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Sample records for cardiac mitochondrial compromise

  1. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial function. Therefore, this study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in the smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cardiac, skele...

  2. Mitochondrial Protein Dynamics in Cardiac Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac mitochondrial proteome contains ~1,500 distinct proteins that carry out necessary metabolic and energetic processes in the heart. To sustain cardiac function, the mitochondrial proteome must be maintained in constant renewal, or turnover, especially under stress conditions. Disruptions of protein turnover can lead to protein damage and proteotoxicity, a hallmark of many heart disease etiologies. Current quantitative proteomics experiments largely focus on the measurement of the st...

  3. Cardiac hypertrophy in the newborn delays the maturation of fatty acid β-oxidation and compromises postischemic functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tatsujiro; Lam, Victoria H; Zhang, Liyan; Keung, Wendy; Cadete, Virgilio J J; Samokhvalov, Victor; Tanner, Brandon A; Beker, Donna L; Ussher, John R; Huqi, Alda; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Rebeyka, Ivan M; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2012-05-01

    During the neonatal period, cardiac energy metabolism progresses from a fetal glycolytic profile towards one more dependent on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. In this study, we identified the effects of cardiac hypertrophy on neonatal cardiac metabolic maturation and its impact on neonatal postischemic functional recovery. Seven-day-old rabbits were subjected to either a sham or a surgical procedure to induce a left-to-right shunt via an aortocaval fistula to cause RV volume-overload. At 3 wk of age, hearts were isolated from both groups and perfused as isolated, biventricular preparations to assess cardiac energy metabolism. Volume-overload resulted in cardiac hypertrophy (16% increase in cardiac mass, P < 0.05) without evidence of cardiac dysfunction in vivo or in vitro. Fatty acid oxidation rates were 60% lower (P < 0.05) in hypertrophied hearts than controls, whereas glycolysis increased 246% (P < 0.05). In contrast, glucose and lactate oxidation rates were unchanged. Overall ATP production rates were significantly lower in hypertrophied hearts, resulting in increased AMP-to-ATP ratios in both aerobic hearts and ischemia-reperfused hearts. The lowered energy generation of hypertrophied hearts depressed functional recovery from ischemia. Decreased fatty acid oxidation rates were accompanied by increased malonyl-CoA levels due to decreased malonyl-CoA decarboxylase activity/expression. Increased glycolysis in hypertrophied hearts was accompanied by a significant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression, a key transcriptional regulator of glycolysis. Cardiac hypertrophy in the neonatal heart results in a reemergence of the fetal metabolic profile, which compromises ATP production in the rapidly maturing heart and impairs recovery of function following ischemia. PMID:22408020

  4. Rapamycin doses sufficient to extend lifespan do not compromise muscle mitochondrial content or endurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widlund, Anne Lykkegaard; Vang, Ole; Ye, Lan;

    2013-01-01

    compromise the function of mitochondria in cultured muscle cells, implying that defects in bioenergetics might be an unavoidable consequence of targeting mTORC1 in vivo. Therefore, we tested whether rapamycin, at the same doses used to extend lifespan, affects mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. While...

  5. Compromised mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis in transgenic mice results in defective protein lipoylation and energy disequilibrium.

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    Stuart Smith

    Full Text Available A mouse model with compromised mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis has been engineered in order to assess the role of this pathway in mitochondrial function and overall health. Reduction in the expression of mitochondrial malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase, a key enzyme in the pathway encoded by the nuclear Mcat gene, was achieved to varying extents in all examined tissues employing tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox technology. Although affected mice consumed more food than control animals, they failed to gain weight, were less physically active, suffered from loss of white adipose tissue, reduced muscle strength, kyphosis, alopecia, hypothermia and shortened lifespan. The Mcat-deficient phenotype is attributed primarily to reduced synthesis, in several tissues, of the octanoyl precursors required for the posttranslational lipoylation of pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes, resulting in diminished capacity of the citric acid cycle and disruption of energy metabolism. The presence of an alternative lipoylation pathway that utilizes exogenous free lipoate appears restricted to liver and alone is insufficient for preservation of normal energy metabolism. Thus, de novo synthesis of precursors for the protein lipoylation pathway plays a vital role in maintenance of mitochondrial function and overall vigor.

  6. Role of mitochondrial damage during cardiac apoptosis in septic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; HU Bang-chuan; CHEN Chang-qin; GONG Shi-jin; YU Yi-hua; DAI Hai-wen; YAN Jing

    2013-01-01

    Background Myocardial apoptosis is involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis-related myocardial depression.However,the underlying mechanism remains unknown.This study investigated the role of mitochondrial damage and mitochondria-induced oxidative stress during cardiac apoptosis in septic rats.Methods Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and septic group receiving lipopolysaccharide injection.Heart tissue was removed and changes in cardiac morphology were observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.In situ apoptosis was examined using terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and nuclear factor-kappa B activation in myocardium by Western blotting to estimate myocardial apoptosis.Appearance of mitochondrial cristae and activation of cytochrome C oxidase were used to evaluate mitochondrial damage.Oxidative stress was assessed by mitochondrial lipid and protein oxidation,and antioxidant defense was assessed by mitochondrial superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity.Results Sepsis-induced inflammatory cell infiltration,myocardium degeneration and dropsy were time-dependent.Expanded capillaries were observed in the hearts of infected rats 24 hours post-challenge.Compared with sham-treated rats,the percentage of cell apoptosis increased in a time-dependent manner in hearts from septic rats at 6 hours,12 hours and 24 hours post-injection (P < 0.05).The expression of nuclear factor-kappa B p65 decreased gradually in the cytosol and increased in the nucleus during sepsis,indicating that septic challenge provoked the progressive activation of nuclear factor-kappa B.Mitochondrial cristae and activation of cytochrome C oxidase increased in a time-dependent manner.Both superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities decreased,while mitochondrial lipid and protein oxidation increased between 6 and 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide challenge.Conclusions Septic challenge induced

  7. Mitochondrial networks in cardiac myocytes reveal dynamic coupling behavior.

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    Kurz, Felix T; Derungs, Thomas; Aon, Miguel A; O'Rourke, Brian; Armoundas, Antonis A

    2015-04-21

    Oscillatory behavior of mitochondrial inner membrane potential (ΔΨm) is commonly observed in cells subjected to oxidative or metabolic stress. In cardiac myocytes, the activation of inner membrane pores by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major factor mediating intermitochondrial coupling, and ROS-induced ROS release has been shown to underlie propagated waves of ΔΨm depolarization as well as synchronized limit cycle oscillations of ΔΨm in the network. The functional impact of ΔΨm instability on cardiac electrophysiology, Ca(2+) handling, and even cell survival, is strongly affected by the extent of such intermitochondrial coupling. Here, we employ a recently developed wavelet-based analytical approach to examine how different substrates affect mitochondrial coupling in cardiac cells, and we also determine the oscillatory coupling properties of mitochondria in ventricular cells in intact perfused hearts. The results show that the frequency of ΔΨm oscillations varies inversely with the size of the oscillating mitochondrial cluster, and depends on the strength of local intermitochondrial coupling. Time-varying coupling constants could be quantitatively determined by applying a stochastic phase model based on extension of the well-known Kuramoto model for networks of coupled oscillators. Cluster size-frequency relationships varied with different substrates, as did mitochondrial coupling constants, which were significantly larger for glucose (7.78 × 10(-2) ± 0.98 × 10(-2) s(-1)) and pyruvate (7.49 × 10(-2) ± 1.65 × 10(-2) s(-1)) than lactate (4.83 × 10(-2) ± 1.25 × 10(-2) s(-1)) or β-hydroxybutyrate (4.11 × 10(-2) ± 0.62 × 10(-2) s(-1)). The findings indicate that mitochondrial spatiotemporal coupling and oscillatory behavior is influenced by substrate selection, perhaps through differing effects on ROS/redox balance. In particular, glucose-perfusion generates strong intermitochondrial coupling and temporal oscillatory stability

  8. Effects of Caloric Restriction on Cardiac Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Bioenergetics: Potential Role of Cardiac Sirtuins

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    Ken Shinmura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology of aging has not been fully clarified, but the free radical theory of aging is one of the strongest aging theories proposed to date. The free radical theory has been expanded to the oxidative stress theory, in which mitochondria play a central role in the development of the aging process because of their critical roles in bioenergetics, oxidant production, and regulation of cell death. A decline in cardiac mitochondrial function associated with the accumulation of oxidative damage might be responsible, at least in part, for the decline in cardiac performance with age. In contrast, lifelong caloric restriction can attenuate functional decline with age, delay the onset of morbidity, and extend lifespan in various species. The effect of caloric restriction appears to be related to a reduction in cellular damage induced by reactive oxygen species. There is increasing evidence that sirtuins play an essential role in the reduction of mitochondrial oxidative stress during caloric restriction. We speculate that cardiac sirtuins attenuate the accumulation of oxidative damage associated with age by modifying specific mitochondrial proteins posttranscriptionally. Therefore, the distinct role of each sirtuin in the heart subjected to caloric restriction should be clarified to translate sirtuin biology into clinical practice.

  9. Carnitine Insufficiency Caused by Aging and Overnutrition Compromises Mitochondrial Performance and Metabolic Control*

    OpenAIRE

    Noland, Robert C.; Koves, Timothy R.; Seiler, Sarah E; Lum, Helen; Lust, Robert M.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Stevens, Robert D; Hegardt, Fausto G.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to its essential role in permitting mitochondrial import and oxidation of long chain fatty acids, carnitine also functions as an acyl group acceptor that facilitates mitochondrial export of excess carbons in the form of acylcarnitines. Recent evidence suggests carnitine requirements increase under conditions of sustained metabolic stress. Accordingly, we hypothesized that carnitine insufficiency might contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and obesity-related impairments in gluco...

  10. Cardiac oxygen supply is compromised during the night in hypertensive patients

    OpenAIRE

    Westerhof, B E; Lieshout, van, J.J.; Parati, G.; Montfrans, van, G.A.; Guelen, I.; Spaan, J.A.E.; Westerhof, N.; Karemaker, J. M.; W J W Bos

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced heart rate and blood pressure soon after awaking increases cardiac oxygen demand, and has been associated with the high incidence of acute myocardial infarction in the morning. The behavior of cardiac oxygen supply is unknown. We hypothesized that oxygen supply decreases in the morning and to that purpose investigated cardiac oxygen demand and oxygen supply at night and after awaking. We compared hypertensive to normotensive subjects and furthermore assessed whether pressures mea...

  11. Isolating the segment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain responsible for mitochondrial damage during cardiac ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ischemia damages the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), mediated in part by damage generated by the mitochondria themselves. Mitochondrial damage resulting from ischemia, in turn, leads to cardiac injury during reperfusion. The goal of the present study was to localize the segment of the ETC that produces the ischemic mitochondrial damage. We tested if blockade of the proximal ETC at complex I differed from blockade distal in the chain at cytochrome oxidase. Isolated rabbit hearts were perfused for 15 min followed by 30 min stop-flow ischemia at 37 oC. Amobarbital (2.5 mM) or azide (5 mM) was used to block proximal (complex I) or distal (cytochrome oxidase) sites in the ETC. Time control hearts were buffer-perfused for 45 min. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) were isolated. Ischemia decreased cytochrome c content in SSM but not in IFM compared to time control. Blockade of electron transport at complex I preserved the cytochrome c content in SSM. In contrast, blockade of electron transport at cytochrome oxidase with azide did not retain cytochrome c in SSM during ischemia. Since blockade of electron transport at complex III also prevented cytochrome c loss during ischemia, the specific site that elicits mitochondrial damage during ischemia is likely located in the segment between complex III and cytochrome oxidase.

  12. Mitochondrial compromise in 3-year old patas monkeys exposed in utero to human-equivalent antiretroviral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongmin; Shim Park, Eunwoo; Gibbons, Alexander T; Shide, Eric D; Divi, Rao L; Woodward, Ruth A; Poirier, Miriam C

    2016-08-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug therapy, given during pregnancy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), induces fetal mitochondrial dysfunction in some children. However, the persistence/reversibility of that dysfunction is unclear. Here we have followed Erythrocebus patas (patas) monkey offspring for up to 3 years of age (similar in development to a 15-year old human) after exposure of the dams to human-equivalent in utero ARV exposure protocols. Pregnant patas dams (3-5/exposure group) were given ARV drug combinations that included zidovudine (AZT)/lamivudine (3TC)/abacavir (ABC), or AZT/3TC/nevirapine (NVP), for the last 10 weeks (50%) of gestation. Infants kept for 1 and 3 years also received drug for the first 6 weeks of life. In offpsring at birth, 1 and 3 years of age mitochondrial morphology, examined by electron microscopy (EM), was compromised compared to the unexposed controls. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), measured by hybrid capture chemiluminescence assay (HCCA) was depleted in hearts of patas exposed to AZT/3TC/NVP at all ages (P < 0.05), but not in those exposed to AZT/3TC/ABC at any age. Compared to unexposed controls, mitochondrial reserve capacity oxygen consumption rate (OCR by Seahorse) in cultured bone marrow mesenchymal fibroblasts from 3-year-old patas offspring was ∼50% reduced in AZT/3TC/ABC-exposed patas (P < 0.01), but not in AZT/3TC/NVP-exposed patas. Overall the data show that 3-year-old patas sustain persistent mitochondrial dysfunction as a result of perinatal ARV drug exposure. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:526-534, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27452341

  13. Overexpression of mtDNA-associated AtWhy2 compromises mitochondrial function

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    Abou-Rached Charbel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background StWhy1, a member of the plant-specific Whirly single-stranded DNA-binding protein family, was first characterized as a transcription factor involved in the activation of the nuclear PR-10a gene following defense-related stress in potato. In Arabidopsis thaliana, Whirlies have recently been shown to be primarily localized in organelles. Two representatives of the family, AtWhy1 and AtWhy3 are imported into plastids while AtWhy2 localizes to mitochondria. Their function in organelles is currently unknown. Results To understand the role of mitochondrial Whirlies in higher plants, we produced A. thaliana lines with altered expression of the atwhy2 gene. Organellar DNA immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AtWhy2 binds to mitochondrial DNA. Overexpression of atwhy2 in plants perturbs mitochondrial function by causing a diminution in transcript levels and mtDNA content which translates into a low activity level of respiratory chain complexes containing mtDNA-encoded subunits. This lowered activity of mitochondria yielded plants that were reduced in size and had distorted leaves that exhibited accelerated senescence. Overexpression of atwhy2 also led to early accumulation of senescence marker transcripts in mature leaves. Inactivation of the atwhy2 gene did not affect plant development and had no detectable effect on mitochondrial morphology, activity of respiratory chain complexes, transcription or the amount of mtDNA present. This lack of phenotype upon abrogation of atwhy2 expression suggests the presence of functional homologues of the Whirlies or the activation of compensating mechanisms in mitochondria. Conclusion AtWhy2 is associated with mtDNA and its overexpression results in the production of dysfunctional mitochondria. This report constitutes the first evidence of a function for the Whirlies in organelles. We propose that they could play a role in the regulation of the gene expression machinery of organelles.

  14. Rapamycin doses sufficient to extend lifespan do not compromise muscle mitochondrial content or endurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widlund, Anne Lykkegaard; Vang, Ole; Ye, Lan;

    2013-01-01

    Rapamycin extends lifespan in mice, but can have a number of undesirable effects that may ultimately limit its utility in humans. The canonical target of rapamycin, and the one thought to account for its effects on lifespan, is the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin, complex 1 (mTORC1). We...... isolated, permeabilized muscle fibers displayed similar rates of oxygen consumption. We conclude that the doses of rapamycin required to extend life do not cause overt mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle....

  15. Mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress compromise autophagosomal degradation of α-synuclein in oligodendroglial cells.

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    Pukaß, Katharina; Goldbaum, Olaf; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn)-containing glial cytoplasmic inclusions originating in oligodendrocytes are characteristically observed in multiple system atrophy. The mechanisms of glial cytoplasmic inclusion formation remain rather elusive. α-Syn over-expression, uptake from the environment, oxidative stress or impairment of the proteolytic degradation systems have been discussed. Here, we investigated whether in oligodendrocytes autophagy plays a major role in the degradation and aggregation of endogenously expressed α-syn and of α-syn taken up from the extracellular environment. Furthermore, we studied whether in cells with impaired mitochondria the accumulation and aggregation of exogenously added α-syn is promoted. Using primary cultures of rat brain oligodendrocytes and an oligodendroglial cell line, genetically engineered to express green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated light chain 3 with or without α-syn to monitor the autophagic flux, we demonstrate that both exogenously applied α-syn and α-syn stably expressed endogenously are effectively degraded by autophagy and do not affect the autophagic flux per se. Mitochondrial impairment with the protonophore carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone or 3-nitropropionic acid disturbs the autophagic pathway and leads to the accumulation of exogenously applied α-syn and enhances its propensity to form aggregates intracellularly. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, which occur over time and are significant pathological features in synucleinopathies, have an impact on the autophagic pathway and participate in pathogenesis. Glial cytoplasmic inclusions are characteristically observed in multiple system atrophy, their occurrence might be related to failure in protein degradation systems. Here, we show that in oligodendrocytes autophagy is the major route of α-synuclein degradation which is either endogenously expressed or added exogenously (1, 2). Mitochondrial impairment (3) disturbs the

  16. Even Four Minutes of Poor Quality of CPR Compromises Outcome in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

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    Heng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Untrained bystanders usually delivered suboptimal chest compression to victims who suffered from cardiac arrest in out-of-hospital settings. We therefore investigated the hemodynamics and resuscitation outcome of initial suboptimal quality of chest compressions compared to the optimal ones in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. Methods. Fourteen Yorkshire pigs weighted 30 ± 2 kg were randomized into good and poor cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR groups. Ventricular fibrillation was electrically induced and untreated for 6 mins. In good CPR group, animals received high quality manual chest compressions according to the Guidelines (25% of animal’s anterior-posterior thoracic diameter during first two minutes of CPR compared with poor (70% of the optimal depth compressions. After that, a 120-J biphasic shock was delivered. If the animal did not acquire return of spontaneous circulation, another 2 mins of CPR and shock followed. Four minutes later, both groups received optimal CPR until total 10 mins of CPR has been finished. Results. All seven animals in good CPR group were resuscitated compared with only two in poor CPR group (P<0.05. The delayed optimal compressions which followed 4 mins of suboptimal compressions failed to increase the lower coronary perfusion pressure of five non-survival animals in poor CPR group. Conclusions. In a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, even four minutes of initial poor quality of CPR compromises the hemodynamics and survival outcome.

  17. Cardiac oxygen supply is compromised during the night in hypertensive patients.

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    Westerhof, Berend E; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Parati, Gianfranco; van Montfrans, Gert A; Guelen, Ilja; Spaan, Jos A E; Westerhof, Nico; Karemaker, John M; Bos, Willem Jan W

    2011-09-01

    The enhanced heart rate and blood pressure soon after awaking increases cardiac oxygen demand, and has been associated with the high incidence of acute myocardial infarction in the morning. The behavior of cardiac oxygen supply is unknown. We hypothesized that oxygen supply decreases in the morning and to that purpose investigated cardiac oxygen demand and oxygen supply at night and after awaking. We compared hypertensive to normotensive subjects and furthermore assessed whether pressures measured non-invasively and intra-arterially give similar results. Aortic pressure was reconstructed from 24-h intra-brachial and simultaneously obtained non-invasive finger pressure in 14 hypertensives and 8 normotensives. Supply was assessed by Diastolic Time Fraction (DTF, ratio of diastolic and heart period), demand by Rate-Pressure Product (RPP, systolic pressure times heart rate, HR) and supply/demand ratio by A(dia)/A(sys), with A(dia) and A(sys) diastolic and systolic areas under the aortic pressure curve. Hypertensives had lower supply by DTF and higher demand by RPP than normotensives during the night. DTF decreased and RPP increased in both groups after awaking. The DTF of hypertensives decreased less becoming similar to the DTF of normotensives in the morning; the RPP remained higher. A(dia)/A(sys) followed the pattern of DTF. Findings from invasively and non-invasively determined pressure were similar. The cardiac oxygen supply/demand ratio in hypertensive patients is lower than in normotensives at night. With a smaller night-day differences, the hypertensives' risk for cardiovascular events may be more evenly spread over the 24 h. This information can be obtained noninvasively. PMID:21786015

  18. Resorcylidene Aminoguanidine (RAG) Improves Cardiac Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impaired by Hyperglycaemia in a Model of Experimental Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zofia Jozwiak; Karolina Siewiera; Magdalena Labieniec-Watala

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a mitochondrial dysfunction. Hyperglycaemia is also clearly recognized as the primary culprit in the pathogenesis of cardiac complications. In response to glycation and oxidative stress, cardiac mitochondria undergo cumulative alterations, often leading to heart deterioration. There is a continuous search for innovative treatment strategies for protecting the heart mitochondria from the destructive impact of diabetes. Aminoguanidine derivatives have been successful...

  19. Activation of mitochondrial calpain and increased cardiac injury: beyond AIF release.

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    Thompson, Jeremy; Hu, Ying; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun

    2016-02-01

    Calpain 1 (CPN1) is a ubiquitous cysteine protease that exists in both cytosol and cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial CPN1 (mit-CPN1) is located in the intermembrane space and matrix. Activation of mit-CPN1 within the intermembrane space increases cardiac injury by releasing apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria during ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We asked if activation of mit-CPN1 is involved in mitochondrial injury during IR. MDL-28170 (MDL) was used to inhibit CPN1 in buffer-perfused hearts following 25-min ischemia and 30-min reperfusion. MDL treatment decreased the release of lactate dehydrogenase into coronary effluent compared with untreated hearts, indicating that inhibition of CPN1 decreases cardiac injury. MDL also prevented the cleavage of spectrin (a substrate of CPN1) in cytosol during IR, supporting that MDL treatment decreased cytosolic calpain activation. In addition, MDL markedly improved calcium retention capacity compared with untreated heart, suggesting that MDL treatment decreases mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. In addition, we found that IR led to decreased complex I activity, whereas inhibition of mit-CPN1 using MDL protected complex I. Pyruvate dehydrogenase content was decreased following IR. However, pyruvate dehydrogenase content was preserved in MDL-treated mitochondria. Taken together, MDL treatment decreased cardiac injury during IR by inhibiting both cytosolic and mit-CPN1. Activation of mit-CPN1 increases cardiac injury during IR by sensitizing mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and impairing mitochondrial metabolism through damage of complex I. PMID:26637561

  20. What do we know about carbon monoxide poisoning and cardiac compromise?

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    Cardiga, Rosa; Proença, Margarida; Carvalho, Carolina; Costa, Luís; Botella, Arturo; Marques, Filipa; Paulino, Carolina; Carvalho, António; Fonseca, Cândida

    2015-09-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is one of the most common types of poisoning and the leading cause of death by poisoning worldwide. Cardiac injury caused by CO poisoning has been little described despite being a predictor of poor prognosis. We present the case of a healthy 24-year-old woman, admitted to our emergency room due to an episode of lipothymia without loss of consciousness. She reported holocranial headache for the previous two weeks associated with nausea and vomiting. Laboratory tests revealed blood gas analysis: pH 7.392, pCO2 32 mmHg, pO2 101 mmHg, lactate 3.5 mmol/l, HCO3 20.8 mmol/l; COHb 29.2%; serial troponin I 1.21 → 5.25 → 6.13 → 3.65 μg/l; myoglobin 1378 → 964 → 352 μg/l; and NT-proBNP 1330 pg/l. The electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm, heart rate 110 bpm, and ST-segment depression of 2 mm in V4 and 1 mm in V5. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a left ventricle with normal wall motion and preserved ejection fraction. Given the clinical and epidemiological context, myocardial and central nervous system ischemia due to prolonged CO exposure was assumed and normobaric oxygen therapy was immediately started. In view of evidence of injury to two major organ systems the indication for hyperbaric oxygen therapy was discussed with a specialist colleague, who suggested maintaining conservative treatment with oxygen therapy and in-hospital monitoring for 72 h. The patient was discharged on the third day and was still asymptomatic at 400 days of follow-up. Besides symptoms and signs of central nervous system dysfunction, myocardial damage should also always be considered in the context of CO poisoning. Hyperbaric therapy is still controversial and the lack of objective data highlights the need for new randomized studies. PMID:26232341

  1. Interaction of TNF with angiotensin II contributes to mitochondrial oxidative stress and cardiac damage in rats.

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    Nithya Mariappan

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF and angiotensin II (ANGII induce oxidative stress contribute to cardiovascular disease progression. Here, we examined whether an interaction between TNF and ANGII contributes to altered cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis and ATP production to cause cardiac damage in rats. Rats received intraperitoneal injections of TNF (30 µg/kg, TNF + losartan (LOS, 1 mg/kg, or vehicle for 5 days. Left ventricular (LV function was measured using echocardiography. Rats were sacrificed and LV tissues removed for gene expression, electron paramagnetic resonance and mitochondrial assays. TNF administration significantly increased expression of the NADPH oxidase subunit, gp91phox, and the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT-1R and decreased eNOS in the LV of rats. Rats that received TNF only had increased production rates of superoxide, peroxynitrite and total reactive oxygen species (ROS in the cytosol and increased production rates of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in mitochondria. Decreased activities of mitochondrial complexes I, II, and III and mitochondrial genes were observed in rats given TNF. In addition, TNF administration also resulted in a decrease in fractional shortening and an increase in Tei index, suggesting diastolic dysfunction. TNF administration with concomitant LOS treatment attenuated mitochondrial damage, restored cardiac function, and decreased expression of AT1-R and NADPH oxidase subunits. Mitochondrial biogenesis and function is severely impaired by TNF as evidenced by downregulation of mitochondrial genes and increased free radical production, and may contribute to cardiac damage. These defects are independent of the downregulation of mitochondrial gene expression, suggesting novel mechanisms for mitochondrial dysfunction in rats given TNF.

  2. The profound effects of microcystin on cardiac antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial function and cardiac toxicity in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaths from microcystin toxication have widely been attributed to hypovolemic shock due to hepatic interstitial hemorrhage, while some recent studies suggest that cardiogenic complication is also involved. So far, information on cardiotoxic effects of MC has been rare and the underlying mechanism is still puzzling. The present study examined toxic effects of microcystins on heart muscle of rats intravenously injected with extracted MC at two doses, 0.16LD50 (14 μg MC-LReq kg-1 body weight) and 1LD50 (87 μg MC-LReq kg-1 body weight). In the dead rats, both TTC staining and maximum elevations of troponin I levels confirmed myocardial infarction after MC exposure, besides a serious interstitial hemorrhage in liver. In the 1LD50 dose group, the coincident falls in heart rate and blood pressure were related to mitochondria dysfunction in heart, while increases in creatine kinase and troponin I levels indicated cardiac cell injury. The corresponding pathological alterations were mainly characterized as loss of adherence between cardiac myocytes and swollen or ruptured mitochondria at the ultrastructural level. MC administration at a dose of 1LD50 not only enhanced activities and up-regulated mRNA transcription levels of antioxidant enzymes, but also increased GSH content. At both doses, level of lipid peroxides increased obviously, suggesting serious oxidative stress in mitochondria. Simultaneously, complex I and III were significantly inhibited, indicating blocks in electron flow along the mitochondrial respiratory chain in heart. In conclusion, the findings of this study implicate a role for MC-induced cardiotoxicity as a potential factor that should be considered when evaluating the mechanisms of death associated with microcystin intoxication in Brazil

  3. Sulfur Dioxide Contributes to the Cardiac and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rats.

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    Qin, Guohua; Wu, Meiqiong; Wang, Jiaoxia; Xu, Zhifang; Xia, Jin; Sang, Nan

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between sulfur dioxide (SO2) and an increase of morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and arrhythmia. Mitochondrion is the most sensitive organelle in myocardium of animals exposed to SO2 Here we study the molecular characterization of mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac muscles of rat after SO2 exposure. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), ATP contents, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contents, and mRNA expression of complexes IV and V subunits encoded by mtDNA were decreased after NaHSO3 treatment in vitro or SO2 inhalation in vivo The mitochondrial dysfunctions were accompanied by depressions of co-activator of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) mRNA and protein. We observed swollen mitochondria and lower amounts of cristae in hearts of rats after 3.5 mg/m(3) SO2 inhalation for 30 days. Interestingly, NaHSO3 induced mitochondrial dysfunctions marked by ΔΨm and ATP reduction could be inhibited by an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC), accompanied by the restoration of transcriptional factors expressions. The cardiac mitochondrial dysfunctions could also be alleviated by overexpression of TFAM. SO2 induced abnormal left ventricular function was restored by NALC in vivo Our findings demonstrate that SO2 induces cardiac and mitochondrial dysfunction. And inhibition of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the transcriptional network controlling mitochondrial biogenesis can mitigate the SO2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26980303

  4. Genetic Manipulation of The Cardiac Mitochondrial Phosphate Carrier does not affect Permeability Transition

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    Gutiérrez-Aguilar, Manuel; Douglas, Diana L.; Gibson, Anne K.; Domeier, Timothy L.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Baines, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    The Mitochondrial Permeability Transition (MPT) pore is a voltage-sensitive unselective channel known to instigate necrotic cell death during cardiac disease. Recent models suggest that the isomerase cyclophilin D (CypD) regulates the MPT pore by binding to either the F0F1-ATP synthase lateral stalk or the mitochondrial phosphate carrier (PiC). Here we confirm that CypD, through its N-terminus, can directly bind PiC. We then generated cardiac-specific mouse strains overexpressing or with decr...

  5. Mitochondrial approaches to protect against cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury

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    Amadou K.S. Camara

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrion is a vital component in cellular energy metabolism and intracellular signaling processes. Mitochondria are involved in a myriad of complex signaling cascades regulating cell death vs. survival. Importantly, mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting oxidative and nitrosative stress are central in the pathogenesis of numerous human maladies including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and retinal diseases, many of which are related. This review will examine the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of cardiovascular diseases and will explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the organelle in attenuating the disease process. Indeed, recent advances in mitochondrial biology have led to selective targeting of drugs designed to modulate or manipulate mitochondrial function, to the use of light therapy directed to the mitochondrial function, and to modification of the mitochondrial genome for potential therapeutic benefit. The approach to rationally treat mitochondrial dysfunction could lead to more effective interventions in cardiovascular diseases that to date have remained elusive. The central premise of this review is that if mitochondrial abnormalities contribute to the etiology of cardiovascular diseases (e.g. ischemic heart disease, alleviating the mitochondrial dysfunction will contribute to mitigating the severity or progression of the disease. To this end, this review will provide an overview of our current understanding of mitochondria function in cardiovascular diseases as well as the potential role for targeting mitochondria with potential drugs or other interventions that lead to protection against cell injury.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: The Link with Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Gary; Yan, Bryan P.; Chan, Yin W. F.; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac arrhythmias represent a significant problem globally, leading to cerebrovascular accidents, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. There is increasing evidence to suggest that increased oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is elevated in conditions such as diabetes and hypertension, can lead to arrhythmogenesis. Method: A literature review was undertaken to screen for articles that investigated the effects of ROS on cardiac ion channel function, remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. Results: Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress is observed in heart failure, leading to increased production of ROS. Mitochondrial ROS, which is elevated in diabetes and hypertension, can stimulate its own production in a positive feedback loop, termed ROS-induced ROS release. Together with activation of mitochondrial inner membrane anion channels, it leads to mitochondrial depolarization. Abnormal function of these organelles can then activate downstream signaling pathways, ultimately culminating in altered function or expression of cardiac ion channels responsible for generating the cardiac action potential (AP). Vascular and cardiac endothelial cells become dysfunctional, leading to altered paracrine signaling to influence the electrophysiology of adjacent cardiomyocytes. All of these changes can in turn produce abnormalities in AP repolarization or conduction, thereby increasing likelihood of triggered activity and reentry. Conclusion: ROS plays a significant role in producing arrhythmic substrate. Therapeutic strategies targeting upstream events include production of a strong reducing environment or the use of pharmacological agents that target organelle-specific proteins and ion channels. These may relieve oxidative stress and in turn prevent arrhythmic complications in patients with diabetes, hypertension, and heart failure. PMID:27536244

  7. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes. PMID:27350339

  8. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes. PMID:27350339

  9. Dietary ω-3 Fatty Acids Alter Cardiac Mitochondrial Phospholipid Composition and Delay Ca2+-Induced Permeability Transition

    OpenAIRE

    O’Shea, Karen M.; Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Xu, Wenhong; Hecker, Peter A; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Kristian, Tibor; Robert C. Murphy; Fiskum, Gary; Stanley, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Consumption of ω-3 fatty acids from fish oil, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), decreases risk for heart failure and attenuates pathologic cardiac remodeling in response to pressure overload. Dietary supplementation with EPA+DHA may also impact cardiac mitochondrial function and energetics through alteration of membrane phospholipids. We assessed the role of EPA+DHA supplementation on left ventricular (LV) function, cardiac mitochondrial membrane phospho...

  10. Tissue-specific and substrate-specific mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline cardiac and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen;

    2015-01-01

    No studies have investigated the mitochondrial function in permeabilized muscle fiber from cats. The aim of this study was to investigate tissue-specific and substrate-specific characteristics of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in feline permeabilized oxidative muscle...... fibers. Biopsies of left ventricular cardiac muscle and soleus muscle, a type I-rich oxidative skeletal muscle, were obtained from 15 healthy domestic cats. Enzymatic activity of citrate synthase (CS), a biomarker of mitochondrial content, was measured. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with various kinds of...... non-fatty-acid substrates and fatty-acid substrate in permeabilized muscle fiber was measured by using high-resolution respirometry. CS activity in the heart was 3 times higher than in the soleus muscle. Mitochondrial state 3 respiration, ADP-stimulated respiration, with complex I-linked and complex I...

  11. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria

  12. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mengwei [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Huang, Chenglin [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen100@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: weili_shen@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria.

  13. Cardiac muscle’s mitochondrial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Zvezdana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are often associated with energy deficit and in many cases this is also accompanied by lipid disorders such as hyperlipidemias and obesity. The aim of the study was to check mitochondrial oxidative capacity in the course of twelve weeks atherogenic hypercholesterolic diet. Thirty five Chinchilla rabbits, male, were randomized to one of two groups a control group (A, n=17 received (per os physiological saline experimental group (B, n=18 received atherogenic 2% hypercholesterolemic diet. Isolation of the mitochondrial fraction of the heart was done by the method of Tyler. The oxygen consumption rate was studied in different respiration phases: as basal, unstimulated (V4 and as ADP-stimulated (V3 and expressed as indices: respiratory control ratio (RCR and ADP/O. Hypercholesterolemic atherogenic diet induced profound perturbations in mitochondrial energy metabolism and oxidative capacity. Basal oxygen consumption rate without ADP (V4 and the maximal ADP-stimulated respiration rate (V3 showed a marked reduction (quantitative changes; sensibility of mitochondria to ADP (ADP/O was also reduced (qualitative change in rabbits treated by atherogenic diet (group B compared to controls (group A. Respiratory control ratio was not significantly different among the groups. These results indicate that hypercholesterolemic atherogenic diet impairs mitochondrial oxidative capacity without affecting coupling of oxidative and phosphorilative processes.

  14. Carvedilol-mediated antioxidant protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiac mitochondrial toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiotoxicity associated with doxorubicin (DOX) therapy limits the total cumulative dose and therapeutic success of active anticancer chemotherapy. Cardiac mitochondria are implicated as primary targets for DOX toxicity, which is believed to be mediated by the generation of highly reactive free radical species of oxygen from complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study was to determine if the protection demonstrated by carvedilol (CV), a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist with strong antioxidant properties, against DOX-induced mitochondrial-mediated cardiomyopathy [Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 185 (2002) 218] is attributable to its antioxidant properties or its β-adrenergic receptor antagonism. Our results confirm that DOX induces oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and histopathological lesions in the cardiac tissue, all of which are inhibited by carvedilol. In contrast, atenolol (AT), a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist lacking antioxidant properties, preserved phosphate energy charge but failed to protect against any of the indexes of DOX-induced oxidative mitochondrial toxicity. We therefore conclude that the cardioprotective effects of carvedilol against DOX-induced mitochondrial cardiotoxicity are due to its inherent antioxidant activity and not to its β-adrenergic receptor antagonism

  15. Mitochondrial Approaches to Protect Against Cardiac Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Camara, Amadou K. S.; Martin eBienengraeber; Stowe, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital component in cellular energy metabolism and intracellular signaling processes. Mitochondria are involved in a myriad of complex signaling cascades regulating cell death vs. survival. Importantly, mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting oxidative and nitrosative stress are central in the pathogenesis of numerous human maladies including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and retinal diseases, many of which are related. This review wi...

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence and mutations of the cardiac hypertrophy model inbred rat strain (Muridae; Rattus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong; Meng, Zi-Li; Chen, Liang; Chen, Wei; Wang, Hong; Hong, Yong-qing

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we undertook the complete mitochondrial genome sequencing of a important cardiac hypertrophy model inbred rat strain for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 16,308 bp. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). The mutation events were also reported. PMID:25109625

  17. Contribution of impaired mitochondrial autophagy to cardiac aging: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Debapriya; Calvani, Riccardo; Bernabei, Roberto; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) increases with advancing age. While the long-term exposure to cardiovascular risk factors plays a major role in the etiopathogenesis of CVD, intrinsic cardiac aging enhances the susceptibility to developing heart pathologies in late life. The progressive decline of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial function is considered to be a major mechanism underlying heart senescence. Damaged mitochondria not only produce less ATP, but also generate increased amou...

  18. Hypoxia signaling controls postnatal changes in cardiac mitochondrial morphology and function

    OpenAIRE

    Neary, Marianne T.; Ng, Keat-Eng; Ludtmann, Marthe H. R.; Hall, Andrew R.; Piotrowska, Izabela; Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J.; Mohun, Timothy J; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Breckenridge, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal cardiomyocyte adaptation to low levels of oxygen in utero is incompletely understood, and is of interest as hypoxia tolerance is lost after birth, leading to vulnerability of adult cardiomyocytes. It is known that cardiac mitochondrial morphology, number and function change significantly following birth, although the underlying molecular mechanisms and physiological stimuli are undefined. Here we show that the decrease in cardiomyocyte HIF-signaling in cardiomyocytes immediately after b...

  19. Impact of aging on mitochondrial function in cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepple, R T

    2016-09-01

    Both skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle are subject to marked structural and functional impairment with aging and these changes contribute to the reduced capacity for exercise as we age. Since mitochondria are involved in multiple aspects of cellular homeostasis including energetics, reactive oxygen species signaling, and regulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways, defects in this organelle are frequently implicated in the deterioration of skeletal and cardiac muscle with aging. On this basis, the purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence that aging causes dysfunction in mitochondria in striated muscle with a view towards drawing conclusions about the potential of these changes to contribute to the deterioration seen in striated muscle with aging. As will be shown, impairment in respiration and reactive oxygen species emission with aging are highly variable between studies and seem to be largely a consequence of physical inactivity. On the other hand, both skeletal and cardiac muscle mitochondria are more susceptible to permeability transition and this seems a likely cause of the increased recruitment of mitochondrial-mediated pathways of apoptosis seen in striated muscle. The review concludes by examining the role of degeneration of mitochondrial DNA versus impaired mitochondrial quality control mechanisms in the accumulation of mitochondria that are sensitized to permeability transition, whereby the latter mechanism is favored as the most likely cause. PMID:27033952

  20. Important role of energy-dependent mitochondrial pathways in cultured rat cardiac myocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, J; Tatsumi, T; Keira, N; Akashi, K; Mano, A; Yamanaka, S; Matoba, S; Asayama, J; Yaoi, T; Fushiki, S; Fliss, H; Nakagawa, M

    2001-10-01

    Recent studies have suggested that apoptosis and necrosis share common features in their signaling pathway and that apoptosis requires intracellular ATP for its mitochondrial/apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 suicide cascade. The present study was, therefore, designed to examine the role of intracellular energy levels in determining the form of cell death in cardiac myocytes. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes were first incubated for 1 h in glucose-free medium containing oligomycin to achieve metabolic inhibition. The cells were then incubated for another 4 h in similar medium containing staurosporine and graded concentrations of glucose to manipulate intracellular ATP levels. Under ATP-depleting conditions, the cell death caused by staurosporine was primarily necrotic, as determined by creatine kinase release and nuclear staining with ethidium homodimer-1. However, under ATP-replenishing conditions, staurosporine increased the percentage of apoptotic cells, as determined by nuclear morphology and DNA fragmentation. Caspase-3 activation by staurosporine was also ATP dependent. However, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)), Bax translocation, and cytochrome c release were observed in both apoptotic and necrotic cells. Moreover, cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, attenuated staurosporine-induced apoptosis and necrosis through the inhibition of DeltaPsi(m) reduction, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. Our data therefore suggest that staurosporine induces cell demise through a mitochondrial death signaling pathway and that the presence of intracellular ATP favors a shift from necrosis to apoptosis through caspase activation. PMID:11557554

  1. Elephant Trunk-Like Teratoma of the Face with Compromised Airway in an Infant with Complex Congenital Cardiac Defects: An Anesthetic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Madan Mohan; Al Balushi, Faisal Khalfan Ahmed; Waje, Niranjan Dilip

    2016-02-01

    Large head and neck teratomas are very rare. Depending on their site of origin, they can produce varying degrees of airway compromise and can interfere with the conduct of general anesthesia. Large space-occupying lesions of the face may even interfere with the simple task of mask ventilation rendering inhaled induction of general anesthesia and maintenance of spontaneous ventilation difficult. If these neoplasms coexist with cardiac lesions necessitating corrective or palliative procedures, the task of oxygenation, ventilation, and securing a definitive airway becomes challenging especially in the presence of underlying unstable hemodynamics. We report on the anesthetic management of a female infant with a facial teratoma and single-ventricle physiology undergoing a cardiac palliative procedure where securing a definitive airway with minimal hemodynamic instability was the immediate requirement. PMID:26599737

  2. Resorcylidene Aminoguanidine (RAG Improves Cardiac Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impaired by Hyperglycaemia in a Model of Experimental Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Jozwiak

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with a mitochondrial dysfunction. Hyperglycaemia is also clearly recognized as the primary culprit in the pathogenesis of cardiac complications. In response to glycation and oxidative stress, cardiac mitochondria undergo cumulative alterations, often leading to heart deterioration. There is a continuous search for innovative treatment strategies for protecting the heart mitochondria from the destructive impact of diabetes. Aminoguanidine derivatives have been successfully used in animal model studies on the treatment of experimental diabetes, as well as the diabetes-driven dysfunctions of peripheral tissues and cells. Considerable attention has been paid particularly to β-resorcylidene aminoguanidine (RAG, often shown as the efficient anti-glycation and anti-oxidant agent in both animal studies and in vitro experiments. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that RAG improves oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport capacity in mitochondria impaired by hyperglycaemia. Diabetes mellitus was induced in Wistar rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (70 mg/kg body weight. Heart mitochondria were isolated from healthy rats and rats with streptozotocin-diabetes. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity was measured by high resolution respirometry with the OROBOROS Oxygraph-2k according to experimental protocol including respiratory substrates and inhibitors. The results revealed that RAG protects the heart against diabetes-associated injury by improving the mitochondrial bioenergetics, thus suggesting a possible novel pharmacological strategy for cardioprotection.

  3. Effects of amiodarone on cardiac function and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation during ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, D; Clauw, F; Martine, L; Grynberg, A; Rochette, L; Demaison, L

    1999-04-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine if the efficiency of amiodarone, a class III antiarrhythmic agent, is associated with changes in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. A population of 30 rats were treated with amiodarone (100 mg/kg/day) for 5 days. A second population receiving only vehicle was used as control. The hearts were perfused according to the working mode. After 15 min of normoxic perfusion, the left main coronary artery was ligated and the ligation was maintained for 20 min. The ligation was removed and reperfusion continued for a further 30 min. The electrocardiogram was monitored continuously. At the end of perfusion, the ischemic and non ischemic areas were visually separated and mitochondria were harvested from each area. Their oxidative and energy metabolism were assessed with palmitoylcarnitine as substrate in 2 respiration media differing in their free calcium concentration (0 or 0.34 microm). In normoxic conditions, amiodarone treatment increased the cardiac metabolic efficiency (mechanical work to oxygen consumption ratio). The local ischemia decreased the aortic and coronary flows without modifying the cardiac metabolic efficiency. Amiodarone treatment maintained the aortic flow at a significantly higher value; the duration of severe arrhythmias was significantly decreased by the drug. The reperfusion of the ischemic area allowed the partial recovery of fluid dynamics. The coronary flow was restored to 89% of the pre ischemic value. Conversely, the aortic flow never exceeded that measured at the end of ischemia, partly due to the important development of severe arrhythmias. The recovery of aortic flow and metabolic efficiency during reperfusion was improved by amiodarone treatment; ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation duration were reduced. In the mitochondria issued from the normoxic area, the energy metabolism was not altered by the amiodarone treatment, but the presence of calcium in the respiration medium modified the

  4. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  5. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikstroem, Johan; Hjelstuen, Mari H.B.; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar (Dept. of Radiotherapy, Stavanger Univ. Hospital, Stavanger (Norway)), e-mail: vijo@sus.no

    2011-01-15

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  6. A comparison of cardiac rate-pressure product and pressure-rate quotient in healthy and medically compromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R L; Langston, W G

    1995-08-01

    Healthy and medically compromised patients were studied to compare blood pressure and heart rate changes in response to stress of routine dental extractions performed while they were under local anesthesia. Thirty-nine patients divided into American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I and II groups were noninvasively monitored every 5 minutes. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures and heart rate were recorded. Rate pressure products (RPP) and pressure rate (PRQ) quotients were calculated and compared in each group. Significant results were measures of RPP greater than 12,000 and PRQ less than one. Of the 24 patients in the ASA I category, 50% demonstrated elevated RPP values, but only two of 24 had coincidental PRQ abnormalities. Of the 15 patients in the ASA II category, 80% demonstrated elevated RPP values, but two of 15 had coincidental PRQ abnormalities. Patients in the ASA II category had a higher incidence of RPP and PRQ abnormalities, as was expected. However, it is not known which of these two measures is a more sensitive indicator of increased risk associated with stimulation of the sympathetic-adrenergic axis during oral surgery performed with patients under local anesthesia. Correlation studies with continuous Holter monitoring for ST-T wave changes on electrocardiography are forthcoming. PMID:7552876

  7. Deficiency in the mouse mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 2 gene is associated with cardiac noncompaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoszka, Jason E; Waymire, Katrina G; Flierl, Adrian; Sweeney, Katelyn M; Angelin, Alessia; MacGregor, Grant R; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    The mouse fetal and adult hearts express two adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) isoform genes. The predominant isoform is the heart-muscle-brain ANT-isoform gene 1 (Ant1) while the other is the systemic Ant2 gene. Genetic inactivation of the Ant1 gene does not impair fetal development but results in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in postnatal mice. Using a knockin X-linked Ant2 allele in which exons 3 and 4 are flanked by loxP sites combined in males with a protamine 1 promoter driven Cre recombinase we created females heterozygous for a null Ant2 allele. Crossing the heterozygous females with the Ant2(fl), PrmCre(+) males resulted in male and female ANT2-null embryos. These fetuses proved to be embryonic lethal by day E14.5 in association with cardiac developmental failure, immature cardiomyocytes having swollen mitochondria, cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation, and cardiac failure due to hypertrabeculation/noncompaction. ANTs have two main functions, mitochondrial-cytosol ATP/ADP exchange and modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). Previous studies imply that ANT2 biases the mtPTP toward closed while ANT1 biases the mtPTP toward open. It has been reported that immature cardiomyocytes have a constitutively opened mtPTP, the closure of which signals the maturation of cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesize that the developmental toxicity of the Ant2 null mutation may be the result of biasing the cardiomyocyte mtPTP to remain open thus impairing cardiomyocyte maturation and resulting in cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation and failure of trabecular maturation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27048932

  8. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity. PMID:26471891

  9. Myocardial overexpression of Mecr, a gene of mitochondrial FAS II leads to cardiac dysfunction in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Chen

    Full Text Available It has been recently recognized that mammalian mitochondria contain most, if not all, of the components of fatty acid synthesis type II (FAS II. Among the components identified is 2-enoyl thioester reductase/mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase (Etr1/Mecr, which catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of trans-2-enoyl thioesters, generating saturated acyl-groups. Although the FAS type II pathway is highly conserved, its physiological role in fatty acid synthesis, which apparently occurs simultaneously with breakdown of fatty acids in the same subcellular compartment in mammals, has remained an enigma. To study the in vivo function of the mitochondrial FAS in mammals, with special reference to Mecr, we generated mice overexpressing Mecr under control of the mouse metallothionein-1 promoter. These Mecr transgenic mice developed cardiac abnormalities as demonstrated by echocardiography in vivo, heart perfusion ex vivo, and electron microscopy in situ. Moreover, the Mecr transgenic mice showed decreased performance in endurance exercise testing. Our results showed a ventricular dilatation behind impaired heart function upon Mecr overexpression, concurrent with appearance of dysmorphic mitochondria. Furthermore, the data suggested that inappropriate expression of genes of FAS II can result in the development of hereditary cardiomyopathy.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations in adult mouse cardiac side population cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushaj, Entela B., E-mail: lushaj@surgery.wisc.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Lozonschi, Lucian; Barnes, Maria; Anstadt, Emily; Kohmoto, Takushi [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the presence and potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations in adult cardiac stem cells. Cardiac side population (SP) cells were isolated from 12-week-old mice. Standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen for the presence of mtDNA deletion mutations in (a) freshly isolated SP cells and (b) SP cells cultured to passage 10. When present, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutation was analyzed in single cell colonies. The effect of different levels of deletion mutations on SP cell growth and differentiation was determined. MtDNA deletion mutations were found in both freshly isolated and cultured cells from 12-week-old mice. While there was no significant difference in the number of single cell colonies with mtDNA deletion mutations from any of the groups mentioned above, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutations was significantly higher in the cultured cells, as determined by quantitative PCR. Within a single clonal cell population, the detectable mtDNA deletion mutations were the same in all cells and unique when compared to deletions of other colonies. We also found that cells harboring high levels of mtDNA deletion mutations (i.e. where deleted mtDNA comprised more than 60% of total mtDNA) had slower proliferation rates and decreased differentiation capacities. Screening cultured adult stem cells for mtDNA deletion mutations as a routine assessment will benefit the biomedical application of adult stem cells.

  11. Characterization of the Cardiac Overexpression of HSPB2 Reveals Mitochondrial and Myogenic Roles Supported by a Cardiac HspB2 Interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne H Grose

    Full Text Available Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs are molecular chaperones that transiently interact with other proteins, thereby assisting with quality control of proper protein folding and/or degradation. They are also recruited to protect cells from a variety of stresses in response to extreme heat, heavy metals, and oxidative-reductive stress. Although ten human sHSPs have been identified, their likely diverse biological functions remain an enigma in health and disease, and much less is known about non-redundant roles in selective cells and tissues. Herein, we set out to comprehensively characterize the cardiac-restricted Heat Shock Protein B-2 (HspB2, which exhibited ischemic cardioprotection in transgenic overexpressing mice including reduced infarct size and maintenance of ATP levels. Global yeast two-hybrid analysis using HspB2 (bait and a human cardiac library (prey coupled with co-immunoprecipitation studies for mitochondrial target validation revealed the first HspB2 "cardiac interactome" to contain many myofibril and mitochondrial-binding partners consistent with the overexpression phenotype. This interactome has been submitted to the Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID. A related sHSP chaperone HspB5 had only partially overlapping binding partners, supporting specificity of the interactome as well as non-redundant roles reported for these sHSPs. Evidence that the cardiac yeast two-hybrid HspB2 interactome targets resident mitochondrial client proteins is consistent with the role of HspB2 in maintaining ATP levels and suggests new chaperone-dependent functions for metabolic homeostasis. One of the HspB2 targets, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, has reported roles in HspB2 associated phenotypes including cardiac ATP production, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis, and was validated as a potential client protein of HspB2 through chaperone assays. From the clientele and phenotypes identified herein, it is

  12. Characterization of the Cardiac Overexpression of HSPB2 Reveals Mitochondrial and Myogenic Roles Supported by a Cardiac HspB2 Interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Julianne H; Langston, Kelsey; Wang, Xiaohui; Squires, Shayne; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Hayes, Whitney; Neubert, Jonathan; Fischer, Susan K; Fasano, Matthew; Saunders, Gina Moore; Dai, Qiang; Christians, Elisabeth; Lewandowski, E Douglas; Ping, Peipei; Benjamin, Ivor J

    2015-01-01

    Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones that transiently interact with other proteins, thereby assisting with quality control of proper protein folding and/or degradation. They are also recruited to protect cells from a variety of stresses in response to extreme heat, heavy metals, and oxidative-reductive stress. Although ten human sHSPs have been identified, their likely diverse biological functions remain an enigma in health and disease, and much less is known about non-redundant roles in selective cells and tissues. Herein, we set out to comprehensively characterize the cardiac-restricted Heat Shock Protein B-2 (HspB2), which exhibited ischemic cardioprotection in transgenic overexpressing mice including reduced infarct size and maintenance of ATP levels. Global yeast two-hybrid analysis using HspB2 (bait) and a human cardiac library (prey) coupled with co-immunoprecipitation studies for mitochondrial target validation revealed the first HspB2 "cardiac interactome" to contain many myofibril and mitochondrial-binding partners consistent with the overexpression phenotype. This interactome has been submitted to the Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID). A related sHSP chaperone HspB5 had only partially overlapping binding partners, supporting specificity of the interactome as well as non-redundant roles reported for these sHSPs. Evidence that the cardiac yeast two-hybrid HspB2 interactome targets resident mitochondrial client proteins is consistent with the role of HspB2 in maintaining ATP levels and suggests new chaperone-dependent functions for metabolic homeostasis. One of the HspB2 targets, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has reported roles in HspB2 associated phenotypes including cardiac ATP production, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis, and was validated as a potential client protein of HspB2 through chaperone assays. From the clientele and phenotypes identified herein, it is tempting to

  13. SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF PERIPHERAL VENO-ARTERIAL EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION FOR CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT ANTIBODY-MEDIATED REJECTION WITH SEVERE HEMODYNAMIC COMPROMISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is one of the severe complications of early and late period after heart transplantation (HT. Only few case reports and studies presented of mechanical circulatory support (MCS application for refractory acute rejection causing hemodynamic compromise. Aim. We report the case of a woman with cardiogenic shock caused by severe AMR that was successfully treatment by peripheral venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO. Material and methods. In december 2014, a 60-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy was operated for HT. The patient had a good initial cardiac allograft function and no and was discharged from ICU on the 4th day after HT. 1st endomyocardial biopsy (EMB (the 7th day after HT showed absence of acute cellular and antibody-mediated rejection. On the 11th day after HT patient aggravated and presented clinical signs of life-threatening acute cardiac allograft dysfunction: arterial blood pressure 78/49/38 mm Hg, HR 111 in min, CVP 20 mm Hg, PAP 47/34/25 mm Hg, PCWP 25 mm Hg, CI 1.5 l/min/m2, adrenalin 110 ng/kg/min, dopamine 15 mcg/kg/min. ECG showed impairment of systolic left (LVEF 25% and right (RVEF 15% ventricle function, left and right ventricle diffuse hypokinesis, thickness of IVS, LV and RV wall 1.7, 1.4 and 0.8 cm, tricuspid and mitral valve regurgitation 2–3 degrees. EMB presented AMR. In conscience peripheral VA ECMO was installed. We used peripheral transcutaneous cannulation technique via femoral vessels – arterial cannula 15 F, venous cannula – 23 F, vascular catheter 14 G for anterograde leg’s perfusion. ACT 130–150 sec. AMR therapy included: methylprednisolon pulse-therapy (10 mg/kg for 5 day, IgG, plasmapheresis (No 7, rituximab. Results. Under MCS by VA ECMO we noted quick improvement of hemodynamic, metabolic homeostasis and organ functions. On the 6th day of VA ECMO (blood flow 1.8 l/min: arterial blood pressure 133/81/54 mm Hg, CVP 5 mm

  14. Developmental changes of the sensitivity of cardiac and liver mitochondrial permeability transition pore to calcium load and oxidative stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drahota, Zdeněk; Milerová, Marie; Endlicher, R.; Rychtrmoc, D.; Červinková, Z.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, Suppl.1 (2012), S165-S172. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial permeability transition pore * cardiac mitochondria * liver mitochondria * oxidative stress * calcium load * rat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  15. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces leftventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chainactivity and increases oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eKINDO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular subendocardium (Endo but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi and whether pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure and function were determined with echocardiography and catheterization in sham-operated and LVH rats (n=10 for each group. Mitochondrial respiration rates, coupling, content and ROS production were measured in LV Endo and Epi, using saponin-permeabilised fibres, Amplex Red fluorescence and citrate synthase activity.Results: In sham, a transmural respiratory gradient was observed with decreases in endo maximal oxidative capacity (-36.7%, P<0.01 and complex IV activity (-57.4%, P<0.05. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production was similar in both LV layers.Aortic banding induced mild LVH (+31.7% LV mass, associated with normal LV fractional shortening and end diastolic pressure. LVH reduced maximal oxidative capacity (-23.6 and -33.3%, increased mitochondrial H2O2 production (+86.9 and +73.1%, free radical leak (+27.2% and +36.3% and citrate synthase activity (+27.2% and +36.3% in Endo and Epi, respectively.Transmural mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity was reduced in LVH (-57.4 vs –12.2%; P=0.02. Conclusions: Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities are reduced compared to LV Epi. Mild LVH impairs mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increases oxidative stress and reduces transmural complex IV activity. Further studies will be helpful to determine whether reduced LV transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration might be a new marker of a transition from uncomplicated toward complicated LVH.

  16. An Incompatibility between a Mitochondrial tRNA and Its Nuclear-Encoded tRNA Synthetase Compromises Development and Fitness in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Holmbeck, Marissa A.; Siddiq, Mohammad A.; Abt, Dawn N.; Rand, David M.; Montooth, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription, translation, and respiration require interactions between genes encoded in two distinct genomes, generating the potential for mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes to interact epistatically and cause incompatibilities that decrease fitness. Mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis for fitness has been documented within and between populations and species of diverse taxa, but rarely has the genetic or mechanistic basis of these mitochondrial–nuclear interactions be...

  17. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR)Gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8±3.7 vs 11.0±1.6 mm, p0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) gene. (author)

  18. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20 min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca(2+)-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in the mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  19. Strained Compromises?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Christian Lyhne

    The Danish version of flexicurity is not only about a balance between labour market flexibility and social security. Arguably, it is also series of more or less stable underlying compromises between social partners about the main mechanisms and aims of labour market regulation which – supposedly...... – should be focused on employment rather than jobs and competition on quality rather than on labour costs. However, most studies on Danish flexicurity have been carried out under favourable economic conditions with social partners almost naturally agreeing to the merits of the model – at least in principle...

  20. Sexual hormones: effects on cardiac and mitochondrial activity after ischemia-reperfusion in adult rats. Gender difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón, Natalia; Martínez-Abundis, Eduardo; Hernández, Luz; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Alvarez-Delgado, Carolina; Cerbón, Marco; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Aranda, Alberto; Chávez, Edmundo

    2012-10-01

    In this work we studied the influence of sex hormones on heart and mitochondrial functions, from adult castrated female and male, and intact rats. Castration was performed at their third week of life and on the fourth month animals were subjected to heart ischemia and reperfusion. Electrocardiogram and blood pressure recordings were made, cytokines levels were measured, histopathological studies were performed and thiobarbituric acid reactive species were determined. At the mitochondrial level respiratory control, transmembranal potential and calcium management were determined; Western blot of some mitochondrial components was also performed. Alterations in cardiac function were worst in intact males and castrated females as compared with those found in intact females and castrated males, cytokine levels were modulated also by hormonal status. Regarding mitochondria, in those obtained from hearts from castrated females without ischemia-reperfusion, all evaluated parameters were similar to those observed in mitochondria after ischemia-reperfusion. The results show hormonal influences on the heart at functional and mitochondrial levels. PMID:22609314

  1. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)}Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Hiroshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Shiotani, Hideyuki

    1999-11-01

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8{+-}3.7 vs 11.0{+-}1.6 mm, p<0.001) than those without the mutation. Fractional shortening was lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than those without it (30.7{+-}7.0 vs 42.5{+-}6.6, p<0.001). MIBG uptake on the delayed MIBG image was significantly lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than in those without the mutation (mean value of the heart to mediastinum ratio: 1.6{+-}0.2 vs 2.0{+-}0.4, p>0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)} gene. (author)

  2. Cardiac structure and function during ageing in energetically compromised Guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT-knockout mice – a one year longitudinal MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Kieran

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI is well suited for determining global cardiac function longitudinally in genetically or surgically manipulated mice, but in practice it is seldom used to its full potential. In this study, male and female guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT knockout, and wild type littermate mice were subjected to a longitudinal cine-MRI study at four time points over the course of one year. GAMT is an essential enzyme in creatine biosynthesis, such that GAMT deficient mice are entirely creatine-free. Since creatine plays an important role in the buffering and transfer of high-energy phosphate bonds in the heart, it was hypothesized that lack of creatine would be detrimental for resting cardiac performance during ageing. Methods Measurements of cardiac structure (left ventricular mass and volumes and function (ejection fraction, stroke volume, cardiac output were obtained using high-resolution cine-MRI at 9.4 T under isoflurane anaesthesia. Results There were no physiologically significant differences in cardiac function between wild type and GAMT knockout mice at any time point for male or female groups, or for both combined (for example ejection fraction: 6 weeks (KO vs. WT: 70 ± 6% vs. 65 ± 7%; 4 months: 70 ± 6% vs. 62 ± 8%; 8 months: 62 ± 11% vs. 62 ± 6%; 12 months: 61 ± 7% vs. 59 ± 11%, respectively. Conclusion These findings suggest the presence of comprehensive adaptations in the knockout mice that can compensate for a lack of creatine. Furthermore, this study clearly demonstrates the power of cine-MRI for accurate non-invasive, serial cardiac measurements. Cardiac growth curves could easily be defined for each group, in the same set of animals for all time points, providing improved statistical power, and substantially reducing the number of mice required to conduct such a study. This technique should be eminently useful for following changes of cardiac structure and

  3. Long QT Syndrome Leading to Multiple Cardiac Arrests After Posaconazole Administration in an Immune-Compromised Patient with Sepsis: An Unusual Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panos, George; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Tylianakis, Minos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We present the case of a septic patient with severe immunodeficiency, who developed QT interval prolongation followed by episodes of lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Cardiac events occurred after posaconazole administration, incriminating posaconazole use, alone or in combination with voriconazole, as the culpable agent. CASE REPORT A 26-year-old female patient underwent orthopedic surgery to remove ectopic calcifications in her left hip joint. On the first post-operative day she became septic due to a surgical wound infection. Despite being treated according to the therapeutic protocols for sepsis, no clinical improvement was noticed and further assessment revealed an underlying immunodeficiency. Considering the underlying immunodeficiency and to that point poor clinical response, an antifungal agent was added to the antibiotic regiment. Following discontinuation of multiple antifungal agents due to adverse effects, posaconazole was administered. Posaconazole oral intake was followed by episodes of bradycardia and QT interval prolongation. The patient suffered continuous incidents of cardiac arrest due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsades des pointes) that degenerated to lethal ventricular fibrillation. Posaconazole was immediately discontinued and a temporary pacemaker was installed. The patient finally recovered without any neurological deficit, and was discharged in a good clinical status. CONCLUSIONS Close cardiac monitoring is recommended in cases where posaconazole administration is combined with coexisting risk factors, as they may lead to severe ECG abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT interval syndrome and torsades de pointes. Posaconazole interactions with medications metabolized via the CYP3A4 pathway should be considered an additional risk factor for lethal cardiac incidents. PMID:27125217

  4. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces left ventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and increases oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    BernardGENY; MichelKINDO; LaurentMONASSIER; FabriceFAVRET

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular subendocardium (Endo) but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi) and whether pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure...

  5. MITOCHONDRIAL REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES (ROS AS SIGNALLING MOLECULES OF INTRACELLULAR PATHWAYS TRIGGERED BY THE CARDIAC RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN II-ALDOSTERONE SYSTEM (RAAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Celeste De Giusti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria represent major sources of basal reactive oxygen species (ROS production of the cardiomyocyte. The role of ROS as signalling molecules that mediate different intracellular pathways has gained increasing interest among physiologists in the last years. In our lab, we have been studying the participation of mitochondrial ROS in the intracellular pathways triggered by the renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system (RAAS in the myocardium during the past few years. We have demonstrated that acute activation of cardiac RAAS induces mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channel (mitoKATP opening with the consequent enhanced production of mitochondrial ROS. These oxidant molecules, in turn, activate membrane transporters, as sodium/hydrogen exchanger (NHE-1 and sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC via the stimulation of the ROS-sensitive MAPK cascade. The stimulation of such effectors leads to an increase in cardiac contractility. In addition, it is feasible to suggest that a sustained enhanced production of mitochondrial ROS induced by chronic cardiac RAAS, and hence, chronic NHE-1 and NBC stimulation, would also result in the development of cardiac hypertrophy.

  6. Decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity in the human heart with left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Sander, Kåre; Lund, Jens T; Gustafsson, Finn; Køber, Lars; Dela, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) is associated with a shift in substrate utilization and a compromised energetic state. Whether these changes are connected with mitochondrial dysfunction is not known. We hypothesized that the cardiac phenotype in LVSD could be...

  7. Saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity increases adenylate cyclase of myocardial β-adrenergic system and does not compromise cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vileigas, Danielle F; de Deus, Adriana F; da Silva, Danielle C T; de Tomasi, Loreta C; de Campos, Dijon H S; Adorni, Caroline S; de Oliveira, Scarlet M; Sant'Ana, Paula G; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos R; Cicogna, Antonio C

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic associated with high incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which the obesity leads cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated and few studies have evaluated the relationship between obesity and proteins involved in myocardial β-adrenergic (βA) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiac function and βA pathway components in myocardium of obese rats. Male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: control (n = 17; standard diet) and obese (n = 17; saturated high-fat diet) fed for 33 weeks. Nutritional profile and comorbidities were assessed. Cardiac structure and function was evaluated by macroscopic postmortem, echocardiographic and isolated papillary muscle analyzes. Myocardial protein expression of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, Gαs protein, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) was performed by Western blot. Cardiac cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and PKA activity were assessed by ELISA Obese rats showed increased adiposity index (P < 0.001) and several comorbidities as hypertension, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia compared with control rats. Echocardiographic assessment revealed increased left atrium diameter (C: 4.98 ± 0.38 vs. Ob: 5.47 ± 0.53, P = 0.024) and posterior wall shortening velocity (C: 37.1 ± 3.6 vs. Ob: 41.8 ± 3.8, P = 0.007) in obese group. Papillary muscle evaluation indicated that baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to isoproterenol stimulation were similar between the groups. Protein expression of myocardial AC was higher in obese group than in the control (C: 1.00 ± 0.21 vs. Ob: 1.25 ± 0.10, P = 0.025), whereas the other components were unchanged. These results suggest that saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity was not effective in triggering cardiac dysfunction and impair the beta-adrenergic signaling. PMID:27582064

  8. Increasing tetrahydrobiopterin in cardiomyocytes adversely affects cardiac redox state and mitochondrial function independently of changes in NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Whitsett, Jennifer; Bennett, Brian; Ionova, Irina A; Pieper, Galen M; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2016-04-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) represents a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiac remodeling, fibrosis and/or diastolic dysfunction. The effects of oral treatment with BH4 (Sapropterin™ or Kuvan™) are however dose-limiting with high dose negating functional improvements. Cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase I (mGCH) increases BH4 several-fold in the heart. Using this model, we aimed to establish the cardiomyocyte-specific responses to high levels of BH4. Quantification of BH4 and BH2 in mGCH transgenic hearts showed age-based variations in BH4:BH2 ratios. Hearts of mice (nitrosyl complexes were detected in any of the age groups. Increased BH4 production in cardiomyocytes resulted in a significant loss of mitochondrial function. Diminished oxygen consumption and reserve capacity was verified in mitochondria isolated from hearts of 12-month old compared to 3-month old mice, even though at 12 months an improved BH4:BH2 ratio is established. Accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and decreased glutathione levels were found in the mGCH hearts and isolated mitochondria. Taken together, our results indicate that the ratio of BH4:BH2 does not predict changes in neither NO levels nor cellular redox state in the heart. The BH4 oxidation essentially limits the capacity of cardiomyocytes to reduce oxidant stress. Cardiomyocyte with chronically high levels of BH4 show a significant decline in redox state and mitochondrial function. PMID:26826575

  9. Heart Mitochondrial Proteome Study Elucidates Changes in Cardiac Energy Metabolism and Antioxidant PRDX3 in Human Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Tarazón, Estefanía; Barderas, María G.; Ortega, Ana; Otero, Manuel; Molina-Navarro, Maria Micaela; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Salvador, Antonio; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a public health problem with no available curative treatment, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in its development. The present study is the first to analyze the mitochondrial proteome in cardiac tissue of patients with DCM to identify potential molecular targets for its therapeutic intervention. Methods and Results 16 left ventricular (LV) samples obtained from explanted human hearts with DCM (n = 8) and control donors (n = 8) were extracted to perform a proteomic approach to investigate the variations in mitochondrial protein expression. The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry. These changes were validated by classical techniques and by novel and precise selected reaction monitoring analysis and RNA sequencing approach increasing the total heart samples up to 25. We found significant alterations in energy metabolism, especially in molecules involved in substrate utilization (ODPA, ETFD, DLDH), energy production (ATPA), other metabolic pathways (AL4A1) and protein synthesis (EFTU), obtaining considerable and specific relationships between the alterations detected in these processes. Importantly, we observed that the antioxidant PRDX3 overexpression is associated with impaired ventricular function. PRDX3 is significantly related to LV end systolic and diastolic diameter (r = 0.73, p value<0.01; r = 0.71, p value<0.01), fractional shortening, and ejection fraction (r = −0.61, p value<0.05; and r = −0.62, p value<0.05, respectively). Conclusion This work could be a pivotal study to gain more knowledge on the cellular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of this disease and may lead to the development of etiology-specific heart failure therapies. We suggest new molecular targets for therapeutic interventions, something that up to now has been lacking. PMID:25397948

  10. Heart mitochondrial proteome study elucidates changes in cardiac energy metabolism and antioxidant PRDX3 in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Roselló-Lletí

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a public health problem with no available curative treatment, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in its development. The present study is the first to analyze the mitochondrial proteome in cardiac tissue of patients with DCM to identify potential molecular targets for its therapeutic intervention.16 left ventricular (LV samples obtained from explanted human hearts with DCM (n = 8 and control donors (n = 8 were extracted to perform a proteomic approach to investigate the variations in mitochondrial protein expression. The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry. These changes were validated by classical techniques and by novel and precise selected reaction monitoring analysis and RNA sequencing approach increasing the total heart samples up to 25. We found significant alterations in energy metabolism, especially in molecules involved in substrate utilization (ODPA, ETFD, DLDH, energy production (ATPA, other metabolic pathways (AL4A1 and protein synthesis (EFTU, obtaining considerable and specific relationships between the alterations detected in these processes. Importantly, we observed that the antioxidant PRDX3 overexpression is associated with impaired ventricular function. PRDX3 is significantly related to LV end systolic and diastolic diameter (r = 0.73, p value<0.01; r = 0.71, p value<0.01, fractional shortening, and ejection fraction (r = -0.61, p value<0.05; and r = -0.62, p value<0.05, respectively.This work could be a pivotal study to gain more knowledge on the cellular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of this disease and may lead to the development of etiology-specific heart failure therapies. We suggest new molecular targets for therapeutic interventions, something that up to now has been lacking.

  11. Oxidative Stress in Cardiac Mitochondria Caused by Copper Deficiency May Be Insufficient to Damage Mitochondrial Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper (Cu) deficiency may promote the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the mitochondrial electron transport chain through inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) and increased reduction of respiratory complexes upstream from CCO. In the present study, respiration, H2O2 production and...

  12. Ablation of PGC-1beta results in defective mitochondrial activity, thermogenesis, hepatic function, and cardiac performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Lelliott

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1beta (PGC-1beta has been implicated in important metabolic processes. A mouse lacking PGC-1beta (PGC1betaKO was generated and phenotyped using physiological, molecular, and bioinformatic approaches. PGC1betaKO mice are generally viable and metabolically healthy. Using systems biology, we identified a general defect in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function and, specifically, the electron transport chain. This defect correlated with reduced mitochondrial volume fraction in soleus muscle and heart, but not brown adipose tissue (BAT. Under ambient temperature conditions, PGC-1beta ablation was partially compensated by up-regulation of PGC-1alpha in BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT that lead to increased thermogenesis, reduced body weight, and reduced fat mass. Despite their decreased fat mass, PGC1betaKO mice had hypertrophic adipocytes in WAT. The thermogenic role of PGC-1beta was identified in thermoneutral and cold-adapted conditions by inadequate responses to norepinephrine injection. Furthermore, PGC1betaKO hearts showed a blunted chronotropic response to dobutamine stimulation, and isolated soleus muscle fibres from PGC1betaKO mice have impaired mitochondrial function. Lack of PGC-1beta also impaired hepatic lipid metabolism in response to acute high fat dietary loads, resulting in hepatic steatosis and reduced lipoprotein-associated triglyceride and cholesterol content. Altogether, our data suggest that PGC-1beta plays a general role in controlling basal mitochondrial function and also participates in tissue-specific adaptive responses during metabolic stress.

  13. Endonuclease G is a novel determinant of cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    McDermott-Roe, Ch.; Ye, J.; Ahmed, R.; Sun, X. M.; Serafín, A.; Ware, J.; Bottolo, L.; Muckett, P.; Caňas, X.; Zhang, J.; Rowe, G. C.; Buchan, R.; Lu, H.; Braithwaite, A.; Mancini, M.; Hauton, D.; Martí, R.; García-Arumí, E.; Hubner, N.; Jacob, H.; Serikawa, T.; Zídek, Václav; Papoušek, František; Kolář, František; Cardona, M.; Ruiz-Meana, M.; García-Dorado, D.; Comella, J. X.; Felkin, L. E.; Barton, P. J. R.; Arany, Z.; Pravenec, Michal; Petretto, E.; Sanchis, D.; Cook, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 478, č. 7367 (2011), s. 114-118. ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/08/0166 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : left ventricular hypertrophy * endonuclease G * mitochondrial dysfunction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 36.280, year: 2011

  14. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    OpenAIRE

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R; Gustavo Bonacci; Woodcock, Steven R.; Chen-Shan Chen; Nadiezhda Cantu-Medellin; Kelley, Eric E.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the s...

  15. Caffeine Enhances the Calcium-Dependent Cardiac Mitochondrial Permeability Transition: Relevance for Caffeine Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sardão, Vilma A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Moreno, António J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a compound present in beverages such as tea and coffee, is known to be toxic at high concentrations. Some of the observed clinical conditions include cardiovascular disease and reproductive disorders, among others. The possible toxic effects of caffeine on heart mitochondria are still poorly understood. The influence of caffeine on the mitochondrial permeability transition has not been clarified so far. The objective of this study was to investigate whether...

  16. Mitochondrial Transcription Factors TFA, TFB1 and TFB2: A Search for DNA Variants/Haplotypes and the Risk of Cardiac Hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Alonso-Montes; Castro, Mónica G.; Julián R. Reguero; Andreas Perrot; Cemil Özcelik; Christian Geier; Posch, Maximilian G.; César Morís; Victoria Alvarez; Marta Ruiz-Ortega; Eliecer Coto

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factors mtTFA, mtTFB1 and mtTFB2 are required for the replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), regulating the number of mtDNA copies. Mice with a mtTFA deletion showed a reduced number of mtDNA copies, a reduction in respiratory chain activity, and a characteristic dilated cardiomyopathy. DNA variants in these genes could be involved in the risk for cardiac hypertrophy (HCM). We determined the variation in the TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M genes (using SSCA, DHPLC, and d...

  17. Ionising radiation induces persistent alterations in the cardiac mitochondrial function of C57BL/6 mice 40 weeks after local heart exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy of thoracic and chest-wall tumours increases the long-term risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of local heart irradiation on cardiac mitochondria. Methods: C57BL/6 and atherosclerosis-prone ApoE−/− mice received local heart irradiation with a single X-ray dose of 2 Gy. To investigate the low-dose effect, C57BL/6 mice also received a single heart dose of 0.2 Gy. Functional and proteomic alterations of cardiac mitochondria were evaluated after 40 weeks, compared to age-matched controls. Results: The respiratory capacity of irradiated C57BL/6 cardiac mitochondria was significantly reduced at 40 weeks. In parallel, protein carbonylation was increased, suggesting enhanced oxidative stress. Considerable alterations were found in the levels of proteins of mitochondria-associated cytoskeleton, respiratory chain, ion transport and lipid metabolism. Radiation induced similar but less pronounced effects in the mitochondrial proteome of ApoE−/− mice. In ApoE−/−, no significant change was observed in mitochondrial respiration or protein carbonylation. The dose of 0.2 Gy had no significant effects on cardiac mitochondria. Conclusion: This study suggests that ionising radiation causes non-transient alterations in cardiac mitochondria, resulting in oxidative stress that may ultimately lead to malfunctioning of the heart muscle

  18. Mg(2+) differentially regulates two modes of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in isolated cardiac mitochondria: implications for mitochondrial Ca(2+) sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomeyer, Christoph A; Bazil, Jason N; Stowe, David F; Dash, Ranjan K; Camara, Amadou K S

    2016-06-01

    The manner in which mitochondria take up and store Ca(2+) remains highly debated. Recent experimental and computational evidence has suggested the presence of at least two modes of Ca(2+) uptake and a complex Ca(2+) sequestration mechanism in mitochondria. But how Mg(2+) regulates these different modes of Ca(2+) uptake as well as mitochondrial Ca(2+) sequestration is not known. In this study, we investigated two different ways by which mitochondria take up and sequester Ca(2+) by using two different protocols. Isolated guinea pig cardiac mitochondria were exposed to varying concentrations of CaCl2 in the presence or absence of MgCl2. In the first protocol, A, CaCl2 was added to the respiration buffer containing isolated mitochondria, whereas in the second protocol, B, mitochondria were added to the respiration buffer with CaCl2 already present. Protocol A resulted first in a fast transitory uptake followed by a slow gradual uptake. In contrast, protocol B only revealed a slow and gradual Ca(2+) uptake, which was approximately 40 % of the slow uptake rate observed in protocol A. These two types of Ca(2+) uptake modes were differentially modulated by extra-matrix Mg(2+). That is, Mg(2+) markedly inhibited the slow mode of Ca(2+) uptake in both protocols in a concentration-dependent manner, but not the fast mode of uptake exhibited in protocol A. Mg(2+) also inhibited Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) extrusion. The general Ca(2+) binding properties of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) sequestration system were reaffirmed and shown to be independent of the mode of Ca(2+) uptake, i.e. through the fast or slow mode of uptake. In addition, extra-matrix Mg(2+) hindered Ca(2+) sequestration. Our results indicate that mitochondria exhibit different modes of Ca(2+) uptake depending on the nature of exposure to extra-matrix Ca(2+), which are differentially sensitive to Mg(2+). The implications of these findings in cardiomyocytes are discussed. PMID:26815005

  19. Sex difference in the sensitivity of cardiac mitochondrial permeability transition pore to calcium load

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Milerová, Marie; Drahota, Zdeněk; Chytilová, Anna; Tauchmannová, Kateřina; Houštěk, Josef; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 412, 1-2 (2016), s. 147-154. ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MZd(CZ) NT14050; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-10267S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : heart * mitochondrial permeability transition pore * sex difference * calcium-induced swelling Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.393, year: 2014

  20. Dietary Supplementation with Docosahexaenoic Acid, but Not Eicosapentanoic Acid, Dramatically Alters Cardiac Mitochondrial Phospholipid Fatty Acid Composition and Prevents Permeability Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Khanna, Nishanth; O’Shea, Karen M.; Hecker, Peter A; Kristian, Tibor; Fiskum, Gary; Rosiers, Christine Des; Polster, Brian M.; Stanley, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) docosahexanoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) exerts cardioprotective effects, and suppresses Ca2+-induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). These effects are associated with increased DHA and EPA, and lower arachidonic acid (ARA) in cardiac phospholipids. While clinical studies suggest the triglyceride lowering effects of DHA and EPA are equivalent, little is known about the independent effe...

  1. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces left ventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and increases oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kindo, Michel; Gerelli, Sébastien; Bouitbir, Jamal; Charles, Anne-Laure; Zoll, Joffrey; Hoang Minh, Tam; Monassier, Laurent; Favret, Fabrice; Piquard, François; Geny, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular (LV) subendocardium (Endo) but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi) and whether pressure overload-induced LV hypertrophy (LVH) might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure and function...

  2. Modulation by Central MAPKs/PI3K/sGc of the TNF-α/iNOS-dependent Hypotension and Compromised Cardiac Autonomic Control in Endotoxic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Marwa Y; El-Gowilly, Sahar M; Abdel-Galil, Abdel-Galil A; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2016-08-01

    Reduced blood pressure (BP) and cardiac autonomic activity are early manifestations of endotoxemia. We investigated whether these effects are modulated by central mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and related phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) signaling in conscious rats. The effect of pharmacologic inhibition of these molecular substrates on BP, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) responses evoked by intravascular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 mg/kg) were assessed. LPS (1) lowered BP (2) increased HR, (3) reduced time [SD of beat-to-beat intervals (SDNN), and root mean square of successive differences in R-R intervals (rMSSD)], and frequency domain indices of HRV (total power and spectral bands of low and high-frequency), and (4) elevated serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. The inhibition of TNF-α (pentoxifylline) or inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, aminoguanidine) abolished hemodynamic, HRV, and inflammatory actions of LPS. Intracisternal (i.c.) injection of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor), and SP600125 (MAPKJNK inhibitor) mitigated the hypotensive and tachycardic actions of LPS but failed to affect associated decreases in HRV. MAPKp38 inhibition by i.c. SB203580 produced exactly opposite effects. None of the LPS effects was altered after i.c. PD98059 (MAPKERK1/2 inhibitor). Overall, central MAPKs/PI3K/sGC pathways variably contribute to the TNF-α/iNOS-dependent reductions in BP and HRV seen during endotoxic shock. PMID:27110744

  3. Cardiac-Specific Knockout of ETA Receptor Mitigates Paraquat-Induced Cardiac Contractile Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaxing; Lu, Songhe; Zheng, Qijun; Hu, Nan; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Na; Liu, Min; Gao, Beilei; Zhang, Guoyong; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2016-07-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dim ethyl-4-4'-bipyridinium dichloride), a highly toxic quaternary ammonium herbicide widely used in agriculture, exerts potent toxic prooxidant effects resulting in multi-organ failure including the lung and heart although the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Recent evidence suggests possible involvement of endothelin system in paraquat-induced acute lung injury. This study was designed to examine the role of endothelin receptor A (ETA) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and mitochondrial injury. Wild-type (WT) and cardiac-specific ETA receptor knockout mice were challenged to paraquat (45 mg/kg, i.p.) for 48 h prior to the assessment of echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties, as well as apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Levels of the mitochondrial proteins for biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation including UCP2, HSP90 and PGC1α were evaluated. Our results revealed that paraquat elicited cardiac enlargement, mechanical anomalies including compromised echocardiographic parameters (elevated left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic diameters as well as reduced factional shortening), suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, overt apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. ETA receptor knockout itself failed to affect myocardial function, apoptosis, mitochondrial integrity and mitochondrial protein expression. However, ETA receptor knockout ablated or significantly attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) defect, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Taken together, these findings revealed that endothelin system in particular the ETA receptor may be involved in paraquat-induced toxic myocardial contractile anomalies possibly related to apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. PMID:26089164

  4. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Koenitzer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2 reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval.

  5. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R; Bonacci, Gustavo; Woodcock, Steven R; Chen, Chen-Shan; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2016-08-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H(+) and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval. PMID:26722838

  6. Differential expression of cardiac muscle mitochondrial matrix proteins in broilers from ascites-resistant and susceptible lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, C R; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Donoghue, A M

    2005-05-01

    Ascites is a metabolic disorder of modern broilers that is distinguished by cardiopulmonary insufficiency in the face of intense oxygen demands of rapidly growing tissues. Broilers with ascites exhibit sustained elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy, the end result of which is heart failure. It has been shown that mitochondrial function is impaired in broilers with ascites. In the current study, mitochondrial matrix protein levels were compared between ascites-resistant line broilers and ascites-susceptible line broilers with and without ascites using two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. One hundred seventy-two protein spots were detected on the gels, and 9 of the spots were present at different levels in the 4 groups of broilers. These 9 protein spots were selected for identification by mass spectrometry. Two of the spots were found to contain single mitochondrial matrix proteins. Both mitochondrial matrix proteins, the dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and the alpha-subunit of mitochondrial trifunctional enzyme, were present at higher levels in ascites-resistant line broilers with ascites in the present study. The elevated levels of 2 key proteins in aerobic metabolism in ascites-resistant line broilers with ascites observed in the present study suggests that the mitochondria of broilers with this disease may respond inappropriately to hypoxia. PMID:15913181

  7. Compromises of Bali Roadmap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jingmin; Wei Dong

    2008-01-01

    The Bali Roadmap, as the breakthrough on intergovernmental negotiation of climate change mitigation, having brought United States on track, is still a result of compromises. The major compromises of the Bali Roadmap are centered around three issues of quantifying emission reduction targets, developing countries' obligations as well as quantifying developed countries' financial assistance in developing countries' capacity building on climate change. It is found that the rationalities behind these compromises are the national interests. Due to the fact, achieving cohesion among all nations in climate change actions is very difficult. Therefore, the Bali Roadmap may lead to a tough way with distant hope. However, technology innovation and well-designed economic instruments would be helpful and supportive for further international negotiation and cooperation.

  8. Development of endothermy and concomitant increases in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in the precocial Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirsat, Sarah K G; Sirsat, Tushar S; Faber, Alan; Duquaine, Allison; Winnick, Sarah; Sotherland, Paul R; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2016-04-15

    Attaining endothermic homeothermy occurs at different times post-hatching in birds and is associated with maturation of metabolic and aerobic capacity. Simultaneous measurements at the organism, organ and cellular levels during the transition to endothermy reveal means by which this change in phenotype occurs. We examined development of endothermy in precocial Pekin ducks ( ITALIC! Anas platyrhynchos domestica) by measuring whole-animal O2consumption ( ITALIC! V̇O2 ) as animals cooled from 35 to 15°C. We measured heart ventricle mass, an indicator of O2delivery capacity, and mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized skeletal and cardiac muscle to elucidate associated changes in mitochondrial capacities at the cellular level. We examined animals on day 24 of incubation through 7 days post-hatching. ITALIC! V̇O2  of embryos decreased when cooling from 35 to 15°C; ITALIC! V̇O2  of hatchlings, beginning on day 0 post-hatching, increased during cooling with a lower critical temperature of 32°C. Yolk-free body mass did not change between internal pipping and hatching, but the heart and thigh skeletal muscle grew at faster rates than the rest of the body as the animals transitioned from an externally pipped paranate to a hatchling. Large changes in oxidative phosphorylation capacity occurred during ontogeny in both thigh muscles, the primary site of shivering, and cardiac ventricles. Thus, increased metabolic capacity necessary to attain endothermy was associated with augmented metabolic capacity of the tissue and augmented increasing O2delivery capacity, both of which were attained rapidly at hatching. PMID:26896549

  9. Mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Most of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear DNA (nDNA) whereas a very small fraction is encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes can result in mitochondrial dysfunction which leads to a wide range of cellular perturbations including aberrant calcium homeostasis, excessive reactive oxygen species production, dysregulated apoptosis, and insufficient energy generation to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy demand. Impaired mitochondrial function in various tissues and organs results in the multi-organ manifestations of mitochondrial diseases including epilepsy, intellectual disability, skeletal and cardiac myopathies, hepatopathies, endocrinopathies, and nephropathies. Defects in nDNA genes can be inherited in an autosomal or X-linked manners, whereas, mtDNA is maternally inherited. Mitochondrial diseases can result from mutations of nDNA genes encoding subunits of the electron transport chain complexes or their assembly factors, proteins associated with the mitochondrial import or networking, mitochondrial translation factors, or proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. MtDNA defects can be either point mutations or rearrangements. The diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders can be challenging in many cases and is based on clinical recognition, biochemical screening, histopathological studies, functional studies, and molecular genetic testing. Currently, there are no satisfactory therapies available for mitochondrial disorders that significantly alter the course of the disease. Therapeutic options include symptomatic treatment, cofactor supplementation, and exercise. PMID:26996063

  10. Preserved cardiac mitochondrial function and reduced ischaemia/reperfusion injury afforded by chronic continuous hypoxia: Role of opioid receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maslov, L. N.; Naryzhnaya, N. V.; Prokudina, E. S.; Kolář, František; Gorbunov, A. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, H.; Tsibulnikov, S.Yu.; Portnichenko, A. G.; Lasukova, T. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2015), s. 496-501. ISSN 1440-1681 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardioprotection * chronic hypoxia * ischaemia/reperfusion * mitochondrial function * opioid receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2014

  11. Attenuated Cardiac Mitochondrial-Dependent Apoptotic Effects by Li-Fu Formula in Hamsters Fed with a Hypercholesterol Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wen Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis involves in the pathogenesis of various cardiac abnormalities. This study intends to evaluate the effects of Li-Fu formula on cardiac apoptosis induced by hyper-cholesterol diet. Twenty-four male Golden Syrian hamsters were randomly divided into Control, Cholesterol and Li-Fu formula groups. Histopathological analysis, western blotting and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assays were performed to measure the effects of Li-Fu formula on left ventricle. Significantly reduced TUNEL-positive cells and mitochondria- dependent apoptosis were observed in the left ventricle of hamsters from Li-Fu formula group compared to the Cholesterol group. Additionally, induced cardiac insulin like growth factor I receptor (IGFIR-dependent survival pathway was detected in the Li-Fu formula group compared to the Cholesterol group. Besides, minor fibrosis, increased collagen deposition, and myofibril disarray was detected in the Cholesterol group, whereas the reductions of collagen deposition and myofibril disarray were observed in the Li-Fu formula group. This study demonstrated that Li-Fu formula not only reduced the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and fibrosis, but also enhanced the IGF-I survival pathway in the left ventricle from high cholesterol-fed hamsters. We suggest the protective effects of Li-Fu formula on cardiac apoptosis and therapeutic potentials against cardiovascular disease.

  12. Erythropoietin treatment enhances muscle mitochondrial capacity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Ulla; Belhage, Bo; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia;

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) treatment has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle along with enhanced mitochondrial capacity in mice. We hypothesized that recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) treatment enhances skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in...

  13. A novel mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome: a late-onset of the fatal cardiac conduction deficit and cardiomyopathy accompanying long-term rGH treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Obara-Moszynska, Monika; Maceluch, Jaroslaw; Bobkowski, Waldemar; Baszko, Artur; Jaremba, Oskar; Krawczynski, Maciej R; Niedziela, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Background Kearns-Sayre Syndrome (KSS) is a multisystem disorder caused by a dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system within mitochondria. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements are a key molecular feature of this disease, which manifest a broad phenotypic spectrum. Case presentation Here, we present a boy with KSS whose symptoms included cardiac conduction deficit, cardiomyopathy and growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The patient showed typical symptoms for KSS from early childhood...

  14. Cyclovirobuxine D Attenuates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Suppression of Oxidative Damage and Mitochondrial Biogenesis Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of doxorubicin (DOX is compromised by its cardiac toxic effect. Cyclovirobuxine D (CVB-D is a steroid alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicine, Buxus microphylla. Our results showed that CVB-D pretreatment markedly attenuated DOX-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and histological alterations. By using TUNEL assay and western blot analysis, we found that CVB-D pretreatment reduced DOX-induced apoptosis of myocardial cells and mitochondrial cytochrome c release to cytosol. CVB-D pretreatment ameliorated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative damage including lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation and a decrease in the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH to oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Moreover, CVB-D was found to prevent DOX-induced mitochondrial biogenesis impairment as evidenced by preservation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1, as well as mitochondrial DNA copy number. These findings demonstrate that CVB-D protects against DOX-induced cardiomyopathy, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative damage and mitochondrial biogenesis impairment.

  15. Flow-based Compromise Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Hofstede, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Brute-force attacks are omnipresent and manyfold on the Internet, and aim at compromising user accounts by issuing large numbers of authentication attempts on applications and daemons. Widespread targets of such attacks are Secure SHell (SSH) and Web applications, for example. The impact of brute-force attacks and compromises resulting thereof is often severe: Once compromised, attackers gain access to remote machines, allowing those machines to be misused for all sorts of criminal activities...

  16. [Tuberculosis in compromised hosts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Recent development of tuberculosis in Japan tends to converge on a specific high risk group. The proportion of tuberculosis developing particularly from the compromised hosts in the high risk group is especially high. At this symposium, therefore, we took up diabetes mellitus, gastrectomy, dialysis, AIDS and the elderly for discussion. Many new findings and useful reports for practical medical treatment are submitted; why these compromised hosts are predisposed to tuberculosis, tuberculosis diagnostic and remedial notes of those compromised hosts etc. It is an important question for the future to study how to prevent tuberculosis from these compromised hosts. 1. Tuberculosis in diabetes mellitus: aggravation and its immunological mechanism: Kazuyoshi KAWAKAMI (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus). It has been well documented that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major aggravating factor in tuberculosis. The onset of this disease is more frequent in DM patients than in individuals with any underlying diseases. However, the precise mechanism of this finding remains to be fully understood. Earlier studies reported that the migration, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of neutrophils are all impaired in DM patients, which is related to their reduced host defense to infection with extracellular bacteria, such as S. aureus and E. colli. Host defense to mycobacterial infection is largely mediated by cellular immunity, and Th1-related cytokines, such as IFN-gamma and IL-12, play a central role in this response. It is reported that serum level of these cytokines and their production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are reduced in tuberculosis patients with DM, and this is supposed to be involved in the high incidence of tuberculosis in DM. Our study observed similar findings and furthermore indicated that IFN-gamma and IL-12 production by BCG-stimulated PBMC was lower

  17. Diminishing impairments in glucose uptake, mitochondrial content, and ADP-stimulated oxygen flux by mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the infarcted heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughey, Curtis C; James, Freyja D; Ma, Lianli; Bracy, Deanna P; Wang, Zhizhang; Wasserman, David H; Rottman, Jeffrey N; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    A constant provision of ATP is of necessity for cardiac contraction. As the heart progresses toward failure following a myocardial infarction (MI), it undergoes metabolic alterations that have the potential to compromise the ability to meet energetic demands. This study evaluated the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation into the infarcted heart to minimize impairments in the metabolic processes that contribute to energy provision. Seven and twenty-eight days following the MI and MSC transplantation, MSC administration minimized cardiac systolic dysfunction. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, coupled with 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose administration, were employed to assess systemic insulin sensitivity and tissue-specific, insulin-mediated glucose uptake 36 days following the MI in the conscious, unrestrained, C57BL/6 mouse. The improved systolic performance in MSC-treated mice was associated with a preservation of in vivo insulin-stimulated cardiac glucose uptake. Conserved glucose uptake in the heart was linked to the ability of the MSC treatment to diminish the decline in insulin signaling as assessed by Akt phosphorylation. The MSC treatment also sustained mitochondrial content, ADP-stimulated oxygen flux, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation efficiency in the heart. Maintenance of mitochondrial function and density was accompanied by preserved peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. These studies provide insight into mechanisms of action that lead to an enhanced energetic state in the infarcted heart following MSC transplantation that may assist in energy provision and dampen cardiac dysfunction. PMID:24196528

  18. The impact of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion on the mitochondria-cytoskeleton interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagur, Rafaela; Tanguy, Stéphane; Foriel, Sarah; Grichine, Alexei; Sanchez, Caroline; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Kaambre, Tuuli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Usson, Yves; Boucher, François; Guzun, Rita

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) and compartmentalized intracellular energy transfer via the phosphocreatine/creatine kinase (CK) network. The restriction of ATP/ADP diffusion at the level of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) is an essential element of compartmentalized energy transfer. In adult cardiomyocytes, the MOM permeability to ADP is regulated by the interaction of voltage-dependent anion channel with cytoskeletal proteins, particularly with β tubulin II. The IR-injury alters the expression and the intracellular arrangement of cytoskeletal proteins. The objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of IR on the intracellular arrangement of β tubulin II and its effect on the regulation of mitochondrial respiration. Perfused rat hearts were subjected to total ischemia (for 20min (I20) and 45min (I45)) or to ischemia followed by 30min of reperfusion (I20R and I45R groups). High resolution respirometry and fluorescent confocal microscopy were used to study respiration, β tubulin II and mitochondrial arrangements in cardiac fibers. The results of these experiments evidence a heterogeneous response of mitochondria to IR-induced damage. Moreover, the intracellular rearrangement of β tubulin II, which in the control group colocalized with mitochondria, was associated with increased apparent affinity of OxPhos for ADP, decreased regulation of respiration by creatine without altering mitochondrial CK activity and the ratio between octameric to dimeric isoenzymes. The results of this study allow us to highlight changes of mitochondrial interactions with cytoskeleton as one of the possible mechanisms underlying cardiac IR injury. PMID:26976332

  19. Flow-based Compromise Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Brute-force attacks are omnipresent and manyfold on the Internet, and aim at compromising user accounts by issuing large numbers of authentication attempts on applications and daemons. Widespread targets of such attacks are Secure SHell (SSH) and Web applications, for example. The impact of brute-fo

  20. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; De Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Sillje, Herman H W

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a genetic variant in the mitochondrial exo/endo nuclease EXOG, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrop

  1. A role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ling; Wang, Miao; Martin, Ola J; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Han, Xianlin; Kelly, Daniel P

    2014-01-24

    The energy demands of the adult mammalian heart are met largely by ATP generated via oxidation of fatty acids in a high capacity mitochondrial system. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1)-α and -β serve as inducible transcriptional coregulators of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism. Whether PGC-1 plays a role in the regulation of mitochondrial structure is unknown. In this study, mice with combined deficiency of PGC-1α and PGC-1β (PGC-1αβ(-/-)) in adult heart were analyzed. PGC-1αβ(-/-) hearts exhibited a distinctive mitochondrial cristae-stacking abnormality suggestive of a phospholipid abnormality as has been described in humans with genetic defects in cardiolipin (CL) synthesis (Barth syndrome). A subset of molecular species, containing n-3 polyunsaturated species in the CL, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine profiles, was reduced in PGC-1αβ-deficient hearts. Gene expression profiling of PGC-1αβ(-/-) hearts revealed reduced expression of the gene encoding CDP-diacylglycerol synthase 1 (Cds1), an enzyme that catalyzes the proximal step in CL biosynthesis. Cds1 gene promoter-reporter cotransfection experiments and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that PGC-1α coregulates estrogen-related receptors to activate the transcription of the Cds1 gene. We conclude that the PGC-1/estrogen-related receptor axis coordinately regulates metabolic and membrane structural programs relevant to the maintenance of high capacity mitochondrial function in heart. PMID:24337569

  2. Cardiac mitochondria exhibit dynamic functional clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FelixTobiasKurz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-oscillatory behavior of mitochondrial inner membrane potential ΔΨm in self-organized cardiac mitochondrial networks can be triggered by metabolic or oxidative stress. Spatio-temporal analyses of cardiac mitochondrial networks have shown that mitochondria are heterogeneously organized in synchronously oscillating clusters in which the mean cluster frequency and size are inversely correlated, thus suggesting a modulation of cluster frequency through local inter-mitochondrial coupling. In this study, we propose a method to examine the mitochondrial network's topology through quantification of its dynamic local clustering coefficients. Individual mitochondrial ΔΨm oscillation signals were identified for each cardiac myocyte and cross-correlated with all network mitochondria using previously described methods (Kurz et al., 2010. Time-varying inter-mitochondrial connectivity, defined for mitochondria in the whole network whose signals are at least 90% correlated at any given time point, allowed considering functional local clustering coefficients. It is shown that mitochondrial clustering in isolated cardiac myocytes changes dynamically and is significantly higher than for random mitochondrial networks that are constructed using the Erdös-Rényi model based on the same sets of vertices. The network's time-averaged clustering coefficient for cardiac myocytes was found to be 0.500 ± 0.051 (N=9 versus 0.061 ± 0.020 for random networks, respectively. Our results demonstrate that cardiac mitochondria constitute a network with dynamically connected constituents whose topological organization is prone to clustering. Cluster partitioning in networks of coupled oscillators has been observed in scale-free and chaotic systems and is therefore in good agreement with previous models of cardiac mitochondrial networks (Aon et al., 2008.

  3. Evaluation of the mitochondrial respiration of cardiac myocytes in rats submitted to mechanical bile duct obstruction Avaliação da respiração mitocondrial de miócitos cardíacos em ratos ictéricos sumetidos à obstrução do ducto biliar

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Kemp; Orlando de Castro-e-Silva; José Sebastião dos Santos; Ajith Kumar Sankarankutty; Rodrigo Borges Correa; Caroline Floreoto Baldo; Maria Elisa Jordani Souza; Maria Cecilia Jordani

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of the myocardium for energy production by the analysis of mitochondrial respiration in rats with jaundice submitted to bile duct ligature. METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into 2 Groups: Group SO submitted to nontherapeutic laparotomy (sham operation) and Group IC (icteric group) submitted to bile duct ligature. After 7 days, laparotomy was again performed in all animals for cardiac muscle extraction and a...

  4. Hsp90 inhibition decreases mitochondrial protein turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daciana H Margineantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells treated with hsp90 inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic changes, including an expansion of the mitochondrial compartment, accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and condensed mitochondrial morphology, with ultimate compromise of mitochondrial integrity and apoptosis. FINDINGS: We identified several mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits, including several encoded by mtDNA, that are upregulated by hsp90 inhibitors, without corresponding changes in mRNA abundance. Post-transcriptional accumulation of mitochondrial proteins observed with hsp90 inhibitors is also seen in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Detailed studies of the OSCP subunit of mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase revealed the presence of mono- and polyubiquitinated OSCP in mitochondrial fractions. We demonstrate that processed OSCP undergoes retrotranslocation to a trypsin-sensitive form associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Inhibition of proteasome or hsp90 function results in accumulation of both correctly targeted and retrotranslocated mitochondrial OSCP. CONCLUSIONS: Cytosolic turnover of mitochondrial proteins demonstrates a novel connection between mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Analogous to defective protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a mitochondrial unfolded protein response may play a role in the apoptotic effects of hsp90 and proteasome inhibitors.

  5. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Prevents Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Tafazzin Gene Knockdown in Cardiac Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tafazzin, a mitochondrial acyltransferase, plays an important role in cardiolipin side chain remodeling. Previous studies have shown that dysfunction of tafazzin reduces cardiolipin content, impairs mitochondrial function, and causes dilated cardiomyopathy in Barth syndrome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the development of cardiomyopathy and are also the obligated byproducts of mitochondria. We hypothesized that tafazzin knockdown increases ROS production from mitochondria, and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents tafazzin knockdown induced mitochondrial and cardiac dysfunction. We employed cardiac myocytes transduced with an adenovirus containing tafazzin shRNA as a model to investigate the effects of the mitochondrial antioxidant, mito-Tempo. Knocking down tafazzin decreased steady state levels of cardiolipin and increased mitochondrial ROS. Treatment of cardiac myocytes with mito-Tempo normalized tafazzin knockdown enhanced mitochondrial ROS production and cellular ATP decline. Mito-Tempo also significantly abrogated tafazzin knockdown induced cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, and cell death. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents cardiac dysfunction induced by tafazzin gene knockdown in cardiac myocytes and suggest mito-Tempo as a potential therapeutic for Barth syndrome and other dilated cardiomyopathies resulting from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

  6. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents cardiac dysfunction induced by tafazzin gene knockdown in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quan; Harris, Nicole; Ren, Jun; Han, Xianlin

    2014-01-01

    Tafazzin, a mitochondrial acyltransferase, plays an important role in cardiolipin side chain remodeling. Previous studies have shown that dysfunction of tafazzin reduces cardiolipin content, impairs mitochondrial function, and causes dilated cardiomyopathy in Barth syndrome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the development of cardiomyopathy and are also the obligated byproducts of mitochondria. We hypothesized that tafazzin knockdown increases ROS production from mitochondria, and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents tafazzin knockdown induced mitochondrial and cardiac dysfunction. We employed cardiac myocytes transduced with an adenovirus containing tafazzin shRNA as a model to investigate the effects of the mitochondrial antioxidant, mito-Tempo. Knocking down tafazzin decreased steady state levels of cardiolipin and increased mitochondrial ROS. Treatment of cardiac myocytes with mito-Tempo normalized tafazzin knockdown enhanced mitochondrial ROS production and cellular ATP decline. Mito-Tempo also significantly abrogated tafazzin knockdown induced cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, and cell death. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents cardiac dysfunction induced by tafazzin gene knockdown in cardiac myocytes and suggest mito-Tempo as a potential therapeutic for Barth syndrome and other dilated cardiomyopathies resulting from mitochondrial oxidative stress. PMID:25247053

  7. Forensic Analysis of Compromised Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Directory Tree Analysis File Generator is a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) script that simplifies and automates the collection of information for forensic analysis of compromised computer systems. During such an analysis, it is sometimes necessary to collect and analyze information about files on a specific directory tree. Directory Tree Analysis File Generator collects information of this type (except information about directories) and writes it to a text file. In particular, the script asks the user for the root of the directory tree to be processed, the name of the output file, and the number of subtree levels to process. The script then processes the directory tree and puts out the aforementioned text file. The format of the text file is designed to enable the submission of the file as input to a spreadsheet program, wherein the forensic analysis is performed. The analysis usually consists of sorting files and examination of such characteristics of files as ownership, time of creation, and time of most recent access, all of which characteristics are among the data included in the text file.

  8. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grevengoed, Trisha J; Cooper, Daniel E; Young, Pamela A; Ellis, Jessica M; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2015-01-01

    protein and RNA synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, while decreasing autophagy. Compared with controls, Acsl1(T-/-) hearts contained 3 times more mitochondria with abnormal structure and displayed a 35-43% lower respiratory function. To study the effects of mTORC1 activation on mitochondrial structure......, which was likely caused by the 33-51% lower ATP synthase activity present in both vehicle- and rapamycin-treated Acsl1(T-/-) hearts. The turnover of microtubule associated protein light chain 3b in Acsl1(T-/-) hearts was 88% lower than controls, indicating a diminished rate of autophagy. Rapamycin...... treatment increased autophagy to a rate that was 3.1-fold higher than in controls, allowing the formation of autophagolysosomes and the clearance of damaged mitochondria. Thus, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 (ACSL1) deficiency in the heart activated mTORC1, thereby inhibiting autophagy and...

  9. Integrity and compromise in nursing ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, B J; Winslow, G R

    1991-06-01

    Nurses are often caught in the middle of what appear to be intractable moral conflicts. For such times, the function and limits of moral compromise need to be explored. Compromise is compatible with moral integrity if a number of conditions are met. Among these are the sharing of a moral language, mutual respect on the part of those who differ, acknowledgement of factual and moral complexities, and recognition of limits to compromise. Nurses are in a position uniquely suited to leadership in fostering an environment that makes compromise with integrity possible. PMID:1880466

  10. An open source HPC-enabled model of cardiac defibrillation of the human heart

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabeu Llinares, Miguel Oscar; Pitt-Francis, Joe; Rodriguez, Blanca; Kay, David

    2011-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death following cardiac arrest is a major killer in the industrialised world. The leading cause of sudden cardiac death are disturbances in the normal electrical activation of cardiac tissue, known as cardiac arrhythmia, which severely compromise the ability of the heart to fulfill the body's demand of oxygen. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the most deadly form of cardiac arrhythmia. Furthermore, electrical defibrillation through the application of strong electric shocks to t...

  11. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  12. 48 CFR 1432.610 - Compromising debts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromising debts. 1432.610 Section 1432.610 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 1432.610 Compromising debts. The CO may...

  13. 48 CFR 32.610 - Compromising debts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 32.610 Compromising debts. For debts under $100,000, excluding interest, the designated agency official may compromise the debt pursuant to the Federal Claims Collection Standards (31 CFR part 902) and agency regulations. Unless specifically authorized by agency...

  14. An axiomatization of the Euclidean compromise solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorneveld, M.; Nouweland, A. van den

    2001-01-01

    The Euclidean compromise solution in multicriteria optimization is a solution concept that assigns to a feasible set the alternative with minimal Euclidean distance to the utopia point The purpose of this paper is to provide a characterization of the Euclidean compromise solution

  15. Phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitor (cilostazol) attenuates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siriporn C.Chattipakorn; Savitree Thummasorn; Jantira Sanit; Nipon Chattipakorn

    2014-01-01

    Background Cilostazol is a type 3 phosphodiesterase inhibitor which has been previously demonstrated to prevent the occurrence of tachyarrhythmia and improve defibrillation efficacy. However, the mechanism for this beneficial effect is still unclear. Since cardiac mito-chondria have been shown to play a crucial role in fatal cardiac arrhythmias and that oxidative stress is one of the main contributors to arr-hythmia generation, we tested the effects of cilostazol on cardiac mitochondria under severe oxidative stress. Methods Mitochondria were isolated from rat hearts and treated with H2O2 to induce oxidative stress. Cilostazol, at various concentrations, was used to study its protective effects. Pharmacological interventions, including a mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) blocker, cyclosporine A (CsA), and an inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) blocker, 4’-chlorodiazepam (CDP), were used to investigate the mechanistic role of cilostazol on cardiac mitochondria. Cardiac mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential change and mi-tochondrial swelling were determined as indicators of cardiac mitochondrial function. Results Cilostazol preserved cardiac mitochondrial function when exposed to oxidative stress by preventing mitochondrial depolarization, mitochondrial swelling, and decreasing ROS produc-tion. Conclusions Our findings suggest that cardioprotective effects of cilostazol reported previously could be due to its prevention of car-diac mitochondrial dysfunction caused by severe oxidative stress.

  16. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  17. Iterated Kalai-Smorodinsky-Nash Compromise

    OpenAIRE

    Saglam, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new n-person bargaining solution, which we call Iterated Kalai-Smorodinsky-Nash Compromise. We show that this solution is the unique solution satisfying a new axiom called Kalai-Smorodinsky-Nash Decomposability.

  18. 48 CFR 232.616 - Compromise actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 232.616 Compromise actions. Only the department/agency contract financing offices (see 232.070(c)) are authorized...

  19. Towards Detecting Compromised Accounts on Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Egele, Manuel; Stringhini, Gianluca; Kruegel, Christopher; Vigna, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Compromising social network accounts has become a profitable course of action for cybercriminals. By hijacking control of a popular media or business account, attackers can distribute their malicious messages or disseminate fake information to a large user base. The impacts of these incidents range from a tarnished reputation to multi-billion dollar monetary losses on financial markets. In our previous work, we demonstrated how we can detect large-scale compromises (i.e., so-called campaigns)...

  20. Role of mitochondrial lipids in guiding fission and fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Frohman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Clinically-important links have been established between mitochondrial function and cardiac physiology and disease in the context of signaling mechanisms, energy production, and muscle cell development. The proteins and processes that drive mitochondrial fusion and fission are now known to have emergent functions in intracellular calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, myofibril organization, and Notch-driven cell differentiation, all key issues in cardiac d...

  1. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NINDS supports research focused on effective treatments and cures for mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases. Scientists are investigating the possible benefits of exercise programs and nutritional supplements, primarily natural and synthetic versions of CoQ10. While CoQ10 has ...

  2. Mitochondrial plasticity in pathophysiological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Padrão, Ana Isabel Martins Novais

    2013-01-01

    Both skeletal and cardiac muscles daily burn tremendous amounts of ATP to meet the energy requirements for contraction. So, it is not surprising that the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology, number, distribution and functionality in striated muscle are important for muscle homeostasis. In these tissues mitochondria present the added dimension of two populations, the intermyofibrillar (IMF) and the subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria, being IMF the most abundant one. In the present thesis, th...

  3. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  4. The morality in/of compromise: some

    OpenAIRE

    Nachi, Mohamed

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to highlight the position occupied by compromise in the field of ethics. The argument is set out in two stages. First, the author attempts to clarify the contours of compromise by treating it as both a procedure or process of conflict resolution and a goal or ‘‘solution’’ to be achieved. In the second stage, he examines the distinction that could be made between ‘‘morality in compromise’’ and ‘‘morality of compromise’’, so as to measure its import and show how...

  5. Modeling the Dynamics of Compromised Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soper, B; Merl, D M

    2011-09-12

    Accurate predictive models of compromised networks would contribute greatly to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the detection and control of network attacks. Compartmental epidemiological models have been applied to modeling attack vectors such as viruses and worms. We extend the application of these models to capture a wider class of dynamics applicable to cyber security. By making basic assumptions regarding network topology we use multi-group epidemiological models and reaction rate kinetics to model the stochastic evolution of a compromised network. The Gillespie Algorithm is used to run simulations under a worst case scenario in which the intruder follows the basic connection rates of network traffic as a method of obfuscation.

  6. Impaired coronary metabolic dilation in the metabolic syndrome is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, Giacinta; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Pung, Yuh Fen; Marzilli, Mario; Chen, Yeong Renn; Chen, Chwen Lih; Kang, Patrick T; Hardwick, James P; Kolz, Christopher L; Yin, Liya; Wilson, Glenn L; Shokolenko, Inna; Dobson, James G; Fenton, Richard; Chilian, William M

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity and diabetes can be caused by excessive production of free radicals, which can damage mitochondrial DNA. Because mitochondrial DNA plays a key role in the production of ATP necessary for cardiac work, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction, induced by mitochondrial DNA damage, uncouples coronary blood flow from cardiac work. Myocardial blood flow (contrast echocardiography) was measured in Zucker lean (ZLN) and obese fatty (ZOF) rats during increased cardiac metabolism (product of heart rate and arterial pressure, i.v. norepinephrine). In ZLN increased metabolism augmented coronary blood flow, but in ZOF metabolic hyperemia was attenuated. Mitochondrial respiration was impaired and ROS production was greater in ZOF than ZLN. These were associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ZOF. To determine if coronary metabolic dilation, the hyperemic response induced by heightened cardiac metabolism, is linked to mitochondrial function we introduced recombinant proteins (intravenously or intraperitoneally) in ZLN and ZOF to fragment or repair mtDNA, respectively. Repair of mtDNA damage restored mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation, and reduced ROS production in ZOF; whereas induction of mtDNA damage in ZLN reduced mitochondrial function, increased ROS production, and attenuated metabolic dilation. Adequate metabolic dilation was also associated with the extracellular release of ADP, ATP, and H2O2 by cardiac myocytes; whereas myocytes from rats with impaired dilation released only H2O2. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial function plays a seminal role in connecting myocardial blood flow to metabolism, and integrity of mtDNA is central to this process. PMID:27040114

  7. MITOCHONDRIAL DYNAMICS IN PRE- AND POSTPUBERTAL PIG OOCYTES BEFORE AND AFTER IN VITRO MATURATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H. S.; Løvendahl, P.; Nikolaisen, N. K.;

    2013-01-01

    . Oocytes were processed for transmission electron microscopy (Acta Anat. 129:12). For assessment of mitochondrial numbers, paired dissector sections were collected at uniform intervals throughout the oocyte, and in each set of dissector sections a known area fraction was sampled for mitochondrial counting......-like and compartmentalized mitochondria indicate (1) dividing mitochondria (increasing mitochondrial numbers during maturation), or (2) apoptosis-related mitochondrial fission (compromised oocytes after maturation). After IVM, mitochondria seemed to reach the final central position most consistently in POST...

  8. Mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) frequently is the unfavorable outcome of pathological heart hypertrophy. In contrast to physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which occurs in response to exercise and leads to full adaptation of contractility to the increased wall stress, pathological hypertrophy occurs in response to volume or pressure overload, ultimately leading to contractile dysfunction and HF. Because cardiac hypertrophy impairs the relationship between ATP demand and production, mitochondrial bioenerget...

  9. Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your body tissues. If you have a metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are small structures that produce energy in ...

  10. Convergent mechanisms for dysregulation of mitochondrial quality control in metabolic disease: implications for mitochondrial therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Tanecia; Chacko, Balu; Ballinger, Scott; Bailey, Shannon; Zhang, Jianhua; Darley-Usmar, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a broad range of pathologies including diabetes, ethanol toxicity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiac failure. It is now becoming clear that maintaining mitochondrial quality through a balance between biogenesis, reserve capacity, and mitophagy is critical in determining the response to metabolic or xenobiotic stress. In diseases associated with metabolic stress, such as type II diabetes, non-alcoholic and alcoholic steatosis, the mitochondria are sub...

  11. Objections to the Libertarian Stem Cell Compromise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter E. Block

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In Block (2010 I offered a compromise between the pro choice position that fervently supports stem cell research, and the pro life philosophy which bitterly opposes it. The compromise was a contest: allow would be researchers to create as many fertilized eggs as they wished. But, also, these should be offered up to would be parents to adopt all of these “children” as they wanted. If and only if there were any unadopted fetuses remaining in the laboratories of the nation would it be licit, on libertarian grounds, for research on them to take place. In the present paper I respond to several objections to this “modest proposal.”

  12. WHEN DATA REPRESENTATION COMPROMISE DATA SECURITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Eivind Ortind; Dahl, Mads Ronald

    . These representations can be used for multiple purposes such as publications in journals, teaching and conference material. But when created, stored and distributed in a digital form there is a risk of compromising data security. Data beyond the once used specifically to create the representation can be included......WHEN DATA REPRESENTATION COMPROMISE DATA SECURITY The workflow of transforming data into informative representations makes extensive usage of computers and software. Scientists have a conventional tradition for producing publications that include tables and graphs as data representations...... as Object Linking and Embedding (OLE-objects). The OLE-object may “hide” data, in some cases sensitive data, such as data from research or health care information that was in the original data complex. This issue is known and documented but why is it then still a problem leading to data being exposed...

  13. Multiple Criteria Decision Making With Compromise Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. MUTHU NESA BEULA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the exposition of the logical structure of the most commonly used MCDM technique compromise programming and to show how it can be used to model the decision process. The concept of ideal or Utopian solution is introduced and taken as the reference point for the analysis. The concept of Lp metric is used in finding the optimal solution. An example is given for illustration.

  14. Compete and Compromise: Machiavellianism and Conflict Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Mesko, Norbert; Lang, Andras; Andrea, Czibor; Szijjarto, Linda; Bereczkei, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our present study was to examine Machiavellians’ conflict management styles that have been neglected in previous research. One hundred eighty three participants completed the Thomas-Kilmann Instrument and the Mach-IV test. A positive correlation was found between the scores on the Mach scale and the scores on the Competing and Compromising subscales, while a negative correlation was found between Mach scores and Avoiding and Accommodating scores. These results coincide with finding...

  15. Genetic deletion of the mitochondrial phosphate carrier desensitizes the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and causes cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kwong, J Q; Davis, J; Baines, C P; Sargent, M.A.; Karch, J.; X. Wang; Huang, T.; Molkentin, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial phosphate carrier (PiC) is critical for ATP synthesis by serving as the primary means for mitochondrial phosphate import across the inner membrane. In addition to its role in energy production, PiC is hypothesized to have a role in cell death as either a component or a regulator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) complex. Here, we have generated a mouse model with inducible and cardiac-specific deletion of the Slc25a3 gene (PiC protein). Loss of PiC pro...

  16. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels ofperoxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1αand the downstream targetscytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, andIdh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (allPrespiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function. PMID:26825520

  17. Mitochondrial accumulation of APP and Abeta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Pavel F; Petersen, Anna Camilla Hansson; Glaser, Elzbieta;

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that alterations in energy metabolism are among the earliest events that occur in the Alzheimer disease (AD) affected brain. Energy consumption is drastically decreased in the AD-affected regions of cerebral cortex and hippocampus pointing towards compromised...... mitochondrial function of neurons within specific brain regions. This is accompanied by an elevated production of reactive oxygen species contributing to increased rates of neuronal loss in the AD-affected brain regions. In this review, we will discuss the role of mitochondrial function and dysfunction in AD...

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  19. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  20. Democracy as a Way to Social Compromise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Zhen

    2006-01-01

    In modem society,democracy as a symbol of social civilization and progress is cherished.Any government or organization,whether truly democratic or not,will claim that it is democratic while its opponents are not.However,as a historical notion,democracy does not possess the quality of absoluteness.In my view,democracy,in its original meaning,should be understood as a way to social compromise,whose aim is to guarantee a relatively fair political life.

  1. Compromise and Synchronization in Opinion Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pluchino, A; Rapisarda, A; Pluchino, Alessandro; Latora, Vito; Rapisarda, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two interesting models of opinion dynamics. We present first a brief review of the Hegselmann and Krause compromise model in two dimensions, showing that it is possible to simulate the opinion dynamics in the limit of an infinite number of agents by solving numerically a rate equation for a continuum distribution of opinions. Then we discuss the OCR model, which represents an alternative point of view in opinion dynamics and allows to study under which conditions a group of agents with a different natural tendency (rate) to change opinion can find agreement. Within this model, inspired to the Kuramoto model, consensus is viewed as a synchronization process.

  2. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Costello BT; Nadel J.; Taylor AJ

    2016-01-01

    Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting syst...

  3. Haemodynamic compromise during thoracoscopic/laparoscopic oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, P P; Moore, P G; Nguyen, N T

    2001-12-01

    Minimally invasive oesophagectomy is a relatively new procedure that is performed by means of thoracoscopy and laparoscopy. One stage of the procedure involves creation of a peritoneo-pleural communication in the presence of a pneumoperitoneum. In the case presented, severe hypotension occurred at this point. We believe this was caused by the escape of carbon dioxide from the peritoneal cavity into the right hemithorax, resulting in tension pneumothorax and cardiac tamponade. We believe this to be a predictable complication of this procedure but one that if expected, recognised and correctly managed, should not result in adverse outcomes. PMID:11771610

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates mitochondrial quality control in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Travis D.; Boddu, Ravindra; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C.; Traylor, Amie M.; Patel, Bindiya; Joseph, Reny; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The cardioprotective inducible enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) degrades prooxidant heme into equimolar quantities of carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. We hypothesized that HO-1 mediates cardiac protection, at least in part, by regulating mitochondrial quality control. We treated WT and HO-1 transgenic mice with the known mitochondrial toxin, doxorubicin (DOX). Relative to WT mice, mice globally overexpressing human HO-1 were protected from DOX-induced dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac cytoarchitectural derangement, and infiltration of CD11b+ mononuclear phagocytes. Cardiac-specific overexpression of HO-1 ameliorated DOX-mediated dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondrial disorganization in the form of mitochondrial fragmentation and increased numbers of damaged mitochondria in autophagic vacuoles. HO-1 overexpression promotes mitochondrial biogenesis by upregulating protein expression of NRF1, PGC1α, and TFAM, which was inhibited in WT animals treated with DOX. Concomitantly, HO-1 overexpression inhibited the upregulation of the mitochondrial fission mediator Fis1 and resulted in increased expression of the fusion mediators, Mfn1 and Mfn2. It also prevented dynamic changes in the levels of key mediators of the mitophagy pathway, PINK1 and parkin. Therefore, these findings suggest that HO-1 has a novel role in protecting the heart from oxidative injury by regulating mitochondrial quality control. PMID:27110594

  5. 20 CFR 340.13 - Compromise of amounts recoverable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INSURANCE ACT RECOVERY OF BENEFITS § 340.13 Compromise of amounts recoverable. The Board or its designee may compromise an amount recoverable, provided such amount does not exceed $100,000, excluding interest, or such... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compromise of amounts recoverable....

  6. 49 CFR 1018.71 - Referral of a compromise offer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Referral of a compromise offer. 1018.71 Section... § 1018.71 Referral of a compromise offer. The Board may refer a debtor's firm written offer of compromise which is substantial in amount to GAO or to DOJ if the Board is uncertain whether the offer should...

  7. 5 CFR 185.146 - Compromise or settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compromise or settlement. 185.146 Section 185.146 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.146 Compromise or settlement. (a) Parties may make offers of compromise...

  8. A 'historical compromise' in energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is the idea of the new energy-political colloquium to provide an opportunity for journalists to discuss topical economic issues with experts, to have the report of the Enquete Commission explained by members of the Commission, to have the opinions of majorities and minorities substantiated, and to be able to discuss them together with other experts. Since its publication in summer 1980 the report of the Commission has hardly been likely to have been interpreted and discussed more extensively than at this Tutzing meeting. In his conclusion, Meyer-Abich interprets the term of 'historical compromise' as an expression of the hope for a consensus in energy policy still to be found. (orig./HSCH)

  9. No-compromise reptation quantum Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its publication, the reptation quantum Monte Carlo algorithm of Baroni and Moroni (1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4745) has been applied to several important problems in physics, but its mathematical foundations are not well understood. We show that their algorithm is not of typical Metropolis-Hastings type, and we specify conditions required for the generated Markov chain to be stationary and to converge to the intended distribution. The time-step bias may add up, and in many applications it is only the middle of a reptile that is the most important. Therefore, we propose an alternative, 'no-compromise reptation quantum Monte Carlo' to stabilize the middle of the reptile. (fast track communication)

  10. Morgellons: contested illness, diagnostic compromise and medicalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The case of Morgellons illustrates how the emergence of a new medically contested illness intersected with and impacted on the diagnostic processes of an existing uncontested psychiatric condition, Delusional Parasitosis (DP). More specifically, the sociopolitical processes at play in the contested illness, Morgellons, dubiously reflect patient empowerment, as well the resilience and power of medical jurisdiction. This research offers insights into the contested illness and medicalisation literatures, and aims to bridge these two approaches towards the relationship between patient empowerment and medical authority, which I do through the notion of doctor-patient compromise. The data for this research come from a comprehensive qualitative analysis of Morgellons discourse through four key sources: the pro-Morgellons website Morgellons.org; the anti-Morgellons website Morgellonswatch.com; the popular media's portrayal of Morgellons; and the DP and Morgellons articles published in peer-reviewed medical journals, as made available on PubMed. PMID:20149149

  11. Strained Compromises? Danish Flexicurity During Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Christian Lyhne

    2011-01-01

    The Danish concept of flexicurity in a ‘Golden Triangle’ of low job protection, high income security and high employment security is not only about a balance between labor market flexibility and social security. Arguably, it is also a series of more or less stable underlying compromises between...... social partners about the main mechanisms and aims of labor market regulation which – supposedly – should be focused on employment rather than jobs, and competition on quality rather than on labor costs. However, the ‘Golden Triangle’ – this article argues – seems in need of complementary concepts. The...... article therefore introduces, ‘centralized decentralization’ – a concept that directs our attention to forms of flexibility and security primarily for people in work. Most studies on Danish flexicurity have been carried out under favorable economic conditions. In light of the economic slump hitting...

  12. Physiological and structural differences in spatially distinct subpopulations of cardiac mitochondria: influence of cardiac pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Hollander, John M.; Thapa, Dharendra; Shepherd, Danielle L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue contains discrete pools of mitochondria that are characterized by their subcellular spatial arrangement. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) exist below the cell membrane, interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) reside in rows between the myofibrils, and perinuclear mitochondria are situated at the nuclear poles. Microstructural imaging of heart tissue coupled with the development of differential isolation techniques designed to sequentially separate spatially distinct mitochondrial su...

  13. Mitochondrial Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Viewed through the lens of the genome it contains, the mitochondrion is of unquestioned bacterial ancestry, originating from within the bacterial phylum α-Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria). Accordingly, the endosymbiont hypothesis—the idea that the mitochondrion evolved from a bacterial progenitor via symbiosis within an essentially eukaryotic host cell—has assumed the status of a theory. Yet mitochondrial genome evolution has taken radically different pathways in diverse eukaryotic lineag...

  14. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  15. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  16. GATED SPECT IN PATIENTS WITH BIOPSY-NEGATIVE CARDIAC TRANSPLANT REJECTION

    OpenAIRE

    E. N. Ostroumov; V. M. Zakharevich; E. D. Kotina; N. N. Mojeiko; A. G. Kupriyanova; E. I. Ryaboshtanova; B. N. Morozov; N.Z. Meboniya; Mironov, S. V.; A. Y. Kormer; I. M. Ilynsky; L. V. Beletskaya; E. N. Kazakov

    2009-01-01

    Humoral rejection of the cardiac allograft is still a challenging problem associated with high incidence of graft loss and patient mortality. These episodes of rejection are often more severe, and more difficult to treat, than classical acute cellular rejection. Hemodynamic compromise, in the absence of acute cellular rejection, called biopsy-negative rejection occurs in 10 to 20% of cardiac allograft recipients. The assessment of hemodynamic compromise can provide functional data in transpla...

  17. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  18. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  19. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  20. Cardiac biomarkers in neonatal hypoxic ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D

    2012-04-01

    Following a perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic insult, term infants commonly develop cardiovascular dysfunction. Troponin-T, troponin-I and brain natriuretic peptide are sensitive indicators of myocardial compromise. The long-term effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcome following perinatal hypoxic ischaemia remain controversial. Follow-up studies are warranted to ensure optimal cardiac function in adulthood. CONCLUSION: Cardiac biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of myocardial injury, help guide management, estimate mortality risk and may also aid in longterm neurodevelopmental outcome prediction following neonatal hypoxic-ischaemia.

  1. Deficiency of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase component of complex I of mitochondrial electron transport. Fatal infantile lactic acidosis and hypermetabolism with skeletal-cardiac myopathy and encephalopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppel, C L; Kerr, D S; Dahms, B; Roessmann, U

    1987-01-01

    A mitochondrial defect was investigated in an infant with fatal congenital lactic acidosis (3-14 mM), high lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, hypotonia, and cardiomyopathy. His sister had died with a similar disorder. Resting oxygen consumption was 150% of controls. Pathological findings included increased numbers of skeletal muscle mitochondria (many with proliferated, concentric cristae), cardiomegaly, fatty infiltration of the viscera, and spongy encephalopathy. Mitochondria from liver and muscle ...

  2. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  3. Muscle-Specific Loss of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Leads to Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Skeletal Muscle Atrophy, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Joza, Nicholas; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Brown, Doris; Bénit, Paule; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Vahsen, Nicola; Benoit, Loralyn; Patel, Mikin M.; Nowikovsky, Karin; Vassault, Anne; Backx, Peter H; Wada, Teiji; Kroemer, Guido; Rustin, Pierre; Penninger, Josef M.

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle critically depend on mitochondrial energy metabolism for their normal function. Recently, we showed that apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial protein implicated in programmed cell death, plays a role in mitochondrial respiration. However, the in vivo consequences of AIF-regulated mitochondrial respiration resulting from a loss-of-function mutation in Aif are not known. Here, we report tissue-specific deletion of Aif in the mouse. Mice in which Aif has b...

  4. Kinetics and specificity of paternal mitochondrial elimination in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lianwan; Liang, Qian; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Miao, Long; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, mitochondria are inherited maternally. The autophagy process is critical for paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how paternal mitochondria, but not maternal mitochondria, are selectively targeted for degradation is poorly understood. Here we report that mitochondrial dynamics have a profound effect on PME. A defect in fission of paternal mitochondria delays PME, whereas a defect in fusion of paternal mitochondria accelerates PME. Surprisingly, a defect in maternal mitochondrial fusion delays PME, which is reversed by a fission defect in maternal mitochondria or by increasing maternal mitochondrial membrane potential using oligomycin. Electron microscopy and tomography analyses reveal that a proportion of maternal mitochondria are compromised when they fail to fuse normally, leading to their competition for the autophagy machinery with damaged paternal mitochondria and delayed PME. Our study indicates that mitochondrial dynamics play a critical role in regulating both the kinetics and the specificity of PME. PMID:27581092

  5. Private Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Danish Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Pham, Tam T.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mi...

  6. Orthodontic management of a periodontally compromised dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant K Zaveri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malocclusion superimposed with severe periodontitis may present a great challenge to clinicians while providing orthodontic treatment due the episodic and site-specific nature of the disease with risk of rapid tissue breakdown. However, orthodontic treatment in such situation may contribute significantly to the overall rehabilitation both functionally and esthetically. In this article, a case report outlines a combined periodontic-orthodontic management of compromised dentition. A 37-year-old female patient with significant medical history was treated for Class II Division 1 type of malocclusion associated with spaced upper and lower anterior teeth, deep overbite, and increased overjet, superimposed with chronic generalized periodontitis and bone loss. Treatment was completed using temporary anchorage devices assisted strategically applied force and modified tandem retraction biomechanics amidst management of acute inflammatory episodes during and mucogingival complication after treatment. Affected areas healed very well after post-orthodontic periodontal treatment with minimal pocket depth, and bleeding on probing, and a healthy zone of attached gingiva at the follow up visits. The orthodontic results lead to improvement in patient's facial profile, lip posture, and correction of protrusion which addressed her main concern. One year follow-up shows good orthodontic and periodontic stability. The report highlights the importance of identifying “at risk” individuals and continuous monitoring of disease status during treatment. Despite all precautionary measures, a flare-up during the treatment can be anticipated.

  7. Female genital alteration: a compromise solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Kavita Shah; Jacobs, Allan J

    2016-03-01

    Despite 30 years of advocacy, the prevalence of non-therapeutic female genital alteration (FGA) in minors is stable in many countries. Educational efforts have minimally changed the prevalence of this procedure in regions where it has been widely practiced. In order to better protect female children from the serious and long-term harms of some types of non-therapeutic FGA, we must adopt a more nuanced position that acknowledges a wide spectrum of procedures that alter female genitalia. We offer a revised categorisation for non-therapeutic FGA that groups procedures by effect and not by process. Acceptance of de minimis procedures that generally do not carry long-term medical risks is culturally sensitive, does not discriminate on the basis of gender, and does not violate human rights. More morbid procedures should not be performed. However, accepting de minimis non-therapeutic f FGA procedures enhances the effort of compassionate practitioners searching for a compromise position that respects cultural differences but protects the health of their patients. PMID:26902479

  8. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  9. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  10. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  11. Compromise in cooperative game and the VIKOR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opricović Serafim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Five approaches in conflict resolution are distinguished, based on cooperativeness and aggressiveness in resolving conflict. Compromise based on cooperativeness is emphasized here as a solution in conflict resolution. Cooperative game theory oriented towards aiding the conflict resolution is considered and the compromise value for TU(transferable utility-game is presented. The method VIKOR could be applied to determine compromise solution of a multicriteria decision making problem with noncommensurable and conflicting criteria. Compromise is considered as an intermediate state between conflicting objectives or criteria reached by mutual concession. The applicability of the cooperative game theory and the VIKOR method for conflict resolution is illustrated.

  12. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus;

    2014-01-01

    determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  13. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    cunha-oliveira, teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J.; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Santos, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand ...

  14. Mitochondrial dynamics in the adult cardiomyocytes: which roles for a highly specialized cell?

    OpenAIRE

    FredericJOUBERT; MartaNovotova

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is a recent topic of research in the field of cardiac physiology. The study of mechanisms involved in the morphological changes and in the mobility of mitochondria is legitimate since the adult cardiomyocytes possess numerous mitochondria which occupy at least 30% of cell volume. However, architectural constraints exist in the cardiomyocyte that limit mitochondrial movements and communication between adjacent mitochondria. Still, the proteins involved in mitochondrial f...

  15. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondria are involved in active and dynamic processes, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial and cellular functions. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, impaired oxidation, reduced mitochondrial contents, lowered rates of oxidative phosphorylation and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production have been reported. Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by various transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs). Mitochondrial fusion is promoted by mitofusin 1 (MFN1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), while fission is governed by the recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by adaptor proteins such as mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51), and fission 1 (FIS1). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and PARKIN promote DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 is required in DRP1 recruitment and PARKIN-dependent mitophagy. This review describes the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics, its abnormality in diabetes and obesity, and pharmaceuticals targeting mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy. PMID:27339203

  16. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  17. Multisite Tissue Oxygenation Monitoring Indicates Organ-Specific Flow Distribution and Oxygen Delivery Related to Low Cardiac Output in Preterm Infants With Clinical Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Michelle E; Roofthooft, Marc; Fries, Marian W A; Schat, Trijntje E; Bos, Arend F; Berger, Rolf M F; Kooi, Elisabeth M W

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiac output may be compromised in preterm infants with sepsis. Whether low cardiac output is associated with low tissue oxygen supply in these patients is unclear. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between cardiac output, assessed by echocardiography, and tiss

  18. S-nitrosylation of Drp1 links excessive mitochondrial fission to neuronal injury in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomohiro; Cieplak, Piotr; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Godzik, Adam; Lipton, Stuart A

    2010-08-01

    Neurons are known to use large amounts of energy for their normal function and activity. In order to meet this demand, mitochondrial fission, fusion, and movement events (mitochondrial dynamics) control mitochondrial morphology, facilitating biogenesis and proper distribution of mitochondria within neurons. In contrast, dysfunction in mitochondrial dynamics results in reduced cell bioenergetics and thus contributes to neuronal injury and death in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. We recently reported that amyloid-beta peptide, thought to be a key mediator of AD pathogenesis, engenders S-nitrosylation and thus hyperactivation of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. This activation leads to excessive mitochondrial fragmentation, bioenergetic compromise, and synaptic damage in models of AD. Here, we provide an extended commentary on our findings of nitric oxide-mediated abnormal mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:20447471

  19. Iron insufficiency compromises motor neurons and their mitochondrial function in Irp2-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suh Young Jeong

    Full Text Available Genetic ablation of Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2, which post-transcriptionally regulates iron metabolism genes, causes a gait disorder in mice that progresses to hind-limb paralysis. Here we have demonstrated that misregulation of iron metabolism from loss of Irp2 causes lower motor neuronal degeneration with significant spinal cord axonopathy. Mitochondria in the lumbar spinal cord showed significantly decreased Complex I and II activities, and abnormal morphology. Lower motor neurons appeared to be the most adversely affected neurons, and we show that functional iron starvation due to misregulation of iron import and storage proteins, including transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, may have a causal role in disease. We demonstrated that two therapeutic approaches were beneficial for motor neuron survival. First, we activated a homologous protein, IRP1, by oral Tempol treatment and found that axons were partially spared from degeneration. Secondly, we genetically decreased expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, to diminish functional iron starvation. These data suggest that functional iron deficiency may constitute a previously unrecognized molecular basis for degeneration of motor neurons in mice.

  20. Iron insufficiency compromises motor neurons and their mitochondrial function in Irp2-null mice

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Suh Young

    2011-10-07

    Genetic ablation of Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2), which post-transcriptionally regulates iron metabolism genes, causes a gait disorder in mice that progresses to hind-limb paralysis. Here we have demonstrated that misregulation of iron metabolism from loss of Irp2 causes lower motor neuronal degeneration with significant spinal cord axonopathy. Mitochondria in the lumbar spinal cord showed significantly decreased Complex I and II activities, and abnormal morphology. Lower motor neurons appeared to be the most adversely affected neurons, and we show that functional iron starvation due to misregulation of iron import and storage proteins, including transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, may have a causal role in disease. We demonstrated that two therapeutic approaches were beneficial for motor neuron survival. First, we activated a homologous protein, IRP1, by oral Tempol treatment and found that axons were partially spared from degeneration. Secondly, we genetically decreased expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, to diminish functional iron starvation. These data suggest that functional iron deficiency may constitute a previously unrecognized molecular basis for degeneration of motor neurons in mice.

  1. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  2. 42 CFR 401.613 - Compromise of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... claims. (a) Amount of compromise. HFCA requires that the amount to be recovered through a compromise of a claim must— (1) Bear a reasonable relation to the amount of the claim; and (2) Be recoverable through... present or prospective ability to pay the full amount of the claim within a reasonable time....

  3. 49 CFR 209.109 - Payment of penalty; compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the Internet at https://www.pay.gov/paygov/. Instructions for online payment are found on the Web site... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment of penalty; compromise. 209.109 Section... Civil Penalties § 209.109 Payment of penalty; compromise. (a) Payment of a civil penalty may be made...

  4. INHALATION OF OZONE AND DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES (DEP) INDUCES ACUTE AND REVERSIBLE CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have recently shown that episodic but not acute exposure to ozone or DEP induces vascular effects that are associated with the loss of cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acids (DEP 2.0 mg/m3 > ozone, 0.4 ppm). In this study we determined ozone and DEP-induced cardiac gen...

  5. Identification of species-specific nuclear insertions of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas and their potential as population genetic markers

    OpenAIRE

    Soto-Calderón, Iván Darío; Clark Nicholas, Jonathan; Wildschutte Julia, Vera Halo; DiMattio, Kelly; Jensen-Seaman, Michael Ignatius; Anthony, Nicola Mary

    2014-01-01

    The first hyper-variable region (HV1) of the mitochondrial control region (MCR) has been widely used as a molecular tool in population genetics, but inadvertent amplification of nuclear translocated copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas has compromised the use of mitochondrial DNA in population genetic studies. At least three putative classes (I, II, III) of gorilla-specific HV1 MCR numts have been uncovered over the past decade. However, the number, size and location of numt loci i...

  6. Impaired Transport of Mitochondrial Transcription Factor and the Metabolic Memory Phenomenon Associated with the Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Julia M.; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes damages retinal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and compromises the mtDNA transcription. In the transcription and replication of mtDNA, nuclear-encoded transcription factor A (TFAM) is considered as a key activator, and we have shown that in diabetes while retinal TFAM gene expression is increased, its mitochondrial levels are decreased. This study investigates the role of mitochondrial outer and inner membrane transport systems in the transfer of TFAM into the mitochondria in diabetes, a...

  7. Mitochondrial dynamics in the adult cardiomyocytes: which roles for a highly specialized cell?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FredericJOUBERT

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a recent topic of research in the field of cardiac physiology. The study of mechanisms involved in the morphological changes and in the motility of mitochondria is legitimate since the adult cardiomyocytes possess numerous mitochondria which occupy at least 30% of cell volume. However, architectural constraints exist in the cardiomyocyte that limit mitochondrial movements and communication between adjacent mitochondria. Still, the proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion and fission are highly expressed in these cells and could be involved in different processes important for the cardiac function. For example, they are required for mitochondrial biogenesis to synthesize new mitochondria and for the quality-control of the organelles. They are also involved in inner membrane organization and may play a role in apoptosis. More generally, change in mitochondrial morphology can have consequences in the functioning of the respiratory chain, in the regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP, and in the interactions with other organelles. Furthermore, the proteins involved in fusion and fission of mitochondria are altered in cardiac pathologies such as ischemia/reperfusion or heart failure, and appear to be valuable targets for pharmacological therapies. Thus, mitochondrial dynamics deserves particular attention in cardiac research. The present review draws up a report of our knowledge on these phenomena.

  8. Testosterone deprivation accelerates cardiac dysfunction in obese male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pintana, Hiranya; Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Jaiwongkam, Thidarat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-06-01

    Low testosterone level is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular diseases. As obese-insulin-resistant condition could impair cardiac function and that the incidence of obesity is increased in aging men, a condition of testosterone deprivation could aggravate the cardiac dysfunction in obese-insulin-resistant subjects. However, the mechanism underlying this adverse effect is unclear. This study investigated the effects of obesity on metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV), left ventricular (LV) function, and cardiac mitochondrial function in testosterone-deprived rats. Orchiectomized or sham-operated male Wistar rats (n=36per group) were randomly divided into groups and were given either a normal diet (ND, 19.77% of energy fat) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 57.60% of energy fat) for 12weeks. Metabolic parameters, HRV, LV function, and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined at 4, 8, and 12weeks after starting each feeding program. We found that insulin resistance was observed after 8weeks of the consumption of a HFD in both sham (HFS) and orchiectomized (HFO) rats. Neither the ND sham (NDS) group nor ND orchiectomized (NDO) rats developed insulin resistance. The development of depressed HRV, LV contractile dysfunction, and increased cardiac mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production was observed earlier in orchiectomized (NDO and HFO) rats at week 4, whereas HFS rats exhibited these impairments later at week 8. These findings suggest that testosterone deprivation accelerates the impairment of cardiac autonomic regulation and LV function via increased oxidative stress and impaired cardiac mitochondrial function in obese-orchiectomized male rats. PMID:27000685

  9. Exercise training increases mitochondrial content and ex vivo mitochondrial function similarly in patients with type 2 diabetes and in control individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Phielix, E.; Meex, R.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Hesselink, M. K. C.; Schrauwen, P

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We previously showed that type 2 diabetic patients are characterised by compromised intrinsic mitochondrial function. Here, we examined if exercise training could increase intrinsic mitochondrial function in diabetic patients compared with control individuals. Methods Fifteen male type 2 diabetic patients and 14 male control individuals matched for age, BMI and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\u...

  10. Mitochondrial disease and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamima

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are relatively common inborn errors of energy metabolism, with a combined prevalence of one in 5000. These disorders typically affect tissues with high energy requirements, and cerebral involvement occurs frequently in childhood, often manifesting in seizures. Mitochondrial diseases are genetically heterogeneous; to date, mutations have been reported in all 37 mitochondrially encoded genes and more than 80 nuclear genes. The major genetic causes of mitochondrial epilepsy are mitochondrial DNA mutations (including those typically associated with the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes [MELAS] and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres [MERRF] syndromes); mutations in POLG (classically associated with Alpers syndrome but also presenting as the mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome [MIRAS], spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy [SCAE], and myoclonus, epilepsy, myopathy, sensory ataxia [MEMSA] syndromes in older individuals) and other disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance; complex I deficiency; disorders of coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis; and disorders of mitochondrial translation such as RARS2 mutations. It is not clear why some genetic defects, but not others, are particularly associated with seizures. Epilepsy may be the presenting feature of mitochondrial disease but is often part of a multisystem clinical presentation. Mitochondrial epilepsy may be very difficult to manage, and is often a poor prognostic feature. At present there are no curative treatments for mitochondrial disease. Individuals with mitochondrial epilepsy are frequently prescribed multiple anticonvulsants, and the role of vitamins and other nutritional supplements and the ketogenic diet remain unproven. PMID:22283595

  11. Cardiac extracellular matrix proteomics: Challenges, techniques, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Wei; Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; López, Javier E; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has emerged as a dynamic tissue component, providing not only structural support, but also functionally participating in a wide range of signaling events during development, injury, and disease remodeling. Investigation of dynamic changes in cardiac ECM proteome is challenging due to the relative insolubility of ECM proteins, which results from their macromolecular nature, extensive post-translational modification (PTM), and tendency to form protein complexes. Finally, the relative abundance of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue further complicates cardiac ECM proteomic approaches. Recent developments of various techniques to enrich and analyze ECM proteins are playing a major role in overcoming these challenges. Application of cardiac ECM proteomics in disease tissues can further provide spatial and temporal information relevant to disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and engineering of therapeutic candidates for cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:26200932

  12. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  13. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  14. MRI and pathologic correlation of cardiac myxomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the MRI features of cardiac myxoma by correlated with its pathological findings. Methods: MRI features of 22 cases of pathologically confirmed cardiac myxomas were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 22 cases, 21 are solitary, 12 located in left atrium, 6 located in right atrium, 2 located in left ventricle and 1 located in fight ventricle. The other one occupied multiple chambers. MRI: 19 are heterogeneous and 3 are homogeneous. Cine-MRI: 18 attach to the endocardium with a pedunculated stalk and 4 are sessile and with a broad attachment. Thirteen cases had secondary valve insufficience or stenosis. Nine have compromised cardiac function. Nineteen cases demonstrated mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement after Gd-DTPA administration and 3 case showed no enhancement. Four cases had gadolinium first-pass perfusion study and showed a slow and continuous increasing time-intensity, lower than normal myocardium. The pedicles and wall showed delay enhancement. Pathologic findings: 21 are oval and lobular configuration, 1 is grape-like. Ten cases had fresh hemorrhage and 5 had chronic hemorrhage. Fourteen had necrosis, 2 had cystic change and 4 had calcification. Blood vessels or inflammatory cells could be detected in 19 cases. Conclusions: MRI can evaluate the size, location, morphology, especially the vascularity, histologic features and cardiac function of cardiac myxomas. (authors)

  15. Kyphoplasty for osteoporotic fractures with spinal canal compromise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feasibility and clinical outcome of kyphoplasty in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures with canal compromise. Methods: A total of 16 patients with osteoporotic fractures with canal compromise without neurological deficit were attempted to be treated by kyphoplasty. During kyphoplasty, modified techniques including staged bone cement injection and dynamic fluoroscopic monitoring were used. Pain was measured using the self-reporting Visual Analogue pain Scale (VAS) preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. Disability was measured using the Oswestry Disability questionnaire (ODI) preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. The height of the compromised vertebral body, the kyphotic angle and the spinal canal compromise were measured preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. Results: Operations were completed smoothly, with the exception of one patient with less cement leakage but without clinical symptom occurred. Relief of pain was achieved after kyphoplasty. The mean VAS score of these patients decreased from 8.1 ± 1.2 pre-operatively to 2.7 ± 0.6 post-operatively (P0.05). In the final follow-up, the spinal canal compromise was (14.4 ± 3.1)%. Conclusion: Kyphoplasty is a relatively safe and effective method for the treatment of osteoporotic fractures with canal compromise without neurological deficit. (authors)

  16. The decrease of cardiac chamber volumes and output during positive-pressure ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Kyhl; Ahtarovski, Kiril Aleksov; Iversen, Kasper;

    2013-01-01

    effect of PPV on the central circulation by studying cardiac chamber volumes with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). We hypothesized that PPV lowers cardiac output (CO) mainly via the Frank-Starling relationship. In 18 healthy volunteers, cardiac chamber volumes and flow in aorta and the pulmonary......Positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) is widely used for treatment of acute cardiorespiratory failure, occasionally at the expense of compromised cardiac function and arterial blood pressure. The explanation why has largely rested on interpretation of intracardiac pressure changes. We evaluated the...... artery were measured by CMR during PPV levels of 0, 10, and 20 cmH2O applied via a respirator and a face mask. All cardiac chamber volumes decreased in proportion to the level of PPV. Following 20-cmH2O PPV, the total diastolic and systolic cardiac volumes (±SE) decreased from 605 (±29) ml to 446 (±29...

  17. Strokes in mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Pizova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that mitochondrial diseases might be identified in 22—33% of cryptogenic stroke cases in young subjects. The incidence of mitochondrial disorders in patients with stroke is unknown; it is 0.8 to 7.2% according to the data of some authors. The paper gives data on the prevalence, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of mitochondrial diseases, such as mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like syndrome (MELAS and insulin-like episodes; myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF syndrome, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (sporadic multisystem mitochondrial pathology.

  18. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD. PMID:27444386

  19. Rev-erb-α modulates skeletal muscle oxidative capacity by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Woldt, Estelle; Sebti, Yasmine; Solt, Laura A.; Duhem, Christian; Lancel, Steve; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Matthijs K. C. Hesselink; Paquet, Charlotte; Delhaye, Stéphane; Shin, Youseung; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Schaart, Gert; Lefebvre, Philippe; Nevière, Rémi; Burris, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α modulates hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, adipogenesis and the inflammatory response in macrophages. We show here that Rev-erb-α is highly expressed in oxidative skeletal muscle and plays a role in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, in gain- and loss-of function studies. Rev-erb-α-deficiency in skeletal muscle leads to reduced mitochondrial content and oxidative function, resulting in compromised exercise capacity. This phenotype was recapitu...

  20. Myocardial mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in mice lacking adiponectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Braun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin deficiency leads to increased myocardial infarct size following ischemia reperfusion and to exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy following pressure overload, entities that are causally linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In skeletal muscle, lack of adiponectin results in impaired mitochondrial function. Thus, it was our objective to investigate whether adiponectin deficiency impairs mitochondrial energetics in the heart. At 8 weeks of age, heart weight-to-body weight ratios were not different between adiponectin knockout (ADQ-/- mice and wildtypes (WT. In isolated working hearts, cardiac output, aortic developed pressure and cardiac power were preserved in ADQ-/- mice. Rates of fatty acid oxidation, glucose oxidation and glycolysis were unchanged between groups. While myocardial oxygen consumption was slightly reduced (-24% in ADQ-/- mice in isolated working hearts, rates of maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis in saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers were preserved in ADQ-/- mice with glutamate, pyruvate or palmitoyl-carnitine as a substrate. In addition, enzymatic activity of respiratory complexes I and II was unchanged between groups. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and SIRT1 activity were not decreased, expression and acetylation of PGC-1α were unchanged, and mitochondrial content of OXPHOS subunits was not decreased in ADQ-/- mice. Finally, increasing energy demands due to prolonged subcutaneous infusion of isoproterenol did not differentially affect cardiac contractility or mitochondrial function in ADQ-/- mice compared to WT. Thus, mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in hearts of mice lacking adiponectin, suggesting that adiponectin may be expendable in the regulation of mitochondrial energetics and contractile function in the heart under non-pathological conditions.

  1. Mitochondrial dynamics and cell death in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-García, José; Akhmedov, Alexander T

    2016-03-01

    The highly regulated processes of mitochondrial fusion (joining), fission (division) and trafficking, collectively called mitochondrial dynamics, determine cell-type specific morphology, intracellular distribution and activity of these critical organelles. Mitochondria are critical for cardiac function, while their structural and functional abnormalities contribute to several common cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure (HF). The tightly balanced mitochondrial fusion and fission determine number, morphology and activity of these multifunctional organelles. Although the intracellular architecture of mature cardiomyocytes greatly restricts mitochondrial dynamics, this process occurs in the adult human heart. Fusion and fission modulate multiple mitochondrial functions, ranging from energy and reactive oxygen species production to Ca(2+) homeostasis and cell death, allowing the heart to respond properly to body demands. Tightly controlled balance between fusion and fission is of utmost importance in the high energy-demanding cardiomyocytes. A shift toward fission leads to mitochondrial fragmentation, while a shift toward fusion results in the formation of enlarged mitochondria and in the fusion of damaged mitochondria with healthy organelles. Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1 constitute the core machinery promoting mitochondrial fusion, whereas Drp1, Fis1, Mff and MiD49/51 are the core components of fission machinery. Growing evidence suggests that fusion/fission factors in adult cardiomyocytes play essential noncanonical roles in cardiac development, Ca(2+) signaling, mitochondrial quality control and cell death. Impairment of this complex circuit causes cardiomyocyte dysfunction and death contributing to heart injury culminating in HF. Pharmacological targeting of components of this intricate network may be a novel therapeutic modality for HF treatment. PMID:26872674

  2. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  3. Alchemy or Science? Compromising Archaeology in the Deep Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    In the torrid debate between archaeology and treasure hunting, compromise is often suggested as the pragmatic solution, especially for archaeology carried out either in deep water or beyond the constraints that commonly regulate such activities in territorial seas. Both the wisdom and the need for such compromise have even been advocated by some archaeologists, particularly in forums such as the internet and conferences. This paper argues that such a compromise is impossible, not in order to fuel confrontation but simply because of the nature of any academic discipline. We can define what archaeology is in terms of its aims, theories, methods and ethics, so combining it with an activity founded on opposing principles must transform it into something else. The way forward for archaeology in the deep sea does not lie in a contradictory realignment of archaeology’s goals but in collaborative research designed to mesh with emerging national and regional research and management plans.

  4. Physically Compromised and Physically Talented Children in Northeastern Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Planinšec Jurij

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research was to determine the share of physically compromised and physically talented children in northeastern Slovenia. The sample comprised 621 children aged nine to eleven years, among which there were 316 girls (M=10; SD=0.8 and 305 boys (M=10; SD=0.81. In order to assess their motor skills, seven different tests were used, mostly from Eurofit test battery, which covered explosive power, repetitive power balance, eye–hand coordination, speed of simple movements, whole body coordination, and endurance. The assessment was made for each physical fitness test separately. The cut-off points for determination of physically compromised and physically talented children were set at -1SD and +1SD, respectively. The results of all physical fitness tests showed that the share of physically compromised children exceeded ten percent for both genders. The largest number of boys and girls were physically compromised with regard to endurance and balance, respectively. On the other hand, boys proved to be most physically talented with regard to endurance, and girls with regard to explosive power. Gender differences were most obvious with regard to general endurance, as 21 per cent of the boys were physically compromised as opposed to 13 per cent of the girls. As for physical talent, we observed less gender-related differences. The results indicate increasing differences in physical fitness among children from northeastern Slovenia. The implementation of curricular and extracurricular sports activities should aim at reducing the number of physically compromised children. On the other hand, it would make sense to encourage physically talented children to get involved in organized forms of exercise.

  5. Novel Roles of Epoxyeicosanoids in Regulating Cardiac Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sikhry, Haitham E.; Alsaleh, Nasser; Dakarapu, Rambabu; Falck, John R.; Seubert, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of a healthy pool of mitochondria is important for the function and survival of terminally differentiated cells such as cardiomyocytes. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are epoxy lipids derived from metabolism of arachidonic acid by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases. We have previously shown that EETs trigger a protective response limiting mitochondrial dysfunction and reducing cellular death. The aim of this study was to investigate whether EET-mediated effects influence mitochondrial quality in HL-1 cardiac cells during starvation. HL-1 cells were subjected to serum- and amino acid free conditions for 24h. We employed a dual-acting synthetic analog UA-8 (13-(3-propylureido)tridec-8-enoic acid), possessing both EET-mimetic and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitory properties, or 14,15-EET as model EET molecules. We demonstrated that EET-mediated events significantly improved mitochondrial function as assessed by preservation of the ADP/ATP ratio and oxidative respiratory capacity. Starvation induced mitochondrial hyperfusion observed in control cells was attenuated by UA-8. However, EET-mediated events did not affect the expression of mitochondrial dynamic proteins Fis1, DRP-1 or Mfn2. Rather we observed increased levels of OPA-1 oligomers and increased mitochondrial cristae density, which correlated with the preserved mitochondrial function. Increased DNA binding activity of pCREB and Nrf1/2 and increased SIRT1 activity together with elevated mitochondrial proteins suggest EET-mediated events led to preserved mitobiogenesis. Thus, we provide new evidence for EET-mediated events that preserve a healthier pool of mitochondria in cardiac cells following starvation-induced stress. PMID:27494529

  6. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  7. Phenotypic dichotomy in mitochondrial complex II genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, B E; Rubinstein, W S; Taschner, P E

    2001-09-01

    This review presents our current knowledge on the genetic and phenotypic aspects of mitochondrial complex II gene defects. The mutations of the complex II subunits cause two strikingly different group of disorders, revealing a phenotypic dichotomy. Genetic disorders of the mitochondrial respiratory chain are often characterized by hypotonia, growth retardation, cardiomyopathy, myopathy, neuropathy, organ failure, and metabolic derangement. These disorders are transmitted through maternal lineage if the defective gene is located in the mitochondrial genome or may follow a Mendelian pattern if it is in the nucleus. Mitochondrial complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the smallest complex in the respiratory chain and is composed of four subunits encoded by nuclear genes SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD. Complex II oxidizes succinate to fumarate in the Krebs cycle and is involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. SDHA and SDHB encode the flavoprotein and iron-sulfur proteins, respectively, and SDHC and SDHD encode the two hydrophobic membrane-spanning subunits. While mutations in SDHA display a phenotype resembling other mitochondrial and Krebs cycle gene defects, those in SDHB, SDHC and SDHD cause hereditary paraganglioma. Paraganglioma is characterized by slow-growing vascular tumors of the paraganglionic tissue (i.e., adrenal and extra-adrenal paragangliomas, including those in the head and neck, mediastinum, abdomen, and pheochromocytomas). Paraganglioma caused by SDHD mutations occurs exclusively after paternal transmission, suggesting that genomic imprinting influences gene expression. Association of a mitochondrial gene defect with tumorigenesis expands the phenotypic spectrum of mitochondrial diseases and adds genomic imprinting as a new transmission mode in mitochondrial genetics. The phenotypic features of complex II gene mutations suggest that whereas the catalytic subunit SDHA mutations may compromise the Krebs cycle, those in other

  8. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  9. GATED SPECT IN PATIENTS WITH BIOPSY-NEGATIVE CARDIAC TRANSPLANT REJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Ostroumov

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Humoral rejection of the cardiac allograft is still a challenging problem associated with high incidence of graft loss and patient mortality. These episodes of rejection are often more severe, and more difficult to treat, than classical acute cellular rejection. Hemodynamic compromise, in the absence of acute cellular rejection, called biopsy-negative rejection occurs in 10 to 20% of cardiac allograft recipients. The assessment of hemodynamic compromise can provide functional data in transplant patients that is complementary to myocardial biopsies if the biopsy can miss significant rejection. We present three cases of the biopsy-negative rejection. All patients have studied with gated SPECT phase analysis. 

  10. Impaired mitochondrial function in chronically ischemic human heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis Ottesen; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ischemic heart disease is associated with myocardial hypoperfusion. The resulting hypoxia potentially inflicts damage upon the mitochondria, leading to a compromised energetic state. Furthermore, ischemic damage may cause excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), producing...... mitochondrial damage, hereby reinforcing a vicious circle. Ischemic preconditioning has been proven protective in acute ischemia, but the subject of chronic ischemic preconditioning has not been explored in humans. We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory capacity would be diminished in chronic ischemic...... regions of human myocardium but that these mitochondria would be more resistant to ex vivo ischemia and, second, that ROS generation would be higher in ischemic myocardium. The aim of this study was to test mitochondrial respiratory capacity during hyperoxia and hypoxia, to investigate ROS production, and...

  11. 31 CFR 902.2 - Bases for compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bases for compromise. 902.2 Section 902.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FEDERAL CLAIMS... appropriate discount for the administrative and litigative costs of collection, with consideration given...

  12. Time-to-Compromise Model for Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

    2005-09-01

    We propose a new model for estimating the time to compromise a system component that is visible to an attacker. The model provides an estimate of the expected value of the time-to-compromise as a function of known and visible vulnerabilities, and attacker skill level. The time-to-compromise random process model is a composite of three subprocesses associated with attacker actions aimed at the exploitation of vulnerabilities. In a case study, the model was used to aid in a risk reduction estimate between a baseline Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system and the baseline system enhanced through a specific set of control system security remedial actions. For our case study, the total number of system vulnerabilities was reduced by 86% but the dominant attack path was through a component where the number of vulnerabilities was reduced by only 42% and the time-to-compromise of that component was increased by only 13% to 30% depending on attacker skill level.

  13. Secretion of salivary statherin is compromised in uncontrolled diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Izumi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions and general significance: The results show that synthesis and secretion of statherin is reduced in diabetics and this reduction is salivary gland specific. As compromised salivary statherin secretion leads to increased oral health risk, this study indicates that routine oral health assessment of these patients is warranted.

  14. 26 CFR 601.203 - Offers in compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... STATEMENT OF PROCEDURAL RULES Rulings and Other Specific Matters § 601.203 Offers in compromise. (a) General... Department of Justice for prosecution or defense. Certain functions of the Commissioner with respect to... prosecution are pending in the Office of the Chief Counsel, the Department of Justice, or in an office of...

  15. An Item Response Model for Characterizing Test Compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2002-01-01

    Developed an item response model for characterizing test-compromise that enables the estimation of item preview and score-gain distributions. In the approach, models parameters and posterior distributions are estimated by Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedures. Simulation study results suggest that when at least some test items are known to be…

  16. Mitochondrial morphology and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic and are able to interchange their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and a fragmented disconnected arrangement by the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are regulated by the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins 1 and 2, and optic atrophy 1) and the mitochondrial fission proteins (dynamin-related peptide 1 and mitochondrial fission protein 1) and have been implicated in a...

  17. Mitochondrial Energy-Deficient Endophenotype in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Gargus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available While evidence points to a multigenic etiology of most autism, the pathophysiology of the disorder has yet to be defined and the underlying genes and biochemical pathways they subserve remain unknown. Autism is considered to be influenced by a combination of various genetic, environmental and immunological factors; more recently, evidence has suggested that increased vulnerability to oxidative stress may be involved in the etiology of this multifactorial disorder. Furthermore, recent studies have pointed to a subset of autism associated with the biochemical endophenotype of mitochondrial energy deficiency, identified as a subtle impairment in fat and carbohydrate oxidation. This phenotype is similar, but more subtle than those seen in classic mitochondrial defects. In some cases the beginnings of the genetic underpinnings of these mitochondrial defects are emerging, such as mild mitochondrial dysfunction and secondary carnitine deficiency observed in the subset of autistic patients with an inverted duplication of chromosome 15q11-q13. In addition, rare cases of familial autism associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS or associated with abnormalities in cellular calcium homeostasis, such as malignant hyperthermia or cardiac arrhythmia, are beginning to emerge. Such special cases suggest that the pathophysiology of autism may comprise pathways that are directly or indirectly involved in mitochondrial energy production and to further probe this connection three new avenues seem worthy of exploration: 1 metabolomic clinical studies provoking controlled aerobic exercise stress to expand the biochemical phenotype, 2 high-throughput expression arrays to directly survey activity of the genes underlying these biochemical pathways and 3 model systems, either based upon neuronal stem cells or model genetic organisms, to discover novel genetic and environmental inputs into these pathways.

  18. Mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins as novel therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, S. B.; Kalkhoran, S B; Cabrera-Fuentes, H A; Hausenloy, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a number of exciting developments in the field of mitochondrial dynamics – a phenomenon in which changes in mitochondrial shape and movement impact on cellular physiology and pathology. By undergoing fusion and fission, mitochondria are able to change their morphology between elongated interconnected networks and discrete fragmented structures, respectively. The cardiac mitochondria, in particular, have garnered much interest due to their unique spatial arrangeme...

  19. Mitochondrial Quality Control in the Myocardium: Cooperation between Protein Degradation and Mitophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Hammerling, Babette C.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for cardiomyocyte survival and maintenance of normal cardiac function. However, changes in the extra- or intracellular environments during stress can cause excessive damage to mitochondria and lead to activation of cell death. In fact, there is evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is an important contributor to both development of heart failure and the aging process. To counteract the adverse effects resulting from mitochondrial damage, cells have evolved mitochon...

  20. A technical solution to avoid partial scan artifacts in cardiac MDCT

    OpenAIRE

    Primaka, A. N.; Dong, Y; Dzyubak, O. P.; Jorgensen, S. M.; McCollough, C. H.; Ritman, E.L. (Erik L.)

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of cardiac image data obtained using multidetector row computed tomography (CT) is compromised by partial scan reconstructions, which improve the temporal resolution but significantly increase image-to-image CT number variations for a fixed region of interest compared to full reconstruction images. The feasibility of a new approach to solve this problem is assessed. An anthropomorphic cardiac phantom and an anesthetized pig were scanned on a dual-source CT scanner usin...

  1. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  2. Myoclonus in mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Michelangelo; Orsucci, Daniele; Angelini, Corrado; Bertini, Enrico; Catteruccia, Michela; Pegoraro, Elena; Carelli, Valerio; Valentino, Maria L; Comi, Giacomo P; Minetti, Carlo; Bruno, Claudio; Moggio, Maurizio; Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; Mongini, Tiziana; Vercelli, Liliana; Primiano, Guido; Servidei, Serenella; Tonin, Paola; Scarpelli, Mauro; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia; Moroni, Isabella; Uziel, Graziella; Santorelli, Filippo M; Nesti, Claudia; Filosto, Massimiliano; Lamperti, Costanza; Zeviani, Massimo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    Myoclonus is a possible manifestation of mitochondrial disorders, and its presence is considered, in association with epilepsy and the ragged red fibers, pivotal for the syndromic diagnosis of MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers). However, its prevalence in mitochondrial diseases is not known. The aims of this study are the evaluation of the prevalence of myoclonus in a big cohort of mitochondrial patients and the clinical characterization of these subjects. Based on the database of the "Nation-wide Italian Collaborative Network of Mitochondrial Diseases," we reviewed the clinical and molecular data of mitochondrial patients with myoclonus among their clinical features. Myoclonus is a rather uncommon clinical feature of mitochondrial diseases (3.6% of 1,086 patients registered in our database). It is not strictly linked to a specific genotype or phenotype, and only 1 of 3 patients with MERRF harbors the 8344A>G mutation (frequently labeled as "the MERRF mutation"). Finally, myoclonus is not inextricably linked to epilepsy in MERRF patients, but more to cerebellar ataxia. In a myoclonic patient, evidences of mitochondrial dysfunction must be investigated, even though myoclonus is not a common sign of mitochondriopathy. Clinical, histological, and biochemical data may predict the finding of a mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutation. Finally, this study reinforces the notion that myoclonus is not inextricably linked to epilepsy in MERRF patients, and therefore the term "myoclonic epilepsy" seems inadequate and potentially misleading. PMID:24510442

  3. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Yisang; Galloway, Chad A.; Jhun, Bong Sook; Yu, Tianzheng

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are at the center of cellular energy metabolism and regulate cell life and death. The cell biological aspect of mitochondria, especially mitochondrial dynamics, has drawn much attention through implications in human pathology, including neurological disorders and metabolic diseases. Mitochondrial fission and fusion are the main processes governing the morphological plasticity and are controlled by multiple factors, including mechanochemical enzymes and accessory proteins. Emergin...

  4. Evaluation of the mitochondrial respiration of cardiac myocytes in rats submitted to mechanical bile duct obstruction Avaliação da respiração mitocondrial de miócitos cardíacos em ratos ictéricos sumetidos à obstrução do ducto biliar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Kemp

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of the myocardium for energy production by the analysis of mitochondrial respiration in rats with jaundice submitted to bile duct ligature. METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into 2 Groups: Group SO submitted to nontherapeutic laparotomy (sham operation and Group IC (icteric group submitted to bile duct ligature. After 7 days, laparotomy was again performed in all animals for cardiac muscle extraction and analysis. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was determined by stage 3 velocity and stage 4 velocity. The respiratory control ratio (RCR was obtained by the ratio of stage 3 to stage 4 velocity. Statistical analysis was performed by the Mann-Whitney test, with the level of significance set at 5% (pOBJETIVO: A proposta deste trabalho é avaliar a capacidade de produção energética do miocárdio mediante análise da respiração mitocondrial em ratos ictéricos submetidos à ligadura do ducto biliar. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 16 ratos Wistar machos divididos em 2 Grupos: Grupo SO , os quais foram submetidos à Laparotomia branca e Grupo IC, os quais sofreram ligadura do ducto biliar para o desenvolvimento de icterícia obstrutiva. Todos os animais após 7 dias de cirurgia foram submetidos à nova laparotomia para extração e análise do músculo cardíaco. O consumo de oxigênio pelas mitocôndrias foi determinado pela velocidade do estado 3 e velocidade do estado 4. A razão do controle respiratório (RCR foi obtida pela relação entre as velocidades dos estados 3 e 4. A análise estatística foi feita pelo teste de Mann-Whitney com nível de significância de 5 % (p<0.05. RESULTADOS: Observou-se queda estatisticamente significante nos valores do consumo de oxigênio do estado 3 da respiração mitocondrial no grupo IC em relação ao SO, no entanto os valores para estado 4 permaneceram basicamente inalterados entre os grupos. Os valores de RCR entre os

  5. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  6. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H., E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  7. Mechanisms of Disease: Is Mitochondrial Function Altered in Heart Failure?

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Dale J.

    2013-01-01

    The human heart sustains an exceptional energy transfer rate, consuming more energy per gram weight than any other organ system. The healthy heart can rapidly adapt to changes in demand, while the failing heart cannot. Cardiac energy flux systems falter in the failing heart. The purpose of this review is to characterize the fundamental role of mitochondria in this energy transfer system and describe our local research on mitochondrial respiratory capacity in failing human hearts.

  8. Cardioprotection by modulation of mitochondrial respiration during ischemia–reperfusion: Role of apoptosis-inducing factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Blockade of electron transport prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria during IR. •Blockade of electron transport decreases caspase-independent cell death during IR. •Mitochondrial AIF content is down-regulated in Harlequin mice. •Blockade of electron transport protects Harlequin mouse hearts during IR. •Amobarbital protection is partially dependent on mitochondrial AIF content. -- Abstract: The transient, reversible blockade of electron transport (BET) during ischemia or at the onset of reperfusion protects mitochondria and decreases cardiac injury. Apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is located within the mitochondrial intermembrane space. A release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nucleus triggers caspase-independent cell death. We asked if BET prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria as a mechanism of protection in the buffer perfused heart. BET during ischemia with amobarbital, a rapidly reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, attenuated a release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol, in turn decreasing the formation of cleaved and activated PARP-1. These results suggest that BET-mediated protection may occur through prevention of the loss of AIF from mitochondria during ischemia–reperfusion. In order to further clarify the role of mitochondrial AIF in BET-mediated protection, Harlequin (Hq) mice, a genetic model with mitochondrial AIF deficiency, were used to test whether BET could still decrease cell injury in Hq mouse hearts during reperfusion. BET during ischemia protected Hq mouse hearts against ischemia–reperfusion injury and improved mitochondrial function in these hearts during reperfusion. Thus, cardiac injury can still be decreased in the presence of down-regulated mitochondrial AIF content. Taken together, BET during ischemia protects both hearts with normal mitochondrial AIF content and hearts with mitochondrial AIF deficiency. Although preservation of mitochondrial AIF content plays a key role in

  9. Cardioprotection by modulation of mitochondrial respiration during ischemia–reperfusion: Role of apoptosis-inducing factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Aijun [Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Cardiology), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Szczepanek, Karol; Hu, Ying [Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Cardiology), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Lesnefsky, Edward J. [Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Cardiology), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); McGuire Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Richmond, VA 23249 (United States); Chen, Qun, E-mail: qchen8@vcu.edu [Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Cardiology), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Blockade of electron transport prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria during IR. •Blockade of electron transport decreases caspase-independent cell death during IR. •Mitochondrial AIF content is down-regulated in Harlequin mice. •Blockade of electron transport protects Harlequin mouse hearts during IR. •Amobarbital protection is partially dependent on mitochondrial AIF content. -- Abstract: The transient, reversible blockade of electron transport (BET) during ischemia or at the onset of reperfusion protects mitochondria and decreases cardiac injury. Apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is located within the mitochondrial intermembrane space. A release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nucleus triggers caspase-independent cell death. We asked if BET prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria as a mechanism of protection in the buffer perfused heart. BET during ischemia with amobarbital, a rapidly reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, attenuated a release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol, in turn decreasing the formation of cleaved and activated PARP-1. These results suggest that BET-mediated protection may occur through prevention of the loss of AIF from mitochondria during ischemia–reperfusion. In order to further clarify the role of mitochondrial AIF in BET-mediated protection, Harlequin (Hq) mice, a genetic model with mitochondrial AIF deficiency, were used to test whether BET could still decrease cell injury in Hq mouse hearts during reperfusion. BET during ischemia protected Hq mouse hearts against ischemia–reperfusion injury and improved mitochondrial function in these hearts during reperfusion. Thus, cardiac injury can still be decreased in the presence of down-regulated mitochondrial AIF content. Taken together, BET during ischemia protects both hearts with normal mitochondrial AIF content and hearts with mitochondrial AIF deficiency. Although preservation of mitochondrial AIF content plays a key role in

  10. Azelnidipine prevents cardiac dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats by reducing intracellular calcium accumulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kain Vasundhara

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous evidences suggest that diabetic heart is characterized by compromised ventricular contraction and prolonged relaxation attributable to multiple causative factors including calcium accumulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therapeutic interventions to prevent calcium accumulation and oxidative stress could be therefore helpful in improving the cardiac function under diabetic condition. Methods This study was designed to examine the effect of long-acting calcium channel blocker (CCB, Azelnidipine (AZL on contractile dysfunction, intracellular calcium (Ca2+ cycling proteins, stress-activated signaling molecules and apoptosis on cardiomyocytes in diabetes. Adult male Wistar rats were made diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (IP injection of streptozotocin (STZ. Contractile functions were traced from live diabetic rats to isolated individual cardiomyocytes including peak shortening (PS, time-to-PS (TPS, time-to-relengthening (TR90, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt and intracellular Ca2+ fluorescence. Results Diabetic heart showed significantly depressed PS, ± dL/dt, prolonged TPS, TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ clearing and showed an elevated resting intracellular Ca2+. AZL itself exhibited little effect on myocyte mechanics but it significantly alleviated STZ-induced myocyte contractile dysfunction. Diabetes increased the levels of superoxide, enhanced expression of the cardiac damage markers like troponin I, p67phox NADPH oxidase subunit, restored the levels of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, calcium regulatory proteins RyR2 and SERCA2a, and suppressed the levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. All of these STZ-induced alterations were reconciled by AZL treatment. Conclusion Collectively, the data suggest beneficial effect of AZL in diabetic cardiomyopathy via altering intracellular Ca2+ handling proteins and preventing apoptosis by its antioxidant property.

  11. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 μM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dtmax of 105 ± 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 ± 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 ± 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 ± 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 ± 1 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 ± 3 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  12. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  13. Securing Single Points of Compromise (SPoC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belangia, David Warren [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-25

    Securing the Single Points of Compromise that provide central services to the institution’s environment is paramount to success when trying to protect the business. (Fisk, 2014) Time Based Security mandates protection (erecting and ensuring effective controls) that last longer than the time to detect and react to a compromise. When enterprise protections fail, providing additional layered controls for these central services provides more time to detect and react. While guidance is readily available for securing the individual critical asset, protecting these assets as a group is not often discussed. Using best business practices to protect these resources as individual assets while leveraging holistic defenses for the group increases the opportunity to maximize protection time, allowing detection and reaction time for the SPoCs that is commensurate with the inherent risk of these centralized services.

  14. Alcohol Dehydrogenase Accentuates Ethanol-Induced Myocardial Dysfunction and Mitochondrial Damage in Mice: Role of Mitochondrial Death Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Rui; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Binge drinking and alcohol toxicity are often associated with myocardial dysfunction possibly due to accumulation of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde although the underlying mechanism is unknown. This study was designed to examine the impact of accelerated ethanol metabolism on myocardial contractility, mitochondrial function and apoptosis using a murine model of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Methods ADH and wild-type FVB mice were acutely chall...

  15. On the Viability of Memory Forensics in Compromised Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Stuettgen, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Memory forensics has become a powerful tool for the detection and analysis of malicious software. It provides investigators with an impartial view of a system, exposing hidden processes, threads, and network connections, by acquiring and analyzing physical memory. Because malicious software must be at least partially resident in memory in order to execute, it cannot remove all its traces from RAM. However, the memory acquisition process is vulnerable to subversion in compromised environments....

  16. SOCIAL POLICY VERSUS SOCIAL INEQUALITY: JUST COMPROMISING INJUSTICES?

    OpenAIRE

    Venieris, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the controversial relationship between social policy and social inequality. This is primarily about investigating the principles of equality, liberty and justice which are central to an understanding of inequality and of social intervention. A social policy system is either radical or compromising. For those who prefer the radical option, the failure of social policy to substantially erode inequality in unquestionable. For those who choose the preva...

  17. A School Choice Compromise: Between Immediate and Deferred Acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Harless, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    School assignment procedures aim to improve student welfare, but must balance efficiency and equity goals and provide incentives for students to report their preferences truthfully. Debate centers largely on two rules: immediate acceptance (IA), the so-called Boston mechanism, and deferred acceptance (DA). IA's strength is efficiency, while DA is touted for its superior strategic properties. Thinking of these as extremes, we advocate a compromise rule, immediate-acceptance-with-skips (IA+), ...

  18. Sophia's Compromises and Fielding's Creation of a Patriarchal World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋芳

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, critics maintain that Henry Fielding has created an ideal heroine, Sophia, in his novel The History of Tom Jones.This paper argues that Sophia is not a very successful woman character since she fails to be an autonomous individual and has to make compromises with the patriarchal world created by Fielding.Relating to this, Fielding's male Chauvinism embodied in this novel will also be explored by analyzing other women characters.

  19. Fatty old hearts: role of cardiac lipotoxicity in age-related cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Drosatos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cardiomyopathy accounts for a significant part of heart failure cases. Imbalance of the energetic equilibrium of the heart along with mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired β-adrenergic receptor signaling contributes in the aggravation of cardiac function in the elderly. In this review article, studies that correlate cardiac aging with lipotoxicity are summarized. The involvement of inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, β-adrenergic receptor desensitization, ...

  20. Defective insulin signaling and mitochondrial dynamics in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeier, Francisco; Navarro-Marquez, Mario; López-Crisosto, Camila; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Quiroga, Clara; Bustamante, Mario; Verdejo, Hugo E.; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Ibacache, Mauricio; Parra, Valentina; Castro, Pablo F.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a common consequence of longstanding type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and encompasses structural, morphological, functional, and metabolic abnormalities in the heart. Myocardial energy metabolism depends on mitochondria, which must generate sufficient ATP to meet the high energy demands of the myocardium. Dysfunctional mitochondria are involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic heart disease. A large body of evidence implicates myocardial insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of DCM. Recent studies show that insulin signaling influences myocardial energy metabolism by impacting cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dynamics and function under physiological conditions. However, comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms linking insulin signaling and changes in the architecture of the mitochondrial network in diabetic cardiomyopathy is lacking. This review summarizes our current understanding of how defective insulin signaling impacts cardiac function in diabetic cardiomyopathy and discusses the potential role of mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:25686534

  1. Private mitochondrial DNA variants in danish patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole;

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM....... Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446...... MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM....

  2. Molecular structure and pathophysiological roles of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, Cristina; Raffaello, Anna; Vecellio Reane, Denis; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake regulates a wide array of cell functions, from stimulation of aerobic metabolism and ATP production in physiological settings, to induction of cell death in pathological conditions. The molecular identity of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU), the highly selective channel responsible for Ca(2+) entry through the IMM, has been described less than five years ago. Since then, research has been conducted to clarify the modulation of its activity, which relies on the dynamic interaction with regulatory proteins, and its contribution to the pathophysiology of organs and tissues. Particular attention has been placed on characterizing the role of MCU in cardiac and skeletal muscles. In this review we summarize the molecular structure and regulation of the MCU complex in addition to its pathophysiological role, with particular attention to striated muscle tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26968367

  3. Ranolazine reduces Ca2+ overload and oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial integrity to protect against ischemia reperfusion injury in isolated hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Aldakkak, Mohammed; Camara, Amadou KS; Heisner, James S; Yang, Meiying; Stowe, David F

    2011-01-01

    Ranolazine is a clinically approved drug for treating cardiac ventricular dysrhythmias and angina. Its mechanism(s) of protection is not clearly understood but evidence points to blocking the late Na+ current that arises during ischemia, blocking mitochondrial complex I activity, or modulating mitochondrial metabolism. Here we tested the effect of ranolazine treatment before ischemia at the mitochondrial level in intact isolated hearts and in mitochondria isolated from hearts at different tim...

  4. Role of mitochondrial lipids in guiding fission and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohman, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Clinically important links have been established between mitochondrial function and cardiac physiology and disease in the context of signaling mechanisms, energy production, and muscle cell development. The proteins and processes that drive mitochondrial fusion and fission are now known to have emergent functions in intracellular calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, myofibril organization, and Notch-driven cell differentiation, all key issues in cardiac disease. Moreover, decreasing fission may confer protection against ischemic heart disease, particularly in the setting of obesity, diabetes, and heart failure. The importance of lipids in controlling mitochondrial fission and fusion is increasingly becoming appreciated. Roles for the bulk and signaling lipids cardiolipin, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol, and lysophosphatidic acid and the enzymes that synthesize or metabolize them in the control of mitochondrial shape and function are reviewed here. A number of diseases have been linked to loss-of-function alleles for a subset of the enzymes, emphasizing the importance of the lipid environment in this context. PMID:25471483

  5. Sex-specific cardiac cardiolipin remodelling after doxorubicin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Moulin, Maryline; Solgadi, Audrey; Veksler, Vladimir; Garnier, Anne; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Chaminade, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Imbalance in lipid metabolism and membrane lipid homeostasis has been observed in numerous diseases including heart failure and cardiotoxicity. Growing evidence links phospholipid alterations especially cardiolipins (CLs) to defects in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism in heart failure. We have shown recently that doxorubicin cardiotoxicity is more severe in male than female Wistar rats. We aimed to study whether this sex specificity is linked to differences in cardiac p...

  6. Preoperative cardiac risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaković Radosav; Poldermans Don; Nešković Aleksandar N.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 100 million people undergo noncardiac surgery annually worldwide. It is estimated that around 3% of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery experience a major adverse cardiac event. Although cardiac events, like myocardial infarction, are major cause of perioperative morbidity or mortality, its true incidence is difficult to assess. The risk of perioperative cardiac complications depends mainly on two conditions: 1) identified risk factors, and 2) the type of the surgical p...

  7. Mitochondrial diseases and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoff, Laurence A; Engelsen, Bernt A

    2012-09-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the final common pathway for energy production. Defects affecting this pathway can give rise to disease that presents at any age and affects any tissue. However, irrespective of genetic defect, epilepsy is common and there is a significant risk of status epilepticus. This review summarizes our current understanding of the epilepsy that occurs in mitochondrial disease, focusing on three of the most common disorders: mitochondrial myopathy encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF), and polymerase gamma (POLG) related disease. In addition, we review the pathogenesis and possible treatment of these disorders. PMID:22946726

  8. Impaired Cerebral Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Function in a Rat Model of Ventricular Fibrillation and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest brain injury significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients suffering from cardiac arrest (CA. Evidence that shows that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be a key factor in tissue damage after ischemia/reperfusion is accumulating. However, limited data are available regarding the cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and its relationship to the alterations of high-energy phosphate. Here, we sought to identify alterations of mitochondrial morphology and oxidative phosphorylation function as well as high-energy phosphates during CA and CPR in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF. We found that impairment of mitochondrial respiration and partial depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr developed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus following a prolonged cardiac arrest. Optimal CPR might ameliorate the deranged phosphorus metabolism and preserve mitochondrial function. No obvious ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria have been found during CA. We conclude that CA causes cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction along with decay of high-energy phosphates, which would be mitigated with CPR. This study may broaden our understanding of the pathogenic processes underlying global cerebral ischemic injury and provide a potential therapeutic strategy that aimed at preserving cerebral mitochondrial function during CA.

  9. Mitochondrial respiratory control and early defects of oxidative phosphorylation in the failing human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Hélène; Semsroth, Severin; Antretter, Herwig; Höfer, Daniel; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure is a consequence of progressive deterioration of cardiac performance. Little is known about the role of impaired oxidative phosphorylation in the progression of the disease, since previous studies of mitochondrial injuries are restricted to end-stage chronic heart failure. The present study aimed at evaluating the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human heart failure. We measured the control of oxidative phosphorylation with high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized myocardial fibres from donor hearts (controls), and patients with no or mild heart failure but presenting with heart disease, or chronic heart failure due to dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The capacity of the phosphorylation system exerted a strong limitation on oxidative phosphorylation in the human heart, estimated at 121 pmol O(2)s(-1)mg(-1) in the healthy left ventricle. In heart disease, a specific defect of the phosphorylation system, Complex I-linked respiration, and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation were identified. These early defects were also significant in chronic heart failure, where the capacities of the oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer systems per cardiac tissue mass were decreased with all tested substrate combinations, suggesting a decline of mitochondrial density. Oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer system capacities were higher in ventricles compared to atria, but the impaired mitochondrial quality was identical in the four cardiac chambers of chronic heart failure patients. Coupling was preserved in heart disease and chronic heart failure, in contrast to the mitochondrial dysfunction observed after prolonged cold storage of cardiac tissue. Mitochondrial defects in the phosphorylation system, Complex I respiration and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation occurred early in the development of heart failure. Targeting these mitochondrial injuries with metabolic therapy may offer a promising approach to delay

  10. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  11. Mitochondrial injury and dysfunction in hypertension-induced cardiac damage

    OpenAIRE

    Eirin, Alfonso; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension remains an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Deciphering the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension is critical, as its prevalence continues increasing worldwide. Mitochondria, the primary cellular energy producers, are numerous in parenchymal cells of the heart, kidney, and brain, major target organs in hypertension. These membrane-bound organelles not only maintain cellular respiratio...

  12. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26712328

  13. Mitochondrial dynamics and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Suen, Der-Fen; Norris, Kristi L.; Youle, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In healthy cells, mitochondria continually divide and fuse to form a dynamic interconnecting network. The molecular machinery that mediates this organelle fission and fusion is necessary to maintain mitochondrial integrity, perhaps by facilitating DNA or protein quality control. This network disintegrates during apoptosis at the time of cytochrome c release and prior to caspase activation, yielding more numerous and smaller mitochondria. Recent work shows that proteins involved in mitochondri...

  14. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.;

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  15. Mitochondrial metabolism and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Ki‐Up; Lee, Hong Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The oversupply of calories and sedentary lifestyle has resulted in a rapid increase of diabetes prevalence worldwide. During the past two decades, lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Mitochondria are vital to most of the eukaryotic cells as they provide energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate by oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, mitochondrial function is an integral part of glucose‐stimulated insulin...

  16. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:21402391

  17. The Swiss approach to finding compromises in nuclear waste governance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Switzerland, a new site selection procedure is being implemented since 2008. This procedure, which is laid down in a 'sectoral plan', shows strong elements of public participation and transparency and can be considered a step away from the classical 'decide-announce-defend' approach in decision-making. This procedure tends towards a more governance-oriented approach based on ideas of 'civility' of decision-making. Despite this renewal, the Swiss case clearly shows that any kind of selection process has to be considered as a 'working compromise', which needs to be adapted when new challenges emerge.

  18. The Swiss approach to finding compromises in nuclear waste governance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuppler, Sophie; Grunwald, Armin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). Inst. for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis

    2015-07-01

    In Switzerland, a new site selection procedure is being implemented since 2008. This procedure, which is laid down in a 'sectoral plan', shows strong elements of public participation and transparency and can be considered a step away from the classical 'decide-announce-defend' approach in decision-making. This procedure tends towards a more governance-oriented approach based on ideas of 'civility' of decision-making. Despite this renewal, the Swiss case clearly shows that any kind of selection process has to be considered as a 'working compromise', which needs to be adapted when new challenges emerge.

  19. Osseous pseudo-myelomatose compromise, in leukemia chronic lymphoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was described a case of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in a 75 year old man, with pseudomyelomatosis osteolytic lesions in the skull, excluding other potential causes of osteolytic lesions in the clinical context of malignant lymphoproliferative neoplasm. The real frequency of osseous compromise in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is 10%. Lesions are defined as generalized osteoporosis and osteolysis with lacunar aspect, similar to myeloma lesions. Because histopathology in lymphoproliferative neoplasms may be similar, it might be difficult to diagnose chronic lymphocytic leukemia certainly, if the clinical manifestations are not considered. Differential diagnosis with other lymphoproliferative neoplasm is based basically in absolute lymphocytosis greater than 10 X 109/L, with lymphocytes with mature appearance

  20. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  1. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu; Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. PMID:27114304

  2. Large-scale characterization of the murine cardiac proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Jake; Emili, Andrew; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart that result in impaired cardiac muscle function. This dysfunction can progress to an inability to supply blood to the body. Cardiovascular diseases play a large role in overall global morbidity. Investigating the protein changes in the heart during disease can uncover pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Establishing a global protein expression "footprint" can facilitate more targeted studies of diseases of the heart.In the technical review presented here, we present methods to elucidate the heart's proteome through subfractionation of the cellular compartments to reduce sample complexity and improve detection of lower abundant proteins during multidimensional protein identification technology analysis. Analysis of the cytosolic, microsomal, and mitochondrial subproteomes separately in order to characterize the murine cardiac proteome is advantageous by simplifying complex cardiac protein mixtures. In combination with bioinformatic analysis and genome correlation, large-scale protein changes can be identified at the cellular compartment level in this animal model. PMID:23606244

  3. Cardiac-specific succinate dehydrogenase deficiency in Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Jan; Cheng, I-Fen; Chowdhury, Arpita; Wozny, Katharina; Balleininger, Martina; Reinhold, Robert; Grunau, Silke; Callegari, Sylvie; Toischer, Karl; Wanders, Ronald Ja; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Brügger, Britta; Guan, Kaomei; Rehling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a cardiomyopathy caused by the loss of tafazzin, a mitochondrial acyltransferase involved in the maturation of the glycerophospholipid cardiolipin. It has remained enigmatic as to why a systemic loss of cardiolipin leads to cardiomyopathy. Using a genetic ablation of tafazzin function in the BTHS mouse model, we identified severe structural changes in respiratory chain supercomplexes at a pre-onset stage of the disease. This reorganization of supercomplexes was specific to cardiac tissue and could be recapitulated in cardiomyocytes derived from BTHS patients. Moreover, our analyses demonstrate a cardiac-specific loss of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), an enzyme linking the respiratory chain with the tricarboxylic acid cycle. As a similar defect of SDH is apparent in patient cell-derived cardiomyocytes, we conclude that these defects represent a molecular basis for the cardiac pathology in Barth syndrome. PMID:26697888

  4. Understanding STAT3 signaling in cardiac ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, K E; Breen, E P; Gallagher, H C; Buggy, D J; Hurley, J P

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. It remains one of the greatest challenges to global health and will continue to dominate mortality trends in the future. Acute myocardial infarction results in 7.4 million deaths globally per annum. Current management strategies are centered on restoration of coronary blood flow via percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting and administration of anti-platelet agents. Such myocardial reperfusion accounts for 40-50 % of the final infarct size in most cases. Signaling transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been shown to have cardioprotective effects via canonical and non-canonical activation and modulation of mitochondrial and transcriptional responses. A significant body of in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that activation of the STAT3 signal transduction pathway results in a cardio protective response to ischemia and attempts have been made to modulate this with therapeutic effect. Not only is STAT3 important for cardiomyocyte function, but it also modulates the cardiac microenvironment and communicates with cardiac fibroblasts. To this end, we here review the current evidence supporting the manipulation of STAT3 for therapeutic benefit in cardiac ischemia and identify areas for future research. PMID:27017613

  5. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  6. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  7. Abnormal mitochondrial L-arginine transport contributes to the pathogenesis of heart failure and rexoygenation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. METHODS AND RESULTS: In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01 compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05. The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1 exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. CONCLUSION: These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury.

  8. Diffusion-reaction compromise the polymorphs of precipitated calcium carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Wang; Wenlai Huang; Yongsheng Han

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion is seldom considered by chemists and materialists in the preparation of materials while it plays an important role in the field of chemical engineering.If we look at crystallization at the atomic level,crystal growth in a solution starts from the diffusion of ions to the growing surface followed by the incorporation of ions into its lattice.Diffusion can be a rate determining step for the growth of crystals.In this paper,we take the crystallization of calcium carbonate as an example to illustrate the microscopic processes of diffusion and reaction and their compromising influence on the morphology of the crystals produced.The diffusion effect is studied in a specially designed three-cell reactor.Experiments show that a decrease of diffusion leads to retardation of supersaturation and the formation of a continuous concentration gradient in the reaction cell,thus promoting the formation of cubic calcite particles.The reaction rate is regulated by temperature.Increase of reaction rate favors the formation of needle-like aragonite particles.When diffusion and reaction play joint roles in the reaction system,their compromise dominates the formation of products,leading to a mixture of cubic and needle-like particles with a controllable ratio.Since diffusion and reaction are universal factors in the preparation of materials,the finding of this paper could be helpful in the controlled synthesis of other materials.

  9. Differential diagnosis of the signal-compromised lunate in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define both the underlying pathology and diagnostic criteria in lunates presenting with conspicuous signal pattern in MRI. Materials and Methods: The retrospective evaluation of 2940 MRI examinations revealed 203 patients with signal alterations of the lunate. All MRI examinations were performed on 1.5-Tesla platforms using dedicated surface coils and an intravenous contrast agent. To establish a definitive diagnosis, a total of 252 MRI examinations (49 follow-ups), 22 CT examinations and 4 arthroscopic studies were obtained in addition to the obligatory conventional radiographs. Results: Incorporating all clinical data, radiographs and MRI examinations succeeded in assigning a diagnosis in 136 signal-compromised lunates (67.0%), whereas additional diagnostic procedures or follow-up examinations were required for the definitive diagnosis in 57 cases (33.0%). The most frequent entities were 51 cases of Kienboeck's disease (25.1%), 47 cases of ulnolunate-(triquetral) impaction syndromes (23.2%) and 44 cases of intra-osseous ganglion cysts (21.7%). Other pathologies included 23 degenerative, 19 traumatic and 10 inflammatory changes as well as 9 congenital conditions. For MRI assessment of the altered lunate, the most important parameters were location and morphology as well as involvement of the articular and osseous structures of the carpus. Conclusion: The lunate may be affected by different pathological states of the wrist. In total, only one quarter of the signal-compromised lunate represented Kienboeck's disease. (orig.)

  10. Erythropoietin treatment enhances mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla ePlenge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Erythropoietin (Epo treatment has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle along with enhanced mitochondrial capacity in mice. We hypothesized that recombinant human Epo (rhEpo treatment enhances skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS capacity in humans. In six healthy volunteers rhEpo was administered by sub-cutaneous injection over eight weeks with oral iron (100 mg supplementation taken daily. Mitochondrial OXPHOS was quantified by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized muscle fibers obtained from biopsies of the vastus lateralis before and after rhEpo treatment. OXPHOS was determined with the mitochondrial complex I substrates malate, glutamate, pyruvate and complex II substrate succinate in the presence of saturating ADP concentrations, while maximal electron transport capacity (ETS was assessed by addition of an uncoupler. rhEpo treatment increased OXPHOS (from 92±5 to 113±7 pmol.sec-1.mg-1 and ETS (107±4 to 143±14 pmol.sec-1.mg-1, P<0.05, demonstrating that Epo treatment induces an upregulation of OXPHOS and ETS in human skeletal muscle.

  11. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  12. Complex IV Deficient Surf1−/− Mice Initiate Mitochondrial Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Daniel A.; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S.; Liu, Yuhong; Hill, Shauna; Lin, Ai-Ling; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Shi, Yun; Sloane, Lauren; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Van Remmen, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mutations in SURF1 cytochrome c oxidase (COX) assembly protein are associated with Leigh’s syndrome, a human mitochondrial disorder that manifests as severe mitochondrial phenotypes and early lethality. In contrast, mice lacking the Surf1 protein (Surf1−/−) are viable and were previously shown to have enhanced longevity and a greater than 50% reduction in COX activity. We measured mitochondrial function in heart and skeletal muscle, and despite the significant reduction in COX activity, we found little or no difference in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, membrane potential, ATP production or respiration in isolated mitochondria from Surf1−/− mice compared to wild-type. However, blood lactate levels are elevated and Surf1−/− mice have reduced running endurance, suggesting compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism in vivo. Decreased COX activity in Surf1−/− mice is associated with increased markers of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and VDAC) in both heart and skeletal muscle. While mitochondrial biogenesis is a common response in the two tissues, skeletal muscle have an up-regulation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRMT) and heart exhibits induction of the Nrf2 antioxidant response pathway. These data are the first to report induction of the UPRMT in a mammalian model of diminished COX activity. In addition our results suggest that impaired mitochondrial function can lead to induction of mitochondrial stress pathways to confer protective effects on cellular homeostasis. Loss of complex IV assembly factor Surf1 in mice results in compensatory responses including mitochondrial biogenesis, the nrf2 pathway and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This compensatory response may contribute to the lack of deleterious phenotypes under basal conditions. PMID:24911525

  13. [Cardiac evaluation before non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzenbach, Jan; Boehm, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Before non-cardiac surgery, evaluation of cardiac function is no frequent part of surgical treatment. European societies of anesthesiology and cardiology published consensus-guidelines in 2014 to present a reasonable approach for preoperative evaluation. This paper intends to differentiate the composite of perioperative risk and to display the guidelines methodical approach to handle it. Features to identify patients at risk from an ageing population with comorbidities, are the classification of surgical risk, functional capacity and risk indices. Application of diagnostic means, should be used adjusted to this risk estimation. Cardiac biomarkers are useful to discover risk of complications or mortality, that cannot be assessed by clinical signs. After preoperative optimization and perioperative cardiac protection, the observation of the postoperative period remains, to prohibit complications or even death. In consideration of limited resources of intensive care department, postoperative ward rounds beyond intensive care units are considered to be an appropriate instrument to avoid or recognize complications early to reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:27479258

  14. Neurological mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta M

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cytopathies are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by structural and functional abnormalities in mitochondria. To the best of our knowledge, there are very few studies published from India till date. Selected and confirmed fourteen cases of neurological mitochondrial cytopathies with different clinical syndromes admitted between 1997 and 2000 are being reported. There were 8 male and 6 female patients. The mean age was 24.42+/-11.18 years (range 4-40 years. Twelve patients could be categorized into well-defined syndromes, while two belonged to undefined group. In the defined syndrome categories, three patients had MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke like episodes, three had MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibre myopathy, three cases had KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome and three were diagnosed to be suffering from mitochondrial myopathy. In the uncategorized group, one case presented with paroxysmal kinesogenic dystonia and the other manifested with generalized chorea alone. Serum lactic acid level was significantly increased in all the patients (fasting 28.96+/-4.59 mg%, post exercise 41.02+/-4.93 mg%. Muscle biopsy was done in all cases. Succinic dehydrogenase staining of muscle tissue showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in 12 cases. Mitochondrial DNA study could be performed in one case only and it did not reveal any mutation at nucleotides 3243 and 8344. MRI brain showed multiple infarcts in MELAS, hyperintensities in putaminal areas in chorea and bilateral cerebellar atrophy in MERRF.

  15. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion. PMID:20196232

  16. Cardiac metabolism and arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, Andreas S.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.

    2009-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a leading cause of mortality in the Western world, accounting for up to 20% of all deaths in the U.S.1, 2 The major causes of sudden cardiac death in adults age 35 and older are coronary artery disease (70–80%) and dilated cardiomyopathy (10–15%).3 At the molecular level, a wide variety of mechanisms contribute to arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death, ranging from genetic predisposition (rare mutations and common polymorphisms in ion channels and structural...

  17. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  18. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed for...... uncertain and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  19. BRG1 and BRM SWI/SNF ATPases redundantly maintain cardiomyocyte homeostasis by regulating cardiomyocyte mitophagy and mitochondrial dynamics in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultman, Scott J; Holley, Darcy Wood; G de Ridder, Gustaaf; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Sidorova, Tatiana N; Murray, Katherine T; Jensen, Brian C; Wang, Zhongjing; Bevilacqua, Ariana; Chen, Xin; Quintana, Megan T; Tannu, Manasi; Rosson, Gary B; Pandya, Kumar; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increasing recognition that mitochondrial perturbations play a central role in human heart failure. Mitochondrial networks, whose function is to maintain the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy ('mitophagy') and mitochondrial fusion/fission, are new potential therapeutic targets. Yet our understanding of the molecular underpinning of these processes is just emerging. We recently identified a role of the SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in the metabolic homeostasis of the adult cardiomyocyte using cardiomyocyte-specific and inducible deletion of the SWI/SNF ATPases BRG1 and BRM in adult mice (Brg1/Brm double mutant mice). To build upon these observations in early altered metabolism, the present study looks at the subsequent alterations in mitochondrial quality control mechanisms in the impaired adult cardiomyocyte. We identified that Brg1/Brm double-mutant mice exhibited increased mitochondrial biogenesis, increases in 'mitophagy', and alterations in mitochondrial fission and fusion that led to small, fragmented mitochondria. Mechanistically, increases in the autophagy and mitophagy-regulated proteins Beclin1 and Bnip3 were identified, paralleling changes seen in human heart failure. Evidence for perturbed cardiac mitochondrial dynamics included decreased mitochondria size, reduced numbers of mitochondria, and an altered expression of genes regulating fusion (Mfn1, Opa1) and fission (Drp1). We also identified cardiac protein amyloid accumulation (aggregated fibrils) during disease progression along with an increase in pre-amyloid oligomers and an upregulated unfolded protein response including increased GRP78, CHOP, and IRE-1 signaling. Together, these findings described a role for BRG1 and BRM in mitochondrial quality control, by regulating mitochondrial number, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics not previously recognized in the adult cardiomyocyte. As critical to the pathogenesis of heart failure, epigenetic

  20. Cyclophilin D controls mitochondrial pore–dependent Ca2+ exchange, metabolic flexibility, and propensity for heart failure in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Elrod, John W.; Wong, Renee; Mishra, Shikha; Vagnozzi, Ronald J.; Sakthievel, Bhuvana; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Karch, Jason; Gabel, Scott; Farber, John; Force, Thomas; Heller Brown, Joan; Murphy, Elizabeth; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclophilin D (which is encoded by the Ppif gene) is a mitochondrial matrix peptidyl-prolyl isomerase known to modulate opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). Apart from regulating necrotic cell death, the physiologic function of the MPTP is largely unknown. Here we have shown that Ppif–/– mice exhibit substantially greater cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and reduction in myocardial function in response to pressure overload stimulation than control mice. In addition,...

  1. Open-Loop Control of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Mitochondria by Ca(2.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Singhal, Abhishek; Van den Bergh, Françoise; Bagher-Oskouei, Masoumeh; Wiseman, Robert W; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-02-23

    In cardiac muscle, mitochondrial ATP synthesis is driven by demand for ATP through feedback from the products of ATP hydrolysis. However, in skeletal muscle at higher workloads there is an apparent contribution of open-loop stimulation of ATP synthesis. Open-loop control is defined as modulation of flux through a biochemical pathway by a moiety, which is not a reactant or a product of the biochemical reactions in the pathway. The role of calcium, which is known to stimulate the activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenases, as an open-loop controller, was investigated in isolated cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria. The kinetics of NADH synthesis and respiration, feedback from ATP hydrolysis products, and stimulation by calcium were characterized in isolated mitochondria to test the hypothesis that calcium has a stimulatory role in skeletal muscle mitochondria not apparent in cardiac mitochondria. A range of respiratory states were obtained in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria utilizing physiologically relevant concentrations of pyruvate and malate, and flux of respiration, NAD(P)H fluorescence, and rhodamine 123 fluorescence were measured over a range of extra mitochondrial calcium concentrations. We found that under these conditions calcium stimulates NADH synthesis in skeletal muscle mitochondria but not in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:26910432

  2. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Singhal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis.

  3. Sarcoidosis with Major Airway, Vascular and Nerve Compromise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sekiguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a 60-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with progressive dyspnea, cough and wheeze. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed innumerable bilateral inflammatory pulmonary nodules with bronchovascular distribution and a mediastinal and hilar infiltrative process with calcified lymphadenopathy leading to narrowing of lobar bronchi and pulmonary arteries. An echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hypertension. Bronchoscopy showed left vocal cord paralysis and significant narrowing of the bilateral bronchi with mucosal thickening and multiple nodules. Transbronchial biopsy was compatible with sarcoidosis. Despite balloon angioplasty of the left lower lobe and pulmonary artery, and medical therapy with oral corticosteroids, her symptoms did not significantly improve. To the authors’ knowledge, the present report describes the first case of pulmonary sarcoidosis resulting in major airway, vascular and nerve compromise due to compressive lymphadenopathy and suspected concurrent granulomatous infiltration. Its presentation mimicked idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis.

  4. Protecting Privacy of Shared Epidemiologic Data without Compromising Analysis Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cologne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Ensuring privacy of research subjects when epidemiologic data are shared with outside collaborators involves masking (modifying the data, but overmasking can compromise utility (analysis potential. Methods of statistical disclosure control for protecting privacy may be impractical for individual researchers involved in small-scale collaborations. Methods. We investigated a simple approach based on measures of disclosure risk and analytical utility that are straightforward for epidemiologic researchers to derive. The method is illustrated using data from the Japanese Atomic-bomb Survivor population. Results. Masking by modest rounding did not adequately enhance security but rounding to remove several digits of relative accuracy effectively reduced the risk of identification without substantially reducing utility. Grouping or adding random noise led to noticeable bias. Conclusions. When sharing epidemiologic data, it is recommended that masking be performed using rounding. Specific treatment should be determined separately in individual situations after consideration of the disclosure risks and analysis needs.

  5. Glycan Side Reaction May Compromise ETD-Based Glycopeptide Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.

    2014-06-01

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) is one of the most frequently used buffer ingredients. Among other things, it is recommended and is usually used for lectin-based affinity enrichment of glycopeptides. Here we report that sialic acid, a common `capping' unit in both N- and O-linked glycans may react with this chemical, and this side reaction may compromise glycopeptide identification when ETD spectra are the only MS/MS data used in the database search. We show that the modification may alter N- as well as O-linked glycans, the Tris-derivative is still prone to fragmentation both in `beam-type' CID (HCD) and ETD experiments, at the same time—since the acidic carboxyl group was `neutralized'—it will display a different retention time than its unmodified counterpart. We also suggest solutions that—when incorporated into existing search engines—may significantly improve the reliability of glycopeptide assignments.

  6. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath eVenketaraman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH such as glutathione synthase (GSS, glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC and glutathione reductase (GSR were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals’ is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients’ indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells.

  7. Compromising Tor Anonymity Exploiting P2P Information Leakage

    CERN Document Server

    Manils, Pere; Blond, Stevens Le; Kaafar, Mohamed Ali; Castelluccia, Claude; Legout, Arnaud; Dabbous, Walid

    2010-01-01

    Privacy of users in P2P networks goes far beyond their current usage and is a fundamental requirement to the adoption of P2P protocols for legal usage. In a climate of cold war between these users and anti-piracy groups, more and more users are moving to anonymizing networks in an attempt to hide their identity. However, when not designed to protect users information, a P2P protocol would leak information that may compromise the identity of its users. In this paper, we first present three attacks targeting BitTorrent users on top of Tor that reveal their real IP addresses. In a second step, we analyze the Tor usage by BitTorrent users and compare it to its usage outside of Tor. Finally, we depict the risks induced by this de-anonymization and show that users' privacy violation goes beyond BitTorrent traffic and contaminates other protocols such as HTTP.

  8. Mitigating reptile road mortality: fence failures compromise ecopassage effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Baxter-Gilbert

    Full Text Available Roadways pose serious threats to animal populations. The installation of roadway mitigation measures is becoming increasingly common, yet studies that rigorously evaluate the effectiveness of these conservation tools remain rare. A highway expansion project in Ontario, Canada included exclusion fencing and ecopassages as mitigation measures designed to offset detrimental effects to one of the most imperial groups of vertebrates, reptiles. Taking a multispecies approach, we used a Before-After-Control-Impact study design to compare reptile abundance on the highway before and after mitigation at an Impact site and a Control site from 1 May to 31 August in 2012 and 2013. During this time, radio telemetry, wildlife cameras, and an automated PIT-tag reading system were used to monitor reptile movements and use of ecopassages. Additionally, a willingness to utilize experiment was conducted to quantify turtle behavioral responses to ecopassages. We found no difference in abundance of turtles on the road between the un-mitigated and mitigated highways, and an increase in the percentage of both snakes and turtles detected dead on the road post-mitigation, suggesting that the fencing was not effective. Although ecopassages were used by reptiles, the number of crossings through ecopassages was lower than road-surface crossings. Furthermore, turtle willingness to use ecopassages was lower than that reported in previous arena studies, suggesting that effectiveness of ecopassages may be compromised when alternative crossing options are available (e.g., through holes in exclusion structures. Our rigorous evaluation of reptile roadway mitigation demonstrated that when exclusion structures fail, the effectiveness of population connectivity structures is compromised. Our project emphasizes the need to design mitigation measures with the biology and behavior of the target species in mind, to implement mitigation designs in a rigorous fashion, and quantitatively

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Psychiatric Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw-Hwa Jou; Nan-Yin Chiu; Chin-San Liu

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles crucial in the production of cellular energy.Mitochondrial diseases may result from malfunctions in this biochemical cascade. Severalinvestigators have proposed that mitochondrial dysfunction is related to the pathophysiologyof bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Theauthors reviewed recent study findings and tried to delineate the current understanding of thecorrelation between mitochondrial dysfunction and p...

  10. Implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Lu; Lokendra Kumar Sharma; Yidong Bai

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondria have recently been shown to play an important role in regulating both programmed cell death and cell proliferation. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in various cancer cells. However, the role of these mtDNA mutations in tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. This review focuses on basic mitochondrial genetics, mtDNA mutations and consequential mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cancer. The potential molecular mechanisms, mediating the pathogenesis from mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction to tumorigenesis are also discussed.

  11. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator February 19, 2009 Halifax Health Medical Center, Daytona Beach, FL Welcome to Halifax Health Daytona Beach, Florida. Over the next hour you' ...

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan, or MUGA, which shows how well your heart is pumping blood. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which gives doctors detailed pictures of your heart. How is SCA treated? Sudden cardiac arrest should ...

  13. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) SCA: Who's At Risk? Prevention of SCA What Causes SCA? SCA Awareness Atrial Flutter Heart Block Heart Failure Sick Sinus Syndrome Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  14. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranđelović Aleksandra Č.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death in an athlete is rare and tragic event. An athlete's death draws high public attention given that athletes are considered the healthiest category of society. The vast majority of sudden cardiac death in young athletes is due to congenital cardiac malformations such as hypertrophie cardiomyopathy and various coronary artery anomalies. In athletes over age 35, the usual cause of sudden cardiac death is coronary artery disease. With each tragic death of a young athlete, there is a question why this tragedy has not been prevented. The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association recommend that a pre-participation exam should include a complete cardiovascular history and physical examination.

  15. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to assess cardiac risk include: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) : Studies have shown that measuring ... LDL-C but does not respond to typical strategies to lower LDL-C such as diet, exercise, ...

  16. Diastolic Dysfunction Induced by a High-Fat Diet Is Associated with Mitochondrial Abnormality and Adenosine Triphosphate Levels in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ki-Woon; Kim, Ok-Soon; Chin, Jung Yeon; Kim, Won Ho; Park, Sang Hyun; Choi, Yu Jeong; Shin, Jong Ho; Jung, Kyung Tae; Lim, Do-Seon; Lee, Seong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is well-known as a risk factor for heart failure, including diastolic dysfunction. However, this mechanism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese rats remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cardiac dysfunction develops when rats are fed with a HFD for 10 weeks; additionally, we sought to investigate the association between mitochondrial abnormalities, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and cardiac dysfunction. Methods We examined myocardia...

  17. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  18. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  19. Safety in cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (NVT) database. The safety of care is usually measured using patient outcomes. If outcomes are not available, the process and structure of care may be used. Outcomes should be adjusted ...

  20. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  1. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  2. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...

  3. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor inhibition is deleterious for high-fat diet-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Palud

    Full Text Available AIMS: Development of metabolic syndrome is associated with impaired cardiac performance, mitochondrial dysfunction and pro-inflammatory cytokine increase, such as the macrophage migration inhibitory factor MIF. Depending on conditions, MIF may exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on the myocardium. Therefore, we tested whether pharmacological inhibition of MIF prevented or worsened metabolic syndrome-induced myocardial dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: C57BL/6J mice were fed for ten weeks with 60% fat-enriched diet (HFD or normal diet (ND. MIF inhibition was obtained by injecting mice twice a week with ISO-1, for three consecutive weeks. Then, triglycerides, cholesterol, fat mass, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, ex vivo cardiac contractility, animal energetic substrate utilization assessed by indirect calorimetry and mitochondrial respiration and biogenesis were evaluated. HFD led to fat mass increase, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. ISO-1 did not alter these parameters. However, MIF inhibition was responsible for HFD-induced cardiac dysfunction worsening. Mouse capacity to increase oxygen consumption in response to exercise was reduced in HFD compared to ND, and further diminished in ISO-1-treated HFD group. Mitochondrial respiration was reduced in HFD mice, treated or not with ISO-1. Compared to ND, mitochondrial biogenesis signaling was upregulated in the HFD as demonstrated by mitochondrial DNA amount and PGC-1α expression. However, this increase in biogenesis was blocked by ISO-1 treatment. CONCLUSION: MIF inhibition achieved by ISO-1 was responsible for a reduction in HFD-induced mitochondrial biogenesis signaling that could explain majored cardiac dysfunction observed in HFD mice treated with MIF inhibitor.

  4. Cardiac Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Long procedure time and somewhat suboptimal results hinder the widespread use of catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF. Due to lack of contrast differentiation between the area of interest and surrounding structures in a moving organ like heart, there is a lack of proper intraprocedural guidance using current imaging techniques for ablation. Cardiac image registration is currently under investigation and is in clinical use for AF ablation. Cardiac image registration, which involves integration of two images in the context of left atrium (LA, is intermodal, with the acquired image and the real-time reference image residing in different image spaces, and involves optimization, where one image space is transformed into the other. Unlike rigid body registration, cardiac image registration is unique and challenging due to cardiac motion during the cardiac cycle and due to respiration. This review addresses the basic principles of the emerging technique of registration and the inherent limitations as they relate to cardiac imaging and registration.

  5. Cardiac Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasbir Sra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Long procedure time and somewhat suboptimal results hinder the widespread use of catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF. Due to lack of contrast differentiation between the area of interest and surrounding structures in a moving organ like heart, there is a lack of proper intraprocedural guidance using current imaging techniques for ablation. Cardiac image registration is currently under investigation and is in clinical use for AF ablation. Cardiac image registration, which involves integration of two images in the context of the left atrium (LA, is intermodal, with the acquired image and the real-time reference image residing in different image spaces, and involves optimization, where one image space is transformed into the other. Unlike rigid body registration, cardiac image registration is unique and challenging due to cardiac motion during the cardiac cycle and due to respiration. This review addresses the basic principles of the emerging technique of registration and the inherent limitations as they relate to cardiac imaging and registration.

  6. Effect of fast-track cardiac anesthesia on myocardial oxidative damage, inflammation and nerve related peptides of patients undergoing cardiac operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Tao Cai; Zhong-Jun Zhang; Wen-Bo Diao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of fast-track cardiac anesthesia on myocardial oxidative damage, inflammation and nerve related peptides of patients undergoing cardiac operation.Methods:Sixty patients with rheumatic heart disease undergoing heart valve surgery were randomly divided into the fast track group (n=30) and conventional group (n=30). Then myocardial injury indicators, mitochondrial oxidative stress indicators, inflammation indicators and nerve-related peptides of both groups were analyzed.Results: cTnI contents at T2-T4 points in time of both groups showed an increasing trend and the increasing trend of fast track group was weaker than that of conventional group; SOD contents as well as mitochondrial tristate respiratory function, respiratory control ratios and phosphorus oxygen ratios in myocardial tissue of fast track group were higher than those of conventional group, and MDA contents was lower than those of conventional group; plasma TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, NSE, S100β and Aβcontents of fast track group were lower than those of conventional group.Conclusions:Fast-track cardiac anesthesia can protect myocardial cells, reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress, relieve inflammation and improve nerve function; it is an ideal anesthesia method for cardiac operation.

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for the stochastic heterogeneity in telomere-dependent senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F Passos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging is an inherently stochastic process, and its hallmark is heterogeneity between organisms, cell types, and clonal populations, even in identical environments. The replicative lifespan of primary human cells is telomere dependent; however, its heterogeneity is not understood. We show that mitochondrial superoxide production increases with replicative age in human fibroblasts despite an adaptive UCP-2-dependent mitochondrial uncoupling. This mitochondrial dysfunction is accompanied by compromised [Ca(2+]i homeostasis and other indicators of a retrograde response in senescent cells. Replicative senescence of human fibroblasts is delayed by mild mitochondrial uncoupling. Uncoupling reduces mitochondrial superoxide generation, slows down telomere shortening, and delays formation of telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. This indicates mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS as one of the causes of replicative senescence. By sorting early senescent (SES cells from young proliferating fibroblast cultures, we show that SES cells have higher ROS levels, dysfunctional mitochondria, shorter telomeres, and telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. We propose that mitochondrial ROS is a major determinant of telomere-dependent senescence at the single-cell level that is responsible for cell-to-cell variation in replicative lifespan.

  8. Peroxynitrite induced mitochondrial biogenesis following MnSOD knockdown in normal rat kidney (NRK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Marine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide is widely regarded as the primary reactive oxygen species (ROS which initiates downstream oxidative stress. Increased oxidative stress contributes, in part, to many disease conditions such as cancer, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, diabetes, aging, and neurodegeneration. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide into hydrogen peroxide which can then be further detoxified by other antioxidant enzymes. MnSOD is critical in maintaining the normal function of mitochondria, thus its inactivation is thought to lead to compromised mitochondria. Previously, our laboratory observed increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a novel kidney-specific MnSOD knockout mouse. The current study used transient siRNA mediated MnSOD knockdown of normal rat kidney (NRK cells as the in vitro model, and confirmed functional mitochondrial biogenesis evidenced by increased PGC1α expression, mitochondrial DNA copy numbers and integrity, electron transport chain protein CORE II, mitochondrial mass, oxygen consumption rate, and overall ATP production. Further mechanistic studies using mitoquinone (MitoQ, a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor demonstrated that peroxynitrite (at low micromolar levels induced mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings provide the first evidence that low levels of peroxynitrite can initiate a protective signaling cascade involving mitochondrial biogenesis which may help to restore mitochondrial function following transient MnSOD inactivation.

  9. Postoperative cardiac arrest due to cardiac surgery complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the role of anesthetists in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with cardiac anesthesia. In this retrospective study we studied the potential performances for each of the relevant incidents among 712 patients undergoing cardiac operations at Golestan and Naft Hospitals Ahwaz between November 2006 and July 2008. Out of total 712 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, cardiac arrest occurred in 28 cases (3.9%) due to different postoperative complications. This included massive bleeding (50% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.9% of patients); pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.1% of patients); Heart Failure (7% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.2% of patients); Aorta Arc Rapture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients); Tamponade due to pericardial effusion (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of total patients); Right Atrium Rupture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients) were detected after cardiac surgery. Out of 28 cases 7 deaths occurred (25% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients). The most prevalent reason for cardiac arrest during post operative phase was massive bleeding (50%) followed by pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5%). Six patients had some morbidity and the remaining 15 patients recovered. There are often multiple contributing factors to a cardiac arrest under cardiac anesthesia, as much a complete systematic assessment of the patient, equipment, and drugs should be completed. We also found that the diagnosis and management of cardiac arrest in association with cardiac anesthesia differs considerably from that encountered elsewhere. (author)

  10. Cardiac surgery in a fixed-reimbursement environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, H E

    1996-02-01

    access to good cardiac surgical care. Further constraints on physician compensation and (academic) hospital funding will compromise this balance. PMID:8572826

  11. Enhanced permeability transition explains the reduced calcium uptake in cardiac mitochondria from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Paulo J; Seiça, Raquel; Coxito, Pedro M.; Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M.; Santos, Maria S.; Moreno, António J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is associated with diabetes. It was previously shown that heart mitochondria from diabetic rats have a reduced calcium accumulation capacity. The objective of this work was to determine whether the reduction in calcium accumulation by cardiac mitochondria from diabetic rats is related to an enhanced susceptibility to induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were used as a model to study the alterations caused by diabetes ...

  12. Mitochondrial Processing Peptidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutejová, Eva; Kučera, Tomáš; Matušková, Anna; Janata, Jiří

    Vol. 1. Oxford : Oxford: Academic Press, 2013 - (Rawlings, N.; Salvesen, G.), s. 1435-1442 ISBN 978-0-12-382219-2 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08064 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mitochondria * mitochondrial peptidase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KayFMacleod

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability and other more conventional aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the sigificance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis and spatial dynamics and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knockon effects for cell proliferation and growth. Scientifically, there is also scope for defining what mitochondria dysfunction is and here we address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Mitochondrial Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In work spanning more than a century, mitochondria have been recognized for their multifunctional roles in metabolism, energy transduction, ion transport, inheritance, signaling, and cell death. Foremost among these tasks is the continuous production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, which requires a large electrochemical driving force for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This process requires a membrane with relatively low permeability to ions to minimize energy dissipation. However, a wealth of evidence now indicates that both selective and nonselective ion channels are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, along with several known channels on the outer membrane. Some of these channels are active under physiological conditions, and others may be activated under pathophysiological conditions to act as the major determinants of cell life and death. This review summarizes research on mitochondrial ion channels and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. Except in a few cases, our understanding of the structure of mitochondrial ion channels is limited, indicating the need for focused discovery in this area. PMID:17059356

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Anni, H.; Dráber, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 216-227. ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gliomas * mitochondrial dysfunction * microtubule proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Kunz, W.S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 35-40. ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR GA309/08/0292 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epilepsy * mitochondrial dysfunction * neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.025, year: 2012

  17. Cardiac and thermoregulatory responses to inhaled pollutants in healthy and compromised rodents: modulation via interaction with environmental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodents often demonstrate a profound depression in physiological function following acute exposure to toxic xenobiotic agents. This effect, termed the hypothermic response, is primarily characterized by significant decreases in ore temperature and heart rate and is generally accompanied by similar deficits in other important functional parameters. This response appears to be remarkably consistent across a wide variety of toxic agents and exposure regimens; however, the magnitude and duration of the induced effects may be modulated by changes in dose, animal mass, and environmental conditions. while the initiating stimulus and underlying mechanism(s) remains elusive, this response may represent an inherent reflexive pattern that is unique to the rodent and serves to attenuate the induced toxicity. Given that rodents re the primary animal species used in toxicological studies, it is important to consider this hypothermic response and its modulatory factors when interpreting the results of such studies and extrapolating those results to an

  18. Cutaneous mitochondrial respirometry: non-invasive monitoring of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Floor A; Bodmer, Sander I A; Raat, Nicolaas J H; Mik, Egbert G

    2015-08-01

    The recently developed technique for measuring cutaneous mitochondrial oxygen tension (mitoPO2) by means of the Protoporphyrin IX-Triplet State Lifetime Technique (PpIX-TSLT) provides new opportunities for assessing mitochondrial function in vivo. The aims of this work were to study whether cutaneous mitochondrial measurements reflect mitochondrial status in other parts of the body and to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for potential clinical use. The first part of this paper demonstrates a correlation between alterations in mitochondrial parameters in skin and other tissues during endotoxemia. Experiments were performed in rats in which mitochondrial dysfunction was induced by a lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis (n = 5) and a time control group (n = 5). MitoPO2 and mitochondrial oxygen consumption (mitoVO2) were measured using PpIX-TSLT in skin, liver and buccal mucosa of the mouth. Both skin and buccal mucosa show a significant mitoPO2-independent decrease (P paper describes the clinical concept of monitoring cutaneous mitochondrial respiration in man. A first prototype of a clinical PpIX-TSLT monitor is described and its usability is demonstrated on human skin. We expect that clinical implementation of this device will greatly contribute to our understanding of mitochondrial oxygenation and oxygen metabolism in perioperative medicine and in critical illness. Our ultimate goal is to develop a clinical monitor for mitochondrial function and the current results are an important step forward. PMID:25388510

  19. Cardiomyocyte-Restricted Deletion of PPARβ/δ in PPARα-Null Mice Causes Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Defense, but No Further Depression of Myocardial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that PPARα and PPARβ/δ share overlapping functions in regulating myocardial lipid metabolism. However, previous studies demonstrated that cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARβ/δ deficiency in mice leads to severe cardiac pathological development, whereas global PPARα knockout shows a benign cardiac phenotype. It is unknown whether a PPARα-null background would alter the pathological development in mice with cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARβ/δ deficiency. In the present study, a mouse model with long-term PPARβ/δ deficiency in PPARα-null background showed a comparably reduced cardiac expression of lipid metabolism to those of single PPAR-deficient mouse models. The PPARα-null background did not rescue or aggravate the cardiac pathological development linked to cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARβ/δ deficiency. Moreover, PPARα-null did not alter the phenotypic development in adult mice with the short-term deletion of PPARβ/δ in their hearts, which showed mitochondrial abnormalities, depressed cardiac performance, and cardiac hypertrophy with attenuated expression of key factors in mitochondrial biogenesis and defense. The present study demonstrates that cardiomyocyte-restricted deletion of PPARβ/δ in PPARα-null mice causes impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and defense, but no further depression of fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, PPARβ/δ is essential for maintaining mitochondrial biogenesis and defense in cardiomyocytes independent of PPARα.

  20. Auditing Litigation and Claims: Conflicts and the Compromise of Privilege

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harleen Kaur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Auditing standards require an auditor to make various enquiries about liabilities in general this may entail consideration of potential litigations and claims that the audited entity may be facing. To perform this part of audit, the auditors will generally seek representation letters from lawyers of the company detailing an estimate prepared by management, confirmed by their lawyers through a representation letter, and then sent directly to the auditors. This paper reviews the implications for the auditing profession of a case that involved auditors seeking such representation letters. The case involves litigation between theWestpac Banking Corporation and 789TEN Pty Ltd. While theWestpac case confirmed the legal position of the auditor in their task of collecting evidence in order to form an opinion in Australia, it highlights a significant anomaly under the law and should place the issue of solicitor’s representation letters as audit evidence firmly on the agenda of policymakers. This issue of the compromise of legal privilege during the conduct of an audit is also not confined to Australia: other common law jurisdictions, such as the UK and the US, have also sought to clarify the position of auditors when issues of the integrity of legal privacy privilege arise.

  1. Towards mesoscience the principle of compromise in competition

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jinghai

    2014-01-01

    This brief is devoted to providing a complete outline of meso-science by briefing the relevant contents from the published book and by updating evidences and concepts of meso-science. The importance of meso-science in solving various problems in energy, resource, and the environment is introduced.  The whole evolutionary development of the EMMS principle is reviewed to show how a simple idea on the customized modeling of particle clustering in gas-solid systems was developed, verified, extended, and finally generalized into the common principle of compromise in competition between dominant mechanisms for all mesoscale phenomena in science and engineering, leading to the proposition of meso-science. More importantly, updates on the concept of meso-science and perspectives are presented, along with new insights and findings from after the publication of the original book. In this way, we hope to help readers more easily familiarize themselves with meso-science, and to trigger interest and attention to this int...

  2. Evaluation of intravenous voriconazole in patients with compromised renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilly Craig M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incorporation of the solubilizing excipient, sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBECD, in the intravenous (IV formulation of voriconazole has resulted in the recommendation that this formulation be used with caution in patients with creatinine clearances (Clcr  Methods A total of 128 patients aged 11–93 years who had a baseline Clcr cr and Clcr levels while on therapy were compared with baseline values and between groups. Results The groups had similar characteristics apart from the larger proportion of females that received fluconazole. Baseline Scr was higher in those receiving caspofungin, but maximal increases of Scr and decreases in Clcr were greatest for the fluconazole group. Acute kidney injury (AKI, assessed by RIFLE criteria, was more frequent in the fluconazole vs. the caspofungin group (p  Conclusions Treatment of fungal infections in patients with compromised renal function with an SBECD-containing antifungal agent was not associated with AKI in clinical practice. Since the infecting organism was associated with AKI, decision on which antifungal to use should be determined by susceptibilities to the organism and not the incorporation of SBECD in the IV formulation.

  3. Compromised Rat Testicular Antioxidant Defence System by Hypothyroidism before Puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak K. Sahoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered thyroid function during early stages of development is known to affect adversely testicular growth, physiology, and antioxidant defence status at adulthood. The objective of the present study is to investigate the modulation of antioxidant defence status in neonatal persistent hypothyroid rats before their sexual maturation and also to identify the specific testicular cell populations vulnerable to degeneration during neonatal hypothyroidism in immature rats. Hypothyroidism was induced in neonates by feeding the lactating mother with 0.05% 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU through the drinking water. From the day of parturition till weaning (25 day postpartum, the pups received PTU through mother's milk (or drinking water and then directly from drinking water containing PTU for the remaining period of experimentation. On the 31st day postpartum, the animals were sacrificed for the study. An altered antioxidant defence system marked by elevated SOD, CAT, and GR activities, with decreased GPx and GST activities were observed along with increased protein carbonylation, disturbed redox status in hypothyroid immature rat testis. This compromised testicular antioxidant status might have contributed to poor growth and development by affecting the spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in rats before puberty as indicated by reduced germ cell number, complete absence of round spermatids, decreased seminiferous tubule diameter, and decreased testosterone level.

  4. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  5. Neonatal SSRI exposure improves mitochondrial function and antioxidant defense in rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Glauber Ruda F; Freitas, Cristiane M; Nascimento, Luciana; Pedroza, Anderson A; da Silva, Aline Isabel; Lagranha, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Protein restriction during prenatal, postnatal, or in both periods has a close relationship with subsequent development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Elevated brain levels of serotonin and its metabolites have been found in malnourished states. The aim in the present study was to investigate whether treatment with fluoxetine (Fx), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, mimics the detrimental effect of low-protein diet during the perinatal period on the male rat heart. Our hypothesis is that increased circulating serotonin as a result of pharmacologic treatment with Fx leads to cardiac dysfunction similar to that observed in protein-restricted rats. Male Wistar rat pups received daily subcutaneous injection of Fx or vehicle from postnatal day 1 to postnatal day 21. Male rats were euthanized at 60 days of age and the following parameters were evaluated in the cardiac tissue: mitochondrial respiratory capacity, respiratory control ratio, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and biomarkers of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense. We found that Fx treatment increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity (123%) and membrane potential (212%) and decreased ROS production (55%). In addition we observed an increase in the antioxidant capacity (elevation in catalase activity (5-fold) and glutathione peroxidase (4.6-fold)). Taken together, our results suggest that Fx treatment in the developmental period positively affects the mitochondrial bioenergetics and antioxidant defense in the cardiac tissue. PMID:26939042

  6. Preventing mitochondrial fission impairs mitochondrial function and leads to loss of mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe A Parone

    Full Text Available Mitochondria form a highly dynamic tubular network, the morphology of which is regulated by frequent fission and fusion events. However, the role of mitochondrial fission in homeostasis of the organelle is still unknown. Here we report that preventing mitochondrial fission, by down-regulating expression of Drp1 in mammalian cells leads to a loss of mitochondrial DNA and a decrease of mitochondrial respiration coupled to an increase in the levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. At the cellular level, mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the lack of fission leads to a drop in the levels of cellular ATP, an inhibition of cell proliferation and an increase in autophagy. In conclusion, we propose that mitochondrial fission is required for preservation of mitochondrial function and thereby for maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  7. Effects of Endurance Exercise on Mitochondrial Function in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Gun-Soo; Kim, Seon-Rye

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 8 weeks of endurance exercise on the cardiac mitochondrial function of mice. [Subjects] Ten 129 SvJ/C57BL6 Male mice were used. The mice were randomly divided into an exercise group (n=5; mean ± SD weight, 27.4 ± 1.6 g) and a control (n=5; mean ± SD weight, 28.2 ± 1.1 g). The exercise mice ran on a motor driven treadmill 5 days per week for 30 minutes at a speed of 24 m/min for 8 weeks. Mitochondrial function as measured RC...

  8. Effect of heat stress on cardiac output and systemic vascular conductance during simulated hemorrhage to presyncope in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganio, Matthew S; Overgaard, Morten; Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H; Johansson, Pär I; Meyer, Martin; Crandall, Craig G

    2012-01-01

    During moderate actual or simulated hemorrhage, as cardiac output decreases, reductions in systemic vascular conductance (SVC) maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP). Heat stress, however, compromises the control of MAP during simulated hemorrhage, and it remains unknown whether this response is due...

  9. Direct cone-beam cardiac reconstruction algorithm with cardiac banding artifact correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multislice helical computed tomography (CT) is a promising noninvasive technique for coronary artery imaging. Various factors can cause inconsistencies in cardiac CT data, which can result in degraded image quality. These inconsistencies may be the result of the patient physiology (e.g., heart rate variations), the nature of the data (e.g., cone-angle), or the reconstruction algorithm itself. An algorithm which provides the best temporal resolution for each slice, for example, often provides suboptimal image quality for the entire volume since the cardiac temporal resolution (TRc) changes from slice to slice. Such variations in TRc can generate strong banding artifacts in multi-planar reconstruction images or three-dimensional images. Discontinuous heart walls and coronary arteries may compromise the accuracy of the diagnosis. A β-blocker is often used to reduce and stabilize patients' heart rate but cannot eliminate the variation. In order to obtain robust and optimal image quality, a software solution that increases the temporal resolution and decreases the effect of heart rate is highly desirable. This paper proposes an ECG-correlated direct cone-beam reconstruction algorithm (TCOT-EGR) with cardiac banding artifact correction (CBC) and disconnected projections redundancy compensation technique (DIRECT). First the theory and analytical model of the cardiac temporal resolution is outlined. Next, the performance of the proposed algorithms is evaluated by using computer simulations as well as patient data. It will be shown that the proposed algorithms enhance the robustness of the image quality against inconsistencies by guaranteeing smooth transition of heart cycles used in reconstruction

  10. Cardiac Autonomic Drive during Arterial Hypertension and Metabolic Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kseneva, S I; Borodulina, E V; Trifonova, O Yu; Udut, V V

    2016-06-01

    ANS support of the cardiac work was assessed with analysis of heart rate variability in representative samples of patients with arterial hypertension and metabolic disturbances manifested by overweight, classes I-II obesity, compromised glucose tolerance, and type II diabetes. Initially enhanced sympathetic effects on the heart rate demonstrated no further increase during the orthostatic test in contrast to suprasegmentary influences enhanced by this test. The pronouncedness of revealed peculiarities in ANS drive to the heart correlated with metabolic disturbances, and these peculiarities attained maximum in patients with type II diabetes. PMID:27383176

  11. Desmin common mutation is associated with multi-systemic disease manifestations and depletion of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMcCormick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Desmin (DES is a major muscle scaffolding protein that also functions to anchor mitochondria. Pathogenic DES mutations, however, have not previously been recognized as a cause of multi-systemic mitochondrial disease. Here, we describe a 45-year-old man who presented to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Mitochondrial-Genetics Diagnostic Clinic for evaluation of progressive cardiac, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, and mood disorders. Muscle biopsy at age 45 was remarkable for cytoplasmic bodies, as well as ragged red fibers and SDH positive/COX negative fibers that were suggestive of a mitochondrial myopathy. Muscle also showed significant reductions in mitochondrial content (16% of control mean for citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA (35% of control mean. His family history was significant for cardiac conduction defects and myopathy in multiple maternal relatives. Multiple single gene and panel-based sequencing studies were unrevealing. Whole exome sequencing identified a known pathogenic p.S13F mutation in DES that had previously been associated with desmin-related myopathy. Desmin-related myopathy is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by right ventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and arrhythmias. However, neuropathy, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and depletion of both mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA have not previously been widely recognized in this disorder. Recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in desmin-related myopathy clarifies the basis for the multi-systemic manifestations, as are typical of primary mitochondrial disorders. Understanding the mitochondrial pathophysiology of desmin-related myopathy highlights the possibility of new therapies for the otherwise untreatable and often fatal class of disease. We postulate that drug treatments aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis or reducing oxidative stress may be effective therapies to ameliorate the effects of desmin

  12. High-density lipoprotein, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell survival mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C Roger; Giordano, Samantha; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic injury is associated with acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting and open heart surgery. The timely re-establishment of blood flow is critical in order to minimize cardiac complications. Reperfusion after a prolonged ischemic period, however, can induce severe cardiomyocyte dysfunction with mitochondria serving as a major target of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. An increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces damage to mitochondrial respiratory complexes leading to uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial membrane perturbations also contribute to calcium overload, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and the release of apoptotic mediators into the cytoplasm. Clinical and experimental studies show that ischemic preconditioning (ICPRE) and postconditioning (ICPOST) attenuate mitochondrial injury and improve cardiac function in the context of I/R injury. This is achieved by the activation of two principal cell survival cascades: 1) the Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase (RISK) pathway; and 2) the Survivor Activating Factor Enhancement (SAFE) pathway. Recent data suggest that high density lipoprotein (HDL) mimics the effects of conditioning protocols and attenuates myocardial I/R injury via activation of the RISK and SAFE signaling cascades. In this review, we discuss the roles of apolipoproteinA-I (apoA-I), the major protein constituent of HDL, and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lysosphingolipid associated with small, dense HDL particles as mediators of cardiomyocyte survival. Both apoA-I and S1P exert an infarct-sparing effect by preventing ROS-dependent injury and inhibiting the opening of the mPTP. PMID:27150975

  13. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  14. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology. PMID:25425472

  15. The mitochondrial ryanodine receptor in rat heart: a pharmaco-kinetic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschafl, Beth A; Beutner, Gisela; Sharma, Virendra K; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2007-07-01

    A protein discovered within inner mitochondrial membranes (IMM), designated as the mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR), has been recognized recently as a modulator of Ca(2+) fluxes in mitochondria. The present study provides fundamental pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of this mRyR. Rat cardiac IMM fused to lipid bilayers revealed the presence of a mitochondrial channel with gating characteristics similar to those of classical sarcoplasmic reticulum RyR (SR-RyR), but a variety of other mitochondrial channels obstructed clean recordings. Mitochondrial vesicles were thus solubilized and subjected to sucrose sedimentation to obtain mRyR-enriched fractions. Reconstitution of sucrose-purified fractions into lipid bilayers yielded Cs(+)-conducting, Ca(2+)-sensitive, large conductance (500-800 pS) channels with signature properties of SR-RyRs. Cytosolic Ca(2+) increased the bursting frequency and mean open time of the channel. Micromolar concentrations of ryanodine induced the appearance of subconductance states or inhibited channel activity altogether, while Imperatoxin A (IpTx(a)), a specific activator of RyRs, reversibly induced the appearance of distinct subconductance states. Remarkably, the cardiac mRyR displayed a Ca(2+) dependence of [(3)H]ryanodine binding curve similar to skeletal RyR (RyR1), not cardiac RyR (RyR2). Overall, the mRyR displayed elemental attributes that are present in single channel lipid bilayer recordings of SR-RyRs, although some exquisite differences were also noted. These results therefore provide the first direct evidence that a unique RyR occurs in mitochondrial membranes. PMID:17499575

  16. Epigenetic Dysregulation Observed in Monosomy Blastocysts Further Compromises Developmental Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denomme, Michelle M.; McCallie, Blair R.; Parks, Jason C.; Schoolcraft, William B.; Katz-Jaffe, Mandy G.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation regulate genomic imprinting and account for the distinct non-equivalence of the parental genomes in the embryo. Chromosomal aneuploidy, a major cause of infertility, distorts this highly regulated disparity by the presence or absence of chromosomes. The implantation potential of monosomy embryos is negligible compared to their trisomy counterparts, yet the cause for this is unknown. This study investigated the impact of chromosomal aneuploidy on strict epigenetically regulated domains, specifically imprinting control regions present on aneuploid chromosomes. Donated cryopreserved human IVF blastocysts of transferable quality, including trisomy 15, trisomy 11, monosomy 15, monosomy 11, and donor oocyte control blastocysts were examined individually for DNA methylation profiles by bisulfite mutagenesis and sequencing analysis of two maternally methylated imprinting control regions (ICRs), SNRPN (15q11.2) and KCNQ1OT1 (11p15.5), and one paternally methylated imprinting control region, H19 (11p15.5). Imprinted genes within the regions were also evaluated for transcript abundance by RT-qPCR. Overall, statistically significant hypermethylated and hypomethylated ICRs were found in both the trisomy and monosomy blastocysts compared to controls, restricted only to the chromosome affected by the aneuploidy. Increased expression was observed for maternally-expressed imprinted genes in trisomy blastocysts, while a decreased expression was observed for both maternally- and paternally-expressed imprinted genes in monosomy blastocysts. This epigenetic dysregulation and altered monoallelic expression observed at imprinting control regions in aneuploid IVF embryos supports euploid embryo transfer during infertility treatments, and may specifically highlight an explanation for the compromised implantation potential in monosomy embryos. PMID:27271036

  17. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  18. Cancer: Mitochondrial Origins

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano, George B.; Kream, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The primacy of glucose derived from photosynthesis as an existential source of chemical energy across plant and animal phyla is universally accepted as a core principle in the biological sciences. In mammalian cells, initial processing of glucose to triose phosphate intermediates takes place within the cytosolic glycolytic pathway and terminates with temporal transport of reducing equivalents derived from pyruvate metabolism by membrane-associated respiratory complexes in the mitochondrial ma...

  19. Mitochondrial Subversion in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Aditi; Dasgupta, Santanu; Sidransky, David

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria control essential cellular activities including generation of ATP via oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in the regulatory D-loop region and somatic mtDNA mutations are common in primary human cancers. The biological impact of a given mutation may vary, depending on the nature of the mutation and the proportion of mutant mtDNAs carried by the cell. Identification of mtDNA mutations in precancerous lesions supports their early contribution to cell trans...

  20. Complex IV-deficient Surf1(-/-) mice initiate mitochondrial stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Daniel A; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Liu, Yuhong; Hill, Shauna; Lin, Ai-Ling; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Shi, Yun; Sloane, Lauren; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Van Remmen, Holly

    2014-09-01

    Mutations in SURF1 (surfeit locus protein 1) COX (cytochrome c oxidase) assembly protein are associated with Leigh's syndrome, a human mitochondrial disorder that manifests as severe mitochondrial phenotypes and early lethality. In contrast, mice lacking the SURF1 protein (Surf1-/-) are viable and were previously shown to have enhanced longevity and a greater than 50% reduction in COX activity. We measured mitochondrial function in heart and skeletal muscle, and despite the significant reduction in COX activity, we found little or no difference in ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation, membrane potential, ATP production or respiration in isolated mitochondria from Surf1-/- mice compared with wild-type. However, blood lactate levels were elevated and Surf1-/- mice had reduced running endurance, suggesting compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism in vivo. Decreased COX activity in Surf1-/- mice is associated with increased markers of mitochondrial biogenesis [PGC-1α (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α) and VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)] in both heart and skeletal muscle. Although mitochondrial biogenesis is a common response in the two tissues, skeletal muscle has an up-regulation of the UPRMT (mitochondrial unfolded protein response) and heart exhibits induction of the Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2) antioxidant response pathway. These data are the first to show induction of the UPRMT in a mammalian model of decreased COX activity. In addition, the results of the present study suggest that impaired mitochondrial function can lead to induction of mitochondrial stress pathways to confer protective effects on cellular homoeostasis. PMID:24911525

  1. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  2. Adding Emulsified Isoflurane to Cardioplegia Solution Produces Cardiac Protection in a Dog Cardiopulmonary Bypass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Han; Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Jin; Song, Haibo; Qiu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether caridoplegia solution with Emulsified Isoflurane (EI) could improve cardiaoprotection in a dog CPB model of great similarity to clinical settings. Adult dogs were randomly assigned to receive one of the following cardioplegia solutions: St. Thomas with EI (group ST+EI), St. Thomas with 30% Intralipid (group ST+EL) and St. Thomas alone (group ST). The aorta was cross-clamped for two hours followed by reperfusion for another two hours, during which cardiac output was measured and dosages of positive inotropic agent to maintain normal hemodynamics were recorded. Serum level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and CK-MB were measured. Deletion of cardiac mitochondrial DNA was examined at the end of reperfusion. Compared with ST, ST+EI decreased the requirement of dopamine support while animals receiving ST+EI had a significantly larger cardiac output. ST+EI reduced post-CPB release of cTnI and CK-MB. Mitochondrial DNA loss was observed in only one of the tested animals from group ST+EI while it was seen in all the tested animals from group ST+EL and ST. Addition of emulsified isoflurane into cardioplegia solution protects against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. This protective effect might be mediated by preserving mitochondrial ultrastructure and DNA integrity. PMID:27121996

  3. Radiography in cardiology [cardiac disorders, cardiac insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic procedure in cardiology nearly always requires an X-ray examination of the thorax. This examination is very informative when it is correctly performed and interpreted. The radiographs need to be read precisely and comprehensively: this includes the evaluation of the silhouette of the heart (size, form and position) as well as the examination of extra-cardiac thoracic structures allowing among other things to search for signs of cardiac insufficiency. The conclusion of the X-ray examination can be drawn after having brought together information concerning the case history, the clinical examination and the study of the radiographs. The radiologist finds himself in one of three situations: (1) the information provided by the X-ray pictures is characteristic of a disease and permits a diagnosis, (2) the X-ray pictures indicate a group of hypotheses; further complementary tests could be useful and (3) the X-ray pictures provide ambiguous even contradictory information; it is necessary to complete the radiological examination by other techniques such as an ultrasonographic study of the heart

  4. Proteomic alterations of distinct mitochondrial subpopulations in the type 1 diabetic heart: contribution of protein import dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Baseler, Walter A.; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Williamson, Courtney L.; Croston, Tara L.; Thapa, Dharendra; Powell, Matthew J.; Razunguzwa, Trust T.; Hollander, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with increased risk of heart failure in type 1 diabetic patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction is suggested as an underlying contributor to diabetic cardiomyopathy. Cardiac mitochondria are characterized by subcellular spatial locale, including mitochondria located beneath the sarcolemma, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM), and mitochondria situated between the myofibrils, interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM). The goal of this study was to determine whether type...

  5. Serum myoglobin after cardiac catheterisation.

    OpenAIRE

    McComb, J. M.; McMaster, E A

    1982-01-01

    Study of 80 consecutive patients undergoing elective diagnostic cardiac catheterisation showed that after the procedure 25 (31%) developed myoglobinaemia. This was attributed to complications of the catheterisation in two. The remaining 23 had received premedication by intramuscular injection. In patients without intramuscular injections myoglobinaemia did not occur after uncomplicated cardiac catheterisation. The study did not support the proposition that cardiac catheterisation results in m...

  6. Polymorphisms of mitochondrially encoded proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Spinner, N B; King, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Polymorphisms of mitochondrially encoded proteins can be detected in human lymphocytes by sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Using an SDS-polyacrylamide 8 M urea system, 17 mitochondrially encoded proteins are distinguishable. Three of these (ME-6, ME-8, and ME-17) were polymorphic among 92 individuals screened, and these polymorphisms are reported here for the first time. With SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis without urea, 18 mitochondrial proteins are de...

  7. Hydroxytyrosol ameliorates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Principal, Sergio; El-Azem, Nuri; Pamplona, Reinald; Ramirez-Tortosa, Cesar; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Vera-Ramirez, Laura; Quiles, Jose L; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Naudí, Alba; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Perez-Lopez, Patricia; Ramirez-Tortosa, Mcarmen

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in several processes including cancer, aging and cardiovascular disease, and has been shown to potentiate the therapeutic effect of drugs such as doxorubicin. Doxorubicin causes significant cardiotoxicity characterized by marked increases in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Herein, we investigate whether doxorubicin-associated chronic cardiac toxicity can be ameliorated with the antioxidant hydroxytyrosol in rats with breast cancer. Thirty-six rats bearing breast tumors induced chemically were divided into 4 groups: control, hydroxytyrosol (0.5mg/kg, 5days/week), doxorubicin (1mg/kg/week), and doxorubicin plus hydroxytyrosol. Cardiac disturbances at the cellular and mitochondrial level, mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I-IV and apoptosis-inducing factor, and oxidative stress markers have been analyzed. Hydroxytyrosol improved the cardiac disturbances enhanced by doxorubicin by significantly reducing the percentage of altered mitochondria and oxidative damage. These results suggest that hydroxytyrosol improve the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This study demonstrates that hydroxytyrosol protect rat heart damage provoked by doxorubicin decreasing oxidative damage and mitochondrial alterations. PMID:24727461

  8. Effects of a single terlipressin administration on cardiac function and perfusion in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Aleksander; Bendtsen, Flemming; Mortensen, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vasoconstrictor terlipressin is widely used in the treatment of the hepatorenal syndrome and variceal bleeding. However, terlipressin may compromise cardiac function and induce ischemia. AIM: Therefore, we aimed to assess the effects of terlipressin on cardiac function and perfusion...... with nonrefractory ascites, both at baseline and after terlipressin treatment. The decrease in the left ventricular wall thickening and wall motion correlated with the Child--Pugh score, r=-0.59, P=0.005 and r=-0.48, P=0.03. CONCLUSION: In advanced cirrhosis, the increase in afterload and EDV after...

  9. Cardiac arrest in intensive care unit: Case report and future recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiation of hemofiltration in a patient in septic shock can cause hemodynamic compromise potentially leading to cardiac arrest. We propose that the standard ′4Hs and 4Ts′ approach to the differential diagnosis of a cardiac arrest should be supplemented in critically ill patients with anaphylaxis and human and technical errors involving drug administration (the 5 th H and T. To illustrate the point, we report a case where norepinephrine infused through a central venous catheter (CVC was being removed by the central venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH catheter causing the hemodynamic instability. CVVH has this potential of interfering with the systemic availability of drugs infused via a closely located CVC.

  10. Mediastinal Bronchogenic Cyst With Acute Cardiac Dysfunction: Two-Stage Surgical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smail, Hassiba; Baste, Jean Marc; Melki, Jean; Peillon, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    We describe a two-stage surgical approach in a patient with cardiac dysfunction and hemodynamic compromise resulting from a massive and compressive mediastinal bronchogenic cyst. To drain this cyst, video-assisted mediastinoscopy was performed as an emergency procedure, which immediately improved the patient's cardiac function. Five days later and under video thoracoscopy, resection of the cyst margins was impossible because the cyst was tightly adherent to the left atrium. We performed deroofing of this cyst through a right thoracotomy. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery, and no recurrence was observed at the long-term follow-up visit. PMID:26434484

  11. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw-Hwa Jou

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are intracellular organelles crucial in the production of cellular energy.Mitochondrial diseases may result from malfunctions in this biochemical cascade. Severalinvestigators have proposed that mitochondrial dysfunction is related to the pathophysiologyof bipolar disorder (BD, major depressive disorder (MDD and schizophrenia (SZ. Theauthors reviewed recent study findings and tried to delineate the current understanding of thecorrelation between mitochondrial dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. A growing body ofevidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is important in patients with psychiatricdisorders. The evidence include impaired energy metabolism in the brain detected usingresults of magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron microscopy, co-morbidity with mitochondrialdiseases, the effects of psychotropics on mitochondria, increased mitochondrialDNA (mtDNA deletion in the brain, and association with mtDNA mutations/polymorphismsor nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. It is possible that the new information willlead to a focus on psychiatric disorder as a metabolic disease. Treatment with psychotropicsmight ultimately enhance energy metabolism and reduce the damage of oxidative stress. Thenext step in the study of mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with psychiatric disordersshould be clarification of how mitochondrial dysfunction, a nonspecific risk factor, causesspecific symptoms. Further study of mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with psychiatricdisorder is expected to be useful for the development of cellular disease markers and newpsychotropics.

  12. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D;

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...... myopathies. We investigated regeneration in muscle biopsies from 61 genetically well-defined patients affected by mitochondrial myopathy. Our results show that the perturbed energy metabolism in mitochondrial myopathies causes ongoing muscle regeneration in a majority of patients, and some were even affected...

  13. HypoxamiRs: regulators of cardiac hypoxia and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouzi, Hamid El; Leptidis, Stefanos; Doevendans, Pieter A; De Windt, Leon J

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia and its intricate regulation are at the epicenter of cardiovascular research. Mediated by hypoxia-inducible factors as well as by several microRNAs, recently termed 'hypoxamiRs', hypoxia affects several cardiac pathophysiological processes. Hypoxia is the driving force behind the regulation of the characteristic metabolic switch from predominant fatty acid oxidation in the healthy heart to glucose utilization in the failing myocardium, but also instigates reactivation of the fetal gene program, induces the cardiac hypertrophy response, alters extracellular matrix composition, influences mitochondrial biogenesis, and impacts upon myocardial contractility. HypoxamiR regulation adds a new level of complexity to this multitude of hypoxia-mediated effects, rendering the understanding of the hypoxic response a fundamental piece in solving the cardiovascular disease puzzle. PMID:26197955

  14. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasser; Mahrous; Fouad; Reem; Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases

  15. Primary cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac tumors happen to be among the less known pathologies without clear treatment standards. Even one decade ago most of the cardiac tumor diagnosis were made post mortem, and only reports of isolated cases could be found in the literature, showing the lack of interest in the investigation of these pathologies by cardiology and cardiovascular surgery specialists. With the development of echocardiography and of cardiovascular surgery, more cases of primary and metastatic cardiac tumors have been diagnosed. Many cases have been treated by palliative or curative surgical interventions, thus increasing the reports in the world literature and the experience in this field, and pointing out the real incidence of these pathologies, not being as bizarre as it had been considered. a revision of the literature will be made, in which the frequency and the suggested interventions will be reported, as well as the cases of cardiac pathology in two cardiovascular centers of the country known by the author. The echocardiographic, pathologic and histological characteristics of the representative cases will be presented, without a greater evidence level, due to the problem's incidence and the few cases reported by these centers

  16. Cardiac MRI tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac MRI tagging is an original technique based upon the perturbation of the magnetization of determined regions of the myocardium (tags). The motion of the tags accurately reflects the deformation of the underlying tissue. Data analysis requires special techniques to reconstruct the 3D motion of the heart, and to evaluate the myocardial strain, locally and throughout the whole heart. (authors)

  17. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Over the next hour you'll see the implantation of an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator. The surgery ... evening we're going to be discussing the implantation of a defibrillator. It’s a battery-powered implantable ...

  18. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  19. Cardiac pacemaker power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of chemical and radioisotope batteries used in cardiac pacemakers is presented. The battery systems are examined in terms of longevity, reliability, cost, size and shape, energy density, weight, internal resistance versus time, end-of-life voltage, chemical compatibility, and potential failure mechanisms

  20. Decreased Bioenergetic Health Index in monocytes isolated from the pericardial fluid and blood of post-operative cardiac surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Philip A.; Chacko, Balu K.; George, David J.; Zhi, Degui; Wei, Chih-Cheng; Dell'Italia, Louis J.; Melby, Spencer J.; George, James F.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Translational bioenergetics requires the measurement of mitochondrial function in clinically relevant samples and the integration of the data in a form that can be applied to personalized medicine. In the present study, we show the application of the measurement of the Bioenergetic Health Index (BHI) to cardiac surgery patients.

  1. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I inhibition is not associated with cardiac hypertrophy in rats fed a high fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac lipotoxicity is characterized by hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction and can be triggered by impaired mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and lipid accumulation. The present study investigated the effect of dietary fatty acid intake alone and in combination with inhibition of mitochondria...

  2. Cardiomyopathy induced by artificial cardiac pacing: myth or reality sustained by evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Di Leoni Ferrari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Implantable cardiac pacing systems are a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic irreversible bradycardia. Under the proper indications, cardiac pacing might bring significant clinical benefit. Evidences from literature state that the action of the artificial pacing system, mainly when the ventricular lead is located at the apex of the right ventricle, produces negative effects to cardiac structure (remodeling, dilatation and function (dissinchrony. Patients with previously compromised left ventricular function would benefit the least with conventional right ventricle apical pacing, and are exposed to the risk of developing higher incidence of morbidity and mortality for heart failure. However, after almost 6 decades of cardiac pacing, just a reduced portion of patients in general would develop these alterations. In this context, there are not completely clear some issues related to cardiac pacing and the development of this cardiomyopathy. Causality relationships among QRS widening with a left bundle branch block morphology, contractility alterations within the left ventricle, and certain substrates or clinical (previous systolic dysfunction, structural heart disease, time from implant or electrical conditions (QRS duration, percentage of ventricular stimulation are still subjecte of debate. This review analyses contemporary data regarding this new entity, and discusses alternatives of how to use cardiac pacing in this context, emphasizing cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  3. Aerobic exercise training reduces cardiac function in adult male offspring exposed to prenatal hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Laura M; Kirschenman, Raven; Quon, Anita; Morton, Jude S; Shah, Amin; Davidge, Sandra T

    2015-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) has been associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Exercise is an effective preventive intervention for cardiovascular diseases; however, it may be detrimental in conditions of compromised health. The aim of this study was to determine whether exercise training can improve cardiac performance after I/R injury in IUGR offspring. We used a hypoxia-induced IUGR model by exposing pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to 21% oxygen (control) or hypoxic (11% oxygen; IUGR) conditions from gestational day 15 to 21. At 10 wk of age, offspring were randomized to a sedentary group or to a 6-wk exercise protocol. Transthoracic echocardiography assessments were performed after 6 wk. Twenty-four hours after the last bout of exercise, ex vivo cardiac function was determined using a working heart preparation. With exercise training, there was improved baseline cardiac performance in male control offspring but a reduced baseline cardiac performance in male IUGR exercised offspring (P exercise decreased superoxide generation in control offspring, while in IUGR offspring, it had the polar opposite effect (interaction P ≤ 0.05). There was no effect of IUGR or exercise on cardiac function in female offspring. In conclusion, in male IUGR offspring, exercise may be a secondary stressor on cardiac function. A reduction in cardiac performance along with an increase in superoxide production in response to exercise was observed in this susceptible group. PMID:26157059

  4. [Cardiac amyloidosis. General review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraki, R

    1994-04-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis, most often of AL type, is a non-exceptional disease as it represents 5 to 10% of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. It realizes typically a restrictive cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless the wide diversity of possible presentation makes it a "big shammer" which must be evoked in front of every unexplained cardiopathy after the age of forty. If some associated manifestations can rapidly suggest the diagnosis, as a peripheric neuropathy especially a carpal tunnel syndrome or palpebral ecchymosis, cardiac involvement can also evolve in an apparently isolated way. The most suggestive paraclinic elements for the diagnosis are, in one hand, the increased myocardial echogenicity with a "granular sparkling" appearance seen throughout all walls of the left ventricle and, in the other hand, the association of a thickened left ventricle and a low voltage (electrocardiogram could also show pseudo-infarct Q waves). In front of such aspects, the proof of amyloidosis is brought by an extra-cardiac biopsy or by scintigraphy with labelled serum amyloid P component, so that the indications of endomyocardial biopsy are very limited today. The identification of the amyloid nature of a cardiopathy has an direct therapeutic implication: it contra-indicates the use of digitalis, calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers. The treatment of AL amyloidosis (chemotherapy with alkylant agents) remains very unsatisfactory especially in the cardiac involvement which is the most frequent cause of death (in AL amyloidosis). Last, cardiac amyloidosis is a bad indication for transplantation which results are burden by rapid progression of deposits especially in the gastro-intestinal tract and the nervous system. PMID:8059146

  5. Cardiac surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Linda S; Barnett, Scott D; Beachy, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Accrediting organizations and payers are demanding valid and reliable data that demonstrate the value of services. Federal agencies, healthcare industry groups, and healthcare watchdog groups are increasing the demand for public access to outcomes data. A new and growing outcomes dynamic is the information requested by prospective patients in an increasingly consumer-oriented business. Patients demand outcomes, and resources are developing to meet these demands. Physicians are increasingly confronted with requests for information about their mortality and morbidity rates, malpractice suits, and disciplinary actions received. For example, in Virginia, prospective patients have access to data provided by the nonprofit group Virginia Health Information. After numerous resolutions by the Virginia Senate since 1999, the prospective Virginia medical consumer now has access to several annual publications: Virginia Hospitals: A Consumer's Guide, 1999 Annual Report and Strategic Plan Update, and the 1999 Industry Report: Virginia Hospitals and Nursing Facilities. Consumers have access to cardiac outcomes data stratified by hospital, gender, and cardiac service line (cardiac surgery, noninvasive cardiology, and invasive cardiology). This is particularly relevant to IHI because Virginia Health Information specifically targets cardiac care. IHI has a sizable investment in cardiovascular outcomes and has found outcomes measurement and research are key to providing quality care. IHI's goal is to move from an outcomes management model to a disease management model. The hope is to incorporate all aspects of the patient's continuum of care, from preoperative and diagnostic services through cardiac interventions to postoperative rehabilitation. Furthermore, every step along the way will be supported with functional status and quality of life assessments. Although these goals are ambitious and expensive, the return on investment is high. PMID:14618772

  6. Estrogenic Impact on Cardiac Ischemic/Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-02-01

    The increase in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome incidence following the onset of menopause has highlighted the role of estrogen as a cardiometabolic protective agent. Specifically regarding the heart, estrogen induced an improvement in cardiac function, preserved calcium homeostasis, and inhibited the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The beneficial effects of estrogen in relation to cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, such as reduced infarction and ameliorated post-ischemic recovery, have also been shown. Nevertheless, controversial findings exist and estrogen therapy is reported to be related to a higher rate of thromboembolic events and atrial fibrillation in post-menopausal women. Therefore, greater clarification is needed to evaluate the exact potential of estrogen use in cases of cardiac I/R injury. This article reviews the effects of estrogen, in both acute and chronic treatment, and collates the studies with regard to their in vivo, in vitro, or clinical trial settings in cases of cardiac I/R injury and myocardial infarction. PMID:26786980

  7. Risk factors and the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy on cardiac and non-cardiac mortality in MADIT-CRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkiomaki, Juha S; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Kutyifa, Valentina;

    2015-01-01

    causes, 108 (63.9%) deemed cardiac, and 61 (36.1%) non-cardiac. In multivariate analysis, increased baseline creatinine was significantly associated with both cardiac and non-cardiac deaths [hazard ratio (HR) 2.97, P ...AIMS: To understand modes of death and factors associated with the risk for cardiac and non-cardiac deaths in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) vs. implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which may help clarify...

  8. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  9. The marine toxin, Yessotoxin, induces apoptosis and increases mitochondrial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fernandez-Araujo

    2014-06-01

    Discussion: Colorimetric MTT assay is widely used as a viability measurement method (McHale and L., 1988;Chiba et al., 1998. But after YTX treatment, MTT assay had shown problems to detect a cell viability decrease. In this sense, in primary cardiac cell cultures, a false increment of the proliferation rate opposite to Sulforhodamine B assay (SRB results was reported after YTX treatment (Dell'Ovo et al., 2008. Also the same effect was obtained in different cancer cell lines after assaying anticancer therapies (Ulukaya et al., 2004. In our study, an increase in cell viability using MTT was observed when the number of cells was high, while by using the LDH assay a significant viability decrease was measured. In these conditions, YTX is activating extrinsic apoptosis cell death by increasing caspase 8 activity and caspase 3 levels. The explanation for this increase was found when the mitochondrial activity was quantified cell by cell in a cytometer. In these conditions a significant increment of mitochondrial activity was detected. Since the cell population is too high, the increase in mitochondrial activity that detects the MTT test disguised the decrease of signal due to the cell death and point to a false proliferation increase. In this sense, a mitochondrial activity decrease was observed after 48 hours YTX treatment in BE(2-M17 neuroblastoma cell line (Leira et al., 2002. However, this study was done in a microplate reader with a small number of cells (Leira et al., 2002. Therefore, to measure the viability by MTT assay is very important to take into account the number of cells per condition when the experiment is designed. Alternative assays, such as LDH test, independently of the direct mitochondrial activity, can be used.

  10. GSH or Palmitate Preserves Mitochondrial Energetic/Redox Balance, Preventing Mechanical Dysfunction in Metabolically Challenged Myocytes/Hearts From Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tocchetti, Carlo G.; Caceres, Viviane; Stanley, Brian A.; Xie, Chaoqin; Shi, Sa; Watson, Walter H.; O’Rourke, Brian; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina C.; Cortassa, Sonia; Akar, Fadi G.; Paolocci, Nazareno; Aon, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia and increased sympathetic drive may alter mitochondria energetic/redox properties, decreasing the organelle’s functionality. These perturbations may prompt or sustain basal low-cardiac performance and limited exercise capacity. Yet the precise steps involved in this mitochondrial failure remain elusive. Here, we have identified dysfunctional mitochondrial respiration with substrates of complex I, II, and IV and lowered thioredoxin-2/glutathione (GSH) pools as...

  11. New Insights into the Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Autophagy during Oxidative Stress and Aging in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ikeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The heart is highly sensitive to the aging process. In the elderly, the heart tends to become hypertrophic and fibrotic. Stiffness increases with ensuing systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Aging also affects the cardiac response to stress. At the molecular level, the aging process is associated with accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles, partially due to defects in protein quality control systems. The accumulation of dysfunctional and abnormal mitochondria is an important pathophysiological feature of the aging process, which is associated with excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial fusion and fission and mitochondrial autophagy are crucial mechanisms for maintaining mitochondrial function and preserving energy production. In particular, mitochondrial fission allows for selective segregation of damaged mitochondria, which are afterward eliminated by autophagy. Unfortunately, recent evidence indicates that mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy are progressively impaired over time, contributing to the aging process. This suggests that restoration of these mechanisms could delay organ senescence and prevent age-associated cardiac diseases. Here, we discuss the current understanding of the close relationship between mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, oxidative stress, and aging, with a particular focus on the heart.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy for detection of vascular compromise in paediatric supracondylar fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children suffering supracondylar fractures of the humerus are at risk of vascular compromise, which is currently assessed clinically, although other modalities such as angiography, pulse oximetry, Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography have been used. We sought to ascertain whether tissue haemoglobin oxygenation (StO2) measurement could distinguish between patients with and without clinical vascular compromise following supracondylar fractures of the humerus. We prospectively observed StO2 using near-infrared spectroscopy in 29 paediatric patients with supracondylar fractures requiring operative manipulation. The injured and uninjured volar forearm compartments were monitored immediately before and after fracture reduction. The relationship between StO2 in the injured and uninjured limb, and the presence of pre-operative vascular compromise was assessed. Seven out of 29 children presented with vascular compromise. Patients with clinical vascular compromise had significantly lower pre-reduction StO2 (63.5% ± 15%, mean ± standard deviation), compared to those without compromise (80.9% ± 10%). StO2 normalized following surgery in all children with vascular compromise. These improvements in muscle StO2 were associated, in all patients, with the clinical return of pulses and resolution of neurological symptoms if present. StO2 monitoring can identify patients with clinical vascular compromise, can identify the return of adequate perfusion following operative correction of supracondylar fractures, and may be a useful adjunct to clinical assessment. (paper)

  13. Cross-cultural compromises, multiculturalism and the actuality of unzipped Hofstede

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Magala (Slawomir)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractCultural background of identities calls for upholding of values, but realities of multicultural interactions require cross-cultural compromises. Compromises begin already with the introduction of the term multiculturalism, which served both as a platform for cross-cultural urban policies

  14. 15 CFR 19.7 - When will Commerce entities compromise a Commerce debt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Commerce entity may compromise the Commerce debt in accordance with the provisions of 31 CFR part 902 and... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When will Commerce entities compromise a Commerce debt? 19.7 Section 19.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of...

  15. 46 CFR 502.604 - Compromise of penalties: Relation to assessment proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise of penalties: Relation to assessment... Civil Penalties § 502.604 Compromise of penalties: Relation to assessment proceedings. (a) Scope. Except... Commission may issue a public notice thereof, the terms and language of which are not subject to...

  16. Results of treatment of congenital coronary artery fistulae in combination with cardiac arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria L.A.

    2013-03-01

    and quality of life. Coronary angiography and computed tomography are the main diagnostic methods allowing to examine CAF. Hemodynamically non-compromised CAF coincided with CA require a follow-up and, if necessary, surgical and/or medical therapy of CA. Main indications for embolization are proximal location and single CAF. Indications for surgical on-pump repair are concomitant cardiac pathology and relatively large and wide CAF.

  17. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  18. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  19. The potato tuber mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper;

    ) and in silico-predicted mitochondrial proteins (2000-3000). Thus, before starting to look for oxidized peptides, we wanted to expand the current compendium of plant mitochondrial proteins while obtaining what could be termed the "baseline proteome" from our model organelle, the potato tuber...

  20. Biochemical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Establishing a diagnosis in patients with a suspected mitochondrial disorder is often a challenge. Both knowledge of the clinical spectrum of mitochondrial disorders and the number of identified disease-causing molecular genetic defects are continuously expanding. The diagnostic examination of patie

  1. Mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 induced by ROS contributed to cardiomyocyte apoptosis in metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Metabolic syndrome exacerbated MI/R induced injury accompanied by decreased Nur77. • ROS led to Nur77 translocation in metabolic syndrome. • Inhibiting relocation of Nur77 to mitochondria reduced ROS-induced cardiomyocyte injury in metabolic syndrome. - Abstract: Metabolic syndrome is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis which contributes to cardiac dysfunction after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Nur77, a nuclear orphan receptor, is involved in such various cellular events as apoptosis, proliferation, and glucose and lipid metabolism in several cell types. Apoptosis is positively correlated with mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 in the cancer cells. However, the roles of Nur77 on cardiac myocytes in patients with metabolic syndrome remain unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether Nur77 may contribute to cardiac apoptosis in patients with metabolic syndrome after I/R injury, and, if so, to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible. We used leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice to make metabolic syndrome models. In this report, we observed that, accompanied by the substantial decline in apoptosis inducer Nur77, MI/R induced cardiac dysfunction was manifested as cardiomyopathy and increased ROS. Using the neonatal rat cardiac myocytes cultured in a high-glucose and high-fat medium, we found that excessive H2O2 led to the significant alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential and translocation of Nur77 from the nucleus to the mitochondria. However, inhibition of the relocation of Nur77 to mitochondria via Cyclosporin A reversed the changes in membrane potential mediated by H2O2 and reduced myocardial cell injury. Therefore, these data provide a potential underlying mechanism for cardiac dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and the suppression of Nur77 translocation may provide an effective approach to reduce cardiac injury in the process

  2. Mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 induced by ROS contributed to cardiomyocyte apoptosis in metabolic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Aibin; Liu, Jingyi [Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an (China); Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, General Hospital of Beijing Command, PLA, Beijing (China); Liu, Peilin; Jia, Min; Wang, Han [Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an (China); Tao, Ling, E-mail: lingtao2006@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Metabolic syndrome exacerbated MI/R induced injury accompanied by decreased Nur77. • ROS led to Nur77 translocation in metabolic syndrome. • Inhibiting relocation of Nur77 to mitochondria reduced ROS-induced cardiomyocyte injury in metabolic syndrome. - Abstract: Metabolic syndrome is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis which contributes to cardiac dysfunction after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Nur77, a nuclear orphan receptor, is involved in such various cellular events as apoptosis, proliferation, and glucose and lipid metabolism in several cell types. Apoptosis is positively correlated with mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 in the cancer cells. However, the roles of Nur77 on cardiac myocytes in patients with metabolic syndrome remain unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether Nur77 may contribute to cardiac apoptosis in patients with metabolic syndrome after I/R injury, and, if so, to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible. We used leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice to make metabolic syndrome models. In this report, we observed that, accompanied by the substantial decline in apoptosis inducer Nur77, MI/R induced cardiac dysfunction was manifested as cardiomyopathy and increased ROS. Using the neonatal rat cardiac myocytes cultured in a high-glucose and high-fat medium, we found that excessive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} led to the significant alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential and translocation of Nur77 from the nucleus to the mitochondria. However, inhibition of the relocation of Nur77 to mitochondria via Cyclosporin A reversed the changes in membrane potential mediated by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reduced myocardial cell injury. Therefore, these data provide a potential underlying mechanism for cardiac dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and the suppression of Nur77 translocation may provide an effective approach to reduce cardiac injury in the

  3. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase α subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

  4. Cardiac arrest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tress Erika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners.

  5. Cardiac arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  6. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt;

    2012-01-01

    recruitment and participation among low educated and socially vulnerable patients must be addressed to lower inequality in post-MI health. Our aim was to improve referral, attendance, and adherence rates among socially vulnerable patients by systematic screening and by offering a socially differentiated...... standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......%. Patients were equally distributed to the SRP and the ERP. No inequality was found in attendance and adherence among referred patients. Conclusions: It seems possible to overcome unequal referral, attendance, and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation by organisation of systematic screening and social...

  7. Mitochondrial integrity in a neonatal bovine model of right ventricular dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Bruns, Danielle R; Brown, R. Dale; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Buttrick, Peter M.; Walker, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function is a key determinant of survival in patients with both RV and left ventricular (LV) failure, yet the mechanisms of RV failure are poorly understood. Recent studies suggest cardiac metabolism is altered in RV failure in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Accordingly, we assessed mitochondrial content, dynamics, and function in hearts from neonatal calves exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (HH). This model develops severe PH with concomitant RV hypertrophy, dilation, and dys...

  8. Neuregulin-1 attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yong-fang; ZHANG Xiao-xia; LIU Yong; DUAN Hong-yan; JIE Bing-zhang; WU Xue-si

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the progression of left ventricular (LV) remodeling and heart failure (HF).Recombinant human neuregulin-1 (rhNRG-1)improves cardiac function in models of experimental HF and in clinical trials; however,its impact on mitochondrial function during chronic HF remains largely unknown.The purpose of this study was to investigate whether rhNRG-1 could attenuate the functional and structural changes that occur in cardiac mitochondria in a rat model of HF induced by myocardial infarction.Methods Sixty adult rats underwent sham or coronary ligation to induce HF.Four weeks after ligation,29 animals with LV ejective fraction <50% were randomized to receive either vehicle or rhNRG-1 (10 μg·kg-1·d-1,I.V.) for 10 days,another 12 sham-operated animals were given no treatment.Echocardiography was used to determine physiological changes.Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP),respiratory function and tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production were analyzed.Cytochrome c expression and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were determined.Oxidative stress was evaluated by reactive oxygen species production using fluorescence assays and gene expression of glutathione peroxidase measured by real-time quantitative PCR.Results Compared with sham-operated animals,vehicle treated HF rats exhibited severe LV remodeling and dysfunction,significant mitochondrial dysfunction,increased mitochondrial cytochrome c release,increased myocyte apoptosis and enhanced oxidative stress.Short-term treatment with rhNRG-1 significantly attenuated LV remodeling and cardiac function.Concomitant with this change,mitochondrial dysfunction was significantly attenuated; with ATP production,MMP and respiratory function restored,cytochrome c release and apoptosis inhibited,and oxidative stress reduced.Conclusion The present study demonstrated that rhNRG-1 can significantly improve LV remodeling and cardiac function in the failing heart,this beneficial effect

  9. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clémençon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp and inorganic phosphate (PiC carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1 under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003.

  10. Cardiolipin metabolism and the role it plays in heart failure and mitochondrial supercomplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Edgard M; Cole, Laura K; Hatch, Grant M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipin is a major membrane phospholipid in the mitochondria and is essential for cellular energy metabolism mediated through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Recent studies indicate that it plays a diverse role in cellular metabolism. Eukaryotic cardiolipin is synthesized de novo from phosphatidic acid via the cytidine-5'-diphosphate-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol pathway and is deacylated to monolysocardiolipin in order for it to be remodelled into the form that is observed in mitochondrial membranes. This resynthesis of deacylated cardiolipin from monolysocardiolipin occurs via the Barth Syndrome gene product tafazzin and acyllysocardiolipin acyltransferase-1, monolysocardiolipin acyltransferase-1 and the alpha subunit of trifunctional protein. Heart failure is a disease condition in which the amount and type of cardiolipin is altered. Several animal models have been generated to study the role of altered cardiolipin in heart failure. In many of these models loss of the tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin species is observed during the development of the heart failure. In the doxycycline inducible short hairpin RNA tafazzin knock down mouse, loss of tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin is associated with a mitochondrial bioenergetic disruption. Reduction in mitochondrial supercomplex formation and NADH dehydrogenase activity within these supercomplexes is observed. Modulation of CL fatty acyl composition may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of several pathologies including cardiac dysfunction.We propose that increasing cardiolipin may improve mitochondrial function and potentially serve as a therapy for diseases which exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction involving reduced cardiolipin. PMID:24801725

  11. Cardiac metastases of osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma is a malignancy whose various sites of metastasis greatly modify its ultimate prognosis. We report a case of simultaneous pulmonary and cardiac metastases in a 41-year-old male patient with osteosarcoma of the tibia, presenting after more then one year of completion of adjuvant therapy with progressive dyspnea and cyanosis. Diagnosis was made on computerized tomogram and echocardiogram. The metastatic mass entirely occupying the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery proved fatal. (author)

  12. Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    MILICA RADISIC; GORDANA VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick),compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3) can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of p...

  13. Cardiac developmental toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Jonathan T Butcher

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a highly prevalent problem with mostly unknown origins. Many cases of CHD likely involve an environmental exposure coupled with genetic susceptibility, but practical and ethical considerations make nongenetic causes of CHD difficult to assess in humans. The development of the heart is highly conserved across all vertebrate species, making animal models an excellent option for screening potential cardiac teratogens. This review will discuss exposures known to cause ...

  14. Penetrating Cardiac Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZYAZICIOĞLU, Ahmet

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To present our experience of penetrating cardiac injuries treated at Atatürk University hospital; in 17 years 38 patients were analyzed. Methods: Patients were classified into three groups: group A (stable), 12; group B (shock), 21; and group C (agonal), five. Five patients were treated by pericardial window and three by pericardiocentesis. Two patients in group C, 19 patients in group B and five patients in group A underwent median sternotomy or thoracotomy in the operating room...

  15. Benign cardiac tumours: cardiac CT and MRI imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Primary benign cardiac tumours are rarely found in clinical practice and are generally evaluated with echocardiography. However, with the increasing usage of helical multislice CT, the initial detection and evaluation of these masses may be made by the radiologist during routine daily practice for other indications. The echocardiographic, CT and cardiac MRI appearances of various benign cardiac tumours and masses are described and illustrated in this review

  16. Cardiac tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA RADISIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick,compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3 can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of perfluorocarbons, or with electrical stimulation (continuous application of biphasic pulses, 2 ms, 5 V, 1 Hz. Tissue constructs cultured without perfusion or electrical stimulation served as controls. Medium perfusion and addition of perfluorocarbons resulted in compact, thick constructs containing physiologic density of viable, electromechanically coupled cells, in contrast to control constructs which had only a ~100 mm thick peripheral region with functionally connected cells. Electrical stimulation of cultured constructs resulted in markedly improved contractile properties, increased amounts of cardiac proteins, and remarkably well developed ultrastructure (similar to that of native heart as compared to non-stimulated controls. We discuss here the state of the art of cardiac tissue engineering, in light of the biomimetic approach that reproduces in vitro some of the conditions present during normal tissue development.

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins Reveals Pro-Survival Mechanisms in the Perpetuation of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Waters, Katrina M.; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Baulch, Janet E.

    2012-07-26

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon that is measured as mitotically heritable genetic alterations observed in the progeny of an irradiated cell. The mechanisms that perpetuate this instability are unclear, however, a role for chronic oxidative stress has consistently been demonstrated. In the chromosomally unstable LS12 cell line, oxidative stress and genomic instability were correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To clarify this mitochondrial dysfunction and gain insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation induced genomic instability we have evaluated the mitochondrial sub-proteome and performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of LS12 cells. Of 98 quantified mitochondrial proteins, 17 met criteria for fold changes and reproducibility; and 11 were statistically significant in comparison with the stable parental GM10115 cell line. Previous observations implicated defects in the electron transport chain (ETC) in the LS12 cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis supports these observations, demonstrating significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the intermediary between complexes III and IV of the ETC. Results also suggest that LS12 cells compensate for ETC dysfunction and oxidative stress through increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and up-regulation of proteins that protect against oxidative stress and apoptosis. More than one cellular defect is likely to contribute to the genomic instability phenotype. These data suggest that LS12 cells have adapted mechanisms that allow survival under sub-optimal conditions of oxidative stress and compromised mitochondrial function to perpetuate genomic instability.

  18. Deletion of the transcriptional regulator opi1p decreases cardiolipin content and disrupts mitochondrial metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luévano-Martínez, Luis Alberto; Appolinario, Patricia; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2013-11-01

    Cardiolipin, the main anionic phospholipid in the inner mitochondrial membrane, provides shape, charge and osmotic support to this membrane due to its biophysical properties. In addition, it helps form respiratory supercomplexes and provides functionality to mitochondrial proteins. Defects in the biosynthesis or remodeling of cardiolipin have been related to severe diseases, such as Barth syndrome. Opi1p, a transcriptional repressor for most enzymes in phospholipid biosynthesis found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been demonstrated not to affect the biosynthesis of this mitochondrial phospholipid. However, we found that opi1 deletion compromises mitochondrial metabolism producing severe respiratory defects. The mechanism producing this phenotype was explored and found to be a mitochondrial cardiolipin depletion of almost 50%, resulting in low cytochrome content and high mitochondrial DNA instability. The origin of this low cardiolipin content strongly correlated with the overproduction of inositol, an intrinsic phenotype of this mutation. Overall, our results show that adequate regulation of phospholipid synthesis is essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial function. PMID:23578934

  19. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jianfei, E-mail: jjf73@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C. [Center for Biologic Imaging, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Greenberger, Joel S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. {yields} Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. {yields} Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient {rho}{sup 0} cells. {yields} Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient {rho}{sup o} HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  20. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. → Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. → Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient ρ0 cells. → Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H2O2 was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient ρo HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs tumor suppressor p53 expression/function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Shannon; Kim, Chul; Griner, Nicholas B; Potluri, Prasanth; Scheffler, Immo E; Sen, Sabyasachi; Jerry, D Joseph; Schneider, Sallie; Yadava, Nagendra

    2011-06-10

    Recently, mitochondria have been suggested to act in tumor suppression. However, the underlying mechanisms by which mitochondria suppress tumorigenesis are far from being clear. In this study, we have investigated the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the tumor suppressor protein p53 using a set of respiration-deficient (Res(-)) mammalian cell mutants with impaired assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our data suggest that normal mitochondrial function is required for γ-irradiation (γIR)-induced cell death, which is mainly a p53-dependent process. The Res(-) cells are protected against γIR-induced cell death due to impaired p53 expression/function. We find that the loss of complex I biogenesis in the absence of the MWFE subunit reduces the steady-state level of the p53 protein, although there is no effect on the p53 protein level in the absence of the ESSS subunit that is also essential for complex I assembly. The p53 protein level was also reduced to undetectable levels in Res(-) cells with severely impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. This suggests that p53 protein expression is differentially regulated depending upon the type of electron transport chain/respiratory chain deficiency. Moreover, irrespective of the differences in the p53 protein expression profile, γIR-induced p53 activity is compromised in all Res(-) cells. Using two different conditional systems for complex I assembly, we also show that the effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on p53 expression/function is a reversible phenomenon. We believe that these findings will have major implications in the understanding of cancer development and therapy. PMID:21502317

  2. Indeterminacy of Spatiotemporal Cardiac Alternans

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential duration (at the cellular level) or in ECG morphology (at the whole heart level), is a marker of ventricular fibrillation, a fatal heart rhythm that kills hundreds of thousands of people in the US each year. Investigating cardiac alternans may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and eventually better algorithms for the prediction and prevention of such dreadful diseases. In paced cardiac tissue, alternans develops under increasingly shorter pacing period. Existing experimental and theoretical studies adopt the assumption that alternans in homogeneous cardiac tissue is exclusively determined by the pacing period. In contrast, we find that, when calcium-driven alternans develops in cardiac fibers, it may take different spatiotemporal patterns depending on the pacing history. Because there coexist multiple alternans solutions for a given pacing period, the alternans pattern on a fiber becomes unpredictable. Usin...

  3. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac p...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....... characterized. An ongoing characterization of the molecular heterogeneity will help appreciate the biosynthetic capacity of the endocrine heart and could introduce new diagnostic possibilities. Notably, different biosynthetic products may not be equal markers of the same pathophysiological processes. An...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  4. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  5. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In this article we review the different steps of heart development, focusing on the processes of alignment and septation. We also show, as often as possible, the links between abnormalities of cardiac development and the main congenital heart defects. The development of animal models has permitted the unraveling of many mechanisms that potentially lead to cardiac malformations. A next step towards a better knowledge of cardiac development could be multiscale cardiac modelling. PMID:24138816

  6. Private mitochondrial DNA variants in danish patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Hagen

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446 variants. After elimination of 312 (69.9% non-coding and synonymous variants, a further 109 (24.4% with a global prevalence > 0.1%, three (0.7% haplogroup associated and 19 (2.0% variants with a low predicted in silico likelihood of pathogenicity, three variants: MT-TC: m.5772G>A, MT-TF: m.644A>G, and MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM.

  7. Lipid metabolism in mitochondrial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes have a unique lipid composition necessary for proper shape and function of the organelle. Mitochondrial lipid metabolism involves biosynthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, the latter is a precursor of the late endosomal lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. It also includes mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis necessary for the formation of the lipid cofactor lipoic acid. Furthermore the synthesis of coenzyme Q takes place in mitochondria as well as essential parts of the steroid and vitamin D metabolism. Lipid transport and remodelling, which are necessary for tailoring and maintaining specific membrane properties, are just partially unravelled. Mitochondrial lipids are involved in organelle maintenance, fission and fusion, mitophagy and cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis. Mutations in TAZ, SERAC1 and AGK affect mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism and cause Barth syndrome, MEGDEL and Sengers syndrome, respectively. In these disorders an abnormal mitochondrial energy metabolism was found, which seems to be due to disturbed protein-lipid interactions, affecting especially enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation. Since a growing number of enzymes and transport processes are recognised as parts of the mitochondrial lipid metabolism, a further increase of lipid-related disorders can be expected. PMID:25082432

  8. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Hutter, Adolph M; Weiner, Rory B

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  9. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Guidelines and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Monpere

    1998-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to improve exercise tolerance and symptomatology in patients experiencing angina or heart failure and reduce long term mortality after myocardial infarction, with a good cost-effectiveness ratio. In addition to these `hard' endpoints, cardiac rehabilitation improves the patient's quality of life and risk factor profile through a multifactorial intervention. Indeed, cardiac rehabilitation is no longer restricted to physical reconditioning, but should now b...

  10. Exercise-induced protection against reperfusion arrhythmia involves stabilization of mitochondrial energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Rick J; Tsang, Alvin M; Ryan, Terence E; Patteson, Daniel J; McClung, Joseph M; Spangenburg, Espen E; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Neufer, P Darrell; Brown, David A

    2016-05-15

    Mitochondria influence cardiac electrophysiology through energy- and redox-sensitive ion channels in the sarcolemma, with the collapse of energetics believed to be centrally involved in arrhythmogenesis. This study was conducted to determine if preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) contributes to the antiarrhythmic effect of exercise. We utilized perfused hearts, isolated myocytes, and isolated mitochondria exposed to metabolic challenge to determine the effects of exercise on cardiac mitochondria. Hearts from sedentary (Sed) and exercised (Ex; 10 days of treadmill running) Sprague-Dawley rats were perfused on a two-photon microscope stage for simultaneous measurement of ΔΨm and ECG. After ischemia-reperfusion, the collapse of ΔΨm was commensurate with the onset of arrhythmia. Exercise preserved ΔΨm and decreased the incidence of fibrillation/tachycardia (P hypoxia-reoxygenation, with Ex rats demonstrating enhanced redox control and sustained ΔΨm during reoxygenation. Finally, we induced anoxia-reoxygenation in isolated mitochondria using high-resolution respirometry with simultaneous measurement of respiration and H2O2 Mitochondria from Ex rats sustained respiration with lower rates of H2O2 emission than Sed rats. Exercise helps sustain postischemic mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox homeostasis, which is associated with preserved ΔΨm and protection against reperfusion arrhythmia. The reduction of fatal ventricular arrhythmias through exercise-induced mitochondrial adaptations indicates that mitochondrial therapeutics may be an effective target for the treatment of heart disease. PMID:26945082

  11. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  12. SIRT Is Required for EDP-Mediated Protective Responses toward Hypoxia–Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L.; Fedotov, Ilia; Endo, Tomoko; Seubert, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia–reoxygenation (H/R) injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex, and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s) protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways. PMID:27242531

  13. A method for identifying compromised clients based on DNS traffic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevanovic, Matija; Pedersen, Jens Myrup; D’Alconzo, Alessandro;

    2016-01-01

    DNS is widely abused by Internet criminals in order to provide reliable communication within malicious network infrastructure as well as flexible and resilient hosting of malicious content. This paper presents a novel detection method that can be used for identifying potentially compromised clients...... domain-to-IP mappings, thus assisting in pinpointing potentially compromised clients within the network. The proposed approach targets compromised clients in large-scale operational networks. We have evaluated the proposed approach using an extensive set of DNS traffic traces from different operational...

  14. Diagnostic imaging of cardiac hypertrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As imaging techniques for cardiac hypertrophy, the ultrasonic dimension gauze technique, echocardiography, ventriculography and the RI technique including emission RI tomography were outlined. (Chiba, N.)

  15. Mitochondrial Defects in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Salgado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis because of its high susceptibility to mutations and limited repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer type among women in the world and, although exhaustive research has been done on nuclear DNA changes, several studies describe a variety of mitochondrial DNA alterations present in breast cancer. In this review article, we to provide a summary of the mitochondrial genomic alterations reported in breast cancer and their functional consequences.

  16. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  17. Stimulating basal mitochondrial respiration decreases doxorubicin apoptotic signaling in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deus, Cláudia M; Zehowski, Cheryl; Nordgren, Kendra; Wallace, Kendall B; Skildum, Andrew; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2015-08-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is currently used in cancer chemotherapy, however, its use often results in adverse effects highlighted by the development of cardiomyopathy and ultimately heart failure. Interestingly, DOX cardiotoxicity is decreased by resveratrol or by physical activity, suggesting that increased mitochondrial activity may be protective. Conversely, recent studies showed that troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, increases the cytotoxicity of DOX against breast cancer cells by up-regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. The hypothesis for the current investigation was that DOX cytotoxicity in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts is decreased when mitochondrial capacity is increased. We focused on several end-points for DOX cytotoxicity, including loss of cell mass, apoptotic signaling and alterations of autophagic-related proteins. Our results show that a galactose-based, modified cell culture medium increased H9c2 basal mitochondrial respiration, protein content, and mtDNA copy number without increasing maximal or spare respiratory capacity. H9c2 cardiomyoblasts cultured in the galactose-modified media showed lower DOX-induced activation of the apoptotic pathway, measured by decreased caspase-3 and -9 activation, and lower p53 expression, although ultimately loss of cells was not prevented. Treatment with the PPARγ agonist troglitazone had no effect on DOX toxicity in this cardiac cell line, which agrees with the fact that troglitazone did not increase mitochondrial DNA content or capacity at the concentrations and duration of exposure used in this investigation. Our results show that mitochondrial remodeling caused by stimulating basal rates of oxidative phosphorylation decreased DOX-induced apoptotic signaling and increased DOX-induced autophagy in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. The differential effect on cytotoxicity in cardiac versus breast cancer cell lines suggests a possible overall improvement in the clinical efficacy for doxorubicin in treating cancer. PMID:25997894

  18. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter-Dennerlein, R.; Dennerlein Sven, S.; Rehling, P

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial- encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisin...

  19. Mitochondrial transcript maturation and its disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Van Haute, Lindsey; Pearce, Sarah F.; Powell, Christopher A.; D’Souza, Aaron R.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies exhibit a wide spectrum of clinical presentations owing to defective mitochondrial energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. These defects can be caused by either mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mutations in nuclear genes coding for mitochondrially-targeted proteins. The underlying pathomechanisms can affect numerous pathways involved in mitochondrial biology including expression of mtDNA-encoded genes. Expression of the mi...

  20. Mitochondrial Stress: A Bridge between Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Diseases?

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions such as obesity, excessive oxidation of nutrients may induce mitochondrial stress, leading to mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and initiation of a retrograde stress signaling pathway. Defects in the UPRmt and the retrograde signaling pathways may disrupt the integrity and homeostasis of the mitochondria, resulting endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin resistance. Improving the capacity of mitochondria to reduce stress may be an effective a...

  1. More Than Tiny Sacks: Stem Cell Exosomes as Cell-Free Modality for Cardiac Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Raj; Khan, Mohsin

    2016-01-22

    Stem cell therapy provides immense hope for regenerating the pathological heart, yet has been marred by issues surrounding the effectiveness, unclear mechanisms, and survival of the donated cell population in the ischemic myocardial milieu. Poor survival and engraftment coupled to inadequate cardiac commitment of the adoptively transferred stem cells compromises the improvement in cardiac function. Various alternative approaches to enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapies and to overcome issues with cell therapy have been used with varied success. Cell-free components, such as exosomes enriched in proteins, messenger RNAs, and miRs characteristic of parental stem cells, represent a potential approach for treating cardiovascular diseases. Recently, exosomes from different kinds of stem cells have been effectively used to promote cardiac function in the pathological heart. The aim of this review is to summarize current research efforts on stem cell exosomes, including their potential benefits and limitations to develop a potentially viable therapy for cardiovascular problems. PMID:26838317

  2. Deletions of muscle mitochondrial DNA in patients with mitochondrial myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, I J; Harding, A E; Morgan-Hughes, J A

    1988-02-25

    In vitro studies of muscle mitochondrial metabolism in patients with mitochondrial myopathy have identified a variety of functional defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, predominantly affecting complex I (NADH-CoQ reductase) or complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) in adult cases. These two enzymes consist of approximately 36 subunits, eight of which are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The increased incidence of maternal, as opposed to paternal, transmission in familial mitochondrial myopathy suggests that these disorders may be caused by mutations of mtDNA. Multiple restriction endonuclease analysis of leukocyte mtDNA from patients with the disease, and their relatives, showed no differences in cleavage patterns between affected and unaffected individuals in any single maternal line. When muscle mtDNA was studied, nine of 25 patients were found to have two populations of muscle mtDNA, one of which had deletions of up to 7 kilobases in length. These observations demonstrate that mtDNA heteroplasmy can occur in man and that human disease may be associated with defects of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:2830540

  3. Cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Helle; Vissing, John; Witting, Nanna; Bundgaard, Henning; Køber, Lars

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the degree of cardiac involvement regarding left ventricular ejection fraction, conduction abnormalities, arrhythmia, risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and the associations between cardiac involvement and cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG)-repeat, neuromuscular involvement, age and gender...

  4. Cardiac tamponade as first manifestation of a lung neoplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Medina A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In cardiac tamponade, there is a filling restriction of the heart due to increased pressure of the pericardial cavity secondary to pericardial effusion. Pressure can reach values greater than that of the right heart cavities, compromising their filling, and, secondarily, affecting the preload of the left ventricle. CASE REPORT: A 52-year old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus, consulted to the emergency department of Víctor Ríos Ruiz Hospital of Los Angeles, Chile for epigastric colic pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distention, choluria, oliguria, anorexia, constipation, asthenia, adynamia and malaise. He is admitted to the surgery ward on the suspicion of acute cholecystitis. Abdominal ultrasound showed perihepatic and perisplenic free fluid and increased caliber of the inferior vena cava, associated with bilateral pleural effusion. Hypotension, paradoxical pulse and jugular engorgement developed, so he is transferred to the ICU where echocardiography confirmed cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis was performed, which showed malignant cells on microscopy. A computerized tomography (CT scan showed a solid mass in the left inferior lung lobe, a nodule in the middle lobe and multiple mediastinal and hiliar bilateral lymphoadenopaties. DISCUSSION: Malignant pericardial effusion commonly presents as cardiac tamponade, being the lung cancer its main etiology. The prognosis of pericardial effusion in lung cancer is rather ominous, with an overall survival of less than 3 months.

  5. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation in heart failure associated with obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems, and are linked to the development of heart failure. Emerging data highlight the importance of alterations in cardiac energy metabolism as a major contributor to cardiac dysfunction related to obesity and diabetes. Increased rates of fatty acid oxidation and decreased rates of glucose utilization are two prominent changes in cardiac energy metabolism that occur in obesity and diabetes. This metabolic profile is probably both a cause and consequence of a prominent cardiac insulin resistance, which is accompanied by a decrease in both cardiac function and efficiency, and by the accumulation of potentially toxic lipid metabolites in the heart that can further exaggerate insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. The high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in obesity and diabetes are attributable to several factors, including: 1) increased fatty acid supply and uptake into the cardiomyocyte, 2) increased transcription of fatty acid metabolic enzymes, 3) decreased allosteric control of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake and fatty acid oxidation, and 4) increased post-translational acetylation control of various fatty acid oxidative enzymes. Emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic approaches aimed at switching the balance of cardiac energy substrate preference from fatty acid oxidation to glucose use can prevent cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes. Modulating acetylation control of fatty acid oxidative enzymes is also a potentially attractive strategy, although presently this is limited to precursors of nicotinamide adenine or nonspecific activators of deacetylation such as resveratrol. This review will focus on the metabolic alterations in the heart that occur in obesity and diabetes, as well as on the molecular mechanisms controlling these metabolic changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26996746

  6. The assembly of mitochondrial complex I : a product of nuclear-mitochondrial synergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, Rutger Oscar

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential to cellular energy production. Embedded in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the engine of the mitochondrial powerhouse is formed by the five enzymatic complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Dysfunction of this system results in mitochondrial disease,

  7. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  8. Single ventricle cardiac defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. (author)

  9. Bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Ramos, Eduardo; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Mourier, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are bioenergetic hotspots, producing the bulk of ATP by the oxidative phosphorylation process. Mitochondria are also structurally dynamic and undergo coordinated fusion and fission to maintain their function. Recent studies of the mitochondrial fusion machinery have provided new evidence in detailing their role in mitochondrial metabolism. Remarkably, mitofusin 2, in addition to its role in fusion, is important for maintaining coenzyme Q levels and may be an integral player in the mevalonate synthesis pathway. Here, we review the bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial dynamics and emphasize the importance of the in vitro growth conditions when evaluating mitochondrial respiration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016,' edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060252

  10. A mitochondrially targeted compound delays aging in yeast through a mechanism linking mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism to mitochondrial redox biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Burstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study revealed a mechanism of delaying aging in yeast by a natural compound which specifically impacts mitochondrial redox processes. In this mechanism, exogenously added lithocholic bile acid enters yeast cells, accumulates mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and elicits an age-related remodeling of phospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes. Such remodeling of mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics progresses with the chronological age of a yeast cell and ultimately causes significant changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome. These changes in the composition of membrane phospholipids alter mitochondrial abundance and morphology, thereby triggering changes in the age-related chronology of such longevity-defining redox processes as mitochondrial respiration, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, the preservation of cellular homeostasis of mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species, and the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis.

  11. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: update

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez de Diego, Rafael; Mang de la Rosa, María Rocío; Romero Perez, María Jesús; Cutando Soriano, Antonio; López-Valverde Centeno, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words “implant” AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus article...

  12. Cross-cultural compromises, multiculturalism and the actuality of unzipped Hofstede

    OpenAIRE

    Magala, Slawomir

    2004-01-01

    textabstractCultural background of identities calls for upholding of values, but realities of multicultural interactions require cross-cultural compromises. Compromises begin already with the introduction of the term multiculturalism, which served both as a platform for cross-cultural urban policies in major western cities and for a non-class analysis of a new class structure. The unexpected result of the popularity of the concept of multiculturalism in urban policies is its managerial applic...

  13. Spending Versus Tax Cuts: Who Pays the Cost of Political Compromise?

    OpenAIRE

    Dean Baker

    2009-01-01

    President Obama and the Democratic leadership will undoubtedly have to make some political compromises in order to get a stimulus package through Congress. However, it is important to keep in mind that there will be real costs associated with these compromises insofar as they result in a less effective stimulus package. A less effective package will mean less economic growth, which will, in turn, mean that fewer people will have jobs.

  14. Clustering of health-compromising behavior and delinquency in adolescents and adults in the Dutch population

    OpenAIRE

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, Maroesjka; Junger, Marianne; Klein Velderman, Mariska; Wiefferink, Karin H.; Paulussen, Theo W. G. M.; Hox, Joop; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. This study investigates the clustering of a broad range of health-compromising and delinquent behaviors. We examine whether these behaviors belong to a single but broad cluster. 'risk-taking behavior', and whether the nature and degree of clustering in adolescents differs from that in adults. Method. A representative sample (N =4395) of the Dutch population aged 12 to 40 (overall response rate 67%), was asked about various health-compromising behaviors, such as alcohol consumption,...

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP

  16. Mitochondrial transplantation for therapeutic use

    OpenAIRE

    McCully, James Donald; Levitsky, Sidney; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas Burr

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in the homeostasis of the vast majority of the body’s cells. In the myocardium where mitochondria constitute 30 % of the total myocardial cell volume, temporary attenuation or obstruction of blood flow and as a result oxygen delivery to myocardial cells (ischemia) severely alters mitochondrial structure and function. These alterations in mitochondrial structure and function occur during ischemia and continue after blood flow and oxygen delivery to the myocardium i...

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, P. C.; Kurzawa, M.; Blain, P G; Morris, C M

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has increasingly been linked with mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of the electron transport chain. This inhibition leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of cellular energy levels, which can consequently cause cellular damage and death mediated by oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. A number of genes that have been shown to have links with inherited forms of PD encode mitochondrial ...

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Johri, Ashu; Beal, M. Flint

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a large group of disabling disorders of the nervous system, characterized by the relative selective death of neuronal subtypes. In most cases, there is overwhelming evidence of impaired mitochondrial function as a causative factor in these diseases. More recently, evidence has emerged for impaired mitochondrial dynamics (shape, size, fission-fusion, distribution, movement etc.) in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyo...

  20. Pemphigus vulgaris antibodies target the mitochondrial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that protect keratinocytes from apoptolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyavsky, Alex; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping H; Grando, Sergei A

    2015-11-01

    The mechanism of detachment and death of keratinocytes in pemphigus vulgaris (PV) involves pro-apoptotic action of constellations of autoantibodies determining disease severity and response to treatment. The presence of antibodies to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and the therapeutic efficacy of cholinomimetics in PV is well-established. Recently, adsorption of anti-mitochondrial antibodies abolished the ability of PVIgGs to cause acantholysis, demonstrating their pathophysiological significance. Since, in addition to cell membrane, nAChRs are also present on the mitochondrial outer membrane, wherein they act to prevent activation of intrinsic (mitochondrial apoptosis), we hypothesized that mitochondrial (mt)-nAChRs might be targeted by PVIgGs. To test this hypothesis, we employed the immunoprecipitation-western blot assay of keratinocyte mitochondrial proteins that visualized the α3, α5, α7, α9, α10, β2 and β4 mt-nAChR subunits precipitated by PV IgGs, suggesting that functions of mt-nAChRs are compromised in PV. To pharmacologically counteract the pro-apoptotic action of anti-mitochondrial antibodies in PV, we exposed naked keratinocyte mitochondria to PVIgGs in the presence of the nicotinic agonist nicotine ± antagonists, and measured cytochrome c (CytC) release. Nicotine abolished PVIgG-dependent CytC release, showing a dose-dependent effect, suggesting that protection of mitochondria can be a novel mechanism of therapeutic action of nicotinic agonists in PV. The obtained results indicated that the mt-nAChRs targeted by anti-mitochondrial antibodies produced by PV patients are coupled to inhibition of CytC release, and that nicotinergic stimulation can abolish PVIgG-dependent activation of intrinsic apoptosis in KCs. Future studies should determine if and how the distinct anti-mt-nAChR antibodies penetrate KCs and correlate with disease severity. PMID:25998908

  1. Method for multi-attribute group decision-making based on the compromise weights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengbao Yao; Wan'an Cui

    2010-01-01

    Multi-attribute group decision-making problems are considered where information on both attribute weights and value scores of consequences is incomplete.In group decision analysis,if preference information about alternatives is provided by participants,it should be verified whether there exist compromise weights that can support all the preference relations.The different compromise weight vectors may differ for the ranking of the alternatives.In the case that compromise weights exist,the method is proposed to find out all the compromise weight vectors in order to rank the alternatives.Based on the new feasible domain of attribute weights determined by all the compromise weight vectors and the incomplete information on value scores of consequences,dominance relations between alternatives are checked by a nonlinear goal programming model which can be transformed into a linear one by adopting a transformation.The checked dominance relations uniformly hold for all compromise weight vectors and the incomplete information on value scores of consequences.A final ranking of the alternatives can be obtained by aggregating these dominance relations.

  2. MOLECULAR NEUROGENETICS OF MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cardaioli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial diseases are an expanding group of clinically heterogeneous disorders associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations or nuclear gene defects. Whatever the mechanism, the final common step in mitochondrial disorders is a defect of energy production resulting from respiratory chain impairment. The complexity of the biochemical and genetic features of the respiratory chain accounts for the extraordinarily wide range of clinical presentations of mitochondrial disorders. In general, organs with high aerobic demand, such as skeletal muscle, brain and heart, are the most affected. However, virtually any organ or tissue in the body may be affected and the disorders can be multisystemic (mitochondrial encephalomyopathiesor confined to a single tissue. Moreover, mitochondrial diseases can be sporadic or transmitted by mendelian (nuclear genes or maternal inheritance (mutations in mtDNA. Precise diagnosis is often a challenge; we go through the traditional steps of the diagnostic process, starting with study of inheritance in the family, clinical manifestations in the individual,electrophysiology and imaging techniques at organ level, down to biochemistry, pathology and molecular genetics at tissue, cell and DNA level, respectively. In fact the ultimate goal is to reach, whenever possible, a definitive molecular diagnosis, which can permit rational therapeutic approach and a genetic counseling.

  3. Mitochondrial Epigenetics and Environmental Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Luca; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2016-09-01

    The rising toll of chronic and debilitating diseases brought about by the exposure to an ever expanding number of environmental pollutants and socio-economic factors is calling for action. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the effects of environmental exposures can lead to the development of biomarkers that can support the public health fields of both early diagnosis and intervention to limit the burden of environmental diseases. The study of mitochondrial epigenetics carries high hopes to provide important biomarkers of exposure and disease. Mitochondria are in fact on the frontline of the cellular response to the environment. Modifications of the epigenetic factors regulating the mitochondrial activity are emerging as informative tools that can effectively report on the effects of the environment on the phenotype. Here, we will discuss the emerging field of mitochondrial epigenetics. This review describes the main epigenetic phenomena that modify the activity of the mitochondrial DNA including DNA methylation, long and short non-coding RNAs. We will discuss the unique pattern of mitochondrial DNA methylation, describe the challenges of correctly measuring it, and report on the existing studies that have analysed the correlation between environmental exposures and mitochondrial DNA methylation. Finally, we provide a brief account of the therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondria currently under consideration. PMID:27344144

  4. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gabriel Valdivieso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy.

  5. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, "a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues," has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type two diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25601841

  6. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  7. Atrial tumors in cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the diagnosis of cardiac masses. Various cardiac tumors are predisposed to occurring in atrial structures. The aim of this review article is the description of atrial tumors and their morphological features in MRI. In general, cardiac tumors are rare: approximately 0.001-0.03% in autopsy studies. About 75% of them are benign. The most common cardiac tumor is the myxoma. They are predisposed to occur in the atria and show a characteristically strong hyperintense signal on T2-wieghted images in MRI. In other sequences a heterogeneous pattern reflects its variable histological appearance. Lipomas exhibit a signal behavior identical to fatty tissue with a typical passive movement in cine imaging. Fibroelastomas are the most common tumors of the cardiac valves. Consisting of avascular fibrous tissue, they often present with hypointense signal intensities. Thrombi attached to their surface can cause severe emboli even in small tumors. Amongst primary cardiac malignancies, sarcomas are most common and favor the atria. Secondary malignancies of the heart are far more common than primary ones (20-40 times). In case of known malignancies, approximately 10% of patients develop cardiac metastasis at the end of their disease. Lymphogenic metastases favor the pericardium, while hematogenic spread prefers the myocardium. Since they are not real atrial tumors, thrombi and anatomical structures of the atria have to be differentiated from other pathologies. (orig.)

  8. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  9. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... patients who received their first pacemaker (PM) or cardiac resynchronization device from 1997 to 2008. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and pneumothorax treated with a chest tube. The median...... age was 77 years (25th and 75th percentile: 69-84) and 55% were male (n = 15 785). A total of 190 patients (0.66%) were treated for pneumothorax, which was more often in women [aOR 1.9 (1.4-2.6)], and in patients with age >80 years [aOR 1.4 (1.0-1.9)], a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  10. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance. PMID:20884217

  11. Cardiac chamber scintiscanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two methods of cardiac chamber scintiscanning, i.e. 'first pass' and 'ECG-triggered' examinations, are explained and compared. Two tables indicate the most significant radiation doses of the applied radio tracers, i.e. 99m-Tc-pertechnetate and 99m-Tc-HSA, to which a patient is exposed. These averaged values are calculated from various data given in specialised literature. On the basis of data given in literature, an effective half-life of approximately 5 hours in the intravascular space was calculated for the erythrocytes labelled with technetium 99m. On this basis, the radiation doses for the patients due to 99m-Tc-labelled erythrocytes are estimated. The advantages and disadvantages of the two methods applied for cardiac chamber scintiscanning are put into contrast and compared with the advantages and disadvantages of the quantitative X-ray cardiography of the left heart. The still existing problems connected with the assessment of ECG-triggered images are discussed in detail. The author performed investigations of his own, which concerned the above-mentioned problems. (orig./MG)

  12. Cardiac remodeling and physical training post myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; A; Garza; Emily; A; Wason; John; Q; Zhang

    2015-01-01

    After myocardial infarction(MI), the heart undergoes extensive myocardial remodeling through the accumulation of fibrous tissue in both the infarcted and noninfarcted myocardium, which distorts tissue structure, increases tissue stiffness, and accounts for ventricular dysfunction. There is growing clinical consensus that exercise training may beneficially alter the course of post-MI myocardial remodeling and improve cardiac function. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effect of post-MI exercise training on infarcted hearts. Due to the degree of difficulty to study a viable human heart at both protein and molecular levels, most of the detailed studies have been performed by using animal models. Although there are some negative reports indicating that post-MI exercise may further cause deterioration of the wounded hearts, a growing body of research from both human and animal experiments demonstrates that post-MI exercise may beneficially alter the course of wound healing and improve cardiac function. Furthermore, the improved function is likely due to exercise training-induced mitigation of reninangiotensin-aldosterone system, improved balance between matrix metalloproteinase-1 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, favorable myosin heavy chain isoform switch, diminished oxidative stress, enhanced antioxidant capacity, improved mitochondrial calcium handling, and boosted myocardial angiogenesis. Additionally, meta-analyses revealed that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation has proven to be effective, and remains one of the least expensive therapies for both the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, and prevents re-infarction.

  13. Affect intensity and cardiac arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blascovich, J; Brennan, K; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M; Hughes, P; Coad, M L; Adlin, R

    1992-07-01

    Relationships between affect intensity and basal, evoked, and perceived cardiac arousal were investigated in 3 experiments. Affect intensity was assessed using Larsen and Diener's (1987) Affect Intensity Measure (AIM). Cardiac arousal was evoked with exercise in the 1st study and with mental arithmetic in the 2nd and 3rd. Perceived cardiac arousal was measured under optimal conditions using a standard heartbeat discrimination procedure. Women as a group scored higher on the AIM. Affect intensity was unrelated to basal or evoked cardiac arousal and was negatively related to perceived cardiac arousal in all 3 studies. Data suggest that affect intensity, although unrelated to actual physiological arousal, is negatively related to the accuracy with which individuals perceive their own arousal. Results are discussed within the context of an expanded arousal-regulation model (Blascovich, 1990). PMID:1494983

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Księżakowska-Łakoma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles of eukaryotic cells. They perform crucial functions such as generating most of the cellular energy through the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system and some other metabolic processes. In addition, mitochondria are involved in regulation of cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. Also, mitochondria play important roles in carcinogenesis via altering energy metabolism, resistance to apoptosis, increase of production of ROS and mtDNA (mitochondrial genome changes. Studies have suggested that aerobic glycolysis is high in malignant tumors. Probably, it correlates with high glucose intake of cancerous tissues. This observation is contrary to Warburg’s theory that the main way of energy generation in cancer cells is non-oxidative glycolysis. Further studies have suggested that in tumor cells both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis were active at various rates. An increase of intracellular oxidative stress induces damage of cellular structure and somatic mutations. Further studies confirmed that permanent activity of oxidative stress and the influence of chronic inflammation damage the healthy neighboring epithelium and may lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, chronic inflammato­ry bowel disease could be related to high risk of colon adenocarcinoma. The data have shown a role of ROS generation, mtDNA or nDNA alterations and abnormal apoptotic machinery in endometrial cancer progress. Recent studies suggest that mtDNA mutations might play a potential role in endometrial cancer progress and indicate an increase of mitochondrial biogenesis in this cancer. The investigators suggested that MtCOI and MtND6 alteration has an influence on assembly of respiratory complexes in endometrial cancer. In many human cancers, there is a deregulation of the balance between cell growth and death. The tumor cells can avoid apoptosis through a loss of balance between anti- and pro

  15. Cucumber: a model angiosperm for mitochondrial transformation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havey, Michael J; Lilly, Jason W; Bohanec, Borut; Bartoszewski, Grzegorz; Malepszy, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Plants possess three major genomes, carried in the chloroplast, mitochondrion, and nucleus. The chloroplast genomes of higher plants tend to be of similar sizes and structure. In contrast both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes show great size differences, even among closely related species. The largest plant mitochondrial genomes exist in the genus Cucumis at 1500 to 2300 kilobases, over 100 times the sizes of the yeast or human mitochondrial genomes. Biochemical and molecular analyses have established that the huge Cucumis mitochondrial genomes are due to extensive duplication of short repetitive DNA motifs. The organellar genomes of almost all organisms are maternally transmitted and few methods exist to manipulate these important genomes. Although chloroplast transformation has been achieved, no routine method exists to transform the mitochondrial genome of higher plants. A mitochondrial-transformation system for a higher plant would allow geneticists to use reverse genetics to study mitochondrial gene expression and to establish the efficacy of engineered mitochondrial genes for the genetic improvement of the mitochondrial genome. Cucumber possesses three unique attributes that make it a potential model system for mitochondrial transformation of a higher plant. Firstly, its mitochondria show paternal transmission. Secondly, microspores possess relatively few, huge mitochondria. Finally, there exists in cucumber unique mitochondrial mutations conditioning strongly mosaic (msc) phenotypes. The msc phenotypes appear after regeneration of plants from cell culture and sort with specific rearranged and deleted regions in the mitochondrial genome. These mitochondrial deletions may be a useful genetic tool to develop selectable markers for mitochondrial transformation of higher plants. PMID:12084966

  16. Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) protein attenuates doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial respiration in H9c2 cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a chemotherapeutic agent effective in the treatment of many cancers. However, cardiac dysfunction caused by DOX limits its clinical use. DOX is believed to be harmful to cardiomyocytes by interfering with the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin and causing inefficient electro...

  17. Non-rigid dual respiratory and cardiac motion correction methods after, during, and before image reconstruction for 4D cardiac PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Fung, George; Tsui, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory motion (RM) and cardiac motion (CM) degrade the quality and resolution in cardiac PET scans. We have developed non-rigid motion estimation methods to estimate both RM and CM based on 4D cardiac gated PET data alone, and compensate the dual respiratory and cardiac (R&C) motions after (MCAR), during (MCDR), and before (MCBR) image reconstruction. In all three R&C motion correction methods, attenuation-activity mismatch effect was modeled by using transformed attenuation maps using the estimated RM. The difference of using activity preserving and non-activity preserving models in R&C correction was also studied. Realistic Monte Carlo simulated 4D cardiac PET data using the 4D XCAT phantom and accurate models of the scanner design parameters and performance characteristics at different noise levels were employed as the known truth and for method development and evaluation. Results from the simulation study suggested that all three dual R&C motion correction methods provide substantial improvement in the quality of 4D cardiac gated PET images as compared with no motion correction. Specifically, the MCDR method yields the best performance for all different noise levels compared with the MCAR and MCBR methods. While MCBR reduces computational time dramatically but the resultant 4D cardiac gated PET images has overall inferior image quality when compared to that from the MCAR and MCDR approaches in the ‘almost’ noise free case. Also, the MCBR method has better noise handling properties when compared with MCAR and provides better quantitative results in high noise cases. When the goal is to reduce scan time or patient radiation dose, MCDR and MCBR provide a good compromise between image quality and computational times.

  18. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results. PMID:22399423

  19. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  20. Does a delayed imaging protocol in scintimammography offer better specificity without compromising sensitivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of scintimammography in the management of breast cancer is well established. The reported sensitivity and specificity of scintimammography in initial detection of breast cancer ranges from 92-98% and 94%-100% respectively, generally for palpable abnormalities. Expectedly there has been a drop in sensitivity in non palpable lesions. Tc-99m MIBI which is widely used for scintimammography, is a myocardial perfusion agent, also localizing in tumour cells both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments have confirmed its ability to avidly concentrate in tumour cells. It has been shown that maximal cellular concentration of Tc-99m sestamibi ranges from 5-28% of the external medium activity in tumour cell-lines. This can be compared with < 2% in the normal cells. The maximum level is reached after 1 hr. and the time to half maximum is 10 min. This kinetics was similar to what has been reported in myocardial cells. Tc-99m sestamibi accumulates in tumour cells by trans-membrane diffusion in response to an electrical potential. Tumour cells are supposed to have a higher mitochondrial density and also a higher trans-membrane electrical potential than the surrounding epithelial tissue. It is generally a nonspecific mechanism and thus non-tumour cells with high metabolic activity or a high density of mitochondria will also concentrate these agents. This situation is commonly encountered in atypical hyperplasia. Benign conditions like fibroadenosis or epitheliosis can also concentrate MIBI in the same intensity as seen in malignant breast tumours, quite frequently, as we have observed. The same can also be seen in patients presenting with axillary lymphadenopathy (due to some other cause) without any palpable lump in the ipsilateral breast and in situations where there are coexistent breast infections after interventional procedures (our unpublished data). It has been hypothesized that analysis of tracer washout pattern could be one of the methods to differentiate

  1. A PPARγ-Bnip3 Axis Couples Adipose Mitochondrial Fusion-Fission Balance to Systemic Insulin Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Marc J; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Eijk, Marco; Zelcer, Noam; Aten, Jan; Houten, Sander M; Geerts, Dirk; van Roomen, Cindy; Bierlaagh, Marlou C; Scheij, Saskia; Hoeksema, Marten A; Aerts, Johannes M; Bogan, Jonathan S; Dorn, Gerald W; Argmann, Carmen A; Verhoeven, Arthur J

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant mitochondrial fission plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. However, fusion-fission dynamics are physiologically regulated by inherent tissue-specific and nutrient-sensitive processes that may have distinct or even opposing effects with respect to insulin sensitivity. Based on a combination of mouse population genetics and functional in vitro assays, we describe here a regulatory circuit in which peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the adipocyte master regulator and receptor for the thiazolidinedione class of antidiabetic drugs, controls mitochondrial network fragmentation through transcriptional induction of Bnip3. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Bnip3 in cultured adipocytes shifts the balance toward mitochondrial elongation, leading to compromised respiratory capacity, heightened fatty acid β-oxidation-associated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, insulin resistance, and reduced triacylglycerol storage. Notably, the selective fission/Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 mimics the effects of Bnip3 knockdown on adipose mitochondrial bioenergetics and glucose disposal. We further show that Bnip3 is reciprocally regulated in white and brown fat depots of diet-induced obesity and leptin-deficient ob/ob mouse models. Finally, Bnip3(-/-) mice trade reduced adiposity for increased liver steatosis and develop aggravated systemic insulin resistance in response to high-fat feeding. Together, our data outline Bnip3 as a key effector of PPARγ-mediated adipose mitochondrial network fragmentation, improving insulin sensitivity and limiting oxidative stress. PMID:27325287

  2. Cardiac responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarndt, Rachel; Piloto, Sarah; Powell, Frank L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen

    2015-12-01

    An adequate supply of oxygen is important for the survival of all tissues, but it is especially critical for tissues with high-energy demands, such as the heart. Insufficient tissue oxygenation occurs under a variety of conditions, including high altitude, embryonic and fetal development, inflammation, and thrombotic diseases, often affecting multiple organ systems. Responses and adaptations of the heart to hypoxia are of particular relevance in human cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, in which the effects of hypoxic exposure can range in severity from transient to long-lasting. This study uses the genetic model system Drosophila to investigate cardiac responses to acute (30 min), sustained (18 h), and chronic (3 wk) hypoxia with reoxygenation. Whereas hearts from wild-type flies recovered quickly after acute hypoxia, exposure to sustained or chronic hypoxia significantly compromised heart function upon reoxygenation. Hearts from flies with mutations in sima, the Drosophila homolog of the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-α), exhibited exaggerated reductions in cardiac output in response to hypoxia. Heart function in hypoxia-selected flies, selected over many generations for survival in a low-oxygen environment, revealed reduced cardiac output in terms of decreased heart rate and fractional shortening compared with their normoxia controls. Hypoxia-selected flies also had smaller hearts, myofibrillar disorganization, and increased extracellular collagen deposition, consistent with the observed reductions in contractility. This study indicates that longer-duration hypoxic insults exert deleterious effects on heart function that are mediated, in part, by sima and advances Drosophila models for the genetic analysis of cardiac-specific responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:26377557

  3. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Type 2 Activation by Adenosine and Histamine Inhibits Ischemic Norepinephrine Release in Cardiac Sympathetic Neurons: Mediation by Protein Kinase Cε

    OpenAIRE

    Robador, Pablo A.; Seyedi, Nahid; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Koda, Kenichiro; Levi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    During myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of toxic aldehydes that contribute to ischemic dysfunction. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) alleviates ischemic heart damage and reperfusion arrhythmias via aldehyde detoxification. Because excessive norepinephrine release in the heart is a pivotal arrhythmogenic mechanism, we hypothesized that neuronal ALDH2 activation might diminish ischemic norepinephrine release. Incubation of cardiac sym...

  4. Cardiac Cytochrome c Oxidase Activity and Contents of Submits 1 and 4 are Altered in Offspring by Low Prenatal Intake by Rat Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been reported previously that the offspring of rat dams consuming low dietary copper (Cu) during pregnancy and lactation experience a deficiency in cardiac cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) characterized by reduced catalytic activity and mitochondrial- and nuclear-subunit content after postnatal day...

  5. Accelerated cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the mouse heart using self-gated parallel imaging strategies does not compromise accuracy of structural and functional measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörries Carola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-gated dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables non-invasive visualization of the heart and accurate assessment of cardiac function in mouse models of human disease. However, self-gated CMR requires the acquisition of large datasets to ensure accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of cardiac cines and is therefore hampered by long acquisition times putting high demands on the physiological stability of the animal. For this reason, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerating the data collection using the parallel imaging technique SENSE with respect to both anatomical definition and cardiac function quantification. Results Findings obtained from accelerated data sets were compared to fully sampled reference data. Our results revealed only minor differences in image quality of short- and long-axis cardiac cines: small anatomical structures (papillary muscles and the aortic valve and left-ventricular (LV remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI were accurately detected even for 3-fold accelerated data acquisition using a four-element phased array coil. Quantitative analysis of LV cardiac function (end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF and LV mass in healthy and infarcted animals revealed no substantial deviations from reference (fully sampled data for all investigated acceleration factors with deviations ranging from 2% to 6% in healthy animals and from 2% to 8% in infarcted mice for the highest acceleration factor of 3.0. CNR calculations performed between LV myocardial wall and LV cavity revealed a maximum CNR decrease of 50% for the 3-fold accelerated data acquisition when compared to the fully-sampled acquisition. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of accelerated self-gated retrospective CMR in mice using the parallel imaging technique SENSE. The proposed method led to considerably reduced acquisition times, while preserving high

  6. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... drive the late repolarization of the ventricle with some redundancy, and in atria this repolarization reserve is supplemented by the fairly atrial-specific KV1.5, Kir3, KCa, and K2P channels. The role of the latter two subtypes in atria is currently being clarified, and several findings indicate that...... they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure. The...

  7. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Sarma Mallela

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future.

  8. Platelets and cardiac arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JonasSDe Jong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death remains one of the most prevalent modes of death in industrialized countries, and myocardial ischemia due to thrombotic coronary occlusion is its primary cause. The role of platelets in the occurrence of SCD extends beyond coronary flow impairment by clot formation. Here we review the substances released by platelets during clot formation and their arrhythmic properties. Platelet products are released from three types of platelet granules: dense core granules, alpha-granules, and platelet lysosomes. The physiologic properties of dense granule products are of special interest as a potential source of arrhythmic substances. They are released readily upon activation and contain high concentrations of serotonin, histamine, purines, pyrimidines, and ions such as calcium and magnesium. Potential arrhythmic mechanisms of these substances, e.g. serotonin and high energy phosphates, include induction of coronary constriction, calcium overloading, and induction of delayed after-depolarizations. Alpha-granules produce thromboxanes and other arachidonic acid products with many potential arrhythmic effects mediated by interference with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. Alpha-granules also contain hundreds of proteins that could potentially serve as ligands to receptors on cardiomyocytes. Lysosomal products probably do not have an important arrhythmic effect. Platelet products and ischemia can induce coronary permeability, thereby enhancing interaction with surrounding cardiomyocytes. Antiplatelet therapy is known to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Although an important part of this effect results from prevention of coronary clot formation, there is evidence to suggest that antiplatelet therapy also induces anti-arrhythmic effects during ischemia by preventing the release of platelet activation products.

  9. Rcan1-1L overexpression induces mitochondrial autophagy and improves cell survival in angiotensin II-exposed cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial autophagy is an important adaptive stress response and can be modulated by various key molecules. A previous study found that the regulator of calcineurin 1-1L (Rcan1-1L) may regulate mitochondrial autophagy and cause mitochondria degradation in neurocytes. However, the effect of Rcan1-1L on cardiomyocytes has not been determined. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of Rcan1-1L in angiotensin II (Ang II)-exposed human cardiomyocytes. Above all, Human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs) were exposed to 200 nmol/L Ang II for 4 days. Enhanced H2O2 production, cytochrome C release and mitochondrial permeability were observed in these cells, which were blocked by valsartan. Consistently, Ang II exposure significantly reduced cardiomyocyte viability. However, transfection of Rcan1-1L vector promoted cell viability and ameliorated the apoptosis caused by Ang II. Rcan1-1L clearly promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs, with elevated autophagy protein (ATG) 5 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression. Transient mitochondrial biogenesis and reduced cytochrome C release was also induced by Rcan1-1L. Additionally, Rcan1-1L significantly inhibited calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. We thus conclude that Rcan1-1L may play a protective role in Ang II-treated cardiomyocytes through the induction of mitochondrial autophagy, and may be an alternative method of cardiac protection. - Highlights: • Transfection of Rcan1-1L into HACMs promoted cell viability and reduced apoptosis. • Transfection of Rcan1-1L promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs. • Rcan1-1L inhibited the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling

  10. Rcan1-1L overexpression induces mitochondrial autophagy and improves cell survival in angiotensin II-exposed cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongyan; Li, Yongqiang; Yan, Lijie; Yang, Haitao; Wu, Jintao; Qian, Peng; Li, Bing; Wang, Shanling, E-mail: shanglingwang@126.com

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial autophagy is an important adaptive stress response and can be modulated by various key molecules. A previous study found that the regulator of calcineurin 1-1L (Rcan1-1L) may regulate mitochondrial autophagy and cause mitochondria degradation in neurocytes. However, the effect of Rcan1-1L on cardiomyocytes has not been determined. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of Rcan1-1L in angiotensin II (Ang II)-exposed human cardiomyocytes. Above all, Human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs) were exposed to 200 nmol/L Ang II for 4 days. Enhanced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production, cytochrome C release and mitochondrial permeability were observed in these cells, which were blocked by valsartan. Consistently, Ang II exposure significantly reduced cardiomyocyte viability. However, transfection of Rcan1-1L vector promoted cell viability and ameliorated the apoptosis caused by Ang II. Rcan1-1L clearly promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs, with elevated autophagy protein (ATG) 5 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression. Transient mitochondrial biogenesis and reduced cytochrome C release was also induced by Rcan1-1L. Additionally, Rcan1-1L significantly inhibited calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. We thus conclude that Rcan1-1L may play a protective role in Ang II-treated cardiomyocytes through the induction of mitochondrial autophagy, and may be an alternative method of cardiac protection. - Highlights: • Transfection of Rcan1-1L into HACMs promoted cell viability and reduced apoptosis. • Transfection of Rcan1-1L promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs. • Rcan1-1L inhibited the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling.

  11. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  12. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1b (CPT1b) Deficiency Aggravates Pressure-Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy due to Lipotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lan; Kim, Teayoun; Long, Qinqiang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Peiyong; Zhou, Yiqun; Ding, Yishu; Prasain, Jeevan; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2012-01-01

    Background Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1(CPT1) is a rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation by controlling the mitochondrial uptake of long-chain acyl-CoAs. The muscle isoform, CPT1b, is the predominant isoform expressed in the heart. It has been suggested that inhibiting CPT-1 activity by specific CPT-1 inhibitors exerts protective effects against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, clinical and animal studies have shown mixed results, thereby posting concerns on the safety of this class of drugs. Preclinical studies using genetically modified animal models should provide a better understanding of targeting CPT1 in order to evaluate it as a safe and effective therapeutic approach. Methods and Results Heterozygous CPT1b knockout mice (CPT1b+/−) were subjected to transverse aorta constriction (TAC)-induced pressure-overload. These mice showed overtly normal cardiac structure/function under the basal condition. Under a severe pressure-overload condition induced by two weeks of transverse aorta constriction (TAC), CPT1b+/− mice were susceptible to premature death with congestive heart failure. Under a milder pressure-overload condition, CPT1b+/− mice exhibited exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling compared with that in wild-type littermates. There were more pronounced impairments of cardiac contraction with greater eccentric cardiac hypertrophy in CPT1b+/− than in controlled mice. Moreover, the CPT1b+/− heart exhibited exacerbated mitochondrial abnormalities and myocardial lipid accumulation with elevated triglycerides and ceramide content, leading to greater cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Conclusions We conclude that CPT1b deficiency can cause lipotoxicity in the heart under pathological stress, leading to exacerbation of cardiac pathology. Therefore, caution should be applied in the clinical use of CPT-1 inhibitors. PMID:22932257

  13. PGC-1α accelerates cytosolic Ca2+ clearance without disturbing Ca2+ homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy metabolism and Ca2+ handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1α in cardiac Ca2+ signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1α via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1α improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca2+ transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca2+ increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ waves accelerated in PGC-1α-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca2+ transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na+/Ca2+ exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1α-induced cytosolic Ca2+ clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1α induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1α did not disturb cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis, because SR Ca2+ load and the propensity for Ca2+ waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1α can ameliorate cardiac Ca2+ cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1α-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1α in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  14. The Impact of Age-Related Dysregulation of the Angiotensin System on Mitochondrial Redox Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya eVajapey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with the accumulation of various deleterious changes in cells. According to the free radical and mitochondrial theory of aging, mitochondria initiate most of the deleterious changes in aging and govern life span. The failure of mitochondrial reduction-oxidation (redox homeostasis and the formation of excessive free radicals are tightly linked to dysregulation in the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS. A main rate-controlling step in RAS is renin, an enzyme that hydrolyzes angiotensinogen to generate angiotensin I. Angiotensin I is further converted to Angiotensin II (Ang II by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE. Ang II binds with equal affinity to two main angiotensin receptors—type 1 (AT1R and type 2 (AT2R. The binding of Ang II to AT1R activates NADPH oxidase, which leads to increased generation of cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species (ROS. This Ang II-AT1R–NADPH-ROS signal triggers the opening of mitochondrial KATP channels and mitochondrial ROS production in a positive feedback loop. Furthermore, RAS has been implicated in the decrease of many of ROS scavenging enzymes, thereby leading to detrimental levels of free radicals in the cell.AT2R is less understood, but evidence supports an anti-oxidative and mitochondria-protective function for AT2R. The overlap between age related changes in RAS and mitochondria, and the consequences of this overlap on age-related diseases are quite complex. RAS dysregulation has been implicated in many pathological conditions due to its contribution to mitochondrial dysfunction. Decreased age-related, renal and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction was seen in patients treated with angiotensin receptor blockers. The aim of this review is to: (a report the most recent information elucidating the role of RAS in mitochondrial redox hemostasis and (b discuss the effect of age-related activation of RAS on generation of free radicals.

  15. Mitochondrial integrity in a neonatal bovine model of right ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Danielle R; Brown, R Dale; Stenmark, Kurt R; Buttrick, Peter M; Walker, Lori A

    2015-01-15

    Right ventricular (RV) function is a key determinant of survival in patients with both RV and left ventricular (LV) failure, yet the mechanisms of RV failure are poorly understood. Recent studies suggest cardiac metabolism is altered in RV failure in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Accordingly, we assessed mitochondrial content, dynamics, and function in hearts from neonatal calves exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (HH). This model develops severe PH with concomitant RV hypertrophy, dilation, and dysfunction. After 2 wk of HH, pieces of RV and LV were obtained along with samples from age-matched controls. Comparison with control assesses the effect of hypoxia, whereas comparison between the LV and RV in HH assesses the additional impact of RV overload. Mitochondrial DNA was unchanged in HH, as was mitochondrial content as assessed by electron microscopy. Immunoblotting for electron transport chain subunits revealed a small increase in mitochondrial content in HH in both ventricles. Mitochondrial dynamics were largely unchanged. Activity of individual respiratory chain complexes was reduced (complex I) or unchanged (complex V) in HH. Key enzymes in the glycolysis pathway were upregulated in both HH ventricles, alongside upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein. Importantly, none of the changes in expression or activity were different between ventricles, suggesting the changes are in response to HH and not RV overload. Upregulation of glycolytic modulators without chamber-specific mitochondrial dysfunction suggests that mitochondrial capacity and activity are maintained at the onset of PH, and the early RV dysfunction in this model results from mechanisms independent of the mitochondria. PMID:25416385

  16. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes

  17. Cardiac perioperative complications in noncardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Radovanović Dragana; Kolak Radmila; Stokić Aleksandar; Radovanović Zoran; Jovanović Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are confronted with an increasing population of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for cardiac complications in the perioperative period. Perioperative cardiac complications are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of perioperative (operative and postoperative) cardiac complications and correlations between the incidence of perioperative cardiac complications and type of surgical ...

  18. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ming; Yu; Yong; Xu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this minireview, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs.

  19. Overview of mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Vitor M C

    2012-01-01

    Bioenergetic Science started in seventh century with the pioneer works by Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier on photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. New developments were implemented by Pasteur in 1860s with the description of fermentations associated to microorganisms, further documented by Buchner brothers who discovered that fermentations also occurred in cell extracts in the absence of living cells. In the beginning of twentieth century, Harden and Young demonstrated that orthophosphate and other heat-resistant compounds (cozymase), later identified as NAD, ADP, and metal ions, were mandatory in the fermentation of glucose. The full glycolysis pathway has been detailed in 1940s with the contributions of Embden, Meyeroff, Parnas, Warburg, among others. Studies on the citric acid cycle started in 1910 (Thunberg) and were elucidated by Krebs et al. in the 1940s. Mitochondrial bioenergetics gained emphasis in the late 1940s and 1950s with the works of Lenhinger, Racker, Chance, Boyer, Ernster, and Slater, among others. The prevalent "chemical coupling hypothesis" of energy conservation in oxidative phosphorylation was challenged and replaced by the "chemiosmotic hypothesis" originally formulated in 1960s by Mitchell and later substantiated and extended to energy conservation in bacteria and chloroplasts, besides mitochondria, with clear-cut identification of molecular proton pumps. After identification of most reactive mechanisms, emphasis has been directed to structure resolution of molecular complex clusters, e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, complex III, complex II, ATP synthase, photosystem I, photosynthetic water splitting center, and energy collecting antennæ of several photosynthetic systems. Modern trends concern to the reactivity of radical and other active species in association with bioenergetic activities. A promising trend concentrates on the cell redox status quantified in terms of redox potentials. In spite of significant development and

  20. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  1. 5-azacytidine promotes the transdifferentiation of cardiac cells to skeletal myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Keerat; Yang, Jinpu; Eisenberg, Carol A; Eisenberg, Leonard M

    2014-10-01

    The DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine is widely used to stimulate the cardiac differentiation of stem cells. However, 5-azacytidine has long been employed as a tool for stimulating skeletal myogenesis. Yet, it is unclear whether the ability of 5-azacytidine to promote both cardiac and skeletal myogenesis is dependent strictly on the native potential of the starting cell population or if this drug is a transdifferentiation agent. To address this issue, we examined the effect of 5-azacytidine on cultures of adult mouse atrial tissue, which contains cardiac but not skeletal muscle progenitors. Exposure to 5-azacytidine caused atrial cells to elongate and increased the presence of fat globules within the cultures. 5-Azacytidine also induced expression of the skeletal myogenic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin. 5-Azacytidine pretreatments allowed atrial cells to undergo adipogenesis or skeletal myogenesis when subsequently cultured with either insulin and dexamethasone or low-serum media, respectively. The presence of skeletal myocytes in atrial cultures was indicated by dual staining for myogenin and sarcomeric α-actin. These data demonstrate that 5-azacytidine converts cardiac cells to noncardiac cell types and suggests that this drug has a compromised efficacy as a cardiac differentiation factor. PMID:25090621

  2. The Leptin Paradox-A Treacherous Art in cardiac sequelae of obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任骏

    2009-01-01

    Leptin is the first identified obese gene product which participates in the regulation of food intake, energy expenditure, glucose and lipid metabolism. Leptin initiates both hypertrophic and antihypertrophic effects on hearts in addition to its cardiac depressant effect. Circulating leptin levels correlate with the body mass index (BMI) and total amount of body fat, which may be associated with changes of cardiac morphology and function. It has been shown that cardiac function is present in both hyperleptinemic (db/db) and hypoleptinemic (ob/ob) mouse models. Leptin replenishment reconciles the compromised myocardial function in ob/ob mice, indicating the premises of leptin on heart function. Interestingly, elevated plasma leptin levels may trigger leptin resistance and serve as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, physiological range of leptin is essential tor normal cardiac geometry and function whereas disrupted leptin signaling (hyper-and hypoleptinemia) results in functional and morphological aberrations leading to heart problem. Given that human obesity is a syndrome of leptin resistance, which is unlikely amenable to leptin treatment, the identification of novel parallel signal transduction pathways is of particular therapeutic value for obesity-associated cardiac dysfunction.

  3. Hypoxic regulation of hand1 controls the fetal-neonatal switch in cardiac metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A Breckenridge

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyocytes are vulnerable to hypoxia in the adult, but adapted to hypoxia in utero. Current understanding of endogenous cardiac oxygen sensing pathways is limited. Myocardial oxygen consumption is determined by regulation of energy metabolism, which shifts from glycolysis to lipid oxidation soon after birth, and is reversed in failing adult hearts, accompanying re-expression of several "fetal" genes whose role in disease phenotypes remains unknown. Here we show that hypoxia-controlled expression of the transcription factor Hand1 determines oxygen consumption by inhibition of lipid metabolism in the fetal and adult cardiomyocyte, leading to downregulation of mitochondrial energy generation. Hand1 is under direct transcriptional control by HIF1α. Transgenic mice prolonging cardiac Hand1 expression die immediately following birth, failing to activate the neonatal lipid metabolising gene expression programme. Deletion of Hand1 in embryonic cardiomyocytes results in premature expression of these genes. Using metabolic flux analysis, we show that Hand1 expression controls cardiomyocyte oxygen consumption by direct transcriptional repression of lipid metabolising genes. This leads, in turn, to increased production of lactate from glucose, decreased lipid oxidation, reduced inner mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial ATP generation. We found that this pathway is active in adult cardiomyocytes. Up-regulation of Hand1 is protective in a mouse model of myocardial ischaemia. We propose that Hand1 is part of a novel regulatory pathway linking cardiac oxygen levels with oxygen consumption. Understanding hypoxia adaptation in the fetal heart may allow development of strategies to protect cardiomyocytes vulnerable to ischaemia, for example during cardiac ischaemia or surgery.

  4. Cancun Compromise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Countries take small steps toward addressing global climate change Participants at the UN Climate Change Confe-rence in Cancun from November 29 to December 11 didn’t reach an agreement until the last minute. The agreement was a small yet meaningful step in the international climate change negotiation process.

  5. Nanodelivery System for Mitochondrial Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sia Lee; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable in cellular functions such as energy production and death execution. They are emerging as intriguing therapeutic target as their dysregulation was found to be monumental in diseases such as neurodegenerative disease, obesity, and cancer etc. Despite tremendous interest being focused on therapeutically intervening mitochondrial function, few mito-active drugs were successfully developed, particularly due to challenges in delivering active compound to this organelle. In this review, effort in utilizing nanotechnology for targeted mitochondrial delivery of compound is expounded based on the nature of the nanomaterial used. The advantage and potential offered are discussed alongside the limitation. Finally the review is concluded with perspectives of the application of nanocarrier in mitochondrial medicine, given the unresolved concern on potential complications.

  6. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Meyers, Deborah E.; Basha, Haseeb Ilias; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease is a heterogeneous group of multisystemic diseases that develop consequent to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA. The prevalence of inherited mitochondrial disease has been estimated to be greater than 1 in 5,000 births; however, the diagnosis and treatment of this disease are not taught in most adult-cardiology curricula. Because mitochondrial diseases often occur as a syndrome with resultant multiorgan dysfunction, they might not immediately appear to be specifi...

  7. Unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms: Think mitochondrial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, TP; Hadley, G.; Fratter, C; Cullen, SN; Bax, BE; Bain, MD; Sapsford, RA; Poulton, J; Travis, SP

    2014-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial function are increasingly recognised as central to the pathogenesis of many diseases, both inherited and acquired. Many of these mitochondrial defects arise from abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA and can result in multisystem disease, with gastrointestinal involvement common. Moreover, mitochondrial disease may present with a range of non-specific symptoms, and thus can be easily misdiagnosed, or even considered to be non-organic.We describe the clinical, histopathol...

  8. Unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms: think mitochondrial disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, TP; Hadley, G.; Fratter, C; Cullen, SN; Bax, BE; Bain, MD; Sapsford, RA; Poulton, J; Travis, SP

    2014-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial function are increasingly recognised as central to the pathogenesis of many diseases, both inherited and acquired. Many of these mitochondrial defects arise from abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA and can result in multisystem disease, with gastrointestinal involvement common. Moreover, mitochondrial disease may present with a range of non-specific symptoms, and thus can be easily misdiagnosed, or even considered to be non-organic. We describe the clinical, histopatho...

  9. Platelet mitochondrial membrane potential in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Antony, P.M.; Boyd, O.; Trefois, C.; Ammerlaan, W; Ostaszewski, M.; Baumuratov, A.S.; Longhino, L.; Antunes, L; Koopman, W.J.H.; Balling, R; Diederich, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), which has been reported not to be restricted to striatal neurons. However, studies that analyzed mitochondrial function at the level of selected enzymatic activities in peripheral tissues have produced conflicting data. We considered the electron transport chain as a complex system with mitochondrial membrane potential as an integrative indicator for mitochondrial fitness. METHODS: Twenty-five IPD pati...

  10. Unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms: think mitochondrial disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, TP; Hadley, G.; Fratter, C; Cullen, SN; Bax, BE; Bain, MD; Sapsford, RA; Poulton, J; Travis, SP

    2014-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial function are increasingly recognised as central to the pathogenesis of many diseases, both inherited and acquired. Many of these mitochondrial defects arise from abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA and can result in multisystem disease, with gastrointestinal involvement common. Moreover, mitochondrial disease may present with a range of non-specific symptoms, and thus can be easily misdiagnosed, or even considered to be non-organic.We describe the clinical, histopathol...

  11. Cardiac catheterization and angiography. Third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses the papers on cardiac catheterization and angiography. The topics covered are: historical perspective and present practice of cardiac catheterization; angiography principles and utilization of radiologic and cineangiographic equipment; complications, incidence and prevention of side effects of cardiac catheterization; techniques; blood flow measurement of heart; pressure measurement; diagnostic techniques of angiography; special catheter techniques; coronary angiography, temporary and permanent pacemakers, potential role of lasers in the cardiac catheterization and evaluation of cardiac function

  12. Antifibrotic therapies to control cardiac fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Zhaobo; Guan, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis occurs naturally after myocardial infarction. While the initially formed fibrotic tissue prevents the infarcted heart tissue from rupture, the progression of cardiac fibrosis continuously expands the size of fibrotic tissue and causes cardiac function decrease. Cardiac fibrosis eventually evolves the infarcted hearts into heart failure. Inhibiting cardiac fibrosis from progressing is critical to prevent heart failure. However, there is no efficient therapeutic approach curren...

  13. Robust Public Key Cryptography — A New Cryptosystem Surviving Private Key Compromise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Cheman

    A weakness of the present-day public key cryptosystems is that these cryptosystems do not survive private-key compromise attacks resulting from an internal breach of trust. In a competitive business environment, private key compromise is a common incident that voids the strength of public key cryptosystems such as RSA and ECC. Bribing corporate employees to disclose their secret keys and inadvertently disclosing secret information are among a plethora of practical attacks that occur at the implementation level. Once a breach of trust takes place and subsequently the private key is revealed, any public key cryptosystem fails to secure electronic data in Internet communications. The revealed key may be used by an attacker to decipher the intercepted data at an intermediary router. This weakness of public key cryptography calls for an additional security measure that enables encryptions to survive private key compromise attacks.

  14. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  15. Sustained activation of Akt elicits mitochondrial dysfunction to block Plasmodium falciparum infection in the mosquito host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Luckhart

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The overexpression of activated, myristoylated Akt in the midgut of female transgenic Anopheles stephensi results in resistance to infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but also decreased lifespan. In the present study, the understanding of mitochondria-dependent midgut homeostasis has been expanded to explain this apparent paradox in an insect of major medical importance. Given that Akt signaling is essential for cell growth and survival, we hypothesized that sustained Akt activation in the mosquito midgut would alter the balance of critical pathways that control mitochondrial dynamics to enhance parasite killing at some cost to survivorship. Toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RNOS rise to high levels in the midgut after blood feeding, due to a combination of high NO production and a decline in FOXO-dependent antioxidants. Despite an apparent increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in young females (3 d, energy deficiencies were apparent as decreased oxidative phosphorylation and increased [AMP]/[ATP] ratios. In addition, mitochondrial mass was lower and accompanied by the presence of stalled autophagosomes in the posterior midgut, a critical site for blood digestion and stem cell-mediated epithelial maintenance and repair, and by functional degradation of the epithelial barrier. By 18 d, the age at which An. stephensi would transmit P. falciparum to human hosts, mitochondrial dysfunction coupled to Akt-mediated repression of autophagy/mitophagy was more evident and midgut epithelial structure was markedly compromised. Inhibition of RNOS by co-feeding of the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME at infection abrogated Akt-dependent killing of P. falciparum that begins within 18 h of infection in 3-5 d old mosquitoes. Hence, Akt-induced changes in mitochondrial dynamics perturb midgut homeostasis to enhance parasite resistance and decrease mosquito infective lifespan. Further, quality control of mitochondrial

  16. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sevdalina; Lambova

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis(SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography(especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome.

  17. Computational Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamoorthi, Shankarjee

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a leading cause of death worldwide. Notably, the electrophysiologiy and microstructural requirements for a fatal ventricular arrhythmia remain incompletely understood, thereby the treatment remains largely empirical. Standard antiarrhythmic drug therapy has failed to reduce, and in some instances has increased, the incidence of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD). Hence, a more complete understanding of the mechanisms that foment a fatal arrhythmia is needed and computational m...

  18. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, Jodi Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT-proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been as extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism.Hypothesis: Plasma NT-proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary cardiac disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats.Animals: Twenty-three hyperthyr...

  19. Current trends in cardiac rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dafoe, W; Huston, P

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation can reduce mortality and morbidity for patients with many types of cardiac disease cost-effectively, yet is generally underutilized. Rehabilitation is helpful not only for patients who have had a myocardial infarction but also for those with stable angina or congestive heart failure or those who have undergone myocardial revascularization procedures, a heart transplant or heart valve surgery. The beneficial effects of rehabilitation include a reduction in the rate of de...

  20. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-01-01

    International audience Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In th...