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Sample records for cardiac mast cells

  1. Regular exercise modulates cardiac mast cell activation in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phungphong, Sukanya; Kijtawornrat, Anusak; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas

    2016-03-01

    It is well accepted that regular exercise is a significant factor in the prevention of cardiac dysfunction; however, the cardioprotective mechanism is as yet not well defined. We have examined whether regular exercise can modulate the activity of cardiac mast cells (CMC) after deprivation of female sex hormones, as well as the density and percentage degranulation of mast cells, in ventricular tissue of ovariectomized (OVX) rats after an 11-week running program. A significant increase in CMC density with a greater percentage degranulation was induced after ovarian sex hormone deprivation. Increased CMC density was prevented by estrogen supplements, but not by regular training. To the contrary, increased CMC degranulation in the OVX rat heart was attenuated by exercise training, but not by estrogen supplement. These findings indicate a significant correlation between the degree of CMC degranulation and myocyte cross-section area. However, no change in the expression of inflammatory mediators, including chymase, interleukin-6, and interleukin-10, was detected. Taken together, these results clearly indicate one of the cardioprotective mechanisms of regular aerobic exercise is the modulation of CMC activation. PMID:26467449

  2. Cardiac mast cells regulate myocyte ANP release via histamine H2 receptor in beating rabbit atria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Wen, Jin Fu; Jin, Jing Yu; Quan, He Xiu; Cho, Kyung Woo

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that histamine inhibits atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release. Because cardiac mast cells are the principal source of histamine in the heart, we hypothesized that cardiac mast cells are involved in the regulation of atrial ANP release. To test the hypothesis, experiments were performed in perfused beating rabbit atria allowing atrial pacing and measurements of changes in atrial stroke volume, intraatrial pulse pressure and myocyte ANP release. Mast cell degranulation with Compound 48/80 decreased atrial myocyte ANP release, and the response was blocked by a selective histamine H(2) receptor blocker, cimetidine, indicating that histamine was responsible for the decrease in ANP release. Mast cell stabilization with cromolyn blocked the Compound 48/80-induced decrease in ANP release. These data suggest that mast cell-derived histamine is involved in the regulation of cardiac ANP release. Thus, the cardiac mast cell-cardiomyocyte communication via the histamine-ANP pathway may implicate in the cardiac disorder associated with mast cell degranulation such as in acute coronary syndrome or cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:19328828

  3. Systemic mastocytosis presenting as cardiac tamponade with CD25(+) pericardial mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukrithan, Vineeth K; Salamon, Jason N; Berulava, Giorgi; Sibinga, Nicholas E; Verma, Amit

    2016-03-01

    In this first-in-literature case, we describe a patient with Systemic mastocytosis presenting with life-threatening cardiac tamponade associated with the presence of aberrant mast cells in the pericardium. Procedures involving surgical incisions through the pericardium in such cases can lead to uncontrolled mast cell degranulation leading to circulatory collapse. PMID:27014452

  4. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhuo [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Department of Cardiology, Jinan Central Hospital, Affiliated with Shandong University, 105 Jiefang Road, Jinan, 250013 (China); Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Groban, Leanne, E-mail: lgroban@wakehealth.edu [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Hypertension and Vascular Disease Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Office of Women in Medicine and Science, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2015-03-27

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression.

  5. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression

  6. Mast cells and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Delivanis, Danae-Anastasia; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Zhang, Bodi; Asadi, Shahrzad; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Weng, Zuyi; Miniati, Alexandra; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are well known for their role in allergic and anaphylactic reactions, as well as their involvement in acquired and innate immunity. Increasing evidence now implicates mast cells in inflammatory diseases where they are activated by non-allergic triggers, such as neuropeptides and cytokines, often exerting synergistic effects as in the case of IL-33 and neurotensin. Mast cells can also release pro-inflammatory mediators selectively without degranulation. In particular, IL-1 induces selective release of IL-6, while corticotropin-releasing hormone secreted under stress induces the release of vascular endothelial growth factor. Many inflammatory diseases involve mast cells in cross-talk with T cells, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, which all worsen by stress. How mast cell differential responses are regulated is still unresolved. Preliminary evidence suggests that mitochondrial function and dynamics control mast cell degranulation, but not selective release. Recent findings also indicate that mast cells have immunomodulatory properties. Understanding selective release of mediators could explain how mast cells participate in numerous diverse biologic processes, and how they exert both immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive actions. Unraveling selective mast cell secretion could also help develop unique mast cell inhibitors with novel therapeutic applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation. PMID:21185371

  7. Mast cell stabilisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Finn, Deirdre Frances; Barlow, James William; Walsh, John Jarlath

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells play a critical role in type 1 hypersensitivity reactions. Indeed, mast cell mediators are implicated in many different conditions including allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, psoriasis, mastocytosis and the progression of many different cancers. Thus, there is intense interest in the development of agents which prevent mast cell mediator release or which inhibit the actions of such mediators once released into the environment of the cell. Much progress into the design of new agents has been made since the initial discovery of the mast cell stabilising properties of khellin from Ammi visnaga and the clinical approval of cromolyn sodium. This review critically examines the progress that has been made in the intervening years from the design of new agents that target a specific signalling event in the mast cell degranulation pathway to those agents which have been developed where the precise mechanism of action remains elusive. Particular emphasis is also placed on clinically used drugs for other indications that stabilise mast cells and how this additional action may be harnessed for their clinical use in disease processes where mast cells are implicated. PMID:26130122

  8. Mast cells in bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Rönnberg, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are implicated in immunity towards bacterial infection, but the molecular mechanisms by which mast cells contribute to the host response are only partially understood. Previous studies have examined how mast cells react to purified bacterial cell wall components, such as peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. To investigate how mast cells react to live bacteria we co-cultured mast cells and the gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus equi (S. equi) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)...

  9. Mast cell deficient W/Wv mice have lower serum IL-6 and less cardiac tissue necrosis than their normal littermates following myocardial ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, K; Farwell, K; Huang, M; Kempuraj, D; Donelan, J; Papaliodis, D; Vasiadi, M; Theoharides, T C

    2007-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury complicates all forms of coronary artery revascularization. Circulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been implicated in cell death following a variety of stimuli. Macrophages, platelets, neutrophils and the endothelium have been shown to release IL-6 after IR injury. Cardiac mast cells have been implicated in IR; however, their involvement has never been quantified. In this randomized, prospective study, we compared cardiac tissue susceptibility and serum IL-6 changes between mast cell deficient (W/Wv) mice and their normal littermates (+/+). Twenty-eight male W/Wv mice (n=14) and their +/+ littermates (n=14) were anaesthetized with 2.5% isoflurane. The left coronary artery (LCA) was ligated for 30 minutes or a sham procedure was performed. After 6 hours of reperfusion, the animals were sacrificed. The muscle viability was assessed on fresh whole-mount slices by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) histochemical assay and serum IL-6 concentrations measured by ELISA. Cardiac muscle viability was significantly higher in W/Wv mice than the +/+ mice. Serum IL-6 levels were higher in the +/+ sham mice (465 +/- 32 pg/ml, n=6) than the W/Wv mice (185 +/- 31 pg/ml, n=6), p injury. Furthermore, there is an attenuation in the inflammatory response, as measured by serum IL-6 levels, following this local insult. This finding entertains the prospect of developing prophylactic therapy--targeting selective inhibition of cardiac mast cell activation, in clinical situations involving medical or surgical myocardial revascularization. PMID:17346429

  10. Canine mast cell tumors.

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    Macy, D W

    1985-07-01

    Despite the fact that the mast cell tumor is a common neoplasm of the dog, we still have only a meager understanding of its etiology and biologic behavior. Many of the published recommendations for treatment are based on opinion rather than facts derived from careful studies and should be viewed with some skepticism. Because of the infrequent occurrence of this tumor in man, only a limited amount of help can be expected from human oncologists; therefore, burden of responsibility for progress in predicting behavior and developing treatment effective for canine mast cell tumors must fall on the shoulders of the veterinary profession. PMID:3929444

  11. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yunzhi Xu; Guangjie Chen

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases.

  12. Mast cells and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Folkerts, Gert; Redegeld, Frank

    2011-08-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The inflamed airways of COPD patients contain several inflammatory cells including neutrophils, macrophages, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. The relative contribution of mast cells to airway injury and remodeling is not well documented. In this review, an overview is given on the possible role of mast cells and their mediators in the pathogenesis of COPD. Activation of mast cells and mast cell signaling in response to exposure to cigarette smoke is further discussed. PMID:21463700

  13. Mast cells in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurmond, Jolien; van der Velden, Daniël; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze; Toes, René E M

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease with a complex disease pathogenesis leading to inflammation and destruction of synovial tissue in the joint. Several molecules lead to activation of immune pathways, including autoantibodies, Toll-Like Receptor ligands and cytokines. These pathways can cooperate to create the pro-inflammatory environment that results in tissue destruction. Each of these pathways can activate mast cells, inducing the release of a variety of inflammatory mediators, and in combination can markedly enhance mast cell responses. Mast cell-derived cytokines, chemokines, and proteases have the potential to induce recruitment of other leukocytes able to evoke tissue remodeling or destruction. Likewise, mast cells can secrete a plethora of factors that can contribute to tissue remodeling and fibroblast activation. Although the functional role of mast cells in arthritis pathogenesis in mice is not yet elucidated, the increased numbers of mast cells and mast cell-specific mediators in synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients suggest that mast cell activation in rheumatoid arthritis may contribute to its pathogenesis. PMID:25943290

  14. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  15. Mast cell degranulation breaks peripheral tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    De Vries, V. C.; Wasiuk, A.; Bennett, K A; Benson, M. J.; Elgueta, R.; Waldschmidt, T. J.; Noelle, R J

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) have been shown to mediate regulatory T-cell (T(reg))-dependent, peripheral allograft tolerance in both skin and cardiac transplants. Furthermore, T(reg) have been implicated in mitigating IgE-mediated MC degranulation, establishing a dynamic, reciprocal relationship between MC and T(reg) in controlling inflammation. In an allograft tolerance model, it is now shown that intragraft or systemic MC degranulation results in the transient loss of T(reg) suppressor activities with t...

  16. Mast cell tumors: clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cell tumors are commonly diagnosed in small animal practice; however, appropriate treatment and prognosis remain controversial. These tumors are considered malignant in dogs but generally are benign in cats. Mast cell tumors are associated with various clinical signs that are related to the release of biologic mediators from the granules of the neoplastic cells, and these signs may be the primary presenting complaint. Clinical staging as well as histopathologic grading are important in determining the treatment of choice and prognosis. Treatment consists of several options, including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. This article summarizes the available information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of mast cell tumors and makes recommendations for therapy

  17. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  18. Mast cells in mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropp, J J

    1976-01-01

    Mast cells, which had until recently been believed to be not present in the mammalian brain, were studied in the brains of 29 mammalian species. Although there was considerable intraspecific and interspecific variation, mast cells were most numerous within the leptomeninges (especially in those overlying the cerebrum and the dorsal thalamus - most rodents, most carnivores, chimpanzees, squirrel monkeys and elephant), the cerebral cortex (most rodents, tiger, fox, chimpanzee, tarsier, and elephant) and in many nuclei of the dorsal thalamus (most rodents, tiger, lion, and fox). In some mammals, mast cells were also numerous in the stroma of the telencephalic choroid plexuses (chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), the putamen and the claustrum (chimpanzee), the subfornical organ (pack rat, tiger, chimpanzee), the olfactory peduncles (hooded rat, albino rat), the stroma of the diencephalic choroid plexus (lion, chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), the pineal organ (chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), some nuclei of the hypothalamus (tiger), the infundibulum (hooded rat, tiger, fox) the area postrema (pack rat, chinchilla, lion, spider monkey, chimpanzee, fox) and some nuclei and tracts of the metencephalon and the myelencephalon (tiger). Neither the sex of the animal nor electrolytic lesions made in the brains of some of the animals at various times prior to sacrifice appeared to effect the number and the distribution of mast cells. Age-related changes in mast cell number and distribution were detected in the albino rat. PMID:961335

  19. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily;

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processe...

  20. Chemokine receptor expression by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juremalm, Mikael; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of chemokines and their receptors in the determination of mast cell tissue localization and how chemokines regulate mast cell function. At least nine chemokine receptors (CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, CCR1, CCR3, CCR4 and CCR5) have been described to be expressed by human mast cells of different origins. Seven chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL5, CXCL8, CXCL14, CX3CL1, CCL5 and CCL11) have been shown to act on some of these receptors and to induce mast cell migration. Mast cells have a unique expression pattern of CCR3, CXCR1 and CXCR2. These receptors are mainly expressed intracellularly on cytoplasmic membranes. Upon an allergic activation, CCR3 expression is increased on the cell surface and the cell becomes vulnerable for CCL11 treatment. Chemokines do not induce mast cell degranulation but CXCL14 causes secretion of de novo synthesized CXCL8. Because of the expression of CCR3, CCR5 and CXCR4 on mast cell progenitors, these cells are susceptible to HIV infection and mast cells might therefore be a persistent HIV reservoir in AIDS. In this review, we summarize the knowledge about chemokine receptor expression and function on mast cells. PMID:16107768

  1. Blood-borne donor mast cell precursors migrate to mast cell-rich brain regions in the adult mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Liu, Charles; Dong, Xin; Silver, Rae

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are hematopoietic immune cells located throughout the body, including within the brain. Reconstitution of mast cell deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice has proven valuable in determining peripheral mast cell function. Here we study the brain mast cell population using a novel method of blood transfusion for reconstitution. We show that blood transfusion results in mast cells of donor origin in the WT mouse, including in the brain and are restricted to regions bearing host mast cells. In co...

  2. The autocrine role of tryptase in pressure overload-induced mast cell activation, chymase release and cardiac fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Li

    2016-03-01

    Results and conclusion: The results indicate the presence of PAR-2 on MCs and that tryptase inhibition and nedocromil prevented TAC-induced fibrosis and increases in MC density, activation, and chymase release. Tryptase also significantly increased chymase concentration in ventricular slice culture media, which was prevented by the tryptase inhibitor. Hydroxyproline concentration in culture media was significantly increased with tryptase incubation as compared to the control group and the tryptase group incubated with nafamostat mesilate or chymostatin. We conclude that tryptase contributes to TAC-induced cardiac fibrosis primarily via activation of MCs and the amplified release of chymase.

  3. Benign mast cell hyperplasia and atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile lichen planus in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regauer, Sigrid; Beham-Schmid, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Introduction. Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic cytokine-mediated disease of possible auto-immune etiology. 25% of men have anogenital manifestations. Erosive penile LP causes a scarring phimosis of the foreskin in uncircumcised men. Mast cells as potent immune modulators have been implicated in a number of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, but have not been investigated in LP. Material and Methods. Formalin-fixed tissues of 117 circumcision specimens of adult men affected by LP were evaluated for the extent of mast cell and lymphocyte infiltrates, characterized immunohistochemically with antibodies to CD 3, 4, 8, 20, 21, 25, 30, 117c and human mast cell tryptase. Specimens with dense mast cell infiltrates were analyzed for point mutations of the c-kit gene (D816V). Results. Unaffected skin and modified mucosa of foreskins contained ⟨5 mast cells/mm². The inflammatory infiltrate of LP-lesions displayed ⟨15 mast cells/mm² in 33/117 foreskins, 16-40 mast cells/mm² in 22/117 and ⟩40 mast cells/mm² (average 70, range 40-100) in 62/117 foreskins. Lesional mast cells of 29/117 (24%) foreskins showed aberrant CD25-expression and/or spindled morphology, with 11/29 men having erosive LP, 13/29 a lymphocytic vasculitis and 1/28 a systemic mastocytosis. Neither CD30-expression nor c-kit mutations were identified. Atypical mast cell infiltrates in LP correlated with high disease activity, erosive LP and presence of lymphocytic vasculitis Conclusions. Increased mast cells in penile LP, mostly representing a benign hyperplasia/activation syndrome, suggests them as targets for innovative therapy options for symptomatic LP-patients not responding to corticosteroid therapy. Presently, the biological implications of atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile LP are unknown. PMID:24402730

  4. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  5. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis. PMID:25941081

  6. Involvement of mast cells in the development of fibrosis in rats with postmyocarditis dilated cardiomyopathy.

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    Palaniyandi Selvaraj, Suresh; Watanabe, Kenichi; Ma, Meilei; Tachikawa, Hitoshi; Kodama, Makoto; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2005-11-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Occurrence of myocardial fibrosis is an important event in the ventricular remodeling process, which takes place during DCM. Mast cells are well known inflammatory cells implicated in various biological phenomena. The involvement of mast cells in the development of myocardial fibrosis of DCM in rats after autoimmune myocarditis remains unknown. Nine-week-old male Lewis rats were immunized with cardiac myosin and divided into vehicle treated (group V) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), a mast cell stabilizer (24 mg/kg i.p.) treated (group DSCG) groups. The animals were sacrificed after 60 d of immunization. The myocardium was excised and preserved for histopathology and protein analysis. Myocardial levels of transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1 and collagen-III were quantified. Staining of mast cells was performed by toluidine blue. A significant correlation was obtained between myocardial fibrosis and cardiac mast cell density. DSCG reduced myocardial fibrosis besides preventing infiltration and degranulation of mast cells. Our findings confirm the active participation of mast cells in the progression of myocardial fibrosis in rats with postmyocarditis DCM. PMID:16272703

  7. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  8. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Aich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  9. The enigmatic role of mast cells in dominant tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Elgueta, Raul; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The role of regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral tolerance has been studied extensively in transplantation research. Recently, mast cells have been shown to play an indispensable role in allograft tolerance. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader on the current standings of the role of mast cells in dominant tolerance with an emphasis on the interaction of mast cells with Treg.RECENT FINDINGS: Mast cells are required to sustain peripheral tolerance via Treg. ...

  10. Peritoneal mast cell stabilization potential of Pothos scandens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This finding provides evidence that the P. scandens L. inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and mast cell degranulation. P. scandens has a potential as allergic anti- asthmatic agent.

  11. Recent advances in mast cell clonality and anaphylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Akin, Cem

    2009-01-01

    Clonal expansion of mast cells carrying the D816V c-kit mutation results in mastocytosis. Recent studies identified the presence of clonal mast cells carrying this mutation in patients with anaphylaxis without classic diagnostic findings of systemic mastocytosis.

  12. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of rodent mast cells and mast cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily J; Iwaki, Shoko;

    2006-01-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell activation, with subsequent mediator release, is a major initiator of the inflammatory allergic response associated with such conditions as asthma. A comprehensive understanding of the principles involved in this process therefore is key to the development of novel...... therapies for the treatment of these disease states. In vitro models of mast cell function have allowed significant progress to be made in the recognition of the fundamental principles of mast cell activation via the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcvarepsilonRI) and, more recently, other receptors expressed...

  13. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease. PMID:25959386

  14. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Kirshenbaum, Arnold; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    conducted in rodent mast cells. However, to understand how these responses pertain to human disease, and to investigate and develop novel therapies for the treatment of human mast cell-driven disease, human mast cell models may have greater relevance. Recently, a number of systems have been developed to...

  15. Are mast cells instrumental for fibrotic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eOvered-Sayer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a fatal lung disorder of unknown etiology characterised by accumulation of lung fibroblasts and extracellular matrix deposition, ultimately leading to compromised tissue architecture and lung function capacity. IPF has a heterogeneous clinical course; however the median survival after diagnosis is only 3-5 years. The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry has made many attempts to find effective treatments for IPF, but the disease has so far defied all attempts at therapeutic intervention. Clinical trial failures may arise for many reasons, including disease heterogeneity, lack of readily measurable clinical end points other than overall survival, and, perhaps most of all, a lack of understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of the progression of IPF.The precise link between inflammation and fibrosis remains unclear, but it appears that immune cells can promote fibrosis by releasing fibrogenic factors. So far, however, therapeutic approaches targeting macrophages, neutrophils, or lymphocytes have failed to alter disease pathogenesis. A new cell to garner research interest in fibrosis is the mast cell. Increased numbers of mast cells have long been known to be present in pulmonary fibrosis and clinically correlations between mast cells and fibrosis have been reported. More recent data suggests that mast cells may contribute to the fibrotic process by stimulating fibroblasts resident in the lung, thus driving the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss the mast cell and its physiological role in tissue repair and remodelling, as well as its pathological role in fibrotic diseases such as IPF, where the process of tissue repair and remodelling is thought to be dysregulated.

  16. Mast cells contribute to peripheral tolerance and attenuate autoimmune vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A; Ooi, Joshua D; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Tan, Diana S Y; Muljadi, Ruth C M; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2012-12-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (Kit(W-sh/W-sh)) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph nodes draining the sites of immunization had fewer Tregs and reduced production of IL-10 in mice lacking mast cells. Reconstituting these mice with mast cells significantly increased the numbers of Tregs in the lymph nodes and attenuated both autoimmunity and severity of disease. After immunization with myeloperoxidase, mast cells migrated from the skin to the lymph nodes to contact Tregs. In an ex vivo assay, mast cells enhanced Treg suppression through IL-10. Reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice with IL-10-deficient mast cells led to enhanced autoimmunity to myeloperoxidase and greater disease severity compared with reconstitution with IL-10-intact mast cells. Taken together, these studies establish a role for mast cells in mediating peripheral tolerance to myeloperoxidase, protecting them from the development of focal necrotizing GN in ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23138486

  17. Different mouse mast cell populations express various combinations of at least six distinct mast cell serine proteases.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, D. S.; Stevens, R L; Lane, W S; Carr, M H; Austen, K. F.; Serafin, W E

    1990-01-01

    Mouse serosal mast cells (SMCs) and Kirsten sarcoma virus-immortalized mast cells store large amounts of mast cell carboxypeptidase A and serine proteases in their secretory granules. Secretory granule proteins from 2.6 x 10(6) purified SMCs were separated by NaDodSO4/PAGE, trans-blotted to poly(vinylidine difluoride) membranes, and subjected to amino-terminal amino acid sequencing. Four distinct mast cell serine proteases were identified. With mast cell carboxypeptidase A, these serine prote...

  18. The SNARE machinery in mast cell secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eLorentz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators – stored in granules – as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF Attachment Protein (SNAP Receptors (SNARE proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, SCAMPs, complexins or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion.

  19. Mast cells as regulators of T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eBulfone-Paus

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are recognized to participate in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Owing to their strategic location at the host-environment interface they control tissue homeostasis and are key cells for starting early host defence against intruders. Upon degranulation induced, e.g. by immunoglobulin E (IgE and allergen-mediated engagement of the high-affinity IgE receptor, complement or certain neuropeptide receptors, mast cells release a wide variety of preformed and newly synthesized products including proteases, lipid mediators, and many cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests a regulatory role for mast cells in inflammatory diseases via the regulation of T cell activities. Furthermore, rather than only serving as effector cells, mast cells are now recognized to induce T cell activation, recruitment, proliferation and cytokine secretion in an antigen-dependent manner and to impact on regulatory T cells. This review synthesizes recent developments in mast cell-T cell interactions, discusses their biological and clinical relevance, and explores recent controversies in this field of mast cell research.

  20. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions. PMID:26714690

  1. Mast cell chemotaxis - chemoattractants and signaling pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Dráber, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, May (2012), s. 119. ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759 Grant ostatní: ECST(XE) BM1007; AV ČR(CZ) MC200520901 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cell * IgE receptor * plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Mast Cells Contribute to Peripheral Tolerance and Attenuate Autoimmune Vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A.; Ooi, Joshua D.; O’Sullivan, Kim M.; Tan, Diana S.Y.; Muljadi, Ruth C.M.; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph no...

  3. Rat embryonic mast cells originate in the AGM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Farchi Guiraldelli

    Full Text Available Mast cells originate from pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Two mast cell specific antibodies, mAbsAA4 and BGD6, have previously been used to identify and study committed mast cell precursors (MCcps in the bone marrow of adult mice and rats. However, the embryonic origin of MCcps is still not known. In the present study, we identified MCcps in rat embryos using these previously characterized mast cell specific antibodies. The MCcps were found in the AGM (aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of rat embryos at E11.5. These cells were BGD6+, CD34(+, c-kit(+, CD13(+, FcεRI(-, AA4(- CD40(-, and Thy-1(-. By PCR the cells contained message for the α and β subunits of FcεRI and mast cell specific proteases. In vitro, the MCcps differentiated into metachromatic mast cells. With age of gestation the percent of MCcps diminished while the percent of mast cell progenitors increased. An increased knowledge of the biology and embryonic origin of mast cells may contribute to a greater understanding of allergy, asthma, and other mast cell related diseases.

  4. Quantifying mast cells in bladder pain syndrome by immunohistochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.S.; Mortensen, S.; Nordling, J.;

    2008-01-01

    . frequency and nocturia), as > 28 mast cells/mm(2) is defined as mastocytosis and correlated with clinical outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS The current enzymatic staining method (naphtolesterase) on 10 mu m sections for quantifying mast cells is complicated. In the present study, 61 patients had detrusor...... sections between, respectively. Mast cells were counted according to a well-defined procedure. RESULTS The old and the new methods, on 10 and 3 mu m sections, showed a good correlation between mast cell counts. When using tryptase staining and 3 mu m sections, the mast cell number correlated well with the...... clinical score (Spearman's. 0.576; 95% confidence interval 0.155-0.820) and 27 mast cells/mm(2) was the threshold suggesting mastocytosis. CONCLUSIONS We recommend taking biopsies from the detrusor of patients with suspected BPS and examining them with tryptase-stained 3 mu m thick sections, with every...

  5. Central nervous system mast cells in peripheral inflammatory nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellmeier Wilfried

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional aspects of mast cell-neuronal interactions remain poorly understood. Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of powerful pro-inflammatory mediators such as histamine and cytokines. Cerebral dural mast cells have been proposed to modulate meningeal nociceptor activity and be involved in migraine pathophysiology. Little is known about the functional role of spinal cord dural mast cells. In this study, we examine their potential involvement in nociception and synaptic plasticity in superficial spinal dorsal horn. Changes of lower spinal cord dura mast cells and their contribution to hyperalgesia are examined in animal models of peripheral neurogenic and non-neurogenic inflammation. Results Spinal application of supernatant from activated cultured mast cells induces significant mechanical hyperalgesia and long-term potentiation (LTP at spinal synapses of C-fibers. Lumbar, thoracic and thalamic preparations are then examined for mast cell number and degranulation status after intraplantar capsaicin and carrageenan. Intradermal capsaicin induces a significant percent increase of lumbar dural mast cells at 3 hours post-administration. Peripheral carrageenan in female rats significantly increases mast cell density in the lumbar dura, but not in thoracic dura or thalamus. Intrathecal administration of the mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate or the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk inhibitor BAY-613606 reduce the increased percent degranulation and degranulated cell density of lumbar dural mast cells after capsaicin and carrageenan respectively, without affecting hyperalgesia. Conclusion The results suggest that lumbar dural mast cells may be sufficient but are not necessary for capsaicin or carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia.

  6. Mast cells in the sheep, hedgehog and rat forebrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    MICHALOUDI, HELEN C.; PAPADOPOULOS, GEORGIOS C.

    1999-01-01

    The study was designed to reveal the distribution of various mast cell types in the forebrain of the adult sheep, hedgehog and rat. Based on their histochemical and immunocytochemical characteristics, mast cells were categorised as (1) connective tissue-type mast cells, staining metachromatically purple with the toluidine blue method, or pale red with the Alcian blue/safranin method, (2) mucosal-type or immature mast cells staining blue with the Alcian blue/safranin method and (3) serotonin immunopositive mast cells. All 3 types of brain mast cells in all species studied were located in both white and grey matter, often associated with intraparenchymal blood vessels. Their distribution pattern exhibited interspecies differences, while their number varied considerably not only between species but also between individuals of each species. A distributional left-right asymmetry, with more cells present on the left side, was observed in all species studied but it was most prominent in the sheep brain. In the sheep, mast cells were abundantly distributed in forebrain areas, while in the hedgehog and the rat forebrain, mast cells were less widely distributed and were relatively or substantially fewer in number respectively. A limited number of brain mast cells, in all 3 species, but primarily in the rat, were found to react both immunocytochemically to 5-HT antibody and histochemically with Alcian blue/safranin staining. PMID:10634696

  7. Mast cell degranulation – a mechanism for the anti-arrhythmic effect of endothelin-1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, SK; Kane, KA; Wainwright, CL

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the previously reported anti-arrhythmic effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is mediated by degranulation of cardiac mast cells prior to myocardial ischaemia. Experimental approach: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either ET-1 (1.6 nmol·kg−1) in the presence or absence of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG; 20 mg·kg−1·h−1) prior to coronary artery occlusion (CAO). In separate experiments rats were given compound 48/80 (50 µg·kg−1) to compare the effects of ET-1 with those of a known mast cell degranulator. Ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias were detected through continuous monitoring of a lead I electrocardiogram. After 30 min of CAO, the hearts were removed and mast cell degranulation determined by histological analysis. A parallel series of sham groups were performed to determine the direct effects of ET-1 and compound 48/80 on mast cell degranulation in the absence of ischaemia. Key results: ET-1 and compound 48/80 both exerted profound anti-arrhythmic effects, significantly reducing the total number of ventricular ectopic beats (P DSCG infusion prior to CAO. In sham animals ET-1 and compound 48/80 both induced mast cell degranulation (P DSCG, confirming their ability to induce degranulation of mast cells. Conclusions and implications: These results demonstrate for the first time that when given prior to ischaemia ET-1 mediates its anti-arrhythmic effects, at least in part, via cardiac mast cell degranulation. PMID:19422371

  8. Mast cell degranulation induced by chlorogenic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Fang-hua; Zhang, Xin-yue; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Li, Qin; Ni, Bin; Zheng, Xiao-liang; CHEN, AI-JUN

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanism of chlorogenic acid (CA)-induced anaphylactoid reactions. Methods: Degranulation of peritoneal mast cells was assayed by using alcian blue staining in guinea pigs, and the degranulation index (DI) was calculated. CA-induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells was also observed and assayed using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and β-hexosaminidase release. Results: CA 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mmol/L was able to promote degranulation of ...

  9. Stereological quantification of mast cells in human synovium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Herlin, T;

    1999-01-01

    synovium, using stereological techniques. Different methods of staining and quantification have previously been used for mast cell quantification in human synovium. Stereological techniques provide precise and unbiased information on the number of cell profiles in two-dimensional tissue sections of, in......Mast cells participate in both the acute allergic reaction as well as in chronic inflammatory diseases. Earlier studies have revealed divergent results regarding the quantification of mast cells in the human synovium. The aim of the present study was therefore to quantify these cells in the human...... this case, human synovium. In 10 patients suffering from osteoarthritis a median of 3.6 mast cells/mm2 synovial membrane was found. The total number of cells (synoviocytes, fibroblasts, lymphocytes, leukocytes) present was 395.9 cells/mm2 (median). The mast cells constituted 0.8% of all the cell...

  10. Mast cells and angiogenesis in primary and recurrent pterygia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Hüsniye DİLEK

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Pterygium is a common benign lesion of limbus but the pathogenesis are not completely understood. Pterygia have a chronic inflammatory cellular infiltrate and a rich vasculature. Mast cells are a heterogeneous group of multifunctional tissue-resident cells. It has been suggested that mast cells and their products may be responsible for the formation of new blood vessels. We investigated the number and phenotype of mast cells and neovascularization in pterygia specimens and compared with those in normal conjunctival specimensPterygia tissues were obtained during excisional surgery from 32 eyes of 32 consecutive patients. Seventeen of all cases were recurrent pterygia. Superior bulbar conjunctival tissue from the same eye was also sampled as control tissues. The tissue sections were stained with routine hematoxyline-eosin and toluidine blue stain for mast cells. For immunohistochemical studies anti-factor VIII-related antigen, monoclonal anti human mast cell tryptase and chymase were used as an endothelial and mast cell marker.The mean number of mast cells in pterygia was significantly higher than that in the normal conjunctival tissue and microvessel counts was significantly higher than the counts of the controls in both primary and recurrent pterygia. There was no correlation between microvessel numbers and mast cell numbers. There was no phenotypic difference between the mast cells in the ptergyia and those in the normal conjunctival tissues.This study confirms that mast cells are prominent in pterygia and our results suggest that mast cells and angiogenesis are independent factors in the genesis and progress of ptergyium.

  11. Drug hypersensitivity in clonal mast cell disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonadonna, P; Pagani, M; Aberer, W;

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a clonal disorder characterized by the proliferation and accumulation of mast cells (MC) in different tissues, with a preferential localization in skin and bone marrow (BM). The excess of MC in mastocytosis as well as the increased releasability of MC may lead to a higher frequency...... serum tryptase determination, physical examination for cutaneous mastocytosis lesions, and clinical characteristics of anaphylactic reaction might be useful for differential diagnosis. In this position paper, the ENDA group performed a literature search on immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions in...

  12. The impact of mast cells on cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritikou, Eva; Kuiper, Johan; Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells comprise an innate immune cell population, which accumulates in tissues proximal to the outside environment and, upon activation, augments the progression of immunological reactions through the release and diffusion of either pre-formed or newly generated mediators. The released products of mast cells include histamine, proteases, as well as a variety of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, which act on the surrounding microenvironment thereby shaping the immune responses triggered in various diseased states. Mast cells have also been detected in the arterial wall and are implicated in the onset and progression of numerous cardiovascular diseases. Notably, modulation of distinct mast cell actions using genetic and pharmacological approaches highlights the crucial role of this cell type in cardiovascular syndromes. The acquired evidence renders mast cells and their mediators as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in a broad spectrum of pathophysiological conditions related to cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25959384

  13. Mast cells and eosinophils in invasive breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory cells in the tumour stroma has gained increasing interest recently. Thus, we aimed to study the frequency and prognostic impact of stromal mast cells and tumour infiltrating eosinophils in invasive breast carcinomas. Tissue microarrays containing 234 cases of invasive breast cancer were prepared and analysed for the presence of stromal mast cells and eosinophils. Tumour infiltrating eosinophils were counted on hematoxylin-eosin slides. Immunostaining for tryptase was done and the total number of mast cells were counted and correlated to the proliferation marker Ki 67, positivity for estrogen and progesterone receptors, clinical parameters and clinical outcome. Stromal mast cells were found to correlate to low grade tumours and estrogen receptor positivity. There was a total lack of eosinophils in breast cancer tumours. A high number of mast cells in the tumours correlated to low-grade tumours and estrogen receptor positivity. Eosinophils are not tumour infiltrating in breast cancers

  14. Malignant mast cell tumor in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J T; White, M R; Janovitz, E B

    1997-01-01

    In November 1995, a malignant mast cell tumor (mastocytoma) was diagnosed in an adult African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) from a zoological park (West Lafayette, Indiana, USA). The primary mast cell tumor presented as a firm subcutaneous mass along the ventrum of the neck. Metastasis to the right submandibular lymph node occurred. PMID:9027702

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cells, immune effector cells produced from bone marrow cells, play a major role in immunoglobulin E–mediated allergic responses. Ionizing radiation affects the functions of mast cells, which are involved in radiation-induced tissue damage. However, whether ionizing radiation affects the differential induction of mast cells is unknown. Here we investigated whether bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells. To induce mast cells, bone marrow cells from X-irradiated and unirradiated mice were cultured in the presence of cytokines required for mast cell induction. Although irradiation at 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy decreased the number of bone marrow cells 1 day post-irradiation, the cultured bone marrow cells of X-irradiated and unirradiated mice both expressed mast cell–related cell-surface antigens. However, the percentage of mast cells in the irradiated group was lower than in the unirradiated group. Similar decreases in the percentage of mast cells induced in the presence of X-irradiation were observed 10 days post irradiation, although the number of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice had recovered by this time. Analysis of mast cell function showed that degranulation of mast cells after immunoglobulin E–mediated allergen recognition was significantly higher in the X-irradiated group compared with in the unirradiated group. In conclusion, bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells, but ionizing radiation affected the differentiation efficiency and function of mast cells. (author)

  16. Study of mast cell count in skin tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Hesham

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin tags or acrochordons are common tumors of middle-aged and elderly subjects. They consist of loose fibrous tissue and occur mainly on the neck and major flexures as small, soft, pedunculated protrusions. Objectives: The aim was to compare the mast cells count in skin tags to adjacent normal skin in diabetic and nondiabetic participants in an attempt to elucidate the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of skin tags. Participants and Methods: Thirty participants with skin tags were divided into group I (15 nondiabetic participants and group II (15 diabetic participants. Three biopsies were obtained from each participant: a large skin tag, a small skin tag and adjacent normal skin. Mast cell count from all the obtained sections was carried out, and the mast cell density was expressed as the average mast cell count/high power field (HPF. Results: A statistically significant increase in mast cells count in skin tags in comparison to normal skin was detected in group I and group II. There was no statistically significant difference between mast cell counts in skin tags of both the groups. Conclusion: Both the mast cell mediators and hyperinsulinemia are capable of inducing fibroblast proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia that are the main pathologic abnormalities seen in all types of skin tags. However, the presence of mast cells in all examined skin tags regardless of diabetes and obesity may point to the possible crucial role of mast cells in the etiogenesis of skin tags through its interaction with fibroblasts and keratinocytes.

  17. Microbes taming mast cells: Implications for allergic inflammation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Paul

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing awareness of a relationship between our microbiota and the pathogenesis of allergy and other inflammatory diseases. In investigating the mechanisms underlying microbiota modulation of allergy the focus has been on the induction phase; alterations in the phenotype and function of antigen presenting cells, induction of regulatory T cells and shifts in Th1/Th2 balance. However there is evidence that microbes can influence the effector phase of disease, specifically that certain potentially beneficial bacteria can attenuate mast cell activation and degranulation. Furthermore, it appears that different non-pathogenic bacteria can utilize distinct mechanisms to stabilize mast cells, acting locally though direct interaction with the mast cell at mucosal sites or attenuating systemic mast cell dependent responses, likely through indirect signaling mechanisms. The position of mast cells on the frontline of defense against pathogens also suggests they may play an important role in fostering the host-microbiota relationship. Mast cells are also conduits of neuro-immuo-endocrine communication, suggesting the ability of microbes to modulate cell responses may have implications for host physiology beyond immunology. Further investigation of mast cell regulation by non-pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria will likely lead to a greater understanding of host microbiota interaction and the role of the microbiome in health and disease. PMID:26130124

  18. Role of mast cells in gastrointestinal mucosal defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penissi, Alicia B; Rudolph, María I; Piezzi, Ramón S

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this review, based on studies from our laboratory as well as from others, is to summarize salient features of mast cell immunobiology and to describe their associations with gastrointestinal mucosal defense. Gastrointestinal mast cells are involved in many pathologic effects, such as food hypersensitivity. On the other hand, they also play a protective role in defense against parasitic and microbial infections. Thus, they have both positive and negative effects, but presently the mechanisms that control the balance of these various effects are poorly known. It has been suggested that stabilization of mast cells may be a key mechanism to protect the gastrointestinal tract from injury. Few molecules are known to possess both mast cell stabilizing and gastrointestinal cytoprotective activity. These include zinc compounds, sodium cromoglycate, FPL 52694, ketotifen, aloe vera, certain flavonoids such as quercetin, some sulfated proteoglycans such as chondroitin sulfate and dehydroleucodine. Dehydroleucodine, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia douglasiana Besser, exhibits anti-inflammatory and gastrointestinal cytoprotective action. The lactone stimulates mucus production, and inhibits histamine and serotonin release from intestinal mast cells. The lactone could act as a selective mast cell stabilizer by releasing cytoprotective factors and inhibiting pro-inflammatory mast cell mediators. PMID:14510234

  19. Mast Cells Contribute to Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, J; Millington, O; Millhouse, E; Campbell, L; Adrados Planell, A; Butcher, J P; Lawrence, C; Ross, K; Ramage, G; McInnes, I B; Culshaw, S

    2016-06-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory and bone-destructive disease. Development of periodontitis is associated with dysbiosis of the microbial community, which may be caused by periodontal bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis Mast cells are sentinels at mucosal surfaces and are a potent source of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factors (TNF), although their role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis remains to be elucidated. This study sought to determine the contribution of mast cells to local bone destruction following oral infection with P. gingivalis Mast cell-deficient mice (Kit(W-sh/W-sh)) were protected from P. gingivalis-induced alveolar bone loss, with a reduction in anti-P. gingivalis serum antibody titers compared with wild-type infected controls. Furthermore, mast cell-deficient mice had reduced expression of Tnf, Il6, and Il1b mRNA in gingival tissues compared with wild-type mice. Mast cell-engrafted Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice infected with P. gingivalis demonstrated alveolar bone loss and serum anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers equivalent to wild-type infected mice. The expression of Tnf mRNA in gingival tissues of Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice was elevated following the engraftment of mast cells, indicating that mast cells contributed to the Tnf transcript in gingival tissues. In vitro, mast cells degranulated and released significant TNF in response to oral bacteria, and neutralizing TNF in vivo abrogated alveolar bone loss following P. gingivalis infection. These data indicate that mast cells and TNF contribute to the immunopathogenesis of periodontitis and may offer therapeutic targets. PMID:26933137

  20. Mast cells and gastrointestinal dysmotility in the cystic fibrosis mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C De Lisle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF has many effects on the gastrointestinal tract and a common problem in this disease is poor nutrition. In the CF mouse there is an innate immune response with a large influx of mast cells into the muscularis externa of the small intestine and gastrointestinal dysmotility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of mast cells in gastrointestinal dysmotility using the CF mouse (Cftr(tm1UNC, Cftr knockout. METHODOLOGY: Wild type (WT and CF mice were treated for 3 weeks with mast cell stabilizing drugs (ketotifen, cromolyn, doxantrazole or were treated acutely with a mast cell activator (compound 48/80. Gastrointestinal transit was measured using gavage of a fluorescent tracer. RESULTS: In CF mice gastric emptying at 20 min post-gavage did not differ from WT, but was significantly less than in WT at 90 min post-gavage. Gastric emptying was significantly increased in WT mice by doxantrazole, but none of the mast cell stabilizers had any significant effect on gastric emptying in CF mice. Mast cell activation significantly enhanced gastric emptying in WT mice but not in CF mice. Small intestinal transit was significantly less in CF mice as compared to WT. Of the mast cell stabilizers, only doxantrazole significantly affected small intestinal transit in WT mice and none had any effect in CF mice. Mast cell activation resulted in a small but significant increase in small intestinal transit in CF mice but not WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that mast cells are not involved in gastrointestinal dysmotility but their activation can stimulate small intestinal transit in cystic fibrosis.

  1. Regulatory T cells Enhance Mast Cell Production of IL-6 via Surface-bound TGFβ1

    OpenAIRE

    Ganeshan, Kirthana; Bryce, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cell degranulation is a hallmark of allergic reactions but mast cells can also produce many cytokines that modulate immunity. Recently, CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to inhibit mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis but their influence on cytokine production remained unknown. Here, we show that, rather than inhibit, Tregs actually enhance mast cell production of IL-6. We demonstrate that, while inhibition of degranulation was OX40/OX40L dependent, enhancement of IL-6 ...

  2. Eosinophilic Coronary Periarteritis with Arterial Dissection: The Mast Cell Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Rakesh; Brooks, Erin G; Corliss, Robert F

    2015-07-01

    A subset of coronary arterial dissections is associated with eosinophilic coronary periarteritis (ECPA); however, the pathogenesis of the process remains unclear. Mast cells normally reside in coronary arterial adventitia and are known mediators of eosinophilic inflammatory conditions such as type I hypersensitivity reactions. We report two cases in which coronary arterial dissection with ECPA was detected at autopsy. Tryptase, CD68, CD4, CD8, and CD1a immunohistochemical staining was performed to better characterize inflammation. While eosinophils represented a prominent periadventitial inflammatory cell, there were slightly more lymphocytes: CD4/CD8 ratios were within expected reference ranges. There were moderate numbers of macrophages, and few neutrophils or dendritic cells. Numbers of mast cells in dissected versus nondissected sections were compared: adventitial mast cell densities were threefold higher in dissected portions and showed a trend toward increased degranulation. These findings suggest that mast cells may play a role in orchestrating inflammation in cases of ECPA. PMID:25771824

  3. Effect of fexofenadine,a mast cell blocker,in infertile men with significantly increased testicular mast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CayaS; ApaDD

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the role of fexofenadine,a mast cell blocker,on semen quality in the treatment of infertile men.Methods:The study included 16 Turkish idiopathic infertile men with azoospermia or oligozoospermia who underwent testicular biopsy to examine maxt cells containing tryptase.In all patients,a complete metical history,clinical examination,semen analysis and serum hormone assay were carried out.The biopsy specimens were immunohistochemically stained with antihuman tryptase for mast cells.The number of total mast cells per seminiferous tubule was calculated and recorded as mast cell index.The patients were divided into two groups according to their mast cell index:the higher (≥1,n=9) and the lower (<1,n=7) index groups.Fexofenadine was administered orally at a dose of 180mg/day for 4 to 9 months.Pre-and post-treatment semen parameters,including total motile sperm counts(TMC) were recorded and compared.spontaneous pregnancies after the treatment were registered.Results:There was no statistically significant difference in TMC between the pre-treatment and post-treatment values in patients with higher and lower mast cell index(P≥0.05).In both groups,nobody had a significant response to the treatment and there was no spontaneous pregnancy after the treatment.Conclusion:Althought testicular dysfunction is closely associated with increased number of testicular mast cells,fexofenadine,a mast cell blocker,appears not having any benefit in the treatment of Turkish infertile men with a significant increase in testicular mast cells.

  4. Effect of propolis extract on guines pig lung mast cell

    OpenAIRE

    R. O. Orsi; J. M. SFORCIN; S. R. C. FUNARI; J.C. Gomes

    2005-01-01

    The direct effect of ethanolic extract of propolis on guinea pig lung cell suspension containing mast cells, as well as its influence on the histamine release induced by antigen (ovoalbumin 10 mug/ml) and ionophore A 23187 (3 muM) were investigated. Propolis ethanolic extract (300 mug/ml) increased the histamine release in guinea pig lung suspension containing mast cells by a cytotoxic effect. Lower concentrations of propolis had no effect on histamine release. Our results demonstrated that p...

  5. Quantification of mast cells in different stages of periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Mast cells are mononuclear cells originating from bone marrow. They produce various biologically active substances, which allow them to actively participate in immune and inflammatory processes associated with periodontal disease. The study focused on distribution and density of mast cells in healthy gingiva as well as in different stages of periodontal disease. Methods. The material used for this purpose was gingival biopsies taken from 96 patients classified into 4 groups: healthy gingiva, gingivitis, initial and severe periodontal disease. Toluidine blue staining according to Spicer was utilized for identifying mast cells. Results. Basing on our study, the density of mast cells in the gingival tissue increases with the progression of the infection, which means they are more numerous in gingivitis compared to healthy gingiva, as well as in periodontal disease compared to gingivitis. Conclusion. Increase in the number of mast cells in the infected gingiva can be correlated with an increased influx of inflammatory cells from blood circulation into the gingival stroma, as well as with the collagen lysis, since these cells produce substances with collagenolytic potential. Based on the distribution of mast cells, it could be concluded that in the evolution of periodontal disease there are significant dynamic alterations in migration and localization of these cells.

  6. Histamine from Brain Resident MAST Cells Promotes Wakefulness and Modulates Behavioral States

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko Chikahisa; Tohru Kodama; Atsushi Soya; Yohei Sagawa; Yuji Ishimaru; Hiroyoshi Séi; Seiji Nishino

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing espec...

  7. Increased dermal mast cell prevalence and susceptibility to development of basal cell carcinoma in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Skov, Lone; Finlay-Jones, John J;

    2002-01-01

    dermal area (expressed as mast cells per square millimeter). This technique enabled us to detect heterogeneity of dermal mast cell prevalence in buttock skin between individuals and provided evidence of an association between high dermal mast cell prevalence and BCC development in two diverse populations...

  8. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  9. Distribution of mast cells in the rabbit oral mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    ERPEK, Dr.Semra; OTLU, Dr. Ali

    1995-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by light microscopy in various oral mucosal sites (tongue, cheek, palate, gingiva) of the rabbits. Materials were fixed in Camoy, IFAA, formalin solutions and embedded in paraffin. Four consecutive sections were taken from each sample. The first section was stained by Crossmann's triple staining method, the second and third with toluidine blue, for 1 minute and 7 days and tie last section was double stained in astra blue safranine. Mast cells in these sections were ...

  10. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast

  11. Mast cells, peptides and cardioprotection - an unlikely marriage?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, S K

    2012-01-31

    1 Mast cells have classically been regarded as the \\'bad guys\\' in the setting of acute myocardial ischaemia, where their released contents are believed to contribute both to tissue injury and electrical disturbances resulting from ischaemia. Recent evidence suggests, however, that if mast cell degranulation occurs in advance of ischaemia onset, this may be cardioprotective by virtue of the depletion of mast cell contents that can no longer act as instruments of injury when the tissue becomes ischaemic. 2 Many peptides, such as ET-1, adrenomedullin, relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide, have been demonstrated to be cardioprotective when given prior to the onset of myocardial ischaemia, although their physiological functions are varied and the mechanisms of their cardioprotective actions appear to be diverse and often ill defined. However, one common denominator that is emerging is the ability of these peptides to modulate mast cell degranulation, raising the possibility that peptide-induced mast cell degranulation or stabilization may hold the key to a common mechanism of their cardioprotection. 3 The aim of this review was to consolidate the evidence implying that mast cell degranulation could play both a detrimental and protective role in myocardial ischaemia, depending upon when it occurs, and that this may underlie the cardioprotective effects of a range of diverse peptides that exerts physiological effects within the cardiovascular system.

  12. Participation of mast cells in chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajor, Anna; Danilewicz, Marian; Jankowski, Andrzej; Durko, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media (COM), much attention is paid to the molecular mechanisms of local inflammatory reactions in which mast cells (MCs) may be involved due to their role not only in allergic but also inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to assess the density of mast cells in chronic otitis media in relationship to different clinical courses of COM, bacterial infections and types of disease. The MCs expression was measured immunohistochemically in paraffin-embedded granulation tissue specimens taken during surgery, by staining with a monoclonal antibody against tryptase. The density of tryptase-positive mast cells was lower in tissue samples from the group with a good clinical course than in those from the group with poor healing and recurrence (p = 0.006). There were no differences between the groups of patients with granulomatous and cholesteatomatous chronic otitis media (p = 0.66) or between the groups of patients with and without bacterial infection (p = 0.30), although the density of mast cells was lower for those with Pseudomonas aeruginosa/Proteus sp./ /Staphylococcus MRSA infection. In conclusion, the expression of mast cells in chronic otitis media granulation tissue was found to differ depending on the clinical course of the disease, but not on bacterial infection or type of COM. This may suggest that mast cells contribute to the maintenance of the inflammatory process, but not to antibacterial defense in chronic otitis media. PMID:22038229

  13. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  14. Mast cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Grizzi; Barbara Franceschini; Maurizio Chiriva-Internati; Young Liu; Paul L. Hermonat; Nicola Dioguardi

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the density of mast cells (MCs) in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and to determine whether the MCs density has any correlations with histopathological grading, staging or some baseline patient characteristics.METHODS: Tissue sections of 22 primary HCCs were histochemically stained with toluidine blue, in order to be able to quantify the MCs in and around the neoplasm using a computer-assisted image analysis system. HCC was staged and graded by two independent pathologists. To identify the sinusoidal capillarisation of each specimen 3μm thick sections were histochemically stained with sirius red, and semi-quantitatively evaluated by two independent observers. The data were statistically analysed using Spearman′s correlation and Student′s t-test when appropriate.RESULTS: MCs density did not correlate with the age or sex of the patients, the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) or aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, or the stage or grade of the HCC. No significant differences were found between the MCs density of the patients with and without hepatitis C virus infection, but they were significantly higher in the specimens showing marked sinusoidal capillarisation.CONCLUSION: The lack of any significant correlation between MCs density and the stage or grade of the neoplastic lesions suggests that there is no causal relationship between MCs recruitment and HCC. However, as capillarisation proceeds concurrently with arterial blood supply during hepatocarcinogenesis, MCs may be considered of primary importance in the transition from sinusoidal to capillary-type endothelial cells and the HCC growth.

  15. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results of the...... determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out at the...... yielded the following results: (1) in atopic dermatitis lesional skin an increased number of mast cell profiles was found as compared with nonlesional skin, (2) comparing atopic dermatitis skin with normal skin, a significantly increased number of mast cell profiles per millimetre squared was found in...

  16. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  17. Mast cells, brain inflammation and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Stewart, Julia M; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Melamed, Isaac

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that brain inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. Mast cells (MCs) are located perivascularly close to neurons and microglia, primarily in the leptomeninges, thalamus, hypothalamus and especially the median eminence. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is secreted from the hypothalamus under stress and, together with neurotensin (NT), can stimulate brain MCs to release inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators that disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB), stimulate microglia and cause focal inflammation. CRF and NT synergistically stimulate MCs and increase vascular permeability; these peptides can also induce each other׳s surface receptors on MCs leading to autocrine and paracrine effects. As a result, brain MCs may be involved in the pathogenesis of "brain fog," headaches, and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), which worsen with stress. CRF and NT are significantly increased in serum of ASD children compared to normotypic controls further strengthening their role in the pathogenesis of autism. There are no clinically affective treatments for the core symptoms of ASDs, but pilot clinical trials using natural-antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecules reported statistically significant benefit. PMID:25941080

  18. Mast Cells Regulate Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, Ana; Leal, Ermelindo C; Kafanas, Antonios; Auster, Michael E; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Ostrovsky, Yana; Tecilazich, Francesco; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Zheng, Yongjun; Carvalho, Eugénia; Zabolotny, Janice M; Weng, Zuyi; Petra, Anastasia; Patel, Arti; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Veves, Aristidis

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes that lacks effective treatment. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to wound healing, but their role in diabetes skin complications is poorly understood. Here we show that the number of degranulated MCs is increased in unwounded forearm and foot skin of patients with diabetes and in unwounded dorsal skin of diabetic mice (P diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the MC degranulation inhibitor disodium cromoglycate rescues diabetes-associated wound-healing impairment in mice and shifts macrophages to the regenerative M2 phenotype (P diabetic mice deficient in MCs have delayed wound healing compared with their wild-type (WT) controls, implying that some MC mediator is needed for proper healing. MCs are a major source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse skin, but the level of VEGF is reduced in diabetic mouse skin, and its release from human MCs is reduced in hyperglycemic conditions. Topical treatment with the MC trigger substance P does not affect wound healing in MC-deficient mice, but improves it in WT mice. In conclusion, the presence of nondegranulated MCs in unwounded skin is required for proper wound healing, and therapies inhibiting MC degranulation could improve wound healing in diabetes. PMID:27207516

  19. Modulation of mast cell and basophil functions by benzene metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triggiani, Massimo; Loffredo, Stefania; Granata, Francescopaolo; Staiano, Rosaria I; Marone, Gianni

    2011-11-01

    Benzene is a carcinogenic compound used in industrial manufacturing and a common environmental pollutant mostly derived from vehicle emissions and cigarette smoke. Benzene exposure is associated with a variety of clinical conditions ranging from hematologic diseases to chronic lung disorders. Beside its direct toxicity, benzene exerts multiple effects after being converted to reactive metabolites such as hydroquinone and benzoquinone. Mast cells and basophils are primary effector cells involved in the development of respiratory allergies such as rhinitis and bronchial asthma and they play an important role in innate immunity. Benzene and its metabolites can influence mast cell and basophil responses either directly or by interfering with other cells, such as T cells, macrophages and monocytes, which are functionally connected to mast cells and basophils. Hydroquinone and benzoquinone inhibit the release of preformed mediators, leukotriene synthesis and cytokine production in human basophils stimulated by IgE- and non IgE-mediated agonists. Furthermore, these metabolites reduce IgE-mediated degranulation of mast cells and the development of allergic lung inflammation in rats. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that benzene metabolites alter biochemical and functional activities of other immunocompetent cells and may impair immune responses in the lung. These inhibitory effects of benzene metabolites are primarily mediated by interference with early transduction signals such as PI3 kinase. Together, currently available studies indicate that benzene metabolites interfere by multiple mechanisms with the role of basophils and mast cells in innate immunity and in chronic inflammation in the lung. PMID:22103854

  20. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  1. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  2. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  3. Histamine release from rodent and human mast cells induced by protoporphyrin and ultraviolet light: studies of the mechanism of mast-cell activation in erythropoietic protoporphyria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report that protoporphyrin (PP) and ultraviolet light (UVA) induces histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, mouse bone marrow mast cells and human cutaneous mast cells in a dose- and temperature-dependent manner. The mast-cell activation was associated with loss of membrane integrity and inhibited by the hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase. Histamine release was independent of extracellular calcium in the rodent mast cells, but was markedly reduced in the absence of calcium in human cells. These findings indicate that PP and UVA induce mast-cell-mediator release by a process that may involve hydrogen peroxide formation. There appear to be differences in response to PP and UVA between rodent and human mast cells. (author)

  4. Inhibition of mast cell-dependent conversion of cultured macrophages into foam cells with antiallergic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H; Kovanen, P T

    2000-12-01

    Degranulation of isolated, rat peritoneal mast cells in the presence of low density lipoprotein (LDL) induces cholesteryl ester accumulation in cocultured macrophages with ensuing foam cell formation. This event occurs when the macrophages phagocytose LDL particles that have been bound to the heparin proteoglycans of exocytosed granules. In an attempt to inhibit such foam cell formation pharmacologically, rat peritoneal mast cells that had been passively sensitized with anti-ovalbumin-IgE were treated with 2 mast cell-stabilizing antianaphylactic drugs, MY-1250 or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Both drugs were found to inhibit antigen (ovalbumin)-triggered release of histamine from the mast cells, revealing mast cell stabilization. In cocultures of rat peritoneal macrophages and passively sensitized mast cells, addition of MY-1250 before addition of the antigen resulted in parallel reductions in histamine release from mast cells, uptake of [(14)C]sucrose-LDL, and accumulation of LDL-derived cholesteryl esters in the cocultured macrophages. Similarly, when passively sensitized mast cells were stimulated with antigen in the presence of DSCG and the preconditioned media containing all substances released from the drug-treated mast cells were collected and added to macrophages cultured in LDL-containing medium, uptake and esterification of LDL cholesterol by the macrophages were inhibited. The inhibitory effects of both drugs were mast cell-specific because neither drug inhibited the ability of macrophages to take up and esterify LDL cholesterol. Analysis of heparin proteoglycan contents of the incubation media revealed that both drugs had inhibited mast cells from expelling their granule remnants. Thus, both MY-1250 and DSCG prevent mast cells from releasing the heparin proteoglycan-containing vehicles that bind LDL and carry it into macrophages. This study suggests that antiallergic pharmacological agents could be used in animal models to prevent mast cell

  5. Phenotypic variability in human skin mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babina, Magda; Guhl, Sven; Artuc, Metin; Trivedi, Neil N; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are unique constituents of the human body. While inter-individual differences may influence the ways by which MCs operate in their skin habitat, they have not been surveyed in a comprehensive manner so far. We therefore set out to quantify skin MC variability in a large cohort of subjects. Pathophysiologically relevant key features were quantified and correlated: transcripts of c-kit, FcεRIα, FcεRIβ, FcεRIγ, histidine decarboxylase, tryptase, and chymase; surface expression of c-Kit, FcεRIα; activity of tryptase, and chymase; histamine content and release triggered by FcεRI and Ca(2+) ionophore. While there was substantial variability among subjects, it strongly depended on the feature under study (coefficient of variation 33-386%). Surface expression of FcεRI was positively associated with FcεRIα mRNA content, histamine content with HDC mRNA, and chymase activity with chymase mRNA. Also, MC signature genes were co-regulated in distinct patterns. Intriguingly, histamine levels were positively linked to tryptase and chymase activity, whereas tryptase and chymase activity appeared to be uncorrelated. FcεRI triggered histamine release was highly variable and was unrelated to FcεRI expression but unexpectedly tightly correlated with histamine release elicited by Ca(2+) ionophore. This most comprehensive and systematic work of its kind provides not only detailed insights into inter-individual variability in MCs, but also uncovers unexpected patterns of co-regulation among signature attributes of the lineage. Differences in MCs among humans may well underlie clinical responses in settings of allergic reactions and complex skin disorders alike. PMID:26706922

  6. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells. PMID:26648785

  7. Degranulation of human mast cells induces an endothelial antigen central to leukocyte adhesion.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, L M; Lavker, R M; Matis, W L; Murphy, G F

    1989-01-01

    To understand better the role of mast cell secretory products in the genesis of inflammation, a system was developed for in vitro degranulation of human mast cells in skin organ cultures. Within 2 hr after morphine sulfate-induced degranulation, endothelial cells lining microvessels adjacent to affected mast cells expressed an activation antigen important for endothelial-leukocyte adhesion. Identical results were obtained when other mast cell secretagogues (anti-IgE, compound 48/80, and calci...

  8. The relationship of mast cells and angiogenesis with prognosis in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of mast cell count and angiogenesis on the prognosis of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey, and included 64 cases with diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma between 2002 and 2012. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on paraffin sections using the standard streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. CD31 antibodies were used to identify microvessels in tumoural tissues. The microvessel density was calculated using a serological method. The mean vascular density was equivalent to the vascular surface area (in mm) per unit tissue volume (in mm) (MVD=mm). Mast cells tryptase antibody was used to evaluate the mast cell count in tumoural and non-tumoural tissues. The relationship between mast cell count and microvessel density was evaluated and compared with stage, grade, tumour diameter, and age. Results: The mast cell count in the tumoral tissue of renal cell carcinoma was significantly higher compared with non-neoplastic renal tissue (p0.05). The intratumoural mast cell count in clear cell renal carcinoma was significantly higher compared with non-clear variety (p=0.001). No significant relationship was found between microvessel density, age, stage, diameter, or grade of the tumour and tumoral mast cell count (p>0.05). Conclusion: No significant association was found between the number of mast cells in tumoral tissue and microvessel density. Further studies are needed to demonstrate the effect of mast cells on angiogenesis in renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  9. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase regulates mast cell ion channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Rebecca S; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Lang, Camelia; Felder, Edward; Dietl, Paul; Huber, Stephan M; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Stimulation of the mast cell IgE-receptor (FcepsilonRI) by antigen leads to stimulation of Ca(2+) entry with subsequent mast cell degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. Ca(2+) further activates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, which in turn provide the electrical driving force for Ca(2+) entry. Since phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase has previously been shown to be required for mast cell activation and degranulation, we explored, whether mast cell Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels may be sensitive to PI3-kinase activity. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments and Fura-2 fluorescence measurements for determination of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration were performed in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells either treated or untreated with the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY-294002 (10 muM) and wortmannin (100 nM). Antigen-stimulated Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores was dramatically reduced upon PI3-kinase inhibition. Ca(2+) entry was further inhibited by TRPV blocker ruthenium red (10 muM). Ca(2+) entry following readdition after Ca(+)-store depletion with thapsigargin was again decreased by LY-294002, pointing to inhibition of store-operated channels (SOCs). Moreover, inhibition of PI3-kinase abrogated IgE-stimulated, but not ionomycin-induced stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These observations disclose PI3-kinase-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-channels, which in turn participate in triggering mast cell degranulation. PMID:18769043

  10. Mechanisms of glyceryl trinitrate provoked mast cell degranulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Hougaard; Ramachandran, Roshni; Amrutkar, Dipak Vasantrao; Petersen, Steffen; Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Migraine patients develop attacks several hours after intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate. Due to the short half-life of nitric oxide, this delayed migraine cannot be caused by a direct action of nitric oxide derived from glyceryl trinitrate. The involvement of meningeal...... degranulation after a clinically relevant dose of glyceryl trinitrate. RESULTS: A 6-fold increase in degranulation was observed starting at 2 hours after glyceryl trinitrate infusion. Interestingly, pre-treatment with the effective anti-migraine substances L-nitro-arginine methyl ester and sumatriptan prevented...... glyceryl trinitrate-induced mast cell degranulation whereas the calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor antagonist olcegepant and the substance P receptor antagonist L-733,060 did not affect mast cell degranulation. However, topical application of two different nitric oxide donors did not cause mast cell...

  11. Activation of human tonsil and skin mast cells by agonists of proteinase activated receptor-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-heng HE; Hua XIE; Yi-ling FU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of the agonists of proteinase activated receptor (PAR)-2,and histamine on degranulation of human mast cells. Methods: Human mast cells were enzymatically dispersed from tonsil and skin tissues. The dis persed cells were then cultured with various stimuli, and tryptase and histamine levels in cell supernatants collected from challenge tubes were measured. Results:PAR-2 agonist peptide SLIGKV provoked a dose-dependent release of histamine from skin mast cells. It also induced tryptase release from tonsil mast cells, tcLIGRLO appeared less potent than SLIGKV in induction of release of histamine and tryptase. Trypsin was able to induce a "bell" shape increase in tryptase release from tonsil mast cells. It was also able to induce a dose-dependent release of histamine from both tonsil and skin mast cells. The actions of trypsin on mast cells were inhibited by soy bean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) or α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT).Time course study revealed that both stimulated tryptase or histamine release initiated within 10 s and reached their peak release between 4 and 6 min. Pretreatment of cells with metabolic inhibitors or pertussis toxin reduced the ability of mast cells to release tryptase or histamine. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the in vitro tryptase release properties of human tonsil and skin mast cells suggested a novel type of mast cell heterogeneity. The activation of mast cells by PAR-2 agonists indicated a self-amplification mechanism of mast cell degranulation.

  12. Participation of mast cells in chronic otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Durko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media (COM, much attention is paid to the molecular mechanisms of local inflammatory reactions in which mast cells (MCs may be involved due to their role not only in allergic but also inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to assess the density of mast cells in chronic otitis media in relationship to different clinical courses of COM, bacterial infections and types of disease. The MCs expression was measured immunohistochemically in paraffin-embedded granulation tissue specimens taken during surgery, by staining with a monoclonal antibody against tryptase. The density of tryptase-positive mast cells was lower in tissue samples from the group with a good clinical course than in those from the group with poor healing and recurrence (p = 0.006. There were no differences between the groups of patients with granulomatous and cholesteatomatous chronic otitis media (p = 0.66 or between the groups of patients with and without bacterial infection (p = 0.30, although the density of mast cells was lower for those with Pseudomonas aeruginosa/Proteus sp./ /Staphyloccocus MRSA infection. In conclusion, the expression of mast cells in chronic otitis media granulation tissue was found to differ depending on the clinical course of the disease, but not on bacterial infection or type of COM. This may suggest that mast cells contribute to the maintenance of the inflammatory process, but not to antibacterial defense in chronic otitis media. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 3, pp. 479–485

  13. Familial occurrence of systemic mast cell activation disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard J Molderings

    Full Text Available Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD comprises disorders characterized by an enhanced release of mast cell mediators accompanied by accumulation of dysfunctional mast cells. Demonstration of familial clustering would be an important step towards defining the genetic contribution to the risk of systemic MCAD. The present study aimed to quantify familial aggregation for MCAD and to investigate the variability of clinical and molecular findings (e.g. somatic mutations in KIT among affected family members in three selected pedigrees. Our data suggest that systemic MCAD pedigrees include more systemic MCAD cases than would be expected by chance, i.e., compared with the prevalence of MCAD in the general population. The prevalence of MCAD suspected by symptom self-report in first-degree relatives of patients with MCAD amounted to approximately 46%, compared to prevalence in the general German population of about 17% (p<0.0001. In three families with a high familial loading of MCAD, the subtype of MCAD and the severity of mediator-related symptoms varied between family members. In addition, genetic alterations detected in KIT were variable, and included mutations at position 816 of the amino acid sequence. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for common familial occurrence of MCAD. Our findings observed in the three pedigrees together with recent reports in the literature suggest that, in familial cases (i.e., in the majority of MCAD, mutated disease-related operator and/or regulator genes could be responsible for the development of somatic mutations in KIT and other proteins important for the regulation of mast cell activity. Accordingly, the immunohistochemically different subtypes of MCAD (i.e. mast cell activation syndrome and systemic mastocytosis should be more accurately regarded as varying presentations of a common generic root process of mast cell dysfunction, than as distinct diseases.

  14. Ultrastructural similarity between bat and human mast cell secretory granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliani, S M; Vugman, I; Jamur, M C

    1993-01-01

    Mast cells in the tongue of the bat (Artibeus lituratus) show a well-developed Golgi area and abundant mitochondria in the granule-free perinuclear cytoplasm. Rough endoplasmic reticulum profiles, free ribosomes, mitochondria, bundles of filaments and a great number of secretory granules are found throughout the remaining cytoplasm. The granules, of various shapes and sizes, are simple containing an electron-dense, homogeneous matrix, coarse particles or cylindrical scrolls, or combinations (cylindrical scrolls with either electron-dense, homogeneous matrix or coarse particle contents). Up to now, scroll-containing granules have been considered to be a unique feature of human mast cells. PMID:8453310

  15. Apomorphine-induced inhibition of histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Battistella, A.; Boarato, E.; Bruni, A; Mietto, L.; Palatini, P.; Toffano, G.

    1986-01-01

    The apomorphine-induced inhibition of histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells was studied by means of secretagogues stimulating different pathways of mast cell activation. Apomorphine inhibited the mast cell response to all releasing agents (lysophosphatidylserine plus nerve growth factor, compound 48/80, substance P, ATP, tetradecanoylphorbolacetate, melittin). The IC50 ranged from 4 microM to 24 microM at concentrations of secretagogues releasing 30-50% of mast cell histamine. Howeve...

  16. New Roles for Mast Cells in Modulating Allergic Reactions and Immunity Against Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Alison M.; Abraham, Soman N.

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells have primarily been associated with mediating the pathological secondary responses to allergens in sensitized hosts. In view of the recent evidence for a mast cell role in modulating primary immune responses to pathogens, the likelihood for a role of mast cells in influencing primary immune response to allergens has grown. New evidence suggests that mast cells drive the development of Th2 responses to allergens, particularly when allergen exposure occurs concomitantly with exposure...

  17. Mast cell heterogeneity in the gastrointestinal tract: variable expression of mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1) in intraepithelial mucosal mast cells in nematode-infected and normal BALB/c mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Scudamore, C. L.; McMillan, L; Thornton, E. M.; Wright, S H; Newlands, G. F.; Miller, H. R.

    1997-01-01

    Soluble granule chymases in rodent intestinal mucosal mast cells (IMMCs) may play an important role in altering epithelial permeability during immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Using a monoclonal antibody against the chymase mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1), we have shown that it is constitutively expressed in < or = 20% of esterase-positive (esterase+) IMMCs but not in esterase+ gastric mucosal mast cells (GMMCs) in normal BALB/c mice. Intestinal infection with mouse- or rat-adapted s...

  18. Degranulating mast cells in fibrotic regions of human tumors and evidence that mast cell heparin interferes with the growth of tumor cells through a mechanism involving fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells that are present in fibrotic regions of cancer can suppress the growth of tumor cells through an indirect mechanism involving peri-tumoral fibroblasts. We first immunostained a wide variety of human cancers for the presence of degranulated mast cells. In a subsequent series of controlled in vitro experiments, we then co-cultured UACC-812 human breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts in the presence or absence of different combinations and doses of mast cell tryptase, mast cell heparin, a lysate of the human mast cell line HMC-1, and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7), a powerful, heparin-binding growth factor for breast epithelial cells. Degranulating mast cells were localized predominantly in the fibrous tissue of every case of breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease that we examined. Mast cell tryptase and HMC-1 lysate had no significant effect on the clonogenic growth of cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. By contrast, mast cell heparin at multiple doses significantly reduced the size and number of colonies of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, especially in the presence of FGF-7. Neither heparin nor FGF-7, individually or in combination, produced any significant effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured without fibroblasts. Degranulating mast cells are restricted to peri-tumoral fibrous tissue, and mast cell heparin is a powerful inhibitor of clonogenic growth of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. These results may help to explain the well-known ability of heparin to inhibit the growth of primary and metastatic tumors

  19. Mast cell mediator tryptase levels after inhalation or intravenous administration of high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Rook; A.P. van Zanten; W. van den Brink; J.M. van Ree; J.H. Beijnen

    2006-01-01

    Background: Opioids like morphine and heroin induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. The release of mast cell mediators like histamine and tryptase may lead to allergic symptoms. In this study it was investigated whether mast cell mediator release also occurs in vivo in addicted patients who partic

  20. Delayed expulsion of adult Trichinella spiralis by mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, T. Y.; Reed, N D; Crowle, P K

    1983-01-01

    Mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice and their mast cell-sufficient littermates were given infections of Trichinella spiralis. W/Wv mice were slower than their littermates to expel adult T. spiralis. Repair of the mast cell deficiency of W/Wv mice by bone marrow grafting was accompanied by accelerated expulsion of T. spiralis.

  1. Effect of methylmercury on histamine release from rat mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graevskaya, Elizabeth E.; Rubin, Andrew B. [Moscow State University, Biological Faculty, Department of Biophysics, 119899, Vorobjovy Gory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yasutake, Akira; Aramaki, Ryoji [National Institute for Minamata Disease, 4058-18 Hama, Minamata, Kumamoto 867-0008 (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) is well known as a significant environmental hazard, particularly as a modulator of the immune system. As it is acknowledged that the critical effector cells in the host response participating in various biological responses are mast cells, we tried to define the possible contribution of mast cells in the development of methylmercury-evoked effects. We investigated the effects of methylmercury on the rat mast cell degranulation induced by non-immunological stimuli (the selective liberator of histamine, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187) both in vivo and in vitro. Using the cells prepared from methylmercury-intoxicated rats through a 5-day treatment of MeHgCl (10 mg/kg/day), we observed the suppression of calcium ionophore A23187- and 48/80-induced histamine release, which was enhanced with time after treatment. Similar suppression was observed in the ionophore-stimulated release, when cells were prepared from rat with a single treatment of MeHgCl (20 mg/kg). It should be noted that when cells from the control rat were pre-incubated with methylmercury in vitro at a 10{sup -8} M concentration for 10 min, A23187 and compound 48/80-stimulated histamine release was significantly enhanced. However, when the pre-incubation period was prolonged to 30 min, the release was suppressed. An increase in the methylmercury concentration to 10{sup -6} M also suppressed the histamine release. These results show that methylmercury treatment can modify mast cell function depending on concentration and time, and might provide an insight into the role of mast cells in the development of methylmercury-stimulated effects. (orig.)

  2. Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II – like alveolar cell model, in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyström Max

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases. Result We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p Conclusion These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response.

  3. IL-4 and TGF-β1 Counterbalance One Another while Regulating Mast Cell Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Matthew R.; Sturgill, Jamie L.; Morales, Johanna K.; Falanga, Yves T.; Morales, Joshua; Norton, Sarah K.; Yerram, Nitin; Shim, Hoon; Fernando, Josephine; Gifillan, Alasdair M.; Gomez, Gregorio; Schwartz, Lawrence; Oskeritzian, Carole; Spiegel, Sarah; Conrad, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell responses can be altered by cytokines, including those secreted by Th2 and regulatory T cells (Treg). Given the important role of mast cells in Th2-mediated inflammation and recent demonstrations of Treg-mast cell interactions, we examined the ability of IL-4 and TGF-β1 to regulate mast cell homeostasis. Using in vitro and in vivo studies of mouse and human mast cells, we demonstrate that IL-4 suppresses TGF-β1 receptor expression and signaling, and vice versa. In vitro studies demo...

  4. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endotheli...

  5. Mast cells are important modifiers of autoimmune disease: With so much evidence, why is there controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ann Brown

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of mast cell disorders: practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandes, Alex Freire; Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Rizzatti, Edgar Gil

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE The term mastocytosis covers a group of rare disorders characterized by neoplastic proliferation and accumulation of clonal mast cells in one or more organs. The aim of this study was to assess the principal elements for diagnosing and treating these disorders. DESIGN AND SETTING Narrative review of the literature conducted at Grupo Fleury, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS This study reviewed the scientific papers published in the PubMed, Embase (Excerpta Medica Database), Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases that were identified using the search term "mastocytosis." RESULTS The clinical presentation of mastocytosis is remarkably heterogeneous and ranges from skin lesions that may regress spontaneously to aggressive forms associated with organ failure and short survival. Currently, seven subtypes of mastocytosis are recognized through the World Health Organization classification system for hematopoietic tumors. These disorders are diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and on identification of neoplastic mast cells using morphological, immunophenotypic, genetic and molecular methods. Abnormal mast cells display atypical and frequently spindle-shaped morphology, and aberrant expression of the CD25 and CD2 antigens. Elevation of serum tryptase is a common finding in some subtypes, and more than 90% of the patients present the D816V KIT mutation in mast cells. CONCLUSION Here, we described the most common signs and symptoms among patients with mastocytosis and suggested a practical approach for the diagnosis, classification and initial clinical treatment of mastocytosis. PMID:24141298

  7. Methods for the study of mast cells in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatner, Nichole R; Tsai, FuNien; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2015-01-01

    Tumor growth requires interactions of tumor cells with a receptive and inductive microenvironment. Two major populations of tumor-infiltrating cells are considered to be essential for producing such a microenvironment: (1) proinflammatory cells that nurture the tumor with growth factors and facilitate invasion and metastasis by secreting proteases and (2) immune suppressive leukocytes including T-regulatory cells (Treg) that hinder tumor-specific CD8 T-cell responses, which otherwise could potentially reject the tumor. Among the proinflammatory cells, accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in human tumors is frequently recorded and was recently linked with poor prognosis. Causative links between mast cell infiltration and tumor progression can be deduced from animal studies. There is an interesting link between mast cells and Treg. The adoptive transfer of Treg from healthy syngeneic mice to mice susceptible to colon cancer suppresses focal mastocytosis and hinders tumor progression. Furthermore, T-cell-deficient mice susceptible to colon cancer show enhanced focal mastocytosis and tumor invasion. Here, we describe methods to assess MCs in mouse models of cancer and to investigate how MCs affect tumor epithelium. Additionally, we will detail methods used to investigate how T cells influence MCs and how MCs influence T cells. PMID:25388267

  8. Secretory Granule Proteases in Rat Mast Cells. Cloning of 10 Different Serine Proteases and a Carboxypeptidase A from Various Rat Mast Cell Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Lützelschwab, Claudia; Pejler, Gunnar; Aveskogh, Maria; Hellman, Lars

    1997-01-01

    Two of the major rat mast cell proteases, rat mast cell protease 1 (RMCP-1) and RMCP-2, have for many years served as important phenotypic markers for studies of various aspects of mast cell (MC) biology. However, except for these proteases only fragmentary information has been available on the structure and complexity of proteases expressed by different subpopulations of rat MCs. To address these questions, cDNA libraries were constructed from freshly isolated rat peritoneal MCs and from the...

  9. Comparative functional characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells and peritoneal mast cells in response to non-immunological stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R; Kumar, P; Gupta, P P

    2001-04-01

    The cultured mouse mast cells that are dependent on spleen-derived factor for their proliferation and maintenance and have been shown to be similar to mucosal mast cells in terms of their T-cell dependence and histochemical staining characteristics. Mast cell heterogeneity has been confirmed by functional characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (MBMMC) and mouse peritoneal mast cells (MPMCs). MPMCs released around 30% of histamine when stimulated with compound 48/80 whereas MBMMC were almost unresponsive to the same stimulus. Calcium Ionophore A23187 on the other hand, released histamine in dose-dependent manner from MBMMC. The study was undertaken to investigate the effect of antiallergic drug, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), a synthetic cromone and quercetin, a plant-derived flavonoid on Ca ionophore A23187 induced histamine release from MBMMC. MBMMCs were almost unresponsive to DSCG whereas Ca Ionophore induced histamine release was blocked by Quercetin. The results indicate that response of mast cells at one anatomic site to a given stimulus does not necessarily predict the response of mast cells at a different anatomic location to the same stimulus. It shows functional heterogeneity within a single species. So, it cannot be assumed that antiallergic compounds stabilizing mast cells in one tissue site or organ will be equally efficacious against mast cells in other sites. PMID:11491575

  10. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Chen; Megan E Schrementi; Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; Luisa A DiPietro

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally...

  11. Numerical model of dog mast cell tumor treated by electrochemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daniela O H; Anselmo, Jânio; de Oliveira, Krishna D; Freytag, Jennifer O; Rangel, Marcelo M M; Marques, Jefferson L B; Ramos, Airton

    2015-02-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a combination of high electric field and anticancer drugs. The treatment basis is electroporation or electropermeabilization of the cell membrane. Electroporation is a threshold phenomenon and, for efficient treatment, an adequate local distribution of electric field within the treated tissue is important. When this local electric field is not enough, there is a regrown tumor cell; however, if it is stronger than necessary, permanent damage to the tissue occurs. In the treatment of dogs, electrochemotherapy is not yet an established treatment for mast cell tumor in veterinary medicine, although there are studies showing evidence of its effectiveness. In this study, we examined electrochemotherapy of dog mast cell tumor with numerical simulation of local electric field distribution. The experimental result was used to validate the numerical models. The effect of tumor position and tissue thickness (tumor in different parts of dog body) was investigated using plate electrodes. Our results demonstrated that the electrochemotherapy is efficient and flexible, and even when the tumor extends into the subcutis, the treatment with plate electrode eliminated the tumor cells. This result suggests that electrochemotherapy is a suitable method to treat mast cell tumors in dog. PMID:25041415

  12. Cell Wall Polysaccharides of Candida albicans Induce Mast Cell Degranulation in the Gut

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Natsu; Sonoyama, Kei

    2012-01-01

    We investigated Candida albicans-induced mast cell degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Cell wall fraction but not culture supernatant and cell membrane fraction prepared from hyphally grown C. albicans induced β-hexosaminidase release in RBL-2H3 cells. Cell wall mannan and soluble β-glucan fractions also induced β-hexosaminidase release. Histological examination of mouse forestomach showed that C. albicans gut colonization induces mast cell degranulation. However, intragastric administration ...

  13. An autoradiographic study on the mechanism of mast cell hyperplasia evoked by a carcinogen, 20-methylcholanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactive increase of mast cells was studied by means of 3H-thymidine autoradiography. Mice were painted on the back skin with 20-methylcholanthrene twice a week for two to eight weeks. No labeled mast cells were found with flash labeling or fourty-eight hours' cumulative labeling immediately before the sacrifice at the end of varying periods of painting. Subsequently, a cumulative chase method was performed in order to obtain labeled mast cells. Mice were painted with 20-methylcholanthrene for thirty-one days. Twenty-four hours' cumulative labelings were performed 31 (i.e. at the beginning of painting), 21, 14, 7, 5 and 3 days before the sacrifice. In each of these labeling experiments, labeled mast cells were observed. From these results it was concluded that the increase of mast cells in response to an irritation is not due to the proliferation of mast cells themselves but to the proliferation of undifferentiated precursor cells and their differentiation into the mast cells. A histogram of the labeling indices of mast cells in the subepidermal, dermal and subcutaneous layers indicated that, in the early period of painting, a peak of labeling indices of mast cells appeared in the subcutaneous layer, and that, in the late period of painting, a peak of indices appeared in the subepidermal layer. This suggests that mast cells are produced in the subepidermal layer and migrate into the deep layers of the skin. (author)

  14. Mast cells, basophils and B cell connection network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Sonia; Betto, Elena; Ceccaroni, Alice Amaranta; Magris, Raffaella; Giunta, Marina; Mion, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    It has been proven that both resting and activated mast cells (MCs) and basophils are able to induce a significant increase in proliferation and survival of naïve and activated B cells, and their differentiation into antibody-producing cells. The immunological context in which this regulation occurs is of particular interest and the idea that these innate cells induce antibody class switching and production is increasingly gaining ground. This direct role of MCs and basophils in acquired immunity requires cell to cell contact as well as soluble factors and exosomes. Here, we review our current understanding of the interaction between B cells and MCs or basophils as well as the evidence supporting B lymphocyte-MC/basophil crosstalk in pathological settings. Furthermore, we underline the obscure aspects of this interaction that could serve as important starting points for future research in the field of MC and basophil biology in the peculiar context of the connection between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:24671125

  15. Assay of Histamine in Single Mast Cells by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis was employed for the analysis of histamine in single rat peritoneal mast cells using an amperometric detector. In this method, individual mast cells and then 0.02 mol/L NaOH as a lysing solution are injected into the front end of the separation capillary. A cell injector was constructed for easy injection of single cells. Histamine in single mast cells has been identified and quantified.

  16. Evaluation of mast cells, eosinophils, blood capillaries in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    D Santhosh Reddy; Sivapathasundharam, B; T R Saraswathi; Sriram, G

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Mast cells are granule containing secretory cells present in oral mucosal and connective tissue environment. Oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions are commonly occurring oral diseases and have some similarity clinically and histologically. Both are characterized by an extensive sub epithelial infiltrate of T cells, together with mast cells, eosinophils and blood capillaries. In this study mast cell and eosinophil densities along with number of blood capillaries were stud...

  17. Studies on the Specific Degranulation of Mast Cell Sensitized by Several Allergens in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongchao Guo; Zhenxing Li; Hong Lin; Haider Samee; Jamil Khalid

    2009-01-01

    Food allergy is a major health issue worldwide. Mast cells play a very important role in the immediate hypersensitivity for which mast cell degranulation needs to be studied extensively. In this study, an approach was taken to study the characteristics of sensitized mast cell degranulation in vitro, which associated with the study of mast cells and animal models. BALB/c mice were immunized respectively by several food allergens, then blood and peritoneal mast cells were collected at different time points. A dynamic determination was carried out between mast cells and serumal IgE. Comparative analysis on sequential time points showed that there was a close coincidence between mast cell degranulation and IgE antibody titers in sensitized BALB/c mice. Furthermore, it is interesting that sensitized mast cells could implement specific degranulation against the challenges in vitro, but the closely tropomyosins induced mast cell degranulation displayed cross reactions. This is very similar to IgE resisting the allergens in vivo. The study disclosed some characteristics on mast cells, coming from sensitized BALB/c mice, degranulation in vitro. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  18. Asthma: Eosinophil Disease, Mast Cell Disease, or Both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradding Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there is much circumstantial evidence implicating eosinophils as major orchestrators in the pathophysiology of asthma, recent studies have cast doubt on their importance. Not only does anti-interleukin-5 treatment not alter the course of the disease, but some patients with asthma do not have eosinophils in their airways, whereas patients with eosinophilic bronchitis exhibit a florid tissue eosinophilia but do not have asthma. In contrast, mast cells are found in all airways and localize specifically to key tissue structures such as the submucosal glands and airway smooth muscle within asthmatic bronchi, irrespective of disease severity or phenotype. Here they are activated and interact exclusively with these structural cells via adhesive pathways and through the release of soluble mediators acting across the distance of only a few microns. The location of mast cells within the airway smooth muscle bundles seems particularly important for the development and propagation of asthma, perhaps occurring in response to, and then serving to aggravate, an underlying abnormality in asthmatic airway smooth muscle function. Targeting this mast cell-airway smooth muscle interaction in asthma offers exciting prospects for the treatment of this common disease.

  19. Relationship between Mast Cells and the Colitis with Relapse Induced by Trinitrobenzesulphonic Acid in Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchini, Ana Carolina; Costa de Oliveira, Déborah Mara; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio; Gomes, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the role of mast cells in colitis with relapse induced in Wistar rats by trinitrobenzenosulphonic acid. Colitis induction increased the histamine concentration in the colon, which peaked on day 26. The number of mast cells, probably immature, was ten times higher on day 8. Different from animals infected with intestinal parasites, after colitis remission, mast cells do not migrate to the spleen, showing that mast cell proliferation presents different characteristics depending on the inflammation stimuli. Treatment with sulfasalazine, doxantrazole, quercetin, or nedocromil did not increase the histamine concentration or the mast cell number in the colon on day 26, thereby showing absence of degranulation of these cells. In conclusion, although mast cell proliferation is associated with colitis, these cells and their mediators appear to play no clear role in the colitis with relapses. PMID:19436763

  20. Relationship between Mast Cells and the Colitis with Relapse Induced by Trinitrobenzesulphonic Acid in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Luchini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to clarify the role of mast cells in colitis with relapse induced in Wistar rats by trinitrobenzenosulphonic acid. Colitis induction increased the histamine concentration in the colon, which peaked on day 26. The number of mast cells, probably immature, was ten times higher on day 8. Different from animals infected with intestinal parasites, after colitis remission, mast cells do not migrate to the spleen, showing that mast cell proliferation presents different characteristics depending on the inflammation stimuli. Treatment with sulfasalazine, doxantrazole, quercetin, or nedocromil did not increase the histamine concentration or the mast cell number in the colon on day 26, thereby showing absence of degranulation of these cells. In conclusion, although mast cell proliferation is associated with colitis, these cells and their mediators appear to play no clear role in the colitis with relapses.

  1. Asthma: Eosinophil Disease, Mast Cell Disease, or Both?

    OpenAIRE

    Bradding Peter

    2008-01-01

    Although there is much circumstantial evidence implicating eosinophils as major orchestrators in the pathophysiology of asthma, recent studies have cast doubt on their importance. Not only does anti-interleukin-5 treatment not alter the course of the disease, but some patients with asthma do not have eosinophils in their airways, whereas patients with eosinophilic bronchitis exhibit a florid tissue eosinophilia but do not have asthma. In contrast, mast cells are found in all airways and loca...

  2. The role of mast cells in functional GI disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Mira M; Vicario, Maria; Santos, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are characterized by chronic complaints arising from disorganized brain-gut interactions leading to dysmotility and hypersensitivity. The two most prevalent FGIDs, affecting up to 16-26% of worldwide population, are functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. Their etiopathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, however, recent observations reveal low-grade mucosal inflammation and immune activation, in association with impaired epithelial barrier function and aberrant neuronal sensitivity. These findings come to challenge the traditional view of FGIDs as pure functional disorders, and relate the origin to a tangible organic substrate. The mucosal inflammatory infiltrate is dominated by mast cells, eosinophils and intraepithelial lymphocytes in the intestine of FGIDs. It is well established that mast cell activation can generate epithelial and neuro-muscular dysfunction and promote visceral hypersensitivity and altered motility patterns in FGIDs, postoperative ileus, food allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. This review will discuss the role of mucosal mast cells in the gastrointestinal tract with a specific focus on recent advances in disease mechanisms and clinical management in irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia. PMID:26194403

  3. Mast cell expression of the serotonin1A receptor in guinea pig and human intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Liu, Sumei; Fei, Guijun; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.; Wood, Jackie D.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents, and secretory glands. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells i...

  4. Mast cells dysregulate apoptotic and cell cycle genes in mucosal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Paul

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a disease of high mortality and morbidity. Interactions between the squamous cell carcinoma and the host's local immunity, and how the latter contributes to the biological behavior of the tumor are unclear. In vivo studies have demonstrated sequential mast cell infiltration and degranulation during squamous cell carcinogenesis. The degree of mast cell activation correlates closely with distinct phases of hyperkeratosis, dysplasia, carcinoma in-situ and invasive carcinoma. However, the role of mast cells in carcinogenesis is unclear. Aim This study explores the effects of mast cells on the proliferation and gene expression profile of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma using human mast cell line (HMC-1 and human glossal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCC25. Methods HMC-1 and SCC25 were co-cultured in a two-compartment chamber, separated by a polycarbonate membrane. HMC-1 was stimulated to degranulate with calcium ionophore A23187. The experiments were done in quadruplicate. Negative controls were established where SCC25 were cultured alone without HMC-1. At 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours, proliferation and viability of SCC25 were assessed with MTT colorimetric assay. cDNA microarray was employed to study differential gene expression between co-cultured and control SCC25. Results HMC-1/SCC25 co-culture resulted in suppression of growth rate for SCC-25 (34% compared with 110% for the control by 72 hours, p Conclusion We show that mast cells have a direct inhibitory effect on the proliferation of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma in vitro by dysregulating key genes in apoptosis and cell cycle control.

  5. Induction of Mast Cell Accumulation by Tryptase via a Protease Activated Receptor-2 and ICAM-1 Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Junling; Zhang, Huiyun; Zhan, Mengmeng; Chen, Hanqiu; Fang, Zeman; Xu, Chiyan; Chen, Huifang; He, Shaoheng

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are primary effector cells of allergy, and recruitment of mast cells in involved tissue is one of the key events in allergic inflammation. Tryptase is the most abundant secretory product of mast cells, but little is known of its influence on mast cell accumulation. Using mouse peritoneal model, cell migration assay, and flow cytometry analysis, we investigated role of tryptase in recruiting mast cells. The results showed that tryptase induced up to 6.7-fold increase in mast cell numbers in mouse peritoneum following injection. Inhibitors of tryptase, an antagonist of PAR-2 FSLLRY-NH2, and pretreatment of mice with anti-ICAM-1, anti-CD11a, and anti-CD18 antibodies dramatically diminished tryptase induced mast cell accumulation. On the other hand, PAR-2 agonist peptides SLIGRL-NH2 and tc-LIGRLO-NH2 provoked mast cell accumulation following injection. These implicate that tryptase induced mast cell accumulation is dependent on its enzymatic activity, activation of PAR-2, and interaction between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Moreover, induction of trans-endothelium migration of mast cells in vitro indicates that tryptase acts as a chemoattractant. In conclusion, provocation of mast cell accumulation by mast cell tryptase suggests a novel self-amplification mechanism of mast cell accumulation. Mast cell stabilizers as well as PAR-2 antagonist agents may be useful for treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:27378825

  6. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND MAST CELL PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF FICUS RELIGIOSA

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, S; Thirugnanasambantham, P; Reddy, M. Kannappa; Narasimhan, S.; Subramaniam, G. Anantha

    1990-01-01

    The aqueous extract of bark of Ficus religiosa was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory effect and for its protective effect on mast cells against degranulation. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was observed in both acute and chronic models of inflammation. The extract also protected mast cells from degranulation induced by various degranulatiors. The observed anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect may be responsible for the beneficial effect of Ficus religiosa...

  7. Influence of MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kun, Tomasz; Jakubowski, Lucjusz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Mast cells, owing to diversity of secreted mediators, play a crucial role in the regulation of inflammatory response. Together with basophils, mast cells constitute a central pathogenetic element of anaphylactic (IgE-dependent) and anaphylactoid (IgE-independent) reactions. In severe cases, generalized degranulation of mast cells may cause symptoms of anaphylactic shock. The influence of the classical, iodine-based contrast media on mastocyte degranulation has been fully d...

  8. Mast cells, macrophages, and crown-like structures distinguish subcutaneous from visceral fat in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Mehmet M.; Azad, Adiba; Nayer, Behzad; Contreras, Gabriel; Zaias, Julia; Faul, Christian; Reiser, Jochen; Nayer, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is accompanied by adipocyte death and accumulation of macrophages and mast cells in expanding adipose tissues. Considering the differences in biological behavior of fat found in different anatomical locations, we explored the distribution of mast cells, solitary macrophages, and crown-like structures (CLS), the surrogates for dead adipocytes, in subcutaneous and abdominal visceral fat of lean and diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. In fat depots of lean mice, mast cells were far less pre...

  9. Inhibitory effect of the CA2+ antagonist nifedipine on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanizaki,Yoshiro

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available 45Ca uptake and histamine release was examined in mast cells from rats sensitized with ovalbumin and Bordetella Bertussis as an adjuvant. The uptake of 45Ca by the mast cells was significantly increased by stimulation with ovalbumin as was the release of histamine from the mast cells. Nifedipine, a calcium antagonist, inhibited the increase in both 45Ca uptake and histamine release stimulated by ovalbumin, though the effect on 45Ca uptake was stronger than that on histamine release.

  10. Inhibitory effect of the CA2+ antagonist nifedipine on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanizaki,Yoshiro; Komagoe,Haruki; Sudo,Michiyasu; Ohtani,Jun; Kimura,Ikuro; Akagi,Katsumi; Townley, Robert G.

    1983-01-01

    45Ca uptake and histamine release was examined in mast cells from rats sensitized with ovalbumin and Bordetella Bertussis as an adjuvant. The uptake of 45Ca by the mast cells was significantly increased by stimulation with ovalbumin as was the release of histamine from the mast cells. Nifedipine, a calcium antagonist, inhibited the increase in both 45Ca uptake and histamine release stimulated by ovalbumin, though the effect on 45Ca uptake was stronger than that on histamine release.

  11. Incidence of Mast Cells in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Short Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are regarded as complex and multifunctional cells, playing a significant role in immunopathology and a substantial role in tumor angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is a complex process that is tightly regulated by various growth factors in which mast cells act directly by releasing angiogenic factors and henceforth promoting tumor growth and metastasis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the number of mast cells in tissue sections of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC in comparison with normal mucosa. A total of 40 cases (20 OSCC and 20 normal mucosa were stained with 1% toluidine blue and the quantitative analysis was done by using light microscope under 400x magnification. A significant increase in the mast cell count was observed in the sections of OSCC when compared to normal mucosa suggesting their contributing role in tumor growth and progression.

  12. Graft-infiltrating cells expressing a CD200 transgene prolong allogeneic skin graft survival in association with local increases in Foxp3(+)Treg and mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Chen, Zhiqi; Khatri, Ismat; Yu, Kai

    2011-12-01

    Expression of the molecule CD200 has been reported to increase allograft survival by suppression of inflammation and acquired immunity. In previous studies we have shown that increased skin and cardiac allograft survival in transgenic mice over-expressing CD200 (CD200(tg)) occurs in association with increased intra-graft expression of mRNAs for genes associated with altered T cell subset differentiation. We investigated changes in graft-infiltrating cells, Treg and mast cells in skin grafts post transplantation into control or CD200(tg) mice, using focused gene array and real-time PCR to assess altered gene expression, and FACS, immunohistology and MLC to determine numbers/function of those cells. Graft-infiltrating cells isolated from CD200(tg) recipients suppressed induction of CTL from control lymph node cells in vitro, and contained increased numbers of infiltrating, non-degranulating, mast cells and Foxp3(+)Treg. Mast cells were also evident in graft tissue of control animals, but there these cells showed evidence for degranulation, and fewer Foxp3(+)Treg were present than was the case of CD200(tg) mice. The infusion of a competitive inhibitor of CD200:CD200R interactions, CD200(tr), at high concentrations (50μg/mouse iv) caused rapid rejection of grafts in CD200(tg) mice, mast cell degranulation within graft tissue, and a decrease in Treg infiltrates. These effects were attenuated by simultaneous infusion of the mast cell stabilizer, sodium cromoglycate. We conclude that CD200 expression contributes to graft prolongation through local suppression of mast cell degranulation, attraction/expansion of Treg, and attenuation of T cell effector activation. PMID:21801836

  13. Choroidal mast cells in retinal pathology: a potential target for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Elodie; Zhao, Min; Thillaye-Goldenberg, Brigitte; Lorena, Viera; Castaneda, Beatriz; Naud, Marie Christine; Bergin, Ciara; Besson-Lescure, Bernadette; Behar-Cohen, Francine; de Kozak, Yvonne

    2015-08-01

    Mast cells are important in the initiation of ocular inflammation, but the consequences of mast cell degranulation on ocular pathology remain uncharacterized. We induced mast cell degranulation by local subconjunctival injection of compound 48/80. Initial degranulation of mast cells was observed in the choroid 15 minutes after the injection and increased up to 3 hours after injection. Clinical signs of anterior segment inflammation paralleled mast cell degranulation. With the use of optical coherence tomography, dilation of choroidal vessels and serous retinal detachments (SRDs) were observed and confirmed by histology. Subconjunctival injection of disodium cromoglycate significantly reduced the rate of SRDs, demonstrating the involvement of mast cell degranulation in posterior segment disorders. The infiltration of polymorphonuclear and macrophage cells was associated with increased ocular media concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, CXCL1, IL-6, IL-5, chemokine ligand 2, and IL-1β. Analysis of the amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor and IL-18 showed an opposite evolution of vascular endothelial growth factor compared with IL-18 concentrations, suggesting that they regulate each other's production. These findings suggest that the local degranulation of ocular mast cells provoked acute ocular inflammation, dilation, increased vascular permeability of choroidal vessels, and SRDs. The involvement of mast cells in retinal diseases should be further investigated. The pharmacologic inhibition of mast cell degranulation may be a potential target for intervention. PMID:26166807

  14. Human mast cell chymase induces the accumulation of neutrophils, eosinophils and other inflammatory cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    He, Shaoheng; Walls, Andrew F.

    1998-01-01

    The roles of chymase in acute allergic responses are not clear, despite the relative abundance of this serine proteinase in the secretory granules of human mast cells. We have isolated chymase to high purity from human skin tissue by heparin-agarose affinity chromatography and Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration procedures, and have investigated the ability of human mast cell chymase to stimulate cell accumulation following injection into laboratory animals.Injection of chymase provoked marked neu...

  15. Damnacanthal inhibits IgE receptor-mediated activation of mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vilas, Javier A; Medina, Miguel A; Melo, Fabio R; Pejler, Gunnar; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni

    2015-05-01

    Damnacanthal, an anthraquinone obtained from the noni fruit (Morinda citrifolia L.), has been described to possess anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. Since mast cells are key players in various inflammatory conditions as well as in cancer, we considered the possibility that the biological actions of damnacanthal, at least partly, could be due to effects on mast cells. Many of the biological activities of mast cells are mediated by IgE receptor cross-linking, which results in degranulation with release of preformed granule mediators, as well as de novo synthesis and release of additional compounds. Here we show that damnacanthal has profound inhibitory activity on mast cell activation through this pathway. The release of the granule compounds beta-hexosaminidase and tryptase release was completely abrogated by damnacanthal at doses that were non-toxic to mast cells. In addition, damnacanthal inhibited activation-dependent pro-inflammatory gene induction, as well as cytokine/chemokine release in response to mast cell stimulation. The mechanism underlying damnacanthal inhibition was linked to impaired phosphorylation of Syk and Akt. Furthermore, damnacanthal inhibited mast cell activation in response to calcium ionophore A23187. Altogether, the data presented here demonstrate that damnacanthal inhibits mast cell activation induced by different stimuli and open a new window for the use of this compound as a mast cell stabilizer. PMID:25656801

  16. Molecular targets on mast cells and basophils for novel therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harvima, I.T.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Dráber, Petr; Friedman, S.; Polakovičová, Iva; Gibbs, B.F.; Blank, U.; Nilsson, G.; Maurer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 3 (2014), s. 530-544. ISSN 0091-6749 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cell activation * mast cells and basophils * treatment of allergic diseases Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.476, year: 2014

  17. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived Mast Cell Precursors from Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen K Meurer

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC or mucosal (MMC type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM. The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC. These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research.

  18. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived) Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived) Mast Cell Precursors from Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurer, Steffen K.; Neß, Melanie; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Kim, Philipp; Tag, Carmen G.; Kauffmann, Marlies; Huber, Michael; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC) or mucosal (MMC) type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT) and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs) and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM). The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC). These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research. PMID:27337047

  19. Mast Cell-Derived Exosomes Promote Th2 Cell Differentiation via OX40L-OX40 Ligation

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Li; Yuping Wang; Lihui Lin; Juan Wang; Hui Xiao; Jia Li; Xia Peng; Huirong Dai; Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles released by different cell types, such as dendritic cells (DCs), mast cells (MCs), and tumor cells. Exosomes of different origin play a role in antigen presentation and modulation of immune response to infectious disease. In this study, we demonstrate that mast cells and CD4+ T cells colocated in peritoneal lymph nodes from BALB/c mouse. Further, bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) constitutively release exosomes, which express CD63 and OX40L. BMMC-exosomes partia...

  20. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Mekori, Yoseph A.; Hershko, Alon Y.

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytok...

  1. Mast cells and basophils: trojan horses of conventional lin- stem/progenitor cell isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneberg, Petr

    2011-11-01

    Cancer microenvironment is increasingly recognized as an important factor affecting cancer onset and progression. Since Wirchow reported in 1863 that tumors contain inflammatory cells, the field shifted significantly forward, and immune cells residing in tumors appear to be attractive targets of cancer therapies. For some methods, such as stem/progenitor cell isolation from both cancer and healthy tissues, removal of contaminating immune cells is crucial to achieve consistent, reproducible and accurate results. Despite current methods of lineage negative selection accounts for removal of over 99 % of immune cells from stem/progenitor cell isolates, the vast majority of lineage antibody cocktails retain basophils, dendritic cells, and mast cells. Here we discuss the ability of the most commonly used lineage markers to bind to the plasma membrane of mast cells and/or basophils, and suggest alternatives, which may be used for negative selection of these cellular populations. Both, mast cells and basophils, were shown to participate actively in cancer-associated angiogenesis, tissue remodeling and recruitment of other immune cell types, including eosinophils, B cells, memory T cells and Treg cells. In turn, tumor-derived peptides and chemotactic factors are known to recruit and activate mast cells in neoplasias, resulting in altered tumor progression. Repeated findings of CD34+ populations of mast cells and basophils further highlight necessity of their separation from stem/progenitor cell isolates in both, preclinical experiments and clinical praxis. PMID:22103846

  2. The development of human mast cells. An historical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-03-15

    The understanding of mast cell (MC) differentiation is derived mainly from in vitro studies of different stages of stem and progenitor cells. The hematopoietic lineage development of human MCs is unique compared to other myeloid-derived cells. Human MCs originate from CD34(+)/CD117(+)/CD13(+)multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which undergo transendothelial recruitment into peripheral tissues, where they complete differentiation. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a major chemotactic factor for MCs and their progenitors. SCF also elicits cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion, facilitates the proliferation, and sustains the survival, differentiation, and maturation, of MCs. Because MC maturation is influenced by local microenvironmental factors, different MC phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs. PMID:26997528

  3. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  4. Pharmacological targeting of the KIT growth factor receptor: a therapeutic consideration for mast cell disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina Margrethe; Akin, C; Gilfillan, A M

    2008-01-01

    activated, accumulation of mast cells in tissues results in mastocytosis. Such dysregulated KIT activation is a manifestation of specific activating point mutations within KIT, with the human D816V mutation considered as a hallmark of human systemic mastocytosis. A number of other activating mutations in...... within these tissues, mast cell activation by antigen may also be amplified by SCF. Thus, KIT inhibitors may have potential application in multiple conditions linked to mast cells including systemic mastocytosis, anaphylaxis, and asthma. In this review, we discuss the role of KIT in the context of mast...

  5. KIT mutation analysis in mast cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arock, M; Sotlar, K; Akin, C;

    2015-01-01

    Although acquired mutations in KIT are commonly detected in various categories of mastocytosis, the methodologies applied to detect and quantify the mutant type and allele burden in various cells and tissues are poorly defined. We here propose a consensus on methodologies used to detect KIT mutat...

  6. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph A. Mekori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras MAPK systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by regulatory T cells on mast cell function.

  7. Modeling Pharmacological Inhibition of Mast Cell Degranulation as a Therapy for Insulinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Soucek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Myc, a pleiotropic transcription factor that is deregulated and/or overexpressed in most human cancers, instructs multiple extracellular programs that are required to sustain the complex microenvironment needed for tumor maintenance, including remodeling of tumor stroma, angiogenesis, and inflammation. We previously showed in a model of pancreatic β-cell tumorigenesis that acute Myc activation in vivo triggers rapid recruitment of mast cells to the tumor site and that this is absolutely required for angiogenesis and macroscopic tumor expansion. More-over, systemic inhibition of mast cell degranulation with sodium cromoglycate induced death of tumor and endothelial cells in established tumors. Hence, mast cells are required both to establish and to maintain the tumors. Whereas this intimates that selective inhibition of mast cell function could be therapeutically efficacious, cromoglycate is not a practical drug for systemic delivery in humans, and no other systemic inhibitor of mast cell degranulation has hitherto been available. PCI-32765 is a novel inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk that blocks mast cell degranulation and is currently in clinical trial as a therapy for B-cell non–Hodgkin lymphoma. Here, we show that systemic treatment of insulinoma-bearing mice with PCI-32765 efficiently inhibits Btk, blocks mast cell degranulation, and triggers collapse of tumor vasculature and tumor regression. These data reinforce the notion that mast cell function is required for maintenance of certain tumor types and indicate that the Btk inhibitor PCI-32765 may be useful in treating such diseases.

  8. Cloning and expression of human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang-Quan Chen; Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and express the human colon mast cell METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from colon tissue, and the cDNA encoding human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase was amplified by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The product cDNA was subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pMAL-c2x and eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9K to conrtruct prokaryotic expression vector pMAL/human MC-CP (hMC-CP) and eukaryotic pPIC9K/hMC-CP. The recombinant fusion protein expressed in E.coli was induced with IPTG and purified by amylose affinity chromatography. After digestion with factor Xa, recombinant hMC-CP was purified by heparin agarose chromatography. The recombinant hMC-CP expressed in Pichia pastoris (P.pastoris) was induced with methanol and analyzed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, N-terminal amino acid RESULTS: The cDNA encoding the human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase was cloned, which had five nucleotide variations compared with skin MC-CP cDNA. The recombinant hMC-CP protein expressed in E.coli was purified with amylose affinity chromatography and heparin agarose chromatogphy.SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant protein expressed by E. coli had a molecular weight of 36 kDa and reacted to the anti-native hMC-CP monoclonal antibody (CA5). The N-terminal amino acid sequence confirmed further the product was hMC-CP. E. coli generated hMC-CP showed a very low level of enzymatic activity, but P. pastoris produced hMC-CP had a relatively high enzymatic activity towards a synthetic substrate hippuryl-L-phenylalanine.carboxypeptidase can be successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli and P. pastoris, which will contribute greatly to the fonctional study on hMC-CP.

  9. Differential eosinophil and mast cell regulation: Mast cell viability and accumulation in inflammatory tissue are independent of proton-sensing receptor GPR65

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiang; Mose, Eucabeth; Hogan, Simon P.; Zimmermann, Nives

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular acidification has been observed in allergic inflammatory diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that the proton-sensing receptor G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) regulates eosinophil survival in an acidic environment in vitro and eosinophil accumulation in an allergic lung inflammation model. For mast cells, another inflammatory cell type critical for allergic responses, it remains unknown whether GPR65 is expressed and/or regulates mast cell viability. Thus, in the present st...

  10. T cell-mediated modulation of mast cell function: heterotypic adhesion-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells (Treg) on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by Treg on mast cell function. PMID:22566892

  11. Mast Cells Modulate Acute Toxoplasmosis in Murine Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Huang; Shiguang Huang; Ying Chen; Huanqin Zheng; Jilong Shen; Zhao-Rong Lun; Yong Wang; Kasper, Lloyd H.; Fangli Lu

    2013-01-01

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in Toxoplasma gondii infection is poorly known. Kunming outbred mice were infected intraperitoneally with RH strain T. gondii, either treated with compound 48/80 (C48/80, MC activator) or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, MC inhibitor). Compared with infected controls, infected mice treated with C48/80 exhibited significantly increased inflammation in the liver (P < 0.01), spleen (P < 0.05), and mesentery (P < 0.05) tissues, higher parasite burden in the peritoneal lav...

  12. The putative role of mast cells in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungraithmayr, W

    2015-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were primarily recognized as effector cells of allergy. These cells are acting predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment, such as skin, gastrointestinal and the respiratory tract. Only recently, MCs have gained increased recognition as cells of functional plasticity with immune-regulatory properties that influence both the innate and the adaptive immune response in inflammatory disorders, cancer and transplantation. Through the secretion of both proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mediators, MCs can either ameliorate or deteriorate the course and outcome in lung transplantation. Recent research from other models recognized the immune-protective activity of MCs including its role as an important source of IL-10 and TGF-β for the modulation of alloreactive T cell responses or assistance in Treg activity. This paper summarizes the current understanding of MCs in lung transplantation and discusses MC-mediated immune-mechanisms by which the outcome of the engrafted organ is modulated. PMID:25693471

  13. Autoantibodies against G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Modulate Heart Mast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludmila Okruhlicova; Rosemarie Morwinski; Wolfgang Schulze; Sabine Bartel; Peter Weismann; Narcisa Tribulova; Gerd Wallukat

    2007-01-01

    Mast cells are believed to be involved in myocardial tissue remodelling under pathophysiological conditions. We examined the effects of autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors in sera of patients with heart diseases on myocardial mast cells in the cultured neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat heart cells. Cells collected at day 3 and 10 of the culture were preincubated with autoantibodies against α1-adrenoceptor and angiotensin Ⅱ AT1-receptor,agonist phenylephrine and angiotensin Ⅱ, and control IgG. The pretreated cultured cells were stained for selected mast cell markers tryptase, chymase and TNF-α. The cultured cells were also processed for observation with electron microscopy. The autoantibodies-treatment of the 3-day cultured cells caused both increased intensity of immunofluorescence (p<0.05) and their enlarged diameters of the mast cells when compared to age-matched ones.In contrast, the fluorescence of preincubated 10-day-old mast cells was decreased compared with controls (p<0.01).In control samples, the fluorescence of 10-day-old mast cells was significantly higher than that of 3-day-old ones (p<0.001). Results of electron microscopy examination demonstrated there was an increased granulation of treated 3-day-old mast cells, while a degranulation of mast cells at day 10 of application. The results suggest the modulation effect of the autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors on mast cells, indicating a potential functional link between the autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors and the mast cells in progression of heart disease.

  14. Differential eosinophil and mast cell regulation: mast cell viability and accumulation in inflammatory tissue are independent of proton-sensing receptor GPR65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiang; Mose, Eucabeth; Hogan, Simon P; Zimmermann, Nives

    2014-06-01

    Extracellular acidification has been observed in allergic inflammatory diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that the proton-sensing receptor G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) regulates eosinophil survival in an acidic environment in vitro and eosinophil accumulation in an allergic lung inflammation model. For mast cells, another inflammatory cell type critical for allergic responses, it remains unknown whether GPR65 is expressed and/or regulates mast cell viability. Thus, in the present study, we employed in vitro experiments and an intestinal anaphylaxis model in which both mastocytosis and eosinophilia can be observed, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract, to enable us to directly compare the effect of GPR65 expression on these two cell types. We identified GPR65 expression on mast cells; however, unlike eosinophil viability, mast cell viability in vitro is not affected by acidification or GPR65 expression. Mechanistically, we determined that mast cells do not respond to extracellular acidification with increased cAMP levels. Furthermore, in the intestinal anaphylaxis model, we observed a significant reduction of eosinophils (59.1 ± 9.2% decrease) in the jejunum of allergen-challenged GPR65-deficient mice compared with allergen-challenged wild-type mice, despite the degree of antigen sensitization and the expression levels of Th2 cytokines (Il4, Il13) and eosinophil chemokines (Ccl11, Ccl24) in the jejunum being comparable. In contrast, the accumulation of mast cells in allergen-challenged mice was not affected by GPR65 deficiency. In conclusion, our study demonstrates differential regulation of eosinophils and mast cells in inflammatory tissue, with mast cell viability and accumulation being independent of GPR65. PMID:24742990

  15. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Rachel K., E-mail: rachel.palmer@maine.edu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Gosse, Julie A., E-mail: julie.gosse@umit.maine.edu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  16. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  17. Airway responsiveness to mannitol in asthma is associated with chymase-positive mast cells and eosinophilic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; Bergqvist, Anders; Baines, Katherine J;

    2016-01-01

    tissue. We compared the number and phenotype of mast cells, mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes and number of eosinophils in airway tissue of subjects with asthma and healthy controls in relation to AHR to mannitol. METHODS: Airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled mannitol was measured in 23 non......BACKGROUND: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled mannitol is associated with indirect markers of mast cell activation and eosinophilic airway inflammation. It is unknown how AHR to mannitol relates to mast cell phenotype, mast cell function and measures of eosinophilic inflammation in airway......-smoking, corticosteroid-free asthmatic individuals and 10 healthy controls. Mast cells and eosinophils were identified in mucosal biopsies from all participants. Mast cells were divided into phenotypes based on the presence of chymase. mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS...

  18. Electrogene therapy with interleukin-12 in canine mast cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors in dogs with extremely variable biological behaviour. Different treatment approaches can be used in canine cutaneous MCT, with surgical excision being the treatment of choice. In this study, electrogene therapy (EGT) as a new therapeutic approach to canine MCTs, was established. Eight dogs with a total of eleven cutaneous MCTs were treated with intratumoral EGT using DNA plasmid encoding human interleukin-12 (IL-12). The local response to the therapy was evaluated by repeated measurements of tumor size and histological examination of treated tumors. A possible systemic response was assessed by determination of IL-12 and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) in patients’ sera. The occurence of side effects was monitored with weekly clinical examinations of treated animals and by performing basic bloodwork, consisting of the complete bloodcount and determination of selected biochemistry parameters. Intratumoral EGT with IL-12 elicits significant reduction of treated tumors’ size, ranging from 13% to 83% (median 50%) of the initial tumor volume. Additionally, a change in the histological structure of treated nodules was seen. There was a reduction in number of malignant mast cells and inflammatory cell infiltration of treated tumors. Systemic release of IL-12 in four patients was detected, without any noticeable local or systemic side effects. These data suggest that intratumoral EGT with plasmid encoding IL-12 may be useful in the treatment of canine MCTs, exerting a local antitumor effect

  19. Mast cell-derived neurotrophin 4 mediates allergen-induced airway hyperinnervation in early life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kruti R.; Aven, Linh; Shao, Fengzhi; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Duvall, Melody G.; Levy, Bruce D.; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Asthma often progresses from early episodes of insults. How early life events connect to long-term airway dysfunction remains poorly understood. We demonstrated previously that increased neurotrophin 4 (NT4) levels following early life allergen exposure cause persistent changes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) innervation and airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in mice. Herein, we identify pulmonary mast cells as a key source of aberrant NT4 expression following early insults. NT4 is selectively expressed by ASM and mast cells in mice, nonhuman primates and humans. We show in mice that mast cell-derived NT4 is dispensable for ASM innervation during development. However, upon insults, mast cells expand in number and degranulate to release NT4 and thus become the major source of NT4 under pathological condition. Adoptive transfer of wild type mast cells, but not NT4−/− mast cells restores ASM hyperinnervation and AHR in KitW-sh/W-sh mice following early life insults. Notably, an infant nonhuman primate model of asthma also exhibits ASM hyperinnervation associated with the expansion and degranulation of mast cells. Together, these findings identify an essential role of mast cells in mediating ASM hyperinnervation following early life insults by producing NT4. This role may be evolutionarily conserved in linking early insults to long-term airway dysfunction. PMID:26860818

  20. Dural mast cell degranulation is a putative mechanism for headache induced by PACAP-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Michael; Pedersen, Martin Holst Friborg; Olesen, Jes;

    2012-01-01

    not VIP cause degranulation of mast cells in peritoneum and in dura mater. METHODS: The degranulatory effects of PACAP-38, PACAP-27 and VIP were investigated by measuring the amount of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase released from isolated peritoneal mast cells and from dura mater attached to the skull of...

  1. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we have described studies that have demonstrated that mast cells can be activated as a consequence of adaptive and innate immune reactions and that these responses can be modified by ligands for other receptors expressed on the surface of mast cells. These various stimuli differe...

  2. Proliferation of protease-enriched mast cells in sarcoptic skin lesions of raccoon dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noviana, D; W Harjanti, D; Otsuka, Y; Horii, Y

    2004-07-01

    Skin sites, tongue, lung, liver, jejunum and rectum from two raccoon dogs with Sarcoptes scabiei infestation and five normal (control) raccoon dogs were examined in terms of the distribution, proteoglycan properties and protease activity of mast cells. Infestation with S. scabiei caused a significant increase in the number of dermal mast cells. While the number of mast cells (average +/- standard deviation) in specimens of skin from the dorsum, dorsal neck, dorsal hind foot and dorsal fore foot was 40.0 +/- 19.8/mm2 in control animals, it was 236.1 +/- 58.9/mm2 in the skin of mange-infested animals. Histochemical analysis revealed the glycosaminoglycan, heparin, within the mast cells of all organs examined in both control and affected animals. Enzyme-histochemical detection of serine proteases demonstrated an increase in mast-cell-specific protease activity (i.e., chymase and tryptase) in the skin of infested animals. The percentage of mast cells demonstrating chymase activity was 53.0 +/- 27.4% in control animals and 73.8 +/- 19.4% in mite-infested animals. The corresponding results for tryptase activity were 53.5 +/- 25.2% and 89.4 +/- 9.8%. Increases in mast cell chymase or tryptase activity, or both, were also observed within other organs of the infected animals, but the total number of mast cells found at such sites (with the exception of liver and ventrolateral pinna) did not differ from those of control animals. PMID:15144797

  3. Role of mast cell- and non-mast cell-derived inflammatory mediators in immunologic induction of synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albuquerque A.A.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously discovered a long-lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission in mammal autonomic ganglia caused by immunological activation of ganglionic mast cells. Subsequent to mast cell activation, lipid and peptide mediators are released which may modulate synaptic function. In this study we determined whether some mast cell-derived mediators, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2; 1.0 µM, platelet aggregating factor (PAF; 0.3 µM and U44619 (a thromboxane analogue; 1.0 µM, and also endothelin-1 (ET-1; 0.5 µM induce synaptic potentiation in the guinea pig superior cervical ganglion (SCG, and compared their effects on synaptic transmission with those induced by a sensitizing antigen, ovalbumin (OVA; 10 µg/ml. The experiments were carried out on SCGs isolated from adult male guinea pigs (200-250 g actively sensitized to OVA, maintained in oxygenated Locke solution at 37oC. Synaptic potentiation was measured through alterations of the integral of the post-ganglionic compound action potential (CAP. All agents tested caused long-term (LTP; duration ³30 min or short-term (STP; <30 min potentiation of synaptic efficacy, as measured by the increase in the integral of the post-ganglionic CAP. The magnitude of mediator-induced potentiation was never the same as the antigen-induced long-term potentiation (A-LTP. The agent that best mimicked the antigen was PGD2, which induced a 75% increase in CAP integral for LTP (antigen: 94% and a 34% increase for STP (antigen: 91%. PAF-, U44619-, and ET-1-induced increases in CAP integral ranged for LTP from 34 to 47%, and for STP from 0 to 26%. These results suggest that the agents investigated may participate in the induction of A-LTP

  4. Mast cells control insulitis and increase Treg cells to confer protection against STZ-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Daniela; Yaochite, Juliana N U; Rocha, Fernanda A; Toso, Vanina D; Malmegrim, Kelen C R; Ramos, Simone G; Jamur, Maria C; Oliver, Constance; Camara, Niels O; Andrade, Marcus V M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Silva, João S

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative alterations in mast cell numbers in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs) have been reported to be associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) progression, but their potential role during T1D remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the role of mast cells in T1D induced by multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) treatments, using two strains of mast cell-deficient mice (W/W(v) or Wsh/Wsh) and the adoptive transfer of mast cells. Mast cell deficient mice developed severe insulitis and accelerated hyperglycemia, with 100% of mice becoming diabetic compared to their littermates. In parallel, these diabetic mice had decreased numbers of T regulatory (Treg) cells in the PLNs. Additionally, mast cell deficiency caused a significant reduction in IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-6 expression in the pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, IL-6-deficient mice are more susceptible to T1D associated with reduced Treg-cell numbers in the PLNs, but mast cell transfer from wild-type mice induced protection to T1D in these mice. Finally, mast cell adoptive transfer prior to MLD-STZ administration conferred resistance to T1D, promoted increased Treg cells, and decreased IL-17-producing T cells in the PLNs. Taken together, our results indicate that mast cells are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced T1D via an immunological tolerance mechanism mediated by Treg cells. PMID:26234742

  5. Mast-Cell-Derived TNF Amplifies CD8+ Dendritic Cell Functionality and CD8+ T Cell Priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dudeck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are critical promoters of adaptive immunity in the contact hypersensitivity model, but the mechanism of allergen sensitization is poorly understood. Using Mcpt5-CreTNFFL/FL mice, we show here that the absence of TNF exclusively in mast cells impaired the expansion of CD8+ T cells upon sensitization and the T-cell-driven adaptive immune response to elicitation. T cells primed in the absence of mast cell TNF exhibited a diminished efficiency to transfer sensitization to naive recipients. Specifically, mast cell TNF promotes CD8+ dendritic cell (DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes. The peripherally released mast cell TNF further critically boosts the CD8+ T-cell-priming efficiency of CD8+ DCs, thereby linking mast cell effects on T cells to DC modulation. Collectively, our findings identify the distinct potential of mast cell TNF to amplify CD8+ DC functionality and CD8+ T-cell-dominated adaptive immunity, which may be of great importance for immunotherapy and vaccination approaches.

  6. Key role of mast cells and their major secretory products in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    Hirtoncally, mast cells were known as a key cell type involved in type I hypersensitivity Until last two decades, this cell type was recognized to be widely involved in a number of non-allergic diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Markedly increased numbers of mast cells were observed in the mucosa of the iieum and colon of patients with IBD, which was accompanied by great changes of the content in mart cells such as dramatically increaed expression of TNFα, IL-16 and substance P.The evidence of mast cell degranulation was found in the wall of intestine from patients with IBD with immunohistochemistry technique. The highly elevated histamine and tryptase levels were detected in mucosa of petienta with IBD, strongly suggesting that mast cell degranulation is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD.However, Iittle is known of the actions of histamine, tryptase,chymase and carboxypeptidase in IBD. Over the lart decade,heparin has been used to treat IBD in clinical practice. The low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was effective as adjuvant therapy, and the petienis showed good clinical and laberatory respense with no senous advere effectd. The roles of PGD2, LTC4, PAF and mast cell cytokines in IBD were also discussed. Recently, a series of experiments with dispersed colon mast cells suggested there should be at least two pathways in man for mast colls to amplify their own activationdegranulation signals in an autocrine or paracrine mannec.The hypethesis is that mast cell secretogogues induce mart cell degranulation, release histamine, then stimulate the adjacent mast cells or positively feedback to further stimulate its host mast cells through H1 recepton.Whereas released tryptase acts similarly to hirtamine, but activates mart cells through its receptor PAR-2. The connections between current anti-IBD therapies or potential therapies for IBD with mast cells were discussed, implicating further that mast cell is a key cell type that is involved in the

  7. Pharmacological treatment options for mast cell activation disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Menzen, Markus; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig; Panse, Jens; Butterfield, Joseph; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by aberrant release of variable subsets of mast cell (MC) mediators together with accumulation of either morphologically altered and immunohistochemically identifiable mutated MCs due to MC proliferation (systemic mastocytosis [SM] and MC leukemia [MCL]) or morphologically ordinary MCs due to decreased apoptosis (MC activation syndrome [MCAS] and well-differentiated SM). Clinical signs and symptoms in MCAD vary depending on disease subtype and result from excessive mediator release by MCs and, in aggressive forms, from organ failure related to MC infiltration. In most cases, treatment of MCAD is directed primarily at controlling the symptoms associated with MC mediator release. In advanced forms, such as aggressive SM and MCL, agents targeting MC proliferation such as kinase inhibitors may be provided. Targeted therapies aimed at blocking mutant protein variants and/or downstream signaling pathways are currently being developed. Other targets, such as specific surface antigens expressed on neoplastic MCs, might be considered for the development of future therapies. Since clinicians are often underprepared to evaluate, diagnose, and effectively treat this clinically heterogeneous disease, we seek to familiarize clinicians with MCAD and review current and future treatment approaches. PMID:27132234

  8. Influence of MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cells, owing to diversity of secreted mediators, play a crucial role in the regulation of inflammatory response. Together with basophils, mast cells constitute a central pathogenetic element of anaphylactic (IgE-dependent) and anaphylactoid (IgE-independent) reactions. In severe cases, generalized degranulation of mast cells may cause symptoms of anaphylactic shock. The influence of the classical, iodine-based contrast media on mastocyte degranulation has been fully described. Our objective was to determine the influence of the gadolinium-based MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells and to compare the activity of ionic and non-ionic preparations of contrast media. To determine the intensity of mast cell degranulation, we used an experimental model based on mastocytes isolated from rat peritoneal fluid. Purified suspensions of mast cells were incubated with various concentrations of Gd-DTPA and Gd-DTPA-BMA, and solutions of PEG 600 which served as a non-toxic osmotic stimulus. The intensity of mast cell activation was presented as mean percentage of histamine released from cells after incubation. The obtained results demonstrate that both ionic and non-ionic preparations of the MRI contrast media are able to induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. It was also proved that the non-ionic MRI contrast media stimulate mast cells markedly more weakly than ionic contrast media at identical concentration. The aforementioned results may suggest a more profitable safety profile of the non-ionic contrast preparations. We may also conclude that triggering of mast cell degranulation after incubation with the solutions of MRI contrast media results from non-specific osmotic stimulation and direct toxicity of free ionic residues

  9. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and peritoneal mast cells as targets of a growth activity secreted by BALB/3T3 fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When fibroblast cell lines were cultured in contact with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (CMC), both NIH/3T3 and BALB/3T3 cell lines supported the proliferation of CMC. In contrast, when contact between fibroblasts and CMC was prohibited by Biopore membranes or soft agar, only BALB/3T3 fibroblasts supported CMC proliferation, suggesting that BALB/3T3 but not NIH/3T3 cells secreted a significant amount of a mast cell growth activity. Moreover, the BALB/3T3-derived growth activity induced the incorporation of [3H]thymidine by CMC and the clonal growth of peritoneal mast cells in methylcellulose. The mast cell growth activity appeared to be different from interleukin 3 (IL-3) and interleukin 4 (IL-4), because mRNAs for these interleukins were not detectable in BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Although mast cells are genetically deficient in tissues of W/Wv mice, CMC did develop when bone marrow cells of W/Wv mice were cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cell-conditioned medium. Because BALB/3T3 fibroblast-conditioned medium (BALB-FCM) did not induce the incorporation of [3H]thymidine by W/Wv CMC, the growth activity in BALB-FCM appeared to be a ligand for the receptor encoded by the W (c-kit) locus. Because CMC and peritoneal mast cells are obtained as homogeneous suspensions rather easily, these cells may be potentially useful as targets for the fibroblast-derived mast cell growth activity

  10. Modulation of Chemokine Gene Expression in CD133 Cord Blood-Derived Human Mast Cells by Cyclosporin A and Dexamethasone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Mette; Kvistgaard, Helene; Dahl, Christine;

    2006-01-01

    dexamethasone prior to mast cell activation. Finally, we demonstrate that the same modulators added after mast cell activation can differentially quench ongoing chemokine gene induction. Thus, considering the vast yields of mast cells, our protocol is valuable not only for studying regulation of gene expression...

  11. Antianaphylactic and mast cell stabilization activity of Strychnos potatorum Linn. seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Jayantarao Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The antianaphylactic activity of Strychnos potatorum Linn seed extract was evaluated by using compound 48/80 induced anaphylaxis and mast cell stabilization was studied by using peritoneal mast cells of rats. The possible antianaphylactic and mast cell stabilization mechanism was evaluated by using compound 48/80 induced mast cell activation and level of nitric oxide in rat peritoneal mast cells. Materials and Methods: Anaphylactic shock in mice was induced by the intraperitoneal administration of 8 mg/kg compound 48/80, prior to induction of anaphylaxis the animals were treated with S. potatorum Linn. seed extract administered orally 1 h before administration of compound 48/80, the rate mortality was observed in each group of animals. Mast cell stabilization was seen by preincubation of mast cells with the compound 48/80 and the extracts. Results: This study indicates that the chloroform, petroleum ether, and methanolic extracts were shown potent and has significant (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001 inhibitory effects on compound 48/80 induced anaphylactic reaction and mast cell activation. This compound also inhibited significantly compound 48/80 induced increased level of nitric oxide in rat peritoneal mast cells. Conclusion: We conclude from this study that the different extracts of S. potatorum seed have potent antianaphylactic activity through mast cell stabilization and inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis. The inhibitory effect of S. potatorum Linn. on release of histamine and nitric oxide protects from compound 48/80 induced anaphylactic reaction may be through blocking vasodilatation, decrease vascular resistance, hypotension and tachycardia induced by immunogenic agent used in this study.

  12. Leukocyte common antigen (CD45) is required for immunoglobulin E- mediated degranulation of mast cells

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate using primary mast cell cultures derived from wild-type and CD45-deficient mice that mast cell triggering through the high- affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor requires the cell surface tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Unlike wild-type cells, cross-linking of surface-bound IgE in mast cells deficient in CD45 does not induce degranulation. Degranulation in these mutant cells does occur after treatment with the calcium ionophore A23187 indicating that the degranulation machinery i...

  13. Degradation of C3a anaphylatoxins by rat mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation of 125I-human C3a with rat peritoneal mast cells (RMC) causes extensive degradation of the ligand. Both cell-bound and free 125I-C3a (hu) was degraded by RMC, even at 00C, based on SDS-PAGE analysis. The authors examined several protease inhibitors for their ability to prevent degradation of 125I-C3a (hu). Degradation of 125I-C3a (hu) by RMC was not inhibited by leupeptin, antipain, elastatinal, pepstatin, α1-antitrypsin or EDTA. TPCK and TLCK were only partially effective. PMSF, chymostatin and SBTI were most effective in preventing 125I-C3a (hu) degradation. These latter compounds are effective inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like enzyme chymase extracted from RMC, as is TPCK, based on hydrolysis of the substrate BTEE. Degradation of cell-bound ligand is totally prevented only by PMSF (or DFP). Therefore, 125I-C3a (hu) bound to the RMC appears to be degraded predominantly by chymase; however the cell-bound ligand is attacked by other surface proteases. Degradation of rat C3a by RMC was examined. After incubation with RMC, cell-bound and free 125I-C3a (rat) showed no evidence of degradation with or without inhibitors present. From these results, the authors conclude that chymase may not play a significant role in regulating anaphylatoxin activity. Furthermore, the authors propose that rat C3a is a preferred ligand for identifying receptors on mast cells because of its resistance to proteolysis

  14. Induction of mast cell proliferation, maturation, and heparin synthesis by the rat c-kit ligand, stem cell factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, M.; Takeishi, Takashi; Geissler, E.N. (Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Thompson, H.; Metcalfe, D.D. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Langley, K.E.; Zsebo, K.M.; Galli, S.J. (Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States))

    1991-07-15

    The authors investigated the effects of a newly recognized multifunctional growth factor, the c-kit ligand stem cell factor (SCF), on mouse mast cell proliferation and phenotype. Recombinant rat SCF{sup 164} (rrSCF{sup 164}) induced the development of large numbers of dermal mast cells in normal mice in vivo. Many of these mast cells had features of connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMC), in that they were reactive both with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and with safranin. In vitro, rrSCF{sup 164} induced the proliferation of cloned interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent mouse mast cells and primary populations of IL-3-dependent, bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMCMC), which represent immature mast cells, and purified peritoneal mast cells, which represent a type of mature CTMC> BMCMC maintained in rrSCF{sup 164} not only proliferated but also matured. These findings identify SCF as a single cytokine that can induce immature, IL-3-dependent mast cells to mature and to acquire multiple characteristics of CTMC. These findings also directly demonstrate that SCF can regulate the development of a cellular lineage expressing c-kit through effects on both proliferation and maturation.

  15. The Chymase, Mouse Mast Cell Protease 4, Constitutes the Major Chymotrypsin-like Activity in Peritoneum and Ear Tissue. A Role for Mouse Mast Cell Protease 4 in Thrombin Regulation and Fibronectin Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Tchougounova, Elena; Pejler, Gunnar; Åbrink, Magnus

    2003-01-01

    To gain insight into the biological role of mast cell chymase we have generated a mouse strain with a targeted deletion in the gene for mast cell protease 4 (mMCP-4), the mouse chymase that has the closest relationship to the human chymase in terms of tissue localization and functional properties. The inactivation of mMCP-4 did not affect the storage of other mast cell proteases and did not affect the number of mast cells or the mast cell morphology. However, mMCP-4 inactivation resulted in c...

  16. New models for analyzing mast cell functions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Laurent L; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2012-12-01

    In addition to their well-accepted role as critical effector cells in anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions, mast cells (MCs) have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that contribute to disease or help to maintain health. Although some of these roles were first suggested by analyses of MC products or functions in vitro, it is critical to determine whether, and under which circumstances, such potential roles actually can be performed by MCs in vivo. This review discusses recent advances in the development and analysis of mouse models to investigate the roles of MCs and MC-associated products during biological responses in vivo, and comments on some of the similarities and differences in the results obtained with these newer versus older models of MC deficiency. PMID:23127755

  17. Increased mast cell numbers in a calcaneal tendon overuse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Kongsgaard Madsen, Mads;

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathy is often discovered late because the initial development of tendon pathology is asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of mast cell involvement in early tendinopathy using a high-intensity uphill running (HIUR) exercise model. Twenty-four male Wistar rats...... were divided in two groups: running group (n = 12); sedentary control group (n = 12). The running-group was exposed to the HIUR exercise protocol for 7 weeks. The calcaneal tendons of both hind limbs were dissected. The right tendon was used for histologic analysis using Bonar score......, immunohistochemistry, and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM). The left tendon was used for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. An increased tendon cell density in the runners were observed compared to the controls (P = 0.05). Further, the intensity of immunostaining of protein kinase B, P...

  18. The significant role of mast cells in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Blatner, Nichole R; Khan, Mohammad Wasim; Gounari, Fotini; Gounaris, Elias; Dennis, Kristen; Bonertz, Andreas; Tsai, Fu-Nien; Strouch, Matthew J; Cheon, Eric; Phillips, Joseph D; Beckhove, Philipp; Bentrem, David J

    2011-03-01

    Mast cells (MC) are a bone marrow-derived, long-lived, heterogeneous cellular population that function both as positive and negative regulators of immune responses. They are arguably the most productive chemical factory in the body and influence other cells through both soluble mediators and cell-to-cell interaction. MC are commonly seen in various tumors and have been attributed alternatively with tumor rejection or tumor promotion. Tumor-infiltrating MC are derived both from sentinel and recruited progenitor cells. MC can directly influence tumor cell proliferation and invasion but also help tumors indirectly by organizing its microenvironment and modulating immune responses to tumor cells. Best known for orchestrating inflammation and angiogenesis, the role of MC in shaping adaptive immune responses has become a focus of recent investigations. MC mobilize T cells and antigen-presenting dendritic cells. They function as intermediaries in regulatory T cells (Treg)-induced tolerance but can also modify or reverse Treg-suppressive properties. The central role of MC in the control of innate and adaptive immunity endows them with the ability to tune the nature of host responses to cancer and ultimately influence the outcome of disease and fate of the cancer patient. PMID:21287360

  19. Mast cell gastritis: Children complaining of chronic abdominal pain with histologically normal gastric mucosal biopsies except for increase in mast cells, proposing a new entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourpak Zahra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells reside within the connective tissue of a variety of tissues and all vascularized organs. Since 1996, few studies have been performed on mast cell density in gastrointestinal biopsies, mainly in adult age group. We recently studied mast cell density in pediatric age group on rather larger number of cases in a referral children hospital. Mast cell density was 12.6 ± 0.87 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 0-81 in our study. Since we frequently encounter cases with rather normal gastric biopsies with no H.pylori, which mainly complain of chronic abdominal pain, we gathered those cases with mast cell density more than 30/0.25 mm2. from 895 gastric biopsies and wanted to study their clinical and endoscopic findings and propose a new entity. Methods Between April 2005 and May 2008, 895 children (2, were chosen and a questionnaire was filled for each patient including clinical, endoscopic and pathologic findings. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 13 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results Over a 3 year period of study, of 895 selected children, 86 patients fulfilled the entrance criteria. The major complaint of patients was recurrent abdominal pain. The mean mast cell density was 45.59 ± 13.81 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 30-93. Among our cases, about 67.4% (n = 58 had 30 to 49, 23.3% (n = 20 had 50 to 69, 8.1% (n = 7 had 70 to 89 and 1.2% (n = 1 had 93 mast cells/0.25 mm2 in their specimens Discussion In 29% of our cases, neither endoscopic nor pathologic change was detected and only increase in mast cell number was reported and in others endoscopic and histopathological findings were negligible except increase in mast cells. In updated Sydney system (classification and grading of gastritis, no term is introduced which is in concordance with this group but we think that increased density of mast cells in these cases should not be overlooked and it may contribute to clinical manifestations in some way. We hope that

  20. Differential effects of protoporphyrin and uroporphyrin on murine mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H.W.; Gigli, I.; Wasserman, S.I.

    1987-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the distinct cutaneous manifestations of erythropoietic protoporphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda, the effects of protoporphyrin (PP) and uroporphyrin (URO), the predominant porphyrins in the respective disease, on mast cells were examined. Release of preformed and generated mediators was assessed by the release of radioactivity from cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)serotonin and (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, respectively. Clinically relevant doses of PP (25-500 ng/ml) and 396-407 nm irradiation (3-16 X 10(2)J/m2) induced maximal net release of preformed mediators ,f 44.52 +/- 6.6 to 58.01 +/- 4.0% (mean +/- SE). In contrast, irradiation in the presence of URO (50-5000 ng/ml) resulted in less than 5% net release. (3H)Serotonin release induced by PP and irradiation was calcium-independent, and was not enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a known activator of protein kinase C. This release was suppressed by catalase, a scavenger of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, irradiation in the presence of PP, but not in the presence of URO, resulted in perturbation of cell membrane. Irradiation in the presence of PP also resulted in a maximal net release of generated mediators of 9.98 +/- 3.5% (mean +/- SE), whereas similar treatment in the presence of URO induced less than 0.5% net release. These results suggested that the burning, stinging, erythema, and edema experienced by patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria following sun exposure, and the lack of such findings in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda, may be explained, at least in part, by the differential effects of PP and URO on mast cells.

  1. Differential effects of protoporphyrin and uroporphyrin on murine mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the distinct cutaneous manifestations of erythropoietic protoporphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda, the effects of protoporphyrin (PP) and uroporphyrin (URO), the predominant porphyrins in the respective disease, on mast cells were examined. Release of preformed and generated mediators was assessed by the release of radioactivity from cells labeled with [3H]serotonin and [14C]arachidonic acid, respectively. Clinically relevant doses of PP (25-500 ng/ml) and 396-407 nm irradiation (3-16 X 10(2)J/m2) induced maximal net release of preformed mediators ,f 44.52 +/- 6.6 to 58.01 +/- 4.0% (mean +/- SE). In contrast, irradiation in the presence of URO (50-5000 ng/ml) resulted in less than 5% net release. [3H]Serotonin release induced by PP and irradiation was calcium-independent, and was not enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a known activator of protein kinase C. This release was suppressed by catalase, a scavenger of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, irradiation in the presence of PP, but not in the presence of URO, resulted in perturbation of cell membrane. Irradiation in the presence of PP also resulted in a maximal net release of generated mediators of 9.98 +/- 3.5% (mean +/- SE), whereas similar treatment in the presence of URO induced less than 0.5% net release. These results suggested that the burning, stinging, erythema, and edema experienced by patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria following sun exposure, and the lack of such findings in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda, may be explained, at least in part, by the differential effects of PP and URO on mast cells

  2. MiR-221 influences effector functions and actin cytoskeleton in mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon J Mayoral

    Full Text Available Mast cells have essential effector and immunoregulatory functions in IgE-associated allergic disorders and certain innate and adaptive immune responses, but the role of miRNAs in regulating mast cell functions is almost completely unexplored. To examine the role of the activation-induced miRNA miR-221 in mouse mast cells, we developed robust lentiviral systems for miRNA overexpression and depletion. While miR-221 favored mast cell adhesion and migration towards SCF or antigen in trans-well migration assays, as well as cytokine production and degranulation in response to IgE-antigen complexes, neither miR-221 overexpression, nor its ablation, interfered with mast cell differentiation. Transcriptional profiling of miR-221-overexpressing mast cells revealed modulation of many transcripts, including several associated with the cytoskeleton; indeed, miR-221 overexpression was associated with reproducible increases in cortical actin in mast cells, and with altered cellular shape and cell cycle in murine fibroblasts. Our bioinformatics analysis showed that this effect was likely mediated by the composite effect of miR-221 on many primary and secondary targets in resting cells. Indeed, miR-221-induced cellular alterations could not be recapitulated by knockdown of one of the major targets of miR-221. We propose a model in which miR-221 has two different roles in mast cells: in resting cells, basal levels of miR-221 contribute to the regulation of the cell cycle and cytoskeleton, a general mechanism probably common to other miR-221-expressing cell types, such as fibroblasts. Vice versa, upon induction in response to mast cell stimulation, miR-221 effects are mast cell-specific and activation-dependent, contributing to the regulation of degranulation, cytokine production and cell adherence. Our studies provide new insights into the roles of miR-221 in mast cell biology, and identify novel mechanisms that may contribute to mast cell-related pathological

  3. Inhibition of histamine release from human mast cells by natural chymase inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-heng HE; Hua XIE; Xiao-jun ZHANG; Xian-jie WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of natural chymase inhibitors to modulate histamine release from human mast cells.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human lung, tonsil, and skin were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of the natural chymase inhibitors secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and α1-antitrypsin, then histamine release was determined. RESULTS: IgE-dependent histamine release from lung, tonsil, and skin mast cells were inhibited by up to 70 %, 61%, and 62%, respectively following incubation with α1-antitrypsin (5000 nmol/L). SLPI 5000 nmol/L was also able to inhibit anti-IgEdependent histamine released from lung, tonsil and skin mast cells by up to approximately 72%, 67%, and 58%,respectively. While neither α1-antitrypsin nor SLPI by themselves altered histamine release from lung, tonsil and skin mast cells, they were able to inhibit calcium ionophore-induced histamine release from lung and tonsil mast cells. CONCLUSION: Both α1-antitrypsin and SLPI could potently inhibit IgE-dependent and calcium ionophoreinduced histamine release from dispersed human lung, tonsil, and skin mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner, which suggested that they were likely to play a protective role in mast cell associated diseases including allergy.

  4. IL-4 and TGF-beta 1 counterbalance one another while regulating mast cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, Matthew R; Sturgill, Jamie L; Morales, Johanna K; Falanga, Yves T; Morales, Joshua; Norton, Sarah K; Yerram, Nitin; Shim, Hoon; Fernando, Josephine; Gifillan, Alasdair M; Gomez, Gregorio; Schwartz, Lawrence; Oskeritzian, Carole; Spiegel, Sarah; Conrad, Daniel; Ryan, John J

    2010-05-01

    Mast cell responses can be altered by cytokines, including those secreted by Th2 and regulatory T cells (Treg). Given the important role of mast cells in Th2-mediated inflammation and recent demonstrations of Treg-mast cell interactions, we examined the ability of IL-4 and TGF-beta1 to regulate mast cell homeostasis. Using in vitro and in vivo studies of mouse and human mast cells, we demonstrate that IL-4 suppresses TGF-beta1 receptor expression and signaling, and vice versa. In vitro studies demonstrated that IL-4 and TGF-beta1 had balancing effects on mast cell survival, migration, and FcepsilonRI expression, with each cytokine cancelling the effects of the other. However, in vivo analysis of peritoneal inflammation during Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection in mice revealed a dominant suppressive function for TGF-beta1. These data support the existence of a cytokine network involving the Th2 cytokine IL-4 and the Treg cytokine TGF-beta1 that can regulate mast cell homeostasis. Dysregulation of this balance may impact allergic disease and be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:20304823

  5. Evidence That Mast Cells Are Not Required for Healing of Splinted Cutaneous Excisional Wounds in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, Allison C.; Grova, Monica; Montoro, Daniel T.; Zimmermann, Andrew; Tsai, Mindy; Geoffrey C Gurtner; Galli, Stephen J.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process involving the interaction of many cell types to replace lost or damaged tissue. Although the biology of wound healing has been extensively investigated, few studies have focused on the role of mast cells. In this study, we investigated the possible role of mast cells in wound healing by analyzing aspects of cutaneous excisional wound healing in three types of genetically mast cell-deficient mice. We found that C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh , WBB6F1-KitW/W-...

  6. Tetraspanin CD151 Is a Negative Regulator of FcεRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Bryce, Paul J; Schleimer, Robert P; Wechsler, Joshua B; Loffredo, Lucas F; Cook-Mills, Joan M; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Berdnikovs, Sergejs

    2015-08-15

    Mast cells are critical in the pathogenesis of allergic disease due to the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, yet the mechanisms controlling mast cell activation are not well understood. Members of the tetraspanin family are recently emerging as modulators of FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation; however, mechanistic understanding of their function is currently lacking. The tetraspanin CD151 is a poorly understood member of this family and is specifically induced on mouse and human mast cells upon FcεRI aggregation but its functional effects are unknown. In this study, we show that CD151 deficiency significantly exacerbates the IgE-mediated late phase inflammation in a murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Ex vivo, FcεRI stimulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells from CD151(-/-) mice resulted in significantly enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α compared with wild-type controls. However, FcεRI-induced mast cell degranulation was unaffected. At the molecular signaling level, CD151 selectively regulated IgE-induced activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K, associated with cytokine production, but had no effect on the phospholipase Cγ1 signaling, associated with degranulation. Collectively, our data indicate that CD151 exerts negative regulation over IgE-induced late phase responses and cytokine production in mast cells. PMID:26136426

  7. Mucosal Mast Cells Response in the Jejunum of Ascaridia galli-Infected Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmawi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal defense mechanism against helminthes parasitic nematode to be associated with mucosal mast cells reaction. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of infection by Ascaridia galli parasite to trigger mucosal defense based on mucosal mast cells response in laying hens. Amount of ten head laying hens 12-wk old were divided into two groups containing five chickens of each. The first group, chickens were left as un-infected controls. The second group, chickens were infected orally with 1,000 embryonated eggs of A. galli. Mucosal mast cell responses were assayed by in situ jejunal mast cell counts in stained serial histological sections with Alcian blue (pH 0.3 and Safranin-O (pH 0.1 of the jejunum. Mucosal mast cells response were observed and counted on days 14 post infection. The result showed that A. galli infection was able to increase significantly (P<0.05 mast cells response. This research concluded that the A. galli infection can trigger the involment of mucosal mast cells response in jejunal defense of laying hens against parasitic diseases caused by A. galli.

  8. Ultrastructural study of the mast cells of the human duodenal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A; de Korwin, J D; Tisserant, J; Grignon, M; Claudot, N

    1984-09-01

    The ultrastructure of the process of degranulation of mast cells of human duodenal mucosa was examined. In normal controls little degranulation was seen, but in persons with false food allergy (pseudo-allergy) considerable degranulation of mast cells was detected. This is consistent with the hypothesis that some persons have an abnormal fragility of duodenal mast cells in the presence of histamine-releasing substances. Incubation of duodenal biopsy material with various histamine-releasing agents (compound 48/80, Concanavalin A, the calcium ionophore A 23187, and anti-IgE) confirmed the susceptibility of duodenal mast cells for antigen non-specific release of histamine, or that mediated by IgE. In a group of patients with immediate-type, anaphylactic, food allergy, mast cells in the absence of antigen are in a normal state, but degranulation occurs on exposure in vitro or in vivo to specific antigen. The susceptibility to degranulation continues in persons cured of their food allergy. This suggests that a clinical cure is not due to a change of susceptibility of duodenal mast cells to release histamine, but is possibly associated with formation of blocking antibodies, and/or a modification in reactivity of basophils and mast cells of other organs. PMID:6207955

  9. Bacteria and viruses modulate FcεRI-dependent mast cell activity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Słodka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly, mast cells play a central role in allergic processes. Specific allergen cross-linking of IgE bound to the high affinity receptors (FcεRI on the mast cell surface leads to the release of preformed mediators and newly synthesized mediators, i.e. metabolites of arachidonic acid and cytokines. More and more data indicate that bacteria and viruses can influence FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. Some bacterial and viral components can reduce the surface expression of FcεRI. There are also findings that ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs by bacterial or viral antigens can affect IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation and preformed mediator release as well as eicosanoid production. The synergistic interaction of TLR ligands and allergen can also modify cytokine synthesis by mast cells stimulated via FcεRI. Moreover, data suggest that specific IgE for bacterial or viral antigens can influence mast cell activity. What is more, some bacterial and viral components or some endogenous proteins produced during viral infection can act as superantigens by interacting with the VH3 domain of IgE. All these observations indicate that bacterial and viral infections modify the course of allergic diseases by affecting FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. 

  10. Developmental changes of mast cell populations in the cerebral meninges of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaloudi, Helen; Batzios, Christos; Chiotelli, Maria; Papadopoulos, Georgios C

    2007-01-01

    It is known that both the dura and the pia mater attract and support the differentiation of mast cells. The present study shows that unevenly distributed mast cells in the cerebral meninges of the rat can be found in perivascular sites and vessel ramification points, but can also be unrelated to the meningeal vasculature. It also documents changes in the number, localization and staining preferences of the mast cells in the two meninges of the developing and mature rat brain. Quantitative examination of all types of histochemically differentiated meningeal mast cells reveals no major (although some exist) differences between right and left side subpopulations, but strongly suggests a different origin and fate of the dural and the pial mast cells. The number of dural mast cells, already high from postnatal day 0, although declining from postnatal day 21 onwards, remains conspicuous up to postnatal day 180. In contrast, pial mast cells are comparatively very few in the first day of the postnatal life, and despite a transient significant increase in the following two weeks, they reach almost zero levels from postnatal day 21. PMID:17822416

  11. Mast cells modulate acute toxoplasmosis in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Huang, Shiguang; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Huanqin; Shen, Jilong; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Wang, Yong; Kasper, Lloyd H; Lu, Fangli

    2013-01-01

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in Toxoplasma gondii infection is poorly known. Kunming outbred mice were infected intraperitoneally with RH strain T. gondii, either treated with compound 48/80 (C48/80, MC activator) or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, MC inhibitor). Compared with infected controls, infected mice treated with C48/80 exhibited significantly increased inflammation in the liver (P DSCG had significantly decreased tissue lesions (P DSCG. These findings suggest that mediators associated with the MC activation may play an important role in modulating acute inflammatory pathogenesis and parasite clearance during T. gondii infection in this strain of mice. Thus, MC activation/inhibition mechanisms are potential novel targets for the prevention and control of T. gondii infection. PMID:24146978

  12. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Chikahisa

    Full Text Available Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS. Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v mice and their wild-type littermates (WT, although W/W(v mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v mice. W/W(v mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  13. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of 125I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in 14C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages

  14. Mast Cell-Targeted Strategies in Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sarro, Giovambattista De; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mast cells (MCs) are cells that originate in the bone marrow from pluripotent CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Precursors of MCs migrate through the circulation to their target tissues, completing their maturation process into granulated cells under the influence of several microenvironment growth factors. The most important of these factors is the ligand for the c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) namely stem cell factor (SCF), secreted mainly by fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs). SCF also regulates development, survival and de novo proliferation of MCs. It has already been demonstrated that gain-of-function mutations of gene c-Kit encoding c-Kit-R result in the development of some tumors. Furthermore, MCs are able also to modulate both innate and adaptive immune response and to express the high-affinity IgE receptor following IgE activation. Among the other IgE-independent MC activation mechanisms, a wide variety of other surface receptors for cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, and complement are also described. Interestingly, MCs can stimulate angiogenesis by releasing of several pro-angiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. Studies published in the last year suggest that angiogenesis stimulated by MCs may play an important role in tumor growth and progression. Here, we aim to focus several biological features of MCs and to summarize new anti-cancer MC-targeted strategies with potential translation in human clinical trials.

  15. Mast Cell-Targeted Strategies in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sarro, Giovambattista De; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are cells that originate in the bone marrow from pluripotent CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Precursors of MCs migrate through the circulation to their target tissues, completing their maturation process into granulated cells under the influence of several microenvironment growth factors. The most important of these factors is the ligand for the c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) namely stem cell factor (SCF), secreted mainly by fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs). SCF also regulates development, survival and de novo proliferation of MCs. It has already been demonstrated that gain-of-function mutations of gene c-Kit encoding c-Kit-R result in the development of some tumors. Furthermore, MCs are able also to modulate both innate and adaptive immune response and to express the high-affinity IgE receptor following IgE activation. Among the other IgE-independent MC activation mechanisms, a wide variety of other surface receptors for cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, and complement are also described. Interestingly, MCs can stimulate angiogenesis by releasing of several pro-angiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. Studies published in the last year suggest that angiogenesis stimulated by MCs may play an important role in tumor growth and progression. Here, we aim to focus several biological features of MCs and to summarize new anti-cancer MC-targeted strategies with potential translation in human clinical trials. PMID:27330532

  16. Anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect of ficus religiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S; Thirugnanasambantham, P; Reddy, M K; Narasimhan, S; Subramaniam, G A

    1990-10-01

    The aqueous extract of bark of Ficus religiosa was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory effect and for its protective effect on mast cells against degranulation. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was observed in both acute and chronic models of inflammation. The extract also protected mast cells from degranulation induced by various degranulatiors. The observed anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect may be responsible for the beneficial effect of Ficus religiosa in kumkum dermatitis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:22556521

  17. Mast Cell-Dependent Control of Giardia lamblia Infections in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Erqiu; Zhou, Ping; Petrin, Ziva; Singer, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Mast cells are important for protective immunity to intestinal helminth infections and as mediators of allergic disease. Their role in protozoan infections is less well described. We have therefore analyzed mast cell responses and parasite control in mice infected with the protozoan Giardia lamblia. We also measured immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to the parasite, as IgA can have a protective role in this model. c-kitw/wv mice failed to make parasite-specific IgA, mount a mast cell response,...

  18. Identification of mast cells in buffy coat preparations from dogs with inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayatte, S M; McManus, P M; Miller, W H; Scott, D W

    1995-02-01

    In 100 dogs with 4 inflammatory dermatologic diseases, buffy coat preparations from EDTA-treated blood samples were examined cytologically. Fifty-four dogs had atopy, 26 had flea-bite hypersensitivity, 17 had sarcoptic mange, and 3 had food allergy. Twenty-eight dogs had 2 or more concurrent skin diseases; most of these had secondary pyoderma. Dogs did not have mast cell tumors. Thirteen samples contained 1 or more mast cells/4 slides reviewed. This study revealed that dogs with inflammatory skin diseases can have a few to many mast cells evident on cytologic examination of buffy coat preparations. PMID:7751239

  19. Myeloid derived suppressor cells enhance IgE-mediated mast cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously demonstrated that enhanced development of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in ADAM10 transgenic mice yielded resistance to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection, and that co-culturing MDSC with IgE-activated mast cells enhanced cytokine production. In the current...

  20. TRPV Channels in Mast Cells as a Target for Low-Level-Laser Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Wang; Di Zhang; Wolfgang Schwarz

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser irradiation in the visible as well as infrared range is applied to skin for treatment of various diseases. Here we summarize and discuss effects of laser irradiation on mast cells that leads to degranulation of the cells. This process may contribute to initial steps in the final medical effects. We suggest that activation of TRPV channels in the mast cells forms a basis for the underlying mechanisms and that released ATP and histamine may be putative mediators for therapeutic ...

  1. Mast cells and influenza A virus: Association with allergic responses and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C. Graham

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a widespread infectious agent commonly found in mammalian and avian species. In humans, IAV is a respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal infections associated with significant morbidity in young and elderly populations and has a large economic impact. Moreover, IAV has the potential to cause both zoonotic spillover infection and global pandemics, which have significantly greater morbidity and mortality across all ages. The pathology associated with these pandemic and spillover infections appear to be the result of an excessive inflammatory response leading to severe lung damage, which likely predisposes the lungs for secondary bacterial infections. The lung is protected from pathogens by alveolar epithelial cells, endothelial cells, tissue resident alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, and mast cells. The importance of mast cells during bacterial and parasitic infections has been extensively studied, yet the role of these hematopoietic cells during viral infections is only beginning to emerge. Recently, it has been shown that mast cells can be directly activated in response to IAV, releasing mediators such histamine, proteases, leukotrienes, inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral chemokines, which participate in the excessive inflammatory and pathological response observed during IAV infections. In this review, we will examine the relationship between mast cells and IAV, and discuss the role of mast cells as a potential drug target during highly pathological IAV infections. Finally, we proposed an emerging role for mast cells in other viral infections associated with significant host pathology.

  2. Multiple bidirectional alterations of phenotype and changes in proliferative potential during the in vitro and in vivo passage of clonal mast cell populations derived from mouse peritoneal mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanakura, Y.; Thompson, H.; Nakano, T.; Yamamura, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, Y.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Galli, S.J.

    1988-09-01

    Mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMC) express a connective tissue-type mast cell (CTMC) phenotype, including reactivity with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and incorporation of (35S) sulfate predominantly into heparin proteoglycans. When PMC purified to greater than 99% purity were cultured in methylcellulose with IL-3 and IL-4, approximately 25% of the PMC formed colonies, all of which contained both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative mast cells. When these mast cells were transferred to suspension culture, they generated populations that were 100% berberine sulfate-negative, a characteristic similar to that of mucosal mast cells (MMC), and that synthesized predominantly chondroitin sulfate (35S) proteoglycans. When ''MMC-like'' cultured mast cells derived from WBB6F1-+/+ PMC were injected into the peritoneal cavities of mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice, the adoptively transferred mast cell population became 100% berberine sulfate-positive. In methylcellulose culture, these ''second generation PMC'' formed clonal colonies containing both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative cells, but exhibited significantly less proliferative ability than did normal +/+ PMC. Thus, clonal mast cell populations initially derived from single PMC exhibited multiple and bidirectional alterations between CTMC-like and MMC-like phenotypes. However, this process was associated with a progressive diminution of the mast cells' proliferative ability.

  3. Association of mast cell-derived VEGF and proteases in Dengue shock syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa Furuta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that mast cells are involved in Dengue virus infection. To clarify the role of mast cells in the development of clinical Dengue fever, we compared the plasma levels of several mast cell-derived mediators (vascular endothelial cell growth factor [VEGF], soluble VEGF receptors [sVEGFRs], tryptase, and chymase and -related cytokines (IL-4, -9, and -17 between patients with differing severity of Dengue fever and healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was performed at Children's Hospital No. 2, Ho Chi Minh City, and Vinh Long Province Hospital, Vietnam from 2002 to 2005. Study patients included 103 with Dengue fever (DF, Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, and Dengue shock syndrome (DSS, as diagnosed by the World Health Organization criteria. There were 189 healthy subjects, and 19 febrile illness patients of the same Kinh ethnicity. The levels of mast cell-derived mediators and -related cytokines in plasma were measured by ELISA. VEGF and sVEGFR-1 levels were significantly increased in DHF and DSS compared with those of DF and controls, whereas sVEGFR-2 levels were significantly decreased in DHF and DSS. Significant increases in tryptase and chymase levels, which were accompanied by high IL-9 and -17 concentrations, were detected in DHF and DSS patients. By day 4 of admission, VEGF, sVEGFRs, and proteases levels had returned to similar levels as DF and controls. In-vitro VEGF production by mast cells was examined in KU812 and HMC-1 cells, and was found to be highest when the cells were inoculated with Dengue virus and human Dengue virus-immune serum in the presence of IL-9. CONCLUSIONS: As mast cells are an important source of VEGF, tryptase, and chymase, our findings suggest that mast cell activation and mast cell-derived mediators participate in the development of DHF. The two proteases, particularly chymase, might serve as good predictive markers of Dengue disease severity.

  4. Cell-based phenotypic screening of mast cell degranulation unveils kinetic perturbations of agents targeting phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shenlu; Wang, Xumeng; Wu, Huanwen; Xiao, Peng; Cheng, Hongqiang; Zhang, Xue; Ke, Yuehai

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in initiating allergic diseases. The activation of mast cells are controlled by a complicated signal network of reversible phosphorylation, and finding the key regulators involved in this network has been the focus of the pharmaceutical industry. In this work, we used a method named Time-dependent cell responding profile (TCRP) to track the process of mast cell degranulation under various perturbations caused by agents targeting phosphorylation. To test the feasibility of this high-throughput cell-based phenotypic screening method, a variety of biological techniques were used. We further screened 145 inhibitors and clustered them based on the similarities of their TCRPs. Stat3 phosphorylation has been widely reported as a key step in mast cell degranulation. Interestingly, our TCRP results showed that a Stat3 inhibitor JSI124 did not inhibit degranulation like other Stat3 inhibitors, such as Stattic, clearly inhibited degranulation. Regular endpoint assays demonstrated that the distinctive TCRP of JSI124 potentially correlated with the ability to induce apoptosis. Consequently, different agents possibly have disparate functions, which can be conveniently detected by TCRP. From this perspective, our TCRP screening method is reliable and sensitive when it comes to discovering and selecting novel compounds for new drug developments. PMID:27502076

  5. Strongyloides ratti: implication of mast cell-mediated expulsion through FcεRI-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe K.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine whether FcεRI-dependent degranulation of intestinal mast cells is required for expulsion of intestinal nematode Strongyloides ratti, CD45 exon6-deficient (CD45-/- mice were inoculated with S. ratti. In CD45-/- mice, egg excretion in feces persisted for more than 30 days following S. ratti larvae inoculation, whereas in wild-type (CD45+/+ mice, the eggs completely disappeared by day 20 post-infection. The number of intestinal mucosal mast cells, which are known effector cells for the expulsion of S. ratti, was 75% lower in CD45-/- mice compared with that in CD45+/+ mice. Adoptive transfer of wild-type T cells from CD45+/+ mice into CD45-/- mice reduced the duration of S. ratti infection to comparable levels observed in CD45+/+ mice, with concomitant increases in intestinal mucosal mast cells. These results showed that CD45 is not involved in the effector function of intestinal mucosal mast cells against S. ratti infection. Since FcεRI-dependent degranulation of mast cells is completely impaired in these CD45 knockout mice, we conclude that FcεRIdependent degranulation is not required in the protective function of intestinal mucosal mast cells against primary infection of S. ratti.

  6. Liver tryptase-positive mast cells and fibrosis in children with hepatic echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulubova Maya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatic echinococcosis in children is a serious surgical problem. The aim of this study is to investigate the participation of mast cells in liver inflammatory reactions triggered by echinococcal cysts. Liver biopsy samples were collected from the tissue surrounding the cysts from 16 sick children (11 boys and 5 girls in the course of abdominal surgery and from 5 controls. Light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibody against tryptase. Light microscopical immunocytochemistry revealed abundance of tryptase-positive (MCT mast cells in the capsules of the cysts (43.58 cells/mm2. There were also observed greatly increased numbers of mast cells in portal tracts surrounding the cyst, compared to those of control biopsies (26.49 vs. 1.78 cells/mm2, p=0.0009, Mann-Whitney U test. Based on the ultrastructural appearance of tryptase-positive mast cell granules, morphological sings of activation of most of the mast cells were distinguished. In conclusion, we suggest that the accumulated and activated tryptase-positive mast cells in liver tissues surrounding the echinococcal cysts play a crucial role in modulation of the inflammatory liver response and could induce chronic inflammation and fibrogenesis, resulting in serious liver injury such as nonspecific reactive hepatitis.

  7. Differential effect of plant lectins on mast cells of different origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. Lopes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Histamine release induced by plant lectins was studied with emphasis on the carbohydrate specificity, external calcium requirement, metal binding sites, and mast cell heterogeneity and on the importance of antibodies bound to the mast cell membrane to the lectin effect. Peritoneal mast cells were obtained by direct lavage of the rat peritoneal cavity and guinea pig intestine and hamster cheek pouch mast cells were obtained by dispersion with collagenase type IA. Histamine release was induced with concanavalin A (Con A, lectins from Canavalia brasiliensis, mannose-specific Cymbosema roseum, Maackia amurensis, Parkia platycephala, Triticum vulgaris (WGA, and demetallized Con A and C. brasiliensis, using 1-300 µg/ml lectin concentrations applied to Wistar rat peritoneal mast cells, peaking on 26.9, 21.0, 29.1, 24.9, 17.2, 10.7, 19.9, and 41.5%, respectively. This effect was inhibited in the absence of extracellular calcium. The lectins were also active on hamster cheek pouch mast cells (except demetallized Con A and on Rowett nude rat (animal free of immunoglobulins peritoneal mast cells (except for mannose-specific C. roseum, P. platycephala and WGA. No effect was observed in guinea pig intestine mast cells. Glucose-saturated Con A and C. brasiliensis also released histamine from Wistar rat peritoneal mast cells. These results suggest that histamine release induced by lectins is influenced by the heterogeneity of mast cells and depends on extracellular calcium. The results also suggest that this histamine release might occur by alternative mechanisms, because the usual mechanism of lectins is related to their binding properties to metals from which depend the binding to sugars, which would be their sites to bind to immunoglobulins. In the present study, we show that the histamine release by lectins was also induced by demetallized lectins and by sugar-saturated lectins (which would avoid their binding to other sugars. Additionally, the lectins

  8. Activated MCTC mast cells infiltrate diseased lung areas in cystic fibrosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Cecilia K; Andersson Sjöland, Annika; Mori, Michiko; Hallgren, Oskar; Pardo, Annie; Eriksson, Leif; Bjermer, Leif; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran; Selman, Moises; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Erjefält, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although mast cells are regarded as important regulators of inflammation and tissue remodelling, their role in cystic fibrosis (CF) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has remained less studied. This study investigates the densities and phenotypes of mast cell populations in multiple lung compartments from patients with CF, IPF and never smoking controls. Methods: Small airways, pulmonary vessels, and lung parenchyma were subjected to detailed immunohistochemical analyses usin...

  9. STIM1-cytoskeleton cross-talk in mast cell degranulation and chemotaxis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Petr

    Southampton, 2011. [International Mast Cell and Basophil Meeting 2011 in partnership to the COST Annual Conference on Mast Cells and Basophils 2011. Southampton (GB), 24.11.2011-25.11.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : STIM1 * chemotaxe * žírná buňka Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Distribution of Mast Cells in Mediastinal Lymph Nodes from Lung Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu Tetsuya; Edagawa Masao; Matsuzaki Yasunori; Tomita Masaki; Hara Masaki; Onitsuka Toshio

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Mast cells have been documented to have several key functions with regards to malignant neoplasms. However, the functional significance of their accumulation is largely unknown. An analysis of the mast cell profile in mediastinal lymph nodes from lung cancer patients is reported here. Methods One hundred thirty-four, randomly selected lymph nodes (63 with positive pathological lymph node status) from 39 surgically treated lung cancer patients were examined. All cancer nega...

  11. Identification of a mast cell specific receptor crucial for pseudo-allergic drug reactions

    OpenAIRE

    McNeil, Benjamin D.; Pundir, Priyanka; Meeker, Sonya; Han, Liang; Undem, Bradley J.; Kulka, Marianna; Dong, Xinzhong

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are primary effectors in allergic reactions, and may have significant roles in diseases by secreting histamine and various inflammatory and immunomodulatory substances 1,2 . While classically they are activated by IgE antibodies, a unique property of mast cells is their antibody-independent responsiveness to a range of cationic substances, collectively called basic secretagogues, including inflammatory peptides and drugs associated with allergic-type reactions 1,3 . Roles for these...

  12. Mucosal Mast Cells Response in the Jejunum of Ascaridia galli-Infected Laying Hens

    OpenAIRE

    Darmawi; U. Balqis; M. Hambal; R. Tiuria; Frengki; B.P Priosoeryanto

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal defense mechanism against helminthes parasitic nematode to be associated with mucosal mast cells reaction. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of infection by Ascaridia galli parasite to trigger mucosal defense based on mucosal mast cells response in laying hens. Amount of ten head laying hens 12-wk old were divided into two groups containing five chickens of each. The first group, chickens were left as un-infected controls. The second group, chickens were infected o...

  13. Different Patterns of Mast Cells Distinguish Diffuse from Encapsulated Neurofibromas in Patients with Neurofibromatosis 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, Tracy; Riccardi, Vincent M.; Sutcliffe, Margaret; Vielkind, Juergen; Wechsler, Janine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Friedman, Jan M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple neurofibromas are cardinal features of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Several different types of NF1-associated neurofibromas occur, each distinct in terms of pathological details, clinical presentation, and natural history. Mast cells are present in most neurofibromas and have been shown to be critical to the origin and progression of neurofibromas in both human NF1 and relevant mouse models. In this investigation, the authors determined whether mast cell involvement is the same for all...

  14. Systemic mastocytosis in a patient with ovarian germ cell carcinoma and mast cell leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, G.; Hajianpour, M.J.; Hajianpour, A.K. [Alfigen/The Genetics Institute, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We report a 12-year-old female with a history of mixed germ cell carcinoma of the right ovary who developed a generalized skin rash after oophorectomy and chemotherapy. She also presented with periodic episodes of flushing, anemia, tachycardia, shortness of breath, high fever, hepatosplenomegaly, nausea, abdominal cramping with diarrhea, and a papuloerythematous skin rash. There was no evidence of secondary carcinoma. Skin biopsy revealed nonspecific inflammatory cells with negative staining for mast cells. Peripheral blood smear showed an increased number of mast cells, thrombocytopenia and normal white cells count. Bone marrow showed hypercellularity with 38% of the nucleated cells being mast cells. Bone marrow chromosome analysis revealed hyperdiploidy in 30% of the cells: 58-64,XX, +1, +2, +5, +6, +7, +8, +14, +16, +18, +19, +19, +20, +21, +22. She expired two months after the occurrence of systemic mastocytosis. Systemic mastocytosis has been reported in association with hematopoietic disorders and with germ cell tumors. The association between mediastinal germ cell tumors and hematological malignancies has also been observed. To our knowledge, combination of most cell leukemia, systemic mastocytosis, and ovarian germ cell carcinoma has not been observed. It is know that mutations at the locus of either proto-oncogene c-kit receptor or its ligand, mast/stem cell factor (SCF) may impair the development of three stem cell populations: hematopoietic stem cells, germ cells and melanoblasts. There have been also extensive investigations on the expression and modulation of the SCF/c-kit interaction in various malignancies. Further molecular studies in patients with germ cell tumor/hematopoietic malignancy syndrome are required to delineate underlying mechanisms.

  15. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  16. Lightning protection for roof-mounted solar cell using two masts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Petcharaks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Houses invested in roof-mounted solar cell need protection from direct lightning. This paper presents the application of numerical method in designing the height and location of masts based on protection angle method according to international standard IEC 62305. An isolated external lightning protection system using two isolated masts is designed. The protected zone which is in the volume according to the protection angle method, depends on the protection level, the rolling sphere radius and the height of the masts which must be less than the rolling sphere radius defined in IEC standard. Furthermore, separation distance between the protected house and mast depends on the height of the mast. This paper develops a program using heuristic numerical method to design masts to protect a house with roof-mounted solar cell. Input data such as the house dimensions and the lightning protection class should be provided. This program is tested on houses with different dimensions. The height and location of two masts are obtained. The numerical results show that this program can be used effectively and correctly.

  17. Mast Cells and Histamine: Do They Influence Placental Vascular Network and Development in Preeclampsia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Szewczyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological course of pregnancy is closely related to adequate development of the placenta. Shallow invasion of trophoblast as well as decreased development of the placental vascular network are both common features of preeclampsia. To better understand the proangiogenic features of mast cells, in this study we aim to identify the potential relationship between the distribution of mast cells within the placenta and vascular network development. Material and Methods. Placentas from preeclampsia-complicated pregnancies (=11 and from physiological pregnancies (=11 were acquired after cesarean section. The concentration of histamine was measured, and immunohistochemical staining for mast cell tryptase was performed. Morphometric analysis was then performed. Results. We noticed significant differences between the examined groups. Notably, in the preeclampsia group compared to the control group, we observed a higher mean histamine concentration, higher mast cell density (MCD, lower mean mast cell (MMCA and lower vascular/extravascular (V/EVT index. In physiological pregnancies, a positive correlation was observed between the histamine concentration and V/VEVT index as well as MCD and the V/VEVT index. In contrast, a negative correlation was observed between MMCA and the V/EVT index in physiological pregnancies. Conclusions. Based on the data from our study, we suggest that a differential distribution of mast cells and corresponding changes in the concentration of histamine are involved in the defective placental vascularization seen in preeclamptic placentas.

  18. Airway epithelial cells activate Th2 cytokine production in mast cells via IL-1 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Deepti R.; Poposki, Julie A.; Comeau, Michael R.; Biyasheva, Assel; Avila, Pedro C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway epithelial cells are important regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. Although mast cells are known to play a central role in manifestations of allergic inflammation and are found in the epithelium in Th2-related diseases, their role is incompletely understood. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the role of airway epithelial cells in production of Th2 cytokines in mast cells. Methods Normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) were stimulated with TNF, IL-4, IFN-γ, IL -17A and dsRNA alone or in combination. Human mast cells were stimulated with epithelial cell-derived supernatants, or co-cultured with NHBE. Th2 cytokine responses were blocked with neutralizing antibodies. Results Supernatants from IL-4 and dsRNA stimulated NHBE significantly enhanced Th2 cytokine production from mast cells. The combination of IL-4 and dsRNA itself or supernatants from NHBE stimulated with other cytokines did not activate mast cells, suggesting that mast cell responses were induced by epithelial cell factors that were only induced by IL-4 and dsRNA. Epithelial supernatant-dependent Th2 cytokine production in mast cells was suppressed by anti-IL-1 and anti-TSLP, and was enhanced by anti-IL-1Ra. Similar results were observed in co-culture experiments. Finally, we found dsRNA-dependent production of IL-1, TSLP, and IL-1Ra in NHBE was regulated by Th cytokines, and their ratio in NHBE correlated with Th2 cytokine production in mast cells. Conclusions Pathogens producing dsRNA, such as respiratory viral infections, may amplify local Th2 inflammation in asthmatics via the production of TSLP and IL-1 by epithelial cells and subsequent activation of Th2 cytokine production by mast cells in the airways. PMID:22633328

  19. Development of human connective tissue mast cells from purified blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnetzki, B M; Figdor, C G; Kolde, G; Vroom, T; Aalberse, R; de Vries, J E

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified subfractions of human peripheral blood monocytes, when cultured in the presence of 30% L cell supernatant and 30% horse serum, assumed all the characteristics that define human connective tissue mast cells. After three weeks of culture, 75% of the cells developed metachromasia and granular chloroacetate esterase staining, and their intracellular histamine levels increased from 0.0 to 50.5 ng/10(6) cells. On electron microscopy, the cells developed intracytoplasmic granules with all the features typical for mature and immature mast cells. Cultured cells bound 55 pg 125I-IgE/10(6) cells, while labelling was negligible with cells prior to culture and with heat-denatured 125I-IgE. Fluorescent staining with anti-IgE increased slightly as well, while staining with monoclonal anti-monocyte and anti-HLA-Dr markers decreased. Purified lymphocytes did not assume mast cell characteristics, and lymphokines did not induce or enhance in vitro mast cell development or IgE binding. The data therefore further support the concept that connective tissue mast cells arise from the monocytoid lineage. Images Figure 1 PMID:6698581

  20. Entamoeba histolytica-secreted cysteine proteases induce IL-8 production in human mast cells via a PAR2-independent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Young Ah; Nam Young Hee; Min Arim; Kim Kyeong Ah; Nozaki Tomoyoshi; Saito-Nakano Yumiko; Mirelman David; Shin Myeong Heon

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an extracellular tissue parasite causing colitis and occasional liver abscess in humans. E. histolytica-derived secretory products (SPs) contain large amounts of cysteine proteases (CPs), one of the important amoebic virulence factors. Although tissue-residing mast cells play an important role in the mucosal inflammatory response to this pathogen, it is not known whether the SPs induce mast cell activation. In this study, when human mast cells (HMC-1 cells) were stimu...

  1. EFFECT OF ENDOCANNABINOID SYSTEM AND CANNABIMIMETIC COMPOUNDS IN THE CONTROL OF MAST CELLS: POSSIBLE IMPLICATION IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC INFLAMMATION

    OpenAIRE

    De Filippis, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    The present work aims to elucidate the emerging role played by cannabimimetic compounds in the control of mast cell activation. Mast cells are immune competent cells strategically located at sites directly interfacing with the external environment which, in case of injury, may regulate the immune response by the release of a plethora of both pre-formed and newly-synthesised mediators. However, although the main goal of mast cell activation is to initiate the inflammatory reaction, and thus to...

  2. Mast cells and basophils in inflammatory and tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Gianni; Varricchi, Gilda; Loffredo, Stefania; Granata, Francescopaolo

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis, namely, the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is an essential process of embryonic development and post-natal growth. In adult life, it may occur in physiological conditions (menstrual cycle and wound healing), during inflammatory disorders (autoimmune diseases and allergic disorders) and in tumor growth. The angiogenic process requires a tightly regulated interaction among different cell types (e.g. endothelial cells and pericytes), the extracellular matrix, several specific growth factors (e.g. VEGFs, Angiopoietins), cytokines and chemokines. Lymphangiogenesis, namely, the growth of new lymphatic vessels, is an important process in tumor development, in the formation of metastasis and in several inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In addition to tumors, several effector cells of inflammation (mast cells, macrophages, basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, etc.) are important sources of a wide spectrum of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Human mast cells produce a large array of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic molecules. Primary human mast cells and two mast cell lines constitutively express several isoforms of angiogenic (VEGF-A and VEGF-B) and the two lymphangiogenic factors (VEGF-C and VEGF-D). In addition, human mast cells express the VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) and 2 (VEGFR-2), the co-receptors neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and -2 (NRP2) and the Tie1 and Tie2 receptors. Immunologically activated human basophils selectively produce VEGF-A and -B, but not VEGF-C and -D. They also release Angiopoietin1 that activates Tie2 on human mast cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that human mast cells and basophils might participate in the complex network involving inflammatory and tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:25941082

  3. Canine mast cell tumors: diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett LD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laura D Garrett Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, Urbana, IL, USA Abstract: Mast cell tumors (MCTs are the most common malignant skin cancer in dogs, and significant variability exists in their biological behavior. Most MCTs are cured with appropriate local therapy, but a subset shows malignant behavior with the potential to spread to lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and other areas and to thus become a systemic cancer. Because of this variable behavior, it is difficult to predict how any individual tumor is going to behave. The variability thus creates uncertainty in deciding what a particular dog's prognosis is, whether staging tests to assess for metastasis are needed, and even what treatments will be necessary for best outcome. In addition to controversies over the potential for development of systemic disease, or diffuse metastasis, controversies also exist over what treatment is needed to best attain local control of these tumors. This article will briefly discuss the diagnosis of MCTs in dogs and will summarize the literature in regards to the controversial topics surrounding the more aggressive form of this disease, with recommendations made based on published studies. Keywords: mitotic index, mastocytosis, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, histologic grade

  4. Role(s) of IL-2 inducible T cell kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase in mast cell response to lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells play critical roles during immune responses to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that can lead to fatal septic hypothermia [1], [2], [3]. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that act downstream of numerous receptors, and have been shown to modulate mast cell responses downstream of FcεRIα [4], however, their roles in regulating mast cell responses to endotoxic stimuli were unclear. We found that the absence of ITK and BTK alters the mast cell response to LPS, and leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by mast cells and more severe LPS-induced hypothermia in mice [5]. Here, we detail our investigation using microarray analysis to study the transcriptomic profiles of mast cell responses to LPS, and the roles of ITK and/or BTK expression in this process. Mouse whole genome array data of WT, Itk (-/-) , Btk (-/-) , and Itk (-/-)  Btk (-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) stimulated by PBS (control) or LPS for 1 h were used in our latest research article [5] and is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE64287. PMID:27081634

  5. Lightning protection for roof-mounted solar cell using two masts

    OpenAIRE

    N. Petcharaks

    2013-01-01

    Houses invested in roof-mounted solar cell need protection from direct lightning. This paper presents the application of numerical method in designing the height and location of masts based on protection angle method according to international standard IEC 62305. An isolated external lightning protection system using two isolated masts is designed. The protected zone which is in the volume according to the protection angle method, depends on the protection level, the rolling sphere radius and...

  6. Biochemical and microscopic evidence for the internalization and degradation of heparin-containing mast cell granules by bovine endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation of [35S]heparin-containing mast cell granules with cultured bovine endothelial cells was followed by the appearance of 35S-granule-associated radioactivity within the endothelial cells and a decrease in radioactivity in the extracellular fluid. These changes occurred during the first 24 hours of incubation and suggested ingestion of the mast cell granules by the endothelial cells. Periodic electron microscopic examination of the monolayers confirmed this hypothesis by demonstrating apposition of the granules to the plasmalemma of endothelial cells, which was followed by the engulfment of the granules by cytoplasmic projections. Under light microscopic examination, mast cell granules within endothelial cells then appeared to undergo degradation. The degradation of [35S]heparin in mast cell granules was demonstrated by a decrease in the amount of intracellular [35S]heparin proteoglycan after 24 hours and the appearance of free [35S]sulfate in the extracellular compartment. Intact endothelial cells were more efficient at degrading [35S]heparin than were cell lysates or cell supernatants. These data provide evidence of the ability of endothelial cells to ingest mast cell granules and degrade native heparin that is presented as a part of the mast cell granule

  7. Sputum mast cell subtypes relate to eosinophilia and corticosteroid response in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Baines, Katherine J; Fu, Juan Juan; Wood, Lisa G; Simpson, Jodie L; McDonald, Vanessa M; Cowan, Douglas C; Taylor, D Robin; Cowan, Jan O; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    Mast cells are a resident inflammatory cell of the airways, involved in both the innate and adaptive immune response. The relationship between mast cells and inflammatory phenotypes and treatment response of asthma is not clear.Clinical characteristics of subjects with stable asthma (n=55), inflammatory cell counts and gene expression microarrays in induced sputum were analysed. Sputum mast cell subtypes were determined by molecular phenotyping based on expression of mast cell biomarkers (tryptase (TPSAB1), chymase (CMA1) and carboxypeptidase A3 (CPA3)). Effects of mast cell subtypes on steroid response were observed in a prospective cohort study (n=50).MCT(n=18) and MCT/CPA3(mRNA expression ofTPSAB1andCPA3; n=29) subtypes were identified, as well as a group without mast cell gene expression (n=8). The MCT/CPA3subtype had elevated exhaled nitric oxide fraction, sputum eosinophils, bronchial sensitivity and reactivity, and poorer asthma control. This was accompanied by upregulation of 13 genes. Multivariable logistic regression identifiedCPA3(OR 1.21, p=0.004) rather thanTPSAB1(OR 0.92, p=0.502) as a determinant of eosinophilic asthma. The MCT/CPA3subtype had a better clinical response and reduced signature gene expression with corticosteroid treatment.Sputum mast cell subtypes of asthma can be defined by a molecular phenotyping approach. The MCT/CPA3subtype demonstrated increased bronchial sensitivity and reactivity, and signature gene expression, which was associated with airway eosinophilia and greater corticosteroid responsiveness. PMID:26699720

  8. Titanium dioxide particle – induced goblet cell hyperplasia : association with mast cells and IL-13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Soo-Ho

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhalation of particles aggravates respiratory symptoms including mucus hypersecretion in patients with chronic airway disease and induces goblet cell hyperplasia (GCH in experimental animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Methods To understand this, the numbers of goblet cells, Muc5ac (+ expressing epithelial cells and IL-13 expressing mast cells were measured in the trachea of sham or TiO2 particles – treated rats using periodic acid-Schiff, toluidine blue and immunohistochemical staining. RT-PCR for Muc-1, 2 and 5ac gene transcripts was done using RNA extracted from the trachea. Differential cell count and IL-13 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. In pretreatment groups, cyclophosphamide (CPA or dexamethasone (DEX was given before instillation of TiO2. TiO2 treatment markedly increased Muc5ac mRNA expression, and Muc5ac (+ or PAS (+ epithelial cells 48 h following treatment. Results The concentration of IL-13 in BAL fluids was higher in TiO2 treated – rats when compared to those in sham rats (p 2 treated – rats (p 0.05. In contrast, pretreatment with dexamethasone (DEX diminished the percentage of PAS (+ cells and the levels of IL-13 (p 2 treatment increased the IL-13 (+ mast cells (p 0.05. In addition there were significant correlations of IL-13 (+ rate of mast cells in the trachea with IL-13 concentration in BAL fluid (p 2 treated rats (p Conclusion In conclusion, TiO2 instillation induces GCH and Muc5ac expression, and this process may be associated with increased production of IL-13 by mast cells.

  9. Effects of relaxin on mast cells. In vitro and in vivo studies in rats and guinea pigs.

    OpenAIRE

    Masini, E; Bani, D; Bigazzi, M.; P.F.Mannaioni; Bani-Sacchi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the current study demonstrate that relaxin inhibits histamine release by mast cells. This effect is related to the peptide concentrations, and could be observed in both isolated rat serosal mast cells stimulated with compound 48/80 or calcium ionophore A 23187, and in serosal mast cells isolated from sensitized guinea pigs and challenged with the antigen. The morphological findings agree with the functional data, revealing that relaxin attenuates calcium ionophore-induced granu...

  10. Mast cell expression of the serotonin1A receptor in guinea pig and human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Liu, Sumei; Fei, Guijun; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2013-05-15

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents, and secretory glands. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells in the small intestine and action of 5-HT to degranulate the mast cells and release histamine in guinea pig small intestine and segments of human jejunum discarded during Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Mast cells in human and guinea pig preparations expressed the 5-HT1A receptor. ELISA detected spontaneous release of histamine in guinea pig and human preparations. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-PIPAT evoked release of histamine. A selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, suppressed stimulation of histamine release by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT. Mast cell-stabilizing drugs, doxantrazole and cromolyn sodium, suppressed the release of histamine evoked by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT in guinea pig and human preparations. Our results support the hypothesis that serotonergic degranulation of enteric mast cells and release of preformed mediators, including histamine, are mediated by the 5-HT1A serotonergic receptor. Association of 5-HT with the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome) underlies a question of whether selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonists might have therapeutic application in disorders of this nature. PMID:23518679

  11. Nonclinical evaluation of the potential for mast cell activation by an erythropoietin analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, James L., E-mail: James.Weaver@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Boyne, Michael, E-mail: mboyne@biotechlogic.com [Division of Pharmaceutical Analysis, OTR/OPQ/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Pang, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Pang@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Chimalakonda, Krishna, E-mail: Krishna.Chimalakonda@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Howard, Kristina E., E-mail: Kristina.Howard@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The erythropoietin analog peginesatide was withdrawn from marketing due to unexpected severe anaphylactic reactions associated with administration of the multi-use formulation. The adverse events occurred rapidly following the first ever administration of the drug with most affected patients becoming symptomatic in less than 30 min. This is most consistent with an anaphylactoid reaction due to direct activation of mast cells. Laboratory evaluation was undertaken using rat peritoneal mast cells as the model system. Initial studies showed that high concentrations of the formulated drug as well as formulated vehicle alone could cause mast cell degranulation as measured by histamine release. The purified active drug was not able to cause histamine release whereas the vehicle filtrate and lab created drug vehicle were equally potent at causing histamine release. Individual formulations of vehicle leaving one component out showed that histamine release was due to phenol. Dose response studies with phenol showed a very sharp dose response curve that was similar in three buffer systems. Cellular analysis by flow cytometry showed that the histamine release was not due to cell death, and that changes in light scatter parameters consistent with degranulation were rapidly observed. Limited testing with primary human mast cells showed a similar dose response of histamine release with exposure to phenol. To provide in vivo confirmation, rats were injected with vehicle formulated with various concentrations of phenol via a jugular vein cannula. Significant release of histamine was detected in blood samples taken 2 min after dosing at the highest concentrations tested. - Highlights: • Peginesatide caused severe anaphylactoid reactions in 0.2% of patients. • Both formulated drug and vehicle cause degranulation of rat mast cells. • Phenol was identified as the vehicle component causing degranulation. • Human mast cells show similar dose response to phenol as rat mast cells

  12. Mast Cell Stabilizers as Host Modulatory Drugs to Prevent and Control Periodontal Disease

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    Dhoom Singh Mehta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mast cells are among the first cells to get in-volved in periodontal inflammation. Their numbers have been shown to be in-creased in cases of gingivitis and periodontal disease. The hypothesis: Since mast cell stabilizers like sodium cromogly-cate (SCG and nedocromil sodium (NS have been used in the prophylaxis of bronchial asthma without any significant adverse effects and also the fact that drugs like SCG show significant anti-inflammatory activities, it would be logical to use mast cell stabilizers as host modulating drugs for the treatment and prevention of peri-odontal disease. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Safety and efficacy of both SCG and NS are well documented. So, it will be systemically safe to use in humans. However, oral administration SCG or delivery of the drug by means local irrigation will not be very useful because SCG may not be secreted in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF(as in the case of oral administraion or the drug may get washed out from periodontal pocket due to the constant flow of GCF(as in the case of irrigation. A local or targeted drug delivery of mast cell stabilizers can be used in patients with periodontal disease. Role of mast cells in periodontal disease has been dealt in-depth in many studies and articles. However, limited amount of research has been done on using mast cell stabilizers in the prevention and control of periodontal diseases. More studies are needed to study the efficacy and effective-ness of mast cell stabilizers as an adjunct to phase I therapy in the control of periodontal disease.

  13. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H1 receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases

  14. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Taeg Kyu [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae-Yong [College of Pharmacy, Woosuk University, Jeonju 565-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho [College of Pharmacy, Youngnam University, Kyungsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Hyun, E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  15. Serum Total Tryptase Level Confirms Itself as a More Reliable Marker of Mast Cells Burden in Mast Cell Leukaemia (Aleukaemic Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Savini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell leukemia (MCL is a very rare form of systemic mastocytosis (SM with a short median survival of 6 months. We describe a case of a 65-year-old woman with aleukaemic variant of MCL with a very high serum total tryptase level of 2255 μg/L at diagnosis, which occurred following an episode of hypotensive shock. She fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of SM, with a bone marrow smear infiltration of 50–60% of atypical mast cells (MCs. She tested negative for the KIT D816V mutation, without any sign of organ damage (no B- or C-findings and only few mediator-related symptoms. She was treated with antihistamine alone and then with imatinib for the appearance of anemia. She maintained stable tryptase level and a very indolent clinical course for twenty-two months; then, she suddenly progressed to acute MCL with a serum tryptase level up to 12960 μg/L. The patient died due to haemorrhagic diathesis twenty-four months after diagnosis. This clinical case maybe represents an example of the chronic form of mast cell leukemia, described as unpredictable disease, in which the serum total tryptase level has confirmed itself as a reliable marker of mast cells burden regardless of the presence of other signs or symptoms.

  16. A mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80, prevents the accumulation of hyaluronan in lung tissue injured by ionizing irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, K.; Bjermer, L.; Hellstroem, S.H.; Henriksson, R.; Haellgren, R. (University Hospital, Umea (Sweden))

    1990-02-01

    Irradiation with a single dose of 30 Grey on the basal regions of the lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats induced a peribronchial and alveolar inflammation. Infiltration of mast cells in the edematous alveolar interstitial tissue and also in the peribronchial tissue were characteristic features of the lesion. The appearance of mast cells was already seen 4 wk after irradiation and by weeks 6 to 8 there was a heavy infiltration. The staining properties suggested that they were connective tissue-type mast cells. The infiltration of mast cells was paralleled by an accumulation of hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) in the alveolar interstitial tissue 6 and 8 wk after irradiation. The recovery of hyaluronan (HA) during bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of the lungs also increased at this time. Treatment with a mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80, induced a distinct reduction of granulated mast cells in the alveolar tissue. Regular treatment with compound 48/80 from the time of irradiation considerably reduced the HA recovery during BAL and the HA accumulation in the interstitial tissue but did not affect the interstitial infiltration of mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. By contrast, an accumulation of HA in the alveolar interstitial space was induced when compound 48/80 was given not until mast cell infiltration of the lung had started. The effects of compound 48/80 indicate that the connective tissue response after lung irradiation is dependent on whether or not mast cell degranulation is induced before or after the mast cell infiltration of the alveolar tissue.

  17. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in congenitally athymic, irradiated and mast cell-depleted rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, M.J.; Bickle, Q.D.; Taylor, M.G.

    1987-04-01

    Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni was investigated in congenitally athymic (Nu/Nu) rats, irradiated rats and in mast cell-depleted rats. Nu/Nu rats failed to develop significant resistance following vaccination with irradiated cercariae, although Nu/Nu recipients of serum from vaccinated Fischer rats (VRS) manifested resistance comparable to heterozygous controls, suggesting that T-cells were required in the induction of resistance but were not involved in the efferent arm of antibody-dependent elimination. Radiosensitive cells (including eosinophils, basophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and mast cells) were apparently not essential for the antibody-dependent elimination of lung or post-lung stages since irradiated (700-750 rad.) recipients of VRS manifested comparable degrees of resistance to unirradiated controls in spite of a greater than 85% reduction in total blood leucocyte counts after irradiation. Depletion of 99% of tissue mast cells by treatment of rats with Compound 48/80 had no significant effect on the attrition of a challenge infection in rats rendered immune by vaccination with irradiated cercariae or by transfer of VRS. However, there was a significant increase in worm recovery in unimmunized and mast cell-depleted or irradiated rats, indicating that mast cells and perhaps other radio-isotope sensitive cells may be involved in innate resistance.

  18. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in congenitally athymic, irradiated and mast cell-depleted rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni was investigated in congenitally athymic (Nu/Nu) rats, irradiated rats and in mast cell-depleted rats. Nu/Nu rats failed to develop significant resistance following vaccination with irradiated cercariae, although Nu/Nu recipients of serum from vaccinated Fischer rats (VRS) manifested resistance comparable to heterozygous controls, suggesting that T-cells were required in the induction of resistance but were not involved in the efferent arm of antibody-dependent elimination. Radiosensitive cells (including eosinophils, basophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and mast cells) were apparently not essential for the antibody-dependent elimination of lung or post-lung stages since irradiated (700-750 rad.) recipients of VRS manifested comparable degrees of resistance to unirradiated controls in spite of a greater than 85% reduction in total blood leucocyte counts after irradiation. Depletion of 99% of tissue mast cells by treatment of rats with Compound 48/80 had no significant effect on the attrition of a challenge infection in rats rendered immune by vaccination with irradiated cercariae or by transfer of VRS. However, there was a significant increase in worm recovery in unimmunized and mast cell-depleted or irradiated rats, indicating that mast cells and perhaps other radio-isotope sensitive cells may be involved in innate resistance. (author)

  19. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity affects the density of mast cells in abdominal fat depots and lymph nodes in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altintas Mehmet M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we explored the effects of leptin deficiency-induced obesity on the density of mast cells in metabolic (abdominal fat depots, skeletal muscle, and liver and lymphatic (abdominal lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus organs. Fourteen-week-old male leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and their controls fed a standard chow were studied. Tissue sections were stained with toluidine blue to determine the density of mast cells. CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis was also carried out. Furthermore, mast cells containing immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine involved in obesity-linked insulin resistance, were identified by immunostaining. Results ob/ob mice demonstrated adiposity and insulin resistance. In abdominal fat depots, mast cells were distributed differentially. While most prevalent in subcutaneous fat in controls, mast cells were most abundant in epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in the density of mast cells in epididymal fat, but a 13-fold decrease in subcutaneous fat. This finding was confirmed by CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis. Furthermore, we found that a subset of mast cells in epididymal and subcutaneous fat were immunoreactive for TNF-α. The proportion of mast cells immunoreactive for TNF-α was higher in epididymal than in subcutaneous fat in both ob/ob and control mice. Mast cells were also distributed differentially in retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and inguinal lymph nodes. In both ob/ob mice and lean controls, mast cells were more prevalent in retroperitoneal than in mesenteric and inguinal lymph nodes. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by increased mast cell density in all lymph node stations examined. No significant difference in the density of mast cells in skeletal muscle, liver, spleen, and thymus was

  20. In colorectal cancer mast cells contribute to systemic regulatory T-cell dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Blatner, Nichole R.; Bonertz, Andreas; Beckhove, Philipp; Cheon, Eric C.; Krantz, Seth B.; Strouch, Matthew; Weitz, Juergen; Koch, Moritz; Halverson, Amy L.; Bentrem, David J.; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2010-01-01

    T-regulatory cells (Treg) and mast cells (MC) are abundant in colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors. Interaction between the two is known to promote immune suppression or loss of Treg functions and autoimmunity. Here, we demonstrate that in both human CRC and murine polyposis the outcome of this interaction is the generation of potently immune suppressive but proinflammatory Treg (ΔTreg). These Treg shut down IL10, gain potential to express IL17, and switch from suppressing to promoting MC expansion...

  1. Stimulated human mast cells secrete mitochondrial components that have autocrine and paracrine inflammatory actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodi Zhang

    Full Text Available Mast cells are hematopoietically-derived tissue immune cells that participate in acquired and innate immunity, as well as in inflammation through release of many chemokines and cytokines, especially in response to the pro-inflammatory peptide substance P (SP. Inflammation is critical in the pathogenesis of many diseases, but the trigger(s is often unknown. We investigated if mast cell stimulation leads to secretion of mitochondrial components and whether these could elicit autocrine and/or paracrine inflammatory effects. Here we show that human LAD2 mast cells stimulated by IgE/anti-IgE or by the SP led to secretion of mitochondrial particles, mitochondrial (mt mtDNA and ATP without cell death. Mitochondria purified from LAD2 cells and, when mitochondria added to mast cells trigger degranulation and release of histamine, PGD(2, IL-8, TNF, and IL-1β. This stimulatory effect is partially inhibited by an ATP receptor antagonist and by DNAse. These results suggest that the mitochondrial protein fraction may also contribute. Purified mitochondria also stimulate IL-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF release from cultured human keratinocytes, and VEGF release from primary human microvascular endothelial cells. In order to investigate if mitochondrial components could be secreted in vivo, we injected rats intraperiotoneally (ip with compound 48/80, which mimicks the action of SP. Peritoneal mast cells degranulated and mitochondrial particles were documented by transimission electron microscopy outside the cells. We also wished to investigate if mitochondrial components secreted locally could reach the systemic circulation. Administration ip of mtDNA isolated from LAD2 cells in rats was detected in their serum within 4 hr, indicating that extravascular mtDNA could enter the systemic circulation. Secretion of mitochondrial components from stimulated live mast cells may act as "autopathogens" contributing to the pathogenesis of inflammatory

  2. Histamine immunohistochemistry: a new and highly sensitive method for studying cutaneous mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, O; Virtanen, M; Hilliges, M; Yang, Q

    1992-05-01

    Mast cells have characteristic granulae containing various glucoseaminoglycans, proteases and amines (predominantly histamine). The conventional histological methods for studying mast cells are based upon acidic ortho- and metachromatic routine stains of the glucoseaminoglycans. However, the success of these procedures is dependent upon both the fixatives and the tissues used. In this study, we wanted to find out whether an immunohistochemical procedure could overcome some of these difficulties. Normal human skin was fixed in five different types of fixative and processed for indirect immunofluorescence, using an antiserum to histamine. Only one, 4% carbodiimide in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), resulted in immunostaining. The quality of the staining was good, with a high signal-to-noise ratio, and was located on the mast cells. The method made it possible to visualize small structures such as a single secreted granula, the thin cytoplasmatic extension of some cells, and a previously undescribed dendritic morphology of some of the mast cells. We therefore recommend this procedure for cellular studies of mast cells when accuracy is needed. PMID:1607297

  3. FK506 inhibition of histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengoku, T; Kishi, S; Sakuma, S; Ohkubo, Y; Goto, T

    2000-03-01

    Histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils are thought to be closely involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Some reports show that FK506 (tacrolimus hydrate) inhibited histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils. However, as the effects of FK506 has not been compared with those of clinically used drugs in those reports, the clinical relevancy of FK506 inhibition remained unclear. In this paper, we compared the actions of FK506 with those of steroids or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) which has been clinically used. FK506 inhibited histamine release by Brown-Norway rat peritoneal mast cells more potently than steroids and especially DSCG. FK506 also inhibited histamine release by a mast rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cell line and human peripheral blood basophils, whereas steroids failed to inhibit histamine release by human basophils. FK506 as well as steroids inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-4 production by RBL-1 cells. FK506 was therefore more effective than steroids and DSCG in inhibiting histamine release, and it also had the ability of inhibiting cytokine production by mast cells as steroids do. We concluded that FK506 might regulate allergic diseases via these actions, judging from the viewpoint of clinical relevancy. PMID:10685002

  4. Mast cells and eosinophils in rat mammary gland tumours induced by N-Nitroso-N-methylurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissová Viktória

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the distribution and number of mast cells and eosinophils in rat mammary gland tumours induced by N-Nitroso-N-methylurea. The highest density of mast cells was found in cystic papillary adenocarcinomas of grade II. Eosinophils were detected only in the cystic papillary adenocarcinoma of grades I and II, in non-invasive cribriform adenocarcinoma and comedo-type carcinoma. Mast cell populations were observed perivascularly in the tumour stroma, in the host tumour interface, as well as in necrotic areas of neoplasms. Mast cells were observed to be intact according to their morphological changes, collectively referred to as degranulation. The obtained results indicate that mast cells and eosinophils play an important role in tumour micro-environment formation. The increased density of these cells in experimentally-induced rat mammary gland tumours suggests a poor prognosis in these cancers. Our results also confirmed that rat mammary gland tumours are good models for the study of breast cancers.

  5. Hirschsprung's disease: Is there a relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Kumar Yadav; Kiran Mishra; Anup Mohta; Sarla Agarwal

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To define the topography of mast cells and their numbers in cases of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) and non-HD, assess neural hypertrophy using imaging software and to study the relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers. METHODS:HE stained sections of 32 cases of chronic constipation in the age group of 0-14 years were reviewed for ganglion cells. AChE staining was performed on frozen sections of colonic and rectal biopsies. Based on their findings cases were divided into HD and non-HD and mast cells stained by toluidine blue were evaluated. Image analysis by computerized software was applied to S-100 stained sections for assessment of neural hypertrophy. RESULTS:Difference between number of mast cells in HD group (mean = 36.44) and in non-HD group (mean = 14.79) was statistically significant. Image analysis morphometry on S-100 stained sections served as a useful adjunct. The difference between number, size, and perimeter of the nerve fibers between HD and non-HD group was statistically significant. CONCLUSION:Mast cells are significantly increased in HD and their base line values are much higher in Indian children than that reported in Western literature. Their role in HD needs further research. Morphometry of S-100 stained nerve fibers is a useful adjunct to conventional methods for diagnosis of HD.

  6. Anti-apoptotic BFL-1 is the major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ekoff

    Full Text Available Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions, where aggregation of FcεRI leads to the release of mast cell mediators causing allergic symptoms. The activation also induces a survival program in the cells, i.e., activation-induced mast cell survival. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the activation-induced survival is mediated. Cord blood-derived mast cells and the mast cell line LAD-2 were activated through FcεRI crosslinking, with or without addition of chemicals that inhibit the activity or expression of selected Bcl-2 family members (ABT-737; roscovitine. Cell viability was assessed using staining and flow cytometry. The expression and function of Bcl-2 family members BFL-1 and MCL-1 were investigated using real-time quantitative PCR and siRNA treatment. The mast cell expression of Bfl-1 was investigated in skin biopsies. FcεRI crosslinking promotes activation-induced survival of human mast cells and this is associated with an upregulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1. ABT-737 alone or in combination with roscovitine decreases viability of human mast cells although activation-induced survival is sustained, indicating a minor role for Bcl-X(L, Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Mcl-1. Reducing BFL-1 but not MCL-1 levels by siRNA inhibited activation-induced mast cell survival. We also demonstrate that mast cell expression of Bfl-1 is elevated in birch-pollen-provocated skin and in lesions of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Taken together, our results highlight Bfl-1 as a major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

  7. Utilization of adenosine triphosphate in rat mast cells during histamine release induced by the ionophore A23187

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    The role of endogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in histamine release from rat mast cells induced by the ionophore A23187 in vitro has been studied. 2 The amount of histamine released by calcium from rat mast cells primed with the ionophore A23187 was dependent on the ATP content of the mast...... The observations are consistent with the view that energy requiring processes are involved in ionophore-induced histamine release from rat mast cells although part of the ATP reduction in the aerobic experiments may be due to an uncoupling effect of calcium on the oxidative phosphorylation....

  8. Effect of LED phototherapy (λ630 +/- 20nm) on mast cells during wound healing in hypothyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraguassú, Gardênia M.; De Castro, Isabele Cardoso V.; Vasconcelos, Rebeca M.; da Guarda, Milena G.; Rodriguez, Tânia T.; Ramalho, Maria José P.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.; Ramalho, Luciana Maria P.

    2014-02-01

    Hypothyroidism has been associated with the disruption of the body's metabolism, including the healing process. LED phototherapy has been studied using several healing models, but their effects on mast cells proliferation associated to hypothyroidism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect LED (λ630+/-20nm) phototherapy on mast cells proliferation during tissue repair in hypothyroid rats. Under general anesthesia, a standard surgical wound (1cm2) was created on the dorsum of 24 male Wistar rats divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each: EC-Control Euthyroid; ED-Euthyroid+LED; HC-Control Hypothyroid and HD-Hypothyroid+LED. The irradiation started immediately after surgery and was repeated every other day for 7 days, when animals death occurred. Hypothyroidism was induced in rats with propylthiouracil (0.05g/100mL) administered orally for 4 weeks and maintained until the end of the experiment. The specimens removed were processed to wax and stained with toluidine blue for mast cell identification. The mast cell proliferation was significantly higher in HC group than in EC group (Mann Whitney, pLED light has a biomodulative effect on mast cell population, even when hipothyroidism was present.

  9. Methods for preclinical assessment of antipruritic agents and itch mechanisms independent of mast-cell histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Itch is a sensation that provokes a desire to scratch. Mast-cell histamine was thought to be a key itch mediator. However, histamine and mast-cell degranulation were reported not to elicit scratching in animals. It was difficult to investigate the pathophysiology of itching and to evaluate the antipruritic efficacy of chemical agents in the early 1990 s. We showed that hind-paw scratching and biting were elicited by stimulation with pruritogenic agents in mice. Those results demonstrated for the first time that cutaneous itching could be evaluated behaviorally in animals. We established various animal models of pathological itch of the skin (dry skin, mosquito allergy, surfactant-induced pruritus, and herpes zoster) and mucus membranes (pollen allergy). Mast-cell histamine did not play a key role in itching in any animal model examined except for the pollen allergy model. Histamine is not an exclusive itch mediator of mast cells; tryptase and leukotriene B4 released from mast cells also act as itch mediators. Epidermal keratinocytes release several itch mediators, such as leukotriene B4, sphingosylphosphorylcholine, thromboxane A2, nociceptin, nitric oxide, and histamine, which may play important roles in pathological itching. Appropriate animal models of pathological itching are needed for pharmacological evaluation of the antipruritic efficacy of chemical agents. PMID:25947907

  10. Tyrosol Suppresses Allergic Inflammation by Inhibiting the Activation of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase in Mast Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Gyu Je

    Full Text Available Allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis, rhinitis, asthma, and anaphylaxis are attractive research areas. Tyrosol (2-(4-hydroxyphenylethanol is a polyphenolic compound with diverse biological activities. In this study, we investigated whether tyrosol has anti-allergic inflammatory effects. Ovalbumin-induced active systemic anaphylaxis and immunoglobulin E-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis models were used for the immediate-type allergic responses. Oral administration of tyrosol reduced the allergic symptoms of hypothermia and pigmentation in both animal models. Mast cells that secrete allergic mediators are key regulators on allergic inflammation. Tyrosol dose-dependently decreased mast cell degranulation and expression of inflammatory cytokines. Intracellular calcium levels and activation of inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK regulate cytokine expression and degranulation. Tyrosol blocked calcium influx and phosphorylation of the IKK complex. To define the molecular target for tyrosol, various signaling proteins involved in mast cell activation such as Lyn, Syk, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, and Akt were examined. Our results showed that PI3K could be a molecular target for tyrosol in mast cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that tyrosol has anti-allergic inflammatory effects by inhibiting the degranulation of mast cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines; these effects are mediated via PI3K. Therefore, we expect tyrosol become a potential therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory disorders.

  11. Segmental bronchoprovocation in allergic rhinitis patients affects mast cell and basophil numbers in nasal and bronchial mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Braunstahl (Gert-Jan); S.E. Overbeek (Shelley); W.J. Fokkens (Wytske); A. Kleinjan (Alex); A.R. McEuen; A.F. Walls; H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); J-B. Prins (Jan-Bas)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMast cells and basophils are cells that play an important role in the initiation and control of allergic inflammation in asthma and rhinitis. This study was undertaken to determine the presence and dynamics of mast cells and basophils in the nasal and bronchial mucosa o

  12. Vacuole formation in mast cells responding to osmotic stress and to F-actin disassembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koffer, Anna; Williams, Mark; Johansen, Torben

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescent probes were used to visualize the morphology of membranes and of F-actin in rat peritoneal mast cells, exposed to hyperosmotic medium and consequently reversed to isotonicity. Hypertonicity induced cell shrinkage followed by a regulatory volume increase, and cell alkalinization that w...

  13. Dependence of anaphylactic histamine release from rat mast cells on cellular energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1981-01-01

    The relation between anaphylactic histamine release and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of the mast cells was studied. The cells were incubated with glycolytic (2-deoxyglucose) and respiratory inhibitors (antimycin A and oligomycin) in order to decrease the ATP content of the cells prior...

  14. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. → CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca2+-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. → Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits FcεRI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. → Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl2 promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl2 in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent Fyn kinase activation.

  15. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico); Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia, E-mail: cgonzal@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals

  16. Mast cells and eosinophils in allergy: Close friends or just neighbors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Roopesh Singh; Friedman, Sheli; Seaf, Mansour; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are mostly known for their role in allergic diseases although in recent years it has become clear that they have a role in other diseases and in the body's defense against microbes. In most cases, but especially in allergy, eosinophils are present in the tissue within proximity of mast cells. Due to this spatio-temporal correlation we and others have postulated and described a crosstalk between these two cells, mediated via their released mediators and physical interactions, that is able to modulate each other's function and ultimately the outcome of the allergic inflammatory reaction. This review will focus on the functional unit between mast cells and eosinophils that we have named the "Allergic Effector Unit" and specifically highlight its role in allergy. PMID:26526347

  17. Correlation of mast cells in different stages of human periodontal diseases: Pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Raina; Gupta, Jagriti; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and correlate the relationship between mast cells counts and different stages of human periodontal diseases. Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 50 patients, which were divided into three groups, consisting of 10 cases of clinically healthy gingival tissues (control group) 20 cases of dental plaque-induced gingivitis with no attachment loss and 20 cases of localized chronic periodontitis (LCP) characterized by the loss of periodontal support. The samples for control group were obtained during tooth extractions for orthodontic reasons. The specimens were immediately fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Conclusion: In this study, LCP cases had higher mast cell counts compared to gingivitis sites or healthy tissues. Increased mast cell counts in the progressing sites of periodontal diseases may indicate the importance of these cells in the progression of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27194868

  18. Eosinophils and mast cells as therapeutic targets in pediatric functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Craig; A; Friesen; Jennifer; V; Schurman; Jennifer; M; Colombo; Susan; M; Abdel-Rahman

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of inflammation as a pathophysiologic entity that contributes to functional gastrointestinal disorders including functional dyspepsia(FD).Importantly,inflammation may serve as a mediator between psychologic and physiologic functions.This manuscript reviews the literature implicating two inflammatory cell types,mast cells and eosinophils,in the generation of dyspeptic symptoms and explores their potential as targets for the treatment of FD.There are a number of inciting events which may initiate an inflammatory response,and the subsequent recruitment and activation of mast cells and eosinophils.These include internal triggers such as stress and anxiety,as well as external triggers such as microbes and allergens.Previous studies suggest that there may be efficacy in utilizing medications directed at mast cells and eosinophils.Evidence exists to suggest that combining "anti-inflammatory" medications with other treatments targeting stress can improve the rate of symptom resolution in pediatric FD.

  19. Evidence questioning cromolyn’s effectiveness and selectivity as a “mast cell stabilizer” in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tatsuya; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Starkl, Philipp; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Cromolyn, widely characterized as a “mast cell stabilizer”, has been used in mice to investigate the biological roles of mast cells in vivo. However, it is not clear to what extent cromolyn can either limit the function of mouse mast cells or influence biological processes in mice independently of effects on mast cells. We confirmed that cromolyn (at 10 mg/kg in vivo or 10 – 100 μM in vitro) can inhibit IgE-dependent mast cell activation in rats in vivo (measuring Evans blue extravasation in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and increases in plasma histamine in passive systemic anaphylaxis) and in vitro (measuring peritoneal mast cell β-hexosaminidase release and prostaglandin D2 synthesis). However, under the conditions tested, cromolyn did not inhibit those mast cell-dependent responses in mice. In mice, cromolyn also failed to inhibit the ear swelling or leukocyte infiltration at sites of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Nor did cromolyn inhibit IgE-independent degranulation of mouse peritoneal mast cells induced by various stimulators in vitro. At 100 mg/kg, a concentration ten times higher than that which inhibited passive systemic anaphylaxis in rats, cromolyn significantly inhibited the increases in plasma concentrations of mouse mast cell protease-1 (but not of histamine) during passive systemic anaphylaxis, but had no effect on the reduction in body temperature in this setting. Moreover, this concentration of cromolyn (100 mg/kg) also inhibited LPS-induced TNF production in genetically mast cell-deficient C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh mice in vivo. These results question cromolyn’s effectiveness and selectivity as an inhibitor of mast cell activation and mediator release in the mouse. PMID:22906983

  20. Are testicular mast cells involved in the regulation of germ cells in man?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windschüttl, S; Nettersheim, D; Schlatt, S; Huber, A; Welter, H; Schwarzer, J U; Köhn, F M; Schorle, H; Mayerhofer, A

    2014-07-01

    Protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is the receptor for the prototype mast cell product tryptase. PAR-2 expression by cells of the human germinal epithelium was reported, but the exact cellular sites of testicular expression remained unknown. That became of interest, because mast cells, expressing tryptase, were found in the walls of seminiferous tubules of patients suffering from sub- and infertility. This location suggested that mast cells via tryptase might be able to influence PAR-2-expressing cells in the germinal epithelium. To explore these points, we used testicular paraffin-embedded sections for immunohistochemistry. PAR-2-positive cells were mostly basally located cells of the seminiferous epithelium, namely spermatogonia. Some stained for the receptor for GDNF (GFRalpha-1), and possibly represent spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). As true human SSCs could not be examined, we turned to TCam-2 seminoma cells, expressing PAR-2 and stem cell markers, including GFRalpha-1. TCam-2 cells robustly responded to stimulation with a specific PAR-2 agonist (SLIGKV) by increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Recombinant tryptase and trypsin, but not a control peptide (VKGILS) evoked this response, implying functional PAR-2. Video imaging and caspase 3/7 assays showed that SLIGKV and tryptase prevented spontaneous apoptosis and increased proliferation of TCam-2 cells. The expression of the marker of pluripotency OCT3/4 was unchanged upon activation of PAR-2, suggesting that the stem cell-like character is not changed. Furthermore, human germ cell cancers were examined. A subset of seminoma and carcinoma in situ samples expressed PAR-2, indicating that yet unknown subgroups exist. Collectively, the descriptive data obtained in human testicular sections, in germ cell cancers and the functional results in TCam-2 cells imply a trophic role of mast cell-derived tryptase for human germ cells. This may be relevant for subtypes of human germ cell cancers, and possibly SSCs. It

  1. Regulatory T cells enhance mast cell production of IL-6 via surface-bound TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Kirthana; Bryce, Paul J

    2012-01-15

    Mast cell degranulation is a hallmark of allergic reactions, but mast cells can also produce many cytokines that modulate immunity. Recently, CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to inhibit mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis, but their influence on cytokine production remained unknown. In this study, we show that, rather than inhibit, Tregs actually enhance mast cell production of IL-6. We demonstrate that, whereas inhibition of degranulation was OX40/OX40 ligand dependent, enhancement of IL-6 was due to TGF-β. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that the Treg-derived TGF-β was surface-bound, because the interaction was contact dependent, and no TGF-β was detectable in the supernatant. Soluble TGF-β1 alone was sufficient to enhance mast cell IL-6 production, and these supernatants were sufficient to promote Th17 skewing, but those from Treg-mast cell cultures were not, supporting this being surface-bound TGF-β from the Tregs. Interestingly, the augmentation of IL-6 production occurred basally or in response to innate stimuli (LPS or peptidoglycan), adaptive stimuli (IgE cross-linking by specific Ag), and cytokine activation (IL-33). We demonstrate that TGF-β led to enhanced transcription and de novo synthesis of IL-6 upon activation without affecting IL-6 storage or mRNA stability. In vivo, the adoptive transfer of Tregs inhibited mast cell-dependent anaphylaxis in a model of food allergy but promoted intestinal IL-6 and IL-17 production. Consequently, our findings establish that Tregs can exert divergent influences upon mast cells, inhibiting degranulation via OX40/OX40 ligand interactions while promoting IL-6 via TGF-β. PMID:22156492

  2. TRPV Channels in Mast Cells as a Target for Low-Level-Laser Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser irradiation in the visible as well as infrared range is applied to skin for treatment of various diseases. Here we summarize and discuss effects of laser irradiation on mast cells that leads to degranulation of the cells. This process may contribute to initial steps in the final medical effects. We suggest that activation of TRPV channels in the mast cells forms a basis for the underlying mechanisms and that released ATP and histamine may be putative mediators for therapeutic effects.

  3. Clinical significance of mast cells and IL-9 in B-NHL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封丽丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of mast cells and interleukin-9 (IL-9) in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) development and its clinical significance.Methods The expression level of CD117 in tumor tissues of 32 B-NHL patients was determined by Western blot.The infiltration of CD117+mast cells (MCs) in human B-NHL tumor tissues was observed by immunohistochemistry staining.To evaluate the correlations between the data from CD117+MCs and biological markers of human B-NHL,a Spearman correlation coefficient (rs) was cal-

  4. Extramedullary Involvement of Mast Cell Leukemia Detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhanli; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Meng; Li, Ziao; Li, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare subtype of systemic mastocytosis, characterized by the leukemic expansion of immature mast cells. We present a case of MCL with extramedullary involvement of cervical lymph node and lung demonstrated by the initial F-FDG PET/CT scan. After a transient complete remission by induction chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the follow-up PET/CT showed extensive extramedullary relapse involving multiple lymph nodes and small bowel. F-FDG PET/CT may be a useful tool to comprehensively stage and follow-up MCL. PMID:26975014

  5. RIN3 is a negative regulator of mast cell responses to SCF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Janson

    Full Text Available Stimulation of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT by Stem Cell Factor (SCF triggers activation of RAS and its downstream effectors. Proper KIT activation is essential for the maturation, survival and proliferation of mast cells. In addition, SCF activation of KIT is critical for recruiting mast cells to sites of infection or injury, where they release a mix of pro-inflammatory substances. RIN3, a RAS effector and RAB5-directed guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF, is highly expressed and enriched in human mast cells. SCF treatment of mast cells increased the amount of GTP-bound RAB5, and the degree of RAB5 activation correlated with the expression level of RIN3. At the same time, SCF caused the dissociation of a pre-formed complex of RIN3 with BIN2, a membrane bending protein implicated in endocytosis. Silencing of RIN3 increased the rate of SCF-induced KIT internalization, while persistent RIN3 over-expression led to KIT down regulation. These observations strongly support a role for RIN3 in coordinating the early steps of KIT endocytosis. Importantly, RIN3 also functioned as an inhibitor of mast cell migration toward SCF. Finally, we demonstrate that elevated RIN3 levels sensitize mastocytosis cells to treatment with a KIT tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suggesting the value of a two-pronged inhibitor approach for this difficult to treat malignancy. These findings directly connect KIT activation with a mast cell-specific RAS effector that regulates the cellular response to SCF and provide new insight for the development of more effective mastocytosis treatments.

  6. The mast cell degranulator compound 48/80 directly activates neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Compound 48/80 is widely used in animal and tissue models as a "selective" mast cell activator. With this study we demonstrate that compound 48/80 also directly activates enteric neurons and visceral afferents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used in vivo recordings from extrinsic intestinal afferents together with Ca(++ imaging from primary cultures of DRG and nodose neurons. Enteric neuronal activation was examined by Ca(++ and voltage sensitive dye imaging in isolated gut preparations and primary cultures of enteric neurons. Intraluminal application of compound 48/80 evoked marked afferent firing which desensitized on subsequent administration. In egg albumen-sensitized animals, intraluminal antigen evoked a similar pattern of afferent activation which also desensitized on subsequent exposure to antigen. In cross-desensitization experiments prior administration of compound 48/80 failed to influence the mast cell mediated response. Application of 1 and 10 µg/ml compound 48/80 evoked spike discharge and Ca(++ transients in enteric neurons. The same nerve activating effect was observed in primary cultures of DRG and nodose ganglion cells. Enteric neuron cultures were devoid of mast cells confirmed by negative staining for c-kit or toluidine blue. In addition, in cultured enteric neurons the excitatory action of compound 48/80 was preserved in the presence of histamine H(1 and H(2 antagonists. The mast cell stabilizer cromolyn attenuated compound 48/80 and nicotine evoked Ca(++ transients in mast cell-free enteric neuron cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results showed direct excitatory action of compound 48/80 on enteric neurons and visceral afferents. Therefore, functional changes measured in tissue or animal models may involve a mast cell independent effect of compound 48/80 and cromolyn.

  7. Histamine release from gut mast cells from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolte, Hendrik; Spjeldnæs, Nikolaj; Kruse, Aksel; Nielsen, Bent Windelborg

    1990-01-01

    macroscopically inflamed and normal tissue. Mast cells and corresponding basophils were challenged with anti-IgE, anti-IgG, subclass anti-IgG4, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and results were compared with those from nine patient control subjects. The mast cell count in patients with ulcerative...... histamine per sample at anti-IgG4 challenge; however, the corresponding basophils did not respond to anti-IgG4. In addition, the anti-IgG4 mediated histamine release was primarily confined to patients with inflammatory bowel disease. This study substantiates previous histopathological findings that mast...... cells may play a functional role in the inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel diseases and provides evidence for a possible role of subclass IgG4 as a reaginic antibody....

  8. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. PMID:15050425

  9. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-α transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling

  10. Mast cell stabilizing and antiallergic activity of Abrus precatorius in the management of asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DJ Taur; RY Patil

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate effects of ethanol extract of Abrus precatorius leaves (EAPL) on egg albumin induced mast cell degranulation in mice and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in rats.Methods: In present study ethanol extract of Abrus precatorius leaves (EAPL) at doses of 100, 125, 150 mg/kg i.p were evaluated for preliminary phytochemical screening, acute toxicity studies and egg albumin induced mast cell degranulation in mice and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in rats.Results: The results of present investigation showed that the LD 50 of EAPL is more than 1300 mg/kg. EAPL (100-150 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly protect egg albumin induced degranulation of mast cell and inhibit area of leakage of dye in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Phytochemical studies observed presence of saponin, alkaloids, flavonoids, and glycosides. Conclusions: In conclusion EAPL possesses anti asthmatic potential.

  11. Transgenerational transmission of systemic mast cell activation disease-genetic and epigenetic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molderings, Gerhard J

    2016-08-01

    Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD) comprises disorders characterized by an enhanced release of mast cell mediators accompanied by a varying accumulation of dysfunctional mast cells. Within the last years, evidence has been presented that MCAD is a multifactorial polygenic determined disease with the KIT(D816V) mutation and its induced functional consequences considered as special case. The respective genes encode proteins for various signaling pathways, epigenetic regulators, the RNA splicing machinery, and transcription factors. Transgenerational transmission of MCAD appears to be quite common. The basics of the molecular mechanisms underlying predisposition of the disease, that is, somatic and germline mutations and the contribution of epigenetic processes have become identifiable. The aim of the present review is to present and discuss available genetic, epigenetic and epidemiological findings, and to present a model of MCAD pathogenesis. PMID:26880691

  12. Computed tomography evaluation of mast cell tumours; Avaliacao por tomografia computadorizada dos mastocitomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorigados, Carla Aparecida Batista; Matera, Julia Maria; Macedo, Thais; Pinto, Ana Carolina Brandao Fonseca, E-mail: clorigados@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Cirurgia

    2012-07-01

    The mast cell tumours are common tumours of the canine skin. Computed tomography (CT) has assumed an important role in tumours evaluation and staging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of CT as a method of assessing characteristics of mast cell tumors. Ten dogs with mast cell tumor were evaluated. CT was performed before and after the intravenous injection of hydro soluble ionic iodine. Attenuation, contrast enhancement, cleavage with adjacent tissues and the unidimensional measurement of each lesion was determined in it maximum diameter, in transversal plane. Concerning the attenuation characteristic, 50% were homogeneous and 50% heterogeneous. The contrast enhancement was homogeneous in 50% of cases, heterogeneous in 40% and peripheral in 10%. Fifty percent of the tumours showed loss of plane of cleavage and 30% partial loss. This information can help in directing the patients that will be undergoing chemotherapy or surgery. (author)

  13. Histamine immunohistochemistry is superior to the conventional heparin-based routine staining methodology for investigations of human skin mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, O; Virtanen, M; Hilliges, M; Yang, Q

    1994-05-01

    Conventional studies of mast cells are limited by methodological restrictions such as a selective fixative-dependent routine staining blockage. This is thought to depend on the biochemical differences of the mast cell granule contents suggesting a cellular heterogeneity. Investigations of human mast cells, using routine methods, also suffer from the problem of a low signal-to-noise ratio. In the present study, normal human skin was used to compare an immunohistochemical method for histamine with two recommended mast-cell fixatives and a new commercial fixative in combination with three routine stains. Mast cells were found throughout the dermis with all the routine stains used. However, immunohistochemistry gave profoundly better results. Small structures, such as thin cytoplasmatic extensions and single granules, were readily detectable. Double-staining (immunohistochemistry followed by routine staining) revealed differences in staining capacity. All immunoreactive cells were not stained by routine stains and sometimes the opposite was also seen. This supports earlier reported evidence of heterogeneity, not only between skin and intestinal mast cells but also among skin mast cells themselves. Furthermore, by focusing on histamine, instead of heparin, we probably overcame the problems of the selective fixative-dependent routine staining blockage. Finally, the immunofluorescence technique provides a high signal-to-noise ratio and is an excellent method for making high-quality microphotographs of human mast cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8045782

  14. Mast cells in the intestine and gills of the sea bream, Sparus aurata, exposed to a polychlorinated biphenyl, PCB 126.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriano, Eugenia Rita; Calò, Margherita; Silvestri, Giuseppa; Zaccone, Daniele; Pergolizzi, Simona; Lo Cascio, Patrizia

    2012-02-01

    The presence of mast cells has been reported in all classes of vertebrates, including many teleost fish families. The mast cells of teleosts, both morphologically and functionally, show a close similarity to the mast cells of mammals. Mast cells of teleosts, localized in the vicinity of blood vessels of the intestine, gills and skin, may play an important role in the mechanisms of inflammatory response, because they express a number of functional proteins, including piscidins, which are antimicrobical peptides that act against a broad-spectrum of pathogens. An increase in the number of mast cells in various tissues and organs of teleosts seems to be linked to a wide range of stressful conditions, such as exposure to heavy metals (cadmium, copper, lead and mercury), exposure to herbicides and parasitic infections. This study analyzed the morphological localization and abundance of mast cells in the intestine and gills of sea bream, Sparus aurata, after a 12, 24 or 72 h exposure to PCB 126, a polychlorinated biphenyl, which is a potent immunotoxic agent. In the organs of fish exposed to PCB 126, it was observed that in addition to congestion of blood vessels, there was extravasation of red blood cells, infiltration of lymphocytes, and a progressive increase in numbers of mast cells. These data confirm the immunotoxic action of PCB, and the involvement of mast cells in the inflammatory response. PMID:21565388

  15. Effects of the ether phospholipid AMG-PC on mast cells are similar to that of the ether lipid AMG but different from that of the analogue hexadecylphosphocholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosman, Nina

    Farmakologi, ether phospholipid, hexacylphosphocholine, miltefosine, protein kinase C, AMG-PC(alkyl-methyl-glycero-phosphocholine), Histamine release, mast cell......Farmakologi, ether phospholipid, hexacylphosphocholine, miltefosine, protein kinase C, AMG-PC(alkyl-methyl-glycero-phosphocholine), Histamine release, mast cell...

  16. Galectin-9 enhances cytokine secretion, but suppresses survival and degranulation, in human mast cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiji Kojima

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 (Gal-9, a lectin having a β-galactoside-binding domain, can induce apoptosis of Th1 cells by binding to TIM-3. In addition, Gal-9 inhibits IgE/Ag-mediated degranulation of mast cell/basophilic cell lines by binding to IgE, thus blocking IgE/Ag complex formation. However, the role of Gal-9 in mast cell function in the absence of IgE is not fully understood. Here, we found that recombinant Gal-9 directly induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 but not p38 MAPK in a human mast cell line, HMC-1, which does not express FcεRI. Gal-9 induced apoptosis and inhibited PMA/ionomycin-mediated degranulation of HMC-1 cells. On the other hand, Gal-9 induced cytokine and/or chemokine production by HMC-1 cells, dependent on activation of ERK1/2 but not p38 MAPK. In addition, the lectin activity of Gal-9 was required for Gal-9-mediated cytokine secretion by HMC-1 cells. These observations suggest that Gal-9 has dual properties as both a regulator and an activator of mast cells.

  17. Mast cells in citric acid-induced cough of guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. To investigate the role of mast cells in CA-induced cough, three experiments were carried out in this study. In the first experiment, 59 guinea pigs were employed and we used compound 48/80 to deplete mast cells, cromolyn sodium to stabilize mast cells, MK-886 to inhibit leukotriene synthesis, pyrilamine to antagonize histamine H1 receptor, methysergide to antagonize serotonin receptor, and indomethacin to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In the second experiment, 56 compound 48/80-pretreated animals were divided into two parts; the first one was used to test the role of exogenous leukotriene (LT) C4, while the second one to test the role of exogenous histamine in CA-induced cough. Each animal with one of the above pretreatments was exposed sequentially to saline (baseline) and CA (0.6 M) aerosol, each for 3 min. Then, cough was recorded for 12 min using a barometric body plethysmograph. In the third experiment, the activation of mast cells upon CA inhalation was investigated by determining arterial plasma histamine concentration in 17 animals. Exposure to CA induced a marked increase in cough number. Compound 48/80, cromolyn sodium, MK-886 and pyrilamine, but not indomethacin or methysergide, significantly attenuated CA-induced cough. Injection of LTC4 or histamine caused a significant increase in CA-induced cough in compound 48/80-pretreated animals. In addition, CA inhalation caused significant increase in plasma histamine concentration, which was blocked by compound 48/80 pretreatment. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in CA aerosol inhalation-induced cough via perhaps mediators LTs and histamine

  18. Do laser and led phototherapies influence mast cells and myofibroblasts to produce collagen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Castro, Isabele Cardoso Vieira; Rocha, Clarissa Araújo Gurgel; Gomes Henriques, Aguida Cristina; Cavalcanti de Sousa, Ana Paula; Lisboa, Márcio Vieira; Sotero, Drielli da Rocha; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; Santos, Jean Nunes Dos

    2014-07-01

    Laser and LED phototherapies accelerate tissue repair. Mast cells induce the proliferation of fibroblasts and the development of local fibrosis. Increased numbers of myofibroblasts and mast cells are frequently found together in a normal wound repair, suggesting that mediators produced by the mast cells could play a role in the regulation of myofibroblast differentiation and function. The aim of this study was to analyze the involvement of mast cells on the synthesis of collagen and their influence on myofibroblast differentiation in the late phase of tissue repair on wounds treated with LLLT (λ 660 nm, 10 J/cm(2), 40 mW, 252 s) or LED (λ 630 ± 10 nm, 10 J/cm(2), 115 mW, 87 s). A 1 × 1-cm surgical wound was created on the dorsum of 30 rats divided into three groups of ten animals each: control, laser, and LED. The animals of each group were irradiated and sacrificed 7 and 14 days after injury. The statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation tests. Laser light improved the collagen deposition rate along the time points (p = 0.22), but when compared to the control groups during the periods studied, the number of mast cells decreased significantly (p ≤ 0.05). With respect to myofibroblasts, the results showed a trend to their reduction. No statistical significances were observed for LED light according to the parameters used in this study. It is concluded that the mast cell and myofibroblast population might participate in the collagen formation of irradiated wounds particularly in relation to laser phototherapy. PMID:24554451

  19. Interferon-gamma-like molecule induces Ia antigens on cultured mast cell progenitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, G H; Clark-lewis, I.; McKimm-Breschkin, J L; Schrader, J W

    1982-01-01

    Persisting (P) cells (murine cells that resemble mast cells and grow continuously in vitro for prolonged periods in the presence of a specific growth factor) did not express detectable levels of Ia antigens (murine class II major histocompatibility antigens) when their growth was supported by partially purified P cell-stimulating factor. However, when these Ia-negative P cells were transferred to medium conditioned by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells, Ia antigens appeared within 24 hr. ...

  20. Mast cells modulate acute toxoplasmosis in murine models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Huang

    Full Text Available The role of mast cells (MCs in Toxoplasma gondii infection is poorly known. Kunming outbred mice were infected intraperitoneally with RH strain T. gondii, either treated with compound 48/80 (C48/80, MC activator or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, MC inhibitor. Compared with infected controls, infected mice treated with C48/80 exhibited significantly increased inflammation in the liver (P < 0.01, spleen (P < 0.05, and mesentery (P < 0.05 tissues, higher parasite burden in the peritoneal lavage fluids (P < 0.01, and increased levels of mRNA transcripts of T. gondii tachyzoite surface antigen 1 (SAG1 gene in the spleen and liver tissues (P < 0.01, accompanied with significantly increased Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-12p40, and TNF-α (P < 0.01 and decreased IL-10 (P < 0.01 mRNA expressions in the liver, and increased IFN-γ (P < 0.01 and IL-12p40 (P < 0.01 but decreased TNF-α (P < 0.01 and IL-4 (P < 0.01 in the spleens of infected mice treated with C48/80 at day 9-10 p.i. Whereas mice treated with DSCG had significantly decreased tissue lesions (P < 0.01, lower parasite burden in the peritoneal lavage fluids (P < 0.01 and decreased SAG1 expressions in the spleen and liver tissues (P < 0.01, accompanied with significantly increased IFN-γ (P < 0.01 and IL-12p40 (P < 0.05 in the liver, and decreased IFN-γ (P < 0.05 and TNF-α (P < 0.01 in the spleens; IL-4 and IL-10 expressions in both the spleen and liver were significantly increased (P < 0.01 in the infected mice treated with DSCG. These findings suggest that mediators associated with the MC activation may play an important role in modulating acute inflammatory pathogenesis and parasite clearance during T. gondii infection in this strain of mice. Thus, MC activation/inhibition mechanisms are potential novel targets for the prevention and control of T. gondii infection.

  1. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibits activation of Syk kinase to suppress mast cells in vitro and mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kui Lea [Center for Drug Development Assistance, National Institute of Food Drug Safety Evaluation (NIFDS), KFDA, Cheongwon-gun (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Na Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, A-Ram; Her, Erk; Kim, Bokyung [Department of Immunology and physiology, College of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Sik [College of Pharmacy, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Eun-Yi [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Biological Science, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Mi [College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hang-Rae, E-mail: hangrae2@snu.ac.kr [Department of Anatomy, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Wahn Soo, E-mail: wahnchoi@kku.ac.kr [Department of Immunology and physiology, College of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. We aimed to study the effects of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on activation of mast cells in vitro and in mice. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited degranulation of mast cells in a dose-dependent manner, and also suppressed the expression and secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-4 in mast cells. Mechanistically, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited activating phosphorylation of Syk and LAT, which are crucial for early Fc{epsilon}RI-mediated signaling events, as well as Akt and MAP kinases, which play essential roles in the production of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. Notably, although 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited the activation of Fyn and Syk, minimal inhibition was observed in mast cells in the case of Lyn. Furthermore, consistent with its in vitro activity, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline significantly suppressed mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. In summary, the results from this study demonstrate that 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline shows an inhibitory effect on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, and that this is mediated by inhibiting the activation of Syk in mast cells. Therefore, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on mast cells was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited Syk activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful for IgE-mediated allergy.

  2. Effect of amiloride on arachidonic acid and histamine release from rat mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnebjerg, H.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a putative Na/H exchange inhibition on histamine and [C]arachidonic acid ([C]AA) release has been examined in rat peritoneal mast cells, using either addition of amiloride or removal of extracellular Na. The cells were stimulated by non-immunological agents, i.e. calcium ionophore A...

  3. Estimation of the rate of energy production of rat mast cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1983-01-01

    Rat mast cells were treated with glycolytic and respiratory inhibitors. The rate of adenosine triphosphate depletion of cells incubated with both types of inhibitors and the rate of lactate produced in presence of antimycin A and glucose were used to estimate the rate of oxidative and glycolytic...

  4. [Disodium cromoglycate--mast cell degranulation blocker in the process of tissue remodelation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxová, H; Vasilková, M; Tkaczyk, J; Vízek, M

    2010-01-01

    Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) is a compound commonly used in the treatment of allergic diseases. The effect of DSCG is due to its ability to stabilize the mast cell membrane and to prevent release of histamine and inflammatory mediators. Mast cells are also an abundant source of tissue metalloproteinases, serine proteases and growth factors, which play an important role in the processes of the tissue remodeling. In this view the DSCG is a substance which allows us to study the mechanisms of the pulmonary vascular bed remodeling in the experimental animals exposed to chronic hypoxia and in a phase of the recovery from hypoxia. PMID:21254664

  5. Identification of microRNAs regulating the developmental pathways of bone marrow derived mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in leukocyte differentiation, although those utilised for specific programs and key functions remain incompletely characterised. As a global approach to gain insights into the potential regulatory role of miRNA in mast cell differentiation we characterised expression in BM cultures from the initiation of differentiation. In cultures enriched in differentiating mast cells we characterised miRNA expression and identified miRNA targeting the mRNA of putative factors involved in differentiation pathways and cellular identity. Detailed pathway analysis identified a unique miRNA network that is intimately linked to the mast cell differentiation program. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 86 unique miRNAs with expression patterns that were up- or down- regulated at 5-fold or more during bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMC development. By employing TargetScan and MeSH databases, we identified 524 transcripts involved in 30 canonical pathways as potentially regulated by these specific 86 miRNAs. Furthermore, by applying miRanda and IPA analyses, we predict that 7 specific miRNAs of this group are directly associated with the expression of c-Kit and FcεRIα and likewise, that 18 miRNAs promote expression of Mitf, GATA1 and c/EBPα three core transcription factors that direct mast cell differentiation. Furthermore, we have identified 11 miRNAs that may regulate the expression of STATs-3, -5a/b, GATA2 and GATA3 during differentiation, along with 13 miRNAs that target transcripts encoding Ndst2, mMCP4 and mMCP6 and thus may regulate biosynthesis of mast cell secretory mediators. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This investigation characterises changes in miRNA expression in whole BM cultures during the differentiation of mast cells and predicts functional links between miRNAs and their target mRNAs for the regulation of development. This information provides an important resource for further

  6. Changes in mast cell number and stem cell factor expression in human skin after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis and may be a therapeutic target. The mechanism of increased mast cell number in relation to acute and late tissue responses in human skin was investigated. Materials and methods: Punch biopsies of skin 1 and 15–18 months after breast radiotherapy and a contralateral control biopsy were collected. Mast cells were quantified by immunohistochemistry using the markers c-Kit and tryptase. Stem cell factor (SCF) and collagen-1 expression was analysed by qRT-PCR. Clinical photographic scores were performed at post-surgical baseline and 18 months and 5 years post-radiotherapy. Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HDMEC) cultures were exposed to 2 Gy ionising radiation and p53 and SCF expression was analysed by Western blotting and ELISA. Results: Dermal mast cell numbers were increased at 1 (p = 0.047) and 18 months (p = 0.040) using c-Kit, and at 18 months (p = 0.024) using tryptase immunostaining. Collagen-1 mRNA in skin was increased at 1 month (p = 0.047) and 18 months (p = 0.032) and SCF mRNA increased at 1 month (p = 0.003). None of 16 cases scored had a change in photographic appearance at 5 years, compared to baseline. SCF expression was not increased in HDMECs irradiated in vitro. Conclusions: Increased mast cell number was associated with up-regulated collagen-1 expression in human skin at early and late time points. This increase could be secondary to elevated SCF expression at 1 month after radiotherapy. Although mast cells accumulate around blood vessels, no endothelial cell secretion of SCF was seen after in vitro irradiation. Modification of mast cell number and collagen-1 expression may be observed in skin at 1 and 18 months after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with no change in photographic breast appearance at 5 years

  7. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  8. Single-cell dynamics of mast cell-CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossi, Barbara; D'Incà, Federica; Crivellato, Enrico; Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Mongillo, Marco; Danelli, Luca; Maggi, Laura; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-07-01

    The biological behavior of immune cells is determined by their intrinsic properties and interactions with other cell populations within their microenvironment. Several studies have confirmed the existence of tight spatial interactions between mast cells (MCs) and Tregs in different settings. For instance, we have recently identified the functional cross-talk between MCs and Tregs, through the OX40L-OX40 axis, as a new mechanism of reciprocal influence. However, there is scant information regarding the single-cell dynamics of this process. In this study, time-lapse video microscopy revealed direct interactions between Tregs and MCs in both murine and human cell co-cultures, resulting in the inhibition of the MC degranulation response. MCs incubated with WT, but not OX40-deficient, Tregs mediated numerous and long-lasting interactions and displayed different morphological features lacking the classical signs of exocytosis. MC degranulation and Ca2+ mobilization upon activation were inhibited by Tregs on a single-cell basis, without affecting overall cytokine secretion. Transmission electron microscopy showed ultrastructural evidence of vesicle-mediated secretion reconcilable with the morphological pattern of piecemeal degranulation. Our results suggest that MC morphological and functional changes following MC-Treg interactions can be ascribed to cell-cell contact and represent a transversal, non-species-specific mechanism of immune response regulation. Further research, looking at the molecular composition of this interaction will broaden our understanding of its contribution to immunity. PMID:21509780

  9. Modulation of tryptase secretion from human colon mast cells by histamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of histamine to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells and the potential mechanisms.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colons were challenged with histamine, anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 (CI), and the cell supernatants after challenge were collected. Tryptase release was determined with a sandwich ELISA procedure.able to induce a "bell" shape dose related release of tryptase from colon mast cells. The maximum release of tryptase was approximately 3.5 fold more than spontaneous release. As little as 10 ng/mL histamine showed a similar potency to 10 μg/mL anti-IgE in induction of tryptase release. Histamine induced release of tryptase initiated at 10 s when histamine (100 ng/mL) was added to cells, gradually increased thereafter, and completed at 5 min, Both pertussis toxin or metabolic inhibitors were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. When histamine and anti-IgE were added to colon mast cells at the same time, the quantity of tryptase released was similar to that induced by anti-IgE alone. The similar results were observed with CI. However, when various concentrations of histamine were incubated with cells for 20 min before adding anti-IgE or CI, the quantity of tryptase released was similar to that was induced by histamine alone.CONCLUSION: Histamine is a potent activator of human colon mast cells, which represents a novel and pivotal selfamplification mechanism of mast cell degranulation.

  10. Estrogen modulates the influence of cardiac inflammatory cells on function of cardiac fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLarty JL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer L McLarty,1 Jianping Li,2 Scott P Levick,3 Joseph S Janicki2 1Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Cardiovascular Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA Background: Inflammatory cells play a major role in the pathology of heart failure by stimulating cardiac fibroblasts to regulate the extracellular matrix in an adverse way. In view of the fact that inflammatory cells have estrogen receptors, we hypothesized that estrogen provides cardioprotection by decreasing the ability of cardiac inflammatory cells to influence fibroblast function. Methods: Male rats were assigned to either an untreated or estrogen-treated group. In the treated group, estrogen was delivered for 2 weeks via a subcutaneous implanted pellet containing 17β-estradiol. A mixed population of cardiac inflammatory cells, including T-lymphocytes (about 70%, macrophages (about 12%, and mast cells (about 12%, was isolated from each rat and cultured in a Boyden chamber with cardiac fibroblasts from untreated adult male rats for 24 hours. To examine if tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α produced by inflammatory cells represents a mechanism contributing to the stimulatory effects of inflammatory cells on cardiac fibroblasts, inflammatory cells from the untreated group were incubated with cardiac fibroblasts in a Boyden chamber system for 24 hours in the presence of a TNF-α -neutralizing antibody. Cardiac fibroblasts were also incubated with 5 ng/mL of TNF-α for 24 hours. Fibroblast proliferation, collagen synthesis, matrix metalloproteinase activity, β1 integrin protein levels, and the ability of fibroblasts to contract collagen gels were determined in all groups and statistically compared via one-way analysis of variance. Results: Inflammatory cells from the

  11. Nonclinical evaluation of the potential for mast cell activation by an erythropoietin analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, James L; Boyne, Michael; Pang, Eric; Chimalakonda, Krishna; Howard, Kristina E

    2015-09-15

    The erythropoietin analog peginesatide was withdrawn from marketing due to unexpected severe anaphylactic reactions associated with administration of the multi-use formulation. The adverse events occurred rapidly following the first ever administration of the drug with most affected patients becoming symptomatic in less than 30min. This is most consistent with an anaphylactoid reaction due to direct activation of mast cells. Laboratory evaluation was undertaken using rat peritoneal mast cells as the model system. Initial studies showed that high concentrations of the formulated drug as well as formulated vehicle alone could cause mast cell degranulation as measured by histamine release. The purified active drug was not able to cause histamine release whereas the vehicle filtrate and lab created drug vehicle were equally potent at causing histamine release. Individual formulations of vehicle leaving one component out showed that histamine release was due to phenol. Dose response studies with phenol showed a very sharp dose response curve that was similar in three buffer systems. Cellular analysis by flow cytometry showed that the histamine release was not due to cell death, and that changes in light scatter parameters consistent with degranulation were rapidly observed. Limited testing with primary human mast cells showed a similar dose response of histamine release with exposure to phenol. To provide in vivo confirmation, rats were injected with vehicle formulated with various concentrations of phenol via a jugular vein cannula. Significant release of histamine was detected in blood samples taken 2min after dosing at the highest concentrations tested. PMID:26079829

  12. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by protease inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of protease inhibitors to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of tryptase and chymase inhibitors,and tryptase release was determined.RESULTS: IgE dependent tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 37%, 40% and 36.6% by chymase inhibitors Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me (ZIGPFM), N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), and α1-antitrypsin, respectively. Similarly, the inhibitors of tryptase leupeptin, N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and lactoferrin were also able to inhibit anti-IgE induced tryptase release by a maximum of 39.4%,47.6% and 36.6%, respectively. The inhibitory actions of chymase inhibitors, but not tryptase inhibitors on colon mast cells were enhanced by preincubation of them with cells for 20 min before challenged with anti-IgE. At a concentration of 10 μg/mL, protamine was able to inhibit anti-IgE and calcium ionophore induced tryptase release. However, at 100 μg/mL, protamine elevated tryptase levels in supernatants.A specific inhibitor of aminopeptidase amastatin had no effect on anti-IgE induced tryptase release. The significant inhibition of calcium ionophore induced tryptase release was also observed with the inhibitors of tryptase and chymase examined. The inhibitors tested by themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells.CONCLUSION: It was demonstrated for the first time that both tryptase and chymase inhibitors could inhibit IgE dependent and calcium ionophore induced tryptase release from dispersed colon mast cells in a concentration dependent of manner, which suggest that they are likely to be developed as a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat chronic of colitis in man.

  13. Modulation of histamine release from human colon mast cells by protease inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of protease inhibitors to modulate histamine release from human colon mast cells.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of tryptase and chymase inhibitors, and histamine release was determined.RESULTS: IgE dependent histamine release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 37%, 26% and 36.8% by chymase inhibitors Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me (ZIGPFM), N-Tosyl-L-phenylalanyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), and α1-antitrypsin, respectively. Similarly, inhibitors of tryptase leupeptin, N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), lactoferrin and protamine were also able to inhibit anti-IgE induced histamine release by a maximum of some 48%, 37%, 40% and 34%, respectively. Preincubation of these inhibitors with cells for 20 min before challenged with anti-IgE had small effect on the inhibitory actions of these inhibitors on colon mast cells. A specific inhibitor of aminopeptidase amastatin had no effect on anti-IgE induced histamine release. The significant inhibition of calcium ionophore induced histamine release was also observed with the inhibitors of tryptase and chymase examined. Apart from leupeptin and protamine, the inhibitors tested by themselves did not stimulate colon mast cells.CONCLUSION: It was demonstrated that both tryptase and chymase inhibitors could inhibit IgE dependent and calcium ionophore induced histamine release from dispersed colon mast cells in a concentration dependent of manner, which suggest that they are likely to be developed as a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat chronic of colitis in man.

  14. The natural compound nujiangexanthone A suppresses mast cell activation and allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Cai, Shuangfan; Nie, Jia; Li, Yangyang; Shi, Guochao; Hao, Jimin; Fu, Wenwei; Tan, Hongsheng; Chen, Shilin; Li, Bin; Xu, Hongxi

    2016-01-15

    Mast cells play an important role in allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. The genus Garcinia of the family Guttiferae is well known as a prolific source of polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols and bioactive prenylated xanthones, which exhibit various biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cytotoxic effects. Nujiangexanthone A (N7) is a novel compound isolated from the leaves of Garcinia nujiangensis. In this paper, we sought to determine the anti-allergic and anti-inflammation activity of N7 in vivo and its mechanism in vitro. We found N7 suppressed IgE/Ag induced mast cell activiation, including degranulation and production of cytokines and eicosanoids, through inhibiting Src kinase activity and Syk dependent pathways. N7 inhibited histamine release, prostaglandin D2 and leukotriene C4 generation in mast cell dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis animal model. We also found N7 inhibited the IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IgE levels in ovalbumin-induced asthma model. Histological studies demonstrated that N7 substantially inhibited OVA-induced cellular infiltration and increased mucus production in the lung tissue. Our study reveals the anti-allergic function of N7, thereby suggesting the utility of this compound as a possible novel agent for preventing mast cell-related immediate and delayed allergic diseases. PMID:26571438

  15. Effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), nocodazole, and taxol on mast cell histamine secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, E H; Johansen, Torben

    1986-01-01

    Nocodazole depolymerized microtubules and increased the number of microfilaments, and dimethylsulfoxide increased the number of microfilaments. Both drugs inhibited compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat mast cells. Taxol, which increased the number of microtubules, had no effect on hi...

  16. Drug hypersensitivity in clonal mast cell disorders : ENDA/EAACI position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonadonna, P.; Pagani, M.; Aberer, W.; Bilo, M. B.; Brockow, K.; Elberink, H. Oude; Garvey, L.; Mosbech, H.; Romano, A.; Zanotti, R.; Torres, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a clonal disorder characterized by the proliferation and accumulation of mast cells (MC) in different tissues, with a preferential localization in skin and bone marrow (BM). The excess of MC in mastocytosis as well as the increased releasability of MC may lead to a higher frequency a

  17. Systemic mastocytosis with associated clonal haematological non-mast cell lineage diseases: a histopathological challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Horny, H-P; Sotlar, K; Sperr, W R; Valent, P

    2004-01-01

    Aims: Although systemic mastocytosis (SM) with an associated clonal haematological non-mast cell lineage disease (SM-AHNMD) is a major subtype of SM, little is known about its frequency among myelogenous neoplasms, and mastocytosis in particular, or about AHNMD subtype frequencies.

  18. Mast Cell Stabilizing,Antianaphylactic and Antihistaminic Activity of Coccinia grandis Fruits in Asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dnyaneshwar J Taur; Ravindra Y Patil

    2011-01-01

    Coccinia grandis Linn(Curcubitaceae)is a climber herb cultivated throughout India.In traditional medicine fruits have been used to treat leprosy,fever,asthma,bronchitis and jaundice.In present study,ethanol extract of C.grandis fruit(ECGF)at 100,125 and 150 mg·kg-1,i.p.,was evaluated for mast cell stabilizing,antianaphylactic and antihistaminic activity using egg albumin induced mast cell degranulation in mice;passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in rats and clonidine induced catalepsy in mice respectively.ECGF at(100-150 mg·kg-1,i.p.)significantly protected egg albumin induced degranulations of mast cells and caused reduction of blue dye leakage in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in dose dependently.The treatment ECGF also inhibited clonidine induced catalepsy in dose dependent manner.Phytochemical studies observed presence of saponin,steroids,alkaloids,flavonoids and glycosides.In conclusion ECGF possesses mast cell stabilizing;anti anaphylactic and antihistaminic potential which might be used in treatment of asthma.

  19. Topography of plasma membrane microdomains and its consequences for mast cell signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heneberg, Petr; Lebduška, Pavel; Dráberová, Lubica; Korb, Jan; Dráber, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 10 (2006), s. 2795-2806. ISSN 0014-2980 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Thy-1 * mast cell signaling * membrane microdomains Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.772, year: 2006

  20. In vitro hypoxia increases production of matrix metalloproteinases and tryptase in isolated rat lung mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maxová, H.; Novotná, J.; Vajner, L.; Tomášová, H.; Vytášek, R.; Vízek, M.; Bačáková, Lucie; Valoušková, V.; Eliášová, T.; Herget, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 6 (2008), s. 903-910. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0672 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypoxia * lung mast cells * tryptase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  1. Histamine H4 Receptor mediates interleukin-8 and TNF-α release in human mast cells via multiple signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X-F; Zhang, Z; Dou, X; Li, J-J; Zhang, W; Yu, Y-Y; Yu, B; Yu, B

    2016-01-01

    Histamine, mainly produced by mast cells, is an important inflammatory mediator in immune response. Recently Histamine H4 Receptor (H4R) was also identified in mast cells, from which pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines are released. However, the mechanism of how H4R mediates these cytokines and chemokines release in mast cells was still unclear. To further explore the role of H4R in the immune inflammatory response in mast cells, we tested the release of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and the relevant signaling pathways activated by H4R on LAD2 cells (a human mast cell line). We found that the release of IL-8 and TNF-α were blocked by inhibitors of PI3K, ERK and Ca2+-Calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathways, while the release of these cytokines and chemokines were enhanced by the inhibitor of P38 signaling pathway. However, inhibitors of the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways had little effect on the expression of the pro-inflammatory mediators. Moreover, activation of the H4R could induce phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and AKT in mast cells. In conclusion, we found that H4R mediates the release of inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and chemokine IL-8 in human mast cells via PI3K, Ca2+-Calcineurin-NFAT and MAPKs signaling pathways. PMID:26828993

  2. Adenosine triphosphate levels during anaphylactic histamine release in rat mast cells in vitro. Effects of glycolytic and respiratory inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of rat mast cells was studied during and after anaphylactic histamine release. The almost identical time course of ATP decrease from mast cells treated with either glycolytic or respiratory inhibitors supports the view that the ATP depletion was largely...... related to the histamine release process and not to an uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by an increased concentration of cytosol Ca2+. The ATP content of the cells was not restored within the 2 h of observation. No inhibition of lactate production from mast cells exposed to antigen in the presence...

  3. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells, including lymphoid and myeloid cells, can develop into phenotypically distinct 'subpopulations' with different functions. However, evidence indicates that some of these subpopulations can manifest substantial plasticity (that is, undergo changes in their phenotype and function......). Here we focus on the occurrence of phenotypically distinct subpopulations in three lineages of myeloid cells with important roles in innate and acquired immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils. Cytokine signals, epigenetic modifications and other microenvironmental factors can substantially...... and, in some cases, rapidly and reversibly alter the phenotype of these cells and influence their function. This suggests that regulation of the phenotype and function of differentiated hematopoietic cells by microenvironmental factors, including those generated during immune responses, represents a...

  4. Isolation and in vitro translation of mRNA from rat peritoneal mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, H; Lee, T D; Swieter, M; Saito, A; Tamaoki, T; Befus, A D

    1988-11-10

    In the absence of any specific literature on the isolation of RNA from mast cells, our initial attempts established that unusual measures would be needed to prepare acceptable yields of high quality RNA from peritoneal mast cells of normal adult rats. Accordingly, we developed procedures for the isolation and characterization of RNA from rat peritoneal mast cells (PMC) and basophilic leukemia cells (RBL). The significant components of the procedures include: separation and removal of mast cell granules to minimize contamination of RNA with proteins and proteoglycans; use of bentonite in phenol extractions; and repetition of extractions and precipitation. The amounts of total RNA extracted from PMC were about 15% of those from RBL, although the percentage mRNA of total RNA in PMC and RBL was similar (1.8 and 2.0%). Ribosomal RNA banding patterns in agarose gel electrophoresis and in vitro translation experiments indicate that the isolated RNA can be employed for analysis of molecular mechanisms of mast cell function and heterogeneity. PMID:3183393

  5. Studying mast cells in peripheral tolerance by using a skin transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Victor C; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Nowak, Elizabeth C; Noelle, Randolph J

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in both inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses [1]. The importance of MCs in maintaining peripheral tolerance was discovered in a FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg)-mediated skin transplant model [2]. MCs can directly mediate tolerance by releasing anti-inflammatory mediators (reviewed in ref. 3) or by interacting with other immune cells in the graft. Here we will present protocols used to study the role of MCs in peripheral tolerance with the emphasis on how MCs can regulate T-cell functionality. First we will introduce the skin transplant model followed by reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice (B6.Cg-Kit (W-sh) ). This includes the preparation of MCs from the bone marrow. Finally the methods used to study the influence of MCs on T-cell responses and Treg functionality will be presented by modulating the balance between tolerance and inflammation. PMID:25388268

  6. Induction of mast cell accumulation, histamine release and skin edema by N49 phospholipase A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Ya-Zhen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been recognized that phospholipase A2 (PLA2 is a crucial component of snake venom, which contributes greatly to snake venom induced inflammation in man. However, the mechanisms through which N49 PLA2 provoke inflammation remain unclear. Recently, a N49 PLA2, TM-N49 from Protobothrops mucrosquamatus crude venom was characterized in our laboratory. Since the purification procedure developed is able to supply us with relatively large quantity of highly purified TM-N49, we investigated the ability of TM-N49 in induction of inflammation. Results The results showed that TM-N49 provoked a dose dependent increase in microvascular leakage in the skin of rats. The potency of TM-N49 in induction of skin edema appeared similar potency of bradykinin and histamine. Pretreatment of rats with compound 48/80 diminished TM-N49 induced skin reaction and reduced mast cell numbers in rats. Ginkgolide B and cyproheptadine, but not terfenadine and quinacrine, inhibited TM-N49 elicited microvascular leakage when they were co-injected with the stimulus to rat skin. Moreover, TM-N49 was found to induce histamine release from human colon, lung and tonsil mast cells, and both metabolic inhibitors and pertussis toxin were capable of inhibiting TM-N49 elicited histamine release. TM-N49 induced mast cell accumulation in the peritoneum of mice, which was inhibited by co-injection of ginkgolide B, cyproheptadine and terfenadine. Intravenous injection of monoclonal antibodies against CD18, ICAM-1 and CD11a also blocked TM-N49 induced mast cell accumulation. Conclusion TM-N49 is a potent stimulus for skin edema, mast cell activation and accumulation.

  7. Compound 48/80-induced serotonin release from brain mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambracht-Hall, M.; Marathias, K.P.; Theoharides, T.C.

    1986-03-01

    Mast cells secrete a variety of potent mediators and are mostly known to participate in allergic reactions. Here the authors report that perfused brain mast cells can take up and release serotonin (5-HT) in response to compound 48/80. Thalamic or hypothalamic slices were loaded with /sup 3/H-5-HT (5 x 10/sup -7/M, for 12 min at 37/sup 0/C), washed and placed in individual 2 ml-perfusion wells. A Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer with 1 x 10/sup -6/M imipramine (KRB + IMI) saturated with 5% CO/sub 2//95% O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C and pH 7.4, was used throughout at a perfusion rate of 1 ml/min. After a 60 min wash in KRB + IMI, with or without Ca/sup +2/ + 0.1 M EDTA, the slices were perfused for 45 min with 100 ..mu..g/ml compound 48/80 with or without Ca/sup +2/. The tissue was washed for 30 min as before and then perfused with high K/sup +/ KRB (40mM KCl) for 45 min to induce neuronal depolarization. Finally, calcium was restored to Ca/sup +2/-depleted tissues and all samples were again perfused for 45 min with high K/sup +/ KRB. The first 5-HT peak due to 48/80-induced mast cell release was independent of extracellular Ca/sup +2/, while the second 5-HT peak due to high K/sup +/ was not. These studies indicate that the 48/80-induced 5-HT release was not of neuronal origin and that brain mast cells can utilize intracellular Ca/sup +2/, much like their peritoneal counterparts. The authors are now studying brain mast cells secretion in response to neuropeptides.

  8. The association of mast cells and serotonin in children with chronic abdominal pain of unknown etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Ravi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal pain of unknown origin affects up to 20% of school-aged children. Evaluation of children is symptom-based without clear guidelines to investigate molecular mechanisms of abdominal pain. Aberrant molecular mechanisms may increase intestinal permeability leading to interactions between the immune and nervous systems, subclinical inflammation, and visceral pain. This study evaluated the association between interleukin-6 (IL-6, mast cell infiltrates, and serotonin (5-HT levels in gastrointestinal (GI biopsies, with perceived abdominal pain in a pediatric cohort. Methods Clinical data and biopsy samples from pediatric patients (n = 48 with chronic abdominal pain, with and without inflammation were included. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded GI biopsies were sectioned and immunohistochemistry performed for IL-6 and 5-HT; mast cells were identified with toluidine blue stain. Histological findings were compared to self-reported abdominal pain between groups. Results There was significantly greater IL-6 immunoreactivity in biopsies with confirmed histologic inflammation (p = 0.004. There was a greater number of mast cells per HPF in non-inflammatory biopsies (3.5 ± 2.9 compared to the inflammatory biopsies (2.6 ± 1.8 p = 0.049. The non-inflammatory biopsy group was significantly less likely to respond to standard treatment as evidenced by higher pain reports (p = .018. Mast cells (p = .022 and 5-HT (p = .02 were significantly related to abdominal pain scores. Conclusions A potential association between self-reported abdominal pain, number of mast cells, and 5-HT levels, which may contribute to perceived GI pain in pediatric patients may exist.

  9. The role of mast cells in citric acid-induced airway constriction and cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yih-Loong; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Tai-Yin; Lin, Chien-He

    2009-11-30

    Inhalation of citric acid (CA) causes airway constriction and coughing. To investigate the role of mast cells in CA-induced airway constriction and cough, three experiments using guinea pigs were carried out. In the first experiment, we used compound 48/80 to deplete mast cells, cromolyn sodium to stabilize mast cells, MK-886 to inhibit synthesis of leukotrienes, pyrilamine to antagonize histamine H1 receptor, methysergide to antagonize serotonin receptor, and indomethacin to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In the second experiment, compound 48/80-pretreated animals were divided into 2 parts; the first one was used to test the role of exogenous leukotriene (LT) C4, while the second one to test the role of exogenous histamine. Decreases in respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 sec (FEV0.1) were used as indicators for airway constriction in anesthetized guinea pigs. CA-induced cough was recorded for 12 min using a barometric body plethysmograph in conscious animals. In the third experiment, the activation of mast cells upon CA inhalation was investigated by determining lung tissue or arterial plasma histamine concentration in animals. Exposure to CA induced marked airway constriction and increase in cough number. Compound 48/80, cromolyn sodium, MK-886 and pyrilamine, but not indomethacin or methysergide, significantly attenuated CA-induced airway constriction and cough. Injection of LTC4 or histamine caused a significant increase in CA-induced airway constriction and cough in compound 48/80-pretreated animals. In addition, CA inhalation caused significant increase in lung tissue and plasma histamine concentrations, which were blocked by compound 48/80 pretreatment. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in CA aerosol inhalation-induced airway constriction and cough via perhaps mediators including LTs and histamine. PMID:20359123

  10. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the ∼1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5' regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family

  11. Mucosal Mast Cell Count Is Associated With Intestinal Permeability in Patients With Diarrhea Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Chae, Seoung Wan

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Although mucosal mast cell tryptase is known to significantly increase intestinal permeability, the relationship between mucosal mast cells and intestinal permeability remains unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation among intestinal permeability, tryptase activity and mucosal mast cell count. Methods Rectal biopsies from 16 patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) and 7 normal subjects were assessed for tryptase activity and macromolecular permeability using horseradish peroxidase in Ussing chambers. In addition, mucosal mast cell levels were immunohistochemically quantified via image analysis. Results Rectal biopsy of tissues from IBS-D patients showed significantly increased permeability compared with those from normal controls (0.644 ± 0.08 and 0.06 ± 0.00 ng/2 hr/mm2, P 0.05). However, correlation analysis revealed that only mucosal mast cell count was significantly correlated with intestinal permeability in IBS-D patients (r = 0.558, P < 0.05). Conclusions This study demonstrated a positive correlation between the number of mucosal mast cells and intestinal permeability, suggesting that mucosal mast cells play an important role for increased intestinal permeability in patients with IBS-D. PMID:23667756

  12. Ultra-estrutura dos mastócitos de diferentes tipos histológicos de mastocitoma em cães Mast cell ultrastructure in different types of canine mast cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.R. Sueiro

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar as diferenças ultraestruturais de mastócitos neoplásicos de diferentes tipos histológicos de mastocitoma em cães, usando microscopia eletrônica de transmissão Os resultados mostraram que o núcleo e os grânulos citoplasmáticos são as estruturas mais indicadas para se avaliar o grau de anaplasia celular e o estádio de indiferenciação do tumor.The objective of this work was study the ultrastructural differences among the different histologic types of mast cell tumors in dogs collected in vivo. The ultrastructural analyses showed that the nuclei and cytoplasmic granules characteristics are the best structures to be appointed on evaluating the undifferentiation stage of this tumor.

  13. IL-10 Enhances IgE-Mediated Mast Cell Responses and Is Essential for the Development of Experimental Food Allergy in IL-10-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polukort, Stephanie H; Rovatti, Jeffrey; Carlson, Logan; Thompson, Chelsea; Ser-Dolansky, Jennifer; Kinney, Shannon R M; Schneider, Sallie S; Mathias, Clinton B

    2016-06-15

    IL-10 is a key pleiotropic cytokine that can both promote and curb Th2-dependent allergic responses. In this study, we demonstrate a novel role for IL-10 in promoting mast cell expansion and the development of IgE-mediated food allergy. Oral OVA challenge in sensitized BALB/c mice resulted in a robust intestinal mast cell response accompanied by allergic diarrhea, mast cell activation, and a predominance of Th2 cytokines, including enhanced IL-10 expression. In contrast, the development of intestinal anaphylaxis, including diarrhea, mast cell activation, and Th2 cytokine production, was significantly attenuated in IL-10(-/-) mice compared with wild-type (WT) controls. IL-10 also directly promoted the expansion, survival, and activation of mast cells; increased FcεRI expression on mast cells; and enhanced the production of mast cell cytokines. IL-10(-/-) mast cells had reduced functional capacity, which could be restored by exogenous IL-10. Similarly, attenuated passive anaphylaxis in IL-10(-/-) mice could be restored by IL-10 administration. The adoptive transfer of WT mast cells restored allergic symptoms in IL-10(-/-) mice, suggesting that the attenuated phenotype observed in these animals is due to a deficiency in IL-10-responding mast cells. Lastly, transfer of WT CD4 T cells also restored allergic diarrhea and intestinal mast cell numbers in IL-10(-/-) mice, suggesting that the regulation of IL-10-mediated intestinal mast cell expansion is T cell dependent. Our observations demonstrate a critical role for IL-10 in driving mucosal mast cell expansion and activation, suggesting that, in its absence, mast cell function is impaired, leading to attenuated food allergy symptoms. PMID:27183617

  14. Changes in mast cells and in permeability of mesenteric microvessels under the effect of immobilization and electrostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorizontova, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    It was shown that a reduction in the amount of mast cells in the mesentery and an increase in their degranulation was accompanied by an increase in vascular permeability of rat mesentery. It is supposed that immobilization and electrostimulation causing degranulation of mast cells prompted histamine and serotonin release from them, thus increasing the permeability of the venular portion of the microvascular bed. Prophylactic use of esculamin preparation with P-vitaminic activity decreased mast cell degranulation, which apparently prolonged the release of histamine and serotonin from them and normalized vascular permeability.

  15. Effects of melanin-induced free radicals on the isolated rat peritoneal mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranadive, N.S.; Shirwadkar, S.; Persad, S.; Menon, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    Pheomelanin from human red hair (RHM) produces considerably more cellular damage in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells when subjected to radiations of wavelength 320-700 nm than eumelanin from black hair (BHM). Irradiation of RHM generated large amounts of superoxide while BHM did not produce detectable amounts of superoxide. The present investigations describe the effects of irradiation of mast cells in the presence of various natural and synthetic melanins. Irradiation of mast cells in the presence of RHM and red hair melanoprotein released large amounts of histamine while BHM and synthetic melanins prepared from dopa, cysteinyldopa, or a mixture of dopa and cysteinyldopa did not release histamine. The release of histamine at lower concentrations of RHM was not accompanied by the release of /sup 51/Cr from chromium-loaded cells, suggesting that this release was of noncytotoxic nature. On the other hand, the release of histamine at higher concentrations of RHM was due to cell lysis since both histamine and cytoplasmic marker /sup 51/Cr were released to the same extent. The release evoked by large concentration RHM was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase. This suggests that the cell lysis under these conditions was not due to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or O-2. The finding that mast cells release histamine when irradiated in the presence of RHM suggests that the immediate and late-phase reactions seen in sunburn may in part be due to the release of mediators from these cells.

  16. Effects of melanin-induced free radicals on the isolated rat peritoneal mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pheomelanin from human red hair (RHM) produces considerably more cellular damage in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells when subjected to radiations of wavelength 320-700 nm than eumelanin from black hair (BHM). Irradiation of RHM generated large amounts of superoxide while BHM did not produce detectable amounts of superoxide. The present investigations describe the effects of irradiation of mast cells in the presence of various natural and synthetic melanins. Irradiation of mast cells in the presence of RHM and red hair melanoprotein released large amounts of histamine while BHM and synthetic melanins prepared from dopa, cysteinyldopa, or a mixture of dopa and cysteinyldopa did not release histamine. The release of histamine at lower concentrations of RHM was not accompanied by the release of 51Cr from chromium-loaded cells, suggesting that this release was of noncytotoxic nature. On the other hand, the release of histamine at higher concentrations of RHM was due to cell lysis since both histamine and cytoplasmic marker 51Cr were released to the same extent. The release evoked by large concentration RHM was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase. This suggests that the cell lysis under these conditions was not due to H2O2 or O-2. The finding that mast cells release histamine when irradiated in the presence of RHM suggests that the immediate and late-phase reactions seen in sunburn may in part be due to the release of mediators from these cells

  17. Age-related changes in proliferation, the numbers of mast cells, eosinophils, and cd45-positive cells in human dermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunin, Andrei G; Kornilova, Natalia K; Vasilieva, Olga V; Petrov, Vadim V

    2011-04-01

    Skin aging is an extremely important medical and social problem in the modern world. Therefore, a goal of the present work was to estimate changes in the numbers of fibroblast-like cells, proliferating cells nuclear antigen-positive cells, CD45-positive cells, mast cells, and eosinophils in human dermis at different ages. Skin specimens from human fetuses that died antenatally from 20 to 40 weeks of pregnancy and humans who died from different causes from 1 day to 85 years of life were used for the study. Results showed a decrease in a total number and the number of proliferating cells nuclear antigen-positive fibroblast-like cells in dermis with progression of age. The numbers of CD45-positive cells and mast cells are gradually increased with aging. Eosinophils are almost absent in dermis independently on age. Mast cells are probably a main factor that potentially can be involved in tissue damage and aging changes in skin. Mast cells should be regarded as an important target for anti-aging therapy. PMID:21106704

  18. Segmental bronchoprovocation in allergic rhinitis patients affects mast cell and basophil numbers in nasal and bronchial mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Braunstahl, Gert-Jan; Overbeek, Shelley; Fokkens, Wytske; KleinJan, Alex; McEuen, A.R.; Walls, A F; Hoogsteden, Henk; Prins, Jan-Bas

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMast cells and basophils are cells that play an important role in the initiation and control of allergic inflammation in asthma and rhinitis. This study was undertaken to determine the presence and dynamics of mast cells and basophils in the nasal and bronchial mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients after segmental bronchial provocation (SBP). Eight nonasthmatic, grass pollen-allergic rhinitis patients and eight healthy controls were included. Bronchial and nasal biopsies, as well a...

  19. Enhancement of antigen-induced eosinophilic inflammation in the airways of mast-cell deficient mice by diesel exhaust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was conducted to clarify the involvement of mast cells in the exacerbating effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) toward allergic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Airway inflammation by the infiltration of cosinophils with goblet cell proliferation and AHR, as well as by the production of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE, in plasma were examined using mast cell-deficient mice (W/Wv) and normal mice (W/W+). Both groups of mice received ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA+DEP intratracheally. The eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell proliferation promoted by OVA were significantly greater in W/W+ than in W/Wv. A similar result was observed in AHR, but was not significant among both groups of mice. DEP enhanced OVA induced-allergic airway inflammation, goblet cell proliferation, and development of AHR in W/Wv, but not in W/W+. DEP decreased production of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE in both groups of mice. Mast cells were observed in the submucosal layer of the main bronchus in W/Wv. The number of mast cells was significantly decreased by OVA treatment. The results indicate that mast cells are not necessary to enhance airway damage and development of AHR in W/Wv by DEP. However, mast cells may be required for the OVA-induced cosinophilic inflammation, airway damage with goblet cell proliferation, and AHR in W/W+

  20. Different Roles of Mast Cells in Obesity and Diabetes: Lessons from Experimental Animals and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Michael A.; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in allergic hyperresponsiveness and in defending microorganism infections. Recent studies of experimental animals and humans have suggested that MCs participate in obesity and diabetes. MC distribution and activities in adipose tissues may vary, depending on the locations of different adipose tissues. In addition to releasing inflammatory mediators to affect adipose tissue extracellular matrix remodeling and to promote inflammatory cell recruitment and ...

  1. A key role for ATF3 in regulating mast cell survival and mediator release

    OpenAIRE

    Gilchrist, Mark; Henderson, William R.; Morotti, Andrew; Carrie D. Johnson; Nachman, Alex; Schmitz, Frank; Smith, Kelly D.; Aderem, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a regulatory role in inflammation, cell division, and apoptosis. Mast cells (MCs) initiate many inflammatory responses and have a central role in allergy and allergic diseases. We report here that ATF3 has a central role in MC development and function. Bone marrow–derived MC populations from ATF3-deficient mice are unresponsive to interleukin-3 (IL-3)–induced maturation signals, and this correla...

  2. Ultraviolet B irradiation of skin induces mast cell degranulation and release of tumour necrosis factor-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 'sunburn' response in skin, dermal blood vessels are activated and traffic of dendritic Langerhans' cells altered. While these changes have been attributed to the cytokine TNF-α, the source of this acutely released TNF has not been identified. This report demonstrates that the 'sunburn' response, both in vivo and in vitro, is accompanied by rapid degranulation of cutaneous mast cells, with consequential release of intracellular stores of TNF. Epidermal keratinocytes were only minor contributors to local TNF production. Expression of the TNF-inducible CD62E (E-selectin/ELAM-1) and CD54 adhesion molecules on cutaneous endothelium occurred 2 hours following mast cell degranulation, and this event was sensitive to blockade of mast cells with disodium cromoglycate. These results indicate that TNF release in skin in the acute sunburn response can largely be attributed to mast cells. 47 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  3. Effects of long-term administration of cancer-promoting substances on oral subepithelial mast cells in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, L; Hilliges, M; Larsson, P A; Wallstrom, M; Hirsch, J M

    2002-01-01

    The role of oral subepithelial mast cells in the defence against tumours is a matter of controversy. The effect of established and suggested carcinogens, such as the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO) and Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), in combination with oral snuff on lower lip subepithelial mast cells (MC) was studied in rats. The rats were exposed to prolonged use of oral snuff. The test substances were administered in a surgically created canal in the lower lip of the rats. There were 15 rats in each test group and 10 rats in the control group. The amount of countable subepithelial mast cells decreased significantly when the rat oral mucosa was exposed to the oral carcinogen 4-NQO but the effect of oral snuff and HSV-1 infection was weak. Our findings suggest that mast cells play a role in immunological cell defence against chemical carcinogens. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms. PMID:12529973

  4. MAST CELLS, MAST/STEM CELL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (C-KIT/CD117 AND IGE MAY BE INTEGRAL TO THE PATHOGENESIS OF ENDEMIC PEMPHIGUS FOLIACEUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Roselino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pemphigus foliaceus (PF is endemic in some South American countries, especially in Colombia and Brazil; in Brazil, it is also known as fogo selvagem (FS. We aimed to study the presence of mast cells and the expression of the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (c-kit/CD117 in PF skin biopsies, as well as the role of IgE in the disease pathogenesis. Methods: Forty-four skin biopsies from patients affected by endemic PF (EPF (30 patients from El Bagre, Colombia, and 14 from the northeastern region of São Paulo State, Brazil, 48 control biopsies from Colombian and Brazilian endemic areas, and additional control biopsies from none endemic areas in Colombia and the USA non were studied. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was performed to evaluate skin biopsies with anti-mast cell tryptase (MCT, anti-c-kit and anti-IgE antibodies. We also searched for serum IgE in 30 EPF and 30 non-atopic controls from the El Bagre region via ELISA. In our El Bagre patients and controls, we also searched for IgE in skin samples by direct immunofluorescence. Results: In 100% of the EPF biopsies, MCT, c-kit and IgE were identified with stronger expression relative to control biopsies, especially in the inflammatory infiltrates around upper dermal blood vessels and dermal eccrine glands. IgE staining was positive along the BMZ in some EPF skin samples. The DIF results confirmed a linear deposition of IgE at the BMZ. Increased IgE serum levels were also noted in PF patients relative to controls.. Conclusions: In patients with EPF, the observed increased expression of MCT, c-kit and IgE in lesional skin, associated with higher serum IgE levels may indicate possible IgE participation in the antigenic response.

  5. Cardiac Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Goichberg, Polina; Chang, Jerway; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Heart disease is the primary cause of death in the industrialized world. Cardiac failure is dictated by an uncompensated reduction in the number of viable and fully functional cardiomyocytes. While current pharmacological therapies alleviate the symptoms associated with cardiac deterioration, heart transplantation remains the only therapy for advanced heart failure. Therefore, there is a pressing need for novel therapeutic modalities. Cell-based therapies involving cardiac stem ...

  6. Modulation of Mast Cell Function by Amino Acids In vitro: A Potential Mechanism of Immunonutrition for Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Masuko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available "Mast cells release important chemical mediators, such as histamine and interleukin (IL-13, for the regulation of allergic reactions and inflammation. Recently, mast cell activation has been implicated in wound healing. Glutamine (Gln and Arginine (Arg are used as “immune nutrients” in severe infections and chronic wounds in malnourished patients, but the potential effect of these amino acids on mast cell activation is unclear. We evaluated the effect of Gln and /or Arg in culture on mast cell function. The murine mast cell line P815 was cultured in RPMI-1640 medium under different Gln and/or Arg concentrations and IL-6 stimulation. Histamine and IL-13 release into the supernatant was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays. As a result, the amino acid concentrations affected cellular viability. Cells cultured in higher Gln concentrations produced a greater histamine response upon IL-6 stimulation while the histamine response in cells cultured in a high Arg concentration was suppressed. IL-13 production in the Gln containing medium was not significantly altered by IL-6 stimulation. In conclusion, in an inflammatory milieu, Gln and/or Arg concentrations in situ may regulate histamine and IL-13 release from mast cells. The appropriate use of functional amino acids as immune nutrients may suppress inflammation and aid in wound healing. "

  7. Effect of intranasal corticosteroid on pre-onset activation of eosinophils and mast cells in experimental Japanese cedar pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Noyama

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: These results suggest that pre-onset activation of eosinophils and mast cells is present in experimental JCP, and that prophylactic treatment with intranasal corticosteroids has the potential to control such activation.

  8. Establishment and characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell hybridomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, Takeshi, E-mail: tkawafb@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Integrated Department of Sciences of Functional Foods, Graduate School of Agriculture, Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) are an important model for studying the function of mucosal-type mast cells. In the present study, BMMCs were successfully immortalized by cell fusion using a hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium-sensitive variant of P815 mouse mastocytoma (P815-6TgR) as a partner cell line. The established mouse mast cell hybridomas (MMCHs) expressed {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} subunits of high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor (Fc{epsilon}RI) and possessed cytoplasmic granules devoid of or partially filled with electron-dense material. Four independent MMCH clones continuously proliferated without supplemental exogenous IL-3 and showed a degranulation response on stimulation with IgE+antigen. Furthermore, histamine synthesis and release by degranulation were confirmed in MMCH-D5, a MMCH clone that showed the strongest degranulation response. MMCH-D5 exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, IL-13, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and cyclooxygenase 2, and production of prostaglandin D{sub 2} and leukotriene C{sub 4} in response to IgE-induced stimulation. MMCH clones also expressed Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1, 2, 4, and 6 and showed elevated levels of TNF-{alpha} expression in response to stimulation with TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. The MMCHs established using this method should be suitable for studies on Fc{epsilon}RI- and TLR-mediated effector functions of mast cells.

  9. Possible roles of mast cell-derived chymase for skin rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Nobuyuki; Takai, Shinji; Jin, Denan; Ueda, Koichi; Miyazaki, Mizuo

    2009-03-01

    The relationships between mast cell-derived chymase, angiotensin II, and extracellular matrix production in the skin after intense pulsed light (IPL) were clarified in hamsters. Dorsal areas of the hamsters were irradiated once or twice a week by IPL. The index of extracellular matrix production in the skin was defined as the depth stained with Azan-Mallory stain from the epidermis to the dermis at the point of maximum thickness. The index had significantly increased 7 days after IPL irradiation in sections treated once or twice with IPL compared with that of untreated control sections. The numbers of mast cells, chymase-positive cells, and angiotensin II-positive cells had also significantly increased in IPL-irradiated areas. Significant increases in chymase and angiotensin II activities were observed in the extracts obtained from IPL-irradiated skin. Mast cell-derived chymase may be involved via angiotensin II formation in the dermal extracellular matrix production that occurs after IPL irradiation. PMID:18408985

  10. Cloning of cDNAs that encode human mast cell carboxypeptidase A, and comparison of the protein with mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A and rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skin and lung mast cells and rodent peritoneal cells contain a carboxypeptidase in their secretory granules. The authors have screened human lung cDNA libraries with a mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) cDNA probe to isolate a near-full-length cDNA that encodes human MC-CPA. The 5' end of the human MC-CPA transcript was defined by direct mRNA sequencing and by isolation and partial sequencing of the human MC-CPA gene. Human MC-CPA is predicted to be translated as a 417 amino acid preproenzyme which includes a 15 amino acid signal peptide and a 94-amino acid activation peptide. The mature human MC-CPA enzyme has a predicted size of 36.1 kDa, a net positive charge of 16 at neutral pH, and 86% amino acid sequence identity with mouse MC-CPA. DNA blot analyses showed that human MC-CPA mRNA is transcribed from a single locus in the human genome. Comparison of the human MC-CPA with mouse MC-CPA and with three rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases shows that these enzymes are encoded by distinct but homologous genes

  11. Stem cells for cardiac repair: an introduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bastiaan C du Pr(e); Pieter A Doevendans; Linda W van Laake

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Most cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, are associated with loss of functional cardiomyocytes. Unfortunately, the heart has a limited regenerative capacity and is not able to replace these cardiomyocytes once lost. In recent years, stem cells have been put forward as a potential source for cardiac regeneration. Pre-clinical studies that use stem cell-derived cardiac cells show promising results. The mechanisms, though, are not well understood, results have been variable, sometimes transient in the long term, and often without a mechanistic explanation. There are still several major hurdles to be taken. Stem cell-derived cardiac cells should resemble original cardiac cell types and be able to integrate in the damaged heart. Integration requires administration of stem cell-derived cardiac cells at the right time using the right mode of delivery. Once delivered, transplanted cells need vascularization, electrophysiological coupling with the injured heart, and prevention of immunological rejection. Finally, stem cell therapy needs to be safe, reproducible, and affordable. In this review, we will give an introduction to the principles of stem cell based cardiac repair.

  12. Suppressed histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by ultraviolet B irradiation: decreased diacylglycerol formation as a possible mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on mast cell functions. Purified mast cells obtained from rat peritoneal cavity were irradiated with UVB and subsequently exposed to a degranulator, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore A-23187. The amount of histamine released from mast cells measured by the enzyme isotopic assay was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation (100-400 mJ/cm2). Within this dose range, UVB alone was not cytotoxic to the cells because it did not induce histamine release. The suppression was observed when mast cells were subjected to degranulation without intervals after UVB irradiation, and even after 5 h postirradiation. The wavelength of 300 nm from a monochromatic light source showed the maximum effect. When mast cells prelabeled with [3H]arachidonate were irradiated and challenged by compound 48/80, label accumulation in diacylglycerol produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle was considerably decreased by UVB irradiation. From these results, we hypothesize that, within an adequate irradiation dose, UVB irradiation suppresses histamine release from mast cells, probably by causing noncytotoxic damage to the membrane phospholipid metabolism, which is tied to the degranulation mechanisms

  13. Roles for NHERF1 and NHERF2 on the regulation of C3a receptor signaling in human mast cells.

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    Hariharan Subramanian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anaphylatoxin C3a binds to the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR, C3aR and activates divergent signaling pathways to induce degranulation and cytokine production in human mast cells. Adapter proteins such as the Na(+/H(+ exchange regulatory factor (NHERF1 and NHERF2 have been implicated in regulating functions of certain GPCRs by binding to the class I PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/Zo1 motifs present on their cytoplasmic tails. Although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, the possibility that it interacts with NHERF proteins to modulate signaling in human mast cells has not been determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting, we found that NHERF1 and NHERF2 are expressed in human mast cell lines (HMC-1, LAD2 and CD34(+-derived primary human mast cells. Surprisingly, however, C3aR did not associate with these adapter proteins. To assess the roles of NHERFs on signaling downstream of C3aR, we used lentiviral shRNA to stably knockdown the expression of these proteins in human mast cells. Silencing the expression of NHERF1 and NHERF2 had no effect on C3aR desensitization, agonist-induced receptor internalization, ERK/Akt phosphorylation or chemotaxis. However, loss of NHERF1 and NHERF2 resulted in significant inhibition of C3a-induced mast cell degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, it does not associate with NHERF1 and NHERF2. Surprisingly, these proteins provide stimulatory signals for C3a-induced degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine generation in human mast cells. These findings reveal a new level of complexity for the functional regulation of C3aR by NHERFs in human mast cells.

  14. Inhibitory effects of curcumin on passive cutaneous anaphylactoid response and compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yun-Ho; Yan, Guang-Hai; Chai, Ok Hee; Song, Chang Ho

    2010-01-01

    Mast cells participate in allergies and inflammation by secreting a variety of pro-inflammatory mediators. Curcumin, the active component of turmeric, is a polyphenolic phytochemical with anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-allergic properties. The effects of curcumin on compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation and passive cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions are unknown. In this report, we investigated the influences of curcumin on the passive cutaneous anaphylactoid resp...

  15. Role of mast cell-derived mediators for leukocyte/endothelium-interactions and microvascular mechanisms in inflammation and in anaphylaxis.

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yancai

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of this thesis was to study the roles of mast cell-derived mediators for leukocyte/endothelium interactions and microvascular mechanisms in inflammation and in anaphylaxis, using mast cell-deficient Ws/Ws rats and their wild-type +/+ littermates. The efflux of endogenous histamine and edema formation evoked by subplantar injection of compound 48/80 in rat hindpaws was dose-dependent in +/+ rats, and was essentially lacking in Ws/Ws rats. These findings...

  16. Mast cell stabilization alleviates acute lung injury after orthotopic autologous liver transplantation in rats by downregulating inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lung injury (ALI is one of the most severe complications after orthotopic liver transplantation. Amplified inflammatory response after transplantation contributes to the process of ALI, but the mechanism underlying inflammation activation is not completely understood. We have demonstrated that mast cell stabilization attenuated inflammation and ALI in a rodent intestine ischemia/reperfusion model. We hypothesized that upregulation of inflammation triggered by mast cell activation may be involve in ALI after liver transplantation. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received orthotopic autologous liver transplantation (OALT and were executed 4, 8, 16, and 24 h after OALT. The rats were pretreated with the mast cell stabilizers cromolyn sodium or ketotifen 15 min before OALT and executed 8 h after OALT. Lung tissues and arterial blood were collected to evaluate lung injury. β-hexosaminidase and mast cell tryptase levels were assessed to determine the activation of mast cells. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 in serum and lung tissue were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65 translocation was assessed by Western blot. RESULTS: The rats that underwent OALT exhibited severe pulmonary damage with a high wet-to-dry ratio, low partial pressure of oxygen, and low precursor surfactant protein C levels, which corresponded to the significant elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, β-hexosaminidase, and tryptase levels in serum and lung tissues. The severity of ALI progressed and maximized 8 h after OALT. Mast cell stabilization significantly inhibited the activation of mast cells, downregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and translocation of NF-κB, and attenuated OALT-induced ALI. CONCLUSIONS: Mast cell activation amplified inflammation and played an important role in the process of post-OALT related ALI.

  17. Mast cell chymase potentiates histamine-induced wheal formation in the skin of ragweed-allergic dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinstein, I; Nadel, J A; Graf, P D; Caughey, G H

    1990-01-01

    Skin mast cells release the neutral protease chymase along with histamine during degranulation. To test the hypothesis that chymase modulates histamine-induced plasma extravasation, we measured wheal formation following intradermal injection of purified mast cell chymase and histamine into the skin of ragweed-allergic dogs. We found that chymase greatly augments histamine-induced wheal formation. The magnitude of the potentiating effect increases with increasing doses of chymase and becomes m...

  18. Computed tomography of mast cell tumors in dogs: assessment before and after chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nineteen dogs with mast cell tumors treated with chemotherapy were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). Were evaluated aspects related to contours, attenuation, postcontrast enhancement and presence of cleavage with adjacent structures. The RECIST criteria and volumetric measurement of lesions were performed to assess the response to treatment. The mast cell tumors presented a homogeneous or heterogeneous attenuation, presented more frequently a well delineated and regular contours and moderate enhancement after intravenous administration of the iodinated contrast media. The methods RECIST and volumetric measurements showed an excellent agreement to the classification of therapeutic response, providing a good parameter of the response to treatment. The CT examination proved to be useful in the delimitation of the tumor and an important tool for planning of surgical margins. (author)

  19. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  20. Influence of laser and LED irradiation on mast cells of cutaneous wounds of rats with iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher Rosa, Cristiane; Oliveira Sampaio, Susana C. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Ferreira, Maria F. L.; Zanini, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Jean N.; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    This work aimed to study histologically the effect of Laser or LED phototherapy on mast cells on cutaneous wounds of rats with iron deficiency. 18 rats were used and fed with special peleted iron-free diet. An excisional wound was created on the dorsum of each animal which were divided into: Group I - Control with anemia + no treatment; Group II - Anemia + Laser; Group III - Anemia + LED; Group IV - Healthy + no treatment; Group V - Healthy + Laser; Group VI - Healthy + LED. Irradiation was performed using a diode Laser (λ660nm, 40mW, CW, total dose of 10J/cm2, 4X2.5J/cm2) or a RED-LED ( λ700nm, 15mW, CW, total dose of 10J/cm2). Histological specimens were routinely processed, cut and stained with toluidine blue and mast cell counts performed. No significant statistic difference was found between groups as to the number of degranulated, non-degradulated or total mast cells. Greater mean values were found for degranulated mast cells in the Anemia + LED. LED irradiation on healthy specimens resulted in a smaller number of degranulated mast cells. Our results leads to conclude that there are no significant differences in the number of mast cells seven days after irradiation following Laser or LED phototherapy.

  1. Inhibitory effects of curcumin on passive cutaneous anaphylactoid response and compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Ho; Yan, Guang-Hai; Chai, Ok Hee

    2010-01-01

    Mast cells participate in allergies and inflammation by secreting a variety of pro-inflammatory mediators. Curcumin, the active component of turmeric, is a polyphenolic phytochemical with anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-allergic properties. The effects of curcumin on compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation and passive cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions are unknown. In this report, we investigated the influences of curcumin on the passive cutaneous anaphylactoid response in vivo and compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation in vitro. The mechanism of action was examined by calcium uptake measurements and cAMP assays in mast cells. Curcumin significantly attenuated the mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylactoid reaction in an animal model. In agreement with this in vivo activity, curcumin suppressed compound 48/80-induced rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) degranulation and histamine release from RPMCs. Moreover, compound 48/80-elicited calcium uptake into RPMCs was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by curcumin. Furthermore, curcumin increased the level of intracellular cAMP and significantly inhibited the compound 48/80-induced reduction of cAMP in RPMCs. These results corroborate the finding that curcumin may have anti-allergic activity. PMID:21190003

  2. Anti-allergic effects of Lycopus lucidus on mast cell-mediated allergy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current study characterizes the mechanism by which the aqueous extract of Lycopus lucidus Turcz. (Labiatae) (LAE) decreases mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. The immediate-type allergic reaction is involved in many allergic diseases such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. LAE has been used as a traditional medicine in Korea and is known to have an anti-inflammatory effect. However, its specific mechanism of action is still unknown. LAE was anally administered to mice for high and fast absorption. LAE inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. LAE decreased the local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody. LAE dose-dependently reduced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Furthermore, LAE decreased the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of LAE on the pro-inflammatory cytokine was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent. LAE attenuated PMA plus A23187-induced degradation of IκBα and nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and specifically blocked activation of p38 MAPK, but not that of c-jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Our findings provide evidence that LAE inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB in these effects

  3. Intraluminal acid activates esophageal nodose C fibers after mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Zhenyu; Heldsinger, Andrea; Owyang, Chung; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-02-01

    Acid reflux in the esophagus can induce esophageal painful sensations such as heartburn and noncardiac chest pain. The mechanisms underlying acid-induced esophageal nociception are not clearly understood. In our previous studies, we characterized esophageal vagal nociceptive afferents and defined their responses to noxious mechanical and chemical stimulation. In the present study, we aim to determine their responses to intraluminal acid infusion. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose ganglion neurons with intact nerve endings in the esophagus using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal intraluminal acid perfusion were compared in naive and ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged animals, followed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the expression of tight junction proteins (zona occludens-1 and occludin). In naive guinea pigs, intraluminal infusion with either acid (pH = 2-3) or capsaicin did not evoke an action potential discharge in esophageal nodose C fibers. In OVA-sensitized animals, following esophageal mast cell activation by in vivo OVA inhalation, intraluminal acid infusion for about 20 min started to evoke action potential discharges. This effect is further confirmed by selective mast cell activation using in vitro tissue OVA challenge in esophageal-vagal preparations. OVA inhalation leads to decreased TEER and zona occludens-1 expression, suggesting an impaired esophageal epithelial barrier function after mast cell activation. These data for the first time provide direct evidence of intraluminal acid-induced activation of esophageal nociceptive C fibers and suggest that mast cell activation may make esophageal epithelium more permeable to acid, which subsequently may increase esophageal vagal nociceptive C fiber activation. PMID:24264049

  4. Identification of a mast-cell-specific receptor crucial for pseudo-allergic drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Benjamin D; Pundir, Priyanka; Meeker, Sonya; Han, Liang; Undem, Bradley J; Kulka, Marianna; Dong, Xinzhong

    2015-03-12

    Mast cells are primary effectors in allergic reactions, and may have important roles in disease by secreting histamine and various inflammatory and immunomodulatory substances. Although they are classically activated by immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibodies, a unique property of mast cells is their antibody-independent responsiveness to a range of cationic substances, collectively called basic secretagogues, including inflammatory peptides and drugs associated with allergic-type reactions. The pathogenic roles of these substances have prompted a decades-long search for their receptor(s). Here we report that basic secretagogues activate mouse mast cells in vitro and in vivo through a single receptor, Mrgprb2, the orthologue of the human G-protein-coupled receptor MRGPRX2. Secretagogue-induced histamine release, inflammation and airway contraction are abolished in Mrgprb2-null mutant mice. Furthermore, we show that most classes of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved peptidergic drugs associated with allergic-type injection-site reactions also activate Mrgprb2 and MRGPRX2, and that injection-site inflammation is absent in mutant mice. Finally, we determine that Mrgprb2 and MRGPRX2 are targets of many small-molecule drugs associated with systemic pseudo-allergic, or anaphylactoid, reactions; we show that drug-induced symptoms of anaphylactoid responses are significantly reduced in knockout mice; and we identify a common chemical motif in several of these molecules that may help predict side effects of other compounds. These discoveries introduce a mouse model to study mast cell activation by basic secretagogues and identify MRGPRX2 as a potential therapeutic target to reduce a subset of drug-induced adverse effects. PMID:25517090

  5. Effects of x-ray irradiation on mast cells and mastocalcergy in the connective tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to observe the influence of x-ray irradiation on mast cells and mastocalcergy in rats. Animals were irradiated single dose of x-ray. X-ray irradiation was applied to the whole body in doses either 100 rads or 150 rads (Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Unit). One day after irradiation the rats were injected lead acetate intravenously, followed by injection of compound 48/80 in the back subcutaneously. Animals were killed by decapitation at intervals, 1 hour, 5 hours, 1 day and 6 day after subcutaneous injection. Specimens of the abdominal and back skin were fixed in alcohol formol solution and stained with the following methods; H-E for observation of pathological changes of tissues, toluidine blue for demonstration of mast cells, von Kossa-azure A for demonstration of carbonate and phosphate, and chloranilic acid for demonstration of calcium. The following conclusions were obtained. Calciphylatic wheals are large size in the control group, medium size in 100 rads irradiation group and small size in 150 rads irradiation group. In x-ray irradiation groups the number of mast cells decreases more in the 150 rads than in the 100 rads irradiation. In the 100 rads x-ray irradiation group, histochemical study of the injection sites showed that calcium impregnated to mast cell granules and connective tissue fibers in 1 days after subcutaneous injection. The morphogenesis of this calcinosis was the same in the rat of 5 hour after subcutaneous injection of the control group. Whereas, 1 day after subcutaneous injection in 150 rads x-ray irradiation group calcium deposited more slightly than other groups

  6. Mast Cells in the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rosetta Pedotti; Massimo Costanza; Colombo, Mario P.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are best known as key immune players in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-dependent allergic reactions. In recent years, several lines of evidence have suggested that MCs might play an important role in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. Since their first description in MS plaques in the late 1800s, much effort has been put into elucidating the contri...

  7. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus downregulates FCER1 and HRH4 expression in human mast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Oksaharju; Matti Kankainen; Riina A Kekkonen; Ken A Lindstedt; Petri T Kovanen; Riitta Korpela; Minja Miettinen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of four probiotic bacteria and their combination on human mast cell gene expression using microarray analysis.METHODS: Human peripheral-blood-derived mast cells were stimulated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L.rhamnosus ) GG (LGG(R)), L. rhamnosus Lc705 (Lc705),Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS (PJS) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 (Bb12) and their combination for 3 or 24 h, and were subjected to global microarray analysis using an Affymetrix GeneChip(R) Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. The gene expression differences between unstimulated and bacteria-stimulated samples were further analyzed with GOrilla Gene Enrichment Analysis and Visualization Tool and MeV Multiexperiment Viewer-tool.RESULTS: LGG and Lc705 were observed to suppress genes that encoded allergy-related high-affinity IgE receptor subunits α and γ (FCER1A and FCER1G, respectively)and histamine H4 receptor. LGG, Lc705 and the combination of four probiotics had the strongest effect on the expression of genes involved in mast cell immune system regulation, and on several genes that encoded proteins with a pro-inflammatory impact, such as interleukin (IL)-8 and tumour necrosis factor alpha. Also genes that encoded proteins with anti-inflammatory functions, such as IL-10, were upregulated. CONCLUSION: Certain probiotic bacteria might diminish mast cell allergy-related activation by downregulation of the expression of high-affinity IgE and histamine receptor genes, and by inducing a pro-inflammatory response.

  8. Evaluation of Mast Cell Activation Syndromes: Impact of Pathology and Immunohistology

    OpenAIRE

    Horny, H.-P.; Sotlar, K; Valent, P

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndromes (MCAS) are clinically defined disease states with a largely unknown morphological background. Since mastocytosis may be associated with MCAS, it is crucial in every patient to document or exclude mastocytosis by appropriate histological, molecular, and serological investigations of tissues/organs that are commonly involved in mastocytosis like skin, mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow. Accordingly, histopathological investigation including immun...

  9. Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin induces histamine release from bovine pulmonary mast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Adusu, T E; Conlon, P D; Shewen, P.E.; Black, W D

    1994-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica A1 leukotoxic culture supernatant was evaluated for its ability to induce histamine release from bovine pulmonary mast cells isolated by enzymatic dispersion of lung tissue. Histamine was measured by a radioimmunoassay technique. Leukotoxic culture supernatant of P. haemolytica significantly released histamine in a time and concentration-related manner. This effect was lost when culture supernatant was heat-inactivated or preincubated with leukotoxin neutralizing rabbi...

  10. Dual effects of protoporphyrin and long wave ultraviolet light on histamine release from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigated the effects of long wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and various doses of protoporphyrin (PP) on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells. We also correlated these results with morphologic characteristics and viability of the cells. PP at a dose of 30 ng/ml plus UVA-induced negligible histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC), but was able to suppress the ability of the cells to release histamine in response to subsequent exposure to the calcium ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, or the combination of Ag and IgE. This functional change was associated with an increase in cell size, and cell lysis that gradually occurred during 24 h in culture. PP at a dose of 3 ng/ml plus UVA also significantly inhibited secretogogue-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, but this dose was not associated with significant changes in morphology or viability. These various effects of PP plus UVA were also observed with mast cell preparations obtained by the enzymatic dispersion of rat skin. The suppression of secretogogue-induced histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells treated with PP (3 ng/ml) and UVA could not be reversed by culturing the cells in the dark for 24 h in the absence of PP. Unlike the direct cytotoxic histamine releasing action of high doses of PP plus UVA, the suppressive effect of low PP doses could not be inhibited by catalase, but could be reduced by the absence of calcium. Our results indicate that PP plus UVA has dual effects on mast cells, apparently involving distinct mechanisms. This implies the possibility that PP and UVA at appropriate doses could be used in photochemotherapy of mast cell-mediated skin diseases

  11. A model of calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics induced by laser irradiation in mast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI XiaoMin; ZHENG YuFan; LIU ZengRong; YANG WenZhong

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments show that calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics induced by low power laser irradiation in mast cells must rely on extracellular Ca2+ influx. An analytical expression of Ca2+ flux through TRPV4 cation channel in response to interaction of laser photon energy and extracellular Ca2+ is deduced, and a model characterizing dynamics of calcium signaling and degranulation activated by laser irradiation in mast cells is established. The model indicates that the characteristics of calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics are determined by interaction between laser photon energy and Ca2+ influx. Extracellular Ca2+ concentration is so high that even small photon energy can activate mast cells, thus avoiding the possible injury caused by laser irradiation with shorter wavelengths. The model predicts that there exists a narrow parameter domain of photon energy and extracellular Ca2+ concentration of which results in cytosolic Ca2+ limit cycle oscillations, and shows that PKC activity is in direct proportion to the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations. With the model it is found that sustained and stable maximum plateau of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration can get optimal degranulation rate. Furthermore, the idea of introducing the realistic physical energy into model is applicable to modeling other physical signal transduction systems.

  12. Interleukin 13-positive mast cells are increased in immunoglobulin G4-related sialadenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mai; Ohno, Kyotaro; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Gion, Yuka; Tachibana, Tomoyasu; Orita, Yorihisa; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-13 is a T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine that plays important roles in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL-13 induces hypersensitivity of the airways, increased mucous production, elevated serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and increased numbers of eosinophils. Many patients with IgG4-related disease have allergic backgrounds and show elevated serum IgE levels and an increase in the number of eosinophils. Upregulation of Th2/regulatory T (Treg) cytokines, including IL-13, has been detected in affected tissues of patients with IgG4-related disease. We previously reported that mast cells might be responsible for the production of the Th2/Treg cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in IgG4-related disease. In this study, immunohistochemical analysis showed increased numbers of IL-13-positive mast cells in IgG4-related disease, which suggests that mast cells also produce IL-13 and contribute to elevation of serum IgE levels and eosinophil infiltration in IgG4-related disease. PMID:25571893

  13. Determination of plasma heparin level improves identification of systemic mast cell activation disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milda Vysniauskaite

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of mast cell activation disease (MCAD, i.e. systemic mastocytosis (SM and idiopathic systemic mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS, usually requires demonstration of increased mast cell (MC mediator release. Since only a few MC mediators are currently established as biomarkers of MCAD, the sensitivity of plasma heparin level (pHL as an indicator of increased MC activation was compared with that of serum tryptase, chromogranin A and urinary N-methylhistamine levels in 257 MCAD patients. Basal pHL had a sensitivity of 41% in MCAS patients and 27% in SM patients. Non-pharmacologic stimulation of MC degranulation by obstruction of venous flow for 10 minutes increased the sensitivity of pHL in MCAS patients to 59% and in SM patients to 47%. In MCAS patients tryptase, chromogranin A, and N-methylhistamine levels exhibited low sensitivities (10%, 12%, and 22%, respectively, whereas sensitivities for SM were higher (73%, 63%, and 43%, respectively. Taken together, these data suggest pHL appears more sensitive than the other mediators for detecting systemic MC activity in patients with MCAS. The simple, brief venous occlusion test appears to be a useful indicator of the presence of pathologically irritable MCs, at least in the obstructed compartment of the body.

  14. Mast cells and histamine alter intestinal permeability during malaria parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Rashaun A; Tiffany, Caitlin M; Pakpour, Nazzy; Lokken, Kristen L; Tiffany, Connor R; Cheung, Kong; Tsolis, Renée M; Luckhart, Shirley

    2016-03-01

    Co-infections with malaria and non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can present as life-threatening bacteremia, in contrast to self-resolving NTS diarrhea in healthy individuals. In previous work with our mouse model of malaria/NTS co-infection, we showed increased gut mastocytosis and increased ileal and plasma histamine levels that were temporally associated with increased gut permeability and bacterial translocation. Here, we report that gut mastocytosis and elevated plasma histamine are also associated with malaria in an animal model of falciparum malaria, suggesting a broader host distribution of this biology. In support of mast cell function in this phenotype, malaria/NTS co-infection in mast cell-deficient mice was associated with a reduction in gut permeability and bacteremia. Further, antihistamine treatment reduced bacterial translocation and gut permeability in mice with malaria, suggesting a contribution of mast cell-derived histamine to GI pathology and enhanced risk of bacteremia during malaria/NTS co-infection. PMID:26626201

  15. Systemic mast cell disease (SMCD) and bone pain. A case treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Systemic mast cell disease (SMCD) is a rare disease characterized by a multitopic proliferation of cytologically and/or functionally abnormal tissue mast cells. SMCD preferentially involves the skin, spleen, liver, lymph nodes and the bone marrow. The cause of SMCD is unknown. Bony pain, caused by mast cell infiltration of the marrow cavity, is present in up to 28% of cases and is frequently chronic and difficult to palliate with medical therapy. Case Report: We report one case of refractory bone pain in a 54-year-old female Caucasian patient with advanced SMCD and associated bony involvement, which was treated with radiotherapy for pain palliation. Between 1995 and 1998, the patient was irradiated at four different locations: 1) right shoulder and proximal right humerus, 2) both hands, 3) both knees, 4) left humerus with a total dose of 40 Gy in 2.0 or 2.5 Gy daily fractions. Results: Different results of pain palliation were achieved. In one location the pain was reduced for 55 months until her death due to disease progression, whereas in two other locations a pain control was maintained for 3 and 6 months after radiotherapy. In one location, no pain reduction was achieved. Severe side effects were not observed. Conclusion: Palliative radiotherapy has a role in the control of severe intractable bone pain in patients with advanced SMCD, though in some cases the effect may be short or incomplete. The observed palliation of pain can even differ in the same patient. (orig.)

  16. Equine Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumours Exhibit Variable Differentiation, Proliferation Activity and KIT Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, L; Ward, S; Kipar, A

    2015-11-01

    Equine cutaneous mast cell tumours (CMCTs) are generally considered to be benign skin lesions, although recurrent and multicentric tumours have been described. For canine CMCTs, grading and prognostic approaches are well established and aberrant KIT expression as well as high proliferation indices are associated with poor outcome. However, in the case of equine CMCTs, morphological features, proliferative activity and KIT expression pattern have not been assessed or related to biological behaviour, and there is discussion as to whether CMCTs are true neoplastic processes. The present study describes 45 equine CMCTs in terms of their morphology and KIT and PCNA expression by immunohistochemistry. KIT expression was classified as membranous (I), cytoplasmic and focally stippled (II) or diffuse cytoplasmic (III). A large proportion of the tumours were multinodular or diffuse dermal infiltrates of mast cells with mild anisokaryosis, a low proliferative rate and a dominance of KIT pattern I, representing well-differentiated CMCTs. In approximately one third of the cases, the mast cells exhibited more infiltrative growth, moderate to marked anisokaryosis and a higher degree of proliferation. These were classified as poorly differentiated CMCTs and exhibited only KIT patterns II and III. These findings indicate that there is a subgroup of poorly differentiated equine CMCTs, in which there is an association between aberrant KIT expression, high proliferative rate and potential aggressive behaviour, all features that confirm at least the poorly differentiated CMCT as a true neoplastic processes. PMID:26292768

  17. Induction of dexamethasone (DM) of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, A.; Imanishi, N.; Nakayama, T.; Asano, M.; Tomita, K.

    1986-05-01

    Effects of glucocorticoids on HDC in cultured mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells and rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) were investigated to explore the role of steroids in inflammatory tissues. DM (1 nM to 10 ..mu..M) significantly elevated the histamine content and HDC activity of P-815 cells (37/sup 0/C, 24 hrs), accompanying with a growth retardation of the cells by about 40%. In contrast to histamine, serotonin levels of P-815 cells were decreased by treatment with DM. However, DM had no significant effects on the activities of various enzymes other than HDC present in granules or membrane of P-815 cells. DM-induced increases of histamine and HDC activity were completely suppressed by the addition of cycloheximide and actinomycin D. P-815 cells were found to have the binding sites for /sup 3/H-DM in the cytosol (Kd=2.2 nM, 450 sites/cell) and in the nuclei (Kd=0.1 nM, 39 sites/nucleus). Purified HDC from P-815 cells was identified to be an isozyme of mast cell type enzyme (MW=110K, pI=5.4). In contrast, the basal histamine level of cultured RPMC was not affected by treatment of DM, which suppressed histamine release activity induced by DNP-ascaris antiserum by 40%-50%. Histamine-depleted RPMC after degranulation partially recovered histamine level by 50%-60% in the presence of DM. These results showed that glucocorticoids specifically stimulated histamine formation with the increased de novo synthesis of HDC in mast cells.

  18. Induction of dexamethasone (DM) of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of glucocorticoids on HDC in cultured mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells and rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) were investigated to explore the role of steroids in inflammatory tissues. DM (1 nM to 10 μM) significantly elevated the histamine content and HDC activity of P-815 cells (370C, 24 hrs), accompanying with a growth retardation of the cells by about 40%. In contrast to histamine, serotonin levels of P-815 cells were decreased by treatment with DM. However, DM had no significant effects on the activities of various enzymes other than HDC present in granules or membrane of P-815 cells. DM-induced increases of histamine and HDC activity were completely suppressed by the addition of cycloheximide and actinomycin D. P-815 cells were found to have the binding sites for 3H-DM in the cytosol (Kd=2.2 nM, 450 sites/cell) and in the nuclei (Kd=0.1 nM, 39 sites/nucleus). Purified HDC from P-815 cells was identified to be an isozyme of mast cell type enzyme (MW=110K, pI=5.4). In contrast, the basal histamine level of cultured RPMC was not affected by treatment of DM, which suppressed histamine release activity induced by DNP-ascaris antiserum by 40%-50%. Histamine-depleted RPMC after degranulation partially recovered histamine level by 50%-60% in the presence of DM. These results showed that glucocorticoids specifically stimulated histamine formation with the increased de novo synthesis of HDC in mast cells

  19. UVB-induced systemic immunosuppression: role of mast cells and histamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: UVB radiation (290-320 nm) is immunosuppressive by multiple mechanisms allowing the outgrowth of UV-induced tumours in both mouse and man. Furthermore, patients with non-melanoma skin cancers have a higher risk of death from other cancers which could be explained by UV-induced immunomodulation. The mechanism(s) of suppression by UVB depend on whether the sensitising antigen is applied to the irradiated site ('local') or to non-irradiated sites ('systemic'). In the former, the activity of UV-induced TNFα is important as it affects the migration of Langerhans cells to draining lymph nodes. In contrast, histamine from dermal mast cells is critical to the early events by which UVB can suppress systemic immune responses. The prevalence of dermal mast cells in 7 strains and substrains of mice correlates directly with their susceptibility to UVB-induced systemic immunosuppression. Furthermore, mast cell depleted mice (Wf/Wf) are resistant to UVB-induced systemic immunomodulation. However, they become susceptible after reconstitution of the site to be irradiated with bone marrow derived mast cell precursors. The mice also gain susceptibility to cis-urocanic acid-induced systemic immunomodulation. There is considerable evidence that histamine is the mast cell product critical to downstream immunosuppressive events. Firstly, physiological concentrations of histamine suppress contact hypersensitivity responses. Secondly, histamine receptor antagonists halve UVB-induced systemic immunosuppression. Thirdly, mice with different UVB-susceptibilities are equally susceptible to histamine-induced immunosuppression, and finally, histamine can suppress contact hypersensitivity responses in Wf/Wf mice. We suggest that histamine may be immunomodulatory by multiple pathways. Histamine can induce the production of immunosuppressive prostanoids from keratinocytes. A lymphocyte-derived, histamine-induced suppressor factor was reported in the 1970's. More recently histamine has

  20. Functional characterization of histamine H4 receptor on human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemima, E Angel; Prema, A; Thangam, E Berla

    2014-11-01

    Among the four different types of histamine receptors (H1-H4), H4R is predominantly expressed in immune cells and involved in immunomodulatory response. Here, in this study we determined the expression of H4R in human mast cells (HMC-1, LAD-2 and primary cord blood derived CD34+ human mast cells) and characterized its functional properties. Interestingly, we found that human mast cells responded to both histamine (natural ligand) and 4-methylhistamine (selective H4R agonist) for sustained intracellular calcium mobilization, degranulation and cytokine production. However, only histamine induced the release of cAMP, but 4-methylhistamine down regulates cAMP indicating that H4R mediates its effect through Gαi/o protein and H1R via Gαq protein. Furthermore, both histamine and 4-methylhistamine induced the production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and LTB4. Using human inflammation antibody array membrane, we found that H4R induced the expression of various inflammatory proteins, involving pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and these are TGF-β1, TNF-α, TNF-β, PDGF-BB, TIMP-2, M-CSF, IP-10, IL-16, IL-6, IL-3, IL-10, MIP-1α, IL-1α, ICAM-1, Eotaxin-2, RANTES, IL-8, MCP-1, and IL-6sR. We also quantified the level of various inflammatory cytokines produced by human mast cells through H4R. It was observed that, the production level of Th2 cytokines IL-4(401.34 pg/ml), IL-5 (64.21 pg/ml) and IL-13 (1044 pg/ml) and classical proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 (221.27 pg/ml) and IL-1β (34.24 pg/ml) and chemokines MCP-1(106 pg/ml) and IL-8 (818.32 pg/ml). Furthermore, activation of H4R caused the phosphorylation of ERK and PI3K in a time dependent manner. Taken together these data demonstrate that, the activation of H4R in human mast cells produced not only inflammatory mediators that are associated with allergic reactions but also other inflammatory conditions. PMID:24934979

  1. Independent prognostic value of eosinophil and mast cell infiltration in colorectal cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hansen, Ulla; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    1999-01-01

    .0001), high age ( p=0.0003), and tumour location in the rectum predicted poor survival, while high counts of eosinophils ( p=0.006) and mast cells ( p=0.02) predicted good survival. Tumour-associated eosinophilia and mastocytosis appear to be independent prognostic variables in colorectal cancer. Future......Overall peritumoural inflammatory cell infiltration is a prognostic variable in solid tumours, but the survival-related impact of the individual cell types within the infiltrate has still not been fully evaluated and compared with the conventional disease classification. In the present study, the...

  2. Functionalized gold nanoparticle-based immuno-PCR, a new method for sensitive detection of cytokines produced or utilized by mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Potůčková, Lucie

    Southampton, 2011. [International Mast Cell and Basophil Meeting 2011 in partnership to the COST Annual Conference on Mast Cells and Basophils 2011. Southampton (GB), 24.11.2011-25.11.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cytokines * gold nanoparticles * PCR * mast cells

  3. Degranulation of mast cells and inhibition of the response to secretory agents by phototoxic compounds and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The symptoms of cutaneous phototoxicity from coal tar compounds and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug benoxaprofen are characterized by wheal and flare formation which is mediated by histamine released from dermal mast cells. Rat serosal mast cells were used as an in vitro model system to study the direct effect of phototoxic compounds on mast cell degranulation. The coal tar compounds studied included acridine and pyrene. Combined exposure of cells to acridine and UVA (320 to 400 nm) radiation caused mast cells to degranulate, as assayed by the release of [3H]serotonin. Maximum [3H]serotonin release (70 to 80%) was obtained with 50 microM acridine and 300 kJ/m2 UVA. Pyrene (25 microM), when photoexcited with UVB (280 to 360 nm) radiation, caused about 80% release of [3H]serotonin. No degranulation occurred with 20 microM benoxaprofen and UVB doses up to 7.2 kJ/m2. Trypan blue staining correlated well with degranulation caused by acridine plus UVA; however, with pyrene plus UVB there was greater [3H]serotonin release than dye uptake. Excitation of photosensitizers with doses of UV radiation that did not cause trypan blue staining suppressed degranulation of mast cells in response to chemical stimulation. Acridine, pyrene, and benoxaprofen in the presence of UV radiation inhibited the mast cells from responding to compound 48/80 or the calcium ionophore, chlortetracycline. Two other phototoxic compounds, chlorpromazine and deoxytetracycline, also abolished degranulation by compound 48/80. These findings indicate that phototoxic compounds: (1) cause degranulation in the presence of high doses of UV radiation; and (2) suppress degranulation of mast cells in response to secretory stimuli at doses of UV radiation that do not cause release of mediator

  4. Enhanced incorporation of fatty acid into phosphatidyl choline that parallels histamine discharge in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified rat peritoneal and pleural mast cells preincubated briefly with radioactively labeled fatty acid were treated with A23187, which bypasses primary receptors in stimulating exocytosis. An enhanced incorporation of fatty acid into phosphatidyl choline (PC) that occurred in parallel with histamine release at 24-25 degrees C was observed and was initially proportional to the total amount of histamine discharged. Enhanced PC labeling and histamine secretion were also proportional at temperatures ranging from 17-37 degrees C. Both radioactive linoleic and palmitic acids were incorporated selectively at the beta-position of the glycerol backbone of PC. PC labeling by [3H]choline was not detectably different in control and stimulated cells, and phosphatidic acid did not exhibit selectively enhanced beta-acylation. Thus, the stimulated labeling in A23187-treated cells may occur secondary to the action of a phospholipase A2 that favors PC as a substrate. Other peritoneal cell types exhibit a very similar A23187-stimulated selective labeling of PC. Therefore, autoradiography has been used to provide a direct demonstration that in purified preparations, mast cells are the principal cell type engaged in A23187-elicited incorporation of fatty acid into PC. The efficacy of this approach has relied on special procedures devised to obtain significantly different autoradiographic grain densities between control and stimulated preparations that can be attributed to differences in the level of [3H]palmitate-labeled PC. Preliminary tests using compound 48/80 as a secretory stimulus for mast cells have identified a similar selectively enhanced PC labeling. In either case, however, consideration of possible relationships between PC metabolism and the secretory process are premature since they have not been tested directly

  5. The effect of protoporphyrin on histamine secretion by rat peritoneal mast cells: a dual phototoxic reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protoporphyrin-induced phototoxicity in rat peritoneal mast cells was manifested either by inhibition of 48/80-stimulated histamine secretion or by cell lysis. At a protoporphyrin concentration of 100 ng/ml, histamine secretion was completely inhibited after 30 min illumination. After initiation, the inhibited state progressed in the dark, and was irreversible; however, it did not develop into cell lysis. Cell lysis was evoked by increasing the light intensity between 180-950 W/m2, using a light source with emission maxima in the 350-470 nm region. Dual phototoxic effects could also be demonstrated in erythrocytes. Increased resistance to osmotic lysis was seen under moderate illumination conditions, and decreased resistance and cell lysis were seen under severe conditions. In the absence of protoporphyrin, the effect of light alone on mast cells was similar to protoporphyrin-phototoxicity, although the light intensities required were higher both for inhibition (60-130 W/m2) and lysis (280-950 W/m2). The data therefore indicate that certain cell functions can be specifically disrupted by phototoxic reactions that are not cytotoxic; however, phototoxic reactions that lead to severe membrane protein denaturation and cell lysis also occur. The manifestation of these dual effects depends on the intensity of illumination in the 350-470 nm region. (author)

  6. Mast cells and IgE in defense against venoms: Possible “good side” of allergy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Galli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians think of mast cells and IgE primarily in the context of allergic disorders, including fatal anaphylaxis. This ‘bad side’ of mast cells and IgE is so well accepted that it can be difficult to think of them in other contexts, particularly those in which they may have beneficial functions. However, there is evidence that mast cells and IgE, as well as basophils (circulating granulocytes whose functions partially overlap with those of mast cells, can contribute to host defense as components of adaptive type 2 immune responses to helminths, ticks and certain other parasites. Accordingly, allergies often are conceptualized as “misdirected” type 2 immune responses, in which IgE antibodies are produced against any of a diverse group of apparently harmless antigens, as well as against components of animal venoms. Indeed, certain unfortunate patients who have become sensitized to venoms develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, upon subsequent venom exposure. In this review, we will describe evidence that mast cells can enhance innate resistance to reptile or arthropod venoms during a first exposure to such venoms. We also will discuss findings indicating that, in mice which survive an initial encounter with venom, acquired type 2 immune responses, IgE antibodies, the high affinity IgE receptor (FcɛRI, and mast cells can contribute to acquired resistance to the lethal effects of both honeybee venom and Russell's viper venom. These findings support the hypothesis that mast cells and IgE can help protect the host against venoms and perhaps other noxious substances.

  7. Further observations on the utilization of adenosine triphosphate in rat mast cells during histamine release induced by the ionophore A23187

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1980-01-01

    1 The relation between A23187-induced histamine release and the energy metabolism of the rat mast cells has been studied. 2 Ethacrynic acid was used as an inhibitor of calcium-induced histamine release from mast cells primed with the ionophore A23187, and to study calcium-induced changes in the a......1 The relation between A23187-induced histamine release and the energy metabolism of the rat mast cells has been studied. 2 Ethacrynic acid was used as an inhibitor of calcium-induced histamine release from mast cells primed with the ionophore A23187, and to study calcium-induced changes...

  8. The Effect of Ouabain on Histamine Release from Human Skin Mast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Şenol, Mustafa; Özerol, İ. Halil; Patel, Asha V.; Skoner, David P.

    1996-01-01

    There are controversial reports on the effect of sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+-K+ ATPase) inhibition on mast cell mediator release. Some of them have indicated that ouabain (strophanthin G), a specific Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor, inhibited the release, whereas the others have shown that ouabain had no effect or even had a stimulatory effect on the mediator secretion. Most of these studies utilized animal-derived cells. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Na+-K+ ...

  9. Activation/Inhibition of mast cells by supra-optimal antigen concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident cells of hemopoietic origin and are critically involved in allergic diseases. MCs bind IgE by means of their high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI). The FcεRI belongs to a family of multi-chain immune recognition receptors and is activated by cross-linking in response to multivalent antigens (Ags)/allergens. Activation of the FcεRI results in immediate release of preformed granular substances (e.g. histamine, heparin, and proteases), generation of arachido...

  10. Protein kinase C-α mediates TNF release process in RBL-2H3 mast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Raheem, Ihab T; Hide, Izumi; Yanase, Yuhki; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; SAKAI, Norio; Shirai, Yasuhito; Saito, Naoaki; Hamada, Farid M; El-Mahdy, Nagh A; Elsisy, Alaa El-Din E; Sokar, Samya S; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of mast cell TNF secretion, especially its release process after being produced, we utilized an antiallergic drug, azelastine (4-(p-chlorobenzyl)-2-(hexahydro-1-methyl-1H-azepin-4-yl)-1-(2H)- phthalazinone), which has been reported to inhibit TNF release without affecting its production in ionomycin-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells.Such inhibition was associated with the suppression of an ionomycin-induced increase in membrane-associated PKC activity rather than the suppressi...

  11. Apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine response of mast cells induced by influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the influenza A virus has been investigated heavily, and both the inflammatory response and apoptosis have been found to have a definitive role in this process. The results of studies performed by the present and other groups have indicated that mast cells may play a role in the severity of the disease. To further investigate cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, apoptosis and inflammatory response were studied in mouse mastocytoma cell line P815. This is the first study to demonstrate that H1N1 (A/WSN/33, H5N1 (A/Chicken/Henan/1/04, and H7N2 (A/Chicken/Hebei/2/02 influenza viruses can induce mast cell apoptosis. They were found to do this mainly through the mitochondria/cytochrome c-mediated intrinsic pathway, and the activation of caspase 8-mediated extrinsic pathway was here found to be weak. Two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3 -only molecules Bim and Puma appeared to be involved in the apoptotic pathways. When virus-induced apoptosis was inhibited in P815 cells using pan-caspase (Z-VAD-fmk and caspase-9 (Z-LEHD-fmk inhibitors, the replication of these three subtypes of viruses was suppressed and the secretions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and MCP-1, decreased. The results of this study may further understanding of the role of mast cells in host defense and pathogenesis of influenza virus. They may also facilitate the development of novel therapeutic aids against influenza virus infection.

  12. Investigation of the Role of Mast Cells in Acupuncture Effects and Their Sensitivity to Physical Stimuli During TCM Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张迪; 丁光宏; 顾全保; Wolfgang Schwarz

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To better understand the function of mast cells in acupuncture points (acupoints) inacupuncture-induced analgesia. The author tested their sensitivity to mechanical, thermo and light stimulation.Methods: The tail flick model was applied to measure analgesia in rats, and the author determined the density of mast cells in tissue slices and their degranulation ratio before/after acupuncture. The author also applied the patch-clamp technique to investigate activation of human mast cells (HMC 1 cell line) by mechanical stress or noxious heat, and the author optically observed degranulation phenomena of mast cell in response to red laser light.Results: Manual stimulation by acupuncture at Zusanli (ST 36) of the rat resulted in analgesia and the effect was more pronounced than after stimulation of a sham point nearby the acupuncture point. A higher density of mast cells was found at Zusanli (ST 36) than at the sham point, and acupuncture caused a remarkable increase in degranulation. Pretreatment with disodinm chromoglycate (DSCG, a mast cell stabilizer) injected into Zusanli (ST 36) impaired the analgesic effect of acupuncture. In whole-cell patch-clamp, increasing hydrostatic pressure induced a current that could be inhibited by 10 ~tM of ruthenium red (RuR), an inhibitor of TRPV2. Temperatures above 50~C, which are reached during moxibustion, induced a similar RuR-sensitive current. Laser light of 640 nm (48 mW) applied to acupoints had been shown previously to be highly effective in analgesia. 20 min of light application induced pronounced degranulation in HMC 1 that could be blocked by 0.02 g/mL DSCG as well as by RuR. Conclusion: The author found that mechanical stimulation of acupoints is associated with mast cell degranulation and mast-cell degranulation can be correlated with acupuncture-induced analgesia. The author suggest that TRPV2 plays a key role in mast-ceU degranulation in response to mechanical, thermal (moxibustion) as well as laser

  13. MicroRNA-143 Downregulates Interleukin-13 Receptor Alpha1 in Human Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiu Cheng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA-143 (miR-143 was found to be downregulated in allergic rhinitis, and bioinformatics analysis predicted that IL-13Rα1 was a target gene of miR-143. To understand the molecular mechanisms of miR-143 involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, recombinant miR-143 plasmid vectors were constructed, and human mast cell-1(HMC-1 cells which play a central role in the allergic response were used for study. The plasmids were transfected into HMC-1 cells using a lentiviral vector. Expression of IL-13Rα1 mRNA was then detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western Blotting. The miR-143 lentiviral vector was successfully stably transfected in HMC-1 cells for target gene expression. Compared to the control, the target gene IL-13Rα1 was less expressed in HMC-1 transfected with miR-143 as determined by RT-PCR and Western Blotting (p < 0.05; this difference in expression was statistically significant and the inhibition efficiency was 71%. It indicates that miR-143 directly targets IL-13Rα1 and suppresses IL-13Rα1 expression in HMC-1 cells. Therefore, miR-143 may be associated with allergic reaction in human mast cells.

  14. In colorectal cancer mast cells contribute to systemic regulatory T-cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatner, Nichole R; Bonertz, Andreas; Beckhove, Philipp; Cheon, Eric C; Krantz, Seth B; Strouch, Matthew; Weitz, Juergen; Koch, Moritz; Halverson, Amy L; Bentrem, David J; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2010-04-01

    T-regulatory cells (Treg) and mast cells (MC) are abundant in colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors. Interaction between the two is known to promote immune suppression or loss of Treg functions and autoimmunity. Here, we demonstrate that in both human CRC and murine polyposis the outcome of this interaction is the generation of potently immune suppressive but proinflammatory Treg (DeltaTreg). These Treg shut down IL10, gain potential to express IL17, and switch from suppressing to promoting MC expansion and degranulation. This change is also brought about by direct coculture of MC and Treg, or culture of Treg in medium containing IL6 and IL2. IL6 deficiency in the bone marrow of mice susceptible to polyposis eliminated IL17 production by the polyp infiltrating Treg, but did not significantly affect the growth of polyps or the generation of proinflammatory Treg. IL6-deficient MC could generate proinflammatory Treg. Thus, MC induce Treg to switch function and escalate inflammation in CRC without losing T-cell-suppressive properties. IL6 and IL17 are not needed in this process. PMID:20308560

  15. Gangliosides inhibit bee venom melittin cytotoxicity but not phospholipase A2-induced degranulation in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sting accident by honeybee causes severe pain, inflammation and allergic reaction through IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. In addition to this hypersensitivity, an anaphylactoid reaction occurs by toxic effects even in a non-allergic person via cytolysis followed by similar clinical manifestations. Auto-injectable epinephrine might be effective for bee stings, but cannot inhibit mast cell lysis and degranulation by venom toxins. We used connective tissue type canine mast cell line (CM-MC) for finding an effective measure that might inhibit bee venom toxicity. We evaluated degranulation and cytotoxicity by measurement of β-hexosaminidase release and MTT assay. Melittin and crude bee venom induced the degranulation and cytotoxicity, which were strongly inhibited by mono-sialoganglioside (GM1), di-sialoganglioside (GD1a) and tri-sialoganglioside (GT1b). In contrast, honeybee venom-derived phospholipase A2 induced the net degranulation directly without cytotoxicity, which was not inhibited by GM1, GD1a and GT1b. For analysis of distribution of Gαq and Gαi protein by western blotting, lipid rafts were isolated by using discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifuge. Melittin disrupted the localization of Gαq and Gαi at lipid raft, but gangliosides stabilized the rafts. As a result from this cell-based study, bee venom-induced anaphylactoid reaction can be explained with melittin cytotoxicity and phospholipase A2-induced degranulation. Taken together, gangliosides inhibit the effect of melittin such as degranulation, cytotoxicity and lipid raft disruption but not phospholipase A2-induced degranulation in mast cells. Our study shows a potential of gangliosides as a therapeutic tool for anaphylactoid reaction by honeybee sting.

  16. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of IκBα and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB in these effects

  17. Tetraspanins and Transmembrane Adaptor Proteins As Plasma Membrane Organizers—Mast Cell Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halova, Ivana; Draber, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains diverse and specialized membrane domains, which include tetraspanin-enriched domains (TEMs) and transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP)-enriched domains. Recent biophysical, microscopic, and functional studies indicated that TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains are involved in compartmentalization of physicochemical events of such important processes as immunoreceptor signal transduction and chemotaxis. Moreover, there is evidence of a cross-talk between TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains. In this review we discuss the presence and function of such domains and their crosstalk using mast cells as a model. The combined data based on analysis of selected mast cell-expressed tetraspanins [cluster of differentiation (CD)9, CD53, CD63, CD81, CD151)] or TRAPs [linker for activation of T cells (LAT), non-T cell activation linker (NTAL), and phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (PAG)] using knockout mice or specific antibodies point to a diversity within these two families and bring evidence of the important roles of these molecules in signaling events. An example of this diversity is physical separation of two TRAPs, LAT and NTAL, which are in many aspects similar but show plasma membrane location in different microdomains in both non-activated and activated cells. Although our understanding of TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these domains are under way.

  18. Independent prognostic value of eosinophil and mast cell infiltration in colorectal cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hansen, Ulla; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    1999-01-01

    prognostic value of individual white cell counts in the peritumoural inflammatory infiltrate in colorectal cancer was assessed. Intra-operative tumour tissue samples from 584 patients undergoing elective surgery for colorectal cancer were included. None of the patients received pre- or post......-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. Tissue blocks were cut from the periphery of the tumours and embedded in paraffin. All blocks included both tumour tissue and normal bowel tissue. Serial sections of 4 microm were analysed for tumour tissue inflammatory cell infiltration using a computer- and video......-assisted microscope, which allowed semi-automated quantification of cells within a fixed area. Total white cells and individual counts of eosinophils, neutrophils, mast cells, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were evaluated in every tumour specimen. Stratification into four groups with similar numbers of events was used...

  19. Skin tags: A link between lesional mast cell count/tryptase expression and obesity and dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Abdallah M Salem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:The etiology of skin tags (STs is not fully understood. A relation to diabetes mellitus and obesity was suggested. Few studies of possible mast cells (MCs involvement were reported. Tyrptase is a mast cell mediator and a potent fibroblast growth factor. It may provide a molecular link between mast cell activation and fibrosis. Aims: The aim was to assess clinical and laboratory findings in patients with STs, and the possible link between obesity, dyslipidemia, and lesional MC count/tryptase expression. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients with STs were subjected to clinical examination, estimation of body mass index (BMI, fasting blood glucose (FBG, postprandial blood glucose (PPBG, serum cholesterol and triglycerides, abdominal ultrasound for fatty liver assessment, in addition to study of MCs through staining for MC tryptase in two skin biopsies; lesional and nonlesional (control. Results:All patients showed abnormally high BMI and hypertriglyceridemia, with abnormal sonographic pattern in 15 patients (75%. STs number positively correlated with the age of patients. STs showed significantly higher MC counts and tryptase expression, compared with control skin ( P < 0.001, with no correlation of the STs number or MC count with BMI, FBG, PPBG or serum cholesterol. Obese patients showed a significantly higher MC count than overweight and there was a positive correlation between MC count and serum triglycerides. Axilla and under breast STs showed a higher MC count compared with other sites. Conclusions:STs seem to be related to obesity and hypertriglyceridemia. MCs with their tryptase are possibly involved in pathogenesis of STs. MC count is related to the associated factors; obesity and serum triglycerides. MC tryptase expression is a reliable method for accurate tissue MC counting.

  20. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  1. Na+ -K+ pump activity in rat peritoneal mast cells: inhibition by extracellular calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Johansen, Torben

    1989-01-01

    1. Pure populations of rat peritoneal mast cells were used to study cellular potassium uptake. The radioactive potassium analogue, 86rubidium, was used as a tracer for potassium for measurements of the activity of the cellular potassium uptake process. 2. The ouabain-sensitive and the ouabain...... nature of an enzyme, and it is mediated by the Na+ -K+ pump located in the plasma membrane. It is demonstrated that the activity of the Na+ -K+ pump mechanism is inhibited by low concentrations of extracellular calcium (0.1-1.2 mmol l-1). The possibility is discussed that calcium-deprivation may increase...

  2. Complexity of the influence of gangliosides on histamine release from human basophils and rat mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Svendsen, U G; Thastrup, Ole; Stahl Skov, P; Leon, A; Norn, S

    The influence of exogenous addition of gangliosides on histamine release from human basophils and rat mast cells was examined in vitro. Gangliosides dose-dependently inhibited histamine release, and this inhibition was dependent on the ganglioside sialic acid content, since GT1b, having 3 sialic...... acid moieties, was more potent than gangliosides with 2 moieties (GD1a and GD1b), which again were more potent inhibitors than GM1 with one moiety. Asialo-GM1 was without effect. In high concentrations the gangliosides potentiated basophil histamine release. The modulation of histamine release was...

  3. Membrane-Cytoskeleton Dynamics in the Course of Mast Cell Activation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1220, č. 1 (2015), s. 219-237. ISSN 1064-3745 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1777; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk LD12073; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13015; GA AV ČR KAN200520701; GA AV ČR(CZ) M200520901 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cells * plasma membrane * actin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. New roles for mast cells in modulating allergic reactions and immunity against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alison M; Abraham, Soman N

    2009-12-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have primarily been associated with mediating the pathological secondary responses to allergens in sensitized hosts. In view of the recent evidence for a MC role in modulating primary immune responses to pathogens, the likelihood for a role of MCs in influencing primary immune response to allergens has grown. New evidence suggests that MCs drive the development of Th2 responses to allergens, particularly when allergen exposure occurs concomitantly with exposure to pathogen products present in the environment. These new roles for MCs in allergy and infection suggest additional drug targets to prevent the development of allergic disease and allergic exacerbations of established disease. PMID:19828301

  5. Desensitisation of mast cell β2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses by salmeterol and formoterol

    OpenAIRE

    Scola, Anne-Marie; Chong, Lee K.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Chess-Williams, Russell; Peachell, Peter T

    2003-01-01

    The long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist formoterol (10−10–10−6 M) inhibited the IgE-dependent release of histamine from human lung mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Formoterol was more potent and a full agonist relative to the nonselective β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline. By contrast, the long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist salmeterol (10−10–10−6 M) was about two-thirds less efficacious than either formoterol or isoprenaline as an inhibitor of histamine release.Isoprenaline,...

  6. Involvement of histamine released from mast cells in acute radiation dermatitis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possible involvement of histamine in acute radiation dermatitis in mice was investigated. The dose of 40 Gy of gamma irradiation induced erythema and edema in C57BL/6 mice treated with vehicle. However, in C57BL/6 mice treated with chlorpheniramine and WBB6F1-W/WV mice, erythema and edema were not observed. In all of these mice, epilation and dry desquamation were induced, but bepotastine significantly reduced the extent of these areas. These results suggest that gamma irradiation-induced erythema and edema were caused by histamine released from mast cells via histamine H1 receptor, and epilation was induced by other inflammatory mediators. (author)

  7. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations. PMID:26865278

  8. Effect of 8-methoxypsoralen plus long-wave ultraviolet (PUVA) radiation on mast cells: PUVA suppresses degranulation of mouse skin mast cells induced by compound 48/80 or concanavalin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ears of mice were treated with a 0.5% 8-MOP solution topically plus UVA radiation (1.5-2.5 J/cm2). After PUVA radiation, skin responses to intradermal injection with mast cell liberators, including compound 48/80 (2.5 mg/ml, 10 microliter) and concanavalin A (Con-A) (2.0 mg/ml), or with a mixture of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and histamine as vasodilator (1.0 mg/ml and 50 mM, respectively) were examined with time (2 h-14 days). At each time point, an ear swelling response (ESR) was measured with a dial thickness gauge. The rate of mast cell degranulation and mast cell numbers were assessed by light microscopy using toluidine blue-stained semithin (1 micron) sections. ESR induced by compound 48/80 or Con-A was significantly suppressed dose-dependently (greater than 42% inhibition) by PUVA between 2 h-3 days postirradiation as compared with that in nonirradiated control mice, and the value returned to normal levels by 7-14 days. Compound 48/80- or Con-A-induced mast cell degranulation (%) was remarkably decreased between 2 h-3 days (greater than 48% inhibition) in accordance with the suppression in ESR and it was restored to the rates in nonirradiated controls by 7-14 days. Neither ESR nor percent degranulation was affected by UVA radiation only (less than 3.5 J/cm2) or application of 8-MOP only. 5-HT plus histamine-mediated ESR was not altered at all by PUVA throughout the experimental period. Since PUVA radiation itself at given doses did not produce measurable ESR, mast cell degranulation, or a reduction in mast cell numbers, and since PUVA did not affect a normal vascular response to vasodilator, it seemed that decreased skin reactivity to mast cell degranulators by PUVA might be due to a PUVA-induced noncytolytic alteration in mast cell release mechanisms

  9. Nitric oxide decreases intestinal haemorrhagic lesions in rat anaphylaxis independently of mast cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Carvalho Tavares

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO in the intestinal lesions of passive anaphylaxis, since this experimental model resembles necrotizing enterocolitis. Sprague-Dawley rats were sensitized with IgE anti-dinitrophenol monoclonal antibody. Extravasation of protein-rich plasma and haemorrhagia were measured in the small intestine. Plasma histamine was measured to assess mast cell activation. The effect of exogenous NO on the lesions was assessed by using two structurally unrelated NO-donors: sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-Nacetyl-penicillamine (SNAP. An increased basal production of NO was observed in cells taken after anaphylaxis, associated with a reduced response to platelet-activating factor, interleukin 1beta, and IgE/DNP-bovine serum albumin complexes. The response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP was enhanced 24 h after challenge, but at earlier times was not significantly different from that observed in controls. Treatment with either sodium nitroprusside or SNAP produced a significant reduction of the haemorrhagic lesions, which are a hallmark of rat anaphylaxis. The extravasation of protein-rich plasma was not influenced by NO-donors. The increase of plasma histamine elicited by the anaphylactic challenge was not influenced by SNAP treatment. NO-donors protect intestinal haemorrhagic lesions of rat anaphylaxis by a mechanism apparently independent of mast cell histamine release.

  10. Bronchodilatory and mast cell stabilising activity ofCressa cretica L.:Evaluation throughin vivo andin vitro experimental models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Priyashree Sunita; S Jha; Shakti Prasad Pattanayak

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of ethylacetate fraction (Fr-Et) and methanolic fraction (Fr-Me) obtained fromCressa cretica L.(C. cretica) L. on experimental models for bronchodilatory activity and mast cell stabilising activity.Methods: The effect of Fr-Et and Fr-Me were studied on acetylcholine and histamine aerosol-induced broncospasm using guinea pigs as experimental animals. Also, the effects of these fractions were evaluated on the isolated guinea pig tracheal preparations. Besides this mast cell degranulation effect was assessed using egg albumin and compound48/80 on rat peritoneal mast cells.Results:Significant increase in preconvulsion time was observed due to pretreatment with the fractions when guinea pigs were exposed to histamine and acetylcholine aerosol. Fr-Et and Fr-Me significantly increased the preconvulsion in a dose depended manner that suggestive of bronchodilating activity. Fr-Et and Fr-Me exhibited a significant concentration dependant relaxant effect on guinea pig trachea pre-contracted with CCh,K+ and histamine. The results revealed that Fr-Et to be more potent than Fr-Me in relaxing histamine and K+ and calcium induced contraction than CCh induced contractions. Studies on the fractions in protecting mast cell degranulation, which were elicited by the egg albumin as well as synthetic compound 48/80 revealed both the fractions significantly protect the mast cell degranulation, which release mediators such as histamine and proinflammatory cytokines through various stimuli in a dose depended manner.Conclusions:Thus our study established the bronchodilator activity, and mast cell stabilizing activity which are important mediators that provoke or sustain in asthma.

  11. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  12. Aggregation of tetraspanin CD9 causes activation of mast cells and inhibits their chemotaxis toward antigen and stem cell factor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana

    Nijmegen, 2012. [5th European Conference on Tetraspanins. Nijmegen (NL), 26.09.2012-28.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : tetraspanin * mast cells * CD9 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  13. Ethacrynic acid inhibition of histamine release from rat mast cells: effect on cellular ATP levels and thiol groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1983-01-01

    The experiments concerned the effect of ethacrynic acid (0.5 mM) on the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of rat mast cells and the effect on histamine release induced by the ionophore A23187 (10 microM). Ethacrynic acid decreased the ATP level of the cells in presence of antimycin A and glucose...

  14. Mast cells contribute to altered vascular reactivity and ischemia-reperfusion injury following cerium oxide nanoparticle instillation

    OpenAIRE

    Wingard, Christopher J.; WALTERS, DIANNE M.; Cathey, Brook L.; Hilderbrand, Susana C.; Katwa, Pranita; Lin, Sijie; Ke, Pu Chun; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao; Lust, Robert M.; Brown, Jared M.

    2010-01-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) represents an important nanomaterial with wide ranging applications. However, little is known regarding how CeO2 exposure may influence pulmonary or systemic inflammation. Furthermore, how mast cells would influence inflammatory responses to a nanoparticle exposure is unknown. We thus compared pulmonary and cardiovascular responses between C57BL/6 and B6.Cg-KitW-sh mast cell deficient mice following CeO2 nanoparticle instillation. C57BL/6 mice instilled with CeO2 exhibited...

  15. Regulation of the Na(+)-K+ pump activity and estimation of the reserve capacity in intact rat peritoneal mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Johansen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    Evidence is provided that regulation of the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in rat peritoneal mast cells occurs mainly through stimulation of the pump from inside the plasma membrane by sodium. It is demonstrated that there is a large reserve capacity for the exchange of intracellular sodium with extracel......Evidence is provided that regulation of the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in rat peritoneal mast cells occurs mainly through stimulation of the pump from inside the plasma membrane by sodium. It is demonstrated that there is a large reserve capacity for the exchange of intracellular sodium with...

  16. Randomized clinical trial of mast cell inhibition in patients with a medium-sized abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Eldrup, N; Hultgren, R;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is thought to develop as a result of inflammatory processes in the aortic wall. In particular, mast cells are believed to play a central role. The AORTA trial was undertaken to investigate whether the mast cell inhibitor, pemirolast, could retard the...... surgery, diabetes mellitus, and severe concomitant disease with a life expectancy of less than 2 years. Included patients were treated with 10, 25 or 40 mg pemirolast, or matching placebo for 52 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in aortic diameter as measured from leading edge adventitia at the...

  17. Mucosal mast cells are pivotal elements in inflammatory bowel disease that connect the dots: Stress, intestinal hyperpermeability and inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashkan Farhadi; Jeremy Z Fields; Ali Keshavarzian

    2007-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are pivotal elements in several physiological and immunological functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. MC translate the stress signals that has been transmitted through brain gut axis into release of proinflammatory mediators that can cause stimulation of nerve endings that could affect afferent nerve terminals and change their perception, affect intestinal motility, increase intestinal hyperpermeability and, in susceptible individuals, modulate the inflammation. Thus, it is not surprising that MC are an important element in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease and non inflammatory GI disorders such as IBS and mast cell enterocolitis.

  18. IL-9 production by regulatory T cells recruits mast cells that are essential for regulatory T cell-induced immune-suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, Kathrin; Wolf, Dominik; Huber, Julia M; Metz, Martin; Mayer, Gert; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Maurer, Marcus; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Wolf, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    Both, mast cells (MC) and regulatory T cells (Treg) have gained attention as immunosuppressive cell populations. To investigate a possible interaction, we used the Th1- and Th17-dependent model of nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), in which both MC and Treg have been shown to play a protective role.

  19. Impact of CD40 ligand, B cells, and mast cells in peanut-induced anaphylactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiangfeng; Arias, Katherine; Alvarez, David; Fattouh, Ramzi; Walker, Tina; Goncharova, Susanna; Kim, Bobae; Waserman, Susan; Reed, Jennifer; Coyle, Anthony J; Jordana, Manel

    2007-11-15

    The effector immune mechanisms underlying peanut-induced anaphylaxis remain to be fully elucidated. We investigated the relative contribution of Igs, mast cells (MCs), and FcepsilonRI in the elicitation of anaphylaxis in a murine model. Assessment of peanut hypersensitivity reactions was performed clinically and biologically. Our data show that wild-type (WT; C57BL/6 strain) mice consistently developed severe anaphylaxis (median clinical score: 3.5/5), an approximately 8 degrees C drop in core body temperature, and significantly increased plasma levels of histamine and leukotrienes. CD40 ligand- and B cell-deficient mice presented evidence of allergic sensitization as demonstrated by production of Th2-associated cytokines by splenocytes and a late-phase inflammatory response that were both indistinguishable to those detected in WT mice. However, CD40 ligand- and B cell-deficient mice did not exhibit any evidence of anaphylaxis. Our data also show that MC-deficient (Kit(W)/Kit(W-v)) mice did not suffer, unlike their littermate controls, anaphylactic reactions despite the fact that serum levels of peanut-specific Igs were similarly elevated. Finally, FcepsilonRI-deficient mice experienced anaphylactic responses although to a significantly lesser degree than those observed in WT mice. Thus, these data demonstrate that the presence of peanut-specific Abs along with functional MCs comprise a necessary and sufficient condition for the elicitation of peanut-induced anaphylaxis. That the absence of FcepsilonRI prevented the development of anaphylaxis only partially insinuates the contribution of an IgE-independent pathway, and suggests that strategies to impair MC degranulation may be necessary to improve the efficacy of anti-IgE therapy. PMID:17982059

  20. Intestinal and peritoneal mast cells differ in kinetics of quantal release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Acosta, Jorge; Ales, Eva; Flores, Juan A

    2016-01-15

    5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT, serotonin) storage and release in mast cell (MC) secretory granules (SG) are dependent on serglycin proteoglycans (PG). This notion is based on the studies of MC of the connective tissue subtype that predominantly contain PG of the heparin type, whereas intestinal mucosal MC, which contain predominantly chondroitin sulfate, have been poorly explored. In the present study, we addressed the possibility that PG contents may differently affect the storage and release of preformed mediators in these two MC subclasses and explain in part their different functional properties. Rat peritoneal (PMC) and intestinal mast cells (IMC) were isolated and purified using a percoll gradient, and the efflux of 5-HT from each SG was measured by amperometric detection. IMC exhibited a ∼34% reduction in the release of 5-HT compared with PMC because of a lower number of exocytotic events, rather than a lower secretion per single exocytotic event. Amperometric spikes from IMC exhibited a slower decay phase and increased half-width but a similar ascending phase and foot parameters, indicating that the fusion pore kinetics are comparable in both MC subclasses. We conclude that both PG subtypes are equally efficient systems, directly involved in serotonin accumulation, and play a crucial role in regulating the kinetics of exocytosis from SG, providing specific secretory properties for the two cellular subtypes. PMID:26692491

  1. The stealthy nano-machine behind mast cell granule size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Ilan; Meilijson, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The classical model of mast cell secretory granule formation suggests that newly synthesized secretory mediators, transported from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, undergo post-transitional modification and are packaged for secretion by condensation within membrane-bound granules of unit size. These unit granules may fuse with other granules to form larger granules that reside in the cytoplasm until secreted. A novel stochastic model for mast cell granule growth and elimination (G&E) as well as inventory management is presented. Resorting to a statistical mechanics approach in which SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) REceptor (SNARE) components are viewed as interacting particles, the G&E model provides a simple 'nano-machine' of SNARE self-aggregation that can perform granule growth and secretion. Granule stock is maintained as a buffer to meet uncertainty in demand by the extracellular environment and to serve as source of supply during the lead time to produce granules of adaptive content. Experimental work, mathematical calculations, statistical modeling and a rationale for the emergence of nearly last-in, first out inventory management, are discussed. PMID:24629227

  2. Spontaneous skin canine tumors: toluidine blue stain detection of mast cells in tissue section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALKETA QOKU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dog mast cell tumor (MCT is common in dog. The etiology of canine MCTs is unknown, but it is probably multi-factorial. Its incidence is higher than it has found in human. There are demonstrated several common biological and clinical characteristics in both species. Cutaneous mast cells are located in the dermis and hypodermis. The objective of this study is to detect of MC on Toluidine Blue stained slides. There were examined 74 dogs of difference breeds and aged, from Tirana city. Six of them demonstrated the skin canine tumors. Skin samples were obtained from these animals. Macroscopic examination of the tumor revealed nodular ulcerated lesion with areas of necrosis and hemorrhage, accompanied with normal superjacent epidermis and annexes. Serial sections obtained from biopsy specimens were processed with toluidine blue staining pH 4.5, specific for MC identification. This study suggests that Toluidine blue, pH 4.5 stain may give a good information about skin tumors in dog, histologically with benign behavior.

  3. Activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z L; Mochizuki, T; Watanabe, H; Maeyama, K

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism by which stress induces rapid histamine release from mast cells, Wistar rats, pretreated as neonates with capsaicin, were subjected to immobilization stress for 2 h, and histamine release was measured in paws of anesthetized rats by using in vivo microdialysis after activation of sensory nerves by electrical or chemical stimulation. Immobilization stress studies indicated that in control rats stress induced a 2.7-fold increase in the level of plasma histamine compared to that in freely moving rats. Whereas pretreatment with capsaicin significantly decreased stress-induced elevation of plasma histamine. Microdialysis studies showed that electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve resulted in a 4-fold increase of histamine release in rat paws. However, this increase was significantly inhibited in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin into rat paw significantly increased histamine release in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells. PMID:10462124

  4. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2012-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts proinflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5-2 μM) for 6 hours significantly increases corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 μM) to LAD2 cells, which are "primed" with SP for 48 hours and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hours later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 μM) for 6 hours induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared with controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 μM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, whereas CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  5. Roles of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP in mast cell histamine release induced by radiographic contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mami; Itoh, Yoshinori; Yano, Takahisa; Sendo, Toshiaki; Goromaru, Takeshi; Sakai, Naoko; Oishi, Ryozo

    2003-04-01

    Mast cell histamine release is considered to be associated with the etiology of anaphylactoid reactions to iodinated radiographic contrast media (RCM). In the present study, the effects of various ionic and non-ionic RCM on histamine release from mast cells were compared, and the possible mechanisms of the histamine release were subsequently determined. Both ionic (ioxaglate and amidotrizoate) and non-ionic (iohexol, ioversol, iomeprol, iopamidol and iotrolan) RCM increased histamine release from the dissociated rat pulmonary cells, whereby ionic materials were more potent than non-ionic agents. There was no significant correlation between the extent of histamine release and the osmolarity of each RCM solution. In addition, hyperosmotic mannitol solution (1000 mOsm/kg) caused no marked histamine release. Thus, it is unlikely that the hyperosmolarity of RCM solutions contributes to the histamine release. RCM also stimulated, but to a lesser extent, the histamine release from rat peritoneal cells. The RCM-induced histamine release from both types of cells was inhibited by dibutyl cyclic AMP or combined treatment with forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Corresponding to these results, RCM markedly reduced the cellular cyclic AMP content. On the other hand, the removal of intracellular but not the extracellular Ca2+ attenuated the RCM-induced mast cell histamine release. From these findings, it is suggested that the decrease in cellular cyclic AMP content and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ contribute at least in part to the RCM-induced mast cell histamine release. PMID:12690428

  6. Fibroblasts maintain the phenotype and viability of the rat heparin-containing mast cell in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat serosal heparin-containing mast cells (HP-MC) were maintained in vitro for as long as 30 days when co-cultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts. In contrast, when the mast cells were cultured alone, on fibronectin-, gelatin-, or dermal-collagen-coated dishes, on acid and heat-killed fibroblasts in the presence or absence of 24 hr fibroblast-conditioned medium, or on a monolayer of mouse serosal macrophages, they failed to adhere to the dishes, released significant amounts of their histamine and lactate dehydrogenase, and stained with trypan blue, indicating a loss of viability. The rat serosal HP-MC cultured with the 3T3 fibroblasts became so adherent to the fibroblasts that the two cell types could be separated from one another only by trypsinization. The cultured HP-MC stained with both alcian blue and safranin and continued to synthesize proteoglycan at a rate comparable to that of freshly isolated cells. The 35S-labeled proteoglycan synthesized by these cultured cells, like that produced by freshly isolated rat serosal HP-MC, was a 750,000 to 1,000,000 m.w. proteoglycan containing only heparin glycosaminoglycans of 50,000 to 100,000 m.w. As assessed by electron microscopy, many of the cultured HP-MC resembled freshly isolated cells except that some secretory granules had fused with one another in some cells. These results demonstrate that the in vivo differentiated rat HP-MC maintain their histology, morphology, immunologic responsiveness, histamine content, and ability to synthesize heparin proteoglycan when co-cultured with living fibroblasts

  7. Stem cells and exosomes in cardiac repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Dinender K

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac diseases currently lead in the number of deaths per year, giving rise an interest in transplanting embryonic and adult stem cells as a means to improve damaged tissue from conditions such as myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease. After testing these cells as a treatment option in both animal and human models, it is believed that these cells improve the damaged tissue primarily through the release of autocrine and paracrine factors. Major concerns such as teratoma formation, immune response, difficulty harvesting cells, and limited cell proliferation and differentiation, hinder the routine use of these cells as a treatment option in the clinic. The advent of stem cell-derived exosomes circumvent those concerns, while still providing the growth factors, miRNA, and additional cell protective factors that aid in repairing and regenerating the damaged tissue. These exosomes have been found to be anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic, pro-angiogenic, as well as enhance cardiac differentiation, all of which are key to repairing damaged tissue. As such, stem cell derived exosomes are considered to be a potential new and novel approach in the treatment of various cardiac diseases. PMID:26848944

  8. A novel mast cell co-culture microfluidic chip for the electrochemical evaluation of food allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Jiang, Donglei; Zhu, Pei; Pi, Fuwei; Ji, Jian; Sun, Chao; Sun, Jiadi; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-09-15

    In this study a novel cell-to-cell electrochemical microfluidic chip was developed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of food allergen. Microfluidic cell culture, food allergen-induced cell morphological changes, and cell metabolism measurements were performed simultaneously using the aforementioned device. RBL-2H3 mast cells and ANA-1 macrophages have been used within a cell co-culture model to observe their allergic response when they are introduced to the antigen stimulus. Two cell cultivation microfluidic channels are located in the microfluidic chip, which is fabricated with four groups of gold electrodes, with an additional "capillary". In order to detect the allergic response, the cells were stimulated with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) without anti-DNP IgE incubation. When exocytosis occurs, the cell-secreted inflammatory cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) and cell impedance changes were detected using cell-based electrochemical assay. Results indicate that the real-time cell allergic response are accurately monitored by this electrochemical microfluidic chip, which provides a general example of rapidly prototyped low-cost biosensor technology for applications in both food allergen detection and investigation. PMID:27108255

  9. Induction of tryptase and histmine release from human colon mast cells by IgE dependent or independent mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie; Yong-Song He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the tryptase and histamine release ability of human colon mast cells upon IgE dependent or independent activation and the potential mechanisms.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colons were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187, and the cell supernatants after challenge were collected. Both concentration dependent and time course studies with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 were performed. Tryptase release was determined with a sandwich ELISA procedure and histamine release was measured usina a glass fibre-based fluorometric assay.RESULTS: Both anti-IgE and calcium ionophore were able to induce dose dependent release of histamine from colon mast cells with up to approximately 60% and 25% net histamine release being achieved with 1 μg/mL calcium ionophore and 10 μg/mL anti-IgE, respectively. Dose dependent release of tryptase was also observed with up to approximately 19 ng/mL and 21 ng/mL release of tryptase being achieved with 10 μg/mL anti-IgE and 1 μg/mL calcium ionophore, respectively. Time course study revealed that both tryptase and histamine release from colon mast cells stimulated by anti-IgE initiated within 10 sec and reached their maximum release at 6 min following challenge. Pretreatment of cells with metabolic inhibitors abolished the actions of anti-IgE as well as calcium ionophore. Tryptase and histamine release, particularly that induced by calcium ionophore was inhibited by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin.CONCLUSION: Both anti-IgE and calcium ionophore are able to induce significant release of tryptase and histamine from colon mast cells, indicating that this cell type is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of colitis and other mast cell associated intestinal diseases.

  10. Overexpression of miR-9 in mast cells is associated with invasive behavior and spontaneous metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While microRNA (miRNA) expression is known to be altered in a variety of human malignancies contributing to cancer development and progression, the potential role of miRNA dysregulation in malignant mast cell disease has not been previously explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential contribution of miRNA dysregulation to the biology of canine mast cell tumors (MCTs), a well-established spontaneous model of malignant mast cell disease. We evaluated the miRNA expression profiles from biologically low-grade and biologically high-grade primary canine MCTs using real-time PCR-based TaqMan Low Density miRNA Arrays and performed real-time PCR to evaluate miR-9 expression in primary canine MCTs, malignant mast cell lines, and normal bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Mouse mast cell lines and BMMCs were transduced with empty or pre-miR-9 expressing lentiviral constructs and cell proliferation, caspase 3/7 activity, and invasion were assessed. Transcriptional profiling of cells overexpressing miR-9 was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Gene 2.0 ST arrays and real-time PCR was performed to validate changes in mRNA expression. Our data demonstrate that unique miRNA expression profiles correlate with the biological behavior of primary canine MCTs and that miR-9 expression is increased in biologically high grade canine MCTs and malignant cell lines compared to biologically low grade tumors and normal canine BMMCs. In transformed mouse malignant mast cell lines expressing either wild-type (C57) or activating (P815) KIT mutations and mouse BMMCs, miR-9 overexpression significantly enhanced invasion but had no effect on cell proliferation or apoptosis. Transcriptional profiling of normal mouse BMMCs and P815 cells possessing enforced miR-9 expression demonstrated dysregulation of several genes, including upregulation of CMA1, a protease involved in activation of matrix metalloproteases and extracellular matrix remodeling. Our findings

  11. Polydatin (PD) inhibits IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice by stabilizing mast cells through modulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Meichun [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Department of Physiology, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan (China); Li, Jianjie [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease for Allergy at Shengzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Lv, Jingzhang [Shenzhen Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Shenzhen 518045 (China); Mo, Xucheng; Yang, Chengbin [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease for Allergy at Shengzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Chen, Xiangdong [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Liu, Zhigang [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease for Allergy at Shengzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Liu, Jie, E-mail: ljljz@yahoo.com [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2012-11-01

    Mast cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and are a promising target for therapeutic intervention in asthma. This study investigated the effects of polydatin (PD), a resveratrol glucoside, on mast cell degranulation upon cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI), as well as the anti-allergic activity of PD in vivo. Herein, we demonstrated that PD treatment for 30 min suppressed FcεRI-mediated mast cell degranulation in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, PD significantly decreased FcεRI-mediated Ca{sup 2+} increase in mast cells. The suppressive effects of PD on FcεRI-mediated Ca{sup 2+} increase were largely inhibited by using LaCl{sub 3} to block the Ca{sup 2+} release-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels (CRACs). Furthermore, PD significantly inhibited Ca{sup 2+} entry through CRACs evoked by thapsigargin (TG). Knocking down protein expression of Orai1, the pore-forming subunit of CRACs, significantly decreased PD suppression of FcεRI-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx and mast cell degranulation. In a mouse model of mast cell-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), in vivo PD administration suppressed mast cell degranulation and inhibited anaphylaxis. Taken together, our data indicate that PD stabilizes mast cells by suppressing FcεRI-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization mainly through inhibiting Ca{sup 2+} entry via CRACs, thus exerting a protective effect against PCA. -- Highlights: ► Polydatin can prevent the pathogenesis of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. ► Polydatin stabilizes mast cells by decreasing FcεRI-mediated degranulation. ► Polydatin suppresses Ca{sup 2+} entry through CRAC channels in mast cells.

  12. Activation of human colon mast cells through proteinase activated receptor-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Yong-Song He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of agonists of PAR-2 to rtimulate release of tryptase and histamine from human colon mast cells and the potential mechanisms.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colons were challenged with tc-LIGRLO, tc-OLRGIL, SLIGKV,VKGILS, trypsin, anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187, and the cell supernatante after challenge were collected. Tryptase release was determined with a sandwich ELISA procedure and histamine release was measured using a glass fibrebased fluorometric assay.RESULTS: Both PAR-2 agonists tc-LIGRLO-NH2 and SLIGKVNH2 were able to induce dose dependent release of tryptase and histamine from colon mast cells. More than 2.5 fold increase in both tryptase and histamine release was provoked by 100 μmol/mL tc-LIGRLO-NH2, in compariSon with only 2.0 fold increase being stimulated by SLIGKV-NH2. The reverse peptides tc-OLRGIL-NH2 and VKGILS -NH2 at the concentrations tested had no effect on the release of these two mediators. The maximum tryptase release elicited by tc-LIGRLO-NH2 was similar to that induced by anti-IgE(10 μg/mL) or calcium ionophore (1 μg/mL), though the latter was a more potent stimulus for histamine release. Both histamine and tryptase release in response to tc-LIGRLONH2 were completed within 3 min. Trypsin at concentrations from 1.0 to 100 μg/mL was capable of provoking a dose dependent release of tryptase as well as histamine with a maximum of 16 ng/mL tryptase and 14 ng/mL histamine release being achieved. An approximately 80% and 70% inhibition of trypsin induced release of tryptase and histamine were observed with SBTI, respectively. Pretreatment of cells with metabolic inhibitors or pertussis toxin abolished the actions of tc-LIGRLO-NH2, SLIGKV-NH2 and trypsin.CONCLUSION: The agonists of PAR-2 and trypsin are potent secretagogues of human colon mast cells, which are likely to contribute to the development of inflammatory disorders in human gut.

  13. COMPARISON OF MAST CELL COUNT AND MAST CELL DENSITY IN NORMAL MUCOSA, ORAL LEUKOPLAKIA, ORAL LICHEN PLANUS, ORAL SUBMUCOUS FIBROSIS AND ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA – A STUDY ON 50 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Kinra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out for quantitative analysis of the mean MCC/optical field and also MCD/sq. mm in oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF, oral lichen planus (OLP, oral leukoplakia (OL, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and normal buccal mucosa which constituted control group. This study was carried out in the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Jaipur Dental College, Jaipur. Histologically confirmed 10 cases each of OSMF, OL, OLP and OSCC were selected. The sections were obtained and stained with toluidine blue. The number of mast cells/optical field and mast cell density/sq. mm were assessed. An assessment of the role of mast cells in the etiopathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus and oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma was reviewed. The following conclusions were drawn from our study. An increase in both mean MCC/optical field and MCD/sq. mm in OSMF, OLP, OL & OSCC. This increase in the values was statistically significant when compared with that of normal buccal mucosa which constituted the control group. An increase in both mean MCC/optical field and MCD/sq. mm was found in precancerous condition & lesion and also in potentially malignant and malignant oral lesions. This increase in the values was statistically significant when compared with that of normal buccal mucosa which constituted the controls.

  14. Changes of phospholipase D activity of rat peritoneal mast cells in degranulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-biLU; MingWU; Han-liangZHOU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the changes of phospholipase D (PLD) activity of actively sensitized rat peritoneal mast cells(RPMC) in degranulation. METHODS: Degranulation of RPMC was determined by measurement of β-hexosaminidase release. PLD activity assay was carried out by measurement of PLD product, choline, with chemiluminescent oxidation of luminol. RESULTS: Actively sensitized RPMC challenged with ovalbumin (0.5-8 mg/L for 120 s, 4mg/L for 15-120 s) resulted in significant activation of PLD accompanied with the increment of β-hexosaminidase release. PLD activity of sensitized RPMC was increased by more than 2-fold compared with that of unsensitized RPMC which contained low levels of PLD activity [(35+ 13) pmol choline/min in 1 × 106 cells], but β-hexosaminidase releases of the sensitized cells were as low as spontaneous releases. After challenge with ovalbumin 4 mg/L for 120 s, PLD activity of sensitized RPMC was increased to (155±43) pmol choline/min in 1×106 cells and β-hexosaminidase release was also elevated significantly (4.5-fold of spontaneous release, n=6, P<0.05). When unsensitized RPMC were stimulated with antigen, PLD activity and β-hexosaminidase release of the cells were hardly changed.Sensitized RPMC were treated with 1% 1-butanol or 2,3- disphosphoglycerate 10 mmol/L before challenge with ovalbumin, these drugs induced an inhibition of PLD activity and a reduction of β-hexosaminidase release to basal level. 1-Butanol 0.1% also worked. CONCLUSION: Phospholipase D plays an important role in the regulation of β-hexosaminidase release in actively sensitized rat peritoneal mast cells.

  15. Mast cells phagocyte Candida albicans and produce nitric oxide by mechanisms involving TLR2 and Dectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinke, Karen Henriette; Lima, Heliton Gustavo de; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a fungus commonly found in the human mucosa, which may cause superficial and systemic infections, especially in immunosuppression. Until now, the main actors in the defense against this fungus are the epithelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells. However, mast cells are strategically located to play a first line of anti-Candida defense and it has appropriate mechanisms to do it. As with other cells, the recognition of C. albicans occurs meanly via TLR2 and Dectin-1. We assess the TLR2/Dectin-1 involvement in phagocytosis and production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mast cells challenged with C. albicans. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (MC) from wild type (Wt) or knockout (TLR2-/-) mice C57BL/6 were subjected to in vitro Dectin-1 blockade. After challenged with FITC-labeled C. albicans or zymosan, phagocytosis was analyzed by microscopy. The intracellular production of NO and ROS was measured by DAF-FM diacetate and CellROX Deep/Red Reagent kits. The nitrite formation and hydrogen peroxide release were analyzed by Griess reaction and Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide/Peroxidase Assay Kit. Wt/MC phagocytose C. albicans with production of intracellular NO, but not ROS. Moreover, increased levels of nitrite were also observed. The absence and/or blockade of TLR2/Dectin-1 caused significant decreased in C. albicans phagocytosis and NO production. Our results showed that mast cells are able to phagocytose and produce NO against C. albicans via TLR2/Dectin-1. Therefore, mast cells could be important during the course of Candida infection and as a therapeutic target. PMID:26421959

  16. Mast cell diversion of T-lineage precursor cells by the essential T-lineage transcription factor GATA-3

    OpenAIRE

    Taghon, Tom; Yui, Mary A.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2007-01-01

    GATA-3 is essential for T cell development from the earliest stages. However, highly abundant GATA-3 can drive T-lineage precursors to a non-T fate, depending on Notch signaling and developmental stage. GATA-3 overexpression blocked pro-T cell survival when Notch-Delta signals were present, but enhanced viability in their absence. In double-negative (DN1) and DN2 but not DN3 fetal thymocytes, GATA-3 overexpression rapidly induced mast cell lineage respecification with high frequency by direct...

  17. Mast cells mobilize myeloid-derived suppressor cells and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment via IL-17 pathway in murine hepatocarcinoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoshun Yang

    Full Text Available Tumor immunosuppression is commonly braided with chronic inflammation during tumor development. However, the relationship between immunosuppression and inflammation in tumor microenvironment is still unclear. We have demonstrated that mast cells are accumulated and exacerbate the inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment via SCF/c-kit signaling pathway. Here, we further elucidate the underlying mechanism, which involves both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and regulatory T (Treg cells. Our data showed that mast cells mobilized the infiltration of MDSCs to tumor and induced the production of IL-17 by MDSCs; MDSCs-derived IL-17 indirectly attracted Treg cells, enhanced their suppressor function, and induced the IL-9 production by Treg cells; in turn, IL-9 strengthened the survival and protumor effect of mast cells in tumor microenvironment. Our findings disclose a closed loop among mast cells, MDSCs and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment, which provides a new insight into the paralleled developments of inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment. Based on these findings, we propose that targeting tumor inflammation might be a potential strategy to reverse the immunosuppression of tumor microenvironment, thus facilitating cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Mast cells mobilize myeloid-derived suppressor cells and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment via IL-17 pathway in murine hepatocarcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhuoshun; Zhang, Biao; Li, Dapeng; Lv, Meng; Huang, Chunmei; Shen, Guan-Xin; Huang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Tumor immunosuppression is commonly braided with chronic inflammation during tumor development. However, the relationship between immunosuppression and inflammation in tumor microenvironment is still unclear. We have demonstrated that mast cells are accumulated and exacerbate the inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment via SCF/c-kit signaling pathway. Here, we further elucidate the underlying mechanism, which involves both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T (Treg) cells. Our data showed that mast cells mobilized the infiltration of MDSCs to tumor and induced the production of IL-17 by MDSCs; MDSCs-derived IL-17 indirectly attracted Treg cells, enhanced their suppressor function, and induced the IL-9 production by Treg cells; in turn, IL-9 strengthened the survival and protumor effect of mast cells in tumor microenvironment. Our findings disclose a closed loop among mast cells, MDSCs and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment, which provides a new insight into the paralleled developments of inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment. Based on these findings, we propose that targeting tumor inflammation might be a potential strategy to reverse the immunosuppression of tumor microenvironment, thus facilitating cancer immunotherapy. PMID:20111717

  19. Ouabain enhancement of compound 48/80 induced histamine secretion from rat peritoneal mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified populations of rat peritoneal mast cells were used to study the effect of ouabain on compound 48/80-induced histamine secretion and on 86Rb+ uptake. 86Rb+ was used as a tracer for extracellular K+. The calculated value of the ouabain-sensitive uptake of K+ and 86Rb+ was considered a measure of the Na+-K+ pump activity of the cells. Ouabain caused an immediate inhibition of the pump activity and a time-dependent increase in histamine secretion in the absence of extracellular calcium. No effect on the secretion was observed in the presence of calcium. The effect of ouabain on the secretion occurs in the presence of sodium but not when sodium was replaced by lithium. Preservation by ouabain of a high intracellular sodium content in sodium-loaded cells was associated with preservation of the secretory response in a calcium-free medium. In the presence of lanthanum in a calcium-free medium, the pump activity was inhibited and the enhancement by ouabain of the secretion of histamine was blocked. A less marked inhibition of the pump was found in a calcium-free medium containing magnesium. The inhibition exerted by magnesium was concentration-dependent (0-5 mM) as was the counteraction of magnesium of the enhancement of ouabain of the secretion of histamine. These observations indicate that the echancement by ouabain of the secretory response of mast cells preincubated in a calcium-free medium is associated with accumulation of sodium inside the cell. In addition to a decreased rate of sodium-calcium exchange caused by a decreased inward directed sodium gradient, the mechanism by which ouabain enhances the secretory response is likely to involve an increased binding of calcium to membrane binding sites. (au)

  20. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury. PMID:25480318

  1. Research progress of adult cardiac stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Nan; Ning-kun ZHANG; Lian-ru GAO

    2013-01-01

    The traditional view is that the heart is a terminal organ. This dogma, however, has been widely questioned with the discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs). Since CSCs have a highly self-renewal capacity and specific myocardial differentiation potential, nowadays they have been regarded as the most promising type of stem cells used in ischemic heart disease and other replacement therapy of end-stage heart disease. The present paper will focus on current results of scientific research on...

  2. Mast cells modulate transport of CD23/IgE/antigen complex across human intestinal epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chang Yang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food allergy and chronic intestinal inflammation are common in western countries. The complex of antigen/IgE is taken up into the body from the gut lumen with the aid of epithelial cell-derived CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor II that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of intestinal allergy. This study aimed to elucidate the role of mast cell on modulation of antigen/IgE complex transport across intestinal epithelial barrier. Methods: Human intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 cell monolayer was used as a study platform. Transepithelial electric resistance (TER and permeability to ovalbumin (OVA were used as the markers of intestinal epithelial barrier function that were recorded in response to the stimulation of mast cell-derived chemical mediators. Results: Conditioned media from naïve mast cell line HMC-1 cells or monocyte cell line THP-1 cells significantly upregulated the expression of CD23 and increased the antigen transport across the epithelium. Treatment with stem cell factor (SCF, nerve growth factor (NGF, retinoic acid (RA or dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO enhanced CD23 expression in HT29 cells. Conditioned media from SCF, NGF or RA-treated HMC-1 cells, and SCF, NGF, DMSO or RA-treated THP-1 cells enhanced immune complex transport via enhancing the expression of the CD23 in HT29 cells and the release of inflammatory mediator TNF-α. Nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor, tryptase and TNF-α inhibited the increase in CD23 in HT29 cells and prevents the enhancement of epithelial barrier permeability. Conclusions: Mast cells play an important role in modulating the intestinal CD23 expression and the transport of antigen/IgE/CD23 complex across epithelial barrier.

  3. Brain mast cells are influenced by chemosensory cues associated with estrus induction in female prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster)

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegsfeld, Lance J.; Hotchkiss, Andrew K.; Demas, Gregory E.; Silverman, Ann-Judith; Silver, Rae; Nelson, Randy J.

    2003-01-01

    Historically, the brain has been viewed as protected from the infiltration of peripheral hematopoietic cells by the blood-brain barrier. However, numerous immune cell types have been found in the central nervous system (CNS). Mast cells, granulocytic immune cells, are found in the CNS of birds and mammals and their numbers and location are influenced by both extrinsic and intrinsic factors, including reproductive behavior and endocrine status. The present study used female prairie voles (Micr...

  4. Acidic environment augments FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamide, Yosuke, E-mail: m08702012@gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Clinical Research Center for Allergy and Rheumatology, Sagamihara National Hospital, Sagamihara (Japan); Ishizuka, Tamotsu [Third Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Tobo, Masayuki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Tsurumaki, Hiroaki [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Aoki, Haruka; Mogi, Chihiro [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Tokyo (Japan); Yatomi, Masakiyo; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Sato, Koichi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Hisada, Takeshi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Dobashi, Kunio [Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Maebashi (Japan); Yamada, Masanobu [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan)

    2015-08-28

    Although blood pH is maintained in a narrow range of around pH 7.4 in living organisms, inflammatory loci are characterized by acidic conditions. Mast cells tend to reside close to the surface of the body in areas such as the mucosa and skin where they may be exposed to exogenous acids, and they play an important role in immune responses. However, little is known about the effects of extracellular acidification on the functions of mast cell. Here, we found that extracellular acidification increased the dinitrophenyl-conjugated human serum albumin (DNP-HSA)-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-13 in MC/9 cells or bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells sensitized with anti-DNP IgE. Extracellular acidification also inhibited migration of MC/9 cells toward DNP-HSA. In addition, acidic pH stimulated antigen-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt). These findings suggest that extracellular acidification augmented antigen/IgE-induced and FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells, and that this was associated with the enhancement of p38 MAPK and Akt activation. - Highlights: • Antigen-induced IL-6 and IL-13 production was augmented by acidic pH in mast cells. • Acidic pH-induced actions were associated with activation of p38 MAPK and Akt. • Inhibition of p38 MAPK and Akt attenuated cytokine responses to acidic pH. • Acidic pH effects are not attributable to actions of known proton-sensing GPCRs.

  5. Acidic environment augments FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although blood pH is maintained in a narrow range of around pH 7.4 in living organisms, inflammatory loci are characterized by acidic conditions. Mast cells tend to reside close to the surface of the body in areas such as the mucosa and skin where they may be exposed to exogenous acids, and they play an important role in immune responses. However, little is known about the effects of extracellular acidification on the functions of mast cell. Here, we found that extracellular acidification increased the dinitrophenyl-conjugated human serum albumin (DNP-HSA)-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-13 in MC/9 cells or bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells sensitized with anti-DNP IgE. Extracellular acidification also inhibited migration of MC/9 cells toward DNP-HSA. In addition, acidic pH stimulated antigen-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt). These findings suggest that extracellular acidification augmented antigen/IgE-induced and FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells, and that this was associated with the enhancement of p38 MAPK and Akt activation. - Highlights: • Antigen-induced IL-6 and IL-13 production was augmented by acidic pH in mast cells. • Acidic pH-induced actions were associated with activation of p38 MAPK and Akt. • Inhibition of p38 MAPK and Akt attenuated cytokine responses to acidic pH. • Acidic pH effects are not attributable to actions of known proton-sensing GPCRs

  6. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  7. Ouabain enhancement of compound 48/80 induced histamine secretion from rat peritoneal mast cells: dependence on extracellular sodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Johansen, Torben

    1992-01-01

    Purified populations of rat peritoneal mast cells were used to study the effect of ouabain on compound 48/80-induced histamine secretion and on 86Rb+ uptake. 86Rb+ was used as a tracer for extracellular K+. The calculated value of the ouabain-sensitive uptake of K+ and 86Rb+ was considered a meas...

  8. Mechanism of histamine release from rat mast cells induced by the ionophore A23187: effects of calcium and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1978-01-01

    1 The mechanism of histamine release from a pure population of rat mast cells induced by the lipid soluble antibiotic, A23187, has been studied and compared with data for anaphylactic histamine release reported in the literature. 2 Histamine release induced by A23187 in the presence of calcium 10...

  9. Histamine release induced from rat mast cells by the ionophore A23187 in the absence of extracellular calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1980-01-01

    Isolated rat mast cells were used to study whether ionophore A23187 could induce histamine release by mobilizing cellular calcium. The histamine release was a slow process which was completed after about 20 min incubation with A23187. The A23187-induced histamine release was inhibited after...

  10. Pacific island ‘Awa (Kava) extracts, but not isolated kavalactones, promote pro-inflammatory responses in model mast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Lori M.N.; Park, Christy; Stokes, Alexander J.; Gomes, Henry Halenani; Turner, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Kava (‘Awa) is a traditional water-based beverage in Pacific island communities, prepared from the ground root and stems of Piper methysticum. Kava use is associated with an ichthyotic dermatitis and delayed type hypersensitivity reactions. In the current study we collated preparative methodologies from cultural practitioners and recreational kava users in various Pacific communities. We standardized culturally-informed aqueous extraction methods and prepared extracts that were subjected to basic physicochemical analysis. Mast cells exposed to these extracts displayed robust intracellular free calcium responses, and concomitant release of pro-inflammatory mediators. In contrast, mast cells were refractory to single or combinatorial stimulation with kavalactones including methysticin, dihydromethysticin and kavain. Moreover, we reproduced a traditional modification of the kava preparation methodology, pre-mixing with the mucilage of Hibiscus taliaceus, and observed its potentiating effect on the activity of aqueous extracts in mast cells. Taken together, these data indicate that water extractable active ingredients may play a role in the physiological and pathophysiological effects of kava, and suggests that mast cell activation may be a mechanistic component of kava-related skin inflammations. PMID:22473598

  11. Mast cells contribute to alterations in vascular reactivity and exacerbation of ischemia reperfusion injury following ultrafine PM exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased ambient fine particulate matter (FPM) concentrations are associated with increased risk for short-term and long-term adverse cardiovascular events. Ultrafine PM (UFPM) due to its size and increased surface area might be particularly toxic. Mast cells are well recognized...

  12. Multiple Regulatory Roles of the Mouse Transmembrane Adaptor Protein NTAL in Gene Transcription and Mast Cell Physiology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polakovičová, Iva; Dráberová, Lubica; Šimíček, Michal; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 8 (2014), e105539. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA MŠk LD12073 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cells * NTAL * microarray gene-expression profiling * spreading * chemotaxis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  13. Evidence for a role of mast cells in the lung edema induced by Tityus serrulatus venom in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Matos, I M; Talvani, A; Rocha, O O; Freire-Maia, L; Teixeira, M M

    2001-06-01

    In the most severe cases of human poisoning by Tityus serrulatus, pulmonary edema is a frequent finding and can be the cause of death. Mast cells can release a range of mediators known to be involved in the development of lung edema following T. serrulatus venom injection. The present work was designed to investigate whether mast cells participated in the acute lung injury induced by T. serrulatus scorpion venom and could, thus, be an intermediate between neuropeptide release and activation of the inflammatory cascade. To this end, mast cells were depleted using compound 48/80. Pulmonary edema, as assessed by the levels of extravasation of Evans blue dye in the bronchoalveolar lavage and in the left lung, was completely inhibited in compound 48/80-treated animals. Moreover, the number of animals surviving 60min after injection of venom rose from 20 to 60%. Our results demonstrate an important role for mast cells in the development of lung injury and lethality following the intravenous administration of T. serrulatus venom. PMID:11137547

  14. Often seen, rarely recognized: mast cell activation disease - a guide to diagnosis and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Lawrence B; H Butterfield, Joseph; Raithel, Martin; J Molderings, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Mast cell (MC) disease has long been thought to be just the rare disease of mastocytosis (in various forms, principally cutaneous and systemic), with aberrant MC mediator release at symptomatic levels due to neoplastic MC proliferation. Recent discoveries now show a new view is in order, with mastocytosis capping a metaphorical iceberg now called "MC activation disease" (MCAD, i.e. disease principally manifesting inappropriate MC activation), with the bulk of the iceberg being the recently recognized "MC activation syndrome" (MCAS), featuring inappropriate MC activation to symptomatic levels with little to no inappropriate MC proliferation. Given increasing appreciation of a great menagerie of mutations in MC regulatory elements in mastocytosis and MCAS, the great heterogeneity of MCAD's clinical presentation is unsurprising. Most MCAD patients present with decades of chronic multisystem polymorbidity generally of an inflammatory ± allergic theme. Preliminary epidemiologic investigation suggests MCAD, while often misrecognized, may be substantially prevalent, making it increasingly important that practitioners of all stripes learn how to recognize its more common forms such as MCAS. We review the diagnostically challenging presentation of MCAD (with an emphasis on MCAS) and current thoughts regarding its biology, epidemiology, natural history, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment. Key messages Recent discoveries show a new view of the realm of mast cell disease is in order, with mastocytosis capping a metaphorical iceberg now termed "MC activation disease" (MCAD, i.e. disease principally manifesting inappropriate MC activation) and with the bulk of the iceberg being comprised of the recently recognized "MC activation syndrome" (MCAS), featuring inappropriate MC activation to symptomatic levels with little to no inappropriate MC proliferation. Most MCAD patients present with decades of chronic multisystem polymorbidity generally of an inflammatory

  15. Modeling chronic myeloid leukemia in immunodeficient mice reveals expansion of aberrant mast cells and accumulation of pre-B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm that, if not treated, will progress into blast crisis (BC) of either myeloid or B lymphoid phenotype. The BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, encoding a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, is thought to be sufficient to cause chronic phase (CP) CML, whereas additional genetic lesions are needed for progression into CML BC. To generate a humanized CML model, we retrovirally expressed BCR-ABL1 in the cord blood CD34+ cells and transplanted these into NOD-SCID (non-obese diabetic/severe-combined immunodeficient) interleukin-2-receptor γ-deficient mice. In primary mice, BCR-ABL1 expression induced an inflammatory-like state in the bone marrow and spleen, and mast cells were the only myeloid lineage specifically expanded by BCR-ABL1. Upon secondary transplantation, the pronounced inflammatory phenotype was lost and mainly human mast cells and macrophages were found in the bone marrow. Moreover, a striking block at the pre-B-cell stage was observed in primary mice, resulting in an accumulation of pre-B cells. A similar block in B-cell differentiation could be confirmed in primary cells from CML patients. Hence, this humanized mouse model of CML reveals previously unexplored features of CP CML and should be useful for further studies to understand the disease pathogenesis of CML

  16. Research progress of adult cardiac stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan ZHENG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view is that the heart is a terminal organ. This dogma, however, has been widely questioned with the discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs. Since CSCs have a highly self-renewal capacity and specific myocardial differentiation potential, nowadays they have been regarded as the most promising type of stem cells used in ischemic heart disease and other replacement therapy of end-stage heart disease. The present paper will focus on current results of scientific research on human adult CSCs and epicardium-derived cell (EPDC, as well as the treatment strategies in the field of cardiac regeneration, and the problems and prospect disclosed in the research.

  17. Effect of 8-methoxypsoralen plus long-wave ultraviolet (PUVA) radiation on mast cells. II. In vitro PUVA inhibits degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells induced by compound 48/80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat peritoneal mast cells incubated with a histamine liberator, compound 48/80, showed a significantly reduced capacity for releasing histamine following in vitro treatment with 0.1 micrograms/ml of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus 1-5 J/cm2 of long-wave ultraviolet (UVA) irradiation (PUVA). No remarkable inhibition in histamine release was observed in the cells treated with 8-MOP only. Irradiation with 5 J/cm2 of UVA alone exerted an inhibitory effect on histamine release, to a lesser extent than PUVA. PUVA irradiation did not bring any decrease in cell viability or any spontaneous release of histamine from irradiated cells as shown by phase-contrast microscopy and by histamine assay, respectively. These results suggest that PUVA treatment may cause a noncytotoxic disturbance at mast cell membranes or on surface receptors, leading to a decreased capacity for secreting chemical mediators

  18. Cinnamon extract reduces symptoms, inflammatory mediators and mast cell markers in murine IL-10(-/-) colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenlocher, Yvonne; Hösel, Angela; Bischoff, Stephan C; Lorentz, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) shows an increasing prevalence and harm in western countries. Conventional therapies are associated with bad compliance and adverse side effects. Natural substances like cinnamon extract (CE) could be an additional therapy. We found recently that CE acts anti-inflammatory on mast cells - discussed of being relevant in IBD. Here, we analysed the effects of CE on murine IL-10(-/-) colitis as model for IBD. Mice were treated 12 weeks with or without CE in drinking water. Clinical scores and disease activity index were assessed. Colonic tissue samples were analysed for infiltration, tissue damage, bowel wall thickness, expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, mast cell proteases, tight junction proteins, and NF-κB signaling. Following treatment with CE, symptoms of murine colitis as well as increased infiltration of immune cells, tissue damage and bowel wall thickness in colon tissue of IL-10(-/-) mice were diminished significantly. MIP-2, TNF, IFNγ, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and IL-1β as well as MC-CPA, MCP-1 and MCP-4 were strongly upregulated in IL-10(-/-) mice compared to WT, but noteworthy not in CE group. Expression of tight junction proteins was not influenced by CE. Phosphorylation of IκB was slightly down-regulated in CE treated IL-10(-/-) mice compared to IL-10(-/-) controls. In summary, CE decreases inflammatory symptoms and expression of inflammatory markers in murine IL-10(-/-) colitis. CE has no influence on tight junction proteins, but seems acting via reducing pro-inflammatory mediators and recruitment of neutrophil granulocytes probably by inhibiting NF-κB signaling. PMID:27012624

  19. Effect of Chicoric Acid on Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Young; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Jin, Jong Sik; Bang, Keuk Soo; Eom, Ye-Jin; Hong, Chul-Hee; Nugroho, Agung; Park, Hee-Jun; An, Hyo-Jin

    2015-12-24

    Chicoric acid (dicaffeoyl-tartaric acid), is a natural phenolic compound found in a number of plants, such as chicory (Cichorium intybus) and Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea), which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and analgesic activities. Although these biological effects of chicoric acid have been investigated, there are no reports of its antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effects in human mast cells (HMC)-1 or anaphylactic activity in a mouse model. Therefore, we investigated the antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effect of chicoric acid and its underlying mechanisms of action using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Chicoric acid decreased the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β. We studied the inhibitory effects of chicoric acid on the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activation of caspase-1. However, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was not sufficient to abrogate the stimulus. In addition, we investigated the ability of chicoric acid to inhibit compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis in vivo. Oral administration of chicoric acid at 20 mg/kg inhibited histamine release and protected mice against compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic mortality. These results suggest that chicoric acid has an antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effect that involves modulating mast cell-mediated allergic responses. Therefore, chicoric acid could be an efficacious agent for allergy-related inflammatory disorders. PMID:26593037

  20. Mast cell-mediated long-lasting increases in excitability of vagal C fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaoyong; Kollarik, Marian; Ouyang, Ann; Myers, Allen C; Undem, Bradley J

    2007-10-01

    Several esophageal pathologies are associated with an increased number of mast cells in the esophageal wall. We addressed the hypothesis that activation of esophageal mast cells leads to an increase in the excitability of local sensory C fibers. Guinea pigs were actively sensitized to ovalbumin. The mast cells in the esophagus were selectively activated ex vivo by superfusion with ovalbumin. Action potential discharge in guinea pig vagal nodose esophageal C-fiber nerve endings was monitored in the isolated (ex vivo) vagally innervated esophagus by extracellular recordings. Ovalbumin activated esophageal mast cells, leading to the rapid release of approximately 20% of the tissue histamine stores. This was associated with a consistent and significant increase in excitability of the nodose C fibers as reflected in a two- to threefold increase in action potential discharge frequency evoked by mechanical (increases in intraluminal pressure) stimulation. The increase in excitability persisted unchanged for at least 90 min (longest time period tested) after ovalbumin was washed from the tissue. This effect could be prevented by the histamine H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine, but once the increase in excitability occurred, it persisted in the nominal absence of histamine and could not be reversed even with large concentrations of the histamine receptor antagonist. In conclusion, activation of esophageal mast cells leads to a pronounced and long-lived increase in nociceptive C-fiber excitability such that any sensation or reflex evoked via the vagal nociceptors will likely be enhanced. The effect is initiated by histamine acting via H1 receptor activation and maintained in the absence of the initiating stimulus. PMID:17702952

  1. Impaired mast cell activation in gene-targeted mice lacking the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lam, Rebecca S; Wölbing, Florian; Matzner, Nicole; Kaesler, Susanne; Zemtsova, Irina M; Lupescu, Adrian; Zahir, Naima; Kuhl, Dietmar; Schaller, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo; Lang, Florian

    2009-10-01

    The PI3K pathway plays a pivotal role in the stimulation of mast cells. PI3K-dependent kinases include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1). The present study explored the role of SGK1 in mast cell function. Mast cells were isolated from bone marrow (BMMC) of SGK1 knockout mice (sgk1(-/-)) and their wild-type littermates (sgk1(+/+)). The BMMC number as well as CD117, CD34, and FcepsilonRI expression in BMCCs were similar in both genotypes. Upon Ag stimulation of the FcepsilonRI receptor, Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was markedly impaired in sgk1(-/-) BMMCs. The currents through Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels induced by Ag were significantly higher in sgk1(+/+) BMMCs than in sgk1(-/-) BMMCs. Treatment with the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin (1 microM) led to activation of the K+ channels in both genotypes, indicating that the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels are similarly expressed and sensitive to activation by Ca(2+) in sgk1(+/+) and sgk1(-/-) BMMCs, and that blunted stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels was secondary to decreased Ca(2+) entry. Ag-IgE-induced degranulation and early IL-6 secretion were also significantly blunted in sgk1(-/-) BMMCs. The decrease in body temperature following Ag treatment, which reflects an anaphylactic reaction, was substantially reduced in sgk1(-/-) mice, pointing to impaired mast cell function in vivo. Serum histamine levels measured 30 min after induction of an anaphylactic reaction were significantly lower in sgk1(-/-) than in sgk1(+/+)mice. The observations reveal a critical role for SGK1 in ion channel regulation and the function of mast cells, and thus disclose a completely novel player in the regulation of allergic reaction. PMID:19748978

  2. Mast cells facilitate local VEGF release as an early event in the pathogenesis of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Peritoneal injury sustained at laparotomy may evoke local inflammatory responses that result in adhesion formation. Peritoneal mast cells are likely to initiate this process, whereas vascular permeability\\/endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may facilitate the degree to which subsequent adhesion formation occurs. METHODS: Mast cell deficient mice (WBB6F1-\\/-), along with their mast cell sufficient counterparts (WBB6F1+\\/+), underwent a standardized adhesion-inducing operation (AIS) with subsequent sacrifice and adhesion assessment 14 days later in a blinded fashion. Additional CD-1 and WBB6F1+\\/+, and WBB6F1-\\/- mice were killed 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours after operation for measurement of VEGF by ELISA in systemic serum and peritoneal lavage fluid. Two further groups of CD-1 mice underwent AIS and received either a single perioperative dose of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (10 mug\\/mouse) or a similar volume of IgG isotypic antibody and adhesion formation 2 weeks later was evaluated. RESULTS: WBB6F1-\\/- mice had less adhesions then did their WBB6F1+\\/+ counterparts (median [interquartile range] adhesion score 3[3-3] vs 1.5[1-2] respectively; P < .003). Local VEGF release peaked 6 hours after AIS in both WBB6F1+\\/+ and CD-1 mice whereas levels remained at baseline in WBB6F1-\\/- mice. CD-1 mice treated with a single dose of anti-VEGF therapy during operation had less adhesions than controls (2[1.25-2] vs 3[2.25-3], P = .0002). CONCLUSIONS: Mast cells and VEGF are central to the formation of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions with mast cells being responsible, either directly or indirectly, for VEGF release into the peritoneal cavity after operation. In tandem with the recent clinical success of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies in oncologic practice, our observations suggest an intriguing avenue for research and development of anti-adhesion strategy.

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotube exposure induces membrane rearrangement and suppression of receptor-mediated signalling pathways in model mast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Eric Y.; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M.N.; Kahue, Kara; Sung, Carl; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are environmental challenges to the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa, and to the dermal immune system. Mast cells (MC) are pro-inflammatory immunocytes that reside at these interfaces with the environment. Mast cells are sources of pro-inflammatory mediators (histamine, serotonin, matrix-active proteases, eicosanoids, prostanoids, cytokines and chemokines), which are released in a calcium-dependent manner following immunological challenge or physico-chemical stimulation. Since C-60 fullerenes, which share geometry with CNT, are suppressive of mast cell-driven inflammatory responses, we explored the effects of unmodified SWCNT aggregates on mast cell signaling pathways, phenotype and pro-inflammatory function. We noted SWCNT suppression of antigen-induced signalling pathways and pro-inflammatory degranulation responses. Mast cells recognize unmodified SWCNT by remodeling the plasma membrane, disaggregating the cortical actin cytoskeleton and relocalizing clathrin. Clathrin was also identified as a component of an affinity-purified ‘interactome’ isolated from MC using an SWCNT affinity matrix for mast cell lysates. Together these data are consistent with the ability of SWCNT to suppress mast cell pro-inflammatory function via a novel recognition mechanism. PMID:24910985

  4. Regulation of C3a Receptor Signaling in Human Mast Cells by G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Guo; Hariharan Subramanian; Kshitij Gupta; Hydar Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complement component C3a activates human mast cells via its cell surface G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) C3aR. For most GPCRs, agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation leads to receptor desensitization, internalization as well as activation of downstream signaling pathways such as ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Previous studies in transfected COS cells overexpressing G protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) demonstrated that GRK2, GRK3, GRK5 and GRK6 participate in agonist-induced...

  5. Interleukin mRNA changes in mast cells stimulated by TSL-1 antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizmendi N.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyzed by RT-PCR, the mRNA changes for IL-4, IL-10, TNF and IFN ( induced by TSL-1 antigens in a rat mast cell line (HRMC with mucosal characteristics. The data obtained showed an increase of 65 and 52 % in mRNA expression for IL-4 and TNF respectively and a decrease of 59 and 55 % in mRNAs for IFNγ and IL-10. Our results suggest that TSL-1 antigens induce the release from MC of regulatory molecules, such as IL-4 by an IgE independent mechanism. Our data also provides important information related to the ability of MC to participate not only in the effector phase against the infectious agents, but also in the orchestration of the immune response by the host against parasites.

  6. Contrast media are incomplete secretagogues acting on human basophils and mast cells isolated from heart and lung, but not skin tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, A; Stellato, C; Patella, V; Lamparter-Schummert, B; de Crescenzo, G; Adt, M; Marone, G

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media, in vitro mediator release induced by three iodinated contrast agents was examined using peripheral blood basophils and mast cells purified from human lung parenchyma, heart, and skin tissues. Three iodinated contrast agents, sodium and meglumine salts of ioxaglic acid, sodium and meglumine salts of ioxithalamic acid, and ioversol, were incubated with basophils purified from peripheral blood and human mast cells isolated and purified from different anatomical sites. Release of preformed (histamine and tryptase) and de novo synthesized mediators (prostaglandin D2 and leukotriene C4) into the supernatans was determined at various contrast medium concentrations after incubation for 60 min. Ioxaglate (0.2-0.3 M), ioxithalamate (0.3-0.5 M), and to a lesser extent ioversol (0.3-0.5 M) induced histamine release from basophils in a concentration-dependent manner. All three induced the release of preformed mediators (histamine and tryptase) from human lung, but not from skin mast cells. They also induced histamine and tryptase release from human heart mast cells. However, they did not induce the de novo synthesis of leukotriene C1 or prostaglandin D2 from human basophils or any type of mast cell examined. Cross-linking of IgE by anti-IgE induced the release of leukotriene C4 or prostaglandin D2 from human basophils or mast cells. Mannitol, an osmotic stimulus, induced the release of histamine from human basophils, but to a lesser extent from mast cells. These results show that different contrast media can differ in their ability to release mediators from enriched preparations of human basophils and mast cells. The three contrast agents examined act on basophils and mast cells as incomplete secretagogues, causing the release of preformed mediators, but not these novo synthesis of chemical mediators. It may be useful to measure plasma tryptase levels to detect adverse reactions caused by iodinated

  7. Significance of mast cell distribution in placental tissue and membranes in spontaneous preterm birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Needham K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kate Needham,1 Mitali Fadia,2,3 Jane E Dahlstrom,2,3 Kirsti Harrington,2,3 Bruce Shadbolt,4 Stephen J Robson,1,3,51Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Centenary Hospital for Women and Children, Canberra Hospital, Garran, ACT, Australia; 2Department of Anatomical Pathology, ACT Pathology, Canberra Hospital, Garran, ACT, Australia; 3ANU Medical School, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 4Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Canberra Hospital, Garran, ACT, Australia; 5John James Medical Centre, Deakin, ACT, Australia Background: Preterm birth is a common cause of adverse neonatal and childhood outcomes, in both the short and long term. Preterm labor is commonly associated with inflammation at the maternal–fetal interface. There is some indirect evidence that mast cells (MCs might represent a link between hormonal influences and local reactions leading to the onset of labor. Patients and methods: The placentas and membranes of 51 uncomplicated spontaneous term births were compared to those from 50 spontaneous preterm births. Immunohistochemical staining for MC tryptase was undertaken allowing MC concentration, location, and degranulation status to be determined. Regression modeling was used to compare results. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic characteristics of the two cohorts. There were significantly more MCs in the decidua for term births than preterm births (P=0.03. The presence of histological chorioamnionitis did not affect MC concentrations. Conclusion: Despite evidence suggesting a possible role for MCs in spontaneous preterm birth, this study found that the concentration of decidual MCs was in fact significantly lower in preterm compared to term birth. Keywords: preterm birth, mast cells, inflammation, cohort study, regression modeling

  8. Disodium cromoglycate, a mast-cell stabilizer, alters postradiation regional cerebral blood flow in primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Pautler, E.L.; Hampton, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Early transient incapacitation (ETI) is the complete cessation of performance during the first 30 min after radiation exposure, and performance decrement (PD) is a reduction in performance at the same time. Supralethal doses of radiation have been shown to produce a marked decrease in regional cerebral blood flow in primates concurrent with systemic hypotension and a dramatic release of mast-cell histamine. In an attempt to elucidate mechanisms underlying the radiation-induced ETI/PD phenomena and the postradiation decrease in cerebral blood flow, primates were given the mast-cell stabilizers disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) or BRL 22321 before exposure to 100 Gy whole-body gamma radiation. Hypothalamic and cortical blood flows were measured by hydrogen clearance, before and after radiation exposure. Systemic blood pressures were determined simultaneously. The data indicated that DSCG was successful in diminishing postradiation decrease in cerebral blood flow. Irradiated animals pretreated with DSCG, showed only a 10% decrease in hypothalamic blood flow 60 min postradiation, while untreated, irradiated animals showed a 57% decrease. The cortical blood flow of DSCG treated, irradiated animals showed a triphasic response, with a decrease of 38% at 10 min postradiation, then a rise to 1% below baseline at 20 min, followed by a fall to 42% below baseline by 50 min postradiation. In contrast, the untreated, irradiated animals showed a steady decrease in cortical blood flow to 79% below baseline by 50 min postradiation. There was no significant difference in blood-pressure response between the treated and untreated, irradiated animals. Systemic blood pressure showed a 60% decrease at 10 min postradiation, falling to a 71% decrease by 60 min.

  9. Cultured mast cells from asthmatic patients and controls respond with similar sensitivity to recombinant Der P2 induced, IgE-mediated activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Inge Jacoba Maria Kortekaas; Sverrild, Asger; Lund, Gitte;

    2013-01-01

    conditions. Mast cells were cultured from peripheral blood from twelve patients with an objectively confirmed asthma diagnosis and eight healthy subjects. During the last 2 weeks of culture, mast cells were incubated with IL-4 and 80 kU/l recombinant human IgE containing two clones (7% + 7%) specific for...... mite allergen Der p2. The sensitivity of IgE-mediated activation of mast cells was investigated as FcεRI-mediated upregulation of CD63. Ten subjects were atopic, defined as a positive skin prick test (>3 mm) to at least one of ten common allergens. After activation with recombinant Der p2, the maximum...

  10. Effect of sodium butyrate treatment on the granule morphology, histamine level and elemental content of the bone marrow-derived mast cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cells derived from the bone marrow of BALB/c mice (BMMC) were cultures and their growth ceased with sodium butyrate. Sodium butyrate treatment (1 mM, 4 days) caused maturation of the granules, and increased histamine content from approx. 1 pg/cell to 4 pg/cell. X-ray microanalysis revealed that maturation of the granules was accompanied by the increase in relative weight percent of sodium, phosphorus and sulphur, with concomitant decrease in chloride. The sulphur to potassium ratio increased three-fold in butyrate-treated mast cells. The existence of a different elemental composition during mast cell maturation may provide additional parameter for rapid discrimination of mast cell subpopulations. (author). 28 refs, 6 figs

  11. Cyclosporin in cell therapy for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen Of Lorkeers, S J; Hart, E; Tang, X L; Chamuleau, M E D; Doevendans, P A; Bolli, R; Chamuleau, S A J

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy in promoting cardiac repair in the setting of ischemic heart disease. Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that cell therapy improves cardiac function. Whether autologous or allogeneic cells should be used, and the need for immunosuppression in non-autologous settings, is a matter of debate. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is frequently used in preclinical trials to reduce cell rejection after non-autologous cell therapy. The direct effect of CsA on the function and survival of stem cells is unclear. Furthermore, the appropriate daily dosage of CsA in animal models has not been established. In this review, we discuss the pros and cons of the use of CsA on an array of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we present a small collection of data put forth by our group supporting the efficacy and safety of a specific daily CsA dosage in a pig model. PMID:24831573

  12. Complement Activation by Giardia duodenalis Parasites through the Lectin Pathway Contributes to Mast Cell Responses and Parasite Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erqiu; Tako, Ernest A; Singer, Steven M

    2016-04-01

    Infection withGiardia duodenalisis one of the most common causes of diarrheal disease in the world. While numerous studies have identified important contributions of adaptive immune responses to parasite control, much less work has examined innate immunity and its connections to the adaptive response during this infection. We explored the role of complement in immunity toGiardiausing mice deficient in mannose-binding lectin (Mbl2) or complement factor 3a receptor (C3aR). Both strains exhibited delayed clearance of parasites and a reduced ability to recruit mast cells in the intestinal submucosa. C3aR-deficient mice had normal production of antiparasite IgA, butex vivoT cell recall responses were impaired. These data suggest that complement is a key factor in the innate recognition ofGiardiaand that recruitment of mast cells and activation of T cell immunity through C3a are important for parasite control. PMID:26831470

  13. Pivotal role of mast cells in pruritogenesis in patients with myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takefumi; Wang, Jiapeng; Zhang, Wei; Mascarenhas, John; Hoffman, Ronald; Dai, Ying; Wisch, Nathaniel; Xu, Mingjiang

    2009-06-01

    Pruritus is a common symptom in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs). The pathophysiology of MPD-associated pruritus is unclear. We have demonstrated that MPD mast cells (MCs) are involved by the malignant process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that MCs play an important role in the development of pruritogenesis in MPDs. We found that MPD MCs released significantly greater amounts of pruritogenic factors, including histamine, leukotrienes, and interleukin-31 (IL-31) than normal MCs. Elevated levels of IL-31 were also observed in MPD CD3(+) cell-conditioned media. MPD MCs exhibited increased migratory behavior in response to stem cell factor or interleukin-8, which was associated with increased filamentous-actin content. Furthermore, the presence of pruritus in MPDs was statistically correlated with a greater number of MCs being generated by CD34(+) cells, a greater number of MC colonies being formed by CD34(+) cells, decreased apoptosis and prostaglandin D(2) release by cultured MCs, and higher plasma levels of IL-31. These data demonstrate that functional abnormalities of MPD MCs probably lead to pruritogenesis in patients with MPDs. These studies provide cellular and molecular targets for the development of antipruritus drugs for patients with MPDs. PMID:19196660

  14. Defective bone repair in mast cell deficient mice with c-Kit loss of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrends, D A; Cheng, L; Sullivan, M B; Wang, M H; Roby, G B; Zayed, N; Gao, C; Henderson, J E; Martineau, P A

    2014-01-01

    KitW-sh mice carry an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding the receptor for stem cell factor, which is expressed at high levels on the surface of haematopoietic precursor cells. The mutation results in mast cell deficiency, a variety of defects in innate immunity and poorly defined abnormalities in bone. The present study was designed to characterise healing of a cortical window defect in skeletally mature KitW-sh mice using high-resolution micro computed tomographic imaging and histological analyses. The cortical bone defect healed completely in all wild type mice but failed to heal in about half of the KitW-sh mice by 12 weeks post-operative. Defective healing was associated with premature and excessive expression of TRAP positive cells embedded in fibrous marrow but with little change in ALP activity. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed reduced CD34 positive vascular endothelial cells and F4/80 positive macrophages at 1 and 2 weeks post-operative. Impaired bone healing in the KitW-sh mice was therefore attributed to altered catabolic activity, impaired re-vascularisation and compromised replacement of woven with compact bone. PMID:25284141

  15. Defective bone repair in mast cell deficient mice with c-Kit loss of function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DA Behrends

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available KitW-sh mice carry an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding the receptor for stem cell factor, which is expressed at high levels on the surface of haematopoietic precursor cells. The mutation results in mast cell deficiency, a variety of defects in innate immunity and poorly defined abnormalities in bone. The present study was designed to characterise healing of a cortical window defect in skeletally mature KitW-sh mice using high-resolution micro computed tomographic imaging and histological analyses. The cortical bone defect healed completely in all wild type mice but failed to heal in about half of the KitW-sh mice by 12 weeks post-operative. Defective healing was associated with premature and excessive expression of TRAP positive cells embedded in fibrous marrow but with little change in ALP activity. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed reduced CD34 positive vascular endothelial cells and F4/80 positive macrophages at 1 and 2 weeks post-operative. Impaired bone healing in the KitW-sh mice was therefore attributed to altered catabolic activity, impaired re-vascularisation and compromised replacement of woven with compact bone.

  16. Mast cell-derived TNF-α and histamine modify IL-6 and IL-8 expression and release from cutaneous tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artuc, Metin; Guhl, Sven; Babina, Magda;

    2011-01-01

    The coincidence of skin tumors and elevated mast cell (MC) numbers has been known for many years. However, it has remained controversial whether, in this context, MCs promote or inhibit tumor growth. Addressing this problem, different melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were co...

  17. Inhibition of anaphylactic histamine release from heterologously sensitized mast cells: differential effects of drugs which interfere with calcium influx.

    OpenAIRE

    Kurose, Masao

    1981-01-01

    Drug effects were studied on anaphylactic histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized in vitro with mouse IgE antibody. When histamine release was elicited by adding Ca-++ at various times after antigen-stimulation of sensitized cells in Ca++-free medium, the drugs to be tested were added shortly before each Ca++ addition. Quercetin was effective only when added before or immediately after antigen. Theophylline and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) were active irrespective of the time interva...

  18. Fyn kinase controls Fc{epsilon}RI receptor-operated calcium entry necessary for full degranulation in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Sede Sur, Calzada de los Tenorios 235, Col. Granjas Coapa, CP 14330 Mexico City (Mexico); Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia, E-mail: cgonzal@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Sede Sur, Calzada de los Tenorios 235, Col. Granjas Coapa, CP 14330 Mexico City (Mexico)

    2010-01-22

    IgE-antigen-dependent crosslinking of the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc{epsilon}RI) on mast cells leads to degranulation, leukotriene synthesis and cytokine production. Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) mobilization is a sine qua non requisite for degranulation, allowing the rapid secretion of stored pro-inflammatory mediators responsible for allergy symptoms. Fyn is a Src-family kinase that positively controls Fc{epsilon}RI-induced mast cell degranulation. However, our understanding of the mechanism connecting Fyn activation to secretion of pre-synthesized mediators is very limited. We analyzed Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) differentiated from WT and Fyn -/- knock out mice. Fyn -/- BMMCs showed a marked defect in extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx after Fc{epsilon}RI crosslinking but not after thapsigargin addition. High concentrations of Gadolinium (Gd{sup 3+}) partially blocked Fc{epsilon}RI-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx in WT cells but, in contrast, completely inhibited Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in Fyn -/- cells. Low concentrations of an inhibitor of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) Ca{sup 2+} channels (2-aminoethoxyphenyl-borane, 2-APB) blocked Fc{epsilon}RI-induced maximal Ca{sup 2+} rise in WT but not in Fyn -/- cells. Ca{sup 2+} entry through Fyn-controlled, 2-APB sensitive channels was found to be important for full degranulation and IL-2 mRNA accumulation in WT cells. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that Fyn kinase interacts with TRPC 3/6/7 channels after IgE-antigen stimulation, but its association is not related to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Results indicate Fyn kinase mediates the receptor-dependent activation of TRPC channels that contribute to degranulation in Fc{epsilon}RI-stimulated mast cells.

  19. The 1,4-benzodiazepine Ro5-4864 (4-chlorodiazepam) suppresses multiple pro-inflammatory mast cell effector functions

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefi, Omid Sascha; Wilhelm, Thomas; Maschke-Neuß, Karin; Kuhny, Marcel; Martin, Christian; Molderings, Gerhard J; Kratz, Felix; Hildenbrand, Bernd; Huber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Activation of mast cells (MCs) can be achieved by the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) as well as by additional receptors such as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor and the receptor tyrosine kinase Kit (stem cell factor [SCF] receptor). Thus, pharmacological interventions which stabilize MCs in response to different receptors would be preferable in diseases with pathological systemic MC activation such as systemic mastocytosis. 1,4-Benzodiazepines (BDZs) have been reported to suppres...

  20. Fyn kinase controls FcεRI receptor-operated calcium entry necessary for full degranulation in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IgE-antigen-dependent crosslinking of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) on mast cells leads to degranulation, leukotriene synthesis and cytokine production. Calcium (Ca2+) mobilization is a sine qua non requisite for degranulation, allowing the rapid secretion of stored pro-inflammatory mediators responsible for allergy symptoms. Fyn is a Src-family kinase that positively controls FcεRI-induced mast cell degranulation. However, our understanding of the mechanism connecting Fyn activation to secretion of pre-synthesized mediators is very limited. We analyzed FcεRI-dependent Ca2+ mobilization in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) differentiated from WT and Fyn -/- knock out mice. Fyn -/- BMMCs showed a marked defect in extracellular Ca2+ influx after FcεRI crosslinking but not after thapsigargin addition. High concentrations of Gadolinium (Gd3+) partially blocked FcεRI-induced Ca2+ influx in WT cells but, in contrast, completely inhibited Ca2+ mobilization in Fyn -/- cells. Low concentrations of an inhibitor of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) Ca2+ channels (2-aminoethoxyphenyl-borane, 2-APB) blocked FcεRI-induced maximal Ca2+ rise in WT but not in Fyn -/- cells. Ca2+ entry through Fyn-controlled, 2-APB sensitive channels was found to be important for full degranulation and IL-2 mRNA accumulation in WT cells. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that Fyn kinase interacts with TRPC 3/6/7 channels after IgE-antigen stimulation, but its association is not related to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Results indicate Fyn kinase mediates the receptor-dependent activation of TRPC channels that contribute to degranulation in FcεRI-stimulated mast cells.

  1. Non-Faradaic Electrochemical Detection of Exocytosis from Mast and Chromaffin Cells Using Floating-Gate MOS Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Jayant; Amit Singhai; Yingqiu Cao; Joshua B. Phelps; Manfred Lindau; David A. Holowka; Baird, Barbara A.; Edwin C. Kan

    2015-01-01

    We present non-faradaic electrochemical recordings of exocytosis from populations of mast and chromaffin cells using chemoreceptive neuron MOS (CνMOS) transistors. In comparison to previous cell-FET-biosensors, the CνMOS features control (CG), sensing (SG) and floating gates (FG), allows the quiescent point to be independently controlled, is CMOS compatible and physically isolates the transistor channel from the electrolyte for stable long-term recordings. We measured exocytosis from RBL-2H3 ...

  2. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of [35S] sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the 35S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans

  3. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-07-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of (/sup 35/S) sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the /sup 35/S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans.

  4. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

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    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  5. Molecular and stimulus-response profiles illustrate heterogeneity between peripheral and cord blood-derived human mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Frandsen, Pernille M; Raaby, Ellen M; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf; Skov, Per S; Poulsen, Lars K

    2014-01-01

    functionality. Mast cells were obtained from three culture protocols using two types of PBdMCs (CD34(+) PBdMC or CD133(+) PBdMC) and one type of CBdMC (CD133(+) CBdMC). We analyzed resting cells for specific mast cell markers at protein and mRNA levels, thereby creating a molecular profile. To characterize the......(+) and CD133(+) PBdMC. The SR profile for histamine release illustrated a functional heterogeneity between PBdMC and CBdMC. PBdMC released >10% histamine upon stimulation with anti-IgE, C3a, Substance P, and Compound 48/80, whereas CBdMC only reacted to C3a. Cytokine secretion was only detected after...

  6. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  7. Up-regulation of interleukin-8 expressions induced by mast cell tryptase via protease activated receptor-2 in endothelial cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chao; ZHAO Feng-di; LI Xiao-bo; YIN Lian-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background Protease activated receptor-2 is cleaved and activated by trypsin or mast cell tryptase and may play an important role in inflammation. However, it is unknown whetehr PAR-2 can mediate tryptase-induced inflammatory reaction. This study was conduct to investigate wheter PAR-2 could be the activated by mast cell tryptase and medicated the tryptase induced interleukin-8 expression in endothelial cells.Methods Protease activated receptor-2 expression was found in endothelial cell lines ECV304 cell by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. Interleukin-8 stimulated by purified human mast cell tryptase was determined by RT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Data were analysed by the S-N-K one-way ANOVA test.Results The present study shows that mRNA and protein of protease activated receptor-2 could be expressed in ECV304 cells, and tryptase upregulated the expression levels of both interleukin-8 mRNA and protein. The increased expression of interleukin-8 was inhibited by an antiprotease activated receptor-2 monoclonal antibody, SAM11. An additional band was observed by Western blotting after the incubation of ECV304 cells with tryptase for 2 hours, which suggested that protease activated receptor-2 was activated. Conclusion Protease activated receptor-2 can mediate the mast cell tryptase stimulated expression of interleukin-8 in ECV304 cell.

  8. Possible Involvement of the Inhibition of NF-κB Factor in Anti-Inflammatory Actions That Melatonin Exerts on Mast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, M D; García-Moreno, H; González-Yanes, C; Calvo, J R

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a molecule endogenously produced in a wide variety of immune cells, including mast cells (RBL-2H3). It exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The physiologic mechanisms underlying these activities of melatonin have not been clarified in mast cells. This work is designed to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of melatonin on activated mast cells. RBL-2H3 were pre-treated with exogenous melatonin (MELx) at physiological (100nM) and pharmacological (1 mM) doses for 30 min, washed and activated with PMACI (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187) for 2 h and 12 h. The data shows that pre-treatment of MELx in stimulated mast cells, significantly reduced the levels of endogenous melatonin production (MELn), TNF-α and IL-6. These effects are directly related with the MELx concentration used. MELx also inhibited IKK/NF-κB signal transduction pathway in stimulated mast cells. These results indicate a molecular basis for the ability of melatonin to prevent inflammation and for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1926-1933, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26756719

  9. Correlations Between the Density of Tryptase Positive Mast Cells (DMCT) and that of New Blood Vessels (CD105+) in Patients with Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micu, Gianina Viorica; Stăniceanu, Florica; Sticlaru, Liana Cătălina; Popp, Cristiana Gabriela; Bastian, Alexandra Eugenia; Gramada, Eliza; Pop, G; Mateescu, R B; Rimbaş, M; Archip, Bianca; Bleotu, Coralia

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells proteases, tryptase and chymase are directly involved in the growth and progression of solid tumors due to their important role in tumor angiogenesis. We examined the density of tryptase positive mast cells and the mean density of new blood vessels in gastric malignant tumors of patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection, using immunohistochemical staining for tryptase (for mast cells) and CD 105 (for new vessels). Tryptase and CD 105 expression was detected in gastrectomy specimens. In this study, mast cell density correlates with angiogenesis and the growth and progression of gastric cancer. It also shows that the participation of Helicobacter pylori infection in the growth and progress of gastric neoplasia is due to an increase of peritumoral angiogenesis, with subsequent local and distant tumor spread and perivascular growth, but without perineural and nodal involvement. PMID:27352440

  10. A Clinicopathologic Study of 24 Cases of Systemic Mastocytosis Involving the Gastrointestinal Tract and Assessment of Mucosal Mast Cell Density in Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Asymptomatic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, Leona A.; Sepehr, Golrokh J.; Hamilton, Matthew J; Akin, Cem; Castells, Mariana C.; Hornick, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    Counting mast cells in gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal biopsies is becoming an increasingly common practice. The primary reason for this exercise is to evaluate for possible involvement by systemic mastocytosis (SM). However, the features of mastocytosis in GI biopsies are not well described. In addition, recent studies have suggested that increased mast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of some cases of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); the term “mastocytic enterocol...

  11. Destructive impact of t-lymphocytes, NK and mast cells on basal cell layers: implications for tumor invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous studies have suggested that the primary impact of immune cell infiltration into the normal or pre-invasive tissue component is associated with the physical destruction of epithelial capsules, which may promote tumor progression and invasion. Our current study attempted to further verify our previous observations and determine the primary type(s) of infiltrating immune cells and the possible mechanism associated with physical destructions of the epithelial capsules. In total, the study was conducted with 250 primary breast and prostate tumors, the primary immune cell of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL), Natural killer cells (NK) and Mast cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, fluorescent labeling and apoptosis assay. qRT-PCR was used for gene expression analysis. Our current study assessed the physical disruption of these immune cells and potential impact on the epithelial capsule of human breast and prostate tumors. Our study yield several clinically-relevant findings that have not been studied before. (1) A vast majority of these infiltrating immune cells are distributed in the normal-appearing or pre-invasive tissue components rather than in invasive cancer tissues. (2) These cells often form rings or semilunar structures that either surround focally-disrupted basal cell layers or physically attach to the basal cells. (3) Basal cells physically associated with these immune cells generally displayed distinct signs of degeneration, including substantially elevated apoptosis, necrosis, and reduced tumor suppressor p63 expression. In contrast, luminal cells overlying focally disrupted basal cell layers had a substantially increased proliferation rate and elevated expression of stem cell markers compared to their adjacent morphologically similar counterparts that overlie a non-disrupted capsule. Our findings suggest that at the early stage of tumor invasion, CTL, NK and Mast cells are the main types of tumor infiltrating immune cells involved in focal

  12. Controlling Arteriogenesis and Mast Cells Are Central to Bioengineering Solutions for Critical Bone Defect Repair Using Allografts

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    Ben Antebi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although most fractures heal, critical defects in bone fail due to aberrant differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards fibrosis rather than osteogenesis. While conventional bioengineering solutions to this problem have focused on enhancing angiogenesis, which is required for bone formation, recent studies have shown that fibrotic non-unions are associated with arteriogenesis in the center of the defect and accumulation of mast cells around large blood vessels. Recently, recombinant parathyroid hormone (rPTH; teriparatide; Forteo therapy have shown to have anti-fibrotic effects on non-unions and critical bone defects due to inhibition of arteriogenesis and mast cell numbers within the healing bone. As this new direction holds great promise towards a solution for significant clinical hurdles in craniofacial reconstruction and limb salvage procedures, this work reviews the current state of the field, and provides insights as to how teriparatide therapy could be used as an adjuvant for healing critical defects in bone. Finally, as teriparatide therapy is contraindicated in the setting of cancer, which constitutes a large subset of these patients, we describe early findings of adjuvant therapies that may present future promise by directly inhibiting arteriogenesis and mast cell accumulation at the defect site.

  13. Inhibition of Angiogenic Factor Production from Murine Mast Cells by an Antiallergic Agent (Epinastine Hydrochloride In Vitro

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    K. Asano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is an important event both in the development of allergic inflammatory responses and in the pathophysiology of tissue remodeling in allergic diseases. In the present study, therefore, we examined the influence of antihistamines on angiogenesis through the choice of epinastine hydrochloride (EP and murine mast cells in vitro. Mast cells (5×105 cells/mL presensitized with murine IgE specific for ovalbumin (OVA were stimulated with 10 ng/mL OVA in the presence of various concentrations of EP for 4 hours. The levels of angiogenesis factors, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in culture supernatants, were examined by ELISA. We also examined mRNA expression for the angiogenesis factors by RT-PCR. EP significantly inhibited the production of KC, TNF, and VEGF induced by IgE-dependent mechanism at more than 25 ng/mL. Semiquantitative analysis using RT-PCR showed that EP also significantly reduced mRNA expressions for KC, TNF, and VEGF. These results strongly suggest that EP suppresses angiogenesis factor production through the inhibition of mRNA expression in mast cells and results in favorable modification of clinical conditions of allergic diseases.

  14. Extracellular superoxide dismutase ameliorates house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation and inhibits mast cell activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Sang; Choi, Jung-Hye; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Han-Woong; Lee, Weontae; Kim, Woo Taek; Kim, Tae-Yoon

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an enzyme that catalyses the dismutation of superoxide anions. It has multiple functions, such as reactive oxygen species scavenging, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, antichemotatic and antitumor activities. Recently, we demonstrated that EC-SOD inhibits ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice. However, the anti-allergic effect of EC-SOD on skin tissue and the role of EC-SOD in mast cells, which are important for allergic responses, have not been well studied. In this study, we investigated whether EC-SOD can alleviate atopic dermatitis in mice and inhibit mast cell activation. Treatment with human recombinant EC-SOD ameliorated house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis in mice. Furthermore, the levels of pro-allergic cytokine gene expression and histamine release increased in EC-SOD KO mast cells and decreased in EC-SOD overexpressing mast cells, suggesting that EC-SOD inhibits mast cell activation. Consistently, a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis experiment showed more blood leakage from EC-SOD KO mouse ear skin, implying that the lack of EC-SOD increases allergic responses. These results suggest that EC-SOD inhibits mast cell activation and atopic dermatitis and that the loss of EC-SOD causes more severe allergic responses, implying that EC-SOD might be a good drug candidate for treatment of allergic disorders, such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:27061078

  15. Expression of DP2 (CRTh2, a prostaglandin D₂ receptor, in human mast cells.

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    Tae Chul Moon

    Full Text Available PGD₂ has long been implicated in allergic diseases. Recent cloning of a second PGD₂ receptor, DP2 (also known as CRTh2, led to a greater understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological implications of PGD₂. PGD₂ signaling through DP1 and DP2 mediates different and often opposite effects in many cell types of the immune system. Although mast cells (MC are the largest source of PGD₂ in the body, there is little information about their potential expression of DP2 and its functional significance. In this study, we show that tissue MC in human nasal polyps express DP2 protein, and that human MC lines and primary cultured human MC express mRNA as well as protein of DP2. By immunohistochemistry, we detected that 34% of MC in human nasal polyps expressed DP2. In addition, flow cytometry showed that 87% of the LAD2 human MC line and 98% of primary cultured human MC contained intracellular DP2. However, we could not detect surface expression of DP2 on human MC by single cell analysis using imaging flow cytometry. Blocking of endogenous PGD2 production with aspirin did not induce surface expression of DP2 in human MC. Two DP2 selective agonists, DK-PGD₂ and 15R-15-methyl PGD₂ induced dose-dependent intracellular calcium mobilization that was abrogated by pertussis toxin, but not by three DP2 selective antagonists. MC mediator release including degranulation was not affected by DP2 selective agonists. Thus, human MC express DP2 intracellularly rather than on their surface, and the function of DP2 in human MC is different than in other immune cells such as Th2 cells, eosinophils and basophils where it is expressed on the cell surface and induces Th2 cytokine and/or granule associated mediator release. Further studies to elucidate the role of intracellular DP2 in human MC may expand our understanding of this molecule and provide novel therapeutic opportunities.

  16. The relationship between histologic grades of invasive carcinoma of breast ducts and mast cell infiltration

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    Ashraf Fakhrjou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast carcinoma is the most prevalent tumors among women. Transformation of inflated cells in immune response leads to increase in inflammatory cells such as macrophages, mast cells (MC and fibroblasts. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between grades of invasive carcinoma of the breast ducts and MC infiltration around tumoral cells. Methods: During the present study, 75 female patients suffering from invasive ductal carcinoma who underwent surgery or diagnostic biopsy during 2010 and 2013 in Educational-Medical centers of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, were included in the study. Based on Bloom-Richardson grading system, 25 cases were selected from each grade. To better observe of MCs, samples were stained by Toluidine blue and MCs were counted in 10 40 × 10 fields. Results: The mean age was 47.56 ± 10.84 and the number of MCs was between 6 and 96 and their overall average was 43.01. Average count of MCs in grade 1, 2 and 3 were 15.92 ± 10.07, 45.32 ± 10.47, and 67.8 ± 20.70, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the number of MCs and increase in disease grade (P < 0.001. With increasing grade of malignancy, the number of MCs had grown. No significant relationship was observed between age and grade of disease or age and number of MC. Conclusion: According to obtained results, number of MC around tumoral cells increased significantly with an increase in the grade of disease. In order to treat in thefirst stages of the disease, recognizing primary changes in the stroma of cells could be helpful.

  17. Mast Cells Mobilize Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Treg Cells in Tumor Microenvironment via IL-17 Pathway in Murine Hepatocarcinoma Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuoshun Yang; Biao Zhang; Dapeng Li; Meng Lv; Chunmei Huang; Guan-Xin Shen; Bo Huang

    2010-01-01

    Tumor immunosuppression is commonly braided with chronic inflammation during tumor development. However, the relationship between immunosuppression and inflammation in tumor microenvironment is still unclear. We have demonstrated that mast cells are accumulated and exacerbate the inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment via SCF/c-kit signaling pathway. Here, we further elucidate the underlying mechanism, which involves both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regu...

  18. Pyrazolopyrimidines: synthesis, effect on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, J M; Peinador, C; Moreira, M J; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M; Riguera, R

    2001-04-01

    A series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (3--6) substituted at positions 1 (R(1)=Ph, H, tert-butyl and ribosetribenzoate), 4 (R(2)=chlorine, nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles), and 6 (dimethylamino) have been synthesized and their effect on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells measured. After chemical stimulation, (polymer 48/80), several compounds (i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 5a), produce inhibition two to three times higher (40--60%) than DSCG but this action is lower after preincubation. 4b (R(1)=Ph, R(2)=NHCH(2)Ph; 50--70% inhibition) and 5a (R(1)=H, R(2)=OMe; 50--55% inhibition) are the most active ones in both experiments. With ovoalbumin as stimulus, several pyrazolopyrimidines show inhibition similar to DSCG, the most active compounds being 6a--d (IC(50)=12--16 microM; R(1)=ribosetribenzoate, R(2)=methoxy and amino). Compounds 4e (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=OMe) and 4g (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=piperidino) are inducers of the release of histamine (60 and 150% increase). Compounds 4b and 4c showed cytotoxic activity (IC(50)=1 microg/mL) to HT-29 human colon cancer cells. PMID:11461757

  19. Study of Mast Cells and Granules from Primo Nodes Using Scanning Ionic Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeong-Yung; Jung, Goo-Eun; Kwon, Hee-Min; Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Cho, Sang-Joon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2015-12-01

    Acupuncture points have a notable characteristic in that they have a higher density of mast cells (MCs) compared with nonacupoints in the skin, which is consistent with the augmentation of the immune function by acupuncture treatment. The primo vascular system, which was proposed as the anatomical structure of the acupuncture points and meridians, also has a high density of MCs. We isolated the primo nodes from the surfaces of internal abdominal organs, and the harvested primo nodes were stained with toluidine blue. The MCs were easily recognized by their stained color and their characteristic granules. The MCs were classified into four stages according to the degranulation of histamine granules in the MCs. Using conventional optical microscopes details of the degranulation state of MCs in each stage were not observable. However, we were able to investigate the distribution of the granules on the surfaces of the MCs in each stage, and to demonstrate the height profiles and three-dimensional structures of the MCs without disturbance of the cell membrane by using the scanning ion conductance microscopy. PMID:26742911

  20. Mucosal mast cells are pivotal elements in inflammatory bowel disease that connect the dots: Stress, intestinal hyperpermeability and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Farhadi, Ashkan; Fields, Jeremy Z; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are pivotal elements in several physiological and immunological functions of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. MC translate the stress signals that has been transmitted through brain gut axis into release of proinflammatory mediators that can cause stimulation of nerve endings that could affect afferent nerve terminals and change their perception, affect intestinal motility, increase intestinal hyperpermeability and, in susceptible individuals, modulate the inflammation. Thus,...