular risk, these complications adds to the risk of mortality, so optimal management of these events may reduce the burden of death associated with this infection.

  19. Management and outcome of cardiac and endovascular cystic echinococcosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Díaz-Menéndez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic echinococcosis (CE can affect the heart and the vena cava but few cases are reported. METHODS: A retrospective case series of 11 patients with cardiac and/or endovascular CE, followed-up over a period of 15 years (1995-2009 is reported. RESULTS: Main clinical manifestations included thoracic pain or dyspnea, although 2 patients were asymptomatic. Cysts were located mostly in the right atrium and inferior vena cava. Nine patients were previously diagnosed with disseminated CE. Echocardiography was the diagnostic method of choice, although serology, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and histology aided with diagnosis and follow-up. Nine patients underwent cardiac surgery and nine received long-term antiparasitic treatment for a median duration of 25 months (range 4-93 months. One patient died intra-operatively due to cyst rupture and endovascular dissemination. Two patients died 10 and 14 years after diagnosis, due to pulmonary embolism (PE and cardiac failure, respectively. One patient was lost to follow-up. Patients who had cardiac involvement exclusively did not have complications after surgery and were considered cured. There was only one recurrence requiring a second operation. Patients with vena cava involvement developed PEs and presented multiple complications. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiovascular CE is associated with a high risk of potentially lethal complications. Clinical manifestations and complications vary according to cyst location. Isolated cardiac CE may be cured after surgery, while endovascular extracardiac involvement is associated with severe chronic complications. CE should be included in the differential diagnosis of cardiovascular disease in patients from endemic areas.

  20. Trastuzumab-associated cardiac adverse effects in the herceptin adjuvant trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suter, Thomas M.; Procter, Marion; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Muscholl, Michael; Bergh, Jonas; Carlomagno, Chiara; Perren, Timothy; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Bighin, Claudia; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Ageev, Fail T.; Hitre, Erika; Groetz, Juergen; Iwata, Hiroji; Knap, Malgorzata; Gnant, Michael; Muehlbauer, Susanne; Spence, Alison; Gelber, Richard D.; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to investigate trastuzumab- associated cardiac adverse effects in breast cancer patients after completion of ( neo) adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy. Patients and Methods The Herceptin Adjuvant ( HERA) trial is a three- group, multicenter, o

  1. Patient reported outcomes (PROs in clinical trials: is 'in-trial' guidance lacking? a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G Kyte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcomes (PROs are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on 'in-trial' activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting and the management of 'concerning' PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant appears to be lacking. The purpose of this review was to determine the extent and nature of published guidelines addressing these areas. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Systematic review of 1,362 articles identified 18 eligible papers containing 'in-trial' guidelines. Two independent authors undertook a qualitative content analysis of the selected papers. Guidelines presented in each of the articles were coded according to an a priori defined coding frame, which demonstrated reliability (pooled Kappa 0.86-0.97, and validity (<2% residual category coding. The majority of guidelines present were concerned with 'pre-trial' activities (72%, for example, outcome measure selection and study design issues, or 'post-trial' activities (16% such as data analysis, reporting and interpretation. 'In-trial' guidelines represented 9.2% of all guidance across the papers reviewed, with content primarily focused on compliance, quality control, proxy assessment and reporting of data collection. There were no guidelines surrounding the management of concerning PRO data. CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight there are minimal in-trial guidelines in publication regarding PRO data collection and management in clinical trials. No guidance appears to exist for researchers involved with the handling of concerning PRO data. Guidelines are needed, which support researchers to manage all PRO data appropriately and which facilitate unbiased data collection.

  2. Feasibility and effects of adapted cardiac rehabilitation after stroke: a prospective trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzolini Susan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the cardiovascular etiology of stroke, exercise and risk factor modification programs akin to cardiac rehabilitation (CR are not available. This study aimed to establish the feasibility of adapting a CR model for individuals with mild to moderate stroke disability. A secondary objective was to determine the program's effects on aerobic and walking capacity, and stroke risk factors. Methods A repeated measures design was used with a 3-month baseline period and 6-month adapted CR intervention (n = 43, mean ± SD age 65 ± 12 years, 30 ± 28 months post stroke. Feasibility was determined by the number of participants who completed the study, occurrence of adverse events and frequency, duration and intensity of exercise performed. To determine effectiveness of the program, outcomes measured included aerobic capacity (VO2peak, ventilatory threshold, 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT distance, and risk factors. Descriptive statistics characterized the classes attended and number and intensity of exercise sessions. Paired t-tests, one-factor repeated measures analyses of variance contrasts and chi-square analyses were used to compare changes over time. Results Two participants withdrew during the baseline period. Of the remaining 41 participants who commenced the program, 38 (93% completed all aspects. No serious adverse effects occurred. Post-intervention, VO2peak improved relative to the stable baseline period (P = 0.046 and the increase in ventilatory threshold approached significance (P = 0.062. Conclusions CR is feasible after stroke and may be adapted to accommodate for those with a range of post-stroke disability. It is effective in increasing aerobic capacity. CR may be an untapped opportunity for stroke survivors to access programs of exercise and risk factor modification to lower future event risk. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT01067495

  3. Association of Circulating MicroRNA-124-3p Levels With Outcomes After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devaux, Yvan; Dankiewicz, Josef; Salgado-Somoza, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    and survival of patients with cardiac arrest after targeted temperature management at 33°C or 36°C. Five hundred seventy-nine patients who survived the first 24 hours after the return of spontaneous circulation and who had blood samples available for miRNA assessment were enrolled from 29 intensive care units...... in 9 countries from November 11, 2010, to January 10, 2013. Final follow-up was completed on July 3, 2013, and data were assessed from February 1, 2014, to February 1, 2016. INTERVENTIONS: Blood sampling at 48 hours after the return of spontaneous circulation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary...... end point was poor neurologic outcome at 6 months (cerebral performance category score, 3 [severe neurologic sequelae], 4 [coma], or 5 [death]). The secondary end point was survival until the end of the trial. Circulating levels of miRNAs were measured by sequencing and polymerase chain reaction...

  4. Design and rationale of the PRAGUE-12 trial: a large, prospective, randomized, multicenter trial that compares cardiac surgery with left atrial surgical ablation with cardiac surgery without ablation in patients with coronary and/or valvular heart disease plus atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Zbyněk; Budera, Petr; Osmančík, Pavel; Vaněk, Tomáš; Hulman, Michal; Smíd, Michal; Malý, Marek; Widimský, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Surgical ablation procedure can restore sinus rhythm (SR) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing cardiac surgery. However, it is not known whether it has any impact on clinical outcomes. There is a need for a randomized trial with long-term follow-up to study the outcome of surgical ablation in patients with coronary and/or valve disease and AF. Patients are prospectively enrolled and randomized either to group A (cardiac surgery with left atrial ablation) or group B (cardiac surgery alone). The primary efficacy outcome is the SR presence (without any AF episode) during a 24-hour electrocardiogram after 1 year. The primary safety outcome is the combined end point of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and renal failure at 30 days. Long-term outcomes are a composite of total mortality, stroke, bleeding, and heart failure at 1 and 5 years. We finished the enrollment with a total of 224 patients from 3 centers in 2 countries in December 2011. Currently, the incomplete 1-year data are available, and the patients who enrolled first will have their 5-year visits shortly. PRAGUE-12 is the largest study to be conducted so far comparing cardiac surgery with surgical ablation of AF to cardiac surgery without ablation in an unselected population of patients who are operated on for coronary and/or valve disease. Its long-term results will lead to a better recognition of ablation's potential clinical benefits.

  5. Reporting outcomes of back pain trials: A modified Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froud, Robert; Eldridge, Sandra; Kovacs, Francisco;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a common and expensive health complaint. Many low back pain trials have been conducted, but these are reported in a variety of ways and are often difficult to interpret. AIM: To facilitate consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for future low back pain...... commonly used in back pain trials, are reported using between-group mean differences (accompanied by minimally important difference (between-group/population-level) thresholds where these exist), the proportion of participants improving and deteriorating according to established and relevant minimally...... pain experts reached a high level of consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for patient-reported outcomes in future low back pain trials. The statement has the potential to increase interpretability and improve patient care....

  6. Outcome Measures for Clinical Drug Trials in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Michael G.; Novotny, Sherie; Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Lecavalier, Luc; Leonard, Elizabeth; Gadow, Kenneth D.; King, Bryan H.; Pearson, Deborah A.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Chez, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies instruments and measures that may be appropriate for randomized clinical trials in participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The Clinical Global Impressions scale was recommended for all randomized clinical trials. At this point, however, there is no “perfect” choice of outcome measure for core features of autism, although we will discuss five measures of potential utility. Several communication instruments are recommended, based in part on suitability across the age range. In trials where the intention is to alter core features of ASDs, adaptive behavior scales are also worthy of consideration. Several “behavior complexes” common to ASDs are identified, and instruments are recommended for assessment of these. Given the prevalence of cognitive impairment in ASDs, it is important to assess any cognitive effects, although cognitive data from ASD randomized clinical trials, thus far, are minimal. Guidance from trials in related pharmacologic areas and behavioral pharmacology may be helpful. We recommend routine elicitation of side effects, height and weight, vital signs, and (in the case of antipsychotics) extrapyramidal side-effects assessment. It is often appropriate to include laboratory tests and assessments for continence and sleep pattern. PMID:14999174

  7. Voiding trial outcome following pelvic floor repair without incontinence procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Won, Sara; Haviland, Miriam J.; Bargen, Emily Von; Hacker, Michele R.; Li, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Our aim was to identify predictors of postoperative voiding trial failure among patients who had a pelvic floor repair without a concurrent incontinence procedure in order to identify low-risk patients in whom postoperative voiding trials may be modified. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent pelvic floor repair without concurrent incontinence procedures at two institutions from 1 November 2011 through 13 October 2013 after abstracting demographic and clinical data from medical records. The primary outcome was postoperative retrograde voiding trial failure. We used modified Poisson regression to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 371 women who met eligibility criteria, 294 (79.2 %) had complete data on the variables of interest. Forty nine (16.7%) failed the trial, and those women were less likely to be white (p = 0.04), more likely to have had an anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.001), and more likely to have had a preoperative postvoid residual (PVR) ≥150 ml (p = 0.001). After adjusting for race, women were more likely to fail their voiding trial if they had a preoperative PVR of ≥150 ml (RR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.1–3.2); institution also was associated with voiding trial failure (RR: 3.0; 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4). Conclusions Among our cohort, postoperative voiding trial failure was associated with a PVR of ≥150 ml and institution at which the surgery was performed. PMID:26886553

  8. Outcome of kidney transplantation between controlled cardiac death and brain death donors: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yingzi; Shao Mingjie; Tian Tingting; She Xingguo; Liu Hong; Ye Shaojun; Ye Qifa

    2014-01-01

    Background Our goal was to evaluate the outcomes of kidney transplants from controlled cardiac death donors compared with brain death donors by conducting a meta-analysis of cohort studies.Methods The PubMed database and EMBASE were searched from January 1980 to July 2013 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria.Reference lists of retrieved articles were also reviewed.Two authors independently extracted information on the designs of the studies,the characteristics of the study participants,and outcome assessments.Results Nine cohort studies involving 84 398 participants were included in this meta-analysis; 3 014 received kidneys from controlled cardiac death donors and 80 684 from brain death donors.Warm ischemia time was significantly longer for the controlled cardiac death donor group.The incidence of delayed graft function was 2.74 times (P <0.001) greater in the controlled cardiac death donor group.The results are in favor of the brain death donor group on short-term patient and graft survival while this difference became nonsignificant at mid-term and long term.Sensitivity analysis yielded similar results.No evidence of publication bias was observed.Conclusion This meta-analysis of retrospective cohort studies suggests that the outcome after controlled cardiac death donors is comparable with that obtained using kidneys from brain death donors.

  9. Outcome Management in Cardiac Surgery Using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Linda S; Gallardo, Bret E; Speir, Alan M; Ad, Niv

    2016-09-01

    Health care reform has helped streamline patient care and reimbursement by encouraging providers to provide the best outcome for the best value. Institutions with cardiac surgery programs need a methodology to monitor and improve outcomes linked to reimbursement. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database (STSND) is a tool for monitoring outcomes and improving care. This article identifies the purpose, goals, and reporting system of the STSND and ways these data can be used for benchmarking, linking outcomes to the effectiveness of treatment, and identifying factors associated with mortality and complications. We explain the methodology used at Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, Falls Church, Virginia, to perform outcome management by using the STSND and address our performance-improvement cycle through discussion of data collection, analysis, and outcome reporting. We focus on the revision of clinical practice and offer examples of how patient outcomes have been improved using this methodology.

  10. Health outcomes with and without use of inotropic therapy in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorthe Viemose; Hansen, Malene Kærslund; Johnsen, Søren Paaske;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inotropes used to obtain short-term hemodynamic benefits in cardiac surgery may carry a risk of increased myocardial ischemia and adverse outcomes. This study investigated the association between intra- and postoperative use of inotropes and mortality and postoperative complications. ...

  11. Study of pregnancy outcome in women with cardiac disease: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Pandey

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Heart disease in pregnancy is a high risk condition and has a major impact on pregnancy outcome. Rheumatic heart disease being the prominent cardiac lesion. Fetomaternal mortality and morbidity can be reduced with proper antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care in conjunction with cardiologist and neonatologist. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(10.000: 3537-3541

  12. Randomised controlled trials of iron chelators for the treatment of cardiac siderosis in thalassaemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun John Baksi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In conditions requiring repeated blood transfusion or where iron metabolism is abnormal, heart failure may result from accumulation of iron in the heart (cardiac siderosis. Death due to heart failure from cardiac iron overload has accounted for considerable early mortality in β-thalassemia major. The ability to detect iron loading in the heart by cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2* sequences has created an opportunity to intervene in the natural history of such conditions. However, effective and well tolerated therapy is required to remove iron from the heart. There are currently 3 approved commercially available iron chelators: deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox. We review the high quality randomised controlled trials in this area for iron chelation therapy in the management of cardiac siderosis.

  13. Cardiac safety of citalopram: prospective trials and retrospective analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Poul Lind; Overø, K F; Tanghøj, P

    1999-01-01

    of citalopram on ECG parameters. Results of both prospective and retrospective analyses showed that the only effect of citalopram on ECG findings is a small reduction in heart rate (... in volunteers and patients and in retrospective evaluations of all electrocardiographic (ECG) data from all clinical trials conducted from 1978 through 1996 (a total of 40 studies). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in healthy volunteers (N = 23) to assess intraindividual...... variability of the QTc interval, as well as possible changes during treatment with placebo or citalopram, and its correlation to plasma drug levels. To document any dose-related changes, ECGs were performed at baseline and at the end of study in three randomized, double-blind, placebo- or active...

  14. Incidence, Predictors, and Clinical Outcomes of Postoperative Cardiac Tamponade in Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Seng Chan; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Darae; Cho, In Jeong; Lee, Sak; Chang, Hyuck-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chang, Byung-Chul; Chung, Namsik

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the incidence, predictors, and clinical outcomes of cardiac tamponade after heart valve surgery. A total of 556 patients who underwent heart valve surgery in a single tertiary center between January 2010 and March 2012 were studied. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) about 5 days after surgery and TTE was repeated regularly. Patients with suspected acute pericardial hemorrhage were excluded. Cardiac tamponade occurred in twenty-four (4.3%) patients and all underwent surgical or percutaneous pericardial drainage. The median time of pericardial drainage after surgery was 17 (interquartile range, IQR, 13-30) days. Infective endocarditis, mechanical valve replacement of aortic or mitral valve, and any amount of pericardial effusion (PE) on the first postoperative TTE were related to the occurrence of cardiac tamponade (all ptamponade was associated with any amount of PE on the first postoperative TTE (hazard ratio, HR, 14.00, ptamponade was higher than those without (34.9 vs. 13.5, p = 0.031). After pericardial drainage, there was no echocardiographic recurrence of significant PE during a median of 34.8 (IQR 14.9-43.7) months after surgery. Cardiac tamponade after heart valve surgery is not uncommon. Patients with any amount of PE at the first postoperative TTE or mechanical valve replacement should receive higher attention with regard to the occurrence of cardiac tamponade. Although it prolongs hospital stay, cardiac tamponade exhibits a benign clinical course without recurrence after timely intervention.

  15. Prevention of cardiovascular events with an antihypertensive regimen of amlodipine adding perindopril as required versus atenolol adding bendroflumethiazide as required, in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlöf, Björn; Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R;

    2005-01-01

    The apparent shortfall in prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) noted in early hypertension trials has been attributed to disadvantages of the diuretics and beta blockers used. For a given reduction in blood pressure, some suggested that newer agents would confer advantages over diuretics an...

  16. Impact of dexmedetomidine on the incidence of delirium in elderly patients after cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xue-Ying; Li, Li-Huan; Ma, Daqing

    2017-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent complication after cardiac surgery and its occurrence is associated with poor outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of perioperative dexmedetomidine administration on the incidence of delirium in elderly patients after cardiac surgery. Methods This randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled trial was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Beijing between December 1, 2014 and July 19, 2015. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) was administered during anesthesia and early postoperative period for patients in the DEX group, whereas normal saline was administered in the same rate for the same duration for patients in the control (CTRL) group. The primary endpoint was the incidence of delirium during the first five days after surgery. Secondary endpoints included the cognitive function assessed on postoperative days 6 and 30, the overall incidence of non-delirium complications within 30 days after surgery, and the all-cause 30-day mortality. Results Two hundred eighty-five patients were enrolled and randomized. Dexmedetomidine did not decrease the incidence of delirium (4.9% [7/142] in the DEX group vs 7.7% [11/143] in the CTRL group; OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.23 to 1.65, p = 0.341). Secondary endpoints were similar between the two groups; however, the incidence of pulmonary complications was slightly decreased (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.00, p = 0.050) and the percentage of early extubation was significantly increased (OR 3.32, 95% CI 1.36 to 8.08, p = 0.008) in the DEX group. Dexmedetomidine decreased the required treatment for intraoperative tachycardia (21.1% [30/142] in the DEX group vs 33.6% [48/143] in the CTRL group, p = 0.019), but increased the required treatment for postoperative hypotension (84.5% [120/142] in the DEX group vs 69.9% [100/143] in the CTRL group, p = 0.003). Conclusions Dexmedetomidine administered during anesthesia and early postoperative period

  17. Prevention of cardiovascular events with an antihypertensive regimen of amlodipine adding perindopril as required versus atenolol adding bendroflumethiazide as required, in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlöf, Björn; Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R

    2005-01-01

    The apparent shortfall in prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) noted in early hypertension trials has been attributed to disadvantages of the diuretics and beta blockers used. For a given reduction in blood pressure, some suggested that newer agents would confer advantages over diuretics...... and beta blockers. Our aim, therefore, was to compare the effect on non-fatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD of combinations of atenolol with a thiazide versus amlodipine with perindopril....

  18. Exercise on Prescription: trial protocol and evaluation of outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puggaard Lis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many countries exercise prescriptions are used in an attempt to initiate a physically active lifestyle in sedentary populations. Previous studies have primarily evaluated low intensive exercise prescription interventions and found moderately positive effects on physical activity and aerobic fitness. In a highly intensive Danish exercise prescription scheme called 'Exercise on Prescription' (EoP the general practitioners can prescribe EoP to sedentary patients with lifestyle diseases. The aim of this randomized trial is to assess the short- and long-term effects of the EoP scheme. Thus, the aim of this paper is to describe the randomized controlled trial designed for evaluating effectiveness of EoP, and to present results from validations of outcome measures. Methods/Design EoP involves a 16-week supervised training intervention and five counselling sessions (health profiles. All patients referred to EoP were eligible for the trial and were offered participation during the baseline health profile. Comparisons between the EoP group and the control group were made at baseline, and after four and ten months. Physiological measures used were maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, bodyweight, and BMI. Patient-reported measures used were physical activity, health-related quality of life, amount and intensity of exercise, compliance with national guidelines for physical activity, and physical fitness. The validation of the cycle ergometer test found a strong correlation between maximal work capacity and VO2max, and acceptable test-retest reliability at group level. Calibration of the HbA1c apparatus was stable over ten weeks with minimal use, and test-retest reliability was good. High agreement percents were found for test-retest reliability for the self-administered questionnaire. Discussion The trial is designed to provide information about the effectiveness of the EoP scheme. The trial is part of a

  19. Prevention of coronary and stroke events with atorvastatin in hypertensive patients who have average or lower-than-average cholesterol concentrations, in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial--Lipid Lowering Arm (ASCOT-LLA): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sever, Peter S; Dahlöf, Björn; Poulter, Neil R;

    2003-01-01

    The lowering of cholesterol concentrations in individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease improves outcome. No study, however, has assessed benefits of cholesterol lowering in the primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in hypertensive patients who are not conventionally deemed ...

  20. Prevention of coronary and stroke events with atorvastatin in hypertensive patients who have average or lower-than-average cholesterol concentrations, in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial--Lipid Lowering Arm (ASCOT-LLA): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sever, Peter S; Dahlöf, Björn; Poulter, Neil R;

    2003-01-01

    The lowering of cholesterol concentrations in individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease improves outcome. No study, however, has assessed benefits of cholesterol lowering in the primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in hypertensive patients who are not conventionally deemed...

  1. Prevention of coronary and stroke events with atorvastatin in hypertensive patients who have average or lower-than-average cholesterol concentrations, in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial--Lipid Lowering Arm (ASCOT-LLA): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sever, Peter S; Dahlöf, Björn; Poulter, Neil R;

    2004-01-01

    The lowering of cholesterol concentrations in individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease improves outcome. No study, however, has assessed benefits of cholesterol lowering in the primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in hypertensive patients who are not conventionally deemed...

  2. Imputation strategies for missing binary outcomes in cluster randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar-Danesh Noori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attrition, which leads to missing data, is a common problem in cluster randomized trials (CRTs, where groups of patients rather than individuals are randomized. Standard multiple imputation (MI strategies may not be appropriate to impute missing data from CRTs since they assume independent data. In this paper, under the assumption of missing completely at random and covariate dependent missing, we compared six MI strategies which account for the intra-cluster correlation for missing binary outcomes in CRTs with the standard imputation strategies and complete case analysis approach using a simulation study. Method We considered three within-cluster and three across-cluster MI strategies for missing binary outcomes in CRTs. The three within-cluster MI strategies are logistic regression method, propensity score method, and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method, which apply standard MI strategies within each cluster. The three across-cluster MI strategies are propensity score method, random-effects (RE logistic regression approach, and logistic regression with cluster as a fixed effect. Based on the community hypertension assessment trial (CHAT which has complete data, we designed a simulation study to investigate the performance of above MI strategies. Results The estimated treatment effect and its 95% confidence interval (CI from generalized estimating equations (GEE model based on the CHAT complete dataset are 1.14 (0.76 1.70. When 30% of binary outcome are missing completely at random, a simulation study shows that the estimated treatment effects and the corresponding 95% CIs from GEE model are 1.15 (0.76 1.75 if complete case analysis is used, 1.12 (0.72 1.73 if within-cluster MCMC method is used, 1.21 (0.80 1.81 if across-cluster RE logistic regression is used, and 1.16 (0.82 1.64 if standard logistic regression which does not account for clustering is used. Conclusion When the percentage of missing data is low or intra

  3. Cardiac Risk Assessment, Morbidity Prediction, and Outcome in the Vascular Intensive Care Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dover, Mary

    2013-09-17

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the predictive value of the Lee revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) for a standard vascular intensive care unit (ICU) population as well as assessing the utility of transthoracic echocardiography and the impact of prior coronary artery disease (CAD) and coronary revascularization on patient outcome. Design: This is a retrospective review of prospectively maintained Vascubase and prospectively collected ICU data. Materials and Methods: Data from 363 consecutive vascular ICU admissions were collected. Findings were used to calculate the RCRI, which was then correlated with patient outcomes. All patients were on optimal medical therapy (OMT) in the form of cardioselective β-blocker, aspirin, statin, and folic acid. Results: There was no relationship found between a reduced ejection fraction and patient outcome. Mortality was significantly increased for patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) as identified on echo (14.9% vs 6.5%, P = .028). The overall complication rates were significantly elevated for patients with valvular dysfunction. Discrimination for the RCRI on receiver-operating characteristic analysis was poor, with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of .621. Model calibration was reasonable with an Hosmer-Lemeshow Ĉ statistic of 2.726 (P = .256). Of those with known CAD, 41.22% of the patients receiving best medical treatment developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared to 35.3% of those who previously underwent percutaneous cardiac intervention and 23.5% of those who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting. There was 3-fold increase in major adverse clinical events in patients with troponin rise and LVH. Conclusions: The RCRI\\'s discriminatory capacity is low, and this raises difficulties in assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular intervention. The AMI is highest in the OMT group without prior cardiac intervention, which mandates protocols to

  4. Longer-Term Assessment of Trastuzumab-Related Cardiac Adverse Events in the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procter, Marion; Suter, Thomas M.; de Azambuja, Evandro; Dafni, Urania; van Dooren, Veerle; Muehlbauer, Susanne; Climent, Miguel Angel; Rechberger, Ernst; Liu, Walter Tsang-Wu; Toi, Mazakasu; Coombes, R. Charles; Dodwell, David; Pagani, Olivia; Madrid, Jorge; Hall, Marcia; Chen, Shin-Cheh; Focan, Christian; Muschol, Michael; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the incidence of cardiac adverse events in patients with early breast cancer in the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial who were treated with 1 year of trastuzumab after completion of (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods The HERA trial is a three-group, randomized tri

  5. Cardiac anesthesia and surgery in geriatric patients: epidemiology, current surgical outcomes, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, J G; Silvay, G; Chikwe, J

    2009-01-01

    The mean life expectancy of the population of the United States is projected to increase from 78.3 years at present to over 81 years in 2025, with a concomitant increase in the percentage of the population over the age of 75 years. Elderly patients are more likely to present with valvular and coronary artery disease than younger patients, and as better perioperative management contributes to improving post-operative outcomes and lower referral thresholds, very elderly patients form an increasingly large proportion of the cardiac surgical population. This article summarizes the impact of age-related pathophysiologic changes on patients' response to cardiac surgery and anesthesia, outlines useful perioperative strategies in this age group, and reviews the literature on outcomes after valvular and coronary in elderly patients.

  6. Antithrombin III in cardiac surgery: an outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, J C; Plunkett, P F

    1998-12-01

    A retrospective study examined the impact, in heparin resistant patients (HRP), of lyophilized antithrombin III (ATIII) upon five patient outcomes: intensive care unit stay (ICU-S), 24 hour chest tube drainage (CTD in ml), blood and blood product usage (BPU), development of postoperative coagulopathy (PO-Coag), and reoperation for bleeding (Re-Op). Data was collected from the medical records of 311 patients admitted to the hospital between 12/15/95 and 10/24/96. Subjects were divided into three groups based upon heparin resistance and hemostasis medication. Group 1 (n = 109) were HRP treated with increased heparin, Group 2 (n = 100) were HRP receiving ATIII, and Group 3 (n = 102) were non-HRP and served as controls. Group 2 was also subdivided by use of aminocaproic acid and time of ATIII administration. No significant differences were found between the groups for PO-Coag. and Re-Op. However, significant reduction in CTD (p = 0.05) was seen in the aminocaproic acid patients who were treated with ATIII pre-CPB or within the first 20 minutes of CPB. The CTD in this group was (419.37, +/- 72.96) as compared to Group 1 (782.88, +/- 360.94) and Group 3 (766.67, +/- 407.56). Other Group 2 subgroups showed significant differences in BPU, ICU-S and CTD. The results of this study support the notion that early identification and treatment of HRP with ATIII and aminocaproic acid may decrease postoperative blood loss.

  7. Impact of treatment with rosuvastatin and atorvastatin on cardiovascular outcomes: evidence from the Archimedes-simulated clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colivicchi F

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Furio Colivicchi,1 Catarina Sternhufvud,2 Sanjay K Gandhi3 1Cardiology Division, Emergency Department, San Filippo Neri Hospital, ASL Roma E, Rome, Italy; 2Global Payer Evidence and Pricing, AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden; 3Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, TEVA Pharmaceuticals, Frazer, PA, United States Objective: No clinical trials have been conducted to directly compare the effect of the two high-intensity statins, rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, on cardiovascular outcomes. However, three such trials have been computer-simulated using the Archimedes model, an individual-based simulation of human physiology and behaviors, treatment interventions, and health care systems. The results are reviewed here.Methods: The first simulated trial assessed clinical outcomes in patients receiving available doses of the two drugs. The second assessed the impact of initial treatment decisions, while the third assessed the effect of switching from rosuvastatin to atorvastatin.Results: In the first simulated trial, treatment with rosuvastatin was estimated to result in greater reductions than treatment with atorvastatin in major adverse cardiac event (MACE rates at 5 years and 20 years at all doses examined (relative risk [RR]: 0.897, 0.888, and 0.930 at 5 years for rosuvastatin 20 mg vs atorvastatin 40 mg, rosuvastatin 40 mg vs atorvastatin 80 mg, and rosuvastatin 20 mg vs atorvastatin 80 mg, respectively; all P<0.05. In the second simulated trial, outcomes were significantly better in patients initially prescribed rosuvastatin than in those initially prescribed atorvastatin (RR of MACE at 5 years: 0.918; P<0.001. In the third simulated trial, risk of MACE was significantly greater in patients switching from rosuvastatin to atorvastatin than in those remaining on rosuvastatin (RR at 5 years: 1.109; P<0.001.Conclusion: The results of these simulated clinical trials suggest improved outcomes among patients receiving rosuvastatin relative to

  8. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is as effective as centre-based cardiac rehabilitation among elderly with coronary heart disease: results from a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oerkild, Bodil; Frederiksen, Marianne; Hansen, Jorgen Fischer;

    2011-01-01

    in the secondary outcomes of systolic blood pressure (-0.6 mmHg, 95% CI -11.3, 10.0), LDL cholesterol (0.3 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.04, 0.7), HDL cholesterol (0.2 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.01, 0.3), body composition, proportion of smokers and health-related quality of life. A group of patients who did not have an effect......BACKGROUND: participation in centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is known to reduce morbidity and mortality but participation rates among the elderly are low. Establishing alternative programmes is important, and home-based CR is the predominant alternative. However, no studies have...... investigated the effect of home-based CR among a group of elderly patients with coronary heart disease with a long-term follow-up. METHODS: randomised clinical trial comparing home-based CR with comprehensive centre-based CR among patients = 65 years with coronary heart disease. RESULTS: seventy-five patients...

  9. Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia : Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J. K.; Verkade, H. J.; Burgerhof, J. G.; Bierens, J. J.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Kneyber, M. C.; Albers, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the outcome of drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia, and to determine distinct criteria for termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in drowned children with hypothermia and absence of spontaneous circulation. DESIGN Nationwide retrospective cohort study. S

  10. Meta-analysis for outcomes of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiankun; Hong, Liang; Mu, Xinwei; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery by the meta-analysis. Electronic databases PubMed and Embase were searched for relative studies from December 2008 to June 2015. For eligible studies, the R software was conducted to meta-analyze outcomes of AKI patients (AKI group) and none-AKI patients after cardiac surgery (NO AKI group). The chi-square-based Q test and I2 statistic were used for heterogeneity analysis. P  50% revealed significant heterogeneity among studies, and then a random effects model was used; otherwise a fixed effect model was performed. Egger's test was performed for publication bias assessment. Subgroup analysis was performed by stratifying AKI definitions and study type. Totally 17 studies with 9656 subjects (2331 in the AKI group and 7325 in the NO AKI group) were enrolled. Significantly higher renal replacement therapy (RRT) (OR=23.67, 95%CI: 12.58–44.55), mortality (OR = 6.27, 95%CI: 3.58–11.00), serum creatinine (SMD = 1.42, 95%CI: 1.01–1.83), and hospital length of stay (LOS) (SMD = 0.45, 95%CI: 0.02–0.88) were shown in the AKI group compared with patients in the NO AKI group. Subgroup analysis showed that results of only 3 subgroups were reversed indicating that the definition of AKI did not affect its outcomes. Publication bias was only found among studies involving mortality and serum creatinine, but the 2 outcomes were not reversed after correction. This meta-analysis confirmed the worse outcomes of AKI in patients after cardiac surgery, including higher RRT rates, mortality, and longer hospital LOS than those of NO AKI patients. PMID:27930561

  11. Core domain and outcome measurement sets for shoulder pain trials are needed: Systematic review of physical therapy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Page (Matthew J.); J.E. McKenzie (Joanne E.); S.E. Green (Sally E.); D.E. Beaton (Dorcas E.); N.B. Jain (Nitin B.); M. Lenza (Mario); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne P.); S. Surace (Stephen); J. Deitch (Jessica); R. Buchbinder (Rachelle)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To explore the outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in published randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions for shoulder pain (rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, or nonspecific shoulder pain). Study Design and Setting We included tri

  12. Regional anaesthesia to improve pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients: a qualitative systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S; Schaldenbrand, K; Wallis, B; De Oliveira, G S

    2014-09-01

    Summary The development of analgesic interventions in paediatric surgical patients is often limited by the inherent difficulties of conducting large randomized clinical trials to test interventions in those patients. Regional anaesthesia is a valid strategy to improve postoperative pain in the adult surgical population, but the effects of regional anaesthesia on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric patients are currently not well defined. The main objective of the current review was to systematically evaluate the use of regional anaesthesia techniques to minimize postoperative pain in paediatric patients. A systematic search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of the regional anaesthesia techniques on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients' procedures. Seventy-three studies on 5125 paediatric patients were evaluated. Only few surgical procedures had more than one small randomized controlled trial favouring the use of regional anaesthesia to minimize postoperative pain (ophthalmological surgery, cleft lip repair, inguinal hernia, and urological procedures). Additional evidence is required to support the use of specific regional anaesthesia techniques to improve postoperative pain for several surgical procedures (craniectomy, adenotonsillectomy, appendectomy, cardiac surgery, umbilical hernia repair, upper and lower extremity) in paediatric patients. Currently, only a very limited number of regional anaesthesia techniques have demonstrated significant improvement on postoperative pain outcomes for a restricted number of surgical procedures. More studies are needed in order to establish regional anaesthesia as a valid strategy to improve analgesia in the paediatric surgical population.

  13. [The outcome of trial of labor after cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Z Q; Ma, R M; Xiao, H; Tian, Y Q; Li, B L; Liang, K; Du, M Y; Chen, Z; Geng, L; Yang, M H; Tao, Y P; Zhu, B

    2016-10-25

    Objective: To explore the outcome of trial of labor after cesarean section(TOLAC). Methods: Totally 614 TOLAC were conducted in the First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University from July 2013 to June 2016. Among them, 586 cases of singleton pregnancy with one prior cesarean section(gestational age≥28 weeks)were studied retrospectively. The maternal and neonatal outcomes among the vaginal birth after cesarean(VBAC)group(481 cases), failed TOLAC group(105 cases)and the elective repeat cesarean section(ERCS)group(1 145 cases)were compared. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the risk factors of admission to neonatal intensive care unit(NICU). Results: (1)The TOLAC rate was 29.62%(614/2 073)from July 2013 to June 2016, and the VBAC rate was 82.6%(507/614). The cesarean section rate was reduced by VBAC by 3.147%(507/16 112).(2)The comparison of adverse maternal outcomes: in the VBAC group, the postpartum hemorrhage volume was(431±299)ml, the rate of postpartum fever was 6.4%(31/481), the birth weight of the neonates was(3 085± 561)g, and the rate of large for gestational age was 2.9%(14/481). All were significantly lower than those in the failed TOLAC group and the ERCS group(P0.05). Multiple logistic regression showed no association between VBAC and admission to the NICU(OR=0.84, 95%CI: 0.58-1.21). The isolated risk factors for admission to the NICU were preterm birth(OR=16.71, 95% CI: 11.44-24.40), hypertensive disorder complicating pregnamcy(OR=3.89, 95% CI: 2.39-6.35), meconium stained amniotic fluid(OR=2.48, 95% CI: 1.62-3.80), small for gestational age(OR=2.00, 95% CI: 1.19-3.36)and diabetes mellitus(OR=1.69, 95% CI: 1.14-2.50). Conclusions: VBAC reduces cesarean section rate, with good outcomes in both mother and neonate. It is a safe and feasible way of labor in women with only one cesarean section history.

  14. Cardiac phantom measurement validating the methodology for a cardiac multi-centre trial with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Van de Werf, Frans; Djian, Jacques; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Schwaiger, Marcus; Touboul, Paul; Maes, Alex

    2002-12-01

    In an ongoing international multi-centre trial, positron emission tomography (PET) is being used to evaluate the effect of a new P-selectin antagonist on the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated with thrombolysis. Although it is possible to correct for site-dependent factors, it is desirable to reduce these factors to a minimum. Therefore, acquisition and reconstruction protocols have been defined that can be closely followed by all participating centres. The resulting reconstructed images are transferred to the core centre for central processing with semi-automatic software. This paper reports on the multi-centre phantom experiment that was carried out to assess the inter-centre reproducibility of defect size determination with this protocol. Also, the spatial resolution of the short axis slices was examined. In addition, the analysis procedure was applied to normal PET studies to evaluate the specificity of perfusion defect detection. The transmural cold defect in the phantom occupied 14.8% of the left ventricular area. The automated analysis was applied to the phantom measurements from the 14 participating PET cameras. It yielded an accurate estimate of 15.1% with a standard deviation of 0.6%, indicating excellent reproducibility. The spatial resolution in the short axis slices was similar for all PET systems: 9.6+/-0.8 mm. The same procedure produced a defect size of zero in the studies of normal volunteers. This study indicates that cardiac studies from multiple PET systems can be pooled for statistical analysis.

  15. Cardiac phantom measurement validating the methodology for a cardiac multi-centre trial with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Maes, Alex [Nuclear Medicine, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van de Werf, Frans [Cardiology, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Djian, Jacques [Wyeth Research, Paris la Defense Cedex (France); Sambuceti, Gianmario [Instituto di Fisiologia Clinica CNR, Pisa (Italy); Schwaiger, Marcus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, TU Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Touboul, Paul [Hopital Cardio-Vasculaire et Pneumologique, Lyon (France)

    2002-12-01

    In an ongoing international multi-centre trial, positron emission tomography (PET) is being used to evaluate the effect of a new P-selectin antagonist on the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated with thrombolysis. Although it is possible to correct for site-dependent factors, it is desirable to reduce these factors to a minimum. Therefore, acquisition and reconstruction protocols have been defined that can be closely followed by all participating centres. The resulting reconstructed images are transferred to the core centre for central processing with semi-automatic software. This paper reports on the multi-centre phantom experiment that was carried out to assess the inter-centre reproducibility of defect size determination with this protocol. Also, the spatial resolution of the short axis slices was examined. In addition, the analysis procedure was applied to normal PET studies to evaluate the specificity of perfusion defect detection. The transmural cold defect in the phantom occupied 14.8% of the left ventricular area. The automated analysis was applied to the phantom measurements from the 14 participating PET cameras. It yielded an accurate estimate of 15.1% with a standard deviation of 0.6%, indicating excellent reproducibility. The spatial resolution in the short axis slices was similar for all PET systems: 9.6{+-}0.8 mm. The same procedure produced a defect size of zero in the studies of normal volunteers. This study indicates that cardiac studies from multiple PET systems can be pooled for statistical analysis. (orig.)

  16. Remote Postconditioning Alone and Combined with Hypothermia Improved Postresuscitation Cardiac and Neurological Outcomes in Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiefeng; Huang, Zeng; Ye, Sen; Wang, Moli; Fang, Ya; Li, Zilong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Previously, we demonstrated that remote ischemic postconditioning (RIpostC) improved postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions in rat. Here, we investigated the effects of RIpostC alone and combined with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on cardiac and neurological outcomes after CPR in swine. Methods. Twenty-one pigs were subjected to 10 mins of VF and then 5 mins of CPR. The animals were randomized to receive RIpostC alone, or its combination with TH, or sham control. RIpostC was induced by 4 cycles of limb ischemia followed by reperfusion. TH was implemented by surface cooling to reach a temperature of 32-34°C. Results. During 72 hrs after resuscitation, lower level of cardiac troponin I and greater stroke volume and global ejection fraction were observed in animals that received RIpostC when compared to the control. RIpostC also decreased serum levels of neuron-specific enolase and S100B and increased neurologic alertness score after resuscitation. The combination of RIpostC and TH resulted in greater improvement in cardiac and neurological outcomes than RIpostC alone. Conclusion. RIpostC was conducive to improving postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions and reducing their organ injuries. Its combination with TH further enhanced its protective effects.

  17. Remote Postconditioning Alone and Combined with Hypothermia Improved Postresuscitation Cardiac and Neurological Outcomes in Swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiefeng Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Previously, we demonstrated that remote ischemic postconditioning (RIpostC improved postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions in rat. Here, we investigated the effects of RIpostC alone and combined with therapeutic hypothermia (TH on cardiac and neurological outcomes after CPR in swine. Methods. Twenty-one pigs were subjected to 10 mins of VF and then 5 mins of CPR. The animals were randomized to receive RIpostC alone, or its combination with TH, or sham control. RIpostC was induced by 4 cycles of limb ischemia followed by reperfusion. TH was implemented by surface cooling to reach a temperature of 32–34°C. Results. During 72 hrs after resuscitation, lower level of cardiac troponin I and greater stroke volume and global ejection fraction were observed in animals that received RIpostC when compared to the control. RIpostC also decreased serum levels of neuron-specific enolase and S100B and increased neurologic alertness score after resuscitation. The combination of RIpostC and TH resulted in greater improvement in cardiac and neurological outcomes than RIpostC alone. Conclusion. RIpostC was conducive to improving postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions and reducing their organ injuries. Its combination with TH further enhanced its protective effects.

  18. Outcomes of Cardiac Surgery in Patients With Previous Solid Organ Transplantation (Kidney, Liver, and Pancreas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, Patrick R; Schiltz, Nicholas K; Johnston, Douglas R; Smedira, Nicholas G; Moazami, Nader; Blackstone, Eugene H; Soltesz, Edward G

    2015-12-15

    A growing number of solid organ transplant survivors require surgery for cardiac disease. We examined the effect of having a previous transplant on outcomes after cardiac surgery in these patients from a population-based perspective. Of 1,709,735 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, valve, or thoracic aorta surgery from 2004 to 2008 in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 3,535 patients (0.21%) had a previous organ transplant (2,712 kidney, 738 liver, 300 pancreas). Multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching were used to determine the effect of a previous solid organ transplant on outcomes. In-hospital mortality rate was 7% for patients who underwent transplantation versus 4% for patients who did not undergo transplantation (odds ratio [OR] 1.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16 to 2.38). Patients who underwent transplantation were at an increased risk for acute renal failure (OR 1.62, CI 1.36 to 1.94) and blood transfusions (OR 1.63, CI 1.36 to 1.95). Median length of stay was longer (10 vs 9 days), with greater median total charges ($111,362 vs $102,221; both p mortality after cardiac surgery. Renal protective strategies and bleeding control should be stressed to mitigate complications.

  19. The effect of integrated cardiac rehabilitation versus treatment as usual for atrial fibrillation patients treated with ablation: the randomised CopenHeartRFA trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Ann-Dorth Olsen; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt; Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Gluud, Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Winkel, Per; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Perhonen, Merja; Hansen, Jim; Dunbar, Sandra B; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation affects almost 2% of the population in the Western world. To preserve sinus rhythm, ablation is undertaken in symptomatic patients. Observational studies show that patients with atrial fibrillation often report a low quality of life and are less prone to be physically active due to fear of triggering fibrillation. Small trials indicate that exercise training has a positive effect on exercise capacity and mental health, and both patients with recurrent atrial fibrillation and in sinus rhythm may benefit from rehabilitation in managing life after ablation. No randomised trials have been published on cardiac rehabilitation for atrial fibrillation patients treated with ablation that includes exercise and psychoeducational components. Aim To test the effects of an integrated cardiac rehabilitation programme versus treatment as usual for patients with atrial fibrillation treated with ablation. Methods and analysis design The trial is a multicentre parallel arm design with 1:1 randomisation to the intervention and control group with blinded outcome assessment. 210 patients treated for atrial fibrillation with radiofrequency ablation will be included. The intervention consists of a rehabilitation programme including four psychoeducative consultations with a specially trained nurse and 12 weeks of individualised exercise training, plus the standard medical follow-up. Patients in the control group will receive the standard medical follow-up. The primary outcome measure is exercise capacity measured by the VO2 peak. The secondary outcome measure is self-rated mental health measured by the Short Form 36 questionnaire. Postintervention, qualitative interviews will be conducted in 10% of the intervention group. Ethics and dissemination The protocol is approved by the regional research ethics committee (number H-1-2011-135), the Danish Data Protection Agency (reg. nr. 2007-58-0015) and follows the latest version of the Declaration of Helsinki

  20. Effect of Rosa aromatherapy on anxiety before cardiac catheterization: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atye Babaii

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Most patients experience moderate to severe anxiety before cardiac catheterization. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Rosa aromatherapy on anxiety before cardiac catheterization. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were conveniently sampled and randomly allocated to the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. In the experimental group, patients received routine care and Rosa aromatherapy for eighteen minutes. The level of anxiety was measured immediately before, and after the treatment. Results: In the stages before and after the study, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the terms of the mean scores of state and total anxiety. However, the mean score of trait anxiety in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between pre- and post-treatment in both groups. Conclusion: Most of the patients experience moderate to severe anxiety before cardiac catheterization. The findings of this study demonstrate that aromatherapy, as administered in this study, is not beneficial.

  1. Proposed outcome measures for prospective clinical trials in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Foeldvari, Ivan; Edelsten, Clive

    2012-01-01

    To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis.......To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis....

  2. Clinical Trial Registries Are of Minimal Use for Identifying Selective Outcome and Analysis Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Susan L.; Holmer, Haley K.; Fu, Rongwei; Ogden, Lauren A.; Viswanathan, Meera S.; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine selective outcome reporting (SOR) and selective analysis reporting (SAR) in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to explore the usefulness of trial registries for identifying SOR and SAR. Study Design and Setting: We selected one "index outcome" for each of three comparative effectiveness reviews…

  3. Manual hyperinflation partly prevents reductions of functional residual capacity in cardiac surgical patients - a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Paulus, Frederique; Veelo, Denise P; Selma B. de Nijs; Beenen, Ludo FM; Bresser, Paul; de Mol, Bas AJM; Binnekade, Jan M; Schultz, Marcus J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is associated with post-operative reductions of functional residual capacity (FRC). Manual hyperinflation (MH) aims to prevent airway plugging, and as such could prevent the reduction of FRC after surgery. The main purpose of this study was to determine the effect of MH on post-operative FRC of cardiac surgical patients. Methods This was a randomized controlled trial of patients after elective coronary artery bypass graft and/or valve surgery admitted to the inten...

  4. Definition, reporting, and interpretation of composite outcomes in clinical trials: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina; Schwartz, Lisa; Woloshin, Steven

    2010-01-01

    admission. Other major problems were change in the definition of the composite outcome between the abstract, methods, and results sections (13 trials); missing, ambiguous, or uninterpretable data (9 trials); and post hoc construction of composite outcomes (4 trials). Only 24 trials (60%) provided reliable...... extracted the data using a standardised data sheet, and two other observers, blinded to the results, selected the most important component. RESULTS: Of 40 included trials, 29 (73%) were about cardiovascular topics and 24 (60%) were entirely or partly industry funded. Composite outcomes had a median of three...... also to the most important component. CONCLUSIONS: The use of composite outcomes in trials is problematic. Components are often unreasonably combined, inconsistently defined, and inadequately reported. These problems will leave many readers confused, often with an exaggerated perception of how well...

  5. Admission Laboratory Results to Enhance Prediction Models of Postdischarge Outcomes in Cardiac Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Hannan, Edward L; Naessens, James M; Whitman, Kay; Reband, Agnes; Qian, Feng; Schindler, Joseph; Sonneborn, Mark; Roland, Jaclyn; Hyde, Linda; Dennison, Barbara A

    Predictive modeling for postdischarge outcomes of inpatient care has been suboptimal. This study evaluated whether admission numerical laboratory data added to administrative models from New York and Minnesota hospitals would enhance the prediction accuracy for 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission (PD-90) and 90-day readmissions (RA-90) following inpatient care for cardiac patients. Risk-adjustment models for the prediction of PD-90 and RA-90 were designed for acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous cardiac intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, and congestive heart failure. Models were derived from hospital claims data and were then enhanced with admission laboratory predictive results. Case-level discrimination, goodness of fit, and calibration were used to compare administrative models (ADM) and laboratory predictive models (LAB). LAB models for the prediction of PD-90 were modestly enhanced over ADM, but negligible benefit was seen for RA-90. A consistent predictor of PD-90 and RA-90 was prolonged length of stay outliers from the index hospitalization.

  6. No benefits of statins for sudden cardiac death prevention in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hai-Ha; Fall, Mor; Gueyffier, François; Burnand, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Statins showed mixed results in heart failure (HF) patients. The benefits in major HF outcomes, including all-cause mortality and sudden cardiac death (SCD), have always been discordant across systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We intended to systematically identify and appraise the available evidence that evaluated the effectiveness of statins in clinical outcomes for HF patients. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Data sources We searched, until April 28, 2016: Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science and EBM reviews (Cochrane DSR, ACP journal club, DARE, CCTR, CMR, HTA, and NHSEED), checked clinicaltrials.gov for ongoing trials and manually searched references of included studies. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies We identified 24 randomized clinical trials that evaluated the efficacy of statins for HF patients. All randomized clinical trials were assessed for risk of bias and pooled together in a meta-analysis. Pre-specified outcomes were sudden cardiac death, all-cause mortality, and hospitalization for worsening heart failure. Results Statins did not reduce sudden cardiac death (SCD) events in HF patients [relative risk (RR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70 to 1.21], all-cause mortality [RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.02] but significantly reduced hospitalization for worsening heart failure (HWHF) although modestly [RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.94]. Nevertheless, estimated predictive intervals were insignificant in SCD, all-cause mortality and HWHF [RR, 0.54 to 1.63, 0.64 to 1.19, and 0.54 to 1.15], respectively. An important finding was the possible presence of publication bias, small-study effects and heterogeneity of the trials conducted in HF patients. Conclusions Statins do not reduce sudden cardiac death, all-cause mortality, but may slightly decrease hospitalization for worsening heart failure in HF patients. The evaluation of the risk of biases suggested moderate quality of the published results. Until new

  7. Use of cardiac biomarkers in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijlbrief, Daniel C; Benders, Manon J N L; Kemperman, Hans; van Bel, Frank; de Vries, Willem B

    2012-10-01

    Cardiac biomarkers are used to identify cardiac disease in term and preterm infants. This review discusses the roles of natriuretic peptides and cardiac troponins. Natriuretic peptide levels are elevated during atrial strain (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)) or ventricular strain (B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)). These markers correspond well with cardiac function and can be used to identify cardiac disease. Cardiac troponins are used to assess cardiomyocyte compromise. Affected cardiomyocytes release troponin into the bloodstream, resulting in elevated levels of cardiac troponin. Cardiac biomarkers are being increasingly incorporated into clinical trials as indicators of myocardial strain. Furthermore, cardiac biomarkers can possibly be used to guide therapy and improve outcome. Natriuretic peptides and cardiac troponins are potential tools in the diagnosis and treatment of neonatal disease that is complicated by circulatory compromise. However, clear reference ranges need to be set and validation needs to be carried out in a population of interest.

  8. The roles of funding source, clinical trial outcome, and quality of reporting in orthopedic surgery literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Safdar N; Mermer, Matthew J; Myers, Elizabeth; Sandhu, Harvinder S

    2008-12-01

    Compared with nonfunded or peer-reviewed funded projects, industry-sponsored clinical trials have traditionally been associated with more positive results. This relationship has been extensively studied in the nonsurgical literature. Although a few authors have addressed specialties, little has been reported on orthopedic clinical trials and their association with funding, study outcome, and efforts to reduce bias after randomization across journals of multiple subspecialties. For the study reported here, we selected 5 major orthopedic subspecialty journals: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume), Spine, Journal of Arthroplasty, Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, and American Journal of Sports Medicine. We chose a 2-year limit for investigation (2002-2004); included all original randomized clinical trials reported in these 5 journals; and examined these trials for their study design, funding source, outcome, bias potential, and conclusion reached. Support for the 100 eligible orthopedic clinical trials was stated as coming from industry (26 trials, 26%), nonprofit sources (19 trials, 19%), and mixed sources (5 trials, 5%); no support was stated in 46 trials (46%), and support was not reported in 4 trials (4%). Of the 26 trials reporting industry support, 22 (85%) were graded as indicating an outcome favorable to the new treatment. The association between industry funding and favorable outcome was strong and significant (PJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery and Spine, measures taken to reduce bias were not documented.

  9. Databases for assessing the outcomes of the treatment of patients with congenital and paediatric cardiac disease - the perspective of cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Franklin, Rodney C. G.; Mavroudis, Constantine; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Tchervenkov, Christo I.; Walters, Hal; Bacha, Emile A.; Clarke, David Robinson; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Stellin, Giovanni; Ebels, Tjark; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Tobota, Zdzislaw; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Elliott, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This review includes a brief discussion, from the perspective of cardiac surgeons, of the rationale for creation and maintenance of multi-institutional databases of outcomes of congenital heart Surgery, together with a history of the evolution of such databases, a description of the current state of

  10. Effectiveness of a nursing intervention in decreasing the anxiety levels of family members of patients undergoing cardiac surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamester, Letícia; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Cielo, Cibele; Moraes, Maria Antonieta; Pellanda, Lúcia Campos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to verify the effectiveness of nursing orientation provided to families of patients in the immediate post-operative following cardiac surgery before the first visit to the post-anesthesia care unit, in decreasing anxiety levels, compared to the unit's routine orientation. Method: open randomized clinical trial addressing family members in the waiting room before the first visit in the immediate post-operative period. The family members assigned to the intervention group received audiovisual orientation concerning the patients' conditions at the time and the control group received the unit's routine orientation. Outcome anxiety was assessed using the STAI-State. Results: 210 individuals were included, 105 in each group, aged 46.4 years old on average (±14.5); 69% were female and 41% were the patients' children. The mean score obtained on the anxiety assessment in the intervention group was 41.3±8.6, while the control group scored 50.6±9.4 (p<0.001). Conclusion: a nursing intervention focused on providing guidance to families before their first visit to patients in the immediate post-operative period of cardiac surgery helps to decrease the levels of anxiety of companions, making them feel better prepared for the moment. ReBEC (Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry) and The Universal Trial Number (UTN), No. U1111-1145-6172. PMID:27533263

  11. Perioperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio as a predictor of poor cardiac surgery patient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Fotos, Nikolaos V; Patelarou, Athina; Theologou, Stavros; Argiriou, Mihalis; Chatziefstratiou, Anastasia A; Katzilieri, Christina; Brokalaki, Hero

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the perioperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and cardiac surgery patient outcomes. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study of 145 patients who underwent cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital of Athens, Greece, from January to March 2015, was conducted. By using a structured short questionnaire, this study reviewed the electronic hospital database and the medical and nursing patient records for data collection purposes. The statistical significance was two-tailed, and p-values care unit (ICU) (p=0.002), and in-hospital (p=0.018), and likewise with delayed tracheal extubation (p≤0.001). Furthermore, patients with elevated NLR during the second postoperative day had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (p=0.018), increased incidence of pneumonia (p=0.022), higher probability of readmission to the ICU (p=0.002), prolonged ICU LOS (p≤0.001), and delayed tracheal extubation (p≤0.001). Conclusion Increased perioperative NLR seems to be associated with significantly higher mortality and morbidity in cardiac surgery patients. At the same time, NLR is a significant and inexpensive biomarker for the early identification of patients at high risk for complications. In addition, NLR levels could lead clinicians to perform measures for the optimal therapeutic patient approach. PMID:28243161

  12. Prediction of the potential clinical outcomes for post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungmin; Kwon, Bojun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Joonghee

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral injuries after cardiac arrest are serious causes for morbidity. Many previous researches in the medical society have been proposed to prognosticate the functional recoveries of post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest, but the validity of suggested features and the automation of prognostication have not been made yet. This paper presents the automatic classification method which predicts the potential clinical outcomes of post-resuscitated patients who suffered from cardiac arrest. The global features and the local features are adapted from the researches from the medical society. The global features, which are consisted of the percentage of the partial volume under the uniformly increasing thresholds, represent the global tendency of apparent diffusion coefficient value in a DWI. The local features are localized and measured on the refined local apparent diffusion coefficient minimal points. The local features represent the ischemic change of small areas in a brain. The features are trained and classified by the random forest method, which have been widely used in the machine learning society for classification. The validity of features is automatically evaluated during the classification process. The proposed method achieved the 0.129 false-positive rate while maintaining the perfect true-positive rate. The area-under-curve of the proposed method was 0.9516, which showed the feasibility and the robustness of the proposed method.

  13. Pulmonary Perfusion and Ventilation During Cardiopulmonary Bypass Are Not Associated with Improved Postoperative Outcomes After Cardiac Surgery

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    Yiliam F Rodriguez-Blanco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesClinical trials of either pulmonary perfusion or ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass are equivocal. We hypothesized that to achieve significant improvement in outcomes both interventions had to be concurrent.DesignRetrospective case-control studySettingsMajor academic tertiary referral medical centerParticipants274 consecutive patients who underwent open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass 2009 - 2013.InterventionsThe outcomes of 86 patients who received pulmonary perfusion and ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass were retrospectively compared to the control group of 188 patients.Measurements and Main ResultsRespiratory complications rates were similar in both groups (33.7% vs. 33.5%, as were the rates of postoperative pneumonia (4.7% vs. 4.3%, pleural effusions (13.9% vs. 12.2% and re-intubations (9.3% vs. 9.1%. Rates of adverse postoperative cardiac events including ventricular tachycardia (9.3% vs. 8.5% and atrial fibrillation (33.7% vs. 28.2% were equivalent in both groups. Incidence of sepsis (8.1% vs. 5.3%, postoperative stroke (2.3% vs. 2.1%, acute kidney injury (2.3% vs. 3.7% and renal failure (5.8% vs. 3.7% were likewise comparable. Despite similar transfusion requirements, coagulopathy (12.8% vs. 5.3%, p=0.031 and the need for mediastinal re-exploration (17.4% vs. 9.6%, p=0.0633 were observed more frequently in the pulmonary perfusion and ventilation group, but the difference did not reach the statistical significance. ICU and hospital stays, and the ICU readmission rates (7.0% vs. 8.0% were similar in both groups.ConclusionsSimultaneous pulmonary perfusion and ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass were not associated with improved clinical outcomes.

  14. Factors influencing the outcome of paediatric cardiac surgical patients during extracorporeal circulatory support

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    Peek Giles J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is a common modality of circulatory assist device used in children. We assessed the outcome of children who had ECMO following repair of congenital cardiac defects (CCD and identified the risk factors associated with hospital mortality. Methods From April 1990 to December 2003, 53 patients required ECMO following surgical correction of CCD. Retrospectively collected data was analyzed with univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Median age and weight of the patients were 150 days and 5.4 kgs respectively. The indications for ECMO were low cardiac output in 16, failure to wean cardiopulmonary bypass in 13, cardiac arrest in 10 and cardio-respiratory failure in 14 patients. The mean duration of ECMO was 143 hours. Weaning off from ECMO was successful in 66% and of these 83% were survival to hospital-discharge. 37.7% of patients were alive for the mean follow-up period of 75 months. On univariate analysis, arrhythmias, ECMO duration >168 hours, bleeding complications, renal replacement therapy on ECMO, arrhythmias and cardiac arrest after ECMO were associated with hospital mortality. On multivariate analysis, abnormal neurology, bleeding complications and arrhythmias after ECMO were associated with hospital mortality. Extra and intra-thoracic cannulations were used in 79% and 21% of patients respectively and extra-thoracic cannulation had significantly less bleeding complications (p = 0.031. Conclusion ECMO provides an effective circulatory support following surgical repair of CCD in children. Extra-thoracic cannulation is associated with less bleeding complications. Abnormal neurology, bleeding complications on ECMO and arrhythmias after ECMO are poor prognostic indicators for hospital survival.

  15. The association of targeted temperature management at 33 and 36 °C with outcome in patients with moderate shock on admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annborn, Martin; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Nielsen, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    ). Primary outcome was 180-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were intensive care unit (ICU) and 30-day mortality, severity of circulatory shock assessed by mean arterial pressure, serum lactate, fluid balance and the extended Sequential Organ Failure assessment (SOFA) score. RESULTS......PURPOSE: We hypothesized that a targeted temperature of 33 °C as compared to that of 36 °C would increase survival and reduce the severity of circulatory shock in patients with shock on admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: The recently published Target Temperature...... Management trial (TTM-trial) randomized 939 OHCA patients with no difference in outcome between groups and no difference in mortality at the end of the trial in a predefined subgroup of patients with shock at admission. Shock was defined as a systolic blood pressure of 30 min or the need...

  16. Predictive Value of Brain Arrest Neurological Outcome Scale (BrANOS) on Mortality and Morbidity After Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahutoğlu, Cengiz; Uyar, Mehmet; Demirağ, Kubilay; İsayev, Hasan; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Objective There are several prediction scales and parameters for prognosis after a cardiac arrest. One of these scales is the brain arrest neurological outcome scale (BrANOS), which consists of duration of cardiac arrest, Glasgow Coma Scale score and Hounsfield unit measured on cranial computed tomography (CT) scan. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of BrANOS on predicting the mortality and disability after a cardiac arrest. Methods We retrospectively investigated cardiac arrest patients who were hospitalized in our intensive care unit (ICU) within a 3-year period. Inclusion criteria were age over 18 years old, survival of more than 24 hours after cardiac arrest and availability of cranial CT. We recorded the age, sex, diagnosis, duration of cardiac arrest and hospital stay, mortality, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) and BrANOS score. The primary endpoint of the study was to establish the relationship between mortality and BrANOS score in patients who survived for more than 24 hours after a cardiac arrest. The secondary endpoint of the study was to determine the 2-year life expectancy and GOS after cardiac arrest. Results The mean age of the patients was 57±17 years (33 females, 67 males). ICU mortality rate was 57%. The BrANOS mean score was 10.3±3.2. There was a significant difference between survivors and non-survivors in terms of the BrANOS score (8.8±3.2 vs. 11.6±2.7; p14 predicted death with 100% accuracy. All the patients without disability had a BrANOS score of <10. The BrANOS score also correlated well with GOS (p<0.001). The 2-year life expectancy rate was 31% in patients who survived more than 24 hours after a cardiac arrest. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrated that BrANOS provided reliable data for prognostic evaluation after a cardiac arrest. PMID:28058140

  17. Prospective registration, bias risk and outcome-reporting bias in randomised clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Han, Mei; Li, Xin-Xue;

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications.......Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications....

  18. A trial of nebulised heparin to limit lung injury following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, B; Smith, R; Santamaria, J D; Orford, N R; Wakefield, B J; Ives, K; McKenzie, R; Zhang, B; Yap, C H

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass triggers an acute inflammatory response in the lungs. This response gives rise to fibrin deposition in the microvasculature and alveoli of the lungs. Fibrin deposition in the microvasculature increases alveolar dead space, while fibrin deposition in alveoli causes shunting. We investigated whether prophylactic nebulised heparin could limit this form of lung injury. We undertook a single-centre double-blind randomised trial. Forty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were randomised to prophylactic nebulised heparin (50,000 U) or placebo. The primary endpoint was the change in arterial oxygen levels over the operative period. Secondary endpoints included end-tidal CO₂, the alveolar dead space fraction and bleeding complications. We found nebulised heparin did not improve arterial oxygen levels. Nebulised heparin was, however, associated with a lower alveolar dead space fraction (P heparin was not associated with bleeding complications. In conclusion, prophylactic nebulised heparin did not improve oxygenation, but was associated with evidence of better alveolar perfusion and CO₂elimination at the end of surgery.

  19. Physical conditioning and mental stress reduction - a randomised trial in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Merwe Juliana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preoperative anxiety and physical unfitness have been shown to have adverse effects on recovery from cardiac surgery. This study involving cardiac surgery patients was primarily aimed at assessing the feasibility of delivering physical conditioning and stress reduction programs within the public hospital setting. Secondary aims were to evaluate the effect of these programs on quality of life (QOL, rates of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF and length of stay (LOS in hospital. Methods Elective patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft and/or valve surgery at a public hospital in Melbourne, Australia were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either holistic therapy (HT or usual care (UC. HT consisted of a series of light physical exercise sessions together with a mental stress reduction program administered in an outpatient setting for the first two weeks after placement on the waiting list for surgery. A self-administered SF-36 questionnaire was used to measure QOL and hospital records to collect data on LOS and rate of postoperative AF. Results The study population comprised 117 patients of whom 60 received HT and 57 received UC. Both programs were able to be delivered within the hospital setting but ongoing therapy beyond the two week duration of the program was not carried out due to long waiting periods and insufficient resources. HT, as delivered in this study, compared to UC did not result in significant changes in QOL, LOS or AF incidence. Conclusions Preoperative holistic therapy can be delivered in the hospital setting, although two weeks is insufficient to provide benefits beyond usual care on QOL, LOS or postoperative AF. Further research is now required to determine whether a similar program of longer duration, or targeted to high risk patients can provide measurable benefits. Trial registration This trial was conducted as part of a larger study and according to the principles contained in

  20. Outcome markers for clinical trials in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Greenberg (Steven); R.A.S. Salman (Rustam Al-Shahi); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); C. Cordonnier (Charlotte); J.-M. Lee (Jin-Moo); J. Montaner (Joan); J.A. Schneider (Julie); E.E. Smith (Eric); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); D.J. Werring (David)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractEfforts are underway for early-phase trials of candidate treatments for cerebral amyloid angiopathy, an untreatable cause of haemorrhagic stroke and vascular cognitive impairment. A major barrier to these trials is the absence of consensus on measurement of treatment effectiveness. A ran

  1. Clinical Outcomes and Quality of Life in Recipients of Livers Donated after Cardiac Death

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    Neehar D. Parikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Donation after cardiac death (DCD has expanded in the last decade in the US; however, DCD liver utilization has flattened in recent years due to poor outcomes. We examined clinical and quality of life (QOL outcomes of DCD recipients by conducting a retrospective and cross-sectional review of patients from 2003 to 2010. We compared clinical outcomes of DCD recipients (n=60 to those of donation after brain death (DBD liver recipients (n=669 during the same time period. DCD recipients had significantly lower rates of 5-year graft survival (P<0.001 and a trend toward lower rates of 5-year patient survival (P=0.064 when compared to the DBD cohort. In order to examine QOL outcomes in our cohorts, we administered the Short Form Liver Disease Quality of Life questionnaire to 30 DCD and 60 DBD recipients. The DCD recipients reported lower generic and liver-specific QOL. We further stratified the DCD cohort by the presence of ischemic cholangiopathy (IC. Patients with IC reported lower QOL when compared to DBD recipients and those DCD recipients without IC (P<0.05. While the results are consistent with clinical experience, this is the first report of QOL in DCD recipients using standardized measures. These data can be used to guide future comparative effectiveness studies.

  2. Quality and consistency of outcome reporting in clinical trials of immunosuppression in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Samia; Knight, Simon R

    2016-11-01

    Interpretation, comparison, and combination of results of clinical trials are reliant on accurate and complete reporting of outcomes. This study aimed to assess the quality and variability in outcome reporting in immunosuppression trials following renal transplantation. All randomized controlled trials comparing immunosuppressive interventions in renal transplant recipients published over a 5-year period were included. Outcomes reported in these studies were extracted, along with data regarding completeness of reporting and whether a clear definition of the method used to measure the outcome was provided. A total of 4760 outcomes were identified from 182 studies. Overall, 90.3% outcomes were completely reported; the remainder had missing data that would preclude use in meta-analysis; 31.5% manuscripts did not define a primary endpoint. Efficacy outcomes were more likely to be clearly defined than safety outcomes (OR: 0.022, P<.001) or patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) (OR: 0.014, P<.001). PROMs were reported in less than half of manuscripts, and only five reported quality-of-life data using a validated tool. There was significant variability in the way that common efficacy and safety outcomes were defined. Variability in the way that endpoints are selected and reported in trials in renal transplantation makes interpretation and comparison between studies difficult.

  3. Assurance calculations for planning clinical trials with time-to-event outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shijie; Oakley, Jeremy E

    2014-01-15

    We consider the use of the assurance method in clinical trial planning. In the assurance method, which is an alternative to a power calculation, we calculate the probability of a clinical trial resulting in a successful outcome, via eliciting a prior probability distribution about the relevant treatment effect. This is typically a hybrid Bayesian-frequentist procedure, in that it is usually assumed that the trial data will be analysed using a frequentist hypothesis test, so that the prior distribution is only used to calculate the probability of observing the desired outcome in the frequentist test. We argue that assessing the probability of a successful clinical trial is a useful part of the trial planning process. We develop assurance methods to accommodate survival outcome measures, assuming both parametric and nonparametric models. We also develop prior elicitation procedures for each survival model so that the assurance calculations can be performed more easily and reliably. We have made free software available for implementing our methods.

  4. Effectiveness of massage therapy on post-operative outcomes among patients undergoing cardiac surgery: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ramesh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD are increasing rapidly in developing countries. Most patients with CVD do not respond to medical treatment and have to undergo cardiac surgery. This highly stressful experience results in increased levels of anxiety for patients. The objective of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of massage therapy on postoperative outcomes among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A comprehensive literature search was made on PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane library databases for original research articles published between 2000 and 2015. Original articles that reported the efficacy of massage therapy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery were included. The Cochrane data extraction form was used to extract data. A total of 297 studies were identified in the literature search. However, only seven studies were eligible for analysis. Of the seven studies, six studies demonstrated the effects of massage therapy on improving post-operative outcomes of patients, while one study found no evidence of improvement. Although the methods varied considerably, most of the studies included in this review reported positive results. Therefore, there is some evidence that massage therapy can lead to positive postoperative outcomes. Evidence of the effectiveness of massage therapy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery remains inconclusive. Additional research is needed to provide a strong evidence base for the use of massage therapy to improve post-operative outcomes and recovery among cardiac surgery patients

  5. Impact of epoetin alfa on left ventricular structure, function, and pressure volume relations as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance: the heart failure preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) anemia trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Philip; Babu, Benson A; Teruya, Sergio; Helmke, Stephen; Prince, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S

    2013-01-01

    Anemia, a common comorbidity in older adults with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is associated with worse outcomes. The authors quantified the effect of anemia treatment on left ventricular (LV) structure and function as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. A prospective, randomized single-blind clinical trial (NCT NCT00286182) comparing the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa vs placebo for 24 weeks in which a subgroup (n=22) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and after 3 and 6 months to evaluate changes in cardiac structure and function. Pressure volume (PV) indices were derived from MRI measures of ventricular volume coupled with sphygmomanometer-measured pressure and Doppler estimates of filling pressure. The end-systolic and end-diastolic PV relations and the area between them as a function of end-diastolic pressure, the isovolumic PV area (PVAiso), were calculated. Patients (75±10 years, 64% women) with HFPEF (EF=63%±15%) with an average hemoglobin of 10.3±1.1 gm/dL were treated with epoetin alfa using a dose-adjusted algorithm that increased hemoglobin compared with placebo (PHFPEF resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin, without evident change in LV structure, function, or pressure volume relationships as measured quantitatively using CMR imaging.

  6. Home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or revascularisation: design and rationale of the Birmingham Rehabilitation Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN72884263

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    Lane Deirdre

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction reduces subsequent mortality, but uptake and adherence to rehabilitation programmes remains poor, particularly among women, the elderly and ethnic minority groups. Evidence of the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation remains limited. This trial evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home-based compared to hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of home-based compared with hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation in four hospitals serving a multi-ethnic inner city population in the United Kingdom was designed. The home programme is nurse-facilitated, manual-based using the Heart Manual. The hospital programmes offer comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in an out-patient setting. Patients We will randomise 650 adult, English or Punjabi-speaking patients of low-medium risk following myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft who have been referred for cardiac rehabilitation. Main outcome measures Serum cholesterol, smoking cessation, blood pressure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, distance walked on Shuttle walk-test measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Adherence to the programmes will be estimated using patient self-reports of activity. In-depth interviews with non-attendees and non-adherers will ascertain patient views and the acceptability of the programmes and provide insights about non-attendance and aims to generate a theory of attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. The economic analysis will measure National Health Service costs using resource inputs. Patient costs will be established from the qualitative research, in particular how they affect adherence. Discussion More data are needed on the role of home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation for patients following myocardial infarction and revascularisation, which would be provided by the

  7. Quality of Anticoagulation Control in Preventing Adverse Events in Heart Failure Patients in Sinus Rhythm: A Warfarin Aspirin Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) Substudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Shunichi; Thompson, John L.P.; Qian, Min; Ye, Siqin; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Mann, Douglas L.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Graham, Susan; Mohr, J.P.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between time in therapeutic range (TTR) and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin. Methods and Results We used data from the Warfarin vs. Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) to assess the relationship of TTR with the WARCEF primary outcome (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or death); with death alone; ischemic stroke alone; major hemorrhage alone; and net clinical benefit (primary outcome and major hemorrhage combined). Multivariable Cox models were used to examine how the event risk changed with TTR and to compare the high TTR, low TTR, and aspirin patients, with TTR being treated as a time-dependent covariate. 2,217 patients were included in the analyses, among whom 1,067 were randomized to warfarin and 1,150 were randomized to aspirin. The median (IQR) follow-up duration was 3.6 (2.0–5.0) years. Mean (±SD) age was 61±11.3 years, with 80% being men. The mean (±SD) TTR was 57% (±28.5%). Increasing TTR was significantly associated with reduction in primary outcome (adjusted p<0.001), death alone (adjusted p=0.001), and improved net clinical benefit (adjusted p<0.001). A similar trend was observed for the other two outcomes but significance was not reached (adjusted p=0.082 for ischemic stroke, adjusted p=0.109 for major hemorrhage). Conclusions In HF patients in SR, increasing TTR is associated with better outcome and improved net clinical benefit. Patients in whom good quality anticoagulation can be achieved may benefit from the use of anticoagulants. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00041938. PMID:25850425

  8. Work-related outcome after acute coronary syndrome: Implications of complex cardiac rehabilitation in occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Lamberti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Coronary heart disease is frequent in the working-age population. Traditional outcomes, such as mortality and hospital readmission, are useful for evaluating prognosis. Fit-for-work is an emerging outcome with clinical as well as socioeconomic significance. We describe the possible benefit of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR program for return to work (RTW after acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Material and Methods: We evaluated 204 patients with recent ACS. They were divided into 4 groups on the basis of their occupational work load: very light (VL, light (L, moderate (M, and heavy (H. Work-related outcomes were assessed with the Work Performance Scale (WPS of the Functional Status Questionnaire and as “days missed from work” (DMW in the previous 4 weeks. The variables considered for outcomes were percent ejection fraction, functional capacity expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs, and participation or non-participation in the CR program (CR+ and CR–. Results: One hundred thirty (66% patients took part in the CR program. Total WPS scores for CR+ and CR– subgroups were VL group: 18±4 vs. 14±4 (p < 0.001, L group: 18±3 vs. 14±3 (p < 0.0001, M group: 19±3 vs. 16±3 (p < 0.003, and H group: 20±4 vs. 17±3 (p < 0.006. Fewer DMW were reported by the CR+ group. Conclusions: Non-participation in CR was a consistent cause of poorer work-related outcomes. Our findings indicate that CR and occupational counseling play a very important role in worker recovery and subsequent reintegration in the workplace, in particular among clerical workers.

  9. Process and outcome in cardiac rehabilitation: an examination of cross-lagged effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evon, Donna M; Burns, John W

    2004-08-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation patients improve cardiorespiratory fitness and quality of life, yet therapeutic processes that produce these changes remain unknown. A cross-lagged panel design was used to determine whether early-treatment enhancement of self-efficacy regarding abilities to change diet and exercise habits and the quality of the patient-staff working alliance predicted late-treatment changes in a wide range of outcomes, but not vice versa. Eighty cardiac patients participating in a 12-week program completed measures at early, mid- and late treatment. Early-treatment changes in exercise self-efficacy predicted late-treatment changes in activity level, depression, and working alliance, but not vice versa. Diet self-efficacy changes correlated with concurrent changes in fat intake and body weight. Early-treatment changes in cardiorespiratory fitness and activity level predicted late-treatment changes in working alliance, but not vice versa. Findings suggest that increased exercise self-efficacy represents an important therapeutic mechanism by which rehabilitation gains are realized. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  10. Dealing with missing outcome data in randomized trials and observational studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenwold, R.H.; Donders, A.R.T.; Roes, K.C.; Harrell Jr, F.E.; Moons, K.G.

    2012-01-01

    Although missing outcome data are an important problem in randomized trials and observational studies, methods to address this issue can be difficult to apply. Using simulated data, the authors compared 3 methods to handle missing outcome data: 1) complete case analysis; 2) single imputation; and 3)

  11. Outcomes from a School-Randomized Controlled Trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric C.; Low, Sabina; Smith, Brian H.; Haggerty, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program conducted in 33 California elementary schools. Schools were matched on school demographic characteristics and assigned randomly to intervention or waitlisted control conditions. Outcome measures were obtained from (a) all school…

  12. Clinical outcomes assessment in clinical trials to assess treatment of femoroacetabular impingement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris-Hayes, Marcie; McDonough, Christine M; Leunig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures are an important component of outcomes assessment in clinical trials to assess the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). This review of disease-specific measures and instruments used to assess the generic quality of life and physical activity levels...

  13. Hypotheses, rationale, design, and methods for prognostic evaluation of cardiac biomarker elevation after percutaneous and surgical revascularization in the absence of manifest myocardial infarction. A comparative analysis of biomarkers and cardiac magnetic resonance. The MASS-V Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueb Whady

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the release of cardiac biomarkers after percutaneous (PCI or surgical revascularization (CABG is common, its prognostic significance is not known. Questions remain about the mechanisms and degree of correlation between the release, the volume of myocardial tissue loss, and the long-term significance. Delayed-enhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR consistently quantifies areas of irreversible myocardial injury. To investigate the quantitative relationship between irreversible injury and cardiac biomarkers, we will evaluate the extent of irreversible injury in patients undergoing PCI and CABG and relate it to postprocedural modifications in cardiac biomarkers and long-term prognosis. Methods/Design The study will include 150 patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD with left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF and a formal indication for CABG; 50 patients will undergo CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB; 50 patients with the same arterial and ventricular condition indicated for myocardial revascularization will undergo CABG without CPB; and another 50 patients with CAD and preserved ventricular function will undergo PCI using stents. All patients will undergo CMR before and after surgery or PCI. We will also evaluate the release of cardiac markers of necrosis immediately before and after each procedure. Primary outcome considered is overall death in a 5-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes are levels of CK-MB isoenzyme and I-Troponin in association with presence of myocardial fibrosis and systolic left ventricle dysfunction assessed by CMR. Discussion The MASS-V Trial aims to establish reliable values for parameters of enzyme markers of myocardial necrosis in the absence of manifest myocardial infarction after mechanical interventions. The establishments of these indices have diagnostic value and clinical prognosis and therefore require relevant and different therapeutic measures. In daily practice

  14. Improved Outcome of Cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Infants and Children Using Magnetic Levitation Centrifugal Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Hoxha, Stiljan; Torre, Salvatore; Rungatscher, Alessio; Menon, Tiziano; Barozzi, Luca; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has traditionally been and, for the most part, still is being performed using roller pumps. Use of first-generation centrifugal pumps has yielded controversial outcomes, perhaps due to mechanical properties of the same and the ensuing risk of hemolysis and renal morbidity. Latest-generation centrifugal pumps, using magnetic levitation (ML), exhibit mechanical properties which may have overcome limitations of first-generation devices. This retrospective study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of veno-arterial (V-A) ECMO for cardiac indications in neonates, infants, and children, using standard (SP) and latest-generation ML centrifugal pumps. Between 2002 and 2014, 33 consecutive neonates, infants, and young children were supported using V-A ECMO for cardiac indications. There were 21 males and 12 females, with median age of 29 days (4 days-5 years) and a median body weight of 3.2 kg (1.9-18 kg). Indication for V-A ECMO were acute circulatory collapse in ICU or ward after cardiac repair in 16 (49%) patients, failure to wean after repair of complex congenital heart disease in 9 (27%), fulminant myocarditis in 4 (12%), preoperative sepsis in 2 (6%), and refractory tachy-arrhythmias in 2 (6%). Central cannulation was used in 27 (81%) patients and peripheral in 6. Seven (21%) patients were supported with SP and 26 (79%) with ML centrifugal pumps. Median duration of support was 82 h (range 24-672 h), with 26 (79%) patients weaned from support. Three patients required a second ECMO run but died on support. Seventeen (51%) patients required peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure. Overall survival to discharge was 39% (13/33 patients). All patients with fulminant myocarditis and with refractory arrhythmias were weaned, and five (83%) survived, whereas no patient supported for sepsis survived. Risk factors for hospital mortality included lower (centrifugal pumps in infants and children yields outcomes absolutely

  15. Contaminated heparin and outcomes after cardiac surgery: a retrospective propensity-matched cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko A Kaiser

    Full Text Available During 2007 and 2008 it is likely that millions of patients in the US received heparin contaminated (CH with oversulfated chondroitin sulfate, which was associated with anaphylactoid reactions. We tested the hypothesis that CH was associated with serious morbidity, mortality, intensive care unit (ICU stay and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia following adult cardiac surgery.We conducted a single center, retrospective, propensity-matched cohort study during the period of CH and the equivalent time frame in the three preceding or the two following years. Perioperative data were obtained from the institutional record of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database, for which the data collection is prospective, standardized and performed by independent investigators. After matching, logistic regression was performed to evaluate the independent effect of CH on the composite adverse outcome (myocardial infarction, stroke, pneumonia, dialysis, cardiac arrest and on mortality. Cox regression was used to determine the association between CH and ICU length of stay. The 1∶5 matched groups included 220 patients potentially exposed to CH and 918 controls. There were more adverse outcomes in the exposed cohort (20.9% versus 12.0%; difference  =  8.9%; 95% CI 3.6% to 15.1%, P < 0.001 with an odds ratio for CH of 2.0 (95% CI, 1.4 to 3.0, P < 0.001. In the exposed group there was a non-significant increase in mortality (5.9% versus 3.5%, difference = 2.4%; 95% CI, -0.4 to 3.5%, P  =  0.1, the median ICU stay was longer by 14.1 hours (interquartile range -26.6 to 79.8, S = 3299, P = 0.0004 with an estimated hazard ratio for CH of 1.2 (95% CI, 1.0 to 1.4, P = 0.04. There was no difference in nadir platelet counts between cohorts.The results from this single center study suggest the possibility that contaminated heparin might have contributed to serious morbidity following cardiac surgery.

  16. Design and Organization of the Dexamethasone, Light Anesthesia and Tight Glucose Control (DeLiT Trial: a factorial trial evaluating the effects of corticosteroids, glucose control, and depth-of-anesthesia on perioperative inflammation and morbidity from major non-cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang WH Wilson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The perioperative period is characterized by an intense inflammatory response. Perioperative inflammation promotes postoperative morbidity and increases mortality. Blunting the inflammatory response to surgical trauma might thus improve perioperative outcomes. We are studying three interventions that potentially modulate perioperative inflammation: corticosteroids, tight glucose control, and light anesthesia. Methods/Design The DeLiT Trial is a factorial randomized single-center trial of dexamethasone vs placebo, intraoperative tight vs. conventional glucose control, and light vs deep anesthesia in patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Anesthetic depth will be estimated with Bispectral Index (BIS monitoring (Aspect medical, Newton, MA. The primary outcome is a composite of major postoperative morbidity including myocardial infarction, stroke, sepsis, and 30-day mortality. C-reactive protein, a measure of the inflammatory response, will be evaluated as a secondary outcome. One-year all-cause mortality as well as post-operative delirium will be additional secondary outcomes. We will enroll up to 970 patients which will provide 90% power to detect a 40% reduction in the primary outcome, including interim analyses for efficacy and futility at 25%, 50% and 75% enrollment. Discussion The DeLiT trial started in February 2007. We expect to reach our second interim analysis point in 2010. This large randomized controlled trial will provide a reliable assessment of the effects of corticosteroids, glucose control, and depth-of-anesthesia on perioperative inflammation and morbidity from major non-cardiac surgery. The factorial design will enable us to simultaneously study the effects of the three interventions in the same population, both individually and in different combinations. Such a design is an economically efficient way to study the three interventions in one clinical trial vs three. Trial registration This trial is

  17. A prospective study of paediatric cardiac surgical microsystems: assessing the relationships between non-routine events, teamwork and patient outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.; Schouten, T.; Smit, M.; Haas, F.; Beek, D. van der; Ven, J. van der; Barach, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Paediatric cardiac surgery has a low error tolerance and demands high levels of cognitive and technical performance. Growing evidence suggests that further improvements in patient outcomes depend on system factors, in particular, effective team skills. The hypotheses that small intraopera

  18. Initial outcomes of using allografts from donation after cardiac death donors for liver transplantation in New South Wales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, Jorieke M.; Verran, Deborah J.; deRoo, Ronald A.; Christine, Hazel; Crawford, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To report the early outcomes of the initial selection and use of donation after cardiac death (DCD) donor livers for transplantation in New South Wales, following a guidelines implementation process. Design and setting: Review of database and medical records from the Australian National

  19. Randomized controlled trials in frontotemporal dementia: cognitive and behavioral outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Justin B. Miller; Banks, Sarah J.; Léger, Gabriel C; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Progress has been made in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Targets for intervention have been identified, therapies are being developed, and clinical trials are advancing. A major challenge for FTD research is that multiple underlying pathologies can be associated with heterogeneous phenotypes. The neuropsychological profiles associated with FTD spectrum disorders often include executive dysfunction, language impairments and behavioral disturb...

  20. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Lund, Hans; Guyatt, GH

    2010-01-01

    Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta-analyses ......Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta......-analyses in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in high impact factor journals. Eligible were randomized controlled trials, using two or more PROs measuring pain or disability. A prioritized list was developed based on the capacity to discriminate between intervention...

  1. Significance of classifying antiarrhythmic actions since the cardiac arrhythmia suppression trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1991-02-01

    The Cardiac Antiarrhythmic Suppression Trial (CAST) showed flecainide and encainide induced excess mortality compared with placebo. Labeling drugs as Class 1C is based on clinical observations, comprising measurements of the electrocardiographic parameters QRS. H-V and J-T intervals and of effective refractory period (ERP) as follows: 1--(QRS) wide, 2--(HV) long, 3--(ERP) unchanged, 4--(JT) unchanged. In vitro electrophysiology helped to explain the clinical findings. Flecainide and encainide rendered Na channels as nonconducting, but F and E were only slowly released from the channels after repolarization. At any given drug concentration, a proportion of total channels were eliminated, and the steady-state proportion increased at rising heart rate. It is not proven that the properties that lead to classification of a drug as 1C were those that caused excess deaths in the CAST. The proarrhythmic tendency of 1C drugs can be reduced by beta-blockade, and the mechanisms of adrenergic arrhythmogenicity are discussed. Propafenone is both a 1C drug and a beta-blocker, and its pharmacologic profile is reviewed to illustrate how it resembles and differs from flecainide and encainide. Some features of the CAST are assessed with particular reference to the extent to which conclusions drawn from the results may be justifiably extrapolated to other drugs classified as 1C.

  2. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo John

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome measures that were used in the trials – the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, the Psoriasis Symptom Assessment (PSA Scale, and two itch measures, a Visual Analog Scale (VAS and the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF itch measure. Methods Subjects aged 18 to 70 years with moderate to severe psoriasis for at least 6 months were recruited into the two clinical trials (n = 1095. Internal consistency reliability was evaluated for all patient reported outcomes at baseline and at 12 weeks. Construct validity was evaluated by relations among the different patient reported outcomes and between the patient reported outcomes and the clinical assessments (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index; Overall Lesion Severity Scale; Physician's Global Assessment of Change assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks, as was the change over the course of the 12 week portion of the trial. Results Internal consistency reliability ranged from 0.86 to 0.95 for the patient reported outcome measures. The patient reported outcome measures were all shown to have significant construct validity with respect to each other and with respect to the clinical assessments. The four measures also demonstrated significant responsiveness to change in underlying clinical status of the patients over the course of the trial, as measured by the independently assessed clinical outcomes. Conclusions The DLQI, the PSA, VAS, and the NPF are considered useful tools for the measurement of dermatology

  3. Long term outcomes of cardiac transplant for immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis: The Mayo Clinic experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Martha; Gertz, Morie; McCurdy, Arleigh; Roeker, Lindsey; Kyle, Robert; Kushwaha, Sudhir; Daly, Richard; Dearani, Joseph; Rodeheffer, Richard; Frantz, Robert; Lacy, Martha; Hayman, Suzanne; McGregor, Christopher; Edwards, Brooks; Dispenzieri, Angela

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the outcome of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) in immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis. METHODS: The medical records of patients with AL who underwent orthotopic heart transplantation at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota from 1992 to 2011 were reviewed. Patients met at least one of the following at: New York Heart Association class IV heart failure, ventricular thickness > 15 mm, ejection fraction < 40%. Selection guidelines for heart transplant included age < 60 years, absence of multiple myeloma and significant extra-cardiac organ involvement. Baseline characteristics including age, gender, organ involvement, and New York Heart Association functional class were recorded. Laboratory data, waiting time until heart transplant, and type of treatment of the underlying plasma cell disorder were recorded. Survival from the time of OHT was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Survival of patients undergoing OHT for AL was compared to that of non-amyloid patients undergoing OHT during the same time period. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients (median age 53 years) with AL received OHT. There were no deaths in the immediate perioperative period. Twenty patients have died post OHT. For the entire cohort, the median overall survival was 3.5 years (95%CI: 1.2, 8.2 years). The 1-year survival post OHT was 77%, the 2-year survival 65%, and the 5-year survival 43%. The 5-year survival for non-amyloid patients undergoing OHT during the same era was 85%. Progressive amyloidosis contributed to death in twelve patients. Of those without evidence of progressive amyloidosis, the cause of death included complications of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for 3 patients, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder for 2 patients; and for the remaining one death was related to each of the following causes: acute rejection; cardiac vasculopathy; metastatic melanoma; myelodysplastic syndrome; and unknown. Eight patients had

  4. Association of serum lactate with outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novain, Michaël; Cattet, Florian; Plattier, Rémi; Nefzaoui, Mohamed; Hyvernat, Hervé; Raguin, Olivier; Kaidomar, Michel; Kerever, Sébastien; Ichai, Carole

    2017-01-01

    Aims Lactate reflects hypoxic insult in many conditions and is considered as a prognosis factor. But, after cardiac arrest, its interest is still debated. Our study aimed to assess the prognosis value of lactate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Methods This retrospective observational study included out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia in four ICUs. Lactate levels were compared at different times during the first 24 hours according to outcome at ICU discharge and to the type of death (multiorgan or neurologic failure). Results Two hundred and seventy-two patients were included, 89 good outcome and 183 poor outcome. In the latter group, 171 patients died, from multiorgan failure in 30% and neurologic failure in 70%. Lactate levels were higher in the poor compared to the good outcome patients at admission (5.4 (3.3–9.4) vs. 2.2 (1.5–3.6) mmol/L; padmission (7.9 (3.9–12.0) vs. 5.2 (3.3–8.8) mmol/L; p<0.01), H12 (4.9 (2.1–8.9) vs. 2.2 (1.4–3.4) mmol/L; p<0.01) and H24 (3.3 (1.8–5.5) vs. 1.4 (1.1–2.5) mmol/L; p<0.01). Initial lactate levels showed an increasing proportion of poor outcome from the first to fourth quartile. Conclusions After out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia, lactate levels during the first 24 hours seem linked with ICU outcome. Patients dying from multiorgan failure exhibit higher initial lactate concentrations than patients succumbing from neurological failure. PMID:28282398

  5. Randomized trials, generalizability, and meta-analysis: Graphical insights for binary outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Barnett S

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized trials stochastically answer the question. "What would be the effect of treatment on outcome if one turned back the clock and switched treatments in the given population?" Generalizations to other subjects are reliable only if the particular trial is performed on a random sample of the target population. By considering an unobserved binary variable, we graphically investigate how randomized trials can also stochastically answer the question, "What would be the effect of treatment on outcome in a population with a possibly different distribution of an unobserved binary baseline variable that does not interact with treatment in its effect on outcome?" Method For three different outcome measures, absolute difference (DIF, relative risk (RR, and odds ratio (OR, we constructed a modified BK-Plot under the assumption that treatment has the same effect on outcome if either all or no subjects had a given level of the unobserved binary variable. (A BK-Plot shows the effect of an unobserved binary covariate on a binary outcome in two treatment groups; it was originally developed to explain Simpsons's paradox. Results For DIF and RR, but not OR, the BK-Plot shows that the estimated treatment effect is invariant to the fraction of subjects with an unobserved binary variable at a given level. Conclusion The BK-Plot provides a simple method to understand generalizability in randomized trials. Meta-analyses of randomized trials with a binary outcome that are based on DIF or RR, but not OR, will avoid bias from an unobserved covariate that does not interact with treatment in its effect on outcome.

  6. Trial protocol OPPTIMUM– Does progesterone prophylaxis for the prevention of preterm labour improve outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Jane E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is a global problem, with a prevalence of 8 to 12% depending on location. Several large trials and systematic reviews have shown progestogens to be effective in preventing or delaying preterm birth in selected high risk women with a singleton pregnancy (including those with a short cervix or previous preterm birth. Although an improvement in short term neonatal outcomes has been shown in some trials these have not consistently been confirmed in meta-analyses. Additionally data on longer term outcomes is limited to a single trial where no difference in outcomes was demonstrated at four years of age of the child, despite those in the “progesterone” group having a lower incidence of preterm birth. Methods/Design The OPPTIMUM study is a double blind randomized placebo controlled trial to determine whether progesterone prophylaxis to prevent preterm birth has long term neonatal or infant benefit. Specifically it will study whether, in women with singleton pregnancy and at high risk of preterm labour, prophylactic vaginal natural progesterone, 200 mg daily from 22 – 34 weeks gestation, compared to placebo, improves obstetric outcome by lengthening pregnancy thus reducing the incidence of preterm delivery (before 34 weeks, improves neonatal outcome by reducing a composite of death and major morbidity, and leads to improved childhood cognitive and neurosensory outcomes at two years of age. Recruitment began in 2009 and is scheduled to close in Spring 2013. As of May 2012, over 800 women had been randomized in 60 sites. Discussion OPPTIMUM will provide further evidence on the effectiveness of vaginal progesterone for prevention of preterm birth and improvement of neonatal outcomes in selected groups of women with singleton pregnancy at high risk of preterm birth. Additionally it will determine whether any reduction in the incidence of preterm birth is accompanied by improved childhood outcome. Trial

  7. Mortality and neurological outcome in the elderly after target temperature management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess older age as a prognostic factor in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest (OHCA) and the interaction between age and level of target temperature management. METHODS AND RESULTS: 950 patients included in the target temperature management (TTM) trial were randomly...... age groups, p = 0.001, the same was true for ST segment elevation on ECG at admission, p ....5-5.0, p target temperature...

  8. Disability outcome measures in multiple sclerosis clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Jeffrey A; Reingold, Stephen C; Polman, Chris H;

    2012-01-01

    recommend practical refinements. Conversely, although substantial data support the multiple sclerosis functional composite as an alternative measure, changes to its component tests and scoring method are needed. Novel approaches, including the use of composite endpoints, patient-reported outcomes......, and measurement of biomarkers, show promise as adjuncts to the current disability measures, but are insufficiently validated to serve as substitutes. A collaborative approach that involves academic experts, regulators, industry representitives, and funding agencies is needed to most effectively develop disability...

  9. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial) - design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, A.D.O.; Schou, O.; Soja, A.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. Study Design The DANish Cardiac REHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally ran...

  10. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial)--design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. STUDY DESIGN: The DANish Cardiac ReHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally r...

  11. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Koo John; Thompson Christine; Stone Stephen P; Bresnahan Brian W; Shikiar Richard; Revicki Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome m...

  12. 02A. Design, Methods, and Outcomes for Recent Clinical Trials Utilizing Ayurvedic Medicine, Yoga, and Meditation

    OpenAIRE

    Rioux, Jennifer; Saper, Robert; Vinjamury, Sivarama; Elder, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Focus Area: Integrative Approaches to Care The panel discussants will present on the outcomes of four recent pragmatic trials covering the spectrum of Ayurvedic medicine, yoga, and meditation as therapeutic approaches for both acute and chronic conditions. The presenters will discuss: (1) a pilot study of a whole-systems Ayurveda and Yoga Therapy intervention for obesity; (2) a comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial of hatha yoga, physical therapy, and education for non-specific...

  13. Development and evaluation of an Individualized Outcome Measure (IOM) for randomized controlled trials in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Francesca; Williams, Julie; Bird, Victoria; Freidl, Marion; Le Boutillier, Clair; Leamy, Mary; Macpherson, Rob; Slade, Mike

    2015-12-01

    Pre-defined, researcher-selected outcomes are routinely used as the clinical end-point in randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, individualized approaches may be an effective way to assess outcome in mental health research. The present study describes the development and evaluation of the Individualized Outcome Measure (IOM), which is a patient-specific outcome measure to be used for RCTs of complex interventions. IOM was developed using a narrative review, expert consultation and piloting with mental health service users (n = 20). The final version of IOM comprises two components: Goal Attainment (GA) and Personalized Primary Outcome (PPO). For GA, patients identify one relevant goal at baseline and rate its attainment at follow-up. For PPO, patients choose an outcome domain related to their goal from a pre-defined list at baseline, and complete a standardized questionnaire assessing the chosen outcome domain at baseline and follow-up. A feasibility study indicated that IOM had adequate completion (89%) and acceptability (96%) rates in a clinical sample (n = 84). IOM was then evaluated in a RCT (ISRCTN02507940). GA and PPO components were associated with each other and with the trial primary outcome. The use of the PPO component of IOM as the primary outcome could be considered in future RCTs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Agreement between public register and adjudication committee outcome in a cardiovascular randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Erik; Hilden, Jørgen; Winkel, Per;

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The objective of this study is to describe the agreement between randomized trial outcome assessment by committee and outcomes entirely identified through public registers. METHODS: In the CLARICOR trial, 4,372 patients with stable coronary heart disease received a short course...... of Diseases-coded diagnoses of the public registries into the same categories. After cross-tabulation of the committee diagnoses with National Patient Register diagnoses and Register of Causes of Death, we calculate agreement and compare the estimated intervention effects of the 2 data sets. RESULTS...

  15. Interpreting the clinical importance of treatment outcomes in chronic pain clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, R.H.; Turk, D.C.; Wyrwich, K.W.;

    2008-01-01

    . Provisional benchmarks for identifying clinically important changes in specific outcome measures that can be used for outcome studies of treatments for chronic pain are proposed. PERSPECTIVE: Systematically collecting and reporting the recommended information needed to evaluate the clinical importance......A consensus meeting was convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) to provide recommendations for interpreting clinical importance of treatment outcomes in clinical trials of the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic pain treatments. A group...... of 40 participants from universities, governmental agencies, a patient self-help organization, and the pharmaceutical industry considered methodologic issues and research results relevant to determining the clinical importance of changes in the specific outcome measures previously recommended by IMMPACT...

  16. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in ovarian cancer clinical trials-lost opportunities and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, M; Mercieca-Bebber, R L; King, M T

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased recognition of the value of including patient-reported outcomes (PROs) as important end points in phase III clinical trials, there has been a lack of pre-specified PRO hypotheses and shortcomings with the analyses and interpretation of PROs in many ovarian cancer trials. This paper discusses and provides examples of the so-called lost opportunities in ovarian cancer trials. These include: (i) no clear pre-specified PRO hypotheses; (ii) PRO end points not included; (iii) insensitive PRO end point selection; (iv) collection of poor-quality PRO data not suitable for analysis; (v) differences in PROs between treatment arms ignored; and (vi) poor reporting quality. We can learn from the past and with relatively little additional effort, improve the collection and interpretation of PRO data in future ovarian cancer trials. The importance of doing so is underpinned by recent initiatives to improve the standard and usefulness of PRO data in clinical trials. These include the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance for PROs to support labelling claims, the European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO MCBS), the International Society for Quality-of-Life Research PRO reporting guidance and the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Clinical Trials (CONSORT)-PRO-extension statement which includes a checklist of recommended items to include in PRO sections of trial protocols. Promoting the importance of hypothesis-driven PROs in ovarian cancer clinical trials will lead to improvements in the design of these trials and the interpretation of their results.

  17. Measuring and reporting quality of life outcomes in clinical trials in cystic fibrosis: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Anna

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Good quality clinical trials are essential to inform the best cystic fibrosis (CF management and care, by determining and comparing the effectiveness of new and existing therapies and drug delivery systems. The formal inclusion of quality of life (QoL as an outcome measure in CF clinical trials is becoming more common. Both an appropriate QoL measure and sound methodology are required in order to draw valid inferences about treatments and QoL. A review was undertaken of randomised controlled trials in cystic fibrosis where QoL was measured. EMBASE, MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science were searched to locate all full papers in the English language reporting randomised controlled trials in cystic fibrosis, published between January 1991 and December 2004. All Cochrane reviews published before December 2004 were hand searched. Papers were included if the authors had reported that they had measured QoL or well being in the trial. 16 trials were identified. The interventions investigated were: antibiotics (4; home versus hospital administration of antibiotics (1; steroids (1; mucolytic therapies (6; exercise (3 and pancreatic enzymes (1. Not one trial evaluated in this review provided conclusive results concerning QoL. This review highlights many of the pitfalls of QoL measurement in CF clinical trials and provides constructive information concerning the design and reporting of trials measuring QoL.

  18. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC) trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe Chris; Lamb Sarah E; Lall Ranjit; Horton Jessica; Deakin Charles; Cooke Matthew W; Woollard Malcolm; Perkins Gavin D; Quinn Tom; Slowther Anne; Gates Simon

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost ef...

  19. Combination of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) and Cardiac Surgery Score (CASUS) to Improve Outcome Prediction in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Fabian; Heldwein, Matthias B; Bayer, Ole; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Dohmen, Pascal M; Wahlers, Thorsten; Hekmat, Khosro

    2015-08-17

    BACKGROUND We hypothesized that the combination of a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system would improve the accuracy of mortality prediction and therefore combined the preoperative 'additive EuroSCORE' (European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation) with the postoperative 'additive CASUS' (Cardiac Surgery Score) to form the 'modified CASUS'. MATERIAL AND METHODS We included all consecutive adult patients after cardiac surgery during January 2007 and December 2010 in our prospective study. Our single-centre study was conducted in a German general referral university hospital. The original additive and the 'modified CASUS' were tested using calibration and discrimination statistics. We compared the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver characteristic curves (ROC) by DeLong's method and calculated overall correct classification (OCC) values. RESULTS The mean age among the total of 5207 patients was 67.2 ± 10.9 years. Whilst the ICU mortality was 5.9% we observed a mean length of ICU stay of 4.6 ± 7.0 days. Both models demonstrated excellent discriminatory power (mean AUC of 'modified CASUS': ≥ 0.929; 'additive CASUS': ≥ 0.920), with no significant differences according to DeLong. Neither model showed a significant p-value (cardiac surgery by combining a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system. A separate calculation of the two individual elements is therefore recommended.

  20. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R

    2012-04-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants' ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed.

  1. The effect of an educational intervention on coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients' participation rate in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a controlled health care trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikov Ilia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation has a beneficial effect on the prognosis and quality of life of cardiac patients, and has been found to be cost-effective. This report describes a comprehensive and low cost educational intervention designed to increase the attendance at cardiac rehabilitation programs of patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods/Design A controlled prospective intervention trial. The control arm comprised 520 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery between January 2004 and May 2005 in five medical centers across Israel. This group received no additional treatment beyond usual care. The intervention arm comprised 504 patients recruited from the same cardiothoracic departments between June 2005 and November 2006. This group received oral and written explanations about the advantages of participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs and a telephone call two weeks after hospital discharge intended to further encourage their enrollment. The medical staff attended a one-hour seminar on cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, it was recommended that referral to cardiac rehabilitation be added to the letter of discharge from the hospital. Both study groups were interviewed before surgery and one-year post surgery. A one-year post-operative interview assessed factors affecting patient attendance at cardiac rehabilitation programs, as well as the structure and content of the cardiac rehabilitation programs attended. Anthropometric parameters were measured at pre- and post-operative interviews;- and medical information was obtained from patient medical records. The effect of cardiac rehabilitation on one- and three-year mortality was assessed. Discussion We report a low cost yet comprehensive intervention designed to increase cardiac rehabilitation participation by raising both patient and medical staff awareness to the potential benefits of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial

  2. Factors associated with patient-reported cosmetic outcome in the Young Boost Breast Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Patricia J. A. M.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Bartelink, Harry; Fourquet, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; van Loon, Judith; Maduro, John H.; Russell, Nicola S.; Scheijmans, Luc J. E. E.; Schinagl, Dominic A. X.; Westenberg, Antonia H.; Poortmans, Philip; Boersma, Liesbeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate which factors are related to patient reported cosmetic outcome (PRCO) after breast conserving therapy. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, 2421 cT1-2N0-2a breast cancer patients were randomised in the Young Boost Trial between a 16 and a 26 Gy boost to the tumour bed. Cosmesis was sc

  3. The impact of renal dysfunction on outcomes in the ExTRACT-TIMI 25 trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, K.A.; Antman, E.M.; Montalescot, G.; Agewall, S.; SomaRaju, B.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Lopez-Sendon, J.; Hod, H.; Murphy, S.A.; Braunwald, E.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The ExTRACT-TIMI 25 (Enoxaparin and Thrombolysis Reperfusion for Acute Myocardial Infarction Treatment-Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 25) trial provided the opportunity to evaluate the impact of renal dysfunction on outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarct

  4. Out-of hospital cardiac arrest in Okayama city (Japan: outcome report according to the "Utsutein Style".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi,Hoei

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in the city of Okayama, Japan, during a 1-year period after the reorganization of defibrillation by Emergency Life-Saving Technicians (ELSTs with standing orders of CPR. The data were collected prospectively according to an Utstein style between June 1, 2003 and May 31, 2004; OHCA was confirmed in 363 patients. Cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac etiology (179 was witnessed by a bystander in 62 (34.6% cases. Of this group, ventricular fibrillation (VF was documented in 20 cases (32.3%, and 1 patient (5% was discharged alive without severe neurological disability. This outcome is average in Japan, but it is quite low level compared with Western countries because there is less VF in Japan. The Utstein style revealed that we must try to detect VF before the rhythm changes and to provide defibrillation as soon as possible in order to improve outcomes. Further research will be required to accurately evaluate OHCA in Okayama city.

  5. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in an urban/rural area during 1991 and 1996 : have emergency medical service changes improved outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Absalom, AR; Bradley, P; Soar, J

    1999-01-01

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is influenced by pre-hospital emergency medical care. This study compares outcome of cardiac arrest victims presenting to an emergency department serving a mixed urban/rural area (Norfolk, UK) in 1991 with 1996. Between these years the regional emergency

  6. The verdict on jury trials for juveniles: the effects of defendant's age on trial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warling, Diane; Peterson-Badali, Michele

    2003-01-01

    With the progression to more adult-like policies and procedures for youth in the justice system, the right to a jury trial has been extended to young offenders. These youth would not be tried by a jury of their peers, however, but by a jury of adults. The concern is that adult jurors may hold negative attitudes about youth that might influence their decision making in a case involving a young defendant. Two studies examined whether and under what conditions defendant's age affects jurors' decisions about the guilt and sentencing of an accused. In study 1, data were gathered from two samples of jury eligible adults: one university sample and one public sample. Mock jurors read written transcripts of a trial involving a defendant who was presented as either 13, 17, or 25 years of age. Results indicated that the defendant's age had no effect on mock jurors' verdict or their ratings of defendant guilt. However, younger defendants were granted shorter sentences than the adult defendants. In study 2, mock jurors read the same trial presented in study 1 but were asked to deliberate about the case and render group verdicts. These group verdicts did not differ significantly by defendant's age. Age-related themes that emerged from group deliberations were identified, and results indicated that age tended to be used as a mitigating factor in favor of youth rather than against them. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for youth justice policy and practice.

  7. Assessment of long-term outcomes for the STRokE DOC telemedicine trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Brett C; Raman, Rema; Ernstrom, Karin; Tafreshi, Gilda M; Huisa, Branko; Stemer, Andrew B; Hemmen, Thomas M

    2012-05-01

    Telemedicine can provide stroke evaluations in locations with limited available expertise. The reliability of telestroke has been established. Decision making efficacy has been shown in the National Institutes of Health's STRokE DOC trial. No prospective trial has assessed long-term telestroke outcomes, however. In an institutional review board-approved trial (NCT00936455), we contacted patients originally enrolled in the STRokE DOC trial. A telephone script was used to verify consent. Patients were asked standardized questions regarding disposition, modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score, mortality, and recurrent stroke for 2 retrospective time points (6 and 12 months postevent) and one current time point. Blind was maintained. Primary outcome measures of mortality and percent mRS score of 0-1 [%mRS(0-1)] at 6 months are reported. Wilcoxon's rank-sum test was used for continuous variables, and Fisher's exact was used for categorical variables. Of the original 222 participants, 75 patients or surrogates could be contacted. Mean time from enrollment was 3.96 ± 1.0 years (range, 2.33-5.45 years). Mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score was 8 ± 7 (5 ± 8 for telephone; 12 ± 8 for telemedicine; P = .002). The rate of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) use was 31%. Six-month %mRS(0-1) outcome was not different, at 42%. Mortality after imputation to the entire study sample also was not different, at 18%. There was no difference in the rate of recurrent stroke (P = .61). Some 85% of patients were home at 6 months. This study reports a good 6-month outcome for stroke patients evaluated by telemedicine or telephone. This design is limited by the time since original enrollment and resultant inability to contact participants. Although these findings can add to the limited data on telemedicine outcomes, a prospective trial is needed.

  8. Randomized outcome trial of nutrient-enriched formula and neurodevelopment outcome in preterm infants

    OpenAIRE

    Giannì, Maria Lorella; Roggero, Paola; Amato, Orsola; Picciolini, Odoardo; Piemontese, Pasqua; Liotto, Nadia; Taroni, Francesca; Mosca, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm infants are at risk for adverse neurodevelopment. Furthermore, nutrition may play a key role in supporting neurodevelopment. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a nutrient-enriched formula fed to preterm infants after hospital discharge could improve their neurodevelopment at 24 months (term-corrected age). Methods We conducted an observer-blinded, single-center, randomized controlled trial in infants admitted to the Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Po...

  9. Effectiveness of prophylactic non-invasive ventilation on respiratory function in the postoperative phase of pediatric cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla R. S. Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic, non-invasive ventilation (NIV on respiratory function in seven- to 16-year-old children in the post-operative phase of cardiac surgery. Method A randomized, controlled trial with 50 children who had undergone cardiac surgery with median sternotomy. After extubation, patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control group (n=26, which received instructions regarding posture, early ambulation, and cough stimulation, and CPAP group (continuous positive airway pressure; n=24, which received the same instructions as the control group and CPAP=10 cmH20 twice daily for 30 minutes from the 1st to the 5th post-operative day (POD. As a primary outcome, lung function was evaluated before and on the 1st, 3rd, and 5th PODs with measures of respiratory rate (RR, tidal volume (TV, slow vital capacity (SVC, inspiratory capacity (IC, minute volume (MV, peak expiratory flow (PEF, and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP. As secondary outcomes, the time of hospitalization and intensive care were recorded. A mixed, linear regression model and z-test were used to analyze respiratory function, considering p<0.05. Results All variables, except RR and MV, showed a significant drop on the 1st POD, with gradual recovery; however, only MIP had returned to pre-operative values on the 5th POD in both groups. The RR showed a significant increase on the 1st POD, with a gradual reduction but without returning to baseline. In the intergroup analysis, significant improvement (p=0.04 was observed only in PEF in the CPAP group on the 1st DPO. The length of hospitalization and intensive care showed no significant differences. Conclusion NIV was safe and well accepted in this group of patients, and the protocol used was effective in improving PEF on the 1st DPO in the CPAP group.

  10. A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter; Liu, Yu; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, Kathleen; Stock, Ronald; Chou, Li-Shan

    2014-04-01

    A previous randomized, controlled trial of tai chi showed improvements in objectively measured balance and other motor-related outcomes in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study evaluated whether patient-reported outcomes could be improved through exercise interventions and whether improvements were associated with clinical outcomes and exercise adherence. In a secondary analysis of the tai chi trial, patient-reported and clinical outcomes and exercise adherence measures were compared between tai chi and resistance training and between tai chi and stretching exercise. Patient-reported outcome measures were perceptions of health-related benefits resulting from participation, assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) and Vitality Plus Scale (VPS). Clinical outcome measures included motor symptoms, assessed by a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Examination (UPDRS-ME) and a 50-foot speed walk. Information on continuing exercise after the structured interventions were terminated was obtained at a 3-month postintervention follow-up. Tai chi participants reported significantly better improvement in the PDQ-8 (-5.77 points, P = 0.014) than did resistance training participants and in PDQ-8 (-9.56 points, P tai chi, patient-reported improvement in the PDQ-8 and VPS was significantly correlated with their clinical outcomes of UPDRS-ME and a 50-foot walk, but these correlations were not statistically different from those shown for resistance training or stretching. However, patient-reported outcomes from tai chi training were associated with greater probability of continued exercise behavior than were either clinical outcomes or patient-reported outcomes from resistance training or stretching. Tai chi improved patient-reported perceptions of health-related benefits, which were found to be associated with a greater probability of exercise adherence. The findings indicate the potential of patient perceptions to drive exercise

  11. High Thoracic Epidural Analgesia as an Adjunct to General Anesthesia is Associated with Better Outcome in Low-to-Moderate Risk Cardiac Surgery Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenger, Michael; Fabrin, Anja; Schmidt, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) to general anesthesia in cardiac surgery patients to enhance the fast-track and improvement in outcome.......The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) to general anesthesia in cardiac surgery patients to enhance the fast-track and improvement in outcome....

  12. Gender differences in clinical outcomes for cocaine dependence: Randomized clinical trials of behavioral therapy and disulfiram✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, Elise E.; Babuscio, Theresa A.; Nich, Charla; Ball, Samuel A.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite extensive research on gender differences in addiction, there are relatively few published reports comparing treatment outcomes for women versus men based on evidence-based treatments evaluated in randomized clinical trials. Methods An aggregate sample comprised of data from five randomized clinical trials of treatment for cocaine dependence (N = 434) was evaluated for gender differences in clinical outcomes. Secondary analyses compared gender differences in outcome by medication condition (disulfiram versus no medication) and across multiple behavioral treatment conditions. Results Women, compared with men, had poorer treatment outcomes on multiple measures of cocaine use during treatment and at post-treatment follow-up. These results appear to be primarily accounted for by disulfiram being less effective in women compared with men. There was no evidence of meaningful gender differences in outcome as a function of the behavioral therapies evaluated. Conclusions These findings suggest that women and men may benefit to similar degrees from some empirically validated behavioral treatments for addiction. Conversely, some addiction pharmacotherapies, such as disulfiram, may be associated with poorer outcomes among women relative to men and point to the need for careful assessment of pharmacological treatments in both sexes prior to widespread clinical implementation. PMID:25457739

  13. Management of Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO Alerts in Clinical Trials: A Cross Sectional Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Kyte

    Full Text Available Assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PROs provides valuable information to inform patient-centered care, but may also reveal 'PRO alerts': psychological distress or physical symptoms that may require an immediate response. Ad-hoc management of PRO alerts in clinical trials may result in suboptimal patient care or potentially bias trial results. To gain greater understanding of current practice in PRO alert management we conducted a national survey of personnel involved in clinical trials with a PRO endpoint.We conducted a national cross-sectional survey of 767 UK-based research nurses, data managers/coordinators, trial managers and chief/principal investigators involved in clinical trials using PROs. Respondents were self-selected volunteers from a non-randomised sample of eligible individuals recruited via 55 UK Clinical Research Collaboration Registered Clinical Trials Units and 19 Comprehensive Local Research Networks. Questions centred on the proportion of trial personnel encountering alerts, how staff responded to PRO alerts and whether current guidance was deemed sufficient to support research personnel. We undertook descriptive analyses of the quantitative data and directed thematic analysis of free-text comments. 20% of research nurses did not view completed PRO questionnaires and were not in a position to discover alerts, 39-50% of the remaining respondent group participants reported encountering PRO alerts. Of these, 83% of research nurses and 54% of data managers/trial coordinators reported taking action to assist the trial participant, but less than half were able to record the intervention in the trial documentation. Research personnel reported current PRO alert guidance/training was insufficient.Research personnel are intermittently exposed to PRO alerts. Some intervene to help trial participants, but are not able to record this intervention in the trial documentation, risking co-intervention bias. Other staff do not check PRO

  14. Does Quality of Radiation Therapy Predict Outcomes of Multicenter Cooperative Group Trials? A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, Alysa, E-mail: alysa.fairchild@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Straube, William [Advanced Technology Consortium, Imaged-Guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Followill, David [Radiological Physics Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Central review of radiation therapy (RT) delivery within multicenter clinical trials was initiated in the early 1970s in the United States. Early quality assurance publications often focused on metrics related to process, logistics, and timing. Our objective was to review the available evidence supporting correlation of RT quality with clinical outcomes within cooperative group trials. A MEDLINE search was performed to identify multicenter studies that described central subjective assessment of RT protocol compliance (quality). Data abstracted included method of central review, definition of deviations, and clinical outcomes. Seventeen multicenter studies (1980-2012) were identified, plus one Patterns of Care Study. Disease sites were hematologic, head and neck, lung, breast, and pancreas. Between 0 and 97% of treatment plans received an overall grade of acceptable. In 7 trials, failure rates were significantly higher after inadequate versus adequate RT. Five of 9 and 2 of 5 trials reported significantly worse overall and progression-free survival after poor-quality RT, respectively. One reported a significant correlation, and 2 reported nonsignificant trends toward increased toxicity with noncompliant RT. Although more data are required, protocol-compliant RT may decrease failure rates and increase overall survival and likely contributes to the ability of collected data to answer the central trial question.

  15. Interpretation of cardiovascular outcome trials in type 2 diabetes needs a multiaxial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Odd Erik

    2015-08-10

    In cardiovascular (CV) diabetology a "one-size fits-all" approach needs caution as vasculopathy and CV manifestations in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) with short disease duration are different as compared to those with longer duration. This is of relevance when interpreting results of CV outcome trials as responses to any intervention aimed to reduce CV risk might be different in patients with established vasculopathy as compared to those without, where also the duration of the intervention may play a role. Additionally, the mode-of-action of the intervention and its assumed time to peak CV risk modulation need to be taken into account: an intervention with possibly immediate effects, like on blood pressure or other direct functional dynamic parameters such as endothelial function or renal hemodynamics, could likely provide a meaningful impact on CV outcomes over a shorter time span than interventions that primarily target pathways that work on atherosclerotic processes, organ-remodelling, or vessel integrity. We are now faced with CV outcome results to interpret from a plethora of outcomes trials in T2D, some of which are testing the CV risk modulation predominantly beyond glucose lowering, e.g., as is the case for several trials testing the newer therapy classes di-peptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, glucagon-like protein-1 receptor analogues and sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, and this paper reviews the data that support a call for a multiaxial approach to interpret these results.

  16. Impact of advanced cardiac life support training program on the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwalpreet Sodhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guidelines on performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR have been published from time to time, and formal training programs are conducted based on these guidelines. Very few data are available in world literature highlighting the impact of these trainings on CPR outcome. Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the American Heart Association (AHA-certified basic life support (BLS and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS provider course on the outcomes of CPR in our hospital. Materials and Methods : An AHA-certified BLS and ACLS provider training programme was conducted in our hospital in the first week of October 2009, in which all doctors in the code blue team and intensive care units were given training. The retrospective study was performed over an 18-month period. All in-hospital adult cardiac arrest victims in the pre-BLS/ACLS training period (January 2009 to September 2009 and the post-BLS/ACLS training period (October 2009 to June 2010 were included in the study. We compared the outcomes of CPR between these two study periods. Results: There were a total of 627 in-hospital cardiac arrests, 284 during the pre-BLS/ACLS training period and 343 during the post-BLS/ACLS training period. In the pre-BLS/ACLS training period, 52 patients (18.3% had return of spontaneous circulation, compared with 97 patients (28.3% in the post-BLS/ACLS training period (P < 0.005. Survival to hospital discharge was also significantly higher in the post-BLS/ACLS training period (67 patients, 69.1% than in the pre-BLS/ACLS training period (12 patients, 23.1% (P < 0.0001. Conclusion : Formal certified BLS and ACLS training of healthcare professionals leads to definitive improvement in the outcome of CPR.

  17. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of brief, habit-based, lifestyle advice for cancer survivors: exploring behavioural outcomes for the Advancing Survivorship Cancer Outcomes Trial (ASCOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeken, Rebecca J; Croker, Helen; Heinrich, Maggie; Smith, Lee; Williams, Kate; Hackshaw, Allan; Hines, John; Machesney, Michael; Krishnaswamy, Madhavan; Cavanagh, Sharon; Roylance, Rebecca; Hill, Alison; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Wardle, Jane; Fisher, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Positive health behaviours such as regular physical activity and a healthy diet have significant effects on cancer outcomes. There is a need for simple but effective behaviour change interventions with the potential to be implemented within the cancer care pathway. Habit-based advice encourages repetition of a behaviour in a consistent context so that the behaviour becomes increasingly automatic in response to a specific contextual cue. This approach therefore encourages long-term behaviour change and can be delivered through printed materials. ‘Healthy Habits for Life’ is a brief intervention based on habit theory, and incorporating printed materials plus a personally tailored discussion, that has been designed specifically for patients with a diagnosis of cancer. The aim of this trial was to test the effect of ‘Healthy Habits for Life’ on a composite health behaviour risk index (CHBRI) over 3 months in patients with a diagnosis of breast, colorectal or prostate cancer. Method and analysis A 2-arm, individually randomised controlled trial in patients with breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. Patients will be recruited over 18 months from 7 National Health Service Trusts in London and Essex. Following baseline assessments and allocation to intervention or usual care, patients are followed up at 3 and 6 months. The primary outcome will be change in CHBRI at 3 months. Maintenance of any changes over 6 months, and changes in individual health behaviours (including dietary intake, physical activity, alcohol consumption and smoking status) will also be explored. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained through the National Research Ethics Service Committee South Central—Oxford B via the Integrated Research Application System (reference number 14/SC/1369). Results of this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and scientific presentations. Trial registration number 17421871. PMID:27881518

  18. Pet ownership, social support, and one-year survival after acute myocardial infarction in the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, E; Thomas, S A

    1995-12-15

    Social support and pet ownership, a nonhuman form of social support, have both been associated with increased coronary artery disease survival. The independent effects of pet ownership, social support, disease severity, and other psychosocial factors on 1-year survival after acute myocardial infarction are examined prospectively. The Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial provided physiologic data on a group of post-myocardial infarction patients with asymptomatic ventricular arrhythmias. An ancillary study provided psychosocial data, including pet ownership, social support, recent life events, future life events, anxiety, depression, coronary prone behavior, and expression of anger. Subjects (n = 424) were randomly selected from patients attending participating Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial sites and completed baseline psychosocial questionnaires. One year survival data were obtained from 369 patients (87%), of whom 112 (30.4%) owned pets and 20 (5.4%) died. Logistic regression indicates that high social support (p owning a pet (p = 0.085) tend to predict survival independent of physiologic severity and demographic and other psychosocial factors. Dog owners (n = 87, 1 died) are significantly less likely to die within 1 year than those who did not own dogs (n = 282, 19 died; p pet ownership and social support are significant predictors of survival, independent of the effects of the other psychosocial factors and physiologic status. These data confirm and extend previous findings relating pet ownership and social support to survival among patients with coronary artery disease.

  19. Reducing cardiovascular risk in spouses of cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Bernice C; Rowland, Sheri; Mancuso, Kerry; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Norman, Joseph F; Shurmur, Scott; Tesina, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined risk-reducing interventions in spouses of coronary artery bypass patients. This study examined the effects of the Partners Together in Health (PaTH) intervention versus usual care on cardiovascular risk factors. Spouses in the experimental group (n = 17/group) attended cardiac rehabilitation with patients and made the same physical activity and healthy eating changes as patients. Spouses in the usual care group attended educational classes with patients. Spouses' 30-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Scale before and after cardiac rehabilitation (3 months), and at 6 months. Spouses in both groups significantly reduced 30-year risk scores at 3 and 6 months. Exercise was the key ingredient in lowering risk. There was a trend toward reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both groups. Although there were no group differences, having spouses participate in cardiac rehabilitation with the patient was effective for reducing spouses' cardiovascular risk.

  20. SCANDCLEFT RANDOMIZED TRIALS: SPEECH OUTCOMES IN 5-YEAR-OLDS WITH UCLP - velopharyngeal competency and hypernasality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmander, Anette; Persson, Christina; Willadsen, Elisabeth;

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Adequate velopharyngeal function and speech is a main objective in treatment of cleft palate. The aim was to investigate if there were differences in velopharyngeal competency and hypernasality at 5 years of age in children with UCLP randomized to different surgical methods for primary...... palatal repair were tested against a common procedure. Main Outcome Measures: VPC-Sum, a composite score of velopharyngeal competency, and hypernasality from blinded assessments. Results: Occurrence of more than mild hypernasality and VPC-Sum scores of incompetence varied between 18 and 40......% with no statistical significant difference between the arms in any of the three trials. Conclusions: The methods within each trial revealed similar results regarding velopharyngeal competency at age 5 years. Similar speech outcome was reached with different methods for primary palatal repair but the burden of care...

  1. Analysing data from patient-reported outcome and quality of life endpoints for cancer clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottomley, Andrew; Pe, Madeline; Sloan, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    are analysed and interpreted make it difficult to compare results across trials, and hinders the application of research findings to inform publications, product labelling, clinical guidelines, and health policy. To address these problems, the Setting International Standards in Analyzing Patient......-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Endpoints Data (SISAQOL) initiative has been established. This consortium, directed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), was convened to provide recommendations on how to standardise the analysis of HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes...... data in cancer randomised trials. This Personal View discusses the reasons why this project was initiated, the rationale for the planned work, and the expected benefits to cancer research, patient and provider decision making, care delivery, and policy making....

  2. Multimodal analgesia versus traditional opiate based analgesia after cardiac surgery, a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Wanscher, Michael Jaeger;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate if an opiate sparing multimodal regimen of dexamethasone, gabapentin, ibuprofen and paracetamol had better analgesic effect, less side effects and was safe compared to a traditional morphine and paracetamol regimen after cardiac surgery. METHODS: Open-label, prospective....... 1, p = 0.31). 30-day mortality was 1 vs. 2, p = 0.54. CONCLUSIONS: In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a multimodal regimen offered significantly better analgesia than a traditional opiate regimen. Nausea and vomiting complaints were significantly reduced. No safety issues were observed...

  3. Glycemia and Its Relationship to Outcomes in the Metformin in Gestational Diabetes Trial

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how glucose control in women with GDM treated with metformin and/or insulin influenced pregnancy outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Women randomly assigned to metformin or insulin treatment in the Metformin in Gestational Diabetes (MiG) trial had baseline glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results and A1C documented, together with all capillary glucose measurements during treatment. In the 724 women who had glucose data for analysis, tertiles of baseline glucose values an...

  4. Target Temperature Management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--a randomized, parallel-group, assessor-blinded clinical trial--rationale and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; al-Subaie, Nawaf;

    2012-01-01

    Experimental animal studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurologic function with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest. International guidelines advocate the use of a target temperature management of 32°C to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours after resuscitation...... from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A systematic review indicates that the evidence for recommending this intervention is inconclusive, and the GRADE level of evidence is low. Previous trials were small, with high risk of bias, evaluated select populations, and did not treat hyperthermia...

  5. Choice of design and outcomes in trials among children with moderate acute malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Henrik; Michaelsen, Kim F; Wells, Jonathan C

    2015-03-01

    There is a need for trials on the effects of food aid products for children with moderate acute malnutrition, to identify how best to restore body tissues and function. The choice of control intervention is a major challenge, with both ethical and scientific implications. While randomized trials are needed, special designs, such as cluster-randomized, stepped-wedged or factorial designs may offer advantages. Anthropometry is widely used as the primary outcome in such trials, but anthropometric traits do not refer directly to specific organs, tissues, or functions. Thus, it is difficult to understand what components of health might be impacted by public health programs, or the underlying mechanisms whereby improved nutritional status might benefit short- and long-term health. Measurement of body composition, specific growth markers and functional outcomes may provide greater insight into the nature and implications of growth failure and recovery. There are now several methodologies suitable for application in infants and young children, e.g., measuring body composition with deuterium dilution, physical activity with accelerometers and linear growth with knemometers. To evaluate the generalizability of the findings from nutrition trials, it is important to collect data on baseline nutritional status.

  6. Interpretation of cardiovascular outcome trials in type 2diabetes needs a multiaxial approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    In cardiovascular (CV) diabetology a "one-size fitsall"approach needs caution as vasculopathy and CVmanifestations in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D)with short disease duration are different as comparedto those with longer duration. This is of relevance wheninterpreting results of CV outcome trials as responsesto any intervention aimed to reduce CV risk might bedifferent in patients with established vasculopathy ascompared to those without, where also the durationof the intervention may play a role. Additionally, themode-of-action of the intervention and its assumedtime to peak CV risk modulation need to be takeninto account an intervention with possibly immediateeffects, like on blood pressure or other direct functionaldynamic parameters such as endothelial function orrenal hemodynamics, could likely provide a meaningfulimpact on CV outcomes over a shorter time span thaninterventions that primarily target pathways that workon atherosclerotic processes, organ-remodelling, orvessel integrity. We are now faced with CV outcomeresults to interpret from a plethora of outcomes trials inT2D, some of which are testing the CV risk modulationpredominantly beyond glucose lowering, e.g. , as isthe case for several trials testing the newer therapyclasses di-peptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, glucagonlikeprotein-1 receptor analogues and sodium glucoseco-transporter-2 inhibitors, and this paper reviews thedata that support a call for a multiaxial approach tointerpret these results.

  7. Ibuprofen - a Safe Analgesic During Cardiac Surgery Recovery? A Randomized Controlled Trial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddiq Mohammad Qazi

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that patients treated postoperatively, following cardiac surgery, are at no greater risk of harm if short term slow release ibuprofen combined with lansoprazole treatment is used when compared to an oxycodone based regimen. Renal function should, however, be closely monitored and in the event of any decrease in renal function ibuprofen must be discontinued.

  8. Effect of Vitamin C on adrenal suppression by etomidate induction in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanwita Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Etomidate is usually preferred in the induction of cardiac compromised patients due to its relative cardiovascular stability. However, the use of this drug has been limited as etomidate induces suppression of cortisol biosynthesis as a result of blockade of 11-beta-hydroxylation in the adrenal gland, mediated by the imidazole radical of etomidate. This study was carried out to observe the effect of Vitamin C on adrenal suppression after etomidate induction in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: A total of 78 patients were randomly distributed into two groups. Group-I received oral Vitamin C (500 mg twice daily and Group-II received antacid tablet as placebo twice daily instead of Vitamin C for 7 consecutive days prior to surgery till morning of surgery. Patients of both the groups induced with etomidate (0.1-0.3 mg/kg. Blood cortisol was estimated at different points of time till 24 th postinduction hour/blood lactate, glucose, hemodynamic parameters, and perioperative outcomes were assessed. Results: Data of seventy patients (n = 35 in each group were finally analyzed. Cortisol level is statistically significantly higher in Group-I (69.51 ± 7.65 as compared to Group-II (27.74 ± 4.72 (P < 0.05 in the 1 st postinduction hour. In Group-II, cortisol was consistently lower for 1 st 24 postinduction hour. Total adrenaline requirement was statistically significantly high in Group-II. Time of extubation, length of Intensive Care Unit stay arrhythmia was similar in both the groups. Conclusion: Vitamin C effectively inhibits etomidate-induced adrenal suppression in cardiac patients, thereby etomidate can be used as a safe alternative for induction in cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass when pretreated with Vitamin C.

  9. A simple method for analyzing data from a randomized trial with a missing binary outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freedman Laurence S

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many randomized trials involve missing binary outcomes. Although many previous adjustments for missing binary outcomes have been proposed, none of these makes explicit use of randomization to bound the bias when the data are not missing at random. Methods We propose a novel approach that uses the randomization distribution to compute the anticipated maximum bias when missing at random does not hold due to an unobserved binary covariate (implying that missingness depends on outcome and treatment group. The anticipated maximum bias equals the product of two factors: (a the anticipated maximum bias if there were complete confounding of the unobserved covariate with treatment group among subjects with an observed outcome and (b an upper bound factor that depends only on the fraction missing in each randomization group. If less than 15% of subjects are missing in each group, the upper bound factor is less than .18. Results We illustrated the methodology using data from the Polyp Prevention Trial. We anticipated a maximum bias under complete confounding of .25. With only 7% and 9% missing in each arm, the upper bound factor, after adjusting for age and sex, was .10. The anticipated maximum bias of .25 × .10 =.025 would not have affected the conclusion of no treatment effect. Conclusion This approach is easy to implement and is particularly informative when less than 15% of subjects are missing in each arm.

  10. The Impacts of Inclusion in Clinical Trials on Outcomes among Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC.

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    Ji Yun Lee

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer (MBC remains a devastating and incurable disease. Over the past decade, the implementation of clinical trials both with and without molecular targeted therapeutics has impacted the daily clinical treatment of patients with MBC. In this study, we determine whether including MBC patients in clinical trials affects clinical outcomes.We retrospectively reviewed data for a total of 863 patients diagnosed with initial or recurrent (after receiving adjuvant systemic treatments following surgery metastatic disease between January 2000 and December 2013. Data were obtained from the breast cancer database of Samsung Medical Center.Among the 806 patients selected for inclusion, 188 (23% had participated in clinical trials. A total of 185 clinical trials were conducted from 2000 to 2014. When compared with earlier periods (n = 10 for 2000-2004, clinical trial enrollment significantly increased over time (n = 103 for 2005-2009, P = 0.024; n = 110 for 2010-2014, P = 0.046. Multivariate analyses revealed that biologic subtype, distant recurrence free interval (DRFI, and clinical trial enrollment were independent predictors of overall survival. Patients who participated in clinical trials showed improved survival, with a hazard ratio of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.59-0.95, which was associated with a 25% reduction in the risk of death. However, subgroup analysis showed that this improved survival benefit was not maintained in patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC.Although not conclusive, we could speculate that there were differences in the use of newer agents or regimens over time, and these differences appear to be associated with improved survival.

  11. Protocol for the development of a core domain set for hidradenitis suppurativa trial outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlacius, Linnea; Garg, Amit; Villumsen, Bente; Esmann, Solveig; Kirby, Joslyn S; Gottlieb, Alice B; Merola, Joseph F; Dellavalle, Robert; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) should have well-defined primary and secondary outcomes to answer questions generated by the main hypotheses. However, for the chronic, inflammatory skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), the reported outcome measures are numerous and diverse. A recent systematic review found a total of 30 outcome measure instruments in 12 RCTs. This use of a broad range of outcome measures can increase difficulties in interpretation and comparison of results and may potentially obstruct appropriate evidence synthesis by causing reporting bias. One strategy for dealing with these problems is to develop a core outcome set (COS). A COS is a list of outcomes that are meant as mandatory and should be measured and reported in all clinical trials. The aim of this study is to develop a COS for the management of HS. Method and analysis An international steering group of researchers, clinicians and a patient research partner will guide the COS development. 6 stakeholder groups are involved: patients, dermatologists, surgeons, nurses, industry representatives and drug regulatory authorities. A 1:1 ratio of patients:healthcare professionals is aimed for. The initial list of candidate items will be obtained by combining three data sets: (1) a systematic review of the literature, (2) US and Danish qualitative interview studies involving patients with HS and (3) an online healthcare professional (HCP) item generation survey. To reach consensus on the COS, 4 anonymous online Delphi rounds are then planned together with 2 face-to-face consensus meetings (1 in Europe and 1 in the USA) to ensure global representation. Ethics and dissemination The study will be performed according to the Helsinki declaration. All results from the study, including inconclusive or negative results, will be published in peer-reviewed indexed journals. The study will involve different stakeholder groups to ensure that the developed COS will be suitable and well

  12. The influence of body mass index on outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: does the obesity paradox really exist?

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    Juan Carlos Lopez-Delgado

    Full Text Available Obesity influences risk stratification in cardiac surgery in everyday practice. However, some studies have reported better outcomes in patients with a high body mass index (BMI: this is known as the obesity paradox. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of diverse degrees of high BMI on clinical outcomes after cardiac surgery, and to assess the existence of an obesity paradox in our patients.A total of 2,499 consecutive patients requiring all types of cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass between January 2004 and February 2009 were prospectively studied at our institution. Patients were divided into four groups based on BMI: normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg∙m-2; n = 523; 21.4%, overweight (25-29.9 kg∙m-2; n = 1150; 47%, obese (≥ 30-≤ 34.9 kg∙m-2; n = 624; 25.5% and morbidly obese (≥ 35kg∙m-2; n = 152; 6.2%. Follow-up was performed in 2,379 patients during the first year.After adjusting for confounding factors, patients with higher BMI presented worse oxygenation and better nutritional status, reflected by lower PaO2/FiO2 at 24h and higher albumin levels 48 h after admission respectively. Obese patients showed a higher risk for Perioperative Myocardial Infarction (OR: 1.768; 95% CI: 1.035-3.022; p = 0.037 and septicaemia (OR: 1.489; 95% CI: 1.282-1.997; p = 0.005. In-hospital mortality was 4.8% (n = 118 and 1-year mortality was 10.1% (n = 252. No differences were found regarding in-hospital mortality between BMI groups. The overweight group showed better 1-year survival than normal weight patients (91.2% vs. 87.6%; Log Rank: p = 0.029. HR: 1.496; 95% CI: 1.062-2.108; p = 0.021.In our population, obesity increases Perioperative Myocardial Infarction and septicaemia after cardiac surgery, but does not influence in-hospital mortality. Although we found better 1-year survival in overweight patients, our results do not support any protective effect of obesity in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  13. Extended cardiac rehabilitation for socially vulnerable patients improves attendance and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2013-01-01

    Patients living alone or having a low socioeconomic status are likely to quit cardiac rehabilitation. We aimed to compare patients being offered extended rehabilitation (ERP) with those being offered standard rehabilitation (SRP) as concerns 1) attendance rates and 2) achievement of treatment goals...

  14. The VITAH Trial-Vitamin D Supplementation and Cardiac Autonomic Tone in Patients with End-Stage Kidney Disease on Hemodialysis: A Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michelle C; Exner, Derek V; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Hanley, David A; Turin, Tanvir C; MacRae, Jennifer M; Wheeler, David C; Sola, Darlene Y; Ramesh, Sharanya; Ahmed, Sofia B

    2016-09-28

    End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients are at increased cardiovascular risk. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with depressed heart rate variability (HRV), a risk factor depicting poor cardiac autonomic tone and risk of cardiovascular death. Vitamin D deficiency and depressed HRV are highly prevalent in the ESKD population. We aimed to determine the effects of oral vitamin D supplementation on HRV ((low frequency (LF) to high frequency (HF) spectral ratio (LF:HF)) in ESKD patients on hemodialysis. Fifty-six subjects with ESKD requiring hemodialysis were recruited from January 2013-March 2015 and randomized 1:1 to either conventional (0.25 mcg alfacalcidol plus placebo 3×/week) or intensive (0.25 mcg alfacalcidol 3×/week plus 50,000 international units (IU) ergocalciferol 1×/week) vitamin D for six weeks. The primary outcome was the change in LF:HF. There was no difference in LF:HF from baseline to six weeks for either vitamin D treatment (conventional: p = 0.9 vs. baseline; intensive: p = 0.07 vs. baseline). However, participants who remained vitamin D-deficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D D groups; intensive: n = 8: ∆LF:HF: 0.15 ± 0.06, p D group). Overall, six weeks of conventional or intensive vitamin D only augmented LF:HF in ESKD subjects who remained vitamin D-deficient after treatment. Our findings potentially suggest that while activated vitamin D, with or without additional nutritional vitamin D, does not appear to improve cardiac autonomic tone in hemodialysis patients with insufficient or sufficient baseline vitamin D levels, supplementation in patients with severe vitamin D deficiency may improve cardiac autonomic tone in this higher risk sub-population of ESKD.

  15. The InterHerz project - a web-based psychological treatment for cardiac patients with depression: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

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    Messerli-Bürgy Nadine

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with heart disease often suffer from difficulties in psychological adaptation during cardiac rehabilitation. Mood disorders such as depression are known to be highly prevalent in cardiac patients and to have a negative impact on the progression of coronary heart disease. However, cardiac patients have difficulties to get psychological treatments due to low availability and motivational difficulties. Web-based interventions have been proven to be effective in treating depressive symptoms. Deprexis is a promising web-based psychological treatment which was devised for depressed patients. The aim of the study InterHerz is to examine if Deprexis is an effective psychological treatment to reduce stress and depression in cardiac patients. Methods/Design The sample will consist of 80 depressed patients randomized to an intervention group or a waitlist (10 weeks. Patients are recruited via cardiologists, cardiac rehabilitation units and the website of the Swiss Heart Foundation. Patients have access to a guided self-help program in which they work themselves through several modules and receive feedback from a clinical psychologist. Pre- and post-assessments, and a six-month follow-up, are conducted using online questionnaires and diagnostic interviews. Discussion Deprexis is a new web-based treatment which has the potential to help depressed cardiac patients with limited access to psychological treatment to increase their mental health. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN45945396

  16. Randomized clinical trial of small-incision and laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients with symptomatic cholecystolithiasis: primary and clinical outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, F.; Werner, J.E.; Gooszen, H.G.; Oostvogel, H.J.M.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the primary and clinical outcomes in laparoscopic and small-incision cholecystectomy. DESIGN: Blinded randomized single-center trial emphasizing methodologic quality and generalizability. SETTING: General teaching hospital in the Netherlands. PATIENTS: A total of 257 patients

  17. Depression beliefs, treatment preference, and outcomes in a randomized trial for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Boadie W; Kelley, Mary E; Mletzko, Tanja C; Velasquez, Cristina M; Craighead, W Edward; Mayberg, Helen S

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that individual preferences for medication- or psychotherapy-based treatments for depression may affect outcomes in clinical trials that compare these two forms of treatment. We assessed patients' beliefs about the causes of their depression, their preferred treatment, and strength of that preference in 80 patients participating in a 12-week clinical trial evaluating neuroimaging predictors of response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or escitalopram. Forty-five patients expressed a preference for one of the 2 treatments, but being matched to preference did not influence remission or completion rates. Medication-preferring patients were more likely to terminate the trial early, regardless of treatment received. CBT-preferring patients rarely endorsed unknown causes for their depression, and medication-preferring patients were highly unlikely to identify pessimistic attitudes as a source of their depression. Among patients willing to be randomized to treatment, preference does not appear to strongly influence outcome. Specific preferences for CBT or medication may reflect differing conceptualizations about depressive illness, knowledge of which may enhance treatment retention and efficacy.

  18. The impact of behavioural screening on intervention outcomes in a randomised, controlled multiple behaviour intervention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fjeldsoe Brianna S

    2011-03-01

    unexpected and detrimental. Physical activity screening (alone or in combination with diet resulted in improved intervention effects for physical activity, while fruit and vegetable screening had no impact on intervention effects for these outcomes. All three types of screening impacted detrimentally on intervention effects for behaviours not being targeted by screening. Conclusions Behavioural screening may have desirable and undesirable consequences in the context of multiple behaviour intervention trials, and thus its potential merits and pitfalls should be carefully considered.

  19. Clinical outcome endpoints in heart failure trials : a European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, Faiez; Garcia, Angeles Alonso; Anker, Stefan D.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Calvo, Gonzalo; Cleland, John G. F.; Cohn, Jay N.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Domanski, Michael J.; Ekman, Inger; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Koglin, Joerg; Konstam, Marvin; Kupfer, Stuart; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Metra, Marco; Nowack, Christina; Pieske, Burkert; Pina, Ileana L.; Pocock, Stuart J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ruilope, Luis M.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Severin, Thomas; Solomon, Scott; Stein, Kenneth; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi; Voors, Adriaan A.; Wasserman, ScottM.; Woehrle, Holger; Zalewski, Andrew; McMurray, John J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Endpoint selection is a critically important step in clinical trial design. It poses major challenges for investigators, regulators, and study sponsors, and it also has important clinical and practical implications for physicians and patients. Clinical outcomes of interest in heart failure trials in

  20. Statin therapy and clinical outcomes in myocardial infarction patients complicated by acute heart failure : insights from the EPHESUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Rossignol, Patrick; Murin, Jan; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Lamiral, Zohra; Krum, Henry; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    2013-01-01

    Several clinical trials have shown that in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), statin therapy improves cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, but in these trials patients with acute heart failure (HF) were excluded or only a few were included. In patients with chronic HF, statin therapy does not

  1. Association between funding, risk of bias, and outcome of randomised controlled trials in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomens, M A E M; Lazzari, S; Heymans, M W; Forouzanfar, T

    2016-01-01

    The influence of funding on the main outcome of a random control trial (RCT) is important, as it could potentially lead to bias towards industry, and results that are too optimistic. We investigated the association between funding, the published outcome, and the risk of bias in trials in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) published from January 2000 to May 2013 listed in PubMed. The methods used were scored using the risk of bias items given in a Delphi List. Sources of funding were recorded and categorised five ways: not funded, funded by industry, not funded by industry, supported by industry, and source of funds not clear. A total of 390 RCT met the inclusion criteria, and there was a correlation between funding and favourable main outcomes, although this was not significant. There was no correlation between the risk of bias and favourable results of the main outcome of a trial, or between the risk of bias and the reported source of funding in post-hoc analysis. We were unable to show a significant correlation between funding and a higher likelihood of a favourable result for the primary outcome in RCT in OMFS. We also failed to show a significant correlation between the risk of bias of a trial and its main outcome. In contrast, the source of funding proved to affect the risk of bias of a trial significantly, although not in post-hoc analysis. Funded trials were better organised, and so had a lower risk of bias.

  2. Prediction of responders for outcome measures of Locomotor Experience Applied Post Stroke trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce H. K. Dobkin, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Locomotor Experience Applied Post Stroke rehabilitation trial found equivalent walking outcomes for body weight-supported treadmill plus overground walking practice versus home-based exercise that did not emphasize walking. From this large database, we examined several clinically important questions that provide insights into recovery of walking that may affect future trial designs. Using logistic regression analyses, we examined predictors of response based on a variety of walking speed-related outcomes and measures that captured disability, physical impairment, and quality of life. The most robust predictor was being closer at baseline to the primary outcome measure, which was the functional walking speed thresholds of 0.4 m/s (household walking and 0.8 m/s (community walking. Regardless of baseline walking speed, a younger age and higher Berg Balance Scale score were relative predictors of responding, whether operationally defined by transitioning beyond each speed boundary or by a continuous change or a greater than median increase in walking speed. Of note, the cutoff values of 0.4 and 0.8 m/s had no particular significance compared with other walking speed changes despite their general use as descriptors of functional levels of walking. No evidence was found for any difference in predictors based on treatment group.

  3. Physical Performance and Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis Patients: A Secondary Analysis of the Excite Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Torino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Scarce physical activity predicts shorter survival in dialysis patients. However, the relationship between physical (motor fitness and clinical outcomes has never been tested in these patients. Methods: We tested the predictive power of an established metric of motor fitness, the Six-Minute Walking Test (6MWT, for death, cardiovascular events and hospitalization in 296 dialysis patients who took part in the trial EXCITE (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01255969. Results: During follow up 69 patients died, 90 had fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, 159 were hospitalized and 182 patients had the composite outcome. In multivariate Cox models - including the study allocation arm and classical and non-classical risk factors - an increase of 20 walked metres during the 6MWT was associated to a 6% reduction of the risk for the composite end-point (P=0.001 and a similar relationship existed between the 6MWT, mortality (PConclusions: Poor physical performance predicts a high risk of mortality, cardiovascular events and hospitalizations in dialysis patients. Future studies, including phase-2 EXCITE, will assess whether improving motor fitness may translate into better clinical outcomes in this high risk population.

  4. 02A. Design, Methods, and Outcomes for Recent Clinical Trials Utilizing Ayurvedic Medicine, Yoga, and Meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saper, Robert; Vinjamury, Sivarama; Elder, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Focus Area: Integrative Approaches to Care The panel discussants will present on the outcomes of four recent pragmatic trials covering the spectrum of Ayurvedic medicine, yoga, and meditation as therapeutic approaches for both acute and chronic conditions. The presenters will discuss: (1) a pilot study of a whole-systems Ayurveda and Yoga Therapy intervention for obesity; (2) a comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial of hatha yoga, physical therapy, and education for non-specific chronic low back pain in low-income minority populations; (3) an investigation of the therapeutic usefulness of Shirodhara (Ayurvedic oil dripping therapy) as a treatment for insomnia; and (4) a discussion of the evidence base supporting implementation of meditation interventions in schools and workplace settings. Discussants will present information on study designs, research methodology, and outcome measure selection to highlight special considerations in conducting research on whole medical systems that use multi-target therapies and focus on patient-centered outcomes. Ayurvedic medicine and yoga are characterized by low-cost, noninvasive interventions that can be usefully offered as part of an integrative medicine therapeutic approach.

  5. Effect of preoperative angina pectoris on cardiac outcomes in patients with previous myocardial infarction undergoing major noncardiac surgery (data from ACS-NSQIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Sood, Akshay; Sammon, Jesse D; Abdollah, Firas; Gupta, Ena; Golwala, Harsh; Bardia, Amit; Kibel, Adam S; Menon, Mani; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2015-04-15

    The impact of preoperative stable angina pectoris on postoperative cardiovascular outcomes in patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI) who underwent major noncardiac surgery is not well studied. We studied patients with previous MI who underwent elective major noncardiac surgeries within the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2005 to 2011). Primary outcome was occurrence of an adverse cardiac event (MI and/or cardiac arrest). Multivariable logistic regression models evaluated the impact of stable angina on outcomes. Of 1,568 patients (median age 70 years; 35% women) with previous MI who underwent major noncardiac surgery, 5.5% had postoperative MI and/or cardiac arrest. Patients with history of preoperative angina had significantly greater incidence of primary outcome compared to those without anginal symptoms (8.4% vs 5%, p = 0.035). In secondary outcomes, reintervention rates (22.5% vs 11%, p angina. In multivariable analyses, preoperative angina was a significant predictor for postoperative MI (odds ratio 2.49 [1.20 to 5.58]) and reintervention (odds ratio 2.40 [1.44 to 3.82]). In conclusion, our study indicates that preoperative angina is an independent predictor for adverse outcomes in patients with previous MI who underwent major noncardiac surgery, and cautions against overreliance on predictive tools, for example, the Revised Cardiac Risk Index, in these patients, which does not treat stable angina and previous MI as independent risk factors during risk prognostication.

  6. Developing a Framework for Evaluating Ethical Outcomes of Good Participatory Practices in TB Clinical Drug Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Kathleen M; Eley, Natalie T; Frick, Mike; Mingote, Laia Ruiz; Chou, Alicia; Seidel, Stephanie S; Hannah, Stacey; Hamilton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    Good Participatory Practice Guidelines for TB Drug Trials (GPP-TB) were issued in 2012, based on similar guidelines for HIV prevention and reflecting growing acceptance of the importance of community engagement and participatory strategies in clinical research. Though the need for such strategies is clear, evaluation of the benefits and burdens are needed. Working with a diverse group of global TB stakeholders including advocates, scientists, and ethicists, we used a Theory of Change approach to develop an evaluation framework for GPP-TB that includes a clearly defined ethical goal, a set of powerful strategies derived from GPP-TB practices for achieving the goal, and outcomes connecting strategies to goal. The framework is a first step in systematically evaluating participatory research in clinical trials.

  7. Choice of design and outcomes in trials among children with moderate acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Wells, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for trials on the effects of food aid products for children with moderate acute malnutrition, to identify how best to restore body tissues and function. The choice of control intervention is a major challenge, with both ethical and scientific implications. While randomized trials...... what components of health might be impacted by public health programs, or the underlying mechanisms whereby improved nutritional status might benefit short- and long-term health. Measurement of body composition, specific growth markers and functional outcomes may provide greater insight into the nature...... and implications of growth failure and recovery. There are now several methodologies suitable for application in infants and young children, e.g., measuring body composition with deuterium dilution, physical activity with accelerometers and linear growth with knemometers. To evaluate the generalizability...

  8. 59. Urinary tract infection in children after cardiac surgery: Incidence, risk factors and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Shafi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Foley catheter duration, presence of syndrome and prolonged PCICU and hospital stay were the main risk factors for CAUTI in postoperative pediatric cardiac patients. Resistant Gram-negative were the main cause for BSI with one third of CAUTI cases caused by MDRO or ESBL organisms. The cases with CAUTI were generally sicker and with more morbidity. The study will establish a baseline clinical indicator for monitoring quality improvement and the future measures to minimize CAUTI incidence, and its co-morbidity.

  9. Same day admission for elective cardiac surgery: how to improve outcome with satisfaction and decrease expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvay, George; Goldberg, Andrew; Gutsche, Jacob T; T Augoustides, John G

    2016-06-01

    Admission on the day of surgery for elective cardiac and non-cardiac surgery has been established as a prevalent, critical practice. This approach realizes medical, logistical, psychological and fiscal benefits, and its success is predicated on an effective outpatient pre-operative evaluation. The establishment of a highly functional pre-operative clinic with a comprehensive set-up and efficient logistical pathways is invaluable. This notion has been expanded in recent years to include the entire peri-operative period and the concept of a 'peri-operative anesthesia/surgical home' is gaining popularity and support. Evaluating patients prior to admission for surgery, anesthesiologists can place themselves at the forefront of reducing unnecessary pre-operative hospital admissions, excess lab tests, unneeded consultations, and ultimately decrease the cancellations on the day of surgery. Furthermore, by taking a leadership role in the pre-operative clinic, anesthesiologists place themselves squarely at the forefront of the burgeoning movement for the peri-operative surgical home and continue to cement the indispensability of the anesthesiologist during the entire peri-operative course. The authors present this review as a follow-up describing the successful implementation of a pre-operative same-day cardiac surgery clinic and offer these experiences over the last 8 years as a guide to helping other anesthesiologists do the same.

  10. Cerebral atrophy as outcome measure in short-term phase 2 clinical trials in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elskamp, I.J. van den; Boden, B.; Barkhof, F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dattola, V. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Messina, Department of Neurosciences, Psychiatric and Anaesthesiological Sciences, Messina (Italy); Knol, D.L. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute and University Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Kappos, L. [University Hospital, University of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); Fazekas, F. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Neurology, Graz (Austria); Wagner, K. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Pohl, C. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Bonn, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Sandbrink, R. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University Dusseldorf, Department of Neurology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Polman, C.H. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uitdehaag, B.M.J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Cerebral atrophy is a compound measure of the neurodegenerative component of multiple sclerosis (MS) and a conceivable outcome measure for clinical trials monitoring the effect of neuroprotective agents. In this study, we evaluate the rate of cerebral atrophy in a 6-month period, investigate the predictive and explanatory value of other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in relation to cerebral atrophy, and determine sample sizes for future short-term clinical trials using cerebral atrophy as primary outcome measure. One hundred thirty-five relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients underwent six monthly MRI scans from which the percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and the number and volume of gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions, T2 lesions, and persistent black holes (PBH) were determined. By means of multiple linear regression analysis, the relationship between focal MRI variables and PBVC was assessed. Sample size calculations were performed for all patients and subgroups selected for enhancement or a high T2 lesion load at baseline. A significant atrophy occurred over 6 months (PBVC = -0.33%, SE = 0.061, p < 0.0001). The number of baseline T2 lesions (p = 0.024), the on-study Gd-enhancing lesion volume (p = 0.044), and the number of on-study PBHs (p = 0.003) were associated with an increased rate of atrophy. For a 50% decrease in rate of atrophy, the sample size calculations showed that approximately 283 patients per arm are required in an unselected sampled population and 185 patients per arm are required in a selected population. Within a 6-month period, significant atrophy can be detected and on-study associations of PBVC and PBHs emphasizes axonal loss to be a driving mechanism. Application as primary outcome measure in short-term clinical trials with feasible sample size requires a potent drug to obtain sufficient power. (orig.)

  11. Technology-Enabled Remote Monitoring and Self-Management — Vision for Patient Empowerment Following Cardiac and Vascular Surgery: User Testing and Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Jennifer; Turner, Andrew; Bender, Duane; Scott, Ted; Carroll, Sandra; Ritvo, Paul; Peter, Elizabeth; Lamy, Andre; Furze, Gill; Krull, Kirsten; Dunlop, Valerie; Good, Amber; Dvirnik, Nazari; Bedini, Debbie; Naus, Frank; Pettit, Shirley; Henry, Shaunattonie; Probst, Christine; Mills, Joseph; Gossage, Elaine; Travale, Irene; Duquette, Janine; Taberner, Christy; Bhavnani, Sanjeev; Khan, James S; Cowan, David; Romeril, Eric; Lee, John; Colella, Tracey; Choinière, Manon; Busse, Jason; Katz, Joel; Victor, J Charles; Hoch, Jeffrey; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Ladak, Salima; O'Keefe-McCarthy, Sheila; Parry, Monica; Sessler, Daniel I; Stacey, Michael; Stevens, Bonnie; Stremler, Robyn; Thabane, Lehana; Watt-Watson, Judy; Whitlock, Richard; MacDermid, Joy C; Leegaard, Marit; McKelvie, Robert; Hillmer, Michael; Cooper, Lynn; Arthur, Gavin; Sider, Krista; Oliver, Susan; Boyajian, Karen; Farrow, Mark; Lawton, Chris; Gamble, Darryl; Walsh, Jake; Field, Mark; LeFort, Sandra; Clyne, Wendy; Ricupero, Maria; Poole, Laurie; Russell-Wood, Karsten; Weber, Michael; McNeil, Jolene; Alpert, Robyn; Sharpe, Sarah; Bhella, Sue; Mohajer, David; Ponnambalam, Sem; Lakhani, Naeem; Khan, Rabia; Liu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Tens of thousands of cardiac and vascular surgeries (CaVS) are performed on seniors in Canada and the United Kingdom each year to improve survival, relieve disease symptoms, and improve health-related quality of life (HRQL). However, chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP), undetected or delayed detection of hemodynamic compromise, complications, and related poor functional status are major problems for substantial numbers of patients during the recovery process. To tackle this problem, we aim to refine and test the effectiveness of an eHealth-enabled service delivery intervention, TecHnology-Enabled remote monitoring and Self-MAnagemenT—VIsion for patient EmpoWerment following Cardiac and VasculaR surgery (THE SMArTVIEW, CoVeRed), which combines remote monitoring, education, and self-management training to optimize recovery outcomes and experience of seniors undergoing CaVS in Canada and the United Kingdom. Objective Our objectives are to (1) refine SMArTVIEW via high-fidelity user testing and (2) examine the effectiveness of SMArTVIEW via a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Methods CaVS patients and clinicians will engage in two cycles of focus groups and usability testing at each site; feedback will be elicited about expectations and experience of SMArTVIEW, in context. The data will be used to refine the SMArTVIEW eHealth delivery program. Upon transfer to the surgical ward (ie, post-intensive care unit [ICU]), 256 CaVS patients will be reassessed postoperatively and randomly allocated via an interactive Web randomization system to the intervention group or usual care. The SMArTVIEW intervention will run from surgical ward day 2 until 8 weeks following surgery. Outcome assessments will occur on postoperative day 30; at week 8; and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The primary outcome is worst postop pain intensity upon movement in the previous 24 hours (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form), averaged across the previous 14 days. Secondary outcomes include a

  12. A review of the handling of missing longitudinal outcome data in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powney, Matthew; Williamson, Paula; Kirkham, Jamie; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2014-06-19

    The aim of this review was to establish the frequency with which trials take into account missingness, and to discover what methods trialists use for adjustment in randomised controlled trials with longitudinal measurements. Failing to address the problems that can arise from missing outcome data can result in misleading conclusions. Missing data should be addressed as a means of a sensitivity analysis of the complete case analysis results. One hundred publications of randomised controlled trials with longitudinal measurements were selected randomly from trial publications from the years 2005 to 2012. Information was extracted from these trials, including whether reasons for dropout were reported, what methods were used for handing the missing data, whether there was any explanation of the methods for missing data handling, and whether a statistician was involved in the analysis. The main focus of the review was on missing data post dropout rather than missing interim data. Of all the papers in the study, 9 (9%) had no missing data. More than half of the papers included in the study failed to make any attempt to explain the reasons for their choice of missing data handling method. Of the papers with clear missing data handling methods, 44 papers (50%) used adequate methods of missing data handling, whereas 30 (34%) of the papers used missing data methods which may not have been appropriate. In the remaining 17 papers (19%), it was difficult to assess the validity of the methods used. An imputation method was used in 18 papers (20%). Multiple imputation methods were introduced in 1987 and are an efficient way of accounting for missing data in general, and yet only 4 papers used these methods. Out of the 18 papers which used imputation, only 7 displayed the results as a sensitivity analysis of the complete case analysis results. 61% of the papers that used an imputation explained the reasons for their chosen method. Just under a third of the papers made no reference

  13. Effect of preoperative abstinence on poor postoperative outcome in alcohol misusers: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Rosenberg, J; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen;

    1999-01-01

    often in the intervention group. Surgical stress responses were lower in the intervention group (P LT / =0.05). CONCLUSIONS: One month of preoperative abstinence reduces postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers. The mechanism is probably reduced preclinical organ dysfunction and reduction......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of preoperative abstinence on postoperative outcome in alcohol misusers with no symptoms who were drinking the equivalent of at least 60 g ethanol/day. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Copenhagen, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 42 alcoholic patients without...... liver disease admitted for elective colorectal surgery. INTERVENTIONS: Withdrawal from alcohol consumption for 1 month before operation (disulfiram controlled) compared with continuous drinking. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Postoperative complications requiring treatment within the first month after surgery...

  14. Predictors of poor neurologic outcome in patients after cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia: a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, L.L.A.; Alfen, N. van; Bons, S.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Outcome studies in patients with anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy focus on the early and reliable prediction of an outcome no better than a vegetative state or severe disability. We determined the effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia on the validity of the currently used clinical pract

  15. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  16. Outcomes of usual chiropractic, harm & efficacy, the ouch study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that adverse events occur during chiropractic treatment. However, because of these studies design we do not know the frequency and extent of these events when compared to sham treatment. The principal aims of this study are to establish the frequency and severity of adverse effects from short term usual chiropractic treatment of the spine when compared to a sham treatment group. The secondary aim of this study is to establish the efficacy of usual short term chiropractic care for spinal pain when compared to a sham intervention. Methods One hundred and eighty participants will be randomly allocated to either usual chiropractic care or a sham intervention group. To be considered for inclusion the participants must have experienced non-specific spinal pain for at least one week. The study will be conducted at the clinics of registered chiropractors in Western Australia. Participants in each group will receive two treatments at intervals no less than one week. For the usual chiropractic care group, the selection of therapeutic techniques will be left to the chiropractors' discretion. For the sham intervention group, de-tuned ultrasound and de-tuned activator treatment will be applied by the chiropractors to the regions where spinal pain is experienced. Adverse events will be assessed two days after each appointment using a questionnaire developed for this study. The efficacy of short term chiropractic care for spinal pain will be examined at two week follow-up by assessing pain, physical function, minimum acceptable outcome, and satisfaction with care, with the use of the following outcome measures: Numerical Rating Scale, Functional Rating Index, Neck Disability Index, Minimum Acceptable Outcome Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, and a global measure of treatment satisfaction. The statistician, outcome assessor, and participants will be blinded to treatment allocation. Trial

  17. Outcome assessment for clinical trials: how many adjudicators do we need? Canadian Lung Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, S D; Cook, D J; Guyatt, G H; King, D; Troyan, S

    1997-02-01

    Considerable effort is often expended to adjudicate outcomes in clinical trials, but little has been written on the administration of the adjudication process and its possible impact on study results. As a case study, we describe the function and performance of an adjudication committee in a large randomized trial of two diagnostic approaches to potentially operable lung cancer. Up to five independent adjudicators independently determined two primary outcomes: tumor status at death or at final follow-up and the cause of death. Patients for whom there was any disagreement were discussed in committee until a consensus was achieved. We describe the pattern of agreement among the adjudicators and with the final consensus result. Additionally, we model the adjudication process and predict the results if a smaller committee had been used. We found that reducing the number of adjudicators from five to two or three would probably have changed the consensus outcome in less than 10% of cases. Correspondingly, the effect on the final study results (comparing primary outcomes in both randomized arms) would have been altered very little. Even using a single adjudicator would not have affected the results substantially. About 90 minutes of person-time per patient was required for activities directly related to the adjudication process, or approximately 6 months of full time work for the entire study. This level of effort could be substantially reduced by using fewer adjudicators with little impact on the results. Thus, we suggest that when high observer agreement is demonstrated or anticipated, adjudication committees should consist of no more than three members. Further work is needed to evaluate if smaller committees are adequate to detect small but important treatment effects or if they compromise validity when the level of adjudicator agreement is lower.

  18. Correlation of Post-Operative Hypoalbuminemia with Outcome of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghaderian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoalbuminemia may be caused by liver disease, nephrotic syndrome, burns, protein-losing entropathy, malnutrition, and metabolic stress. Alterations in albumin in metabolic stress such as cardiac surgery have been previously investigated. We studied serum albumin concentration in children with congenital heart disease and also the association of hypoalbuminemia with mortality and morbidity after pediatric cardiac surgery.Methods: We measured serum albumin concentration prospectively in 300 children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery between July and September 2008 in Shaheed Rajaee hospital. Serum albumin concentration was measured before and 48 hours after cardiac surgery and was subsequently compared between 2 groups: cyanotic and acyanotic and also with normal values.Results: Serum albumin concentration decreased on the second post-operative day in 70 (23.3% patients. There was a positive correlation between the post-surgical hypoalbuminemia and cyanotic heart disease. The cyanotic children had lower serum albumin concentration than the acyanotic ones (P value <0.001. There was a significant association between post-operative serum albumin concentration and acute renal failure (P value <0.001 and death (P value <0.001. Drop in serum albumin concentration was more prominent in the males than in the females (P value=0.038 and in the cyanotic patients than in the acyanotic ones (P value <0.001 as well as in those with acute renal failure (P value <0.001, pericardial effusion (P value=0.050, seizure (P value <0.001, and death (P value <0.001. Hypoalbuminemia was not associated with longer hospital (P value=0.142 or intensive care unit stay (P value=0.199 .Conclusion: Post-operative serum albumin concentration was lower in the cyanotic children and male patients in our study. In addition, the post-operative decrease in albumin was associated with an increased risk of pericardial effusion, renal failure, seizure, and

  19. Comparison of epinephrine and Shen-Fu injection on resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Wenpeng; Guo Zhijun; Li Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Epinephrine has been used as a first-choice vasopressor drug for cardiac arrest (CA) since 1974.However,the administration of epinephrine is controversial.This study aims to compare the effects of Shen-Fu injection (SFI) and epinephrine on resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged CA.Methods Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was electrically induced.After 8 minutes of untreated VF and 2 minutes of chest compressions,24 pigs were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=8 per group):central venous injection of SFI (SFI group),epinephrine (EPI group),or saline solution (SA group).The haemodynamic status and oxygen metabolism parameters,including cardiac output,mean arterial pressure,left ventricular dp/dtmax and negative dp/dtmax,oxygen delivery (DO2),and oxygen consumption (VO2),were calculated.Results SFI shortened the time to restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and decreased the number of shocks,similar to epinephrine.However,the mean arterial pressure,cardiac output,left ventricular dp/dtmax and negative dp/dtmax were significantly higher in the SFI group than in the EPI group at 4 and 6 hours after ROSC.VO2 and ERO2 decreased after ROSC and then increased.VO2 and ERO2 were significantly higher in the SFI group than in the EPI and SA groups after ROSC,while those were lowest in the EPI group among all groups.Conclusions SFI shortened the time to ROSC and decreased the number of shocks,similar to epinephrine.However,SFI improved oxygen metabolism,and produced a better hemodynamic status compared with epinephrine.SFI might be a potentially vasopressor drug for the treatment of CA.

  20. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury in a developing country: Prevalence, risk factors and outcome

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CS-AKI) in children in developing regions of the world. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of CSAKI, associated factors and its impact on mortality and utilization of hospital services. The hospital records of children aged 0-17 years who underwent CS at an Indian hospital were reviewed. CS-AKI was defined as a rise in serum creatinine of ≥0.3 mg/dL in any 48 h and or by urine output

  1. Reducing Postpartum Weight Retention and Improving Breastfeeding Outcomes in Overweight Women: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Martin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity is prevalent among women of reproductive age (42% BMI > 25 kg/m2 and parity is associated with risk of weight gain. Weight gain greater than that recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM is also associated with lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in women. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial is to examine the feasibility of recruiting and maintaining a cohort of pregnant women with the view of reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes. Women (BMI of 25–35 kg/m2 (n = 36 were recruited from the John Hunter Hospital antenatal clinic in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were stratified by BMI and randomised to one of three groups with follow-up to six months postpartum. Women received a dietary intervention with or without breastfeeding support from a lactation consultant, or were assigned to a wait-list control group where the dietary intervention was issued at three months postpartum. Feasibility and acceptability was assessed by participation rates and questionnaire. Analysis of variance and covariance was conducted to determine any differences between groups. Sixty-nine per cent of the participants were still enrolled at six months postpartum. This pilot demonstrated some difficulties in recruiting women from antenatal clinics and retaining them in the trial. Although underpowered; the results on weight; biomarkers and breastfeeding outcomes indicated improved metabolic health.

  2. Efficacy Outcome Measures for Procedural Sedation Clinical Trials in Adults: An ACTTION Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark R; McKeown, Andrew; Dexter, Franklin; Miner, James R; Sessler, Daniel I; Vargo, John; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Successful procedural sedation represents a spectrum of patient- and clinician-related goals. The absence of a gold-standard measure of the efficacy of procedural sedation has led to a variety of outcomes being used in clinical trials, with the consequent lack of consistency among measures, making comparisons among trials and meta-analyses challenging. We evaluated which existing measures have undergone psychometric analysis in a procedural sedation setting and whether the validity of any of these measures support their use across the range of procedures for which sedation is indicated. Numerous measures were found to have been used in clinical research on procedural sedation across a wide range of procedures. However, reliability and validity have been evaluated for only a limited number of sedation scales, observer-rated pain/discomfort scales, and satisfaction measures in only a few categories of procedures. Typically, studies only examined 1 or 2 aspects of scale validity. The results are likely unique to the specific clinical settings they were tested in. Certain scales, for example, those requiring motor stimulation, are unsuitable to evaluate sedation for procedures where movement is prohibited (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging scans). Further work is required to evaluate existing measures for procedures for which they were not developed. Depending on the outcomes of these efforts, it might ultimately be necessary to consider measures of sedation efficacy to be procedure specific.

  3. Forecasting trial outcomes: lawyers assign higher probability to possibilities that are described in greater detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Craig R; Birke, Richard

    2002-04-01

    The study of judgment under uncertainty has revealed that people judge the probability of an event to be higher when the event is described as a disjunction of constituent events or when they judge constituent events separately. These observations have motivated the development of support theory (Y. Rottenstreich & A. Tversky, 1997; A. Tversky & D. J. Koehler, 1994), a descriptive model of judgment under uncertainty. The major predictions of support theory are that (1) the judged probabilities of complementary events sum to 1; (2) the judged probabilities of n > 2 exclusive and exhaustive events generally sum to more than 1; and (3) the judged probability of an event generally increases when it is described as a disjunction of specific possibilities. We test these predictions in 6 studies of experienced attorneys who judged the likelihood of particular trial outcomes or were asked to offer advice on whether or not to accept a settlement offer. The results demonstrate that attorneys are indeed susceptible to bias in forecasting trial outcomes, consistent with support theory.

  4. Predictors of Adverse Cosmetic Outcome in the RAPID Trial: An Exploratory Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David; Truong, Pauline T. [Vancouver Island Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Parpia, Sameer [Ontario Clinical Oncology Group, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Berrang, Tanya [Vancouver Island Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Kim, Do-Hoon; Kong, Iwa [Juravinski Cancer Centre at Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Germain, Isabelle [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Pavillon Hôtel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec City, Québec (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Vancouver Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Akra, Mohamed [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Roy, Isabelle [Centre intégré de cancérologie de Laval, Laval, Québec (Canada); Reed, Melanie [Center for the Southern Interior, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Fyles, Anthony [University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Perera, Francisco [London Regional Cancer Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Balkwill, Susan [Fraser Valley Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Lavertu, Sophie [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Hôpital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Elliott, Elizabeth [Juravinski Cancer Centre at Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with adverse cosmesis outcome in breast cancer patients randomized to accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or whole-breast irradiation in the RAPID (Randomized Trial of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation) trial. Methods and Materials: Subjects were trial participants with nurse-assessed global cosmetic scores at baseline and at 3 years. Adverse cosmesis was defined as a score of fair or poor. Cosmetic deterioration was defined as any adverse change in score from baseline to 3 years. The analysis is based on data from the previously reported interim analysis. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of risk factors for these outcomes among all patients and those treated with APBI only. Results: Clinicopathologic characteristics were similar between subjects randomized to APBI (n=569) or whole-breast irradiation (n=539). For all subjects, factors associated with adverse cosmesis at 3 years were older age, central/inner tumor location, breast infection, smoking, seroma volume, breast volume, and use of APBI; factors associated with cosmetic deterioration were smoking, seroma volume, and use of APBI (P<.05). For APBI subjects, tumor location, smoking, age, and seroma volume were associated with adverse cosmesis (P<.05), and smoking was associated with cosmetic deterioration (P=.02). An independent association between the V95/whole-breast volume ratio and adverse cosmesis (P=.28) or cosmetic deterioration (P=.07) was not detected. On further exploration a V95/whole-breast volume ratio <0.15 was associated with a lower risk of cosmetic deterioration (p=.04), but this accounted for only 11% of patients. Conclusion: In the RAPID trial, a number of patient tumor and treatment-related factors, including the use of APBI, were associated with adverse cosmesis and cosmetic deterioration. For patients treated with APBI alone, the high-dose treatment

  5. Incidence of the Bertillon and Gompertz effects on the outcome of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2014-11-01

    The accounts of medical trials provide very detailed information about the patients’ health conditions. On the contrary, almost no vital data such as marital status or age distribution are usually given. Yet, some of these factors can have a notable impact on the overall death rate, thereby changing the outcome and conclusions of the trial. This paper focuses on two of these variables. The first is marital status; its effect on life expectancy (which will be referred to as the Bertillon effect) may double death rates in all age intervals. The second variable is the age distribution of the oldest patients. Because of the exponential nature of Gompertz’s law changes in the distribution of ages in the oldest age group can have dramatic consequences on the overall number of deaths. One should recall that the death rate at the age of 82 is 40 times higher than at the age of 37. It will be seen that randomization alone can hardly take care of these problems. Appropriate remedies are easy to formulate however. First, the marital status of patients as well as the age distribution of those over 65 should be documented for both study groups. Then, thanks to these data and based on the Bertillon and Gompertz laws, it will become possible to perform appropriate corrections. Such corrections will notably improve the reliability and accuracy of the conclusions, especially in trials which include a large proportion of elderly subjects.

  6. Temporal Influence of Heart Failure Hospitalizations Prior to Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator or Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy With Defibrillator on Subsequent Outcome in Mild Heart Failure Patients (from MADIT-CRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Andy Y; Moss, Arthur J; Ruwald, Martin H;

    2015-01-01

    The temporal effect of heart failure (HF) hospitalization occurring at different time periods before implantation has not yet been studied in detail. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential association between time from last HF hospitalization to device implantation and effe......The temporal effect of heart failure (HF) hospitalization occurring at different time periods before implantation has not yet been studied in detail. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential association between time from last HF hospitalization to device implantation...... and effects on subsequent outcomes and benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D). Multivariate Cox models were used to determine the temporal influence of previous HF hospitalization on the end point of HF or death within all left bundle branch block implantable cardioverter......-defibrillator (ICD) and CRT-D patients enrolled in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT) trial (n = 1,250) and to evaluate the clinical benefit of CRT-D implantation, comparing CRT-D patients with ICD patients within each previous HF hospitalization...

  7. Trends in mortality, incidence, hospitalisation, cardiac procedures and outcomes of care for coronary heart disease in Singapore, 1991-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T P; Mak, K H; Phua, K H; Tan, C H

    1999-05-01

    In this study, we used Singapore population-based data from 1991 to 1996 to examine recent trends in mortality, incidence and hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and explored the roles of primary prevention and medical care interventions in explaining these trends. We examined trends in medical interventions, namely coronary angiography (catheterisation), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), length of stay, and payment methods, and explored the roles of technological, healthcare financing and delivery, and regulatory factors in influencing the diffusion and outcomes of these medical interventions. During the period 1991 to 1996, there were parallel declines in resident population rates of mortality, incidence and hospitalisation for AMI. The rates of angiograms, CABG and PTCA among residents also increased greatly, with the greatest increase among elderly aged 60 years and above. The rates of invasive cardiac procedures for AMI were all lower in females than in males. The population case-fatality rate of AMI declined slightly only for persons below 40 years of age. The case-fatality rate was higher in females than in males. The number of hospitalisations and cardiac procedures all rose sharply, and was phenomenal for PTCA (247%). The increase in volume of resource use was starkly greater in private hospitals than in restructured hospitals. The ratios of PTCA to CABG from 1991 to 1996 for private and restructured hospitals showed a greater rate of technology substitution in restructured hospitals than in private hospitals. The average length of stay (LOS, 6.7 days) was fairly constant in restructured hospitals. For private hospitals, LOS declined from 7.6 days in 1991 to 5.6 in 1996. LOS varied little among individual restructured hospitals, but widely among private hospitals. The most common method of payment for AMI hospitalisation was Medisave alone (50%), but for CABG surgery, the

  8. Serial Measurement of High Sensitivity Troponin I and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the EXAMINE Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Matthew A; White, William B; Jarolim, Petr; Bakris, George L; Cushman, William C; Kupfer, Stuart; Gao, Qi; Mehta, Cyrus R; Zannad, Faiez; Cannon, Christopher P; Morrow, David A

    2017-02-28

    Background -We sought to describe the relationship between changes in high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hsTnI) and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. Methods -The Examination of Cardiovascular Outcomes with Alogliptin versus Standard of Care (EXAMINE) was a phase IIIb clinical outcomes trial designed to evaluate the CV safety of alogliptin, a non-selective dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), glycated hemoglobin between 6.5%-11% (or 7%-11% if they were on insulin), and a recent acute coronary syndrome (between 15-90 days prior to randomization) were eligible for the trial. hsTnI was measured using the Abbott ARCHITECT assay at baseline and 6 months in patients randomized in the EXAMINE trial. This analysis was restricted to patients randomized ≥30 days after qualifying ACS in order to mitigate the potential for persistent hsTnI elevation following ACS (n=3808). The primary endpoint of the trial was CV death, MI, or stroke. CV death or heart failure (HF) was a pre-specified, adjudicated secondary endpoint. Results -At baseline, hsTnI was detectable (≥1.9 ng/L) in 93% of patients and above the 99(th)% URL in 16%. There was a strong relationship between increasing hsTnI, both at baseline and 6 months, and the incidence of CV events through 24 months (pURL at 6 months were at increased risk of CV death, MI, or stroke when compared to patients with hsTnI URL irrespective of whether hsTnI was newly elevated (28.1% vs. 8.8%; HRadj 2.65, 95%CI 1.64-4.28, p<0.001) or persistently so (22.5% vs. 8.8%; HRadj 1.90, 95%CI 1.33-2.70, p<0.001). Alogliptin neither increased nor decreased the risk of CV events compared to placebo in patients with high baseline hsTnI (22.3% vs. 23.0%; HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.60-1.25 p=0.44). Conclusions -Serial assessment of hsTnI revealed a substantial proportion of patients with T2DM without clinically recognized events had dynamic or persistently elevated values and were at high risk of recurrent

  9. BP, Cardiovascular Disease, and Death in the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Alin; Weir, Matthew R.; Smith, Stephen R.; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Kasiske, Bertram L.; Kusek, John W.; Bostom, Andrew; Ivanova, Anastasia; Levey, Andrew S.; Solomon, Scott; Pesavento, Todd; Weiner, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The optimal BP level in kidney transplant recipients remains uncertain. This post hoc analysis of the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) trial cohort assessed associations of BP with a pooled cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcome and with all-cause mortality. In 3474 prevalent kidney transplant patients, mean age was 52±9 years, 63% were men, 76% were white, 20% had a history of CVD, 40% had a history of diabetes mellitus, and the median time since transplant was 4.1 years (25th to 75th percentiles, 1.7–7.4); mean systolic BP was 136±20 mmHg and mean diastolic BP was 79±12 mmHg. There were 497 CVD events and 406 deaths. After adjustment for demographic and transplant characteristics and CVD risk factors, each 20-mmHg increase in baseline systolic BP associated with a 32% increase in subsequent CVD risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.19 to 1.46) and a 13% increase in mortality risk (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.27). Similarly, after adjustment, at diastolic BP levels70 mmHg, there was no significant relationship between diastolic BP and outcomes. Higher systolic BP strongly and independently associated with increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality, without evidence of a J shape, whereas only lower levels of diastolic BP associated with increased risk of CVD and death in this trial. PMID:24627349

  10. A win ratio approach to comparing continuous non-normal outcomes in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duolao; Pocock, Stuart

    2016-05-01

    Clinical trials are often designed to compare continuous non-normal outcomes. The conventional statistical method for such a comparison is a non-parametric Mann-Whitney test, which provides a P-value for testing the hypothesis that the distributions of both treatment groups are identical, but does not provide a simple and straightforward estimate of treatment effect. For that, Hodges and Lehmann proposed estimating the shift parameter between two populations and its confidence interval (CI). However, such a shift parameter does not have a straightforward interpretation, and its CI contains zero in some cases when Mann-Whitney test produces a significant result. To overcome the aforementioned problems, we introduce the use of the win ratio for analysing such data. Patients in the new and control treatment are formed into all possible pairs. For each pair, the new treatment patient is labelled a 'winner' or a 'loser' if it is known who had the more favourable outcome. The win ratio is the total number of winners divided by the total numbers of losers. A 95% CI for the win ratio can be obtained using the bootstrap method. Statistical properties of the win ratio statistic are investigated using two real trial data sets and six simulation studies. Results show that the win ratio method has about the same power as the Mann-Whitney method. We recommend the use of the win ratio method for estimating the treatment effect (and CI) and the Mann-Whitney method for calculating the P-value for comparing continuous non-Normal outcomes when the amount of tied pairs is small. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. BP, cardiovascular disease, and death in the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Myra A; John, Alin; Weir, Matthew R; Smith, Stephen R; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Kasiske, Bertram L; Kusek, John W; Bostom, Andrew; Ivanova, Anastasia; Levey, Andrew S; Solomon, Scott; Pesavento, Todd; Weiner, Daniel E

    2014-07-01

    The optimal BP level in kidney transplant recipients remains uncertain. This post hoc analysis of the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) trial cohort assessed associations of BP with a pooled cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcome and with all-cause mortality. In 3474 prevalent kidney transplant patients, mean age was 52±9 years, 63% were men, 76% were white, 20% had a history of CVD, 40% had a history of diabetes mellitus, and the median time since transplant was 4.1 years (25th to 75th percentiles, 1.7-7.4); mean systolic BP was 136±20 mmHg and mean diastolic BP was 79±12 mmHg. There were 497 CVD events and 406 deaths. After adjustment for demographic and transplant characteristics and CVD risk factors, each 20-mmHg increase in baseline systolic BP associated with a 32% increase in subsequent CVD risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.19 to 1.46) and a 13% increase in mortality risk (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.27). Similarly, after adjustment, at diastolic BP levels70 mmHg, each 10-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP level associated with a 31% increase in CVD risk (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.62) and a 31% increase in mortality risk (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.66). However, at diastolic BP levels>70 mmHg, there was no significant relationship between diastolic BP and outcomes. Higher systolic BP strongly and independently associated with increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality, without evidence of a J shape, whereas only lower levels of diastolic BP associated with increased risk of CVD and death in this trial.

  12. Survival in patients without acute ST elevation after cardiac arrest and association with early coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, J; Nielsen, N; Annborn, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether early coronary angiography (CAG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause is associated with improved outcomes in patients without acute ST elevation. METHODS: The target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTM) trial...... the first 6 h after arrest. Primary outcome was mortality at the end of trial. A Cox proportional hazard model was created to estimate hazard of death, adjusting for covariates. In addition, a propensity score matched analysis was performed. RESULTS: A total of 252 patients (46 %) received early CAG...

  13. Examining longitudinal stimulant use and treatment attendance as parallel outcomes in two contingency management randomized clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Sterling; Brooks, Olivia; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Lederhos, Crystal; Lamp, Amanda; Murphy, Sean; Layton, Matthew; Roll, John

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine stimulant use and longitudinal treatment attendance in one ‘parallel outcomes’ model in order to determine how these two outcomes are related to one another during treatment, and to quantify how the intervention impacts these two on- and off-target outcomes differently. Data came from two multi-site randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of contingency management (CM) that targeted stimulant use. We used parallel multilevel modeling to examine the impact of multiple pre-specified covariates, including selected Addiction Severity Index (ASI) scores, age and sex, in addition to CM on concurrent attendance and stimulant use in two separate analyses, i.e., one per trial. In one trial, CM was positively associated with attending treatment throughout the trial (β = 0.060, p < 0.05). In the second trial, CM predicted negative urinalysis (−UA) over the 12-week treatment period (β = 0.069, p < 0.05). In both trials, there was a significant, positive relationship between attendance and −UA submission, but in the first trial a −UA at both baseline and over time was related to attendance over time (r = 0.117; r = 0.013, respectively) and in the second trial, a −UA submission at baseline was associated with increased attendance over time (r = 0.055). These findings indicate that stimulant use and treatment attendance over time are related but distinct outcomes that, when analyzed simultaneously, portray a more informative picture of their predictors and the separate trajectories of each. This ‘indirect reinforcement’ between two clinically meaningful on-target (directly reinforced behavior) and off-target (indirectly reinforced behavior) outcomes is in need of further examination in order to fully exploit the potential clinical benefits that could be realized in substance use disorder treatment trials. PMID:26456717

  14. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Isakoff, Steven J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

  15. Spectral pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging lateral-to-septal delay fails to predict clinical or echocardiographic outcome after cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.I.I. Soliman (Osama Ibrahim Ibrahim); D.A.M.J. Theuns (Dominic); M.L. Geleijnse (Marcel); A. Nemes (Attila); K. Caliskan (Kadir); W.B. Vletter (Wim); L.J.L.M. Jordaens (Luc); F.J. ten Cate (Folkert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAims: The current study sought to assess if pre-implantation lateral-to-septal delay (LSD) ≥60 ms assessed by spectral pulsed-wave myocardial tissue Doppler imaging (PW-TDI) could predict successful long-term outcome after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods and results Sixt

  16. Comparing Outcomes of Donation After Cardiac Death Versus Donation After Brain Death in Liver Transplant Recipients with Hepatitis C: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Wells

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation (LT using organs donated after cardiac death (DCD is increasing due, in large part, to a shortage of organs. The outcome of using DCD organs in recipients with hepatits C virus (HCV infection remains unclear due to the limited experience and number of publications addressing this issue.

  17. Incidence, Causes, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children A Comprehensive, Prospective, Population-Based Study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bardai; J. Berdowski; C. van der Werf; M.T. Blom; M. Ceelen; I.M. van Langen; J.G.P. Tijssen; A.A.M. Wilde; R.W. Koster; H.L. Tan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine comprehensively the incidence of pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and its contribution to total pediatric mortality, the causes of pediatric OHCA, and the outcome of resuscitation of pediatric OHCA patients. Background There is a paucity of co

  18. The impact of brief parental anxiety management on child anxiety treatment outcomes: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jennifer L; Newall, Carol; Rapee, Ronald M; Lyneham, Heidi J; Schniering, Carolyn C; Wuthrich, Viviana M; Schneider, Sophie; Seeley-Wait, Elizabeth; Edwards, Susan; Gar, Natalie S

    2014-01-01

    Parental anxiety is a risk to optimal treatment outcomes for childhood anxiety disorders. The current trial examined whether the addition of a brief parental anxiety management (BPAM) program to family cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was more efficacious than family CBT-only in treating childhood anxiety disorders. Two hundred nine children (aged 6-13 years, 104 female, 90% Caucasian) with a principal anxiety disorder were randomly allocated to family CBT with a five-session program of BPAM (n = 109) or family CBT-only (n = 100). Family CBT comprised the Cool Kids program, a structured 12-week program that included both mothers and fathers. Overall, results revealed that the addition of BPAM did not significantly improve outcomes for the child or the parent compared to the CBT-only group at posttreatment or 6-month follow-up. Overall, however, children with nonanxious parents were more likely to be diagnosis free for any anxiety disorder compared to children with anxious parents at posttreatment and 6-month follow-up. BPAM did not produce greater reductions in parental anxiety. The results support previous findings that parent anxiety confers poorer treatment outcomes for childhood anxiety disorders. Nevertheless the addition of BPAM anxiety management for parents in its current format did not lead to additional improvements when used as an adjunct to family CBT in the treatment of the child's anxiety disorder. Future benefits may come from more powerful methods of reducing parents' anxiety.

  19. Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Ming Yen [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hong Kong (China); Karimzad, Yasser; Menezes, Ravi J.; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Li, Qin; Forero, Julian; Paul, Narinder S.; Nguyen, Elsie T. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. (orig.)

  20. A systematic review of studies that aim to determine which outcomes to measure in clinical trials in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Sinha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In clinical trials the selection of appropriate outcomes is crucial to the assessment of whether one intervention is better than another. Selection of inappropriate outcomes can compromise the utility of a trial. However, the process of selecting the most suitable outcomes to include can be complex. Our aim was to systematically review studies that address the process of selecting outcomes or outcome domains to measure in clinical trials in children. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched Cochrane databases (no date restrictions in December 2006; and MEDLINE (1950 to 2006, CINAHL (1982 to 2006, and SCOPUS (1966 to 2006 in January 2007 for studies of the selection of outcomes for use in clinical trials in children. We also asked a group of experts in paediatric clinical research to refer us to any other relevant studies. From these articles we extracted data on the clinical condition of interest, description of the method used to select outcomes, the people involved in the selection process, the outcomes selected, and limitations of the method as defined by the authors. The literature search identified 8,889 potentially relevant abstracts. Of these, 70 were retrieved, and 25 were included in the review. These studies described the work of 13 collaborations representing various paediatric specialties including critical care, gastroenterology, haematology, psychiatry, neurology, respiratory paediatrics, rheumatology, neonatal medicine, and dentistry. Two groups utilised the Delphi technique, one used the nominal group technique, and one used both methods to reach a consensus about which outcomes should be measured in clinical trials. Other groups used semistructured discussion, and one group used a questionnaire-based survey. The collaborations involved clinical experts, research experts, and industry representatives. Three groups involved parents of children affected by the particular condition. CONCLUSIONS: Very few studies address the

  1. The HEART mobile phone trial: The partial mediating effects of self-efficacy on physical activity among cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph eMaddison

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ubiquitous use of mobile phones provides an ideal opportunity to deliver interventions to increase physical activity levels. Understanding potential mediators of such interventions is needed to increase their effectiveness. A recent randomized controlled trial of a mobile phone and Internet (mHealth intervention was conducted in New Zealand to determine the effectiveness on exercise capacity and physical activity levels in addition to current cardiac rehabilitation (CR services for people (n=171 with ischaemic heart disease (IHD. Significant intervention effect was observed for self-reported leisure time physical activity and walking, but not peak oxygen uptake (PVO2 at 24 weeks. There was also significant improvement in self-efficacy.Objective: To evaluate the mediating effect of self-efficacy on physical activity levels in an mHealth delivered exercise CR programme. Methods: Treatment evaluations were performed on the principle of intention to treat (ITT. Adjusted regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the main treatment effect on leisure time physical activity and walking at 24 weeks, with and without change in self-efficacy as the mediator of interest. Results: Change in self-efficacy at 24 weeks significantly mediated the treatment effect on leisure time physical activity by 13%, but only partially mediated the effect on walking by 4% at 24 weeks. Conclusion: An mHealth intervention involving text messaging and Internet support had a positive treatment effect on leisure time physical activity and walking at 24 weeks, and this effect was likely mediated through changes in self-efficacy. Future trials should examine other potential mediators related to this type of intervention.

  2. A Multicenter Trial of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning for Heart Surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Brosteanu, Oana; Cremer, Jochen; Gruenewald, Matthias; Stoppe, Christian; Coburn, Mark; Schaelte, Gereon; Böning, Andreas; Niemann, Bernd; Roesner, Jan; Kletzin, Frank; Strouhal, Ulrich; Reyher, Christian; Laufenberg-Feldmann, Rita

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is reported to reduce biomarkers of ischemic and reperfusion injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but uncertainty about clinical outcomes remains. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, double-blind, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involving adults who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass under total anesthesia with intravenous propofol. The trial compared upper-limb RIPC with a s...

  3. Examining Longitudinal Stimulant Use and Treatment Attendance as Parallel Outcomes in Two Contingency Management Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Sterling; Brooks, Olivia; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Lederhos, Crystal; Lamp, Amanda; Murphy, Sean; Layton, Matthew; Roll, John

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine stimulant use and longitudinal treatment attendance in one 'parallel outcomes' model in order to determine how these two outcomes are related to one another during treatment, and to quantify how the intervention impacts these two on- and off-target outcomes differently. Data came from two multi-site randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of contingency management (CM) that targeted stimulant use. We used parallel multilevel modeling to examine the impact of multiple pre-specified covariates, including selected Addiction Severity Index (ASI) scores, age and sex, in addition to CM on concurrent attendance and stimulant use in two separate analyses, i.e., one per trial. In one trial, CM was positively associated with attending treatment throughout the trial (β=0.060, preinforcement' between two clinically meaningful on-target (directly reinforced behavior) and off-target (indirectly reinforced behavior) outcomes is in need of further examination in order to fully exploit the potential clinical benefits that could be realized in substance use disorder treatment trials.

  4. Outcomes in cardiac surgery in 500 consecutive Jehovah's Witness patients: 21 year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaislic Claude D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Refusal of heterogenic blood products can be for religious reasons as in Jehovah's Witnesses or otherwise or as requested by an increasing number of patients. Furthermore blood reserves are under continuous demand with increasing costs. Therefore, transfusion avoidance strategies are desirable. We describe a historic comparison and current results of blood saving protocols in Jehovah's Witnesses patients. Methods Data on 250 Jehovah's Witness patients operated upon between 1991 and 2003 (group A were reviewed and compared with a second population of 250 patients treated from 2003 to 2012 (group B. Results In group A, mean age was 51 years of age compared to 68 years in group B. An iterative procedure was performed in 13% of patients in group B. Thirty days mortality was 3% in group A and 1% in group B despite greater operative risk factors, with more redo, and lower ejection fraction in group B. Several factors contributed to the low morbidity-mortality in group B, namely: preoperative erythropoietin to attain a minimal hemoglobin value of 14 g/dl, warm blood cardioplegia, the implementation of the Cornell University protocol and fast track extubation. Conclusions Cardiac surgery without transfusion in high-risk patients such as Jehovah Witnesses can be carried out with results equivalent to those of low risk patients. Recent advances in surgical techniques and blood conservation protocols are main contributing factors.

  5. Social cognition and functional outcome in schizophrenia: The moderating role of cardiac vagal tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Holly K; Sun, Jane C; Green, Michael F; Kee, Kimmy S; Lee, Junghee; Sergi, Mark; Sholty, Gretchen L; Mathis, Kristopher I; Jetton, Christopher; Williams, Terrance J; Kern, Robert; Horan, William; Fiske, Alan; Subotnik, Kenneth L; Ventura, Joseph; Hellemann, Gerhard; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Yee, Cindy M

    2014-11-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia face significant challenges in daily functioning, and although social cognition predicts how well patients respond to these challenges, associated physiological mechanisms remain unspecified. The present study draws from polyvagal theory and tested the hypothesis that respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), an established indicator of the capacity to self-regulate and adapt to environmental demands, combines with social cognition to predict functional outcome. Using data from 41 schizophrenia patients and 36 healthy comparison subjects, we replicated group differences in RSA and social cognition and also demonstrated that RSA and social cognition interact to predict how effectively patients manage work and independent living activities. Specifically, RSA did not enhance functional outcomes when social cognition was already strong, but higher levels of RSA enabled effective role functioning when social-cognitive performance was impaired. Jointly, RSA and social cognition accounted for 40% of the variance in outcome success, compared with 21% when evaluating social cognition alone. As polyvagal theory suggests, physiological flexibility and self-regulatory capacity may compensate for poorer social-cognitive skills among schizophrenia patients.

  6. The role of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in predicting hospital mortality for percutaneous coronary interventions in the Clinical Outcomes Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Charles; Rao, Sunil V; Gregg, Mary; Phillips, Richard C; Reisman, Mark; Tucker, Eben; Goss, J Richard

    2009-01-01

    Published mortality models for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), including the Clinical Outcomes Assessment Program (COAP) model, have not considered the effect of out-ofhospital cardiac arrest. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the inclusion of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest altered the COAP mortality model for PCI. The COAP PCI database contains extensive demographic, clinical, procedural and outcome information, including out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, which was added to the data collection form in 2006. This study included 15,586 consecutive PCIs performed in 31 Washington State hospitals in 2006. Using development and test sets, the existing COAP PCI logistic regression mortality model was examined to assess the effect of out-of-hospital arrest on in-hospital mortality. Overall, 2% of individuals undergoing PCI had cardiac arrest prior to hospital arrival. Among 8 hospitals with PCI volumes 120 cases per year did. In-hospital mortality was 19% in the arrest group and was 1.0% in remaining procedures (p < 0.0001). In the new multivariate model, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was highly associated with mortality (odds ratio = 5.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.28-9.25). When evaluated in the test set, the new model had excellent discrimination (c-statistic = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.85-0.93). Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an important determinant of risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality for PCI, particularly for hospitals with low volumes and relatively high volumes of cardiac arrest cases.

  7. Intensive perioperative glucose control does not improve outcomes of patients submitted to open-heart surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Pei Chen Chan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between different target levels of glucose and the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: We designed a prospective study in a university hospital where 109 consecutive patients were enrolled during a six-month period. All patients were scheduled for open-heart surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. One group consisted of 55 patients and had a target glucose level of 80-130 mg/dl, while the other contained 54 patients and had a target glucose level of 160-200 mg/dl. These parameters were controlled during surgery and for 36 hours after surgery in the intensive care unit. Primary outcomes were clinical outcomes, including time of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit, infection, hypoglycemia, renal or neurological dysfunction, blood transfusion and length of stay in the hospital. The secondary outcome was a combined end-point (mortality at 30 days, infection or length of stay in the intensive care unit of more than 3 days. A p-value of 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: In 109 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, both protocols of glycemic control in an intraoperative setting and in the intensive care unit were found to be safe, easily achieved and not to differentially affect clinical outcomes.

  8. Incidence of the Bertillon and Gompertz effects on the outcome of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Roehner, Bertrand M

    2013-01-01

    The accounts of medical trials provide very detailed information about the patients' health conditions. In contrast, only minimal data are usually given about demographic factors. Yet, some of these factors can have a notable impact on the overall death rate, thereby changing the outcome and conclusions of the trial. This paper focuses on two of these variables. The first is marital status; this effect, which will be referred to as the Bertillon effect, may change death rates by over 100%. The second is the age of the oldest patients; because of the exponential nature of Gompertz's law, changes in the distribution of ages in the oldest age group can have dramatic consequences on the overall number of deaths. It will be seen that randomization alone can hardly take care of these problems. Appropriate remedies are easy to formulate however. First, the marital status of patients as well as the age distribution of those over 65 should be documented for both study groups. Then, thanks to these data and based on th...

  9. Mathematical modeling of herpes simplex virus-2 suppression with pritelivir predicts trial outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T.; Swan, David A.; Magaret, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Ossig, Joachim; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Stoelben, Susanne; Timmler, Burkhard; Zimmermann, Holger; Melhem, Murad R.; Van Wart, Scott A.; Rubino, Christopher M.; Birkmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models estimate the potency of antiviral agents but do not capture viral and immunologic factors that drive the natural dynamics of infection. We designed a mathematical model that synthesizes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and viral pathogenesis concepts to simulate the activity of pritelivir, a DNA helicase-primase inhibitor that targets herpes simplex virus. Our simulations recapitulate detailed viral kinetic shedding features in five dosage arms of a phase 2 clinical trial. We identify that in vitro estimates of EC50 are lower than in vivo values for the drug. Nevertheless, pritelivir potently decreases shedding at appropriate doses based on its mode of action and long half-life. While pritelivir directly inhibits replication in epithelial cells, our model indicates that pritelivir also indirectly limits downstream viral spread from neurons to genital keratinocytes, within genital ulcers, and from ulcer to new mucosal sites of infection. We validate our model based on its ability to predict outcomes in a subsequent trial with a higher dose. The model can therefore be employed to optimize dose selection in clinical practice. PMID:26843190

  10. Criteria for evaluating response and outcome in clinical trials for children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative disease in young children. While hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic option for most patients, children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia increasingly receive novel agents in phase I-II clinical trials as pre-transplant therapy or therapy for relapse after transplantation. However, response criteria or definitions of outcome for standardized evaluation of treatment effect in patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia are currently lacking. Here we propose criteria to evaluate the response to the non-transplant therapy and definitions of remission status after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For the evaluation of non-transplant therapy, we defined 6 clinical variables (white blood cell count, platelet count, hematopoietic precursors and blasts in peripheral blood, bone marrow blast percentage, spleen size and extramedullary disease) and 3 genetic variables (cytogenetic, molecular and chimerism response) which serve to describe the heterogeneous picture of response to therapy in each individual case. It is hoped that these criteria will facilitate the comparison of results between clinical trials in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

  11. RARtool: A MATLAB Software Package for Designing Response-Adaptive Randomized Clinical Trials with Time-to-Event Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryeznik, Yevgen; Sverdlov, Oleksandr; Wong, Weng Kee

    2015-08-01

    Response-adaptive randomization designs are becoming increasingly popular in clinical trial practice. In this paper, we present RARtool, a user interface software developed in MATLAB for designing response-adaptive randomized comparative clinical trials with censored time-to-event outcomes. The RARtool software can compute different types of optimal treatment allocation designs, and it can simulate response-adaptive randomization procedures targeting selected optimal allocations. Through simulations, an investigator can assess design characteristics under a variety of experimental scenarios and select the best procedure for practical implementation. We illustrate the utility of our RARtool software by redesigning a survival trial from the literature.

  12. Early rehabilitation in sepsis: a prospective randomised controlled trial investigating functional and physiological outcomes The i-PERFORM Trial (Protocol Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayambu Geetha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with sepsis syndromes in comparison to general intensive care patients can have worse outcomes for physical function, quality of life and survival. Early intensive care rehabilitation can improve the outcome in general Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients, however no investigations have specifically looked at patients with sepsis syndromes. The 'i-PERFORM Trial' will investigate if early targeted rehabilitation is both safe and effective in patients with sepsis syndromes admitted to ICU. Methods/Design A single-centred blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted in Brisbane, Australia. Participants (n = 252 will include those ≥ 18 years, mechanically ventilated for ≥ 48 hours and diagnosed with a sepsis syndrome. Participants will be randomised to an intervention arm which will undergo an early targeted rehabilitation program according to the level of arousal, strength and cardiovascular stability and a control group which will receive normal care. The primary outcome measures will be physical function tests on discharge from ICU (The Acute Care Index of Function and The Physical Function ICU Test. Health-related quality of life will be measured using the Short Form-36 and the psychological component will be tested using The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Secondary measures will include inflammatory biomarkers; Interleukin-6, Interleukin-10 and Tumour Necrosis Factor-α, peripheral blood mitochondrial DNA content and lactate, fat free muscle mass, tissue oxygenation and microcirculatory flow. Discussion The 'i-PERFORM Trial' will determine whether early rehabilitation for patients with sepsis is effective at improving patient outcomes with functional and physiological parameters reflecting long and short-term effects of early exercise and the safety in its application in critical illness. Trial Registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12610000808044

  13. Neurologic management following cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, N G

    1989-10-01

    Optimal neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest requires careful attention to the details of both intracranial and extracranial homeostasis. A high index of suspicion regarding the potential causes and complications of cardiac arrest facilitates discovery and treatment of problems before they adversely affect neurologic outcome. The future is bright for resuscitation research: Our fundamental understanding of cerebral ischemia and its consequences has dramatically improved, and this knowledge can hopefully be transferred to clinical useful modes of therapy. However, the transition from a promising, therapeutically effective intervention in animals to the demonstration that treatment is effective following cardiac arrest in humans is an important and difficult step. The patient population is heterogeneous before the insult, the duration and severity of the insult are variable, and the effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation varies among institutions. Therefore, the only means of demonstrating clinical efficacy is the performance of a large clinical trial. The Resuscitation Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh has developed and coordinated a multicenter, multinational team of investigators who have completed one definitive trial of postarrest barbiturate therapy and are currently completing a similar trial using a calcium entry blocker. Despite the formidable obstacles posed by such comprehensive efforts, they provide the mechanism for determining whether the cost of a new treatment modality is justified by the likelihood of improved mortality or morbidity.

  14. Implementing referral guidelines: lessons from a negative outcome cluster randomised factorial trial in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Lindsey

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few patients with lower bowel symptoms who consult their general practitioner need a specialist opinion. However data from referred patients suggest that those who are referred would benefit from detailed assessment before referral. Methods A cluster randomised factorial trial. 44 general practices in North Trent, UK. Practices were offered either an electronic interactive referral pro forma, an educational outreach visit by a local colorectal surgeon, both or neither. The main outcome measure was the proportion of cases with severe diverticular disease, cancer or precancerous lesions and inflammatory bowel disease in those referred by each group. A secondary outcome was a referral letter quality score. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to identify key themes relating to the use of the software Results From 150 invitations, 44 practices were recruited with a total list size of 265,707. There were 716 consecutive referrals recorded over a six-month period, for which a diagnosis was available for 514. In the combined software arms 14% (37/261 had significant pathology, compared with 19% (49/253 in the non-software arms, relative risk 0.73 (95% CI: 0.46 to 1.15. In the combined educational outreach arms 15% (38/258 had significant pathology compared with 19% (48/256 in the non-educational arms, relative risk 0.79 (95% CI: 0.50 to 1.24. Pro forma practices documented better assessment of patients at referral. Conclusion There was a lack of evidence that either intervention increased the proportion of patients with organic pathology among those referred. The interactive software did improve the amount of information relayed in referral letters although we were unable to confirm if this made a significant difference to patients or their health care providers. The potential value of either intervention may have been diminished by their limited uptake within the context of a cluster randomised clinical trial. A number of

  15. Improving PTSD Outcomes in OIF/OEF Returnees: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Hydrocortisone Augmentation of Prolonged Exposure Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    intent and practice of manualized PE. 1 Schnurr PP. The rocks and hard places in psychotherapy outcome research. J Trauma Stress. 2007; 20(5):779-92...foresight and planning Social cognition Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT™): Managing Emotions Paper-and-pencil multiple-choice...Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0072 TITLE: Improving PTSD Outcomes in OIF/OEF Returnees: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Hydrocortisone

  16. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury in a developing country: Prevalence, risk factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekure, Ekanem Nsikak; Esezobor, Christopher Imokhuede; Sridhar, Anuradha; Vasudevan, Jyothi; Subramanyan, Rajhavan; Cherian, Kotturathu Mammen

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CS-AKI) in children in developing regions of the world. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of CSAKI, associated factors and its impact on mortality and utilization of hospital services. The hospital records of children aged 0-17 years who underwent CS at an Indian hospital were reviewed. CS-AKI was defined as a rise in serum creatinine of ≥0.3 mg/dL in any 48 h and or by urine output CS. The study included 323 children with a median age of one year (0.04-17), of whom 22 (6.8%) were neonates and 18.3% had a single ventricle. About 60% of the children had Risk Adjusted Congenital Heart Surgery-I category 1 or 2 interventions. CS-AKI occurred in 39 children (12.1%). Factors associated with CS-AKI were sepsis and intraand post-operative hypotension. In-hospital mortality was six-fold higher in children who developed CS-AKI. CS-AKI was associated with two to three days more of mechanical ventilation and Intensive care unit stay. CS-AKI occurs in children in developing countries, but at a lower frequency mainly due to the predominance of post-neonatal children undergoing less-complex CSs. CS-AKI was associated with higher in-hospital mortality and increased utilization of hospital services. Factors associated with CS-AKI included intraand post-operative hypotension and sepsis.

  17. Depression, anxiety, and cardiac morbidity outcomes after coronary artery bypass surgery: a contemporary and practical review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phillip J Tully; Robert A Baker

    2012-01-01

    Research to date indicates that the number of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients affected by depression (i.e., major, minor, dysthymia) approximates between 30% and 40% of all cases. A longstanding empirical interest on psychosocial factors in CABG surgery patients highlights an association with increased risk of morbidity in the short and longer term. Recent evidence suggests that both depression and anxiety increase the risk for mortality and morbidity after CABG surgery independent of medical factors, although the behavioral and biological mechanisms are poorly understood. Though neither depression nor anxiety seem to markedly affect neuropsychological dysfunction, depression confers a risk for incident delirium. Following a comprehensive overview of recent literature, practical advice is described for clinicians taking into consideration possible screening aids to improve recognition of anxiety and depression among CABG surgery patients. An overview of contemporary interventions and randomized, controlled trials are described, along with suggestions for future CABG surgery research.

  18. Clinical and angiographic outcome of elective stent implantation in small coronary vessels: an analysis of the BENESTENT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, D; Azar, A J; de Jaegere, P; Rutsch, W; de Bruyne, B; Legrand, V; Kiemeneij, F; de Feyter, P; van de Heuvel, P; Ozaki, Y; Morel, M A; Serruys, P W

    1996-12-01

    We examined the influence of vessel size using an intention-to-treat approach in 259 patients who underwent stent implantation and in 257 patients who underwent balloon angioplasty alone in the BENESTENT trial. In the stented population, smaller vessel size was associated with a higher stent:vessel ratio, a greater relative gain and a greater subsequent loss index, and a higher risk of adverse cardiac events. In the balloon angioplasty population small vessel size conveyed an increased requirement for revascularization but did not increase the risk of procedural failure or myocardial infarction during follow-up. Logistic regression indicated that decreasing vessel size (as a continous variable) was associated with an increasing risk of a cardiac event for both the stent and balloon angioplasty populations.

  19. The Cues and Care Trial: A randomized controlled trial of an intervention to reduce maternal anxiety and improve developmental outcomes in very low birthweight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunkley David

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very low birthweight infants are at risk for deficits in cognitive and language development, as well as attention and behaviour problems. Maternal sensitive behaviour (i.e. awareness of infant cues and appropriate responsiveness to those cues in interaction with her very low birthweight infant is associated with better outcomes in these domains; however, maternal anxiety interferes with the mother's ability to interact sensitively with her very low birthweight infant. There is a need for brief, cost-effective and timely interventions that address both maternal psychological distress and interactive behaviour. The Cues and Care trial is a randomized controlled trial of an intervention designed to reduce maternal anxiety and promote sensitive interaction in mothers of very low birthweight infants. Methods and design Mothers of singleton infants born at weights below 1500 g are recruited in the neonatal intensive care units of 2 tertiary care hospitals, and are randomly assigned to the experimental (Cues intervention or to an attention control (Care condition. The Cues intervention teaches mothers to attend to their own physiological, cognitive, and emotional cues that signal anxiety and worry, and to use cognitive-behavioural strategies to reduce distress. Mothers are also taught to understand infant cues and to respond sensitively to those cues. Mothers in the Care group receive general information about infant care. Both groups have 6 contacts with a trained intervener; 5 of the 6 sessions take place during the infant's hospitalization, and the sixth contact occurs after discharge, in the participant mother's home. The primary outcome is maternal symptoms of anxiety, assessed via self-report questionnaire immediately post-intervention. Secondary outcomes include maternal sensitive behaviour, maternal symptoms of posttraumatic stress, and infant development at 6 months corrected age. Discussion The Cues and Care trial will

  20. Advanced Cardiac Resuscitation Evaluation (ACRE: A randomised single-blind controlled trial of peer-led vs. expert-led advanced resuscitation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced resuscitation skills training is an important and enjoyable part of medical training, but requires small group instruction to ensure active participation of all students. Increases in student numbers have made this increasingly difficult to achieve. Methods A single-blind randomised controlled trial of peer-led vs. expert-led resuscitation training was performed using a group of sixth-year medical students as peer instructors. The expert instructors were a senior and a middle grade doctor, and a nurse who is an Advanced Life Support (ALS Instructor. A power calculation showed that the trial would have a greater than 90% chance of rejecting the null hypothesis (that expert-led groups performed 20% better than peer-led groups if that were the true situation. Secondary outcome measures were the proportion of High Pass grades in each groups and safety incidents. The peer instructors designed and delivered their own course material. To ensure safety, the peer-led groups used modified defibrillators that could deliver only low-energy shocks. Blinded assessment was conducted using an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE. The checklist items were based on International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR guidelines using Ebel standard-setting methods that emphasised patient and staff safety and clinical effectiveness. The results were analysed using Exact methods, chi-squared and t-test. Results A total of 132 students were randomised: 58 into the expert-led group, 74 into the peer-led group. 57/58 (98% of students from the expert-led group achieved a Pass compared to 72/74 (97% from the peer-led group: Exact statistics confirmed that it was very unlikely (p = 0.0001 that the expert-led group was 20% better than the peer-led group. There were no safety incidents, and High Pass grades were achieved by 64 (49% of students: 33/58 (57% from the expert-led group, 31/74 (42% from the peer-led group. Exact

  1. Acute bronchodilator responsiveness and health outcomes in COPD patients in the UPLIFT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decramer Marc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debate continues as to whether acute bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR predicts long-term outcomes in COPD. Furthermore, there is no consensus on a threshold for BDR. Methods At baseline and during the 4-year Understanding Potential Long-term Improvements in Function with Tiotropium (UPLIFT® trial, patients had spirometry performed before and after administration of ipratropium bromide 80 mcg and albuterol 400 mcg. Patients were split according to three BDR thresholds: ≥12% + ≥200 mL above baseline (criterion A, ≥15% above baseline (criterion B; and ≥10% absolute increase in percent predicted FEV1 values (criterion C. Several outcomes (pre-dose spirometry, exacerbations, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ] total score were assessed according to presence or absence of BDR in the treatment groups. Results 5783 of 5993 randomized patients had evaluable pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry at baseline. Mean age (SD was 64 (8 years, with 75% men, mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 1.33 ± 0.44 L (47.6 ± 12.7% predicted and 30% current smokers. At baseline, 52%, 66%, and 39% of patients had acute BDR using criterion A, B, and C, respectively. The presence of BDR was variable at follow-up visits. Statistically significant improvements in spirometry and health outcomes occurred with tiotropium regardless of the baseline BDR or criterion used. Conclusions A large proportion of COPD patients demonstrate significant acute BDR. BDR in these patients is variable over time and differs according to the criterion used. BDR status at baseline does not predict long-term response to tiotropium. Assessment of acute BDR should not be used as a decision-making tool when prescribing tiotropium to patients with COPD.

  2. Outcome of Percutaneous Release of Tennis Elbow: A Non-Randomized Controlled Trial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Kishor; Kharel, Krishna; Byanjankar, Subin; Shrestha, Rahul; Sharma, Jay R; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2017-01-01

    Background Tennis elbow is a common disorder of the upper extremity. It can be treated conservatively in the majority of patients, but some resistant cases eventually can be treated by percutaneous release with good functional outcome. Materials and methods This non-randomized control trial was conducted at the Department of Orthopaedics Surgery in a tertiary care hospital from July 2015 to June 2016 on 50 patients who underwent percutaneous release of the common extensor origin using an 18 gauge hypodermic needle. These patients did not respond to conservative treatment including rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and local steroid injections. The outcome was graded as Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor. Results Fifty patients (50 elbows) were included in the study. Thirty-two patients were female (64%), and 18 were male (36%). The right side was affected in 37 patients (74%) and left side in 13 (26%). The time taken to achieve a completely pain-free elbow ranged from one day to two months (average of 26.2 days). Those who did not achieve a pain-free elbow had a residual pain of 1.5 to six on the visual analogue scale (VAS) (average 2.32). Excellent outcome was noticed in 24 patients (48%); Good result in eight patients (36% ); Fair in four patients (eight percent) and Poor in four patients (eight percent). Conclusion Tennis elbow probably results from the degenerative tear of the common extensor origin, and a percutaneous tenotomy using an 18 gauge hypodermic needle is a simple, safe, patient-friendly, efficient, and easily reproducible method of treating tennis elbow in those who are resistant to conservative treatment, and it can be done as an outpatient procedure. PMID:28168130

  3. The effects of vitamin D supplementation on maternal and neonatal outcome: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Mojibian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy has been supposed to defend against adverse gestational outcomes. Objective: This randomized clinical trial study was conducted to assess the effects of 50,000 IU of vitamin D every two weeks supplementation on the incidence of gestational diabetes (GDM, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and preterm labor, vitamin D status at term and neonatal outcomes contrasted with pregnant women that received 400 IU vitamin D daily. Materials and Methods: 500 women with gestational age 12-16 weeks and serum 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25 (OH D less than 30 ng/ml randomly categorized in two groups. Group A received 400 IU vitamin D daily and group B 50,000 IU vitamin D every 2 weeks orally until delivery. Maternal and Neonatal outcomes were assessed in two groups. Results: The incidence of GDM in group B was significantly lower than group A (6.7% versus 13.4% and odds ratio (95% Confidence interval was 0.46 (0.24-0.87 (P=0.01. The mean ± SD level of 25 (OH D at the time of delivery in mothers in group B was significantly higher than A (37.9 ± 19.8 versus 27.2 ± 18.8 ng/ml, respectively (P=0.001. There were no differences in the incidence of preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, preterm labor, and low birth weight between two groups. The mean level of 25 (OH D in cord blood of group B was significantly higher than group A (37.9 ± 18 versus 29.7 ± 19ng/ml, respectively. Anthropometric measures between neonates were not significantly different. Conclusion: Our study showed 50,000 IU vitamin D every 2 weeks decreased the incidence of GDM.

  4. Is Mandatory Prospective Trial Registration Working to Prevent Publication of Unregistered Trials and Selective Outcome Reporting? An Observational Study of Five Psychiatry Journals That Mandate Prospective Clinical Trial Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Amelia Scott; Julia J Rucklidge; Roger T Mulder

    2015-01-01

    Objective To address the bias occurring in the medical literature associated with selective outcome reporting, in 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) introduced mandatory trial registration guidelines and member journals required prospective registration of trials prior to patient enrolment as a condition of publication. No research has examined whether these guidelines are impacting psychiatry publications. Our objectives were to determine the extent to which...

  5. Does suprascapular nerve block reduce shoulder pain following stroke: a double-blind randomised controlled trial with masked outcome assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crotty Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder pain is a common complication of a stroke which can impede participation in rehabilitation programs and has been associated with poorer outcomes. The evidence base for current medical and therapeutic management options of hemiplegic shoulder pain is limited. This study will evaluate the use of suprascapular nerve block injection as part of an interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of shoulder pain following stroke. The technique has previously been proven safe and effective in the treatment of shoulder pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and degenerative shoulder conditions but its usefulness in a stroke population is unclear. Methods/Design A double blind randomised placebo controlled trial will assess the effect of a suprascapular nerve block compared with placebo in a population of 66 stroke patients. The trial will measure effect of injection on the primary outcome of pain, and secondary outcomes of function and quality of life. Measurements will take place at baseline, and 1, 4 and 12 weeks post intervention. Both groups will continue to receive routine physiotherapy and standard ward care. Discussion The results of this study could reduce pain symptoms in persons with mechanical shoulder pain post stroke and provide improvement in upper limb function. Trial Registration This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR - ACTRN12609000621213.

  6. Sustained postoperative anaemia is associated with an impaired outcome after coronary artery bypass graft surgery : insights from the IMAGINE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; Kleijn, Lennaert; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Tijssen, Jan G.; Warnica, Wayne J.; Baillot, Richard; Rouleau, Jean L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between sustained postoperative anaemia and outcome after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Design Retrospective analysis of the IMAGINE trial, which tested the effect of the ACE inhibitor quinapril on cardiovascular events after CABG. Setting Thor

  7. Validating an automated outcomes surveillance application using data from a terminated randomized, controlled trial (OPUS [TIMI-16]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Michael E; Morrow, David A; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Cannon, Christopher P; Resnic, Frederic S

    2007-10-11

    We sought to validate an automated outcomes surveillance system (DELTA) using OPUS (TIMI-16), a multi-center randomized, controlled trial that was stopped early due to elevated mortality in one of the two intervention arms. Methodologies that were incorporated into the application (Statistical Process Control [SPC] and Bayesian Updating Statistics [BUS]) were compared with standard Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) protocols.

  8. Comparing patient characteristics, type of intervention, control, and outcome (PICO) queries with unguided searching: a randomized controlled crossover trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendam, A.; Vries Robbé, P.F. de; Overbeke, A.J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Translating a question into a query using patient characteristics, type of intervention, control, and outcome (PICO) should help answer therapeutic questions in PubMed searches. The authors performed a randomized crossover trial to determine whether the PICO format was useful for quick s

  9. Core outcome domains and measures for pediatric acute and chronic/recurrent pain clinical trials : PedIMMPACT recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, Patrick J.; Walco, Gary A.; Turk, Dennis C.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Brown, Mark T.; Davidson, Karina; Eccleston, Christopher; Finley, G. Allen; Goldschneider, Kenneth; Haverkos, Lynne; Hertz, Sharon H.; Ljungman, Gustaf; Palermo, Tonya; Rappaport, Bob A.; Rhodes, Thomas; Schechter, Neil; Scott, Jane; Sethna, Navil; Svensson, Ola K.; Stinson, Jennifer; von Baeyer, Carl L.; Walker, Lynn; Weisman, Steven; White, Richard E.; Zajicek, Anne; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2008-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT), 26 professionals from academia, governmental agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry participated in a 2-stage Delphi poll and a consensus meeting that identified core outcome domains an

  10. Effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy on Employment Outcomes in Early Schizophrenia: Results from a 2-Year Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M.; Hogarty, Gerard E.; Greenwald, Deborah P.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of psychosocial cognitive rehabilitation on employment outcomes in a randomized controlled trial for individuals with early course schizophrenia. Method: Early course schizophrenia outpatients (N = 58) were randomly assigned to cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) or an enriched supportive therapy (EST) control and…

  11. Acute heart failure in elderly patients : worse outcomes and differential utility of standard prognostic variables. Insights from the PROTECT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Mentz, Robert J.; Chiswell, Karen; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Dittrich, Howard C.; Fiuzat, Mona; Givertz, Michael M.; Lazzarini, Valentina; Mansoor, George A.; Massie, Barry M.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; O'Connor, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    AimsPrevious heart failure (HF) trials suggested that age influences patient characteristics and outcome; however, under-representation of elderly patients has limited characterization of this cohort. Whether standard prognostic variables have differential utility in various age groups is unclear. M

  12. Statin treatment and stroke outcome in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Zivin, J.;

    2009-01-01

    strokes in subjects with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (n=4731). We analyzed SPARCL trial data to determine whether treatment favorably shifts the distribution of severities of ischemic cerebrovascular outcomes. METHODS: Severity was assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke...... or 4), moderate (modified Rankin Scale score 3 or 2), and mild (modified Rankin Scale score 1 or 0) outcome ischemic strokes and transient ischemic attacks and an increase in the proportion of event-free subjects randomized to atorvastatin (P... outcome events (ischemic and hemorrhagic, Pischemic stroke (ie, excluding those having a transient ischemic attack...

  13. Improving 1-year outcome in first-episode psychosis: OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lone; Nordentoft, Merete; Jeppesen, Pia;

    2005-01-01

    Because early illness course and outcome may affect the long-term outcome of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, it is especially important to address poor outcome in this early critical period.......Because early illness course and outcome may affect the long-term outcome of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, it is especially important to address poor outcome in this early critical period....

  14. Designs for clinical trials with time-to-event outcomes based on stopping guidelines for lack of benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choodari-Oskooei Babak

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract background The pace of novel medical treatments and approaches to therapy has accelerated in recent years. Unfortunately, many potential therapeutic advances do not fulfil their promise when subjected to randomized controlled trials. It is therefore highly desirable to speed up the process of evaluating new treatment options, particularly in phase II and phase III trials. To help realize such an aim, in 2003, Royston and colleagues proposed a class of multi-arm, two-stage trial designs intended to eliminate poorly performing contenders at a first stage (point in time. Only treatments showing a predefined degree of advantage against a control treatment were allowed through to a second stage. Arms that survived the first-stage comparison on an intermediate outcome measure entered a second stage of patient accrual, culminating in comparisons against control on the definitive outcome measure. The intermediate outcome is typically on the causal pathway to the definitive outcome (i.e. the features that cause an intermediate event also tend to cause a definitive event, an example in cancer being progression-free and overall survival. Although the 2003 paper alluded to multi-arm trials, most of the essential design features concerned only two-arm trials. Here, we extend the two-arm designs to allow an arbitrary number of stages, thereby increasing flexibility by building in several 'looks' at the accumulating data. Such trials can terminate at any of the intermediate stages or the final stage. Methods We describe the trial design and the mathematics required to obtain the timing of the 'looks' and the overall significance level and power of the design. We support our results by extensive simulation studies. As an example, we discuss the design of the STAMPEDE trial in prostate cancer. Results The mathematical results on significance level and power are confirmed by the computer simulations. Our approach compares favourably with methodology

  15. Improving Treatment Trial Outcomes for Rett Syndrome: The Development of Rett-specific Anchors for the Clinical Global Impression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neul, Jeffrey L; Glaze, Daniel G; Percy, Alan K; Feyma, Tim; Beisang, Arthur; Dinh, Thuy; Suter, Bernhard; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Snape, Mike; Horrigan, Joseph; Jones, Nancy E

    2015-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder. Although the clinical consequences of Rett syndrome are profound and lifelong, currently no approved drug treatments are available specifically targeted to Rett symptoms. High quality outcome measures, specific to the core symptoms of a disorder are a critical component of well-designed clinical trials for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. The Clinical Global Impression Scale is a measure of global clinical change with strong face validity that has been widely used as an outcome measure in clinical trials of central nervous system disorders. Despite its favorable assay sensitivity in clinical trials, as a global measure, the Clinical Global Impression Scale is not specific to the signs and symptoms of the disorder under study. Development of key anchors for the scale, specific to the disorder being assessed, holds promise for enhancing the validity and reliability of the measure for disorders such as Rett syndrome.

  16. Funding source and primary outcome changes in clinical trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov are associated with the reporting of a statistically significant primary outcome: a cross-sectional study [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5bj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreeram V Ramagopalan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: We and others have shown a significant proportion of interventional trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov have their primary outcomes altered after the listed study start and completion dates. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether changes made to primary outcomes are associated with the likelihood of reporting a statistically significant primary outcome on ClinicalTrials.gov. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of all interventional clinical trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov as of 20 November 2014 was performed. The main outcome was any change made to the initially listed primary outcome and the time of the change in relation to the trial start and end date. Findings: 13,238 completed interventional trials were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov that also had study results posted on the website. 2555 (19.3% had one or more statistically significant primary outcomes. Statistical analysis showed that registration year, funding source and primary outcome change after trial completion were associated with reporting a statistically significant primary outcome. Conclusions: Funding source and primary outcome change after trial completion are associated with a statistically significant primary outcome report on clinicaltrials.gov.

  17. Is Mandatory Prospective Trial Registration Working to Prevent Publication of Unregistered Trials and Selective Outcome Reporting? An Observational Study of Five Psychiatry Journals That Mandate Prospective Clinical Trial Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Scott

    Full Text Available To address the bias occurring in the medical literature associated with selective outcome reporting, in 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE introduced mandatory trial registration guidelines and member journals required prospective registration of trials prior to patient enrolment as a condition of publication. No research has examined whether these guidelines are impacting psychiatry publications. Our objectives were to determine the extent to which articles published in psychiatry journals adhering to ICMJE guidelines were correctly prospectively registered, whether there was evidence of selective outcome reporting and changes to participant numbers, and whether there was a relationship between registration status and source of funding.Any clinical trial (as defined by ICMJE published between 1 January 2009 and 31 July 2013 in the top five psychiatry journals adhering to ICMJE guidelines (The American Journal of Psychiatry, Archives of General Psychiatry/JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry and conducted after July 2005 (or 2007 for two journals was included. For each identified trial, where possible we extracted trial registration information, changes to POMs between publication and registry to assess selective outcome reporting, changes to participant numbers, and funding type.Out of 3305 articles, 181 studies were identified as clinical trials requiring registration: 21 (11.6% were deemed unregistered, 61 (33.7% were retrospectively registered, 37 (20.4% had unclear POMs either in the article or the registry and 2 (1.1% were registered in an inaccessible trial registry. Only 60 (33.1% studies were prospectively registered with clearly defined POMs; 17 of these 60 (28.3% showed evidence of selective outcome reporting and 16 (26.7% demonstrated a change in participant numbers of 20% or more; only 26 (14

  18. Interpreting patient-reported outcomes from clinical trials in COPD: a discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones PW

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul W Jones,1,2 Stephen Rennard,3,4 Maggie Tabberer,5 John H Riley,2 Mitra Vahdati-Bolouri,2 Neil C Barnes2,6 1Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of London, London, 2Global Respiratory Franchise, GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, UK; 3Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Allergy, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 4Clinical Discovery Unit, AstraZeneca, Cambridge, 5Global R&D, GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, 6William Harvey Institute, Bart’s and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK Abstract: One of the challenges faced by the practising physician is the interpretation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs in clinical trials and the relevance of such data to their patients. This is especially true when caring for patients with progressive diseases such as COPD. In an attempt to incorporate the patient perspective, many clinical trials now include assessments of PROs. These are formalized methods of capturing patient-centered information. Given the importance of PROs in evaluating the potential utility of an intervention for a patient with COPD, it is important that physicians are able to critically interpret (and critique the results derived from them. Therefore, in this paper, a series of questions is posed for the practising physician to consider when reviewing the treatment effectiveness as assessed by PROs. The focus is on the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire for worked examples, but the principles apply equally to other symptom-based questionnaires. A number of different ways of presenting PRO data are discussed, including the concept of the minimum clinically important difference, whether there is a ceiling effect to PRO results, and the strengths and weaknesses of responder analyses. Using a worked example, the value of including a placebo arm in a study is illustrated, and the influence of the study on PRO results is considered, in terms of the design, patient withdrawal, and the selection of

  19. Effect of a randomized controlled exercise trial on bone outcomes: influence of adjuvant endocrine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobf, M Tish; Jeon, Sangchoon; Smith, Barbara; Harris, Lyndsay; Kerstetter, Jane; Thompson, A Siobhan; Insogna, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Bone loss is a significant clinical problem for female cancer survivors (FCS) and increases fracture risk. The aim of the Yale Fitness Intervention Trial (Yale FIT) was to determine the effects of a 12-month aerobic-resistance exercise intervention compared to a home-based physical activity group on bone outcomes [bone mineral density (BMD)] and biomarkers bone turnover). Early postmenopausal FCS (N = 154) were randomized to the exercise intervention (3 times/week) or to a home-based physical activity group. Calcium (1200 mg) and Vitamin D (400 IU) supplements were provided to both groups. BMD was measured at baseline and 12 months. No significant difference in BMD was observed for the exercise vs home-based group. However, subjects on Tamoxifen or no endocrine therapy did not significantly lose BMD, with the exception of the femoral neck (FN). In contrast subjects on aromatase inhibitors (AIs) had significant BMD loss at all sites. The majority of subjects had sufficient serum levels of Vitamin D (>20 ng/mL) but there was significantly less bone loss in subjects in the 20-29 ng/mL range at the LS (p = 0.01), hip (p = 0.03), and GT (p = 0.008) compared to lower or higher levels. Exercise stimulates bone remodeling but the intervention was not superior for BMD outcomes at one year. The dose of the osteogenic stimulus in the intervention has been effective in preserving BMD in healthy postmenopausal women but it may be inadequate for survivors with chemotherapy-induced menopause and for those on adjuvant AI therapy.

  20. Clinical profile, management, and outcome in patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest: insights from a 20-year registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel AA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ashfaq Ahmad Patel, Abdul Rahman Arabi, Hakam Alzaeem, Jassim Al Suwaidi, Rajvir Singh, Hajar A Al BinaliDepartment of Cardiology, Heart Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, QatarBackground: There is limited information regarding the clinical characteristics and outcome of out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA in Middle Eastern patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes in patients admitted following OHCA at a single center in the Middle East over a 20-year period.Methods: The data used for this hospital-based study were collected for patients hospitalized with OHCA in Doha, Qatar, between 1991 and 2010. Baseline clinical characteristics, in-hospital treatment, and outcomes were studied in comparison with the rest of the admissions.Results: A total of 41,453 consecutive patients were admitted during the study period, of whom 987 (2.4% had a diagnosis of OHCA. Their average age was 57±15 years, and 72.7% were males, 56.5% were Arabs, and 30.9% were South Asians. When compared with the rest of the admissions taken as a reference, patients with OHCA were more likely to have diabetes mellitus (42.8% versus 39.1%, respectively, P=0.02, prior myocardial infarction (21.8% versus 19.2%, P=0.04, and chronic renal failure (7.4% versus 3.9%, P=0.001, but were less likely to have dyslipidemia (16.9% versus 25.4%, P=0.001. Further, 52.6% of patients had preceding symptoms, the most common of which was chest pain (27.2% followed by dyspnea (24.8%. An initially shockable rhythm (ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia was present in 25.1% of OHCA patients, with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction documented in 30.0%. Severely reduced left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction ≤35% was present in 53.2% of OHCA patients; 42.9% had cardiogenic shock requiring use of inotropes at presentation. An intra-aortic balloon pump was inserted in 3.6% of cases. Antiarrhythmic

  1. Improved outcome in acute myeloid leukemia patients enrolled in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Mette; Sengeløv, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are critical to improve AML treatment. It remains, however, unclear if clinical trial participation per se affects prognosis and to what extent the patients selected for trials differ from those of patients receiving intensive therapy off-trial.We conducted a population-based cohort...... study of newly diagnosed Danish AML patients treated with intensive chemotherapy between 2000-2013. We estimated accrual rates and compared characteristics, complete remission (CR) rates, and relative risks (RRs) of death at 90-day, 1-year, and 3-years in clinical trial patients to patients treated off......-trial.Of 867 patients, 58.3% (n = 504) were included in a clinical trial. Accrual rates were similar across age groups (p = 0.55). Patients with poor performance status, comorbidity, therapy-related and secondary AML were less likely to be enrolled in trials. CR rates were 80.2% in trial-patients versus 68...

  2. Resistance in gram-negative bacilli in a cardiac intensive care unit in India: Risk factors and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Mandakini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the risk factors and outcome of patients with preexisting resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB with those who develop sensitive GNB in the cardiac intensive care unit (ICU. Of the 3161 patients ( n = 3,161 admitted to the ICU during the study period, 130 (4.11% developed health care-associated infections (HAIs with GNB and were included in the cohort study. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (37.8% was the most common organism isolated followed by Klebsiella species (24.2%, E. coli (22.0%, Enterobacter species (6.1%, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (5.7%, Acinetobacter species (1.3%, Serratia marcescens (0.8%, Weeksella virosa (0.4% and Burkholderia cepacia (0.4%. Univariate analysis revealed that the following variables were significantly associated with the antibiotic-resistant GNB: females ( P = 0.018, re-exploration ( P = 0.004, valve surgery ( P = 0.003, duration of central venous catheter ( P < 0.001, duration of mechanical ventilation ( P < 0.001, duration of intra-aortic balloon counter-pulsation ( P = 0.018, duration of urinary catheter ( P < 0.001, total number of antibiotic exposures prior to the development of resistance ( P < 0.001, duration of antibiotic use prior to the development of resistance ( P = 0.014, acute physiology and age chronic health evaluation score (APACHE II, receipt of anti-pseudomonal penicillins (piperacillin-tazobactam ( P = 0.002 and carbapenems ( P < 0.001. On multivariate analysis, valve surgery (adjusted OR = 2.033; 95% CI = 1.052-3.928; P = 0.035, duration of mechanical ventilation (adjusted OR = 1.265; 95% CI = 1.055-1.517; P = 0.011 and total number of antibiotic exposure prior to the development of resistance (adjusted OR = 1.381; 95% CI = 1.030-1.853; P = 0.031 were identified as independent risk factors for HAIs in resistant GNB. The mortality rate in patients with resistant GNB was significantly higher than those with sensitive GNB (13.9% vs. 1.8%; P = 0.03. HAI with

  3. Reverse Mismatch Pattern in Cardiac 18F-FDG Viability PET/CT Is Not Associated With Poor Outcome of Revascularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Kjeldsen; Gejl, Michael; Bouchelouche, Kirsten;

    2016-01-01

    myocardium; however, only in 12 of 91 patients was the RM considered significant (percentage RM in the left ventricle, 42.5 ± 12.9 [reverse patients] vs 14.1 ± 8.6 [scar and hibernation patients]; P ... is common among HF patients (~15%) and is inversely correlated to insulin sensitivity. It is not, however, associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality and does not predict a worse outcome after revascularization....

  4. Mobile-Based Video Learning Outcomes in Clinical Nursing Skill Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Ju; Chae, Sun-Mi; Kim, Haejin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Min, Hyojin Jennifer; Park, Da-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are a regular part of daily life among the younger generations. Thus, now is the time to apply mobile device use to nursing education. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of a mobile-based video clip on learning motivation, competence, and class satisfaction in nursing students using a randomized controlled trial with a pretest and posttest design. A total of 71 nursing students participated in this study: 36 in the intervention group and 35 in the control group. A video clip of how to perform a urinary catheterization was developed, and the intervention group was able to download it to their own mobile devices for unlimited viewing throughout 1 week. All of the students participated in a practice laboratory to learn urinary catheterization and were blindly tested for their performance skills after participation in the laboratory. The intervention group showed significantly higher levels of learning motivation and class satisfaction than did the control. Of the fundamental nursing competencies, the intervention group was more confident in practicing catheterization than their counterparts. Our findings suggest that video clips using mobile devices are useful tools that educate student nurses on relevant clinical skills and improve learning outcomes.

  5. Outcomes of anatomical vs. functional testing for coronary artery disease : Lessons from the PROMISE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R; Foldyna, B; Hoffmann, U

    2016-08-01

    The development of coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major, final common pathway in heart disease worldwide. With a rise in stress testing and increased scrutiny on cost-effectiveness and radiation exposure in medical imaging, a focus on the relative merits of anatomic versus functional characterization of CAD has emerged. In this context, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is a noninvasive alternative to functional testing as a first-line test for CAD detection but is complimentary in its nature. Here, we discuss the design, results, and implications of the PROMISE trial, a randomized comparative effectiveness study of 10,003 patients across 193 sites in the United States and Canada comparing the prognostic and diagnostic power of CCTA and standard stress testing. Specifically, we discuss the safety (e. g., contrast, radiation exposure) of CCTA versus functional testing in CAD, the need for improved selection for noninvasive testing, the frequency of downstream testing after anatomic or functional imaging, the use of imaging results in clinical management, and novel modalities of CAD risk determination using CCTA. PROMISE demonstrated that in a real-world, low-to-intermediate risk patient population referred to noninvasive testing for CAD, both CCTA and functional testing approaches have similar clinical, economic, and safety-based outcomes. We conclude with open questions in CAD imaging, specifically as they pertain to the utilization of CCTA.

  6. Working alliance and its relationship to outcomes in a randomized controlled trial (RCT of antipsychotic medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wykes Til

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long acting injections (LAI have been associated with perceptions of coercion in cross sectional studies but there have been no longitudinal studies of the effects on clinical relationships with newer depot medications. Method Randomized controlled trial with (50 participants with a diagnosis of schizophrenia randomized to risperidone LAI or oral atypical antipsychotic medication. The main outcome was the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI with background variables (symptoms, side effect, social functioning, quality of life measured before randomization and at two years. Results At follow-up (14 risperidone LAI and 16 oral medication analyses including predictors of missing data and baseline score showed a trend for those on risperidone LAI to reduce WAI score and those on oral medication showing no change. Sensitivity analyses showed (i a significant detrimental effect of LAI on WAI and (ii the pattern of results was not affected by change in symptoms over the study. Conclusion This is the first study to show that the prescription of depot atypical depot medication is associated with detrimental effects on clinical relationships after 2 years of continual treatment.

  7. Reducing bed rest time from five to three hours does not increase complications after cardiac catheterization: the THREE CATH Trial 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, Roselene; Hilário, Thamires de Souza; Reich, Rejane; Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to compare the incidence of vascular complications in patients undergoing transfemoral cardiac catheterization with a 6F introducer sheath followed by 3-hour versus 5-hour rest. Methods: randomized clinical trial. Subjects in the intervention group (IG) ambulated 3 hours after sheath removal, versus 5 hours in the control group (CG). All patients remained in the catheterization laboratory for 5 hours and were assessed hourly, and were contacted 24, 48, and 72 h after hospital discharge. Results: the sample comprised 367 patients in the IG and 363 in the GC. During cath lab stay, hematoma was the most common complication in both groups, occurring in 12 (3%) IG and 13 (4%) CG subjects (P=0.87). Bleeding occurred in 4 (1%) IG and 6 (2%) CG subjects (P=0.51), and vasovagal reaction in 5 (1.4%) IG and 4 (1.1%) CG subjects (P=0.75). At 24-h, 48-h, and 72-h bruising was the most commonly reported complication in both groups. None of the comparisons revealed any significant between-group differences. Conclusion: the results of this trial show that reducing bed rest time to 3 hours after elective cardiac catheterization is safe and does not increase complications as compared with a 5-hour rest. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT-01740856 PMID:27463113

  8. Practical aspects of conducting a pragmatic randomised trial in primary care: patient recruitment and outcome assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A.W.M. van der Windt (Daniëlle); B.W. Koes (Bart); M. van Aarst; M.A. Heemskerk; L.M. Bouter (Lex)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Conducting a pragmatic randomised trial in primary care is often accompanied by practical problems. Such problems are seldom reported and may constitute useful lessons for researchers planning future trials. AIM: To address the difficulties invol

  9. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cardiac Function and Clinical Outcomes in Chinese Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoxin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of OSA on cardiac function in Chinese patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI and determine the prognostic impact of OSA among these patients. Methods. In this retrospective study, 198 STEMI patients were enrolled. Doppler echocardiography was performed to detect the effect of OSA on cardiac function. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE and cardiac mortality were analyzed to determine whether OSA was a clinical prognostic factor; its prognostic impact was then assessed adjusting for other covariates. Results. The echocardiographic results showed that the myocardium of STEMI patients with OSA appeared to be more hypertrophic and with a poorer cardiac function compared with non-OSA STEMI patients. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed significantly higher cumulative incidence of MACE and cardiac mortality in the OSA group compared with that in the non-OSA group during a mean follow-up of 24 months. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that OSA was an independent risk factor for MACE and cardiac mortality. Conclusion. These results indicate that the OSA is a powerful predictor of decreased survival and exerts negative prognostic impact on cardiac function in STEMI patients.

  10. Protocol for: Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT: A randomised controlled trial of exercise therapy and mental health outcomes in obese adolescents [ISRCNT83888112

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Neil P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While obesity is known to have many physiological consequences, the psychopathology of this condition has not featured prominently in the literature. Cross-sectional studies have indicated that obese children have increased odds of experiencing poor quality of life and mental health. However, very limited trial evidence has examined the efficacy of exercise therapy for enhancing mental health outcomes in obese children, and the Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT will provide evidence of the efficacy of supervised exercise therapy in obese young people aged 11–16 years versus usual care and an attention-control intervention. Method/design SHOT is a randomised controlled trial where obese young people are randomised to receive; (1 exercise therapy, (2 attention-control intervention (involving body-conditioning exercises and games that do not involve aerobic activity, or (3 usual care. The exercise therapy and attention-control sessions will take place three times per week for eight weeks and a six-week home programme will follow this. Ninety adolescents aged between 11–16 years referred from a children's hospital for evaluation of obesity or via community advertisements will need to complete the study. Participants will be recruited according to the following criteria: (1 clinically obese and aged 11–16 years (Body Mass Index Centile > 98th UK standard (2 no medical condition that would restrict ability to be active three times per week for eight weeks and (3 not diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes or receiving oral steroids. Assessments of outcomes will take place at baseline, as well as four (intervention midpoint and eight weeks (end of intervention from baseline. Participants will be reassessed on outcome measures five and seven months from baseline. The primary endpoint is physical self-perceptions. Secondary outcomes include physical activity, self-perceptions, depression, affect, aerobic fitness and BMI.

  11. Therapeutic trials in lupus nephritis. Problems related to renal histology, monitoring of therapy and measures of outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balow, J E

    1981-01-01

    Approaches to treatment of lupus nephritis have been complicated by controversies in the definitions of the types of renal histology, the relevance of immunological and renal monitoring techniques as therapeutic guidelines, and lack of definitive clinical trials. It is suggested that demonstration of the efficacy of various therapeutic agents in clinical trials may be identified earlier by renal histological changes and/or assessment of drug toxicity compared to the time required for differences based on renal functional changes to emerge as ultimate measures of outcome.

  12. Fifteen-Year Radiotherapy Outcomes of the Randomized PORTEC-1 Trial for Endometrial Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creutzberg, Carien L., E-mail: c.l.creutzberg@lumc.nl [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Lybeert, Marnix L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital Eindhoven (Netherlands); Warlam-Rodenhuis, Carla C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Jobsen, Jan J. [Department of Radiotherapy, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Mens, Jan-Willem M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, ErasmusMC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lutgens, Ludy C.H.W. [MAASTRO clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pras, Elisabeth [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven and Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases, Tilburg University (Netherlands); Putten, Wim L.J. van [Department of Biostatistics, ErasmusMC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the very long-term results of the randomized Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma (PORTEC)-1 trial for patients with Stage I endometrial carcinoma (EC), focusing on the role of prognostic factors for treatment selection and the long-term risk of second cancers. Patients and Methods: The PORTEC trial (1990-1997) included 714 patients with Stage IC Grade 1-2 or Stage IB Grade 2-3 EC. After surgery, patients were randomly allocated to external-beam pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT) or no additional treatment (NAT). Analysis was by intention to treat. Results: 426 patients were alive at the date of analysis. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. The 15-year actuarial locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates were 6% for EBRT vs. 15.5% for NAT (p < 0.0001). The 15-year overall survival was 52% vs. 60% (p = 0.14), and the failure-free survival was 50% vs. 54% (p = 0.94). For patients with high-intermediate risk criteria, the 15-year overall survival was 41% vs. 48% (p = 0.51), and the 15-year EC-related death was 14% vs. 13%. Most LRR in the NAT group were vaginal recurrences (11.0% of 15.5%). The 15-year rates of distant metastases were 9% vs. 7% (p = 0.25). Second primary cancers had been diagnosed over 15 years in 19% of all patients, 22% vs. 16% for EBRT vs. NAT (p = 0.10), with observed vs. expected ratios of 1.6 (EBRT) and 1.2 (NAT) compared with a matched population (p = NS). Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostic significance of Grade 3 for LRR (hazard ratio [HR] 3.4, p = 0.0003) and for EC death (HR 7.3, p < 0.0001), of age >60 (HR 3.9, p = 0.002 for LRR and 2.7, p = 0.01 for EC death) and myometrial invasion >50% (HR 1.9, p = 0.03 and HR 1.9, p = 0.02). Conclusions: The 15-year outcomes of PORTEC-1 confirm the relevance of HIR criteria for treatment selection, and a trend for long-term risk of second cancers. EBRT should be avoided in patients with low- and intermediate-risk EC.

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation increases physical capacity but not mental health after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine L.; Berg, Selina K.; Rasmussen, Trine B.

    2016-01-01

    -educational consultations (intervention) versus usual care without structured physical exercise or psycho-educational consultations (control). Primary outcome was physical capacity measured by VO2 peak and secondary outcome was self-reported mental health measured by Short Form-36. Results: 76% were men, mean age 62 years.......40) or the exploratory physical and mental outcomes. Cardiac rehabilitation increased the occurrence of self-reported non-serious adverse events (11/72 vs 3/75, p=0.02). Conclusions: Cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery significantly improves VO2 peak at 4 months but has no effect on mental health and other...... valve surgery. Methods: The trial was an investigator-initiated, randomised superiority trial (The CopenHeartVR trial, VR; valve replacement or repair). We randomised 147 patients after heart valve surgery 1:1 to 12 weeks of cardiac rehabilitation consisting of physical exercise and monthly psycho...

  14. Prospective surveillance for cardiac adverse events in healthy adults receiving modified vaccinia Ankara vaccines: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie L Elizaga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vaccinia-associated myo/pericarditis was observed during the US smallpox vaccination (DryVax campaign initiated in 2002. A highly-attenuated vaccinia strain, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA has been evaluated in clinical trials as a safer alternative to DryVax and as a vector for recombinant vaccines. Due to the lack of prospectively collected cardiac safety data, the US Food and Drug Administration required cardiac screening and surveillance in all clinical trials of MVA since 2004. Here, we report cardiac safety surveillance from 6 phase I trials of MVA vaccines. METHODS: Four clinical research organizations contributed cardiac safety data using common surveillance methods in trials administering MVA or recombinant MVA vaccines to healthy participants. 'Routine cardiac investigations' (ECGs and cardiac enzymes obtained 2 weeks after injections of MVA or MVA-HIV recombinants, or placebo-controls, and 'Symptom-driven cardiac investigations' are reported. The outcome measure is the number of participants who met the CDC-case definition for vaccinia-related myo/pericarditis or who experienced cardiac adverse events from an MVA vaccine. RESULTS: Four hundred twenty-five study participants had post-vaccination safety data analyzed, 382 received at least one MVA-containing vaccine and 43 received placebo; 717 routine ECGs and 930 cardiac troponin assays were performed. Forty-five MVA recipients (12% had additional cardiac testing performed; 22 for cardiac symptoms, 19 for ECG/laboratory changes, and 4 for cardiac symptoms with an ECG/laboratory change. No participant had evidence of symptomatic or asymptomatic myo/pericarditis meeting the CDC-case definition and judged to be related to an MVA vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: Prospective surveillance of MVA recipients for myo/pericarditis did not detect cardiac adverse reactions in 382 study participants. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00082446 NCT003766090 NCT00252148 NCT00083603

  15. Mechanical versus manual chest compression for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC): a pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Gavin D; Lall, Ranjit; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Cooke, Matthew W; Horton, Jessica; Lamb, Sarah E; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Woollard, Malcolm; Carson, Andy; Smyth, Mike; Whitfield, Richard; Williams, Amanda; Pocock, Helen; Black, John J. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical chest compression devices have the potential to help maintain high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but despite their increasing use, little evidence exists for their effectiveness. We aimed to study whether the introduction of LUCAS-2 mechanical CPR into front-line emergency response vehicles would improve survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS: The pre-hospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac...

  16. Capillaroscopy as an Outcome Measure for Clinical Trials on the Peripheral Vasculopathy in SSc—Is It Useful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Cutolo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral microvascular impairment in systemic sclerosis (SSc may be easily detected and scored in a safe noninvasive way by nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC. The paper highlights clinical conditions related to SSc in which NVC may represent an outcome measure of therapeutical interventions, by elaborating on their already assessed relationship with the NVC patterns and eventually scores. The 3 important biological/clinical conditions are: the positivity for SSc-specific serum autoantibodies, the presence of SSc skin digital ulcers (DUs and of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH SSc associated. In conclusion, to the question if capillaroscopy (NVC may represent in SSc an outcome measure for clinical trials on the peripheral vasculopathy, based on the growing evidence and our detailed studies, the answer is positive. Recent therapeutic trials in SSc are confirming this role, and the experience is growing rapidly.

  17. Do early quadriceps exercises affect the outcome of ACL reconstruction? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Triston; Williams, Marie T; Chipchase, Lucy S

    2005-01-01

    A prospective, blinded, randomised controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of quadriceps exercises following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A treatment group (Quadriceps exercise group) performed straight leg raises and isometric quadriceps contractions throughout the first two postoperative weeks, and a second group (No quadriceps exercise group) did not. A battery of outcome measures assessed subjects postoperatively at day one, two weeks, and one, three and six months. A total of 103 patients (Quadriceps exercise n = 48, No quadriceps exercise n = 55) commenced the study with 91 subjects available at final follow up (Quadriceps exercise n = 47, No quadriceps exercise n = 44). Performance of quadriceps exercises significantly improved a number of knee flexion and extension range of motion measurements (p = 0.01 to 0.04). No significant differences were found between the two groups at any postoperative period for quadriceps lag (p = 0.36), functional hop testing (p = 0.49 to 0.51), isokinetic quadriceps strength (p = 0.70 to 0.72), the majority of numerical analogue scores (p = 0.1 to 0.94) and Cincinnati scores (p = 0.10 to 0.84). Subjects performing quadriceps exercises reported significantly higher pain scores with exercise on the first postoperative day (p = 0.02). At six months postoperatively, the Quadriceps exercise subjects reported significantly more favourable Cincinnati scores for symptoms (p = 0.005) and problems with sport (p = 0.05). While average knee laxity was not significantly different between treatment groups over time (p = 0.27 to 0.94), quadriceps exercise performance was associated with a significantly lower incidence of abnormal knee laxity. Isometric quadriceps exercises and straight leg raises can be safely prescribed during the first two postoperative weeks and confer advantages for faster recovery of knee range of motion and stability. It remains to be proven whether the magnitude of differences between groups is

  18. Outcomes of a randomised controlled trial of a complex genetic counselling intervention to improve family communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jan; Metcalfe, Sylvia; Gaff, Clara; Donath, Susan; Delatycki, Martin B; Winship, Ingrid; Skene, Loane; Aitken, MaryAnne; Halliday, Jane

    2016-03-01

    When an inherited genetic condition is diagnosed in an individual it has implications for other family members. Privacy legislation and ethical considerations can restrict health professionals from communicating directly with other family members, and so it is frequently the responsibility of the first person in a family to receive the diagnosis (the proband) to share this news. Communication of genetic information is challenging and many at-risk family members remain unaware of important information that may be relevant to their or their children's health. We conducted a randomised controlled trial in six public hospitals to assess whether a specifically designed telephone counselling intervention improved family communication about a new genetic diagnosis. Ninety-five probands/parents of probands were recruited from genetics clinics and randomised to the intervention or control group. The primary outcome measure was the difference between the proportion of at-risk relatives who contacted genetics services for information and/or genetic testing. Audit of the family genetic file after 18 months revealed that 25.6% of intervention group relatives compared with 20.9% of control group relatives made contact with genetic services (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.30, 95% confidence interval 0.70-2.42, P=0.40). Although no major difference was detected overall between the intervention and control groups, there was more contact in the intervention group where the genetic condition conferred a high risk to offspring (adjusted OR 24.0, 95% confidence interval 3.4-168.5, P=0.001). The increasing sophistication and scope of genetic testing makes it imperative for health professionals to consider additional ways of supporting families in communicating genetic information.

  19. Update to the study protocol, including statistical analysis plan for a randomized clinical trial comparing comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery with control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Laerum; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Hansen, Tina Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    (VO2 peak) measured by cardiopulmonary exercise testing with ventilatory gas analysis. The secondary outcome is self-assessed mental health measured by the standardized questionnaire Short Form-36. Long-term healthcare utilization and mortality as well as biochemistry, echocardiography and cost......, either valve replacement or repair, remains the treatment of choice. However, post-surgery, the transition to daily living may become a physical, mental and social challenge. We hypothesize that a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program can improve physical capacity and self-assessed mental health...... patients 1:1 to an intervention or a control group, using central randomization, and blinded outcome assessment and statistical analyses. The intervention consists of 12 weeks of physical exercise and a psycho-educational intervention comprising five consultations. The primary outcome is peak oxygen uptake...

  20. Improving the outcome of infants born at <30 weeks' gestation - a randomized controlled trial of preventative care at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orton Jane

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early developmental interventions to prevent the high rate of neurodevelopmental problems in very preterm children, including cognitive, motor and behavioral impairments, are urgently needed. These interventions should be multi-faceted and include modules for caregivers given their high rates of mental health problems. Methods/Design We have designed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a preventative care program delivered at home over the first 12 months of life for infants born very preterm ( Discussion This paper presents the background, study design and protocol for a randomized controlled trial in very preterm infants utilizing a preventative care program in the first year after discharge home designed to improve cognitive, motor and behavioral outcomes of very preterm children and caregiver mental health at two-years' corrected age. Clinical Trial Registration Number ACTRN12605000492651

  1. The Outcome of Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) reveals the need for better understanding of selenium biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2009-02-01

    The recently completed Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) was one of the largest human cancer prevention trials ever undertaken. Its purpose was to assess the role of selenium and vitamin E in prostate cancer prevention, but SELECT found no decline in prostate cancer. Comparison of this study to other clinical trials involving selenium and to the results of animal studies suggests that the source of the selenium supplement, L-selenomethionine, and the relatively high initial levels of selenium in the enrolled men may have contributed to this outcome. Further analysis of the clinical and animal data highlights the need for mechanistic studies to better understand selenium biology in order to target dietary selenium to appropriate subsets of the human population: those individuals most likely to benefit from this micronutrient.

  2. Predictors of treatment outcome in an effectiveness trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for children with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wergeland, Gro Janne H; Fjermestad, Krister W; Marin, Carla E; Bjelland, Ingvar; Haugland, Bente Storm Mowatt; Silverman, Wendy K; Öst, Lars-Göran; Bjaastad, Jon Fauskanger; Oeding, Kristin; Havik, Odd E; Heiervang, Einar R

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of children with anxiety disorders do not improve following cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Recent effectiveness studies have found poorer outcome for CBT programs than what is typically found in efficacy studies. The present study examined predictors of treatment outcome among 181 children (aged 8-15 years), with separation anxiety, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder, who participated in a randomized, controlled effectiveness trial of a 10-session CBT program in community clinics. Potential predictors included baseline demographic, child, and parent factors. Outcomes were as follows: a) remission from all inclusion anxiety disorders; b) remission from the primary anxiety disorder; and c) child- and parent-rated reduction of anxiety symptoms at post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up. The most consistent findings across outcome measures and informants were that child-rated anxiety symptoms, functional impairment, a primary diagnosis of social phobia or separation anxiety disorder, and parent internalizing symptoms predicted poorer outcome at post-treatment. Child-rated anxiety symptoms, lower family social class, lower pretreatment child motivation, and parent internalizing symptoms predicted poorer outcome at 1-year follow-up. These results suggest that anxious children with more severe problems, and children of parents with elevated internalizing symptom levels, may be in need of modified, additional, or alternative interventions to achieve a positive treatment outcome.

  3. Comparison of Bayesian and classical methods in the analysis of cluster randomized controlled trials with a binary outcome: The Community Hypertension Assessment Trial (CHAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolovich Lisa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster randomized trials (CRTs are increasingly used to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve health outcomes or prevent diseases. However, the efficiency and consistency of using different analytical methods in the analysis of binary outcome have received little attention. We described and compared various statistical approaches in the analysis of CRTs using the Community Hypertension Assessment Trial (CHAT as an example. The CHAT study was a cluster randomized controlled trial aimed at investigating the effectiveness of pharmacy-based blood pressure clinics led by peer health educators, with feedback to family physicians (CHAT intervention against Usual Practice model (Control, on the monitoring and management of BP among older adults. Methods We compared three cluster-level and six individual-level statistical analysis methods in the analysis of binary outcomes from the CHAT study. The three cluster-level analysis methods were: i un-weighted linear regression, ii weighted linear regression, and iii random-effects meta-regression. The six individual level analysis methods were: i standard logistic regression, ii robust standard errors approach, iii generalized estimating equations, iv random-effects meta-analytic approach, v random-effects logistic regression, and vi Bayesian random-effects regression. We also investigated the robustness of the estimates after the adjustment for the cluster and individual level covariates. Results Among all the statistical methods assessed, the Bayesian random-effects logistic regression method yielded the widest 95% interval estimate for the odds ratio and consequently led to the most conservative conclusion. However, the results remained robust under all methods – showing sufficient evidence in support of the hypothesis of no effect for the CHAT intervention against Usual Practice control model for management of blood pressure among seniors in primary care. The

  4. Prognose des neurologischen Outcomes nach Herz-Kreislaufstillstand: Macht Temperaturmanagement einen Unterschied? // Prognostication of Neurological Outcome after Cardiac Arrest: Does Hypothermia makes a Difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, most survivors after cardiac arrest will receive a targeted temperature management in the post-resuscitation phase. Early the important question of the neurological prognosis occurs. In addition to the neurological examination (motor response to painful stimuli, brain stem reflexes technical diagnostics are widely used (SEP, EEG, CCT, CMRI. Furthermore, the serum concentration of biomarkers, such as neuron-specific Enolase (NSE in clinical routine and others mainly in the context of research (S-100B, CRP, PCT, micro-RNA are determined. After introduction of targeted temperature management, several studies from different centres have re-evaluated prognostic parameters. Hypothermia likely alters the level of neuron-specific enolase, markedly higher cut-offs apply for patients treated with hypothermia. The prognostic value of median nerve SEP remains largely unchanged. The sedation used during hypothermia renders neurological examination unreliable, even a few days after rewarming the lack of a motor response to painful stimuli does not safely exclude good neurological outcome. In addition, the absence of corneal reflexes is a less reliable parameter than the absence of pupillary light response. Recent studies indicate that evaluation of several prognostic parameters and interpretation in synopsis is advisable. In addition, clinical follow-up over a few days and re-evaluation of prognostic parameters may increase safety of a poor outcome prediction. p bKurzfassung: /bAktuell wird die Mehrzahl der Patienten nach erfolgreicher Reanimation mit einem „Targeted Temperature Management“ in der Post-Reanimationsphase behandelt. Bereits zu Beginn der Therapie, aber auch im Verlauf stellt sich die Frage nach der neurologischen Prognose. Neben klinischer Untersuchung (motorische Antwort auf Schmerzreize, Hirnstammreflexe kommen apparative Verfahren (SEP, EEG, CCT, CMRT zum Einsatz. Zusätzlich erfolgt die Bestimmung von Biomarkern, routinem

  5. Association of race/ethnicity with visual outcomes following acute optic neuritis: an analysis of the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Heather E; Gao, Weihua; Balcer, Laura J; Joslin, Charlotte E

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Retrospective studies have demonstrated disparate outcomes following acute optic neuritis in individuals of African descent compared with individuals of white race/ethnicity. However, published analyses of the prospectively collected Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial (ONTT) data identified no association between worse visual outcomes and black race/ethnicity. OBJECTIVES To investigate the associations of age, sex, and race/ethnicity with visual outcomes following acute optic neuritis through application of longitudinal data analysis techniques to the ONTT data set. DESIGN Secondary analysis of the ONTT (a prospective randomized controlled trial) data set. Our models included effects of treatment (placebo, oral prednisone, or intravenous methylprednisolone), time, and treatment × time interaction, as well as demographic covariates of age, sex, and race/ethnicity. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS The ONTT data were collected at multiple centers in the United States. Patients of black (n = 58) and white (n = 388) race/ethnicity with acute optic neuritis who enrolled in the ONTT within 8 days of symptom onset were included in analyses. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The contrast sensitivity and visual acuity (logMAR) in the affected eye were modeled using 2-stage mixed-effects regression techniques. All available follow-up data from baseline to 15 to 18 years were included. RESULTS The data identified no relationship of age, sex, or treatment with contrast sensitivity or visual acuity outcomes. Race/ethnicity was significantly related to contrast sensitivity (P optic neuritis, with black race/ethnicity being associated with worse scores for both. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Race/ethnicity seems to be associated with contrast sensitivity and visual acuity outcomes in affected eyes following acute optic neuritis. To our knowledge, this is the largest cohort of black race/ethnicity with acute optic neuritis to be studied and represents the first evidence from a

  6. Clinical features and outcome of eight patients with mediastinal and neck hematoma after transradial cardiac catheterization approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨伟宪

    2014-01-01

    Objective The clinical features of patients with mediastinal and/or neck hematoma after transradial cardiac catheterization were reviewed and analyzed to help the clinicians to recognize this complication,and try their best to avoid the complication and treat the complication properly.Methods A total of 8 patients with mediastinal and/or neck hematoma after right transradial cardiac catheterization in Fuwai hospital from January 1,2005 to the end of 2012 were included in this study.Among

  7. Influence of Cardiovascular and Noncardiovascular Co-morbidities on Outcomes and Treatment Effect of Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine in Stable Heart Failure (from the SHIFT Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Robertson, Michele; Ford, Ian; Borer, Jeffrey S; Komajda, Michel; Kindermann, Ingrid; Maack, Christoph; Lainscak, Mitja; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2015-12-15

    Incidence of chronic heart failure (HF) increases with age and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity. Co-morbidities increase hospitalization and mortality in HF, and non-CV co-morbidities may lead to preventable hospitalizations. We studied the impact of co-morbidities on mortality and morbidity in Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the I(f) Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial, and investigated whether the impact of ivabradine was affected by co-morbidities. We analyzed the Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the I(f) Inhibitor Ivabradine Trialpopulation, with moderate-to-severe HF and left ventricular dysfunction (in sinus rhythm with heart rate at rest ≥70 beats/min), according to co-morbidity: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, anemia, stroke, impaired renal function, myocardial infarction, hypertension, and peripheral artery disease. Co-morbidity load was classed as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4+ or 1 to 2 co-morbidities, or 3+ co-morbidities. Co-morbidities were evenly distributed between the placebo and ivabradine groups. Patients with more co-morbidities were likely to be older, women, had more advanced HF, were less likely to be on β blockers, with an even distribution on ivabradine 2.5, 5, or 7.5 mg bid and placebo at all co-morbidity loads. Number of co-morbidities was related to outcomes. Cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization events significantly increased (p 3 co-morbidities for both, ivabradine and placebo. There was no interaction between co-morbidity load and the treatment effects of ivabradine. Hospitalization rate was lower at all co-morbidity loads for ivabradine. In conclusion, cardiac and noncardiac co-morbidities significantly affect CV outcomes, particularly if there are >3 co-morbidities. The effect of heart rate reduction with ivabradine is maintained at all co-morbidity loads.

  8. Incidence and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the eastern part of Yamaguchi prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Teruo; Osawa, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Masatoki; Takahashi, Natsuki; Takeuchi, Kazufumi; Tanakaya, Machiko; Kohno, Kunihisa; Saito, Daiji

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the factors related to poor prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in one local area of Japan. From May 1, 2002 to April 30, 2008, a total of 442 patients with cardiopulmonary arrest were transferred for resuscitation to the National Hospital Organization, Iwakuni Clinical Center. Of 325 patients with cardiopulmonary arrest of cardiac etiology, 126 patients were witnessed by a bystander. However, only 37 received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 13 had shockable cardiac rhythm, 3 survived 1 month, and 2 had a good neurological discharge. Multivariate analysis of overall cardiac arrest showed that 1-month survival and neurologically favorable discharge were associated with bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (P=0.049 and 0.013) and initial shockable cardiac rhythm (P=0.001 and 0.007). In this region, the survival rate for patients with cardiopulmonary arrest was lower than that reported in other areas, probably because fewer patients received bystander CPR or had shockable cardiac rhythm. This may result from CPR being less popularized in this region than in other areas, suggesting that raising the awareness of CPR would improve the survival rate.

  9. Effects of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyu; Li, Yanda; Ren, Xiaomeng; Xiong, Xingjiang; Wu, Lijun; Li, Jie; Wang, Jie; Gao, Yonghong; Shang, Hongcai; Xing, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the effect of rehabilitation exercise after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). We performed a meta-analysis to determine the effects of exercise in patients after PCI. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, the Embase database, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), China Biology Medicine (CBM), and the Wanfang Database were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The key words used for the searches were PCI, exercise, walking, jogging, Tai Chi, and yoga. Six studies with 682 patients met our inclusion criteria; we chose the primary endpoint events of cardiac death, recurrence of myocardial infarction (MI), repeated PCI, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and restenosis, and the secondary endpoint measures included recurrent angina, treadmill exercise (total exercise time, ST-segment decline, angina, and maximum exercise tolerance). The results showed that exercise was not clearly associated with reductions in cardiac death, recurrence of MI, repeated PCI, CABG, or restenosis. However, the exercise group exhibited greater improvements in recurrent angina, total exercise time, ST-segment decline, angina, and maximum exercise tolerance than did the control group. Future studies need to expand the sample size and improve the quality of reporting of RCTs. PMID:28303967

  10. Evaluation of the preliminary effectiveness of hand massage therapy on postoperative pain of adults in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitor, Mădălina; Martorella, Géraldine; Arbour, Caroline; Michaud, Cécile; Gélinas, Céline

    2015-06-01

    Although many intensive care unit patients experience significant pain, very few studies explored massage to maximize their pain relief. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary effects of hand massage on pain after cardiac surgery in the adult intensive care unit. A pilot randomized controlled trial was used for this study. The study was conducted in a Canadian medical-surgical intensive care unit. Forty adults who were admitted to the intensive care unit after undergoing elective cardiac surgery in the previous 24 hours participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 21) or control (n = 19) group. The experimental group received a 15-minute hand massage, and the control group received a 15-minute hand-holding without massage. In both groups the intervention was followed by a 30-minute rest period. The interventions were offered on 2-3 occasions within 24 hours after surgery. Pain, muscle tension, and vital signs were assessed. Pain intensity and behavioral scores were decreased for the experimental group. Although hand massage decreased muscle tension, fluctuations in vital signs were not significant. This study supports potential benefits of hand massage for intensive care unit postoperative pain management. Although larger randomized controlled trials are necessary, this low-cost nonpharmacologic intervention can be safely administered.

  11. Remote ischemic preconditioning reduces perioperative cardiac and renal events in patients undergoing elective coronary intervention: a meta-analysis of 11 randomized trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjun Pei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Results from randomized controlled trials (RCT concerning cardiac and renal effect of remote ischemic preconditioning(RIPC in patients with stable coronary artery disease(CAD are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to explore whether RIPC reduce cardiac and renal events after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. METHODS AND RESULTS: RCTs with data on cardiac or renal effect of RIPC in PCI were searched from Pubmed, EMBase, and Cochrane library (up to July 2014. Meta-regression and subgroup analysis were performed to identify the potential sources of significant heterogeneity(I(2 ≥ 40%. Eleven RCTs enrolling a total of 1713 study subjects with stable CAD were selected. Compared with controls, RIPC significantly reduced perioperative incidence of myocardial infarction (MI [odds ratio(OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.91; P = 0.01; I(2 = 41.0%] and contrast-induced acute kidney injury(AKI (OR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.98; P = 0.04; I(2 = 39.0%. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses confirmed that the major source of heterogeneity for the incidence of MI was male proportion (coefficient  = -0.049; P = 0.047; adjusted R(2 = 0.988; P = 0.02 for subgroup difference. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis of RCTs suggests that RIPC may offer cardiorenal protection by reducing the incidence of MI and AKI in patients undergoing elective PCI. Moreover, this effect on MI is more pronounced in male subjects. Future high-quality, large-scale clinical trials should focus on the long-term clinical effect of RIPC.

  12. Use of 3D printed models in medical education: A randomized control trial comparing 3D prints versus cadaveric materials for learning external cardiac anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kah Heng Alexander; Loo, Zhou Yaw; Goldie, Stephen J; Adams, Justin W; McMenamin, Paul G

    2016-05-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology capable of readily producing accurate anatomical models, however, evidence for the use of 3D prints in medical education remains limited. A study was performed to assess their effectiveness against cadaveric materials for learning external cardiac anatomy. A double blind randomized controlled trial was undertaken on undergraduate medical students without prior formal cardiac anatomy teaching. Following a pre-test examining baseline external cardiac anatomy knowledge, participants were randomly assigned to three groups who underwent self-directed learning sessions using either cadaveric materials, 3D prints, or a combination of cadaveric materials/3D prints (combined materials). Participants were then subjected to a post-test written by a third party. Fifty-two participants completed the trial; 18 using cadaveric materials, 16 using 3D models, and 18 using combined materials. Age and time since completion of high school were equally distributed between groups. Pre-test scores were not significantly different (P = 0.231), however, post-test scores were significantly higher for 3D prints group compared to the cadaveric materials or combined materials groups (mean of 60.83% vs. 44.81% and 44.62%, P = 0.010, adjusted P = 0.012). A significant improvement in test scores was detected for the 3D prints group (P = 0.003) but not for the other two groups. The finding of this pilot study suggests that use of 3D prints do not disadvantage students relative to cadaveric materials; maximally, results suggest that 3D may confer certain benefits to anatomy learning and supports their use and ongoing evaluation as supplements to cadaver-based curriculums. Anat Sci Educ 9: 213-221. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. Choice of design and outcomes in trials among children with moderate acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Wells, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for trials on the effects of food aid products for children with moderate acute malnutrition, to identify how best to restore body tissues and function. The choice of control intervention is a major challenge, with both ethical and scientific implications. While randomized trials...

  14. Angiographic outcomes following stenting or coronary artery bypass surgery of the left main coronary artery: Fifteen-month outcomes from the synergy between PCI with TAXUS express and cardiac surgery left main angiographic substudy (SYNTAX-LE MANS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); T.E. Feldman (Ted); M. Mack (Michael); E. Stahle (Elisabeth); D.R. Holmes (David); A. Colombo (Antonio); M-A.M. Morel (Marie-Angèle); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich); D. Carrié (Didier); G. Fournial (Gerard); S.K. James (Stefan); K. Leadly (Katrin); K.D. Dawkins (Keith); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAims: The SYNTAX-LE MANS substudy prospectively evaluated 15-month angiographic and clinical outcomes in patients with treated left main (LM) disease. Methods and results: In the SYNTAX trial, 1,800 patients with three-vessel and/or LM disease were randomised to either CABG or PCI; of th

  15. Impact of treating dental caries on schoolchildren’s anthropometric, dental, satisfaction and appetite outcomes: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkarimi Heba A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no randomized controlled trials to assess the impact of treating dental caries on various aspects of children’s health. This study was conducted to assess the impact of dental treatment of severe dental caries on children’s weight, height and subjective health related outcomes, namely dental pain, satisfaction with teeth and smile, dental sepsis and child’s appetite. Methods The study was a community-based, randomized, controlled trial in schoolchildren aged 6-7 years with untreated dental caries. Participants were randomly assigned to early (test or regular (control dental treatment. The primary outcome was Weight-for-age Z-score. Secondary outcomes were Height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores, dental pain, dental sepsis, satisfaction with teeth and child’s appetite. Results 86 children were randomly assigned to test (42 children and control (44 groups. Mean duration of follow-up was 34.8 (±1.1 weeks. There were insignificant improvements in anthropometric outcomes between the groups after treatment of caries. However, treated children had significantly less pain experience (P = 0.006 (OR 0.09, [0.01-0.51] and higher satisfaction with teeth (P = 0.001 (OR 9.91, [2.68-36.51] compared to controls. Controls had significantly poorer appetites (P = 0.01 (OR 2.9, [1.24-6.82] compared to treated children. All treated children were free of clinical dental sepsis whereas 20% (9 of 44 of controls who were free of sepsis at baseline had sepsis at follow-up. Conclusions Although dental treatment did not significantly improve the anthropometric outcomes, it significantly improved the dental outcomes and children’s satisfaction with teeth, smile and appetite. This is the first study to provide evidence that treatment of severe dental caries can improve children’s appetite. Trial registration Effect of Dental Treatment on Children's Growth. Clinical Trial Gov ID# NCT01243866

  16. Statin Therapy and Outcome After Ischemic Stroke: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies and Randomized Trials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2013-01-03

    Background-Although experimental data suggest that statin therapy may improve neurological outcome after acute cerebral ischemia, the results from clinical studies are conflicting. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the relationship between statin therapy and outcome after ischemic stroke. METHODS: The primary analysis investigated statin therapy at stroke onset (prestroke statin use) and good functional outcome (modified Rankin score 0 to 2) and death. Secondary analyses included the following: (1) acute poststroke statin therapy (≤72 hours after stroke), and (2) thrombolysis-treated patients. RESULTS: The primary analysis included 113 148 subjects (27 studies). Among observational studies, statin treatment at stroke onset was associated with good functional outcome at 90 days (pooled odds ratio [OR], 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29-1.56; P<0.001), but not 1 year (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.9-1.4; P=0.31), and with reduced fatality at 90 days (pooled OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.62-0.82; P<0.001) and 1 year (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95; P=0.01). In the single randomized controlled trial reporting 90-day functional outcome, statin treatment was associated with good outcome (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.24; P=0.05). No reduction in fatality was observed on meta-analysis of data from 3 randomized controlled trials (P=0.9). In studies of thrombolysis-treated patients, an association between statins and increased fatality at 90 days was observed (pooled OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.02-1.52; P=0.03, 3 studies, 4339 patients). However, this association was no longer present after adjusting for age and stroke severity in the largest study (adjusted OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.90-1.44; 4012 patients). CONCLUSIONS: In the largest meta-analysis to date, statin therapy at stroke onset was associated with improved outcome, a finding not observed in studies restricted to thrombolysis-treated patients. Randomized trials of statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke are needed.

  17. Association between frequency of atrial and ventricular ectopic beats and biventricular pacing percentage and outcomes in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H; Mittal, Suneet; Ruwald, Anne-Christine

    2014-01-01

    -defibrillator device with data available on biventricular pacing percentage and pre-implantation 24-h Holter recordings were included. Using logistic regression, we estimated the influence of ectopic beats on the percentage of biventricular pacing. Reverse remodeling was measured as reductions in atrial and left.......001) in patients with >1.5% ectopic beats compared with those with reverse remodeling (percent reduction in LVESV 31 ± 15%) than patients with ... biventricular pacing (reverse remodeling and higher risk of HF/death and VTA. This supports pre-implantation Holter monitoring of patients selected for CRT for optimal outcome. (MADIT-CRT: Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation With Cardiac Resynchronization...

  18. Effect of removing direct payment for health care on utilisation and health outcomes in Ghanaian children: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Korkor Ansah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Delays in accessing care for malaria and other diseases can lead to disease progression, and user fees are a known barrier to accessing health care. Governments are introducing free health care to improve health outcomes. Free health care affects treatment seeking, and it is therefore assumed to lead to improved health outcomes, but there is no direct trial evidence of the impact of removing out-of-pocket payments on health outcomes in developing countries. This trial was designed to test the impact of free health care on health outcomes directly. METHODS AND FINDINGS: 2,194 households containing 2,592 Ghanaian children under 5 y old were randomised into a prepayment scheme allowing free primary care including drugs, or to a control group whose families paid user fees for health care (normal practice; 165 children whose families had previously paid to enrol in the prepayment scheme formed an observational arm. The primary outcome was moderate anaemia (haemoglobin [Hb] < 8 g/dl; major secondary outcomes were health care utilisation, severe anaemia, and mortality. At baseline the randomised groups were similar. Introducing free primary health care altered the health care seeking behaviour of households; those randomised to the intervention arm used formal health care more and nonformal care less than the control group. Introducing free primary health care did not lead to any measurable difference in any health outcome. The primary outcome of moderate anaemia was detected in 37 (3.1% children in the control and 36 children (3.2% in the intervention arm (adjusted odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.66-1.67. There were four deaths in the control and five in the intervention group. Mean Hb concentration, severe anaemia, parasite prevalence, and anthropometric measurements were similar in each group. Families who previously self-enrolled in the prepayment scheme were significantly less poor, had better health measures, and used

  19. Effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy on overall mortality and mode of death: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rivero-Ayerza (Maximo); D.A.M.J. Theuns (Dominic); H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); H. Boersma (Eric); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); L.J.L.M. Jordaens (Luc)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAims: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to improve symptoms and exercise tolerance in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). However, studies were underpowered to address its effect on overall mortality. To evaluate whether CRT alone (without a combined defibrill

  20. Identifying the concepts contained in outcome measures of clinical trials on four internal disorders using the international classification of functioning, disability and health as a reference

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically identify and compare the concepts contained in outcome measures of clinical trials on chronic ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity and obstructive pulmonary disease, including asthma using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a reference. Methods: Randomized controlled trials between 1993 and 2003 were located in MEDLINE and selected according predefined criteria. The outcome measures were extracted and...

  1. Impact of biodegradable versus durable polymer drug-eluting stents on clinical outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis of 15 randomized trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yaojun; Tian Nailiang; Dong Shengjie; Ye Fei; Li Minghui; Christos V.Bourantas; Javaid Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug eluting stents (DESs) made with biodegradable polymer have been developed in an attempt to improve clinical outcomes.However,the impact of biodegradable polymers on clinical events and stent thrombosis (ST) remains controversial.Methods We searched Medline,the Cochrane Library and other internet sources,without language or date restrictions for articles comparing clinical outcomes between biodegradable polymer DES and durable polymer DES.Safety endpoints were ST (definite,definite/probable),mortality,and myocardial infarction (MI).Efficacy endpoints were major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and target lesion revascularization (TLR).Results We identified 15 randomized controlled trials (n=17 068) with a weighted mean follow-up of 20.6 months.There was no statistical difference in the incidence of definite/probable ST between durable polymer-and biodegradable polymerDES; relative risk (RR) 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.11; P=0.22.Biodegradable polymer DES had similar rates of definite ST (RR 0.94,95% CI 0.66-1.33,P=0.72),mortality (RR 0.94,95% C/0.82-1.09,P=0.43),MI (RR 1.08,95% CI 0.92-1.26.P=0.35),MACE (RR 0.99,95% CI 0.91-1.09,P=0.85),and TLR (RR,0.94,95% CI 0.83-1.06,P=0.30) compared with durable polymer DES.Based on the stratified analysis of the included trials,the treatment effect on definite ST was different at different follow-up times:≤1 year favoring durable polymer DES and >1 year favoring biodegradable polymer DES.Conclusions Biodegradable polymer DES has similar safety and efficacy for treating patients with coronary artery disease compared with durable polymer DES.Further data with longer term follow-up are warranted to confirm the potential benefits of biodegradable polymer DES.

  2. One-year outcomes of out-of-hospital administration of intravenous glucose, insulin, and potassium (GIK) in patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (from the IMMEDIATE [Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency Care] Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selker, Harry P; Udelson, James E; Massaro, Joseph M; Ruthazer, Robin; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Griffith, John L; Sheehan, Patricia R; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Rosenberg, Yves; Tian, Xin; Vickery, Ellen M; Atkins, James M; Aufderheide, Tom P; Sayah, Assaad J; Pirrallo, Ronald G; Levy, Michael K; Richards, Michael E; Braude, Darren A; Doyle, Delanor D; Frascone, Ralph J; Kosiak, Donald J; Leaming, James M; Van Gelder, Carin M; Walter, Gert-Paul; Wayne, Marvin A; Woolard, Robert H; Beshansky, Joni R

    2014-05-15

    The Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency care Trial of very early intravenous glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in out-of-hospital emergency medical service (EMS) settings showed 80% reduction in infarct size at 30 days, suggesting potential longer-term benefits. Here we report 1-year outcomes. Prespecified 1-year end points of this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, effectiveness trial included all-cause mortality and composites including cardiac arrest, mortality, or hospitalization for heart failure (HF). Of 871 participants randomized to GIK versus placebo, death occurred within 1 year in 11.6% versus 13.5%, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57 to 1.23, p = 0.36). The composite of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality was 12.8% versus 17.0% (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.02, p = 0.06). The composite of hospitalization for HF or mortality within 1 year was 17.2% versus 17.2% (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.37, p = 0.92). The composite of mortality, cardiac arrest, or HF hospitalization within 1 year was 18.1% versus 20.4% (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.16, p = 0.30). In patients presenting with suspected ST elevation myocardial infarction, HRs for 1-year mortality and the 3 composites were, respectively, 0.65 (95% CI 0.33 to 1.27, p = 0.21), 0.52 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.92, p = 0.03), 0.63 (95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, p = 0.14), and 0.51 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.87, p = 0.01). In patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes, serious end points generally were lower with GIK than placebo, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, in those with ST elevation myocardial infarction, the composites of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality, and of cardiac arrest, mortality, or HF hospitalization within 1 year, were significantly reduced.

  3. Trial to assess the utility of genetic sequencing to improve patient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot trial to assess whether assigning treatment based on specific gene mutations can provide benefit to patients with metastatic solid tumors is being launched this month by the NCI. The Molecular Profiling based Assignment of Cancer Therapeutics, or

  4. Interim analysis for binary outcome trials with a long fixed follow-up time and repeated outcome assessments at pre-specified times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpia, Sameer; Julian, Jim A; Gu, Chushu; Thabane, Lehana; Levine, Mark N

    2014-01-01

    In trials with binary outcomes, assessed repeatedly at pre-specified times and where the subject is considered to have experienced a failure at the first occurrence of the outcome, interim analyses are performed, generally, after half or more of the subjects have completed follow-up. Depending on the duration of accrual relative to the length of follow-up, this may be inefficient, since there is a possibility that the trial will have completed accrual prior to the interim analysis. An alternative is to plan the interim analysis after subjects have completed follow-up to a time that is less than the fixed full follow-up duration. Using simulations, we evaluated three methods to estimate the event proportion for the interim analysis in terms of type I and II errors and the probability of early stopping. We considered: 1) estimation of the event proportion based on subjects who have been followed for a pre-specified time (less than the full follow-up duration) or who experienced the outcome; 2) estimation of the event proportion based on data from all subjects that have been randomized by the time of the interim analysis; and 3) the Kaplan-Meier approach to estimate the event proportion at the time of the interim analysis. Our results show that all methods preserve and have comparable type I and II errors in certain scenarios. In these cases, we recommend using the Kaplan-Meier method because it incorporates all the available data and has greater probability of early stopping when the treatment effect exists.

  5. Dairy consumption and cardiometabolic health: outcomes of a 12-month crossover trial

    OpenAIRE

    Crichton Georgina E; C Howe Peter R; Buckley Jonathan D; Coates Alison M; Murphy Karen J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A growing body of research suggests that regular consumption of dairy foods may counteract obesity and other components of the metabolic syndrome. However, human intervention trials are lacking. We aimed to determine the cardiometabolic health effects of increasing the consumption of reduced fat dairy foods in adults with habitually low dairy intakes in the absence of energy restriction. Methods An intervention trial was undertaken in 61 overweight or obese adults who were...

  6. Influence of mannan-binding lectin and MAp44 on outcome in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Thiel, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    randomized Target Temperature Management (TTM) trial, we measured MBL and MAp44 levels at baseline, 24, 48 and 72 h after OHCA in 169 consecutive patients randomly assigned to TTM at 33 °C or 36 °C for 24h. Primary outcome was 30 days mortality and secondary outcome was favorable neurological outcome...... MAp44 levels were not associated with mortality, p=0.25. There was no significant difference in neurological outcome between the two MBL groups assessed by CPC (p=0.69) and mRS (p=0.91). In multivariable models, baseline MBL (OR=1.0, p=0.70), (OR=1.5, p=0.30) and MAp44 levels (OR=1.0, p=0.99), (OR=1...

  7. The effect of preoperative renal dysfunction with or without dialysis on early postoperative outcome following cardiac surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Sarraf, Nael

    2011-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown increased mortality in renal dysfunction patients undergoing cardiac surgery, there is lack of data on the pattern of postoperative complications that occur in such patients and their distribution among dialysis and non-dialysis dependent renal dysfunction.

  8. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR: Its relation to neurological outcome in patients with survived cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaida R. Rana

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: SuPAR serum levels in patients with poor neurological outcome were significantly higher as compared to patients with good neurological outcome. However, the prognostic value was low and inadequate because of a substantial overlap of serum suPAR levels between the outcome groups.

  9. Assessment and implication of prognostic imbalance in randomized controlled trials with a binary outcome--a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chance imbalance in baseline prognosis of a randomized controlled trial can lead to over or underestimation of treatment effects, particularly in trials with small sample sizes. Our study aimed to (1 evaluate the probability of imbalance in a binary prognostic factor (PF between two treatment arms, (2 investigate the impact of prognostic imbalance on the estimation of a treatment effect, and (3 examine the effect of sample size (n in relation to the first two objectives. METHODS: We simulated data from parallel-group trials evaluating a binary outcome by varying the risk of the outcome, effect of the treatment, power and prevalence of the PF, and n. Logistic regression models with and without adjustment for the PF were compared in terms of bias, standard error, coverage of confidence interval and statistical power. RESULTS: For a PF with a prevalence of 0.5, the probability of a difference in the frequency of the PF≥5% reaches 0.42 with 125/arm. Ignoring a strong PF (relative risk = 5 leads to underestimating the strength of a moderate treatment effect, and the underestimate is independent of n when n is >50/arm. Adjusting for such PF increases statistical power. If the PF is weak (RR = 2, adjustment makes little difference in statistical inference. Conditional on a 5% imbalance of a powerful PF, adjustment reduces the likelihood of large bias. If an absolute measure of imbalance ≥5% is deemed important, including 1000 patients/arm provides sufficient protection against such an imbalance. Two thousand patients/arm may provide an adequate control against large random deviations in treatment effect estimation in the presence of a powerful PF. CONCLUSIONS: The probability of prognostic imbalance in small trials can be substantial. Covariate adjustment improves estimation accuracy and statistical power, and hence should be performed when strong PFs are observed.

  10. Postoperative Fluid Overload is a Useful Predictor of the Short-Term Outcome of Renal Replacement Therapy for Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiarui; Shen, Bo; Fang, Yi; Liu, Zhonghua; Zou, Jianzhou; Liu, Lan; Wang, Chunsheng; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Teng, Jie

    2015-08-01

    To analyze the predictive value of postoperative percent fluid overload (PFO) of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for acute kidney injury (AKI) patients after cardiac surgery.Data from 280 cardiac surgery patients between 2005 January and 2012 April were collected for retrospective analyses. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to compare the predictive values of cumulative PFO at different times after surgery for 90-day mortality.The cumulative PFO before RRT initiation was 7.9% ± 7.1% and the median PFO 6.1%. The cumulative PFO before and after RRT initiation in intensive care unit (ICU) was higher in the death group than in the survival group (8.8% ± 7.6% vs 6.1% ± 5.6%, P = 0.001; -0.5[-5.6, 5.1]% vs 6.9[2.2, 14.6]%, P 731, and 0.752. PFO during the whole ICU stay ≥7.2% was determined as the cut-off point for 90-day mortality prediction with a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 64%. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates showed a significant difference in survival among patients with cumulative PFO ≥ 7.2% and PFO < 7.2% after cardiac surgery (log-rank P < 0.001).Postoperative cumulative PFO during the whole ICU stay ≥7.2% would have an adverse effect on 90-day short-term outcome, which may provide a strategy for the volume control of AKI-RRT patients after cardiac surgery.

  11. Effect of remote ischemic conditioning on atrial fibrillation and outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting (RICO-trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouters Patrick

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre- and postconditioning describe mechanisms whereby short ischemic periods protect an organ against a longer period of ischemia. Interestingly, short ischemic periods of a limb, in itself harmless, may increase the ischemia tolerance of remote organs, e.g. the heart (remote conditioning, RC. Although several studies have shown reduced biomarker release by RC, a reduction of complications and improvement of patient outcome still has to be demonstrated. Atrial fibrillation (AF is one of the most common complications after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG, affecting 27-46% of patients. It is associated with increased mortality, adverse cardiovascular events, and prolonged in-hospital stay. We hypothesize that remote ischemic pre- and/or post-conditioning reduce the incidence of AF following CABG, and improve patient outcome. Methods/design This study is a randomized, controlled, patient and investigator blinded multicenter trial. Elective CABG patients are randomized to one of the following four groups: 1 control, 2 remote ischemic preconditioning, 3 remote ischemic postconditioning, or 4 remote ischemic pre- and postconditioning. Remote conditioning is applied at the arm by 3 cycles of 5 minutes of ischemia and reperfusion. Primary endpoint is the incidence AF in the first 72 hours after surgery, detected using a Holter-monitor. Secondary endpoints include length-of-stay on the intensive care unit and in-hospital, and the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events at 30 days, 3 months and 1 year. Based on an expected incidence in the control group of 27%, 195 patients per group are needed to detect with 80% power a reduction by 45% following either pre- or postconditioning, while allowing for a 10% dropout and at an alpha of 0.05. With the combined intervention expected to be stronger, we need 75 patients in this group to detect a reduction in incidence of AF of 60%. Discussion The RICO-trial (the effect of

  12. Probiotics to improve outcomes of colic in the community: Protocol for the Baby Biotics randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Valerie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant colic, characterised by excessive crying/fussing for no apparent cause, affects up to 20% of infants under three months of age and is a great burden to families, health professionals and the health system. One promising approach to improving its management is the use of oral probiotics. The Baby Biotics trial aims to determine whether the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 is effective in reducing crying in infants less than three months old ( Methods/Design Design: Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised trial in Melbourne, Australia. Participants: 160 breast and formula fed infants less than three months old who present either to clinical or community services and meet Wessel’s criteria of crying and/or fussing. Intervention: Oral once-daily Lactobacillus reuteri (1x108 cfu versus placebo for one month. Primary outcome: Infant crying/fussing time per 24 hours at one month. Secondary outcomes: i number of episodes of infant crying/fussing per 24 hours and ii infant sleep duration per 24 hours (at 7, 14, 21, 28 days and 6 months; iii maternal mental health scores, iv family functioning scores, v parent quality adjusted life years scores, and vi intervention cost-effectiveness (at one and six months; and vii infant faecal microbiota diversity, viii infant faecal calprotectin levels and ix Eschericia coli load (at one month only. Analysis: Primary and secondary outcomes for the intervention versus control groups will be compared with t tests and non-parametric tests for continuous data and chi squared tests for dichotomous data. Regression models will be used to adjust for potential confounding factors. Intention-to-treat analysis will be applied. Discussion An effective, practical and acceptable intervention for infant colic would represent a major clinical advance. Because our trial includes breast and formula-fed babies, our results should generalise to most babies with colic. If

  13. Dairy consumption and cardiometabolic health: outcomes of a 12-month crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crichton Georgina E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of research suggests that regular consumption of dairy foods may counteract obesity and other components of the metabolic syndrome. However, human intervention trials are lacking. We aimed to determine the cardiometabolic health effects of increasing the consumption of reduced fat dairy foods in adults with habitually low dairy intakes in the absence of energy restriction. Methods An intervention trial was undertaken in 61 overweight or obese adults who were randomly assigned to a high dairy diet (HD, 4 serves of reduced fat dairy/day or a low dairy control diet (LD, ≤1 serve/day for 6 months then crossed over to the alternate diet for a further 6 months. A range of anthropometric and cardiometabolic parameters including body composition, metabolic rate, blood lipids, blood pressure and arterial compliance were assessed at the end of each diet phase. Results Total energy intake was 1120 kJ/day higher during the HD phase, resulting in slight weight gain during this period. However, there were no significant differences between HD and LD in absolute measures of waist circumference, body weight, fat mass or any other cardiometabolic parameter. Conclusion Recommended intakes of reduced fat dairy products may be incorporated into the diet of overweight adults without adversely affecting markers of cardiometabolic health. Trial Registration The trial was registered with the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12608000538347 on 24th October, 2008.

  14. The role of surgery for treatment of low back pain: insights from the randomized controlled Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is a common medical problem with high morbidity and healthcare costs. The optimal management strategy, including the role of surgical intervention, remains controversial. The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trials were randomized controlled studies conducted to assess the effectiveness of surgery for three of the most common conditions implicated in LBP: Intervertebral disc herniation, degenerative spondylolisthesis, and spinal stenosis. Despite challenges in data interpretation related to patient cross over, these studies support the efficacy of surgery as treatment for these three common conditions.

  15. Rationale and design of a proof-of-concept trial investigating the effect of uninterrupted perioperative (parenteral nutrition on amino acid profile, cardiomyocytes structure, and cardiac perfusion and metabolism of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocchieri Riccardo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is very common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Malnutrition can change myocardial substrate utilization which can induce adverse effects on myocardial metabolism and function. We aim to investigate the hypothesis that there is a disturbed amino acids profile in the cardiac surgical patient which can be normalized by (parenteral nutrition before, during and after surgery, subsequently improving cardiomyocyte structure, cardiac perfusion and glucose metabolism. Methods/Design This randomized controlled intervention study investigates the effect of uninterrupted perioperative (parenteral nutrition on cardiac function in 48 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients are given enteral nutrition (n = 16 or parenteral nutrition (n = 16, at least two days before, during, and two days after coronary artery bypass grafting, or are treated according to the standard guidelines (control (n = 16. We will illustrate the effect of (parenteral nutrition on differences in concentrations of amino acids and asymmetric dimethylarginine and in activity of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase and arginase in cardiac tissue and blood plasma. In addition, cardiomyocyte structure by histological, immuno-histochemical and ultrastructural analysis will be compared between the (parenteral and control group. Furthermore, differences in cardiac perfusion and global left ventricular function and glucose metabolism, and their changes after coronary artery bypass grafting are evaluated by electrocardiography-gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography respectively. Finally, fat free mass is measured before and after intervention with bioelectrical impedance spectrometry in order to evaluate nutritional status. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2183

  16. Developing an analytical tool for evaluating EMS system design changes and their impact on cardiac arrest outcomes: combining geographic information systems with register data on survival rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sund Björn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is a frequent and acute medical condition that requires immediate care. We estimate survival rates from OHCA in the area of Stockholm, through developing an analytical tool for evaluating Emergency Medical Services (EMS system design changes. The study also is an attempt to validate the proposed model used to generate the outcome measures for the study. Methods and results This was done by combining a geographic information systems (GIS simulation of driving times with register data on survival rates. The emergency resources comprised ambulance alone and ambulance plus fire services. The simulation model predicted a baseline survival rate of 3.9 per cent, and reducing the ambulance response time by one minute increased survival to 4.6 per cent. Adding the fire services as first responders (dual dispatch increased survival to 6.2 per cent from the baseline level. The model predictions were validated using empirical data. Conclusion We have presented an analytical tool that easily can be generalized to other regions or countries. The model can be used to predict outcomes of cardiac arrest prior to investment in EMS design changes that affect the alarm process, e.g. (1 static changes such as trimming the emergency call handling time or (2 dynamic changes such as location of emergency resources or which resources should carry a defibrillator.

  17. Prevalence of preoperative anaemia in patients having first-time cardiac surgery and its impact on clinical outcome. A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C J; Connell, H; McGeorge, A D; Hu, R

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of anaemia is increasing globally. It has a close association with perioperative blood transfusion which, in turn, results in an increased risk of postoperative complications. Undesirable effects are not only limited to short-term, but also have long-term implications. Despite this, many patients undergo cardiac surgery with undiagnosed and untreated anaemia. We designed a retrospective, observational study to estimate the prevalence of anaemia in patients having cardiac surgery in Auckland District Health Board, blood transfusion rates and associated clinical outcome. Two hundred of seven hundred and twelve (28.1%) patients were anaemic. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion rates were significantly higher in the anaemic group compared to the non-anaemic group (160 (80%) vs. 192 (38%), p-value Anaemia was significantly associated with the development of new infection (14 (7%) vs. 15 (2.9%), p-value 0.0193, RR (CI 95%) 2.389 (1.175-4.859)), prolonged ventilation time (47.01 hours vs. 23.59 hours, p-value 0.0076) and prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay (80.23 hours vs. 50.27, p-value 0.0011). Preoperative anaemia is highly prevalent and showed a clear link with significantly higher transfusion rates and postoperative morbidity. It is vital that a preoperative management plan for the correction of anaemia should be sought to improve patient safety and outcome.

  18. The ADOPT trial (Assessment of Efficacies of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapies (CRT-P/D for Heart Failure Patients in China: rationale, design, and end-points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu B

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bing Liu1*, Fu Yi1*, Hongwei Cai2, Wenyi Guo1, Weijie Li1, Min Shen1, Jielai Xia3, Liwen Liu4, Haichang Wang1, on behalf of The ADOPT Study Steering Committee and Investigators1Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, FMMU, Xi’an, China; 2Department of Information, School of Stomatology, FMMU, Xi’an, China; 3Department of Statistics, FMMU, Xi’an, China; 4Department of Ultrasound, Xijing Hospital, FMMU, Xi’an, ChinaClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01018667*Both authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is a novel nonpharmacological treatment for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Some clinical trials conducted in Western countries have demonstrated that CRT could improve CHF patients’ symptoms and reduce mortality. However, due to the differences in economic and social conditions as well as inconsistencies in CHF etiologies between China and Western countries, there is an urgent need to conduct a large-scale CRT clinical study in Chinese patients with CHF. The ADOPT Trial (Assessment of Efficacies of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapies (CRT-P/D for Heart Failure Patients in China is designed to observe whether CRT can further improve syptoms and reduce mortality in Chinese patients in addition to optimal pharmalogical therapy.Methods: The ADOPT study is a prospective, nested, case-controlled, open-label clinical trial. About 40 centers across China participate in this study with a planned 800 Chinese cases to be enrolled. All patients will receive optimal medical treatment. Patients who have successful CRT-P/D implant will be assigned to the CRT group. According to the baseline evaluation, matched cases will be selected from the enrolled optimal pharmaceutical therapy alone group (Group for Selection. After successful match, the cases in Group for Selection enter into follow-up and become the control group. The unmatched cases in the Group for Selection will be removed. If patients

  19. A randomized trial comparing perinatal outcomes using insulin detemir or neutral protamine Hagedorn in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hod, Moshe; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Jovanovič, Lois

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of insulin detemir (IDet) with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH), both with insulin aspart, in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. The perinatal and obstetric pregnancy outcomes are presented. METHODS: Subjects...... were randomized to IDet (n = 152) or NPH (n = 158) ≤12 months before pregnancy or at 8-12 gestational weeks. RESULTS: For IDet and NPH, there were 128 and 136 live births, 11 and 9 early fetal losses, and two and one perinatal deaths, respectively. Gestational age at delivery was greater for children...... tolerated as NPH as regards perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and no safety issues were identified....

  20. Homocysteine-Lowering and Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Primary Results from the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostom, Andrew G.; Carpenter, Myra A.; Kusek, John W.; Levey, Andrew S.; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Selhub, Jacob; Jacques, Paul F.; Cole, Edward; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; House, Andrew A.; Kew, Clifton; McKenney, Joyce L.; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Pesavento, Todd; Pirsch, John; Smith, Stephen; Solomon, Scott; Weir, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplant recipients, like other patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), experience excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations. Observational studies of patients with CKD suggest increased homocysteine is a risk factor for CVD. The impact of lowering total homocysteine (tHcy) levels in kidney transplant recipients is unknown. Methods and Results In a double-blind controlled trial, we randomized 4110 stable kidney transplant recipients to a multivitamin that included either a high dose (n=2056) or low dose (n=2054) of folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 to determine whether decreasing tHcy concentrations reduced the rate of the primary composite arteriosclerotic CVD outcome (myocardial infarction, stroke, CVD death, resuscitated sudden death, coronary artery or renal artery revascularization, lower extremity arterial disease, carotid endarterectomy or angioplasty, or abdominal aortic aneurysm repair). Mean follow-up was 4.0 years. Treatment with the high dose multivitamin reduced homocysteine but did not reduce the rates of the primary outcome (n= 547 total events; hazards ratio [95% confidence interval] = 0.99 [0.84–1.17]), or secondary outcomes of all-cause mortality (n=431 deaths; 1.04 [0.86–1.26]) or dialysis-dependent kidney failure (n=343 events; 1.15 [0.93–1.43]) compared to the low dose multivitamin. Conclusions Treatment with a high dose folic acid, B6, and B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a composite cardiovascular disease outcome, all-cause mortality, or dialysis-dependent kidney failure despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. PMID:21482964

  1. Five-Year Outcomes from 3 Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Hoppe, Bradford S.; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph [Division of Urology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal H. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To report 5-year clinical outcomes of 3 prospective trials of image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 211 prostate cancer patients (89 low-risk, 82 intermediate-risk, and 40 high-risk) were treated in institutional review board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel therapy followed by androgen deprivation therapy for high-risk disease. Toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Results: Five-year rates of biochemical and clinical freedom from disease progression were 99%, 99%, and 76% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year rates of late CTCAE, version 3.0 (or version 4.0) grade 3 gastrointestinal and urologic toxicity were 1.0% (0.5%) and 5.4% (1.0%), respectively. Median pretreatment scores and International Prostate Symptom Scores at >4 years posttreatment were 8 and 7, 6 and 6, and 9 and 8, respectively, among the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. There were no significant changes between median pretreatment summary scores and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite scores at >4 years for bowel, urinary irritative and/or obstructive, and urinary continence. Conclusions: Five-year clinical outcomes with image-guided proton therapy included extremely high efficacy, minimal physician-assessed toxicity, and excellent patient-reported outcomes. Further follow-up and a larger patient experience are necessary to confirm these favorable outcomes.

  2. Impact of transitioning from HIV clinical trials to routine medical care on clinical outcomes and patient perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Baligh R; Long, Judith A; Stearns, Cordelia R; French, Benjamin; Tebas, Pablo; Frank, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in antiretroviral therapy clinical trials (ART-RCTs) offers many advantages including access to new drugs, close monitoring, and cost savings. These same benefits may pose a risk to patients ending ART-RCTs and returning to routine care; as they may experience changes to their drug regimen, decreased monitoring, and new out-of-pocket costs. We aimed to evaluate this transition and determine its effects on viral outcomes and patient perceptions. A retrospective cohort was assembled from participants of naïve ART-RCTs at the University of Pennsylvania between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2009. Data were collected in the 12 months prior to and after trial completion. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate viral failure rates and to identify factors associated with viral failure. Qualitative interviews were held with a subset of patients. Content analysis was used to identify thematic differences between patients with viral failure and those with viral suppression. In total, 116 patients enrolled in 5 ART-RCTs from 2000 to 2009. Viral failure was observed in 39 patients (34%). Nonwhites, high enrollment CD4 count, and trial completion in 1999-2002 were risk factors for failure. Patients transitioning from ART-RCTs to routine care had a 20% increased odds of failure (Adjusted Odds Ratio 1.20 (95% CI [0.37, 3.88])). Nine patients with viral suppression and three with viral failure in the year after trail completion were interviewed. Suppressed patients were more eager to continue trial participation, nervous about leaving the trial, and felt prepared to return to routine care. In contrast, those with viral failure were less concerned about the transition. These findings suggest that the posttrial period may be a vulnerable time for patients. Patients without a healthy fear of transitioning from ART-RCTs to routine care may be at increased risk of viral failure. Focus should be given to assisting patients during this transition.

  3. Effect of preoperative abstinence on poor postoperative outcome in alcohol misusers: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Rosenberg, J; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen;

    1999-01-01

    liver disease admitted for elective colorectal surgery. INTERVENTIONS: Withdrawal from alcohol consumption for 1 month before operation (disulfiram controlled) compared with continuous drinking. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Postoperative complications requiring treatment within the first month after surgery...

  4. Neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus treated with metformin in compare with insulin: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safura Ruholamin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to compare neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM treated with either metformin or insulin. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial carried out on year 2011 on 109 women with GDM who did not adequately control by dietary measures. They received metformin 500 mg once or twice daily or insulin 0.2 IU/kg/day initially. The dose was titrated to achieve target blood glucose values. Neonatal outcomes such as hypoglycemia, birth weight, Apgar score, umbilical artery pH, and hyperbilirubinemia in the 50 women who remained exclusively on metformin were compared with 50 women who treated with insulin. Results: Two groups were similar in mean fasting blood sugar (P = 0.7 and postprandial measurements (P = 0.8 throughout GDM treatment. Pregnancy complications or preterm labor were not different significantly between two groups. Considering neonatal outcomes between insulin and metformin groups, such as hypoglycemia (2 [4%] and 0 [0%], respectively, birth weight (3342 ± 506 mg and 3176 ± 438 mg, respectively, 5 th min Apgar score <7 (no one in either group, umbilical artery pH <7.05 (no one in either group and hyperbilirubinemia (1 [2%] and 0 [0%], respectively, no significant statistical differences were seen. Conclusion: Based on these preliminary data, considering neonatal outcomes, metformin appears to be a safe as insulin in the treatment of GDM.

  5. Relationship of Albuminuria and Renal Artery Stent Outcomes: Results From the CORAL Randomized Clinical Trial (Cardiovascular Outcomes With Renal Artery Lesions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy P; Cooper, Christopher J; Pencina, Karol M; D'Agostino, Ralph; Massaro, Joseph; Cutlip, Donald E; Jamerson, Kenneth; Matsumoto, Alan H; Henrich, William; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tuttle, Katherine R; Cohen, David J; Steffes, Michael; Gao, Qi; Metzger, D Christopher; Abernethy, William B; Textor, Stephen C; Briguglio, John; Hirsch, Alan T; Tobe, Sheldon; Dworkin, Lance D

    2016-11-01

    Randomized clinical trials have not shown an additional clinical benefit of renal artery stent placement over optimal medical therapy alone. However, studies of renal artery stent placement have not examined the relationship of albuminuria and treatment group outcomes. The CORAL study (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) is a prospective clinical trial of 947 participants with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis randomized to optimal medical therapy with or without renal artery stent which showed no treatment differences (3(5.8% and 35.1% event rate at mean 43-month follow-up). In a post hoc analysis, the study population was stratified by the median baseline urine albumin/creatinine ratio (n=826) and analyzed for the 5-year incidence of the primary end point (myocardial infarction, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, stroke, renal replacement therapy, progressive renal insufficiency, or cardiovascular disease- or kidney disease-related death), for each component of the primary end point, and overall survival. When baseline urine albumin/creatinine ratio was ≤ median (22.5 mg/g, n=413), renal artery stenting was associated with significantly better event-free survival from the primary composite end point (73% versus 59% at 5 years; P=0.02), cardiovascular disease-related death (93% versus 85%; P≤ 0.01), progressive renal insufficiency (91% versus 77%; P=0.03), and overall survival (89% versus 76%; P≤0.01), but not when baseline urine albumin/creatinine ratio was greater than median (n=413). These data suggest that low albuminuria may indicate a potentially large subgroup of those with renal artery stenosis that could experience improved event-free and overall-survival after renal artery stent placement plus optimal medical therapy compared with optimal medical therapy alone. Further research is needed to confirm these preliminary observations.

  6. Neonatal outcomes of pregnant women with cardiac diseases%心脏疾病孕妇新生儿的结局

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵梓文; 刘桂英

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To research the growth and development and compliments of neonates in pregnant women with heart disease, and identify the intluence factors. Methods: Four hundred and forty one neonates borned in our hospital between September 2009 and March 2010 were reviewed. They were divided into two groups according to whether their mothers had cardiac diseases : cardiac disease group (n =79) and control group (n =362) ; and they were divided into several groups according to the type of cardiac disease of their mothers' , the degree of New York heart association ( NYHA) class of pregnant women with cardiac disease, medications used during pregnancy with cardiac disease, the degree of pulmonary hypertension complicated with cardiac disease.The neonatal outcomes were analyzed. Results :1. Comparison between cardiac disease group and control group:cesarean section rate ( P < 0.01) , average body length (P <0. 001) , average body weight ( P < 0. 001 ) , the rate of normal term infant ( P < 0. 001 ) , the rate of low birth weight infant ( P = 0.001) , the rate of macrosomic ( P <0. 05) , the rate of preterm infant ( P < 0. 01). 2. The type of cardiac disease in pregnant women and neonatal outcomes: the rate of normal term infant (P < 0.01 ) , average body weighL ( P < 0. 05 ) in these three groups. 3.NYHA class and neonatal outcomes : comparison between class Ⅰ-Ⅱ group and class Ⅲ-Ⅳ group, the rate of normal term infant (P < 0. 001) , the rate of low birth weight infant (P < 0. 001) , the rate of preterm infant (P <0. 001). 4. Pulmonary hypertension complicated with cardiac disease and neonatal outcomes: as the degree of pulmonary hypertension developed, the cases of class Ⅲ-Ⅳ , preterm infant, low birth weight infant and asphyxia more, the cases of normal term infant less, however. Conclusions : Overall, the neonates of pregnant women with cardiac disease have higher cesarean section rate , and are prone to lower birth length and lower

  7. Randomized Controlled Trial of the Focus Parent Training for Toddlers with Autism: 1-Year Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterling, Iris; Visser, Janne; Swinkels, Sophie; Rommelse, Nanda; Donders, Rogier; Woudenberg, Tim; Roos, Sascha; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Buitelaar, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial compared results obtained after 12 months of nonintensive parent training plus care-as-usual and care-as-usual alone. The training focused on stimulating joint attention and language skills and was based on the intervention described by Drew et al. (Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatr 11:266-272, 2002). Seventy-five…

  8. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with time-to-event outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2014-01-01

    intravenous administration of the same drug, resulting in bias favouring the control intervention, RHR 1.33 (0.98 to 1.82). Seven trials of cytomegalovirus retinitis, tibial fracture and multiple sclerosis compared experimental interventions with standard control interventions, e.g. placebo, no...

  9. Six-month IVUS and two-year clinical outcomes in the EVOLVE FHU trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, Ian T; Verheye, Stefan; Weissman, Neil J;

    2013-01-01

    The EVOLVE FHU trial demonstrated non-inferiority of six-month late loss with two dose formulations of SYNERGY, a novel bioabsorbable polymer everolimus-eluting stent (EES) compared with the durable polymer PROMUS Element (PE) EES. The current analysis describes the six-month IVUS and clinical re...

  10. Results of Prevention of REStenosis with Tranilast and its Outcomes (PRESTO) trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Holmes Jr (David); J.R. Granett (Jeffrey); J.J. Popma (Jeffrey); P.J. Fitzgerald (Peter); D. Fischman (David); J.J. Ferguson (James); A.M. Lincoff (Michael); S. Goldberg (Sheldon); J.A. Brinker; R. Chan; B.R. Davis (Barry); M. Poland; A.M. Zeiher (Andreas); J.T. Willerson (James); S.B. King 3rd (Spencer); L.M. Shapiro; M. Savage (Michael); J.M. Lablanche (Jean Marc); J.E. Tcheng (James); L. Grip (Lars); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a major problem affecting 15% to 30% of patients after stent placement. No oral agent has shown a beneficial effect on restenosis or on associated major adverse cardiovascular events. In limited trials, the oral age

  11. Follow-Up of the Cues and Care Trial: Mother and Infant Outcomes at 6 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Nancy; Zelkowitz, Phyllis; Shrier, Ian; Stremler, Robyn; Westreich, Ruta; Dunkley, David; Steele, Russell; Rosberger, Zeev; Lefebvre, Francine; Papageorgiou, Apostolos

    2012-01-01

    The long-term effects of the Cues intervention to reduce anxiety and enhance the interactive behavior of mothers of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants were investigated. A randomized trial comparing the Cues intervention to an attention control condition was conducted. A total of 122 mothers of newborns weighing less than 1,500 g were…

  12. Predictors of survival and favorable functional outcomes after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients systematically brought to a dedicated heart attack center (from the Harefield Cardiac Arrest Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M Bilal; Al-Hussaini, Abtehale; Rosser, Gareth; Salehi, Saleem; Phylactou, Maria; Rajakulasingham, Ramyah; Patel, Jayna; Elliott, Katharine; Mohan, Poornima; Green, Rebecca; Whitbread, Mark; Smith, Robert; Ilsley, Charles

    2015-03-15

    Despite advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), survival remains low after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA). Acute coronary ischemia is the predominating precipitant, and prompt delivery of patients to dedicated facilities may improve outcomes. Since 2011, all patients experiencing OOHCA in London, where a cardiac etiology is suspected, are systematically brought to heart attack centers (HACs). We determined the predictors for survival and favorable functional outcomes in this setting. We analyzed 174 consecutive patients experiencing OOHCA from 2011 to 2013 brought to Harefield Hospital-a designated HAC in London. We analyzed (1) all-cause mortality and (2) functional status using a modified Rankin scale (mRS 0 to 6, where mRS0-3(+) = favorable functional status). The overall survival rates were 66.7% (30 days) and 62.1% (1 year); and 54.5% had mRS0-3(+) at discharge. Patients with mRS0-3(+) had reduced mortality compared to mRS0-3(-): 30 days (1.2% vs 72.2%, p <0.001) and 1 year (5.3% vs 77.2%, p <0.001). Multivariate analyses identified lower patient comorbidity, absence of cardiogenic shock, bystander CPR, ventricular tachycardia/ventricullar fibrillation as initial rhythm, shorter duration of resuscitation, prehospital advanced airway, absence of adrenaline and inotrope use, and intra-aortic balloon pump use as predictors of mRS0-3(+). Consistent predictors of increased mortality were the presence of cardiogenic shock, advanced airway use, increased duration of resuscitation, and absence of therapeutic hypothermia. A streamlined delivery of patients experiencing OOHCA to dedicated facilities is associated with improved functional status and survival. Our study supports the standardization of care for such patients with the widespread adoption of HACs.

  13. Discontinuing financial incentives for adherence to antipsychotic depot medication: long-term outcomes of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Stefan; Bremner, Stephen A; Pavlickova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In a cluster randomised controlled trial, offering financial incentives improved adherence to antipsychotic depot medication over a 1-year period. Yet, it is unknown whether this positive effect is sustained once the incentives stop. Methods and analyses Patients in the intervention and control group were followed up for 2 years after the intervention. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed at 6 months and 24 months post intervention. Assessments were conducted between September 2011 and November 2014. Results After the intervention period, intervention and control groups did not show any statistically significant differences in adherence, neither in the first 6 months (71% and 77%, respectively) nor in the following 18 months (68%, 74%). There were no statistically significant differences in secondary outcomes, that is, adherence ≥95% and untoward incidents either. Conclusions It may be concluded that incentives to improve adherence to antipsychotic maintenance medication are effective only for as long as they are provided. Once they are stopped, adherence returns to approximately baseline level with no sustained benefit. Trial registration number ISRCTN77769281; Results. PMID:27655261

  14. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) on psychological and behavioral outcomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heather Ann Hausenblas; Kacey Heekin; Heather Lee Mutchie; Stephen Anton

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Throughout the past three decades, increased scientiifc attention has been given to examining saffron’s (Crocus sativusL.) use as a potential therapeutic or preventive agent for a number of health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and depression. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this systematic review is to examine and categorize the current state of scientiifc evidence from randomized controled trials (RCTs) regarding the efifcacy of saffron on psychological/behavioral outcomes. SEARCH STRATEGY: Electronic and non-electronic systematic searches were conducted to identify al relevant human clinical research on saffron. The search strategy was extensive and was designed according to the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).” Reference lists of articles that met the inclusion criteria were searched. Only English language studies were reviewed. INCLUSION CRITERIA:Saffron trials in combination with other substances and saffron safety studies were considered, in accordance with the PRISMA statement. Included studies must have a control group. Included studies must measure a physiological and/or a behavioral outcome. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS:The methodological quality of al included studies was independently evaluated by two reviewers using the Jadad score. Mean scores andP-values of measures were compared both inter- and intra-study for each parameter (i.e., depression). RESULTS:Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. These studies examined the effects of saffron on psychological/behavioral outcomes of: major depressive disorder (n = 6), premenstrual syndrome (n = 1), sexual dysfunction and infertility (n = 4), and weight loss/snacking behaviors (n = 1). The data from these studies support the efifcacy of saffron as compared to placebo in improving the folowing conditions:depressive symptoms (compared to anti-depressants and placebo), premenstrual symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. In addition

  15. Positive outcomes influence the rate and time to publication, but not the impact factor of publications of clinical trial results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Suñé

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Publication bias may affect the validity of evidence based medical decisions. The aim of this study is to assess whether research outcomes affect the dissemination of clinical trial findings, in terms of rate, time to publication, and impact factor of journal publications. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All drug-evaluating clinical trials submitted to and approved by a general hospital ethics committee between 1997 and 2004 were prospectively followed to analyze their fate and publication. Published articles were identified by searching Pubmed and other electronic databases. Clinical study final reports submitted to the ethics committee, final reports synopses available online and meeting abstracts were also considered as sources of study results. Study outcomes were classified as positive (when statistical significance favoring experimental drug was achieved, negative (when no statistical significance was achieved or it favored control drug and descriptive (for non-controlled studies. Time to publication was defined as time from study closure to publication. A survival analysis was performed using a Cox regression model to analyze time to publication. Journal impact factors of identified publications were recorded. Publication rate was 48·4% (380/785. Study results were identified for 68·9% of all completed clinical trials (541/785. Publication rate was 84·9% (180/212 for studies with results classified as positive and 68·9% (128/186 for studies with results classified as negative (p<0·001. Median time to publication was 2·09 years (IC95 1·61-2·56 for studies with results classified as positive and 3·21 years (IC95 2·69-3·70 for studies with results classified as negative (hazard ratio 1·99 (IC95 1·55-2·55. No differences were found in publication impact factor between positive (median 6·308, interquartile range: 3·141-28·409 and negative result studies (median 8·266, interquartile range: 4·135-17·157. CONCLUSIONS

  16. Intensified Antiplatelet Treatment Reduces Major Cardiac Events in Patients with Clopidogrel Low Response: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Xiao-Wei Hu; Shu-Hua Zhang; Ji-Min Li; Hui Zhu; Ke Xu; Jun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Clopidogrel low response (CLR) is an independent risk factor of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI),and intensified antiplatelet treatments (IAT) guided by platelet function assays might overcome laboratory CLR.However,whether IAT improves clinical outcomes is controversial.Methods:Relevant trials were identified in PubMed,the Cochrane Library,and the Chinese Medical Journal Network databases from their establishment to September 9,2014.Trials were screened using predefined inclusion criteria.Conventional meta-analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were performed using the Review Manager 5.0 and STATA 12.0 software programs.Results:Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving 5111 patients with CLR were recruited.During a follow-up period of 1-12 months,the incidences of cardiovascular (CV) death,nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI),and stent thrombosis were significantly lower in the IAT arm than in the conventional antiplatelet treatment arm (relative risk [RR] =0.45,95% confidence interval [CI]:0.36-0.57,P < 0.000,01),whereas bleeding was similar between the two arms (RR =1.05,95% CI:0.86-1.27,P =0.65).Conclusions:IAT guided by platelet function assays reduces the risk of CV death,nonfatal MI,and stent thrombosis (ST) without an increased risk of bleeding in patients undergoing PCI and with CLR.

  17. Multiple treatment comparisons in a series of anti-malarial trials with an ordinal primary outcome and repeated treatment evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youdom Solange

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT are widely used in African countries, including Cameroon. Between 2005 and 2007, five randomized studies comparing different treatment arms among artesunate-amodiaquine and other ACT were conducted in Cameroonian children aged two to 60 months who had uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In these studies, the categorical criterion proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO to assess the relative effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs was repeatedly evaluated on Days 14, 21 and 28 after treatment initiation. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different treatments on this repeated ordinal outcome, hence using the fully available information. Methods The quantitative synthesis was based on individual patient data. Due to the incomplete block design concerning treatment arms between different trials, a mixed treatment comparison (MTC meta-analysis approach was adopted. The repeated ordinal outcome was modelled through a latent variable, as a proportional odds mixed model with trial, period and treatment arms as covariates. The model was further complexified to account for the variance heterogeneity, and the individual log-residual variance was modelled as a linear mixed model, as well. The effects of individual covariates at inclusion, such as parasitaemia, fever, gender and weight, were also tested. Model parameters were estimated using a Bayesian approach via the WinBUGS software. After selecting the best model using Deviance Information Criterion (DIC, mixed treatment comparisons were based on the estimated treatment effects. Results Modeling the residual variance improved the model ability to adjust the data. The results showed that, compared to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHPP was significantly more efficacious. Artesunate-chlorproguanil-dapsone (ASCD was less efficacious than artesunate

  18. Background rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes for assessing the safety of maternal vaccine trials in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A V Orenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maternal immunization has gained traction as a strategy to diminish maternal and young infant mortality attributable to infectious diseases. Background rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes are crucial to interpret results of clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: We developed a mathematical model that calculates a clinical trial's expected number of neonatal and maternal deaths at an interim safety assessment based on the person-time observed during different risk windows. This model was compared to crude multiplication of the maternal mortality ratio and neonatal mortality rate by the number of live births. Systematic reviews of severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM, low birth weight (LBW, prematurity, and major congenital malformations (MCM in Sub-Saharan African countries were also performed. FINDINGS: Accounting for the person-time observed during different risk periods yields lower, more conservative estimates of expected maternal and neonatal deaths, particularly at an interim safety evaluation soon after a large number of deliveries. Median incidence of SAMM in 16 reports was 40.7 (IQR: 10.6-73.3 per 1,000 total births, and the most common causes were hemorrhage (34%, dystocia (22%, and severe hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (22%. Proportions of liveborn infants who were LBW (median 13.3%, IQR: 9.9-16.4 or premature (median 15.4%, IQR: 10.6-19.1 were similar across geographic region, study design, and institutional setting. The median incidence of MCM per 1,000 live births was 14.4 (IQR: 5.5-17.6, with the musculoskeletal system comprising 30%. INTERPRETATION: Some clinical trials assessing whether maternal immunization can improve pregnancy and young infant outcomes in the developing world have made ethics-based decisions not to use a pure placebo control. Consequently, reliable background rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes are necessary to distinguish between vaccine benefits and safety concerns. Local studies

  19. Short- and Long-term Therapeutic Efficacies of Intravenous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stem Cells on Cardiac Function in Rats with Acute Myocardial Infarction:A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Jiang; Dong Zheng; Yun-lu Feng; Jun Guo; Hai-rui Li; Ai-dong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the short- and long-term therapeutic efficacies of intravenous trans- plantation of bone marrow stem cells (MSCs) in rats with experimental myocardial infarction by meta- analysis. Methods Randomized controlled trials were systematically searched from PubMed, Science Citation Index (SCI), Chinese journal full-text database (CJFD) up to December 2014. While the experimental groups (MSCs groups) were injected MSCs intravenously, the control groups were injected Delubecco’s minimum essential medium (DMEM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS).Subgroup analysis for each outcome measure was performed for the observing time point after the transplantation of MSCs. Weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for outcome parameters including ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS), which were measured by echocardiogram after intravenous injection and analyzed by RevMan 5.2 and STATA 12.0. Results Data from 9 studies (190 rats)were included in the meta-analysis. As compared to the control groups, the cardiac function of the experimental groups were not improved at day 7 (EF: WMD=0.08, 95%CI−1.32 to 1.16,P>0.01; FS: WMD=−0.12, 95%CI−0.90 to 0.65,P>0.01) until at day 14 after MSCs’ transplantation (EF: WMD=10.79, 95%CI 9.16 to 12.42,P<0.01; FS: WMD=11.34, 95%CI 10.44 to 12.23, P<0.01), and it lasted 4 weeks or more after transplantation of MSCs (EF: WMD=13.94, 95%CI 12.24 to 15.64,P<0.01; FS: WMD=9.64, 95%CI 7.98 to 11.31,P<0.01). Conclusion The therapeutic efficacies of MSCs in rats with myocardid infarction become increasing apparent as time advances since 2 weeks after injection.

  20. Intracluster correlation coefficients and coefficients of variation for perinatal outcomes from five cluster-randomised controlled trials in low and middle-income countries: results and methodological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahapatra Rajendra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public health interventions are increasingly evaluated using cluster-randomised trials in which groups rather than individuals are allocated randomly to treatment and control arms. Outcomes for individuals within the same cluster are often more correlated than outcomes for individuals in different clusters. This needs to be taken into account in sample size estimations for planned trials, but most estimates of intracluster correlation for perinatal health outcomes come from hospital-based studies and may therefore not reflect outcomes in the community. In this study we report estimates for perinatal health outcomes from community-based trials to help researchers plan future evaluations. Methods We estimated the intracluster correlation and the coefficient of variation for a range of outcomes using data from five community-based cluster randomised controlled trials in three low-income countries: India, Bangladesh and Malawi. We also performed a simulation exercise to investigate the impact of cluster size and number of clusters on the reliability of estimates of the coefficient of variation for rare outcomes. Results Estimates of intracluster correlation for mortality outcomes were lower than those for process outcomes, with narrower confidence intervals throughout for trials with larger numbers of clusters. Estimates of intracluster correlation for maternal mortality were particularly variable with large confidence intervals. Stratified randomisation had the effect of reducing estimates of intracluster correlation. The simulation exercise showed that estimates of intracluster correlation are much less reliable for rare outcomes such as maternal mortality. The size of the cluster had a greater impact than the number of clusters on the reliability of estimates for rare outcomes. Conclusions The breadth of intracluster correlation estimates reported here in terms of outcomes and contexts will help researchers plan future

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction in Resuscitated Cardiac Arrest (ENDO-RCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Kjaergaard, Jesper;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality following initial survival of cardiac arrest remain high despite great efforts to improve resuscitation techniques and post-resuscitation care, in part due to the ischemia-reperfusion injury secondary to the restoration of the blood circulation. Patients...... resuscitated from cardiac arrest display evidence of endothelial injury and coagulopathy (hypocoagulability, hyperfibrinolysis), which in associated with poor outcome. Recent randomized controlled trials have revealed that treatment with infusion of prostacyclin reduces endothelial damage after major surgery...... and AMI. Thus, a study is pertinent to investigate if prostacyclin infusion as a therapeutic intervention reduces endothelial damage without compromising, or even improving, the hemostatic competence in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. Post-cardiac arrest patients frequently have a need...

  2. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  3. Analysis of time to event outcomes in randomized controlled trials by generalized additive models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Argyropoulos

    Full Text Available Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking.By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population.PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data.By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial results under proportional and

  4. Use and Outcomes of Antiarrhythmic Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Receiving Oral Anticoagulation: Results from the ROCKET AF Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Breithardt, Günter; Passman, Rod; Hankey, Graeme J.; Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Hacke, Werner; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Califf, Robert M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) and anticoagulation are mainstays of atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment. Objective We aimed to study the use and outcomes of AAD therapy in anticoagulated AF patients. Methods Patients in the ROCKET AF trial (n=14,264) were grouped by AAD use at baseline: amiodarone, other AAD, or no AAD. Multivariable adjustment was performed to compare stroke, bleeding, and death across groups, as well as across treatment assignment (rivaroxaban or warfarin). Results Of 14,264 patients randomized, 1681 (11.8%) were treated with an AAD (1144 [8%] with amiodarone, 537 [3.8%] with other AADs). Amiodarone-treated patients were less-often female (38% vs. 48%), had more persistent AF (64% vs. 40%), and more concomitant heart failure (71% vs. 41%) than patients receiving other AADs. Patients receiving no AAD more closely-resembled amiodarone-treated patients. Time in therapeutic range was significantly lower in warfarin-treated patients receiving amiodarone versus no AAD (50% vs. 58%, p<0.0001). Compared with no AAD, neither amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74–1.31, p=0.9) nor other AADs (adjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.37–1.17, p=0.15) were associated with increased mortality. Similar results were observed for embolic and bleeding outcomes. Rivaroxaban treatment effects in patients not on an AAD were consistent with the overall trial (primary endpoint adjusted HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68–0.98, pinteraction=0.06; safety endpoint adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.90–1.24, pinteraction=0.33). Conclusion Treatment with AADs was not associated with increased morbidity or mortality in anticoagulated patients with AF. The influence of amiodarone on outcomes in patients receiving rivaroxaban requires further study. PMID:24833235

  5. Planning a cluster randomized trial with unequal cluster sizes: practical issues involving continuous outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravaud Philippe

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster randomization design is increasingly used for the evaluation of health-care, screeening or educational interventions. At the planning stage, sample size calculations usually consider an average cluster size without taking into account any potential imbalance in cluster size. However, there may exist high discrepancies in cluster sizes. Methods We performed simulations to study the impact of an imbalance in cluster size on power. We determined by simulations to which extent four methods proposed to adapt the sample size calculations to a pre-specified imbalance in cluster size could lead to adequately powered trials. Results We showed that an imbalance in cluster size can be of high influence on the power in the case of severe imbalance, particularly if the number of clusters is low and/or the intraclass correlation coefficient is high. In the case of a severe imbalance, our simulations confirmed that the minimum variance weights correction of the variation inflaction factor (VIF used in the sample size calculations has the best properties. Conclusion Publication of cluster sizes is important to assess the real power of the trial which was conducted and to help designing future trials. We derived an adaptation of the VIF from the minimum variance weights correction to be used in case the imbalance can be a priori formulated such as "a proportion (γ of clusters actually recruit a proportion (τ of subjects to be included (γ ≤ τ".

  6. National Cancer Institute-supported chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy trials: outcomes and lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majithia, Neil; Temkin, Sarah M.; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Beutler, Andreas S.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common and debilitating complications of cancer treatment. Due to a lack of effective management options for patients with CIPN, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a series of trials aimed at both prevention and treatment. A total of 15 such studies were approved, evaluating use of various neuro-modulatory agents which have shown benefit in other neuropathic pain states. Aside from duloxetine, none of the pharmacologic methods demonstrated therapeutic benefit for patients with CIPN. Despite these disappointing results, the series of trials revealed important lessons that have informed subsequent work. Some examples of this include the use of patient-reported symptom metrics, the elimination of traditional—yet unsubstantiated—practice approaches, and the discovery of molecular genetic predictors of neuropathy. Current inquiry is being guided by the results from these large-scale trials, and as such, stands better chance of identifying durable solutions for this treatment-limiting toxicity. PMID:26686859

  7. Randomized controlled trial of heart rate variability biofeedback in cardiac autonomic and hostility among patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Mei; Fan, Sheng-Yu; Lu, Hsueh-Chen; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Lee, Chee-Siong; Lu, Ye-Hsu

    2015-07-01

    Hostility is a psychosocial risk factor that may decrease heart rate variability (HRV) in coronary artery disease (CAD) through cardiac autonomic imbalance. Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) increases HRV indices and baroreflex gain. This study examines the effectiveness of HRV-BF in restoring cardiac autonomic balance and decreasing hostility among patients with CAD. One hundred and fifty-four patients with CAD were assigned randomly to receive 6 weeks of HRV-BF, in addition to the standard medical care received by the wait-list control (WLC) group. A 5-min electrocardiogram, blood pressure, and hostility were assessed pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at 1-month follow-up. The standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), low frequency (LF), and log LF at post-intervention was significantly higher than that at pre-intervention in the HRV-BF group. Baseline log LF was significantly higher post-intervention and at follow-up after HRV-BF training than at pre-intervention. The treatment curve of log LF pre-session increased significantly after session 2, which was maintained to post-intervention. Expressive hostility, suppressive hostility, and hostility total score at post-intervention and one-month follow-up after HRV-BF were significantly lower than at pre-intervention. This study showed increased HRV and decreased expressive and suppressive hostility behavior in patients with CAD following HRV-BF.

  8. Rationale, design, methods and baseline demography of participants of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial. ASCOT investigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sever, P S; Dahlöf, B; Poulter, N R;

    2001-01-01

    To test the primary hypothesis that a newer antihypertensive treatment regimen (calcium channel blocker +/- an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor) is more effective than an older regimen (beta-blocker +/- a diuretic) in the primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). To test a second...

  9. ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes in the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, Paul W; Siha, Hany; Fu, Yuling;

    2012-01-01

    Ticagrelor, when compared with clopidogrel, reduced the 12-month risk of vascular death/myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes intended to undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention in the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) tr...

  10. Goal Attainment Scaling as an Outcome Measure in Randomized Controlled Trials of Psychosocial Interventions in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruble, Lisa; McGrew, John H.; Toland, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal attainment scaling (GAS) holds promise as an idiographic approach for measuring outcomes of psychosocial interventions in community settings. GAS has been criticized for untested assumptions of scaling level (i.e., interval or ordinal), inter-individual equivalence and comparability, and reliability of coding across different behavioral…

  11. Pregnancy outcomes after a Maternity Intervention for Stressful Emotions (PROMISES) : A randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Huibert; Bockting, Claudi L H; Beijers, Chantal; Verbeek, Tjitte; Stant, A Dennis; Ormel, Johan; Stolk, Ronald P; de Jonge, Peter; van Pampus, Mariëlle G; Meijer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: There is ample evidence from observational prospective studies that maternal depression or anxiety during pregnancy is a risk factor for adverse psychosocial outcomes in the offspring. However, to date no previous study has demonstrated that treatment of depressive or anxious symptoms in

  12. Analysis of patient-reported outcomes from the LUME-Lung 1 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novello, Silvia; Kaiser, Rolf; Mellemgaard, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    histology. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) for symptoms and health-related quality of life (QoL) are reported here. METHODS: PROs were assessed at screening, on Day 1 of each 21-day treatment cycle, at the end of active treatment, and at the first follow-up visit. PRO instruments were the European...

  13. Melatonin for Sleep in Children with Autism: A Controlled Trial Examining Dose, Tolerability, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth; Adkins, Karen W.; McGrew, Susan G.; Wang, Lily; Goldman, Suzanne E.; Fawkes, Diane; Burnette, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    Supplemental melatonin has shown promise in treating sleep onset insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-four children, free of psychotropic medications, completed an open-label dose-escalation study to assess dose-response, tolerability, safety, feasibility of collecting actigraphy data, and ability of outcome measures…

  14. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcomes for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten; Lund, Hans; Roos, Ewa M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a prioritised list based on responsiveness for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for performing meta-analyses in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. A systematic search was conducted in 20 highest impact factor general and rheumatology...

  15. Student and Teacher Outcomes of the Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Team Efficacy Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Howard; Kamps, Debra; Fleming, Kandace; Hansen, Blake

    2016-01-01

    Schools continue to strive for the use of evidenced-based interventions and policies to foster well-managed classrooms that promote improved student outcomes. The present study examined the effects of the Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT), a group contingency intervention, on the on-task and disruptive behavior of elementary…

  16. Predicting Outcome in Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, L. Esther; Hollon, Steven D.; Huibers, Marcus J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore pretreatment and short-term improvement variables as potential moderators and predictors of 12-month follow-up outcome of unsupported online computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT), usual care, and CCBT combined with usual care for depression. Method: Three hundred and three depressed patients were randomly allocated…

  17. Ten-year outcomes of a randomised trial of laparoscopic versus open surgery for colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deijen, C.L. (Charlotte L.); Vasmel, J.E. (Jeanine E.); E.S.M. De Lange-De Klerk (E. S M); M.A. Cuesta (Miguel); P-P. Coene (Peter Paul); J.F. Lange (Johan); W.J.H.J. Meijerink (Jeroen); J.J. Jakimowicz; J. Jeekel (Hans); Kazemier, G. (Geert); Janssen, I.M.C. (Ignace M. C.); L. Påhlman (Lars); E. Haglind (Eva); H.J. Bonjer (H. Jaap); Hellberg, R.; Haglind, E.; Kurlberg, G.; P.G. Lindgren (P.); B. Lindholm (Bengt); L. Påhlman (Lars); C. Dahlberg (Caroline); M.S. Raab; B. Anderberg (Bo); Ewerth, S.; M. Janson (Martin); J.E. Åkerlund (J.); K. Smedh (K.); A. Montgomery; S. Skullman (Stefan); P.O. Nyström; A. Kald (A.); A. Wänström (A.); J. Dalén (Johan); I. Svedberg (I.); G. Edlund (G.); U. Kressner (U.); K. Öberg (Kjell); O. Lundberg (O.); G.E. Lindmark (G.); T. Heikkinen (T.); M. Morino (Mario); G. Giraudo (G.); Lacy, A.M.; S. Delgado (Salvadora); Macarulla Sanz, E.; Díez, J.M. (J. Medina); O. Schwandner (O.); T.H. Schiedeck (T.); Shekarriz, H.; Bloechle, C.; I. Baca (I.); Weiss, O.; S. Msika (Simon); G. Desvignes (G.); K.L. Campbell (K.); A. Cuschieri (A.); H.J. Bonjer (Jaap); W.R. Schouten (Ruud); G. Kazemier (Geert); J.F. Lange (Johan); E. van der Harst (Erwin); Coene, P.P.L.O.; P.W. Plaisier; M.J.O.E. Bertleff (Marietta); Cuesta, M.A.; W. van der Broek (W.); Meijerink, W.J.H.J.; J.J. Jakimowicz; G.A.P. Nieuwenhuijzen (Gerard); J.K. Maring (John); Kivit, J.; I.M.C. Janssen (Ignace); E.J. Spillenaar Bilgen (Ernst Jan); F.J. Berends (Frits)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer is associated with improved recovery and similar cancer outcomes at 3 and 5 years in comparison with open surgery. However, long-term survival rates have rarely been reported. Here, we present survival and recurrence rates of the Dutch pa

  18. Arnica Ointment 10% Does Not Improve Upper Blepharoplasty Outcome : A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Exsel, Denise C. E.; Pool, Shariselle M. W.; van Uchelen, Jeroen H.; Edens, Mireille A.; van der Lei, Berend; Melenhorst, Wynand B. W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that arnica can reduce postoperative edema and ecchymosis associated with cosmetic surgical procedures and improve outcome. Despite a high incidence of arnica use among upper blepharoplasty patients, evidence to support its treatment effect is lacking. The authors p

  19. Arnica Ointment 10% Does Not Improve Upper Blepharoplasty Outcome : A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Exsel, Denise C E; Pool, Shariselle M W; van Uchelen, Jeroen H; Edens, Mireille A; van der Lei, Berend; Melenhorst, Wynand B W H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that arnica can reduce postoperative edema and ecchymosis associated with cosmetic surgical procedures and improve outcome. Despite a high incidence of arnica use among upper blepharoplasty patients, evidence to support its treatment effect is lacking. The authors p

  20. PRegnancy Outcomes after a Maternity Intervention for Stressful EmotionS (PROMISES: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jonge Peter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is ample evidence from observational prospective studies that maternal depression or anxiety during pregnancy is a risk factor for adverse psychosocial outcomes in the offspring. However, to date no previous study has demonstrated that treatment of depressive or anxious symptoms in pregnancy actually could prevent psychosocial problems in children. Preventing psychosocial problems in children will eventually bring down the huge public health burden of mental disease. The main objective of this study is to assess the effects of cognitive behavioural therapy in pregnant women with symptoms of anxiety or depression on the child's development as well as behavioural and emotional problems. In addition, we aim to study its effects on the child's development, maternal mental health, and neonatal outcomes, as well as the cost-effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy relative to usual care. Methods/design We will include 300 women with at least moderate levels of anxiety or depression at the end of the first trimester of pregnancy. By including 300 women we will be able to demonstrate effect sizes of 0.35 or over on the total problems scale of the child behavioural checklist 1.5-5 with alpha 5% and power (1-beta 80%. Women in the intervention arm are offered 10-14 individual cognitive behavioural therapy sessions, 6-10 sessions during pregnancy and 4-8 sessions after delivery (once a week. Women in the control group receive care as usual. Primary outcome is behavioural/emotional problems at 1.5 years of age as assessed by the total problems scale of the child behaviour checklist 1.5 - 5 years. Secondary outcomes will be mental, psychomotor and behavioural development of the child at age 18 months according to the Bayley scales, maternal anxiety and depression during pregnancy and postpartum, and neonatal outcomes such as birth weight, gestational age and Apgar score, health care consumption and general health status

  1. The Impact Exerted on Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Chronic Heart Failure by Aldosterone Receptor Antagonists: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, Renato; Cantatrione, Claudio; Mazzei, Damiana; Barone, Augusto; Maurea, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Background Aldosterone receptor antagonists (ARAs) have been associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFREF), but not in those with heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). With the aim to study this topic more deeply, we carried out a meta-analysis of selective and non-selective ARAs in HFREF and HFpEF. Methods We searched PubMed and Scopus databases. We decided to incorporate in the meta-analysis only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of ARAs in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) if they met the following criteria: experimental groups included patients with CHF treated with ARAs in addition to the conventional therapy; control groups included patients with CHF receiving conventional therapy without ARAs. Outcomes of interest were all-cause death, hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause, hyperkalemia, or gynecomastia. Results We detected 15 studies representing 15,671 patients. ARAs were associated with a reduced odds of all-cause death (odds ratio (OR): 0.79; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73 - 0.87) and hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause (OR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.61 - 0.89). However, subgroup analysis showed that these advantages were limited to HFREF (all-cause death: OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.69 - 0.84; hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause: OR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.51 - 0.85), but they did not affect the HFpEF group (all-cause death: OR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.76 - 1.1; hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause: OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.7 - 1.09). ARAs increased the risk of hyperkalemia (OR: 2.17; 95% CI: 1.88 - 2.5). Non-selective ARAs, but not selective ARAs, increased the risk of gynecomastia (OR: 8.22, 95% CI: 4.9 - 13.81 vs. OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.43 - 1.27). Conclusions ARAs reduced the risk of adverse cardiac events in HFREF but not HFpEF. In particular, ARA use in HFpEF patients is questionable, since in this CHF type, no significant

  2. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy decreases the rate of adverse pregnancy outcome: a controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Campos Passanezi Sant'Ana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease during the second trimester of gestation on adverse pregnancy outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pregnant patients during the 1st and 2nd trimesters at antenatal care in a Public Health Center were divided into 2 groups: NIG - "no intervention" (n=17 or IG- "intervention" (n=16. IG patients were submitted to a non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by a single periodontist consisting of scaling and root planning (SRP, professional prophylaxis (PROPH and oral hygiene instruction (OHI. NIG received PROPH and OHI during pregnancy and were referred for treatment after delivery. Periodontal evaluation was performed by a single trained examiner, blinded to periodontal treatment, according to probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level (CAL, plaque index (PI and sulcular bleeding index (SBI at baseline and 35 gestational weeks-28 days post-partum. Primary adverse pregnancy outcomes were preterm birth (0.05 at IG and worsening of all periodontal parameters at NIG (p<0.0001, except for PI. Signifcant differences in periodontal conditions of IG and NIG were observed at 2nd examination (p<0.001. The rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes was 47.05% in NIG and 6.25% in IG. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy was associated to a decreased risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes [OR=13.50; CI: 1.47-123.45; p=0.02]. CONCLUSIONS: Periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestation contributes to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  3. Clinical Practice Variability in Temperature Correction of Arterial Blood Gas Measurements and Outcomes in Hypothermia-Treated Patients After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terman, Samuel Waller; Nicholas, Katherine S; Hume, Benjamin; Silbergleit, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) for the postcardiac arrest syndrome may be challenging given changes in solubility of arterial blood gases (ABGs) with cooling. Whether ABG measurements should be temperature corrected (TC) remain unknown. We sought to describe practice variability in TC at a single institution and explored the association between TC and neurological outcome. We conducted a retrospective cohort study reviewing electronic health records of all patients treated with MTH after cardiac arrest. We examined whether the percentage of TC ABGs relative to total number of ABGs drawn for each subject during hypothermia was associated with the neurological outcome at hospital discharge and 6-12-month follow-up. The cerebral performance category of 1-2 was defined as a favorable outcome in the logistic regression models. 1223 ABGs were obtained during MTH on 122 subjects over 6 years. TC was never used in 72 subjects (59%; no TC group), made available in 1-74% of ABGs in 17 subjects (14%; intermediate TC group), and made available in ≥75% of ABGs in 33 subjects (27%; mostly TC group). Groups differed in the proportion of subjects with shockable presenting rhythms (47% vs. 47% vs. 76%, p=0.02) and admitting ICU (p=0.005). Favorable 6-month outcomes were more common in the mostly TC than no TC group (48% vs. 25%; OR [95% CI]: 2.9 [1.2-7.1]), but not after adjustment (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.33-6.9). There was substantial practice variability in the temperature correction strategy. Availability of temperature-corrected ABGs was not associated with improved neurological outcomes after adjusting for covariates.

  4. Impact of sirolimus-eluting stent fractures without early cardiac events on long-term clinical outcomes: A multislice computed tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Tsuyoshi [Toyohashi Heart Center, Oyama-cho, Toyohashi (Japan); Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardio-Renal Medicine and Hypertension, Nagoya (Japan); Kimura, Masashi; Ehara, Mariko; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Nasu, Kenya; Kinoshita, Yoshihisa; Habara, Maoto; Tsuchikane, Etsuo; Suzuki, Takahiko [Toyohashi Heart Center, Oyama-cho, Toyohashi (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    This study sought to evaluate the impact of sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) fractures on long-term clinical outcomes using multislice computed tomography (MSCT). In this study, 528 patients undergoing 6- to 18-month follow-up 64-slice MSCT after SES implantation without early clinical events were followed clinically (the median follow-up interval was 4.6 years). A CT-detected stent fracture was defined as a complete gap with Hounsfield units (HU) <300 at the site of separation. The major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), including cardiac death, stent thrombosis, and target lesion revascularisation, were compared according to the presence of stent fracture. Stent fractures were observed in 39 patients (7.4 %). MACEs were more common in patients with CT-detected stent fractures than in those without (46 % vs. 7 %, p < 0.01). Univariate Cox regression analysis indicated a significant relationship between MACE and stent fracture [hazard ratio (HR) 7.65; p < 0.01], age (HR 1.03; p = 0.04), stent length (HR 1.03; p < 0.01), diabetes mellitus (HR 1.77; p = 0.04), and chronic total occlusion (HR 2.54; p = 0.01). In the multivariate model, stent fracture (HR 5.36; p < 0.01) and age (HR 1.03; p = 0.04) remained significant predictors of MACE. An SES fracture detected by MSCT without early clinical events was associated with long-term clinical adverse events. (orig.)

  5. Efficacy of a nutritional education program to improve diet in patients attending a cardiac rehabilitation program: outcomes of a one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, Maria Luisa Eliana; Biffi, Barbara; Gheri, Chiara Francesca; Sarli, Ennio; Rafanelli, Elena; Graziano, Emanuela; Vidali, Sofia; Fattirolli, Francesco; Gensini, Gian Franco; Macchi, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Dietary habits are widely reported to play a primary role in the occurrence of coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation is a multidisciplinary intervention that includes nutritional education. Proper nutrition plays an important role in cardiovascular health outcomes and in decreasing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) as highlighted in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of an educational program to improve the diet of cardiac rehabilitation patients compared to usual treatment. 160 patients with CAD, (124 M, 36 F) were randomized into two groups. Data analysis was conducted on 133 patients (11 % dropped out). All enrolled patients attended two educational seminars about proper nutrition and cardiovascular prevention, and completed a questionnaire about dietary habits (before CAD). The Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated, and basal glycaemia and plasma lipids were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the study (12 months after hospital discharge). The intervention group patients underwent a mid-term evaluation of nutrient intakes, BMI, and received a personalized educational reinforcement by a dietitian. At the end of the study, the intervention group was shown to have significantly reduced their daily caloric intake (reduction of total proteins, total fat, carbohydrate, alcohol), and showed a significant reduction of weight and BMI compared to the control group. Individual nutritional counseling session as a reinforcement of a standard educational program is effective in reducing caloric intake and BMI, which may reduce cardiovascular risk factors in cardiovascular patients.

  6. Empirical comparison of four baseline covariate adjustment methods in analysis of continuous outcomes in randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang S

    2014-07-01

    .38 and percent change (–0.019; 95% CI: -0.087, 0.050; P=0.58.Conclusion: ANCOVA, through both simulation and empirical studies, provides the best statistical estimation for analyzing continuous outcomes requiring covariate adjustment. Our empirical findings support the use of ANCOVA as an optimal method in both design and analysis of trials with a continuous primary outcome.Keywords: ANOVA, ANCOVA, change score, knee arthroplasty

  7. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  8. Clinical Outcomes with β-blockers for Myocardial Infarction A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangalore, Sripal; Makani, Harikrishna; Radford, Martha;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Debate exists regarding the efficacy of â-blockers in myocardial infarction and their required duration of usage in contemporary practice. METHODS: We conducted a MEDLINE/EMBASE/CENTRAL search for randomized trials evaluating â-blockers in myocardial infarction enrolling at least 100...... and angina in the reperfusion era appeared to be short-term (30-days). CONCLUSIONS: In contemporary practice of treatment of myocardial infarction, â-blockers have no mortality benefit but reduce recurrent myocardial infarction and angina (short-term) at the expense of increase in heart failure, cardiogenic...

  9. Identification of Typical Left Bundle Branch Block Contraction by Strain Echocardiography Is Additive to Electrocardiography in Prediction of Long-Term Outcome After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Tayal, Bhupendar; Hansen, Thomas F;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines suggest that patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) be treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT); however, one-third do not have a significant activation delay, which can result in nonresponse. By identifying characteristic opposing wall contraction......, 2-dimensional strain echocardiography (2DSE) may detect true LBBB activation. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to investigate whether the absence of a typical LBBB mechanical activation pattern by 2DSE was associated with unfavorable long-term outcome and if this is additive to electrocardiographic...... (ECG) morphology and duration. METHODS: From 2 centers, 208 CRT candidates (New York Heart Association classes II to IV, ejection fraction ≤35%, QRS duration ≥120 ms) with LBBB by ECG were prospectively included. Before CRT implantation, longitudinal strain in the apical 4-chamber view determined...

  10. Class III antiarrhythmic agents in cardiac failure: lessons from clinical trials with a focus on the Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina (GESICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doval, H C

    1999-11-04

    The results of previous clinical trials, in a variety of clinical settings, showed that class I agents may consistently increase mortality in sharp contrast to the effects of beta blockers. Attention has therefore shifted to class III compounds for potential beneficial effects on long-term mortality among patients with underlying cardiac disease. Clinical trials with d-sotalol, the dextro isomer (devoid of beta blockade) of sotalol, showed increased mortality in patients with low ejection fraction after myocardial infarction and in those with heart failure; whereas in the case of dofetilide, the impact on mortality was neutral. Because of the complex effects of its actions as an alpha-adrenergic blocker and a class III agent, the impact on mortality of amiodarone in patients with heart failure is of particular interest. A meta-analysis of 13 clinical trials revealed significant reductions in all-cause and cardiac mortality among patients with heart failure or previous myocardial infarction. Among these were 5 controlled clinical trials that investigated the effects of amiodarone on mortality among patients with heart failure. None of these trials was large relative to the beta-blocker trials in the postinfarction patients. However, the larger 2 of the 5 amiodarone trials produced discordant effects on mortality, neutral in one and significantly positive in the other. Some of the differences may be accounted for by the differences in eligibility criteria and baseline characteristics. Future trials that may be undertaken to resolve the discrepancies may need to allow for the newer findings on the effects of concomitant beta blockers, implantable devices, and possibly, spironolactone. All these modalities of treatment have been shown in controlled clinical trials to augment survival in patients with impaired ventricular function or manifest heart failure. Additional trials, some of which are currently in progress, compare amiodarone with implantable devices and other

  11. Left ventricular ejection fraction normalization in cardiac resynchronization therapy and risk of ventricular arrhythmias and clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H; Solomon, Scott D; Foster, Elyse

    2014-01-01

    within 2.2 years of follow-up. Risk of inappropriate ICD therapy is still present, and these patients could be considered for downgrade from CRT-defibrillator to CRT-pacemaker at the time of battery depletion if no VTAs have occurred. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique...

  12. An exercise programme for patients with intermittent claudication: randomised trial of health outcomes and cost analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Guidon, Marie

    2011-01-01

    As peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a chronic, progressive disease with a significant cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk burden, it has a considerable impact on functional capacity and quality of life (QoL). Exercise programmes result in significant improvements in walking distances but these correlate poorly with patient-reported functioning and QoL and the long-term outcomes are unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term (one year) effects of participation in a 1...

  13. Performance of models for estimating absolute risk difference in multicenter trials with binary outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pedroza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporting of absolute risk difference (RD is recommended for clinical and epidemiological prospective studies. In analyses of multicenter studies, adjustment for center is necessary when randomization is stratified by center or when there is large variation in patients outcomes across centers. While regression methods are used to estimate RD adjusted for baseline predictors and clustering, no formal evaluation of their performance has been previously conducted. Methods We performed a simulation study to evaluate 6 regression methods fitted under a generalized estimating equation framework: binomial identity, Poisson identity, Normal identity, log binomial, log Poisson, and logistic regression model. We compared the model estimates to unadjusted estimates. We varied the true response function (identity or log, number of subjects per center, true risk difference, control outcome rate, effect of baseline predictor, and intracenter correlation. We compared the models in terms of convergence, absolute bias and coverage of 95 % confidence intervals for RD. Results The 6 models performed very similar to each other for the majority of scenarios. However, the log binomial model did not converge for a large portion of the scenarios including a baseline predictor. In scenarios with outcome rate close to the parameter boundary, the binomial and Poisson identity models had the best performance, but differences from other models were negligible. The unadjusted method introduced little bias to the RD estimates, but its coverage was larger than the nominal value in some scenarios with an identity response. Under the log response, coverage from the unadjusted method was well below the nominal value (<80 % for some scenarios. Conclusions We recommend the use of a binomial or Poisson GEE model with identity link to estimate RD for correlated binary outcome data. If these models fail to run, then either a logistic regression, log Poisson

  14. Development of a core outcome set for clinical trials in rosacea: study protocol for a systematic review of the literature and identification of a core outcome set using a Delphi survey

    OpenAIRE

    Iyengar, Sanjana; Paula R Williamson; Schmitt, Jochen; Johannsen, Lena; Maher, Ian A.; Sobanko, Joseph F.; Cartee, Todd V.; Schlessinger, Daniel; Poon, Emily; Alam, Murad

    2016-01-01

    Background Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Diagnosis is based on signs and symptoms with management and treatment aimed to suppress inflammatory lesions, erythema, and telangiectasia. While many clinical trials of rosacea exist, the lack of consensus in outcome reporting across all trials poses a concern. Proper evaluation and comparison of treatment modalities is challenging. In order to address the inconsistencies present, this project...

  15. The effect of endometrial injury on first cycle IVF/ICSI outcome: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahran, Ahmad; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Bahaa, Haitham

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implantation remains a limiting step in IVF/ICSI. Endometrial injury isa promising procedure aiming at improving the implantation and pregnancy rates after IVF/ICSI. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of endometrial injury induced in precedingcycle on IVF/ICSI outcome. Materials and Methods: Four hundred patients undergoing their first IVF/ICSI cycle in two IVF units in Minia, Egypt were randomly selected to undergo either endometrial injury in luteal phase of preceding cycle (intervention group) or no treatment (control group). Primary outcome wasthe implantation and live birth ratesWhile the secondary outcome was clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, multiple pregnancy rates, pain and bleeding during and after procedure. Results: Implantation and live birth rates were significantly higher in intervention compared with control group (22.4% vs. 18.7%, p=0.02 and 67% vs. 28%, p=0.03), respectively. There was also a significant reduction in miscarriage rate in intervention group (4.8% vs. 19.7%, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusion: Endometrial injury in preceding cycle improves the implantation rate and live birth rate and reduces the miscarriage rate per clinical pregnancy in patients undergoing their first IVF/ICSI cycle. PMID:27294218

  16. Defining responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical trials of invasive fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Brahm H; Herbrecht, Raoul; Stevens, David A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Sobel, Jack; Viscoli, Claudio; Walsh, Thomas J; Maertens, Johan; Patterson, Thomas F; Perfect, John R; Dupont, Bertrand; Wingard, John R; Calandra, Thierry; Kauffman, Carol A; Graybill, John R; Baden, Lindsey R; Pappas, Peter G; Bennett, John E; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Cordonnier, Catherine; Viviani, Maria Anna; Bille, Jacques; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Wheat, L Joseph; Graninger, Wolfgang; Bow, Eric J; Holland, Steven M; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Dismukes, William E; De Pauw, Ben E

    2008-09-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) have become major causes of morbidity and mortality among highly immunocompromised patients. Authoritative consensus criteria to diagnose IFD have been useful in establishing eligibility criteria for antifungal trials. There is an important need for generation of consensus definitions of outcomes of IFD that will form a standard for evaluating treatment success and failure in clinical trials. Therefore, an expert international panel consisting of the Mycoses Study Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer was convened to propose guidelines for assessing treatment responses in clinical trials of IFDs and for defining study outcomes. Major fungal diseases that are discussed include invasive disease due to Candida species, Aspergillus species and other molds, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Coccidioides immitis. We also discuss potential pitfalls in assessing outcome, such as conflicting clinical, radiological, and/or mycological data and gaps in knowledge.

  17. Characteristics and outcomes of initial virologic suppressors during analytic treatment interruption in a therapeutic HIV-1 gag vaccine trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Z Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the placebo-controlled trial ACTG A5197, a trend favoring viral suppression was seen in the HIV-1-infected subjects who received a recombinant Ad5 HIV-1 gag vaccine. OBJECTIVE: To identify individuals with initial viral suppression (plasma HIV-1 RNA set point <3.0 log(10 copies/ml during the analytic treatment interruption (ATI and evaluate the durability and correlates of virologic control and characteristics of HIV sequence evolution. METHODS: HIV-1 gag and pol RNA were amplified and sequenced from plasma obtained during the ATI. Immune responses were measured by flow cytometric analysis and intracellular cytokine expression assays. Characteristics of those with and without initial viral suppression were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher's exact tests. RESULTS: Eleven out of 104 participants (10.6% were classified as initial virologic suppressors, nine of whom had received the vaccine. Initial virologic suppressors had significantly less CD4+ cell decline by ATI week 16 as compared to non-suppressors (median 7 CD4+ cell gain vs. 247 CD4+ cell loss, P = 0.04. However, of the ten initial virologic suppressors with a pVL at ATI week 49, only three maintained pVL <3.0 log(10 copies/ml. HIV-1 Gag-specific CD4+ interferon-γ responses were not associated with initial virologic suppression and no evidence of vaccine-driven HIV sequence evolution was detected. Participants with initial virologic suppression were found to have a lower percentage of CD4+ CTLA-4+ cells prior to treatment interruption, but a greater proportion of HIV-1 Gag-reactive CD4+ TNF-α+ cells expressing either CTLA-4 or PD-1. CONCLUSIONS: Among individuals participating in a rAd5 therapeutic HIV-1 gag vaccine trial, initial viral suppression was found in a subset of patients, but this response was not sustained. The association between CTLA-4 and PD-1 expression on CD4+ T cells and virologic outcome warrants further study in trials of other

  18. Detailed statistical analysis plan for the target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Winkel, Per; Cronberg, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    , and did not treat hyperthermia in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management (TTM) strategy is not known. To prevent outcome reporting bias, selective reporting and data-driven results, we present the a priori defined detailed statistical analysis plan as an update to the previously...

  19. Outcomes on the pharmacopsychometric triangle in bupropion-SR vs. buspirone augmentation of citalopram in the STAR*D trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Fava, Maurizio; Trivedi, M H;

    2012-01-01

    Bech P, Fava M, Trivedi MH, Wisniewski SR, Rush AJ. Outcomes on the pharmacopsychometric triangle in bupropion-SR vs. buspirone augmentation of citalopram in the STAR*D trial. Objective: To compare within the framework of a novel pharmacopsychometric triangle, augmentation treatment with bupropion...... Scale (HAM-D(17) ) and of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C(30) ), referred to as HAM-D(6) and IDS-C(6) , were focussed on pure antidepressive effect. Side-effects (tolerable vs. intolerable) and quality of life were measured using patient-administered questionnaires. A modified......-C(6) , and IDS-C(30) , but not on the HAM-D(17) . In the domain of side effects, the total scores on the Patient Rated Inventory of Side Effects (PRISE) were reduced significantly more by bupropion-SR than by buspirone (P = 0.03). In the domain of quality of life, the total scores on the Quality...

  20. The clinical outcomes of triple antiplatelet therapy versus dual antiplatelet therapy for high-risk patients after coronary stent implantation: a meta-analysis of 11 clinical trials and 9,553 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhong-Guo; Ding, Guo-Bin; Li, Xiao-Bo; Gao, Xiao-Fei; Gao, Ya-Li; Tian, Nai-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimal antiplatelet regimen after in-coronary intervention among patients presenting with complex coronary artery lesions or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has remained unclear. This study sought to evaluate the clinical outcomes of triple antiplatelet treatment (TAPT) (cilostazol added to aspirin plus clopidogrel) in these patients. Methods The PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and other Internet sources were searched for relevant articles. The primary end point was major adverse cardiac events (MACE), including all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization. The incidence of definite/probable stent thrombosis and bleeding were analyzed as the safety end points. Results Eleven clinical trials involving 9,553 patients were analyzed. The risk of MACE was significantly decreased following TAPT after stent implantation in the ACS subgroup (odds ratio [OR]: 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.61–0.85; P<0.001), which might mainly result from the lower risk of all-cause mortality in this subset (OR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.48–0.80; P<0.001). The risk of bleeding was not increased with respect to TAPT. Conclusion TAPT after stent implantation was associated with feasible benefits on reducing the risk of MACE, especially on reducing the incidence of all-cause mortality among patients suffering from ACS, without higher incidence of bleeding. Larger and more powerful randomized trials are still warranted to prove the superiority of TAPT for such patients. PMID:27799743

  1. Perioperative utility of goal-directed therapy in high-risk cardiac patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: “A clinical outcome and biomarker-based study”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Magoon, Rohan; Rawat, Rajinder; Mehta, Yatin

    2016-01-01

    Goal-directed therapy (GDT) encompasses guidance of intravenous (IV) fluid and vasopressor/inotropic therapy by cardiac output or similar parameters to help in early recognition and management of high-risk cardiac surgical patients. With the aim of establishing the utility of perioperative GDT using robust clinical and biochemical outcomes, we conducted the present study. This multicenter randomized controlled study included 130 patients of either sex, with European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation ≥3 undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting on cardiopulmonary bypass. The patients were randomly divided into the control and GDT group. All the participants received standardized care; arterial pressure monitored through radial artery, central venous pressure (CVP) through a triple lumen in the right internal jugular vein, electrocardiogram, oxygen saturation, temperature, urine output per hour, and frequent arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis. In addition, cardiac index (CI) monitoring using FloTrac™ and continuous central venous oxygen saturation (ScVO2) using PreSep™ were used in patients in the GDT group. Our aim was to maintain the CI at 2.5–4.2 L/min/m2, stroke volume index 30–65 ml/beat/m2, systemic vascular resistance index 1500–2500 dynes/s/cm5/m2, oxygen delivery index 450–600 ml/min/m2, continuous ScVO2 >70%, and stroke volume variation 30%, and urine output >1 ml/kg/h. The aims were achieved by altering the administration of IV fluids and doses of inotropes or vasodilators. The data of sixty patients in each group were analyzed in view of ten exclusions. The average duration of ventilation (19.89 ± 3.96 vs. 18.05 ± 4.53 h, P = 0.025), hospital stay (7.94 ± 1.64 vs. 7.17 ± 1.93 days, P = 0.025), and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay (3.74 ± 0.59 vs. 3.41 ± 0.75 days, P = 0.012) was significantly less in the GDT group, compared to the control group. The extra volume added and the number of inotropic dose adjustments were

  2. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  3. Safety Events in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Results from the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplant (FAVORIT) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Matthew R.; Gravens-Muller, Lisa; Costa, Nadiesda; Ivanova, Anastasia; Manitpisitkul, Wana; Bostom, Andrew G.; Diamantidis, Clarissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for adverse safety events related to their reduced renal function and many medications. Methods We determined the incidence of adverse safety events based on previously defined Agency for Healthcare and Research Quality (AHRQ) ICD-9 code-derived patient safety indicators (PSI) in the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplant (FAVORIT) trial participants who had a hospitalization stratified by tertiles of estimated glomerular filtration rate. We also examined the frequency of Micromedex defined two precautionary drug-drug interactions, and two medications whose use may be contraindicated due to reduced GFR from the FAVORIT trial Medication Thesaurus at baseline, and annually among 4110 participants. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between patient safety events and baseline demographic and clinical variables at a participant level. Event rates were estimated at participant and visit levels. Results Of the 2514 patients with a hospitalization, 978 (38.9%) experienced an AHRQ PSI. Factors which were associated with more common AHRQ PSI included: US location, history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes, and lower tertile of estimated GFR. At a participant level, 2524 of the 4110 participants (61.4%) were taking a CNI and a statin, 378 (9.2%) were taking azathioprine and an ACE inhibitor, 171 (12.9%) were taking a sulfonylurea ), 45 (3.4%) were taking metformin despite a baseline GFR below 40 ml/min/1.73m2. Conclusions We conclude that patient safety events are not uncommon in kidney transplant recipients. Careful monitoring is necessary to prevent adverse outcomes. PMID:25393158

  4. Is investigator background related to outcome in head to head trials of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Claudio; Pietrini, Pietro; Cuijpers, Pim

    2017-01-01

    Background The influence of factors related to the background of investigators conducting trials comparing psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy has remained largely unstudied. Specializations emphasizing biological determinants of mental disorders, like psychiatry, might favor pharmacotherapy, while others stressing psychosocial factors, like psychology, could promote psychotherapy. Yet financial conflict of interest (COI) could be a confounding factor as authors with a medical specialization might receive more sponsoring from the pharmaceutical industry. Method We conducted a meta-analysis with subgroup and meta-regression analysis examining whether the specialization and affiliation of trial authors were associated to outcomes in the direct comparison of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for the acute treatment of depression. Meta-regression analysis also included trial risk of bias and author conflict of interest in relationship to the pharmaceutical industry. Results We included 45 trials. In half, the first author was psychologist. The last author was psychiatrist/MD in half of the trials, and a psychologist or statistician/other technical in the rest. Most lead authors had medical affiliations. Subgroup analysis indicated that studies with last authors statisticians favored pharmacotherapy. Univariate analysis showed a negative relationship between the presence of statisticians and outcomes favoring psychotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that trials including authors with financial COI reported findings more favorable to pharmacotherapy. Discussion We report the first detailed overview of the background of authors conducting head to head trials for depression. Trials co-authored by statisticians appear to subtly favor pharmacotherapy. Receiving funding from the industry is more closely related to finding better outcomes for the industry’s elective treatment than are factors related to authors’ background. Limitations For a minority of authors we could

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Relationship Education in the U.S. Army: 2-Year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Scott M; Rhoades, Galena K; Loew, Benjamin A; Allen, Elizabeth S; Carter, Sarah; Osborne, Laura J; Prentice, Donnella; Markman, Howard J

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an evidence-based, community-delivered adaptation of couple relationship education (CRE; specifically, PREP, The Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program) delivered at two Army installations. The study is a randomized controlled trial with two years of follow-up, examining marital quality and stability. Sample composition was 662 married couples with a spouse in the U.S. Army. Analyses yielded no evidence of overall enduring intervention effects on relationship quality but couples assigned to intervention at the higher risk site were significantly less likely than controls to be divorced at the two-year follow-up (8.1% vs. 14.9%, p divorce was strongest for minority couples. The findings add to the literature on who may benefit most from CRE.

  6. Functional Outcomes of the Low Vision Depression Prevention Trial in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemer, Ashley D.; Massof, Robert W.; Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Piersol, Catherine V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of behavioral activation (BA) plus low vision rehabilitation with an occupational therapist (OT-LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) on visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized clinical trial with AMD patients with subsyndromal depressive symptoms (n = 188). All subjects had two outpatient low vision rehabilitation optometry visits, then were randomized to in-home BA + OT-LVR or ST. Behavioral activation is a structured behavioral treatment aiming to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. Functional vision was assessed with the activity inventory (AI) in which participants rate the difficulty level of goals and corresponding tasks. Participants were assessed at baseline and 4 months. Results Improvements in functional vision measures were seen in both the BA + OT-LVR and ST groups at the goal level (d = 0.71; d = 0.56 respectively). At the task level, BA + OT-LVR patients showed more improvement in reading, inside-the-home tasks and outside-the-home tasks, when compared to ST patients. The greatest effects were seen in the BA + OT-LVR group in subjects with a visual acuity ≥20/70 (d = 0.360 reading; d = 0.500 inside the home; d = 0.468 outside the home). Conclusions Based on the trends of the AI data, we suggest that BA + OT-LVR services, provided by an OT in the patient's home following conventional low vision optometry services, are more effective than conventional optometric low vision services alone for those with mild visual impairment. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00769015.) PMID:28273318

  7. Physical activity and nutrition behavioural outcomes of a home-based intervention program for seniors: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Linda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This intervention aimed to ascertain whether a low-cost, accessible, physical activity and nutrition program could improve physical activity and nutrition behaviours of insufficiently active 60–70 year olds residing in Perth, Australia. Methods A 6-month home-based randomised controlled trial was conducted on 478 older adults (intervention, n = 248; control, n = 230 of low to medium socioeconomic status. Both intervention and control groups completed postal questionnaires at baseline and post-program, but only the intervention participants received project materials. A modified fat and fibre questionnaire measured nutritional behaviours, whereas physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Generalised estimating equation models were used to assess the repeated outcomes over both time points. Results The final sample consisted of 176 intervention participants and 199 controls (response rate 78.5% with complete data. After controlling for demographic and other confounding factors, the intervention group demonstrated increased participation in strength exercise (p Conclusions A minimal contact, low-cost and home-based physical activity program can positively influence seniors’ physical activity and nutrition behaviours. Trial registration anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12609000735257

  8. Neuron-Specific Enolase as a Predictor of Death or Poor Neurological Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C and 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammet, Pascal; Collignon, Olivier; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a widely-used biomarker for prognostication of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest, but the relevance of recommended cutoff values has been questioned due to the lack of a standardized methodology and uncertainties over the influence of temperatu...

  9. Hyperlactatemia in patients undergoing adult cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass: Causative factors and its effect on surgical outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakesh; George, Gladdy; Karuppiah, Sathappan; Philip, Madhu Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives of the Study: To identify the factors causing high lactate levels in patients undergoing cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and to assess the association between high blood lactate levels and postoperative morbidity and mortality. Methods: A retrospective observational study including 370 patients who underwent cardiac surgeries under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on serum lactate levels; those with serum lactate levels greater than or equal to 4 mmol/L considered as hyperlactatemia and those with serum lactate levels less than 4 mmol/L. Blood lactate samples were collected intraoperatively and postoperatively in the ICU. Preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for hyperlactatemia were identified using the highest intraoperative value of lactate. The postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with hyperlactatemia was studied using the overall (intraoperative and postoperative values) peak lactate levels. Preoperative clinical data, perioperative events and postoperative morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: Intraoperative peak blood lactate levels of 4.0 mmol/L or more were present in 158 patients (42.7%). Females had higher peak intra operative lactate levels (P = 0.011). There was significant correlation between CPB time (Pearson correlation coefficient r = 0.024; P = 0.003) and aortic cross clamp time (r = 0.02, P = 0.007) with peak intraoperative blood lactate levels. Patients with hyperlactatemia had significantly higher rate of postoperative morbidity like atrial fibrillation (19.9% vs. 5.3%; P = 0.004), prolonged requirement of inotropes (34% vs. 11.8%; P = 0.001), longer stay in the ICU (P = 0.013) and hospital (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Hyperlactatemia had significant association with post-operative morbidity. Detection of hyperlactatemia in the perioperative period should be considered as an indicator of inadequate tissue oxygen delivery and must be aggressively

  10. Relation between strain dyssynchrony index determined by comprehensive assessment using speckle-tracking imaging and long-term outcome after cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Matsumoto, Kensuke; Kaneko, Akihiro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Ryo, Keiko; Fukuda, Yuko; Norisada, Kazuko; Onishi, Tetsuari; Yoshida, Akihiro; Kawai, Hiroya; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2012-04-15

    Strain dyssynchrony index (SDI), which was a marker of dyssynchrony and residual myocardial contractility, can predict left ventricular reverse remodeling short-term after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). We investigated SDI-predicted long-term outcome after CRT in patients with heart failure (HF). We studied 74 patients with HF who underwent CRT. SDI was calculated as the average difference between peak and end-systolic strain from 6 segments for radial and circumferential SDIs and 18 segments for longitudinal SDI using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking strain. Based on our previous findings, the predefined cutoff for significant dyssynchrony and residual myocardial contractility was a radial SDI ≥6.5%, a circumferential SDI ≥3.2%, and a longitudinal SDI ≥3.6%. The predefined principal outcome variable was the combined end point of death or hospitalization owing to deteriorating HF. Long-term follow-up after CRT was tracked over 4 years. The primary end point of prespecified events occurred in 14 patients (19%). An association with a favorable long-term outcome after CRT was observed in patients with significant radial, circumferential, and longitudinal SDIs (p SDIs, respectively). Furthermore, cardiovascular event-free rate after CRT in patients with positivity of 3 for the 3 SDIs was 100% better than that in patients with positivity of 1 (52%, p SDIs. In conclusion, SDIs can successfully predict long-term outcome after CRT in patients with HF. Moreover, the approach combining the 3 types of SDI leads to a more accurate prediction than the use of individual parameters. These findings may have clinical implications in patients with CRT.

  11. Impact of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information System (PROMIS) upon the Design and Operation of Multi-center Clinical Trials: a Qualitative Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Lawrence W.; Nahm, Meredith; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies may be required to integrate the National Institutes of Health’s Patient Reported Outcome Management Information System (PROMIS) into multi-center clinical trials. To better understand this need, we identified likely PROMIS reporting formats, developed a multi-center clinical trial process model, and identified gaps between current capabilities and those necessary for PROMIS. These results were evaluated by key trial constituencies. Issues reported by principal investigators fell into two categories: acceptance by key regulators and the scientific community, and usability for researchers and clinicians. Issues reported by the coordinating center, participating sites, and study subjects were those faced when integrating new technologies into existing clinical trial systems. We then defined elements of a PROMIS Tool Kit required for integrating PROMIS into a multi-center clinical trial environment. The requirements identified in this study serve as a framework for future investigators in the design, development, implementation, and operation of PROMIS Tool Kit technologies. PMID:20703765

  12. Rationale, design and organization of the Second Chinese Cardiac Study (CCS-2): a randomized trial of clopidogrel plus aspirin, and of metoprolol, among patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. Second Chinese Cardiac Study (CCS-2) Collaborative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Assessing combined anti-platelet therapy in suspected acute myocardial infarction Aspirin has been shown to be effective in the emergency treatment of acute myocardial infarction. It irreversibly inhibits platelet cyclo-oxygenase and thereby prevents the formation of the platelet aggregating agent thromboxane A2. Clopidogrel is an anti-platelet agent that acts by a different mechanism, inhibiting adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation. Simultaneous inhibition of both of these pathways might produce significantly greater anti-platelet effects than inhibition of either alone. The Second Chinese Cardiac Study (CCS-2) will reliably determine whether adding oral clopidogrel to aspirin for up to 4 weeks in hospital after suspected acute myocardial infarction can produce a greater reduction in the risk of major vascular events than can be achieved by giving aspirin alone. In order to be able to detect a further reduction of 10-15%, some 20,000-40,000 patients in over 1000 Chinese hospitals will be randomized. Assessing early beta-blocker therapy in suspected acute myocardial infarction Although over 27,000 patients have been studied previously in randomized trials of short-term beta-blocker therapy in acute myocardial infarction, the reduction in early mortality (513 (3.7%) for beta-blocker therapy deaths versus 586 (4.3%) for control deaths) was only just conventionally significant (P = 0.02) and, overall, the absolute benefits were small in the relatively low-risk patients studied. Although there might be worthwhile benefit in higher risk patients, there is currently little routine use of beta-blocker therapy in acute myocardial infarction. Hence, patients in CCS-2 will also be randomly allocated to receive metoprolol (intravenous then oral) or matching placebo for up to 4 weeks in hospital in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Such a design allows all patients to contribute fully to assessment of the separate effects of the anti-platelet regimen and the beta

  13. A randomised trial of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for neonatal sepsis: childhood outcomes at 5 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Neil; Morris, Timothy; Brocklehurst, Peter; Carr, Robert; Cowan, Frances; Patel, Nishma; Petrou, Stavros; Redshaw, Margaret; Modi, Neena; Doré, Caroline J

    2015-01-01

    Objective We performed a randomised trial in very preterm, small for gestational age (SGA) babies to determine if prophylaxis with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) improves outcomes (the PROGRAMS trial). GM-CSF was associated with improved neonatal neutrophil counts, but no change in other neonatal or 2-year outcomes. As subtle benefits in outcome may not be ascertainable until school age we performed an outcome study at 5 years. Patients and methods 280 babies born at 31 weeks of gestation or less and SGA were entered into the trial. Outcomes were assessed at 5 years to determine neurodevelopmental and general health status and educational attainment. Results We found no significant differences in cognitive, general health or educational outcomes between 83 of 106 (78%) surviving children in the GM-CSF arm compared with 81 of 110 (74%) in the control arm. Mean mental processing composite (equivalent to IQ) at 5 years were 94 (SD 16) compared with 95 (SD 15), respectively (difference in means −1 (95%CI −6 to 4), and similar proportions were in receipt of special educational needs support (41% vs 35%; risk ratio 1.2 (95% CI 0.8 to 1.9)). Performance on Kaufmann-ABC subscales and components of NEPSY were similar. The suggestion of worse respiratory outcomes in the GM-CSF group at 2 years was replicated at 5 years. Conclusions The administration of GM-CSF to very preterm SGA babies is not associated with improved or more adverse neurodevelopmental, general health or educational outcomes at 5 years. Trial registration number ISRCTN42553489. PMID:25922190

  14. A randomized controlled trial of pre-conception treatment for periodontal disease to improve periodontal status during pregnancy and birth outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hong; Xiong, Xu; Su, Yi; Zhang, Yiming; Wu, Hongqiao; Jiang, Zhijun; Qian, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence has suggested that periodontal disease is associated with an increased risk of various adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. However, several large clinical randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate periodontal therapy during pregnancy reduced the incidence of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. It has been suggested that the pre-conception period may be an optimal period for periodontal disease treatment rather than during pregnancy. To date, no randomized cont...

  15. The Effect of Liaison Nurse Service on Patient Outcomes after Discharging From ICU: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanejad, Zeinab; Pazokian, Marzieh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies suggest that liaison nurse intervention might be effective to solve the gap between intensive care unit and wards, but little studies are known about the effect of this intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of liaison nurse service on patient outcomes after discharging from intensive care unit. Methods: In this single blinded randomized controlled trial, a total of 80 patients were selected by convenience sampling method from two teaching hospitals located in Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental or the control groups. Patients in the experimental group received post-ICU care from a liaison nurse and patients in the control group received the routine care. After the intervention, patients’ vital signs, level of consciousness, length of hospital stay, need for re-hospitalization in ICU, and satisfaction with care were measure. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver.13 software. Results: None of the participants experienced ICU re-hospitalization. According to the result and there were no significant differences between the study groups regarding heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, post-ICU level of consciousness, satisfaction with care, and length of hospitalization in medical-surgical wards. However, the study groups differed significantly in terms of body temperature. Conclusion: Care services provided by an ICU liaison nurse has limited effects on patient outcomes. However, considering the contradictions among the studies, further studies are needed for providing clear evidence about the effectiveness of the liaison nurse strategy. PMID:27752487

  16. Computer-tailored smoking cessation intervention in a general population setting in Germany: outcome of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Anja; John, Ulrich; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Ulbricht, Sabina; Rumpf, Hans-Jürgen; Meyer, Christian

    2008-02-01

    This study reports the outcome of a randomized controlled trial testing a computer-tailored smoking cessation intervention based on the transtheoretical model in a general population setting in Germany. Participants of the smoking intervention study were recruited from an existing general population health examination survey in a university hospital. The sample consisted of 611 current and former smokers at baseline, and of 485 participants in the core group of baseline daily cigarette smokers. Follow-ups were conducted 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after baseline. The intervention was designed for both current and former smokers, involved up to three individualized feedback letters, and was created using expert-system technology. Based on 7-day point-prevalence abstinence and 6-month prolonged abstinence as the outcome measures, the study identified no significant differences between the intervention and control groups. Modeling the full longitudinal data in generalized estimation equation analyses, using different nonresponse procedures, and adjusting for covariates did not alter the results. We conclude that the computer-tailored transtheoretical model-based smoking cessation intervention, as delivered in this study and in this special setting, was ineffective.

  17. Differences in outcomes between GOLD groups in patients with COPD in the TIOSPIR® trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusser D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Dusser,1 Robert A Wise,2 Ronald Dahl,3 Antonio Anzueto,4,5 Kerstine Carter,6 Andy Fowler,7 Peter M Calverley8 1Service de Pneumologie, Hôpital Cochin, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; 2Asthma and Allergy Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark; 4Pulmonary/Critical Care, University of Texas, 5South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX, USA; 6Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Ridgefield, CT, USA; 7Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma Ltd, Bracknell, UK; 8Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK  Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD classification could predict mortality risk factors and whether baseline treatment intensity would relate to mortality within each group, using data from TIOSPIR®, the largest randomized clinical trial in COPD performed to date.Methods: A total of 17,135 patients from TIOSPIR® were pooled and grouped by GOLD grading (A–D according to baseline Medical Research Council breathlessness score, exacerbation history, and spirometry. All-cause mortality and adjudicated cardiovascular (CV and respiratory mortality were assessed.Results: Of the 16,326 patients classified, 1,248 died on treatment. Group B patients received proportionally more CV treatment at baseline. CV mortality risk, but not all-cause mortality risk, was significantly higher in Group B than Group C patients (CV mortality – hazard ratio [HR] =1.74, P=0.004; all-cause mortality – HR =1.18, P=0.11. Group D patients had a higher incidence of all-cause mortality than Group B patients (10.9% vs 6.6%. Similar trends were observed regardless of respiratory or CV medication at baseline. In contrast, respiratory deaths increased consistently from Groups A–D (0.3%, 0.8%, 1.6%, and 4.2% of

  18. A Comparison of Request Process and Outcomes in Donation After Cardiac Death and Donation After Brain Death: Results From a National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminoff, L A; Alolod, G P; Wilson-Genderson, M; Yuen, E Y N; Traino, H M

    2016-10-18

    Available literature points to healthcare providers' discomfort with donation after cardiac death (DCD) and their perception of public reluctance toward the procedure. Using a national sample, we report on the communication content of actual DCD and donation after brain death (DBD) approaches by organ procurement organization (OPO) requesters and compare family decision makers' (FDMs') experiences of both modalities. We recruited 1601 FDMs using a validated protocol; 347 (21.7%) were of potential DCD donors. Semistructured telephone interviews yielded FDMs' sociodemographic data, donation attitudes, assessment of approach, final outcomes, and substantiating reasons. Initial analysis consisted of bivariate analyses. Multilevel mixture models compared groups representing authorization outcome and DCD/DBD status. No significant differences in family authorization were found between DCD and DBD cases. Statistically significant associations were found between sociodemographic characteristics and authorization, with white FDMs more likely to authorize DCD or DBD than black FDMs. FDMs of both modalities had similar evaluations of requester skills, topics discussed, satisfaction, and refusal reasons. The findings suggest that the DCD/DBD distinction may not be notable to families. We recommend the use of similar approach strategies and communication skills and the development of education campaigns about the public's acceptance of DCD.

  19. Mild therapeutic hypothermia in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A Villablanca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH for survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. However, there is little literature demonstrating a survival benefit. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs assessing the efficacy of MTH in patients successfully resuscitated from OHCA. Materials and Methods: Electronic databases were searched for RCT involving MTH in survivors of OHCA, and the results were put through a meta-analysis. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality, and the secondary endpoint was favorable neurological function. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were computed using the Mantel-Haenszel method. A fixed-effect model was used and, if heterogeneity (I2 was >40, effects were analyzed using a random model. Results: Six RCT (n = 1400 patients were included. Overall survival was 50.7%, and favorable neurological recovery was 45.5%. Pooled data demonstrated no significant all-cause mortality (OR, 0.81; 95% CI 0.55-1.21 or neurological recovery (OR, 0.77; 95% CI 0.47-1.24. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated that MTH did not confer benefit on overall survival rate and neurological recovery in patients resuscitated from OHCA.

  20. Cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure: insights from the warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction (WARCEF trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Graham

    Full Text Available We sought to determine whether cognitive function in stable outpatients with heart failure (HF is affected by HF severity. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 2, 043 outpatients with systolic HF and without prior stroke enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF Trial. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cognitive function measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE and markers of HF severity (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class, and 6-minute walk distance. The mean (SD for the MMSE was 28.6 (2.0, with 64 (3.1% of the 2,043 patients meeting the cut-off of MMSE <24 that indicates need for further evaluation of cognitive impairment. After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, 6-minute walk distance (β-coefficient 0.002, p<0.0001, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was independently associated with the MMSE as a continuous measure. Age, education, smoking status, body mass index, and hemoglobin level were also independently associated with the MMSE. In conclusion, six-minute walk distance, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was an important predictor of cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure.

  1. Cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure: insights from the warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction (WARCEF) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Susan; Ye, Siqin; Qian, Min; Sanford, Alexandra R; Di Tullio, Marco R; Sacco, Ralph L; Mann, Douglas L; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M; Freudenberger, Ronald S; Teerlink, John R; Mohr, J P; Labovitz, Arthur J; Lip, Gregory Y H; Estol, Conrado J; Lok, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; Thompson, John L P; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether cognitive function in stable outpatients with heart failure (HF) is affected by HF severity. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 2, 043 outpatients with systolic HF and without prior stroke enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) Trial. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cognitive function measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and markers of HF severity (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class, and 6-minute walk distance). The mean (SD) for the MMSE was 28.6 (2.0), with 64 (3.1%) of the 2,043 patients meeting the cut-off of MMSE <24 that indicates need for further evaluation of cognitive impairment. After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, 6-minute walk distance (β-coefficient 0.002, p<0.0001), but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was independently associated with the MMSE as a continuous measure. Age, education, smoking status, body mass index, and hemoglobin level were also independently associated with the MMSE. In conclusion, six-minute walk distance, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was an important predictor of cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure.

  2. [Primary and secondary outcomes in oncology clinical trials: definitions and uses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Carneiro, António; Luz, Ricardo; Borges, Margarida; Costa, João

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A prova de eficácia de uma intervenção terapêutica em oncologia consegue-se através de ensaios clínicos rigorosamente conduzidos. Um dos factores metodológicos mais importantes é a selecção de indicadores clínicos de eficácia (outcomes), necessários ao cálculo das chamadas medidas de associação que permitem a definição de eficácia terapêutica. Material e Métodos: Foi feita uma revisão narrativa baseada em alguns dos documentos de agências reguladoras internacionais, assim como documentos de consenso entre as sociedades científicas oncológicas, procurando listar e avaliar criticamente cada um dos indicadores utilizados em ensaios clínicos oncológicos. Resultados: Identificaram-se como indicadores mais importantes a sobrevivência global, a sobrevivência livre de progressão/sobrevivência livre de doença, a toxicidade/qualidade de vida e taxa objectiva de resposta tumoral. Discussão: A selecção do outcome primário deve basear-se no conceito de eficácia terapêutica, mas também na toxicidade relativa da terapêutica experimental, na sobrevivência esperada após progressão da doença, na existência de fármacos alternativos já estudados com indicações idênticas e até a prevalência da patologia em causa. Conclusão: A selecção de indicadores em ensaios clínicos oncológicos reveste-se de especial importância e a sua selecção deve ser bem fundamentada, dependendo da doença, dos doentes e do fármaco em estudo.

  3. Association of intervention outcomes with practice capacity for change: Subgroup analysis from a group randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weyer Sharon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between health care practices' capacity for change and the results and sustainability of interventions to improve health care delivery is unclear. Methods In the setting of an intervention to increase preventive service delivery (PSD, we assessed practice capacity for change by rating motivation to change and instrumental ability to change on a one to four scale. After combining these ratings into a single score, random effects models tested its association with change in PSD rates from baseline to immediately after intervention completion and 12 months later. Results Our measure of practices' capacity for change varied widely at baseline (range 2–8; mean 4.8 ± 1.6. Practices with greater capacity for change delivered preventive services to eligible patients at higher rates after completion of the intervention (2.7% per unit increase in the combined effort score, p Conclusion Greater capacity for change is associated with a higher probability that a practice will attain and sustain desired outcomes. Future work to refine measures of this practice characteristic may be useful in planning and implementing interventions that result in sustained, evidence-based improvements in health care delivery.

  4. A randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness of premarital intervention: moderators of divorce outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, Howard J; Rhoades, Galena K; Stanley, Scott M; Peterson, Kristina M

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the effects of premarital relationship intervention on divorce during the first 8 years of first marriage. Religious organizations were randomly assigned to have couples marrying through them complete the Prevention and Relationship Education Program (PREP) or their naturally occurring premarital services. Results indicated no differences in overall divorce rates between naturally occurring services (n = 44), PREP delivered by clergy at religious organizations (n = 66), or PREP delivered by professionals at a university (n = 83). Three moderators were also tested. Measured premaritally and before intervention, the level of negativity of couples' interactions moderated effects. Specifically, couples observed to have higher levels of negative communication in a video task were more likely to divorce if they received PREP than if they received naturally occurring services; couples with lower levels of premarital negative communication were more likely to remain married if they received PREP. A history of physical aggression in the current relationship before marriage and before intervention showed a similar pattern as a moderator, but the effect was only marginally significant. Family-of-origin background (parental divorce and/or aggression) was not a significant moderator of prevention effects across the two kinds of services. Implications for defining risk, considering divorce as a positive versus negative outcome, the practice of premarital relationship education, and social policy are discussed.

  5. The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of cardiac surgery patients: a prospective nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaar, Alexander P J; Hofstra, Jorrit J; Determann, Rogier M; Veelo, Denise P; Paulus, Frederique; Kulik, Wim; Korevaar, Johanna; de Mol, Bas A; Koopman, Marianne M W; Porcelijn, Leendert; Binnekade, Jan M; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2011-04-21

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both antibodies and bioactive lipids that have accumulated during storage of blood have been implicated in TRALI pathogenesis. In a single-center, nested, case-control study, patients were prospectively observed for onset of TRALI according to the consensus definition. Of 668 patients, 16 patients (2.4%) developed TRALI. Patient-related risk factors for onset of TRALI were age and time on the cardiopulmonary bypass. Transfusion-related risk factors were total amount of blood products (odds ratio [OR] = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.44), number of red blood cells stored more than 14 days (OR = 1.6; 95% CI, 1.04-2.37), total amount of plasma (OR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.03-1.44), presence of antibodies in donor plasma (OR = 8.8; 95% CI, 1.8-44), and total amount of transfused bioactive lipids (OR = 1.0; 95% CI, 1.00-1.07). When adjusted for patient risk factors, only the presence of antibodies in the associated blood products remained a risk factor for TRALI (OR = 14.2; 95% CI, 1.5-132). In-hospital mortality of TRALI was 13% compared with 0% and 3% in transfused and nontransfused patients, respectively (P < .05). In conclusion, the incidence of TRALI is high in cardiac surgery patients and associated with adverse outcome. Our results suggest that cardiac surgery patients may benefit from exclusion of blood products containing HLA/HNA antibodies.

  6. Relationship between angina pectoris and outcomes in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction : an analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badar, Athar A.; Perez-Moreno, Ana Cristina; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Wong, Chih M.; Hawkins, Nathaniel M.; Cleland, John G. F.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Wikstrand, John; Kjekshus, John; Wedel, Hans; Watkins, Stuart; Gardner, Roy S.; Petrie, Mark C.; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Angina pectoris is common in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) but its relationship with outcomes has not been well defined. This relationship was investigated further in a retrospective analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure

  7. Community-Dwelling Patients With Dementia and Their Informal Caregivers With and Without Case Management : 2-Year Outcomes of a Pragmatic Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroomen, Janet MacNeil; Bosmans, Judith E.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Joling, Karlijn J.; van Mierlo, Lisa D.; Meiland, Franka J. M.; van Charante, Eric P. Moll; van Hout, Hein P. J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate outcomes for persons with dementia and primary informal caregivers of 2 types of implemented case management (intensive case management [ICMM] and linkage [LM] models) with no case management (control group). Design: A pragmatic trial using a prospective, observational, contro

  8. "Hitting" voices of schizophrenia patients may lastingly reduce persistent auditory hallucinations and their burden : 18-month outcome of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, JA; Nienhuis, FJ; van de Willige, G; Wiersma, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the outcome of an 18-month randomized controlled trial (RCT) on subjective burden and psychopathology of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Method: An RCT was used to compare hallucination-focused integrative treatment (HIT) and routine treatment (RT) i

  9. The effect of the Term Breech Trial on medical intervention behaviour and neonatal outcome in The Netherlands : an analysis of 35,453 term breech infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietberg, CCT; Elferink-Stinkens, PM; Visser, GHA

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of the Term Breech Trial on the medical behaviour of Dutch obstetricians and on neonatal outcomes. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting The Netherlands. Population Infants born at term in breech presentation in the Netherlands between 1998 and 2002, with

  10. The Coping with Depression course : Short-term outcomes and mediating effects of a randomized controlled trial in the treatment of subclinical depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allart-van Dam, E; Hosman, CMH; Hoogduin, CAL; Schaap, CPDR

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on a randomized controlled trial investigating the short-term effectiveness of the Coping With Depression course in a sample of adults seriously at risk of developing major depression. In addition, possible mediating properties of several proximal outcome variables were assessed

  11. A randomised trial of a 5 week, manual based, self-management programme for hypertension delivered in a cardiac patient club in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Shanghai there are 1.2 million people with hypertension, many of whom have difficulty in affording medical treatment. Community based, anti-hypertensive clubs have been created to provide health education but education alone is often ineffective. Lifestyle change programmes have shown some potential for reducing blood pressure but in previous trials have required specialist staff and extensive contact. We have previously demonstrated that self-management programmes delivered by health professionals, such as a nurse who has had short training in self-management techniques can change health behaviour and reduce symptoms. This study was designed to evaluate the benefits of a simple, cognitive-behavioural, self-management programme for hypertension based around a hypertension manual and delivered in the setting of a community anti-hypertensive club in Shanghai. Method The method was a pragmatic randomised controlled trial with an intention-to-treat analysis. Adult patients with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension, waiting to join a neighbourhood anti-hypertension club, were randomised to the self-management programme or to an information only control procedure. They attended the group treatment sessions on 4 occasions over 5 weeks for education combined with goal setting for lifestyle change and an introduction to exercise. The main outcome measures were: changes in blood pressure; blood total cholesterol; diet; activity level and health related quality of life 1 month and 4 months after the end of treatment. Results A total of 140 adults with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension took part. All of the main outcomes showed beneficial changes. Four months after the end of treatment the mean blood pressure differences between groups were systolic 10.15 mm Hg (P Conclusion Patients with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension attending a 5 week, group and manual based, cognitive-behavioural self-management programme, delivered

  12. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart) across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vibeke Brogaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM). DESIGN: A one-year follow-up study. SETTING: A CR programme (Go......%). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)) were assessed at admission (phase IIa), at three months at discharge (phase IIb) and at one-year follow-up (phase III). Intention.......01), self-care management (p 

  13. Bristol Girls Dance Project Feasibility Trial: outcome and process evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jago Russell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adolescent girls do not engage in sufficient physical activity (PA. This study examined the feasibility of conducting a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate an after-school dance program to increase PA among 11–12 year old girls in Bristol, UK. Methods Three-arm, cluster RCT. Three secondary schools were assigned to intervention arm. Intervention participants received a 9-week dance program with 2, 90-minute dance classes per week. Participants at 2 control schools received incentives for data collection. Participants at 2 additional control schools received incentives and a delayed dance workshop. Accelerometer data were collected at baseline (time 0, during the last week of the dance program (time 1 and 20 weeks after the start of the study (time 2. Weekly attendance, enjoyment and perceived exertion were assessed in intervention participants. Post-study qualitative work was conducted with intervention participants and personnel. Results 40.1% of girls provided consent to be in the study. The mean number of girls attending at least one dance session per week ranged from 15.4 to 25.9. There was greater number of participants for whom accelerometer data were collected in control arms. The mean attendance was 13.3 sessions (maximum = 18. Perceived exertion ratings indicated that the girls did not find the sessions challenging. The dance teachers reported that the program content would benefit from revisions including less creative task time, a broader range of dance genres and improved behavioral management policies. At time 2, the 95% confidence intervals suggest between 5 and 12 minutes more weekday MVPA in the intervention group compared with the control incentives only group, and between 6 minutes fewer and 1 minute more compared with the control incentives plus workshop group. Between 14 and 24 schools would be required to detect a difference of 10 minutes in mean weekday MVPA between

  14. Influence of Baseline Characteristics, Operative Conduct and Postoperative Course on 30-day Outcomes of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting among Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Results from the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Krzysztof; Stevens, Susanna R.; Jones, Robert H.; Selzman, Craig H.; Lamy, Andre; Beaver, Thomas M.; Djokovic, Ljubomir T.; Wang, Nan; Velazquez, Eric J.; Sopko, George; Kron, Irving L.; DiMaio, J. Michael; Michler, Robert E.; Lee, Kerry L.; Yii, Michael; Leng, Chua Yeow; Zembala, Marian; Rouleau, Jean L.; Daly, Richard C.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, ischemic heart failure and coronary artery disease (CAD) suitable for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are at higher risk for surgical morbidity and mortality. Paradoxically, those patients with the most severe coronary artery disease and ventricular dysfunction who derive the greatest clinical benefit from CABG are also at the greatest operative risk, which makes decision-making regarding whether to proceed to surgery difficult in such patients. To better inform such decision-making, we analyzed the STICH CABG population for detailed information on perioperative risk and outcomes. Methods and Results In both STICH trials (hypotheses), 2136 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 35% and coronary artery disease were allocated to medical therapy, CABG plus medical therapy or CABG with surgical ventricular reconstruction (SVR). Relationships of baseline characteristics and operative conduct with morbidity and mortality at 30 days were evaluated. There were a total of 1460 patients who received surgery, and 346 of them (roughly, one-quarter) of these high-risk patients developed a severe complication within 30 days. Worsening renal insufficiency, cardiac arrest with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and ventricular arrhythmias were the most frequent complications and those most commonly associated with death. Mortality at 30 days was 5.1% and was generally preceded by a serious complication (65 of 74 deaths). LV size, renal dysfunction, advanced age, and atrial fibrillation/flutter were significant preoperative predictors of mortality within 30 days. Cardiopulmonary bypass time was the only independent surgical variable predictive of 30-day mortality. Conclusions CABG can be performed with relatively low 30-day mortality in patients with LV dysfunction. Serious postoperative complications occurred in nearly 1 in 4 patients and were associated with mortality. Clinical Trial

  15. Impact of presenting rhythm on short- and long-term neurological outcome in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terman, Samuel W; Hume, Benjamin; Meurer, William J; Silbergleit, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare short- and long-term neurological outcomes in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) presenting with non-shockable (nSR) versus shockable (SR) initial rhythms. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting ED and ICU of an academic hospital. Patients One hundred twenty-three consecutive post-OHCA adults (57 nSR, 67 SR) treated with therapeutic hypothermia between 2006 and 2012. Measurements and Main Results Data were collected from electronic health records. Neurological outcomes were dichotomized by Cerebral Performance Category at discharge and 6-12 month follow-up and analyzed via multivariable logistic regressions. Groups were similar, except nSR patients were more likely to have a history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.01), be dialysis-dependent (p = 0.01), and not have bystander CPR (p = 0.05). At discharge, 3/57 (5%) patients with nSR versus 28/66 (42%) with SR had a favorable outcome (unadjusted OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02-0.3; adjusted OR 0.1, 95% CI 0.03-0. 4). At follow-up, 4/55 (7%) versus 29/60 (48%) of patients with nSR and SR respectively had a favorable CPC (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.03-0.3; adjusted OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.09-0.3). Among those surviving hospitalization, neurological outcome was more likely at long-term follow-up than at hospital discharge for both groups (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.7; adjusted 2.9, 1.4-6.2). No significant interaction between changes in neurological status over time and presenting rhythm was seen (p=0.93). Conclusions These data indicate an association between initial nSR and significantly worse short- and long-term outcomes in patients treated with MTH. Among survivors, neurological status significantly improved over time for all patients and SR patients, and tended to improve over time for the small number of nSR patients who survived beyond hospitalization. No significant interaction between changes in neurological status over time and presenting rhythm

  16. Randomized noninferiority clinical trial evaluating 3 commercial dry cow mastitis preparations: I. Quarter-level outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, A G; Godden, S; Rapnicki, P; Gorden, P; Timms, L; Aly, S S; Lehenbauer, T W; Champagne, J

    2013-07-01

    The study objective was to compare the efficacy of 3 commercial dry cow mastitis formulations regarding quarter-level prevalence of intramammary infections (IMI) postcalving, cure of preexisting infections over the dry period, prevention of new infections during the dry period, and risk for a clinical mastitis case between calving and 100d in milk (DIM). A total of 1,091 cows (4,364 quarters) from 6 commercial dairy herds in 4 different states (California, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) were enrolled and randomized to 1 of the 3 treatments at dry-off: Quartermaster (QT; 1,000,000 IU of procaine penicillin G and 1 g of dihydrostreptomycin; Pfizer Animal Health, New York, NY), Spectramast DC (SP; 500 mg of ceftiofur hydrochloride; Pfizer Animal Health), or ToMorrow Dry Cow (TM; 300mg of cephapirin benzathine; Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., St. Joseph, MO). Quarter milk samples were collected for routine bacteriological culture before dry cow therapy treatment at dry-off, 0 to 6 DIM, and 7 to 13 DIM and an on-farm record-keeping system was used to retrieve data on clinical mastitis cases. Noninferiority analysis was used to evaluate the effect of treatment on the primary outcome, risk for a bacteriological cure during the dry period. Multivariable logistic regression techniques were used to describe the effect of treatment on risk for presence of IMI postcalving and risk of a new IMI during the dry period. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to describe the effect of treatment on the risk and time for quarters to experience an episode of clinical mastitis between calving and 100 DIM. The overall crude quarter-level prevalence of infection at dry-off was 19.2%. The most common pathogen isolated from milk samples at dry-off was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, followed by Aerococcus spp. and other Streptococcus spp. Noninferiority analysis showed no effect of treatment on risk for a cure between dry-off and calving [least squares means (LSM): QT=93

  17. Uterine Artery Embolization Versus Laparoscopic Uterine Artery Occlusion: The Outcomes of a Prospective, Nonrandomized Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mara, Michal; Kubinova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.kubinova@gmail.com [General Faculty Hospital and 1st Medical Faculty of Charles University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Czech Republic); Maskova, Jana [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Horak, Petr [General Faculty Hospital and 1st Medical Faculty of Charles University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Czech Republic); Belsan, Tomas [Central Military Hospital, Department of Radiology (Czech Republic); Kuzel, David [General Faculty Hospital and 1st Medical Faculty of Charles University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of two different types of occlusive therapy of uterine fibroids. Methods: Women with fibroid(s) unsuitable for laparoscopic myomectomy (LM) were treated with uterine artery embolization (UAE) or laparoscopic uterine artery occlusion (LUAO). Results: Before the procedure, patients treated with UAE (n = 100) had a dominant fibroid greater in size (68 vs. 48 mm) and a mean age lower (33.1 vs. 34.9 years) than surgically treated patients (n = 100). After 6 months, mean shrinkage of fibroid volume was 53 % after UAE and 39 % after LUAO (p = 0.063); 82 % of women after UAE, but only 23 % after LUAO, had complete myoma infarction (p = 0.001). Women treated with UAE had more complications (31 vs. 11 cases, p = 0.006) and greater incidence of hysteroscopically verified intrauterine necrosis (31 vs. 3 %, p = 0.001). Both groups were comparable in markers of ovarian functions and number of nonelective reinterventions. The groups did not differ in pregnancy (69 % after UAE vs. 67 % after LUAO), delivery (50 vs. 46 %), or abortion (34 vs. 33 %) rates. The mean birth weight of neonates was greater (3270 vs. 2768 g, p = 0.013) and the incidence of intrauterine growth restriction lower (13 vs. 38 %, p = 0.046) in post-UAE patients. Conclusion: Both methods are effective in the treatment of women with future reproductive plans and fibroids not suitable for LM. UAE is more effective in causing complete ischemia of fibroids, but it is associated with greater risk of intrauterine necrosis. Both methods have low rate of serious complications (except for a high abortion rate).

  18. Breast MRI in nonpalpable breast lesions: a randomized trial with diagnostic and therapeutic outcome – MONET – study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nicky HGM; Borel Rinkes, Inne HM; Mali, Willem PTM; van den Bosch, Maurice AAJ; Storm, Remmert K; Plaisier, Peter W; de Boer, Erwin; van Overbeeke, Adriaan J; Peeters, Petra HM

    2007-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an increasing interest in MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic modality for the work-up of suspicious breast lesions. The additional value of Breast MRI lies mainly in its capacity to detect multicentric and multifocal disease, to detect invasive components in ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and to depict the tumor in a 3-dimensional image. Breast MRI therefore has the potential to improve the diagnosis and provide better preoperative staging and possibly surgical care in patients with breast cancer. The aim of our study is to assess whether performing contrast enhanced Breast MRI can reduce the number of surgical procedures due to better preoperative staging and whether a subgroup of women with suspicious nonpalpable breast lesions can be identified in which the combination of mammography, ultrasound and state-of-the-art contrast-enhanced Breast MRI can provide a definite diagnosis. Methods/Design The MONET – study (MR mammography Of Nonpalpable BrEast Tumors) is a randomized controlled trial with diagnostic and therapeutic endpoints. We aim to include 500 patients with nonpalpable suspicious breast lesions who are referred for biopsy. With this number of patients, the expected 12% reduction in surgical procedures due to more accurate preoperative staging with Breast MRI can be detected with a high power (90%). The secondary outcome is the positive and negative predictive value of contrast enhanced Breast MRI. If the predictive values are deemed sufficiently close to those for large core biopsy then the latter, invasive, procedure could possibly be avoided in some women. The rationale, study design and the baseline characteristics of the first 100 included patients are described. Trial registration Study protocol number NCT00302120 PMID:18045470

  19. Breast MRI in nonpalpable breast lesions: a randomized trial with diagnostic and therapeutic outcome – MONET – study

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    de Boer Erwin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years there has been an increasing interest in MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic modality for the work-up of suspicious breast lesions. The additional value of Breast MRI lies mainly in its capacity to detect multicentric and multifocal disease, to detect invasive components in ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and to depict the tumor in a 3-dimensional image. Breast MRI therefore has the potential to improve the diagnosis and provide better preoperative staging and possibly surgical care in patients with breast cancer. The aim of our study is to assess whether performing contrast enhanced Breast MRI can reduce the number of surgical procedures due to better preoperative staging and whether a subgroup of women with suspicious nonpalpable breast lesions can be identified in which the combination of mammography, ultrasound and state-of-the-art contrast-enhanced Breast MRI can provide a definite diagnosis. Methods/Design The MONET – study (MR mammography Of Nonpalpable BrEast Tumors is a randomized controlled trial with diagnostic and therapeutic endpoints. We aim to include 500 patients with nonpalpable suspicious breast lesions who are referred for biopsy. With this number of patients, the expected 12% reduction in surgical procedures due to more accurate preoperative staging with Breast MRI can be detected with a high power (90%. The secondary outcome is the positive and negative predictive value of contrast enhanced Breast MRI. If the predictive values are deemed sufficiently close to those for large core biopsy then the latter, invasive, procedure could possibly be avoided in some women. The rationale, study design and the baseline characteristics of the first 100 included patients are described. Trial registration Study protocol number NCT00302120

  20. Tofacitinib versus methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis: patient-reported outcomes from the randomised phase III ORAL Start trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Lee, Eun Bong; Fleischmann, Roy; Koncz, Tamas; Zwillich, Samuel H; Gruben, David; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Wallenstein, Gene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in methotrexate (MTX)-naive patients (defined as no prior treatment or ≤3 doses) receiving tofacitinib versus MTX. Methods In the 24-month, phase III, randomised, controlled, ORAL Start trial (NCT01039688), patients were randomised 2:2:1 to receive tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day (n=373), tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day (n=397) or MTX (n=186). PROs assessed included Patient Global Assessment of disease (PtGA), pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) and health-related quality of life (Short Form-36 [SF-36]). Results PROs improved following tofacitinib and MTX treatment: benefits were sustained over 24 months. Patients receiving tofacitinib reported earlier responses which were significantly different between each tofacitinib dose and MTX at month 3 through month 24. At month 6 (primary end point), significant improvements versus MTX were observed in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS), 5/8 domain scores and FACIT-F with tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day; all PROs, except SF-36 Mental Component Summary Score and Medical Outcomes Survey-Sleep, with tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day. At month 6, the proportion of patients reporting improvements ≥minimum clinically important difference were significant versus MTX with tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day in PtGA and 3/8 SF-36 domains; and with tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, SF-36 PCS, 4/8 domains and FACIT-F. Conclusions Patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg two times per day monotherapy versus MTX reported statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in multiple PROs over 24 months; onset of benefit with tofacitinib treatment occurred earlier. Trial registration number NCT01039688.

  1. Effect of Behavior Modification on Outcome in Early- to Moderate-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: A Cluster-Randomized Trial.

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    Kunihiro Yamagata

    Full Text Available Owing to recent changes in our understanding of the underlying cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD, the importance of lifestyle modification for preventing the progression of kidney dysfunction and complications has become obvious. In addition, effective cooperation between general physicians (GPs and nephrologists is essential to ensure a better care system for CKD treatment. In this cluster-randomized study, we studied the effect of behavior modification on the outcome of early- to moderate-stage CKD.Stratified open cluster-randomized trial.A total of 489 GPs belonging to 49 local medical associations (clusters in Japan.A total of 2,379 patients (1,195 in group A (standard intervention and 1,184 in group B (advanced intervention aged between 40 and 74 years, who had CKD and were under consultation with GPs.All patients were managed in accordance with the current CKD guidelines. The group B clusters received three additional interventions: patients received both educational intervention for lifestyle modification and a CKD status letter, attempting to prevent their withdrawal from treatment, and the group B GPs received data sheets to facilitate reducing the gap between target and practice.The primary outcome measures were 1 the non-adherence rate of accepting continuous medical follow-up of the patients, 2 the collaboration rate between GPs and nephrologists, and 3 the progression of CKD.The rate of discontinuous clinical visits was significantly lower in group B (16.2% in group A vs. 11.5% in group B, p = 0.01. Significantly higher referral and co-treatment rates were observed in group B (p<0.01. The average eGFR deterioration rate tended to be lower in group B (group A: 2.6±5.8 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, group B: 2.4±5.1 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, p = 0.07. A significant difference in eGFR deterioration rate was observed in subjects with Stage 3 CKD (group A: 2.4±5.9 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, group B: 1.9±4.4 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, p = 0.03.Our care

  2. FFCD-1004 Clinical Trial: Impact of Cytidine Deaminase Activity on Clinical Outcome in Gemcitabine-Monotherapy Treated Patients.

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    Cindy Serdjebi

    Full Text Available Because cytidine deaminase (CDA is the key enzyme in gemcitabine metabolism, numerous studies have attempted to investigate impact of CDA status (i.e. genotype or phenotype on clinical outcome. To date, data are still controversial because none of these studies has fully investigated genotype-phenotype CDA status, pharmacokinetics and clinical outcome relationships in gemcitabine-treated patients. Besides, most patients were treated with gemcitabine associated with other drugs, thus adding a confounding factor. We performed a multicenter prospective clinical trial in gemcitabine-treated patients which aimed at investigating the link between CDA deficiency on the occurrence of severe toxicities and on pharmacokinetics, and studying CDA genotype-phenotype relationships.One hundred twenty patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma eligible for adjuvant gemcitabine monotherapy were enrolled in this study promoted and managed by the Fédération Francophone de Cancérologie Digestive. Toxicities were graded according to National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4. They were considered severe for grade ≥ 3, and early when occurring during the first eight weeks of treatment. CDA status was evaluated using a double approach: genotyping for 79A>C and functional testing. Therapeutic drug monitoring of gemcitabine and its metabolite were performed on the first course of gemcitabine.Five patients out of 120 (i.e., 4.6% were found to be CDA deficient (i.e., CDA activity <1.3 U/mg, and only one among them experienced early severe hematological toxicity. There was no statistically significant difference in CDA activity between patients experiencing hematological severe toxicities (28.44% and patients who tolerated the treatment (71.56%. CDA genetic analysis failed in evidencing an impact in terms of toxicities or in CDA activity. Regarding pharmacokinetics, a wide inter-individual variability has been observed

  3. NORMOTHERMIC EXTRACORPOREAL PERFUSION IN SITU IN DECEASED ORGAN DONORS WITH IRREVERSIBLE CARDIAC ARREST AND ONE HOUR OF ASYSTOLE. 5-YEAR OUTCOMES OF KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

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    A. E. Skvortsov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The global shortage of deceased organ donors caused increasing interest to the transplant program based on the use of organs from the donors with sudden irreversible cardiac arrest, or asystolic donors (DCD. Ischemia-reperfusion injury as a result of cardiac arrest remains a key problem that limits the use of organs from DCD. Our clinical study was intended to determine the acceptability of renal transplants derived from the DCD using extracorporeal perfusion in situ after 60 minutes of asystole. Materials and methods. In 2009–2014, St. Petersburg Organ Procurement Organization (OPO obtained kidneys from 29 DCD with critically expanded warm ischemic time (WIT. The design of this study was approved by the Scientifi c Board and Ethics Committee of the State Research Institute for Emergency Medicine (Decision 7/0615/09. Initially, no one of died patients was considered as potential organ donors. In case of failed advanced CPR the death of a patient was declared initiating the protocol of subnormothermic extracorporeal abdominal perfusion with ECMO, thrombolytics (strepokinase 1.5 mln U, and LD. The procedures were established by the authorized OPO team which arrived with perfusion equipment in 30–40 minutes after declaration of donors’ death. Mean WIT was 58.1 (19.39 minutes (Mean (SD. Resuscitated grafts were transplanted into 58 recipients. The outcomes of transplantation of resuscitated kidneys were compared to those of 112 KTx from 115 brain death donors (BDDs. Results. Immediate functioning of kidney grafts was observed in 28 (48.3% of 58 recipients. There were 4 cases of primary graft non-function. By the end of the fi rst post-transplant year there was an acute rejection rate of 12.1% (9 episodes of rejection in the DCD group vs. 23.2% (26 episodes of rejection in the BDD group (p < 0.05. The actuarial 5-year graft survival rate was 82.8% (n = 48 in DCD group, and 87.5% (n = 98 in BDD group (p > 0.05. Creatinine levels at the end

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: What is the Appropriate Patient-Reported Outcome for Clinical Trial Design?

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    Jennifer Ai-Lian Woo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is increasingly utilized as primary treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. Consensus regarding the appropriate patient-reported outcome (PRO endpoints for clinical trials for early stage prostate cancer RT is lacking. To aid in trial design, this study presents PROs over 36 months following SBRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods: 174 hormone-naïve patients were treated with 35-36.25 Gy SBRT in 5 fractions. Patients completed the EPIC-26 questionnaire at baseline and all follow-ups; the proportion of patients developing a clinically significant decline in each EPIC domain was determined. The minimally important difference (MID was defined as a change of one-half SD from the baseline. Per RTOG 0938, we examined the percentage of patients who reported decline in EPIC urinary summary score of >2 points and EPIC bowel summary score of >5 points from baseline to one year. Results: 174 patients received SBRT with minimum follow-up of 36 months. The proportion of patients reporting a clinically significant decline in EPIC urinary/bowel scores was 34%/30%, 40%/32.2%, and 32.8%/21.5% at 6, 12, and 36 months. The percentage of patients reporting decline in the EPIC urinary summary score of >2 points was 43.2%, 51.6% and 41.8% at 6, 12, and 36 months. The percentage of patients reporting decline in EPIC bowel domain summary score of >5 points was 29.6% 29% and 22.4% at 6, 12, and 36 months. Conclusion: Our treatment protocol meets the RTOG 0938 criteria for advancing to a Phase III trial compared to conventionally fractionated RT. Between 12-36 months, the proportion of patients reporting decrease in both EPIC urinary and bowel scores declined, suggesting late improvement in these domains. Further investigation is needed to elucidate 1 which domains bear the greatest influence on post-treatment QOL, and 2 at what time point PRO endpoint(s should be assessed.

  5. Comparison of glyburide and insulin in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and associated perinatal outcome: a randomized clinical trial.

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    Masoomeh Mirzamoradi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Insulin is currently the drug of choice in treating patients with gestational diabetes mellitus but insulin is expensive, inconvenient to store and use and probably associated with more risks of asymptomatic hypoglycemia in comparison with some oral agents. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of glyburide in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus in comparison with insulin therapy. Pregnant women aged between 18-45 years with singleton pregnancies and in their 24-36 weeks of gestation were assessed for eligibility. Women with gestational diabetes mellitus were randomly allocated to two insulin and glyburide groups and compared with maternal and neonatal outcome. Ninety-six women with gestational diabetes mellitus enrolled in the study. At screen and treated fasting and post-prandial blood glucose levels were similar in both groups. Time for beginning the treatment to control the glycemic index was 28.30 (±20.60 days in the insulin group and 22.56 (±18.86 in the glyburide group. There was no statistically significant difference in time-to-control the blood glucose level in two studied group. Time, between beginning the treatment of GDM and delivery, was 53.22 (±28.96 days in the insulin group and 56.67 (±30.47 in the glyburide group. There was no statistically significant difference between the times of treatment-to-delivery in two studied groups. There were no statistically significant differences between maternal and neonatal outcomes in two studied groups. Glyburide can effectively and safely control the glycemic index in women with gestational diabetes mellitus in comparison with insulin.

  6. Associations of high-dose melphalan pharmacokinetics and outcomes in the setting of a randomized cryotherapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yu Kyoung; Sborov, Douglas W; Lamprecht, Misty; Li, Junan; Wang, Jiang; Hade, Erinn M; Gao, Yue; Tackett, Karen; Williams, Nita; Benson, Don M; Efebera, Yvonne A; Rosko, Ashley E; Devine, Steven M; Poi, Ming; Hofmeister, Craig C; Phelps, Mitch A

    2017-02-04

    High dose melphalan followed by autologous stem cell transplantation remains standard of care for eligible patients with multiple myeloma, but disease response and toxicity, including severe mucositis, varies among patients. Our randomized trial investigated duration of cryotherapy (2 and 6 hours) for reduction of mucositis prevalence and severity and explored factors associated with variability in pharmacokinetics and outcomes from melphalan therapy. The results demonstrate 2-hour is at least as effective as 6-hour cryotherapy in decreasing severe mucositis. From a population pharmacokinetic model, we identified fat free mass, hematocrit, and creatinine clearance were significant covariates, as had been reported previously. Furthermore, we observed the rs4240803 SLC7A5 polymorphism was significantly associated with pharmacokinetic variability, and pharmacokinetics was associated with both mucositis and neutropenia. However, melphalan exposure was not associated with progression-free or overall survival in our dataset. These findings contribute to ongoing efforts to personalize melphalan dosing in transplant patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Permanency Outcomes for Toddlers in Child Welfare Two Years After a Randomized Trial of a Parenting Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieker, Susan J; Oxford, Monica L; Fleming, Charles B

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on child welfare outcomes of a community based, randomized control trial of Promoting First Relationships® (PFR; Kelly, Sandoval, Zuckerman, & Buehlman, 2008), a 10-week relationship-based home visiting program, on stability of children's placements and permanency status two years after enrollment into the study. Toddlers 10 - 24 months (N = 210) with a recent placement disruption were randomized, along with their birth or foster/kin parents, to PFR (n = 105) or a comparison condition (n = 105). A stable placement had no interruptions or disruptions. A permanent placement was a stable placement ending with a legal discharge to the study caregiver. Logistic regression models predicting the dichotomous stability and permanency variables, controlling for caregiver type, child welfare variables, and caregiver commitment, were conducted. There was no difference by intervention group on stability or permanency, but there was a significant interaction between caregiver type (birth parent vs. foster/kin) and intervention group. More foster/kin caregivers who received the PFR intervention provided stable, uninterrupted care and eventually adopted or became the legal guardians of the toddlers in their care, compared to foster/kin caregivers randomized to the comparison condition.

  8. The outcome of control groups in clinical trials of conservative treatments for chronic mechanical neck pain: a systematic review

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    Hagino Carol

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is highly prevalent in Western societies, with about 15% of females and 10% of males suffering with it at any time. The course of untreated chronic neck pain patients in clinical trials has not been well-defined and the placebo effect has not been clarified. Methods A systematic review of RCT's of conservative treatments for chronic mechanical neck pain was conducted. Studies were excluded if they did not include a control group, if they involved subjects with whiplash injuries, a predominance of headache or arm pain associated with chronic neck pain and if only one treatment was reported. Only studies scoring 3–5 out of 5 on the Jadad Scale for quality were included in the final analysis. Data on change in pain scores of subjects in both placebo (PL as well as no-treatment (NT control groups were analyzed. Mean changes in pain scores as well as effect sizes were calculated, summarized and compared between these groups. Results Twenty (20 studies, 5 in the NT group and 15 in the PL group, with outcome intervals ranging from 1–52 weeks were included in the final analysis. The mean [95% CI] effect size of change in pain ratings in the no-treatment control studies at outcome points up to 10 weeks was 0.18 [-0.05, 0.41] and for outcomes from 12–52 weeks it was 0.4 [0.12, 0.68]. In the placebo control groups it was 0.50 [0.10, 0.90] at up to 10 weeks and 0.33. [-1.97, 2.66] at 12–24 weeks. None of the comparisons between the no-treatment and placebo groups were statistically significant. Conclusion It appears that the changes in pain scores in subjects with chronic neck pain not due to whiplash who are enrolled in no-treatment and placebo control groups were similarly small and not significantly different. As well, they do not appear to increase over longer-term follow-up.

  9. Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on angiographic outcomes after drug-eluting stents in patients with de novo long coronary artery lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Young; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Ahn, Jung-Min; Park, Duk-Woo; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Seong-Wook; Yoo, Yeong Sook; Park, Eun-Kyung; Jin, Young-Soo; Kim, Jeongsoon; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Min, Sun-Yang; Park, Seung-Jung

    2014-06-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in coronary artery disease. Long coronary artery lesions may be associated with adverse outcomes after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate angiographic outcomes after a comprehensive CR program in patients with DESs for long coronary artery lesions. A total of 576 patients treated with DESs for long (≥25 mm) coronary lesions were enrolled in this prospective CR registry. Comprehensive CR programs were successfully performed in 288 patients (50%). The primary end point was in-stent late luminal loss at the 9-month angiographic follow-up. There were few significant differences between the CR and non-CR groups in terms of baseline characteristics, including clinical, angiographic, and procedural variables. The rate of in-stent late luminal loss in the CR group was 35% less than in the usual care group (0.19 ± 0.33 mm in CR vs 0.29 ± 0.45 mm in non-CR, difference 0.08 mm, 95% confidence interval 0.01 to 0.16, p = 0.02) at the 9-month follow-up. After propensity-matched analysis (224 pairs), the results were consistent (0.18 ± 0.31 mm in CR vs 0.28 ± 0.41 mm in non-CR, difference 0.10 mm, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.18, p = 0.02). The CR group showed a significant improvement in the overall risk profile compared with the non-CR group, including current smoking, biochemical profiles, depression, obesity, and exercise capacity. In conclusion, the comprehensive CR program significantly reduced late luminal loss after DES implantation for long coronary lesions. This may be associated with significant improvements in exercise capacity and overall risk profile.

  10. Azelnidipine plus olmesartan versus amlodipine plus olmesartan on arterial stiffness and cardiac function in hypertensive patients: a randomized trial

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    Takami T

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available CorrigendumTakami T, Saito Y. Drug Design, Development and Therapy. 2013;7:175–183. On page 177, line 26, heading "Measurement of LVMI and LF diastolic function" should have been "Measurement of LVMI and LV diastolic function". Line 32, "Devereux et al18" should read "Devereux et al19". Line 40, "(E/e’ ratio were measured as previously described.19" should read "(E/e’ ratio were measured as previously described.20". On page 181, line 15, "baPWV with LVMI.20" should read "baPWV with LVMI.21". Line 23, "baPWV and LVMI, E/A ratio.20" should read "baPWV and LVMI, E/A ratio.21,22". Line 28 "diastolic dysfunction.21" should read "diastolic dysfunction.23". Line 38 "is high.22" should read "is high.24". Line 39, "in clinical treatment.23" should read "in clinical treatment.25". Line 57, "A recent cohort study24" should read "A recent cohort study21".On page 182, line 1, "diastolic heart failure.25" should read "diastolic heart failure.26". Line 3, "untreated hypertensive patients.26" should read "untreated hypertensive patients.27". Line 6, "linear regression analysis.27" should read "linear regression analysis.21".On page 183, the references 18 to 27 should be updated as shown below:18. Takami T. Evaluation of arterial stiffness in morning hypertension under high-dose valsartan compared to valsartan plus low-dose diuretic. Hypertens Res. 2009;32:1086–1090.19. Devereux RB, Palmieri V, Sharpe N, et al. Effects of once-daily angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and calcium channel blockade-based antihypertensive treatment regimens on left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic filling in hypertension: the prospective randomized enalapril study evaluating regression of ventricular enlargement (PRESERVE trial. Circulation. 2001;104:1248–1254.20. Ito H, Ishii K, Kihara H, et al. Adding thiazide to a renin-angiotensin blocker improves left ventricular relaxation and improves heart failure in patients with hypertension. Hypertens Res. 2012;35:93

  11. Xenotransplantation of Human Cardiomyocyte Progenitor Cells Does Not Improve Cardiac Function in a Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure. Results from a Randomized, Blinded, Placebo Controlled Trial.

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    Sanne J Jansen of Lorkeers

    Full Text Available Recently cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs were successfully isolated from fetal and adult human hearts. Direct intramyocardial injection of human CMPCs (hCMPCs in experimental mouse models of acute myocardial infarction significantly improved cardiac function compared to controls.Here, our aim was to investigate whether xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of fetal hCMPCs in a pig model of chronic myocardial infarction is safe and efficacious, in view of translation purposes.We performed a randomized, blinded, placebo controlled trial. Four weeks after ischemia/reperfusion injury by 90 minutes of percutaneous left anterior descending artery occlusion, pigs (n = 16, 68.5 ± 5.4 kg received intracoronary infusion of 10 million fetal hCMPCs or placebo. All animals were immunosuppressed by cyclosporin (CsA. Four weeks after infusion, endpoint analysis by MRI displayed no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic and left ventricular end systolic volumes between both groups. Serial pressure volume (PV-loop and echocardiography showed no differences in functional parameters between groups at any timepoint. Infarct size at follow-up, measured by late gadolinium enhancement MRI showed no difference between groups. Intracoronary pressure and flow measurements showed no signs of coronary obstruction 30 minutes after cell infusion. No premature death occurred in cell treated animals.Xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of hCMPCs is feasible and safe, but not associated with improved left ventricular performance and infarct size compared to placebo in a porcine model of chronic myocardial infarction.

  12. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. METHODS: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists......, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression...... with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3-5 until 180 days. RESULTS: Eight TTM sites randomized 202...

  13. Predictors of Ominous Outcome in Infants who Undergo Cardiac Surgery and Cardiopulmonary By-Pass: S100B Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrica, Alessandro; Satriano, Angela; Tettamanti, Guido; Pelissero, Gabriele; Gavilanes, Antonio D W; Zimmermann, Luc J; Vles, Hans J S; Florio, Pasquale; Pluchinotta, Francesca R; Gazzolo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    S100B protein has been recently proposed as a consolidated marker of brain damage and death in adult, children and newborn patients. The present study evaluates whether the longitudinal measurement of S100B at different perioperative time-points may be a useful tool to identify the occurrence of perioperative early death in congenital heart disease (CHD) newborns. We conducted a case-control study in 88 CHD infants, without pre-existing neurological disorders or other co-morbidities, of whom 22 were complicated by perioperative death in the first week from surgery. Control group was composed by 66 uncomplicated CHD infants matched for age at surgical procedure. Blood samples were drawn at five predetermined timepoints before during and after surgery. In all CHD children, S100B levels showed a pattern characterized by a significant increase in protein's concentration from hospital admission up to 24-h after procedure reaching their maximum peak (P<0.01) during cardiopulmonary by-pass and at the end of the surgical procedure. Moreover, S100B concentrations in CHD death group were significantly higher (P<0.01) than controls at all monitoring time-points. The ROC curve analysis showed that S100B measured before surgical procedure was the best predictor of perioperative death, among a series of clinical and laboratory parameters, reaching at a cut-off of 0.1 µg/L a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 63.7%. The present data suggest that in CHD infants biochemical monitoring in the perioperative period is becoming possible and S100B can be included among a series of parameters for adverse outcome prediction.

  14. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  15. Effect of indacaterol on lung deflation improves cardiac performance in hyperinflated COPD patients: an interventional, randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santus P

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pierachille Santus,1,2 Dejan Radovanovic,1,2 Silvia Di Marco,3 Vincenzo Valenti,4,5 Rita Raccanelli,1,2 Francesco Blasi,6,7 Stefano Centanni,8,9 Maurizio Bussotti31Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, 2Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit, Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri Scientific Institute of Milan-IRCCS, 3Cardiological Rehabilitation Unit, Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri Rehabilitation Institute of Milan-IRCCS, 4Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, 5Respiratory Unit, Policlinico San Donato-IRCCS, San Donato Milanese, 6Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, 7IRCCS Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico Cà Granda Milan, 8Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, 9Respiratory Unit, Ospedale San Paolo, Milan, ItalyBackground: COPD is often associated with cardiovascular comorbidity. Treatment guidelines recommend therapy with bronchodilators as first choice. We investigated the acute effect of single-dose indacaterol on lung hyperinflation in COPD subjects, for the first time evaluating the potential effects on right heart performance.Methods: In this Phase IV, randomized, interventional, double-blind, crossover clinical study, we recruited 40 patients (50–85 years of age with stable COPD. Patients were treated with 150 µg indacaterol or placebo and after 60 minutes (T60 and 180 minutes (T180 the following tests were performed: trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE, plethysmography, diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, saturation of peripheral oxygen, and visual analog scale dyspnea score. Patients underwent a crossover re-challenge after a further 72 hours of pharmacological washout. All TTE measurements were conducted blindly by the same operator and further interpreted by two different blinded operators. Consensus decisions were taken on every value and parameter. The primary outcome was the effect of the reduction of residual volume and functional

  16. Systematic evaluation of patient-reported outcome (PRO) protocol content and reporting in UK cancer clinical trials: the EPiC study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khaled; Kyte, Derek; Keeley, Thomas; Efficace, Fabio; Armes, Jo; Brown, Julia M; Calman, Lynn; Copland, Chris; Gavin, Anna; Glaser, Adam; Greenfield, Diana M; Lanceley, Anne; Taylor, Rachel; Velikova, Galina; Brundage, Michael; Mercieca-Bebber, Rebecca; King, Madeleine T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emerging evidence suggests that patient-reported outcome (PRO)-specific information may be omitted in trial protocols and that PRO results are poorly reported, limiting the use of PRO data to inform cancer care. This study aims to evaluate the standards of PRO-specific content in UK cancer trial protocols and their arising publications and to highlight examples of best-practice PRO protocol content and reporting where they occur. The objective of this study is to determine if these early findings are generalisable to UK cancer trials, and if so, how best we can bring about future improvements in clinical trials methodology to enhance the way PROs are assessed, managed and reported. Hypothesis: Trials in which the primary end point is based on a PRO will have more complete PRO protocol and publication components than trials in which PROs are secondary end points. Methods and analysis Completed National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Portfolio Cancer clinical trials (all cancer specialities/age-groups) will be included if they contain a primary/secondary PRO end point. The NIHR portfolio includes cancer trials, supported by a range of funders, adjudged as high-quality clinical research studies. The sample will be drawn from studies completed between 31 December 2000 and 1 March 2014 (n=1141) to allow sufficient time for completion of the final trial report and publication. Two reviewers will then review the protocols and arising publications of included trials to: (1) determine the completeness of their PRO-specific protocol content; (2) determine the proportion and completeness of PRO reporting in UK Cancer trials and (3) model factors associated with PRO protocol and reporting completeness and with PRO reporting proportion. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the ethics committee at University of Birmingham (ERN_15-0311). Trial findings will be disseminated via presentations at local, national and international conferences, peer

  17. Comprehensive analysis of published phase I/II clinical trials between 1990-2010 in osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma confirms limited outcomes and need for translational investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Maldegem Annemiek M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High grade primary bone sarcomas are rare cancers that affect mostly children and young adults. Osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma are the most common histological subtypes in this age group, with current multimodality treatment strategies achieving 55-70% overall survival. As there remains an urgent need to develop new therapeutic interventions, we have reviewed published phase I/II trials that have been reported for osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma in the last twenty years. Results We conducted a literature search for clinical trials between 1990 and 2010, either for trials enrolling bone sarcoma patients as part of a general sarcoma indication or trials specifically in osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. We identified 42 clinical trials that fulfilled our search criteria for general sarcoma that enrolled these patient groups, and eight and twenty specific trials for Ewing and osteosarcoma patients, respectively. For the phase I trials which enrolled different tumour types our results were incomplete, because the sarcoma patients were not mentioned in the PubMed abstract. A total of 3,736 sarcoma patients were included in these trials over this period, 1,114 for osteosarcoma and 1,263 for Ewing sarcoma. As a proportion of the worldwide disease burden over this period, these numbers reflect a very small percentage of the potential patient recruitment, approximately 0.6% for Ewing sarcoma and 0.2% for osteosarcoma. However, these data show an increase in recent activity overall and suggest there is still much room for improvement in the current trial development structures. Conclusion Lack of resources and commercial investment will inevitably limit opportunity to develop sufficiently rapid improvements in clinical outcomes. International collaboration exists in many well founded co-operative groups for phase III trials, but progress may be more effective if there were also more investment of molecular and translational research into

  18. An Interactive Text Message Intervention to Reduce Binge Drinking in Young Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial with 9-Month Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Suffoletto

    Full Text Available Binge drinking is associated with numerous negative consequences. The prevalence and intensity of binge drinking is highest among young adults. This randomized trial tested the efficacy of a 12-week interactive text message intervention to reduce binge drinking up to 6 months after intervention completion among young adults.Young adult participants (18-25 y; n = 765 drinking above the low-risk limits (AUDIT-C score >3/4 women/men, but not seeking alcohol treatment, were enrolled from 4 Emergency Departments (EDs in Pittsburgh, PA. Participants were randomized to one of three conditions in a 2:1:1 allocation ratio: SMS Assessments + Feedback (SA+F, SMS Assessments (SA, or control. For 12 weeks, SA+F participants received texts each Thursday querying weekend drinking plans and prompting drinking limit goal commitment and each Sunday querying weekend drinking quantity. SA+F participants received tailored feedback based on their text responses. To contrast the effects of SA+F with self-monitoring, SA participants received texts on Sundays querying drinking quantity, but did not receive alcohol-specific feedback. The control arm received standard care. Follow-up outcome data collected through web-based surveys were provided by 78% of participants at 3- months, 63% at 6-months and 55% at 9-months. Multiple imputation-derived, intent-to-treat models were used for primary analysis. At 9-months, participants in the SA+F group reported greater reductions in the number of binge drinking days than participants in the control group (incident rate ratio [IRR] 0.69; 95% CI .59 to.79, lower binge drinking prevalence (odds ratio [OR] 0.52; 95% CI 0.26 to 0.98], less drinks per drinking day (beta -.62; 95% CI -1.10 to -0.15 and lower alcohol-related injury prevalence (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.21 to 0.88. Participants in the SA group did not reduce drinking or alcohol-related injury relative to controls. Findings were similar using complete case analyses.An interactive

  19. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Potential Prognostic Implications After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Substudy of the Target Temperature Management Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Whole-body ischemia during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest triggers immediate activation of inflammatory systems leading to a sepsis-like syndrome. The aim was to investigate the association between level of systemic inflammation and mortality in survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac...

  20. Satisfaction With the Outcome of Physical Therapist-Prescribed Exercise in Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardern, Clare L; Peterson, Gunnel; Ludvigsson, Maria Landén; Peolsson, Anneli

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial. Background Patient perception of the benefits gained from treatment is important, yet satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) has not been investigated. Objectives To investigate whether satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic WAD changed over time, and whether there were group differences. Methods Two hundred sixteen people with chronic WAD (66% women; mean age, 40.4 years) participated in a 3-month program of physical therapist-led neck-specific exercises with or without a behavioral approach, or received a prescription of general physical activity. The main outcome was satisfaction with the outcome of treatment, assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months later. Additional outcomes were enablement and expectation fulfillment. Results Satisfaction improved over time in the 3 groups (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.20; Pphysical activity. Enablement increased after completion of the intervention in all groups (Pphysical activity (P<.01). Conclusion Exercise interventions for chronic WAD led to increased satisfaction for 12 months following treatment that was unrelated to the type of exercise intervention received. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Registered January 22, 2012 at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01528579). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):640-649. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6136.

  1. Feedback versus no feedback to improve patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Waaddegaard, Mette; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    Background: A high rate of dropout in the treatment of eating disorders calls for ways to improve treatment attendance. Research indicates that continuous feedback on patient improvement and the therapeutic alliance reduces the number of dropouts and increases patient outcome. There are, however...... of continuous feedback on adherence and outcome in group psychotherapy. Methods/design: The trial is set up in a randomized design for outpatients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or eating disorder not otherwise specified (DSM-IV). They are allocated 1:1 to the experimental group...

  2. Selecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) clinical trials: first report of the MRI in JIA special interest group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemke, Robert; Doria, Andrea S; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Maas, Mario; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have substantially improved the evaluation of joint pathologies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Because of the current availability of highly effective antirheumatic therapies and the unique and useful features of MRI, there is a growing need for an accurate and reproducible MRI assessment scoring system for JIA, such as the rheumatoid arthritis MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To effectively evaluate the efficacy of treatment in clinical research trials, we need to develop and validate scoring methods to accurately measure joint outcomes, standardize imaging protocols for data acquisition and interpretation, and create imaging atlases to differentiate physiologic and pathologic joint findings in childhood and adolescence. Such a standardized, validated, JIA-MRI scoring method could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  3. Five-year outcomes following a randomized trial of femorofemoral and femoropopliteal bypass grafting with heparin-bonded or standard polytetrafluoroethylene grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J S; Houlind, K; Gottschalksen, B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cohort studies suggest superior long-term patency of luminal heparin-bonded polytetrafluoroethylene (Hb-PTFE) bypass grafts compared with standard PTFE grafts. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of Hb-PTFE grafts with those of standard PTFE grafts 5 years after...... a randomized trial. METHODS: Patients with intermittent claudication or critical limb ischaemia requiring femorofemoral or femoropopliteal bypass grafting were randomized in a clinical trial of Hb-PTFE versus standard PTFE in 11 Scandinavian centres between 2005 and 2009. Patients were followed up for 5 years...... of the primary outcome. Use of Hb-PTFE significantly improved patency by 37 per cent at 2 years, but 5 years after randomization there was no difference in primary patency (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0·95, 95 per cent c.i. 0·71 to 1·28; P = 0·748). In patients with critical limb ischaemia the use of Hb-PTFE...

  4. Child Feeding and Parenting Style Outcomes and Composite Score Measurement in the 'Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Randomised Controlled Trial'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncanson, Kerith; Burrows, Tracy L; Collins, Clare E

    2016-11-10

    Child feeding practices and parenting style each have an impact on child dietary intake, but it is unclear whether they influence each other or are amenable to change. The aims of this study were to measure child feeding and parenting styles in the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids (FHFK) Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) and test a composite child feeding score and a composite parenting style score. Child feeding and parenting style data from 146 parent-child dyads (76 boys, aged 2.0-5.9 years) in the FHFK study were collected over a 12-month intervention. Parenting style was measured using parenting questions from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children and the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) was used to measure child feeding practices. Data for both measures were collected at baseline, 3 and 12 months and then modelled to develop a composite child feeding score and a parenting score. Multivariate mixed effects linear regression was used to measure associations between variables over time. All child feeding domains from the CFQ were consistent between baseline and 12 months (p feeding score and parenting style score within the FHFK RCT. In conclusion, composite scores have potential applications in the analysis of relationships between child feeding and dietary or anthropometric data in intervention studies aimed at improving child feeding or parenting style. These applications have the potential to make a substantial contribution to the understanding of child feeding practices and parenting style, in relation to each other and to dietary intake and health outcomes amongst pre-school aged children.

  5. Effects of maternal vitamin B12 supplementation on early infant neurocognitive outcomes: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Thomas, Tinku; Kapanee, Aruna Rose Mary; Ramthal, Asha; Bellinger, David C; Bosch, Ronald J; Kurpad, Anura V; Duggan, Christopher

    2016-06-29

    Maternal nutritional status during pregnancy impacts fetal brain development. Vitamin B12 plays a vital role in neuronal development. However, findings from studies on the association between maternal B12 status and child cognitive functions have been inconsistent. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of oral B12 supplementation (50 µg) beginning at B12 supplementation on cognitive development in infants at 9 months of age on Bayley Scales of Infant Development-III (BSID-III). One hundred eighty-three pregnant women received vitamin B12, and 183 received placebo. Nine-month BSID-III development score was available in 178 infants. There were no significant differences in maternal sociodemographic characteristics and baseline biochemical measures between infants who underwent BSID-III evaluation and infants who were not evaluated. There were no significant differences in any of the subscales of BSID-III between infants born to mothers who received B12 supplementation (n = 78) vs. placebo (n = 100). On multiple regression analysis, elevated maternal total homocysteine (tHcy) levels adjusted for treatment group, birthweight, parity, income and home environment at second trimester of pregnancy were significantly negatively associated with expressive language (β = 3.13 points, P B12 supplementation were seen on cognitive development in infants at 9 months of age, elevated maternal tHcy levels were associated with poorer cognitive performance in some of the subdomains of BSID-III. In pregnant women with elevated tHcy levels and or B12 deficiencies, it may be worthwhile to study the impact of longer term maternal supplementation on infant cognitive outcomes.

  6. Comparison of maternal and fetal outcomes among patients undergoing cesarean section under general and spinal anesthesia: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anıl İçel Saygı

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: As the rates of cesarean births have increased, the type of cesarean anesthesia has gained importance. Here, we aimed to compare the effects of general and spinal anesthesia on maternal and fetal outcomes in term singleton cases undergoing elective cesarean section.DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial in a tertiary-level public hospital.METHODS: Our study was conducted on 100 patients who underwent cesarean section due to elective indications. The patients were randomly divided into general anesthesia (n = 50 and spinal anesthesia (n = 50 groups. The materna