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Sample records for cardiac magnetic resonance

  1. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...... is based on determination of the left-ventricular endocardial and epicardial borders. Since manual border detection is laborious, automated segmentation is highly desirable as a fast, objective and reproducible alternative. Automated segmentation will thus enhance comparability between and within cardiac...... studies and increase accuracy by allowing acquisition of thinner MRI-slices. This abstract demonstrates that statistical models of shape and appearance, namely the deformable models: Active Appearance Models, can successfully segment cardiac MRIs....

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging will not replace echocardiography as the simplest and most definitive method of establishing a noninvasive diagnosis in young patients with congenital cardiac malformations, nor will it replace radionuclide angiography for relatively noninvasive detection and quantitation of cardiac shunts. Magnetic resonance imaging is a complementary noninvasive imaging procedure that can answer some questions left in doubt by echocardiography (mainly extracardiac artery and vein assessments) or radionuclide angiography and used as a preferred follow-up imaging method in certain clinical circumstances. In addition, MRI can be a first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in older patients in whom adequate echo windows are not available. Angiocardiography remains necessary to provide vital physiological data, i.e., chamber pressures, shunt volumes, oxygen saturations, and pulmonary vascular resistance; however, MRI could negate some follow-up catheterizations in appropriate clinical circumstances. High-resolution proton MRI tomography should ultimately permit the accurate evaluation of ventricular volumes, myocardial mass, and the assessment of regional wall motion and ejection fractions. Paramagnetic substances such as manganese ion may ultimately provide a basis for myocardial perfusion imaging. The potential for MRI evaluation of tissue characterization, noninvasive blood-flow measurements, and myocardial metabolism assessment in intriguing and awaits clinical evaluation

  5. Italian registry of cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francone, Marco [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Applicate e Biotecnologie, Università di L’Aquila (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pontone, Gianluca [IRCCS Centro Cardiologico Monzino (Italy); Lovato, Luigi [Policlinico S. Orsola Bologna (Italy); Matta, Gildo [Azienda ospedaliera G Brotzu Cagliari (Italy); Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Maffei, Erica [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pradella, Silvia [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (Italy); Carbone, Iacopo [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Marano, Riccardo [Policlinico Gemelli, Università Cattolica Roma (Italy); Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Ospedale Galliera, Genova (Italy); Chiodi, Elisabetta [Ospedale S. Anna Ferrara (Italy); Donato, Rocco [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria G. Martino, Me (Italy); Sbarbati, Stefano [Ospedale Madre Giuseppina Vannini, Roma (Italy); De Cobelli, Francesco [IRCCS S. Raffaele, Università Vita Salute, Milano (Italy); Di Renzi, Paolo [Fate Bene Fratelli Isola tiberina, Roma (Italy); Ligabue, Guido; Mancini, Andrea [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena (Italy); Palmieri, Francesco [Diparimento di Diagnostica per immagini e radiologia interventistica, Ospedale S. Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: Forty sites were involved in this multicenter and multivendor registry, which sought to evaluate indications, spectrum of protocols, impact on clinical decision making and safety profile of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Data were prospectively collected on a 6-month period and included 3376 patients (47.2 ± 19 years; range 1–92 years). Recruited centers were asked to complete a preliminary general report followed by a single form/patient. Referral physicians were not required to exhibit any specific certificate of competency in CMR imaging. Results: Exams were performed with 1.5 T scanners in 96% of cases followed by 3 T (3%) and 1 T (1%) magnets and contrast was administered in 84% of cases. The majority of cases were performed for the workup of inflammatory heart disease/cardiomyopathies representing overall 55.7% of exams followed by the assessment of myocardial viability and acute infarction (respectively 6.9% and 5.9% of patients). In 49% of cases the final diagnosis provided was considered relevant and with impact on patient's clinical/therapeutic management. Safety evaluation revealed 30 (0.88%) clinical events, most of which due to patient's preexisting conditions. Radiological reporting was recorded in 73% of exams. Conclusions: CMR is performed in a large number of centers in Italy with relevant impact on clinical decision making and high safety profile.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Benign Cardiac Masses: A Pictorial Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Ward

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis for a cardiac mass includes primary and metastatic neoplasms. While primary cardiac tumors are rare, metastatic disease to the heart is a common finding in cancer patients. Several "tumor-like" processes can mimic a true cardiac neoplasm with accurate diagnosis critical at guiding appropriate management. We present a pictorial essay of the most common benign cardiac masses and "mass-like" lesions with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features.

  7. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  8. Recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Simon; Arai, Andrew E; Sechtem, Udo; Mahrholdt, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a non-invasive imaging modality that has rapidly emerged during the last few years and has become a valuable, well-established clinical tool. Beside the evaluation of anatomy and function, CMR has its strengths in providing detailed non-invasive myocardial tissue characterization, for which it is considered the current diagnostic gold standard. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), with its capability to detect necrosis and to separate ischemic from non-ischemic cardiomyopathies by distinct LGE patterns, offers unique clinical possibilities. The presence of LGE has also proven to be a good predictor of an adverse outcome in various studies. T2-weighted (T2w) images, which are supposed to identify areas of edema and inflammation, are another CMR approach to tissue characterization. However, T2w images have not held their promise owing to several technical limitations and potential physiological concerns. Newer mapping techniques may overcome some of these limitations: they assess quantitatively myocardial tissue properties in absolute terms and show promising results in studies for characterization of diffuse fibrosis (T1 mapping) and/or inflammatory processes (T2 mapping). However, these techniques are still research tools and are not part of the clinical routine yet. T2* CMR has had significant impact in the management of thalassemia because it is possible to image the amount of iron in the heart and the liver, improving both diagnostic imaging and the management of patients with thalassemia. CMR findings frequently have clinical impact on further patient management, and CMR seems to be cost effective in the clinical routine. PMID:27635240

  9. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  10. Myocardial wall motion imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Dani�l; Kuijpers, D.; Oudkerk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Wall motion imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) provides important functional information about global and regional myocardial function. This review will give an overview of the current state of myocardial wall motion imaging, especially focusing on the clinical role of dobutamine

  11. Intraocular lymphoma after cardiac transplantation: Magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Hyung Jin; Woo, Kyung In; Kim, Yoon Duck [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    We report a case of intraocular lymphoma in a 65-year-old man, 15 months after cardiac transplantation. On Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, the iris and the anterior chamber of the right eye were found to be involved with an enhancing soft-tissue lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of post-transplantation intraocular lymphoma evaluated with MR imaging.

  12. Unveiling nonischemic cardiomyopathies with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Peterson, Tyler J; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Glockner, James; Mankad, Sunil V; Williamson, Eric E

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a heterogeneous group of myocardial disorders with mechanical or electrical dysfunction. Identification of the etiology is important for accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, but continues to be challenging. The ability of cardiac MRI to non-invasively obtain 3D-images of unparalleled resolution without radiation exposure and to provide tissue characterization gives it a distinct advantage over any other diagnostic tool used for evaluation of cardiomyopathies. Cardiac MRI can accurately visualize cardiac morphology and function and also help identify myocardial edema, infiltration and fibrosis. It has emerged as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in tertiary care centers for work up of patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This review covers the role of cardiac MRI in evaluation of nonischemic cardiomyopathies, particularly in the context of other diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities. PMID:24417294

  13. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Alström syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Catherine M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A case series of the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings in seven adult Alström patients. Methods Seven patients from the National Specialist Commissioning Group Centre for Alström Disease, Torbay, England, UK, completed the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging protocol to assess cardiac structure and function in Alström cardiomyopathy. Results All patients had some degree of left and right ventricular dysfunction. Patchy mid wall gadolinium delayed enhancement was demonstrated, suggesting an underlying fibrotic process. Some degree of cardiomyopathy was universal. No evidence of myocardial infarction or fatty infiltration was demonstrated, but coronary artery disease cannot be completely excluded. Repeat scanning after 18 months in one subject showed progression of fibrosis and decreased left ventricular function. Conclusion Adult Alström cardiomyopathy appears to be a fibrotic process causing impairment of both ventricles. Serial cardiac magnetic resonance scanning has helped clarify the underlying disease progression and responses to treatment. Confirmation of significant mutations in the ALMS1 gene should lead to advice to screen the subject for cardiomyopathy, and metabolic disorders.

  14. Giant right atrial myxoma: characterization with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, Carole A

    2012-02-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of dyspnoea and chest pain. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography was performed to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE). This demonstrated a large right atrial mass and no evidence of PE. Transthoracic echocardiography followed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a mobile right atrial mass. Surgical resection was then performed confirming a giant right atrial myxoma. We describe the typical clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of right atrial myxoma.

  15. Characterisation of peripartum cardiomyopathy by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouquet, Frederic; Groote, Pascal de; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Dagorn, Joel; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe [Pole de Cardiologie et Maladies Vasculaires, CHRU Lille et Universite Lille 2, Lille Cedex (France); Lions, Christophe; Willoteaux, Serge; Beregi, Jean Paul [Radiologie et Imagerie Cardiovasculaire, CHRU Lille et Universite Lille 2, Lille Cedex (France); Deruelle, Philippe [Gynecologie-Maternite, CHRU Lille et Universite Lille 2, Lille Cedex (France)

    2008-12-15

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare cause of heart failure. Only half of the patients recover normal cardiac function. We assessed the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and late enhancement imaging to detect myocardial fibrosis in order to predict cardiac function recovery in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy. Among a consecutive series of 1,037 patients referred for heart failure treatment or prognostic evaluation between 1999 and 2006, eight women had confirmed PPCM. They all underwent echocardiography and cardiac MRI for assessment of left ventricular anatomy, systolic function and detection of myocardial fibrosis through late enhancement imaging. Mean ({+-} SD) baseline left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 28 {+-} 4%. After a follow-up of 50 {+-} 9 months, half the patients recovered normal cardiac function (LVEF = 58 {+-} 4%) and four did not (LVEF = 35 {+-} 6%). None of the eight patients exhibited abnormal myocardial late enhancement. No difference in MRI characteristics was observed between the two groups. Patients with PPCM do not exhibit a specific cardiac MRI pattern and particularly no myocardial late enhancement. It suggests that myocardial fibrosis does not play a major role in the limitation of cardiac function recovery after PPCM. (orig.)

  16. Cardiac carcinoid: tricuspid delayed hyperenhancement on cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martos, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare condition in adults. Its diagnosis can be easily missed in a patient presenting to a primary care setting. We revised the advantages of using coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing this condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid heart disease and right heart failure using transthoracic Doppler-echocardiogram, cardiac MDCT and MRI. Cardiac echocardiogram revealed marked thickening and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with dilated right atrium and ventricle. Cardiac MDCT and MRI demonstrated fixation and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with delayed contrast hyperenhancement of the tricuspid annulus. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates fascinating imaging findings of cardiac carcinoid disease and highlights the increasing utility of contrast-enhanced MRI and cardiac MDCT in the diagnosis of this interesting condition.

  17. Spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nessim; Williams, Ronald B; Yarmozik, June A; Biederman, Robert W W

    2014-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetically determined heart muscle disease; characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Spiral HCM is described as having a counterclockwise rotation pattern of hypertrophy along with variable degrees of fibrosis. A 34-year-old female presented with symptoms suggestive of heart failure. Echocardiography showed concentric LVH with normal contractility. Cardiac MRI showed asymmetric septal hypertrophy with mid-cavity obliteration and a spiral pattern of variably increasing wall thickness. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) demonstrated several areas of abnormal postgadolinium uptake. We report a case of spiral HCM. We should consider cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as the reference standard for diagnosing HCM. PMID:24749165

  18. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and prognosis in cardiac amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roughton Michael

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac involvement is common in amyloidosis and associated with a variably adverse outcome. We have previously shown that cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can assess deposition of amyloid protein in the myocardial interstitium. In this study we assessed the prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and gadolinium kinetics in cardiac amyloidosis in a prospective longitudinal study. Materials and methods The pre-defined study end point was all-cause mortality. We prospectively followed a cohort of 29 patients with proven cardiac amyloidosis. All patients underwent biopsy, 2D-echocardiography and Doppler studies, 123I-SAP scintigraphy, serum NT pro BNP assay, and CMR with a T1 mapping method and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE. Results Patients with were followed for a median of 623 days (IQ range 221, 1436, during which 17 (58% patients died. The presence of myocardial LGE by itself was not a significant predictor of mortality. However, death was predicted by gadolinium kinetics, with the 2 minute post-gadolinium intramyocardial T1 difference between subepicardium and subendocardium predicting mortality with 85% accuracy at a threshold value of 23 ms (the lower the difference the worse the prognosis. Intramyocardial T1 gradient was a better predictor of survival than FLC response to chemotherapy (Kaplan Meier analysis P = 0.049 or diastolic function (Kaplan-Meier analysis P = 0.205. Conclusion In cardiac amyloidosis, CMR provides unique information relating to risk of mortality based on gadolinium kinetics which reflects the severity of the cardiac amyloid burden.

  19. ABC of the cardiac magnetic resonance. Part 1: perfusion, viability and coronary anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the fundamental concepts, the basic sequences and the clinical and potential applications of cardiac magnetic resonance as a diagnostic technique in updated radiology and cardiology practices. In this second part, we present basic aspects of the cardiac magnetic resonance application in the coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion and viability. (author)

  20. Acupuncture Effects on Cardiac Functions Measured by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Feline Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-chi Lee; Jen-Hwey Chiu; Weng-Yih Tseng; Leang-Shin Wu; Krishna Kaphle; Jen-Hsou Lin; Chen-Haw Shih; Ying-Ling Wu

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of acupuncture (AP) as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI), an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-a...

  1. Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cardiac Venous Anatomic Variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of persistent left superior venacava (PLSVC) is approximately 0.5% in the general population; however,the coexistent absence of the right SVC has a reported incidence in tertiary centers of 0.1%. The vast majority of reports are limited to pediatric cardiology. Likewise, sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is a rare congenital anomaly, with a reported incidence of 0.1-3.5% of all congenital heart defects. We present a 71-year-old patient undergoing preoperative evaluation for incidental finding of aortic root aneurysm,and found to have all three in coexistence. Suggestive findings were demonstrated on cardiac catheterization and definitive diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging. The use of MRI for the diagnosis of asymptomatic adult congenital heart disease will be reviewed

  2. New insights into peripartum cardiomyopathy using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renz, D.M.; Roettgen, R.; Wagner, M.; Elgeti, T. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Habedank, D.; Dietz, R. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Kardiologie; Boettcher, J. [SRH Wald-Klinikum Gera (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Pfeil, A. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Innere Medizin III; Kivelitz, D. [Asklepios Klinik St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany). Albers-Schoenberg-Institut fuer Strahlendiagnostik

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate a comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). The focus was on inflammatory myocardial changes. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 12 cardiac MR examinations was performed in 6 patients with PPCM. The protocol comprised cine sequences for the determination of chamber sizes and function. T2-weighted sequences for determination of edema (T2 ratio), T1-weighted images for measurement of early gadolinium enhancement ratio (EGER), and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) sequences were used for tissue characterization. 5 examinations were performed during the acute stage, and 7 examinations were performed during the course of the disease. Results: Initially, 3 of 5 patients presented with an elevated left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV); in one patient, the LVEDV was in the upper range. In 4 of 5 subjects, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was decreased. The T2 ratio and EGER values were initially elevated in all women. No LGE was detected in initial scans. In follow-up examinations, the LVEDV decreased and the LVEF increased in all patients. Tissue-characterizing parameters decreased to normal in all but 1 patient. 2 patients showing LGE did not present a favorable clinical course. Conclusion: Myocardial inflammation was detected in the acute stage of PPCM, which was mostly transient. In our small group, patients showing LGE had a non-favorable clinical course. Future studies should include tissue-characterizing parameters, such as T2 ratio and EGER. Thus, further insights into pathophysiology can be gained and therapeutic effects can be measured in a more extensive manner. (orig.)

  3. Acupuncture Effects on Cardiac Functions Measured by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Feline Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsou Lin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The usefulness of acupuncture (AP as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI, an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-acupuncture (EA at bilateral acupoint Neiguan (PC6 on recovery time after ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia in healthy cats. The CMRI data established the basic feline cardiac function index (CFI, including cardiac output and major vessel velocity. To evaluate the effect of EA on the functions of the autonomic nervous and cardiovascular systems, heart rate, respiration rate, electrocardiogram and pulse rate were also measured. Ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia caused a transient hypertension in the cats; EA inhibited this anesthetic-induced hypertension and shortened the post-anesthesia recovery time. Our data support existing knowledge on the cardiovascular benefits of EA at PC6, and also provide strong evidence for the combination of anesthesia and EA to shorten post-anesthesia recovery time and counter the negative effects of anesthetics on cardiac physiology.

  4. Acupuncture effects on cardiac functions measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a feline model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Hsou; Shih, Chen-Haw; Kaphle, Krishna; Wu, Leang-Shin; Tseng, Weng-Yih; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2010-06-01

    The usefulness of acupuncture (AP) as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI), an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-acupuncture (EA) at bilateral acupoint Neiguan (PC6) on recovery time after ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia in healthy cats. The CMRI data established the basic feline cardiac function index (CFI), including cardiac output and major vessel velocity. To evaluate the effect of EA on the functions of the autonomic nervous and cardiovascular systems, heart rate, respiration rate, electrocardiogram and pulse rate were also measured. Ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia caused a transient hypertension in the cats; EA inhibited this anesthetic-induced hypertension and shortened the post-anesthesia recovery time. Our data support existing knowledge on the cardiovascular benefits of EA at PC6, and also provide strong evidence for the combination of anesthesia and EA to shorten post-anesthesia recovery time and counter the negative effects of anesthetics on cardiac physiology. PMID:18955311

  5. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography in determination of cardiac dimensions in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B J; Waters, J; Kwan, O L; DeMaria, A N

    1985-06-01

    No data exist regarding the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac size and performance in human beings. Therefore, measurements of cardiac dimensions by magnetic resonance imaging were compared with those obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography in 21 normal subjects. Magnetic resonance transverse cardiac sections were obtained during electrocardiographic gating using a spin echo pulse sequence. In normal subjects, magnetic resonance imaging yielded a range of values for cardiac dimensions having a similar standard deviation as that of two-dimensional echocardiography. Diastolic measurements of the aorta, left atrium, left ventricle and septum obtained by magnetic resonance imaging correlated well with those obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography (r = 0.82, 0.78, 0.81 and 0.75, respectively). The correlation coefficient of r = 0.35 observed for the posterior wall thickness was not surprising in view of the narrow range of normal values. Only a general correlation (r = 0.53) existed for the right ventricular diastolic dimension; this was probably related to the difficulty in obtaining representative measurements due to the complex geometry of this chamber. Failure of systolic dimension measurements by magnetic resonance imaging to correlate with those obtained by echocardiography is probably related to limitations of electrocardiographic gating, especially of determining the exact end-systolic frame. Although technically complex at present, magnetic resonance imaging does provide an additional noninvasive technique for measurement of cardiac size.

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance T1 mapping of left atrial myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinart, Roy; Khurram, Irfan M.; Liu, Songtao; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Halperin, Henry R.; Bluemke, David A.; Gai, Neville; van der Geest, Rob J.; Lima, Joao A.C.; Calkins, Hugh; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Nazarian, Saman

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) T1 mapping is an emerging tool for objective quantification of myocardial fibrosis. OBJECTIVES To (a) establish the feasibility of left atrial (LA) T1 measurements, (b) determine the range of LA T1 values in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) vs healthy volunteers, and (c) validate T1 mapping vs LA intracardiac electrogram voltage amplitude measures. METHODS CMR imaging at 1.5 T was performed in 51 consecutive patients before AF ablation and in 16 healthy volunteers. T1 measurements were obtained from the posterior LA myocardium by using the modified Look-Locker inversion-recovery sequence. Given the established association of reduced electrogram amplitude with fibrosis, intracardiac point-by-point bipolar LA voltage measures were recorded for the validation of T1 measurements. RESULTS The median LA T1 relaxation time was shorter in patients with AF (387 [interquartile range 364–428] ms) compared to healthy volunteers (459 [interquartile range 418–532] ms; P < .001) and was shorter in patients with AF with prior ablation compared to patients without prior ablation (P = .035). In a generalized estimating equations model, adjusting for data clusters per participant, age, rhythm during CMR, prior ablation, AF type, hypertension, and diabetes, each 100-ms increase in T1 relaxation time was associated with 0.1 mV increase in intracardiac bipolar LA voltage (P = .025). CONCLUSIONS Measurement of the LA myocardium T1 relaxation time is feasible and strongly associated with invasive voltage measures. This methodology may improve the quantification of fibrotic changes in thin-walled myocardial tissues. PMID:23643513

  7. Quadricuspid aortic valve by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamruz Khan Akerem; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Araoz, Philip A

    2011-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac entity. The recognition of QAV has clinical significance as it causes aortic valve dysfunction, commonly aortic regurgitation, and is often associated with other congenital cardiac abnormalities. We showed the important role played by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in detecting QAV and review the available literature to explain its incidence, diagnosis, classifications, embryology, correlation between morphology of the QAV and its function, associated conditions, and management. PMID:21926862

  8. T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance in acute cardiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Eitel Ingo; Friedrich Matthias G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using T2-weighted sequences can visualize myocardial edema. When compared to previous protocols, newer pulse sequences with substantially improved image quality have increased its clinical utility. The assessment of myocardial edema provides useful incremental diagnostic and prognostic information in a variety of clinical settings associated with acute myocardial injury. In patients with acute chest pain, T2-weighted CMR is able to identify acu...

  9. Determinants of Left Ventricular Mass and Hypertrophy in Hemodialysis Patients Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Rajan K.; Oliver, Scott; Patrick B. Mark; Powell, Joanna R.; McQuarrie, Emily P.; Traynor, James P.; Dargie, Henry J; Jardine, Alan G

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for premature cardiovascular death in hemodialysis (HD) patients and one of the three forms of uremic cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a volume-independent technique to assess cardiac structure. We used CMR to assess the determinants of left ventricular mass (LVM) and LVH in HD patients.

  10. Coronary artery stent mimicking intracardiac thrombus on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging due to signal loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove; Ahtarovski, Kiril Aleksov;

    2012-01-01

    Since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention for coronary artery disease, thousands of patients have been treated with the implantation of coronary stents. Moreover, several of the patients with coronary stent undergo cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging every year. This case...... report is of a 77-year-old man who was previously treated with the implantation of a coronary stent in the left circumflex artery. He underwent CMR imaging, which revealed a process 14×21 mm in the left atrium. Cardiac contrast computed tomography did not demonstrate any cardiac pathology. While the...

  11. Assessment of Myocardial Infarction by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Long-Term Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luiz Fernandes Petriz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed anatomical information on infarction. However, few studies have investigated the association of these data with mortality after acute myocardial infarction. Objective: To study the association between data regarding infarct size and anatomy, as obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, and long-term mortality. Methods: A total of 1959 reports of “infarct size” were identified in 7119 cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies, of which 420 had clinical and laboratory confirmation of previous myocardial infarction. The variables studied were the classic risk factors – left ventricular ejection fraction, categorized ventricular function, and location of acute myocardial infarction. Infarct size and acute myocardial infarction extent and transmurality were analyzed alone and together, using the variable named “MET-AMI”. The statistical analysis was carried out using the elastic net regularization, with the Cox model and survival trees. Results: The mean age was 62.3 ± 12 years, and 77.3% were males. During the mean follow-up of 6.4 ± 2.9 years, there were 76 deaths (18.1%. Serum creatinine, diabetes mellitus and previous myocardial infarction were independently associated with mortality. Age was the main explanatory factor. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging variables independently associated with mortality were transmurality of acute myocardial infarction (p = 0.047, ventricular dysfunction (p = 0.0005 and infarcted size (p = 0.0005; the latter was the main explanatory variable for ischemic heart disease death. The MET-AMI variable was the most strongly associated with risk of ischemic heart disease death (HR: 16.04; 95%CI: 2.64-97.5; p = 0.003. Conclusion: The anatomical data of infarction, obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, were independently associated with long

  12. Assessment of Myocardial Infarction by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Long-Term Mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriz, João Luiz Fernandes, E-mail: jlpetriz@cardiol.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) / Instituto do Coração Edson Saad - Programa de Pós Graduação em Medicina (Cardiologia), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Barra D’Or, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto D’Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gomes, Bruno Ferraz de Oliveira; Rua, Braulio Santos [Hospital Barra D’Or, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Azevedo, Clério Francisco [Instituto D’Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hadlich, Marcelo Souza [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) / Instituto do Coração Edson Saad - Programa de Pós Graduação em Medicina (Cardiologia), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto D’Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mussi, Henrique Thadeu Periard [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) / Instituto do Coração Edson Saad - Programa de Pós Graduação em Medicina (Cardiologia), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Barra D’Or, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Taets, Gunnar de Cunto [Instituto D’Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nascimento, Emília Matos do; Pereira, Basílio de Bragança; Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de Souza e [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) / Instituto do Coração Edson Saad - Programa de Pós Graduação em Medicina (Cardiologia), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed anatomical information on infarction. However, few studies have investigated the association of these data with mortality after acute myocardial infarction. To study the association between data regarding infarct size and anatomy, as obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, and long-term mortality. A total of 1959 reports of “infarct size” were identified in 7119 cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies, of which 420 had clinical and laboratory confirmation of previous myocardial infarction. The variables studied were the classic risk factors – left ventricular ejection fraction, categorized ventricular function, and location of acute myocardial infarction. Infarct size and acute myocardial infarction extent and transmurality were analyzed alone and together, using the variable named “MET-AMI”. The statistical analysis was carried out using the elastic net regularization, with the Cox model and survival trees. The mean age was 62.3 ± 12 years, and 77.3% were males. During the mean follow-up of 6.4 ± 2.9 years, there were 76 deaths (18.1%). Serum creatinine, diabetes mellitus and previous myocardial infarction were independently associated with mortality. Age was the main explanatory factor. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging variables independently associated with mortality were transmurality of acute myocardial infarction (p = 0.047), ventricular dysfunction (p = 0.0005) and infarcted size (p = 0.0005); the latter was the main explanatory variable for ischemic heart disease death. The MET-AMI variable was the most strongly associated with risk of ischemic heart disease death (HR: 16.04; 95%CI: 2.64-97.5; p = 0.003). The anatomical data of infarction, obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, were independently associated with long-term mortality, especially for ischemic heart disease death.

  13. Non-cardiac findings on coronary computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Schnapauff, Dirk; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Chariteplatz 1, P.O. Box 10098, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Both multislice computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are emerging as methods to detect coronary artery stenoses and assess cardiac function and morphology. Non-cardiac structures are also amenable to assessment by these non-invasive tests. We investigated the rate of significant and insignificant non-cardiac findings using CT and MRI. A total of 108 consecutive patients suspected of having coronary artery disease and without contraindications to CT and MRI were included in this study. Significant non-cardiac findings were defined as findings that required additional clinical or radiological follow-up. CT and MR images were read independently in a blinded fashion. CT yielded five significant non-cardiac findings in five patients (5%). These included a pulmonary embolism, large pleural effusions, sarcoid, a large hiatal hernia, and a pulmonary nodule (>1.0 cm). Two of these significant non-cardiac findings were also seen on MRI (pleural effusions and sarcoid, 2%). Insignificant non-cardiac findings were more frequent than significant findings on both CT (n = 11, 10%) and MRI (n = 7, 6%). Incidental non-cardiac findings on CT and MRI of the coronary arteries are common, which is why images should be analyzed by radiologists to ensure that important findings are not missed and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. (orig.)

  14. Cardiac resynchronization therapy guided by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Leyva Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment for patients with symptomatic heart failure, severely impaired left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction and a wide (> 120 ms) complex. As with any other treatment, the response to CRT is variable. The degree of pre-implant mechanical dyssynchrony, scar burden and scar localization to the vicinity of the LV pacing stimulus are known to influence response and outcome. In addition to its recognized role in the assessm...

  15. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Characterizes Myocarditis in a 16-Year-Old Female With Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, Catherine M; Harris, Matthew A; Chowdhury, Devyani

    2016-05-01

    Myocarditis may occur during early disseminated Lyme disease. A 16-year-old girl with serologic evidence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection and transient first-degree atrioventricular block underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated myocardial hyperemia, edema, and delayed gadolinium enhancement. We discuss the use of T1- and T2-weighted dark blood sequences in addition to inversion recovery delayed enhancement imaging to support the diagnosis of Lyme myocarditis. PMID:26701623

  16. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging parameters as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials of acute myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Gutberlet Matthias; Lurz Philipp; Fuernau Georg; de Waha Suzanne; Eitel Ingo; Desch Steffen; Schuler Gerhard; Thiele Holger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) offers a variety of parameters potentially suited as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials of acute myocardial infarction such as infarct size, myocardial salvage, microvascular obstruction or left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. The present article reviews each of these parameters with regard to the pathophysiological basis, practical aspects, validity, reliability and its relative value (strengths and limitations) as compared to competit...

  17. Delayed contrast enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in trastuzumab induced cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick Iain; Fang Tielan; Lytwyn Matthew; Fallah-Rad Nazanin; Jassal Davinder S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an antagonist to the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptor significantly decreases the rates of breast cancer recurrence and mortality by 50%. Despite therapeutic benefits, the risk of cardiotoxicity with trastuzumab ranges from 10–15% when administered sequentially following anthraycline chemotherapy. Little is known about the utility of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of trastuzumab mediated cardiomyopathy. Methods an...

  18. Cardiac magnetic resonance findings predicting mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.M. Baggen (Vivan J. M.); I. Leiner; M.C. Post (Martijn); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); H. Boersma (Eric); J. Habets; G.T. Sieswerda (Gertjan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To provide a comprehensive overview of all reported cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings that predict clinical deterioration in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods: MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were systematically searched for longitudinal studies p

  19. Important advances in technology and unique applications related to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G; Shah, Dipan J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance has become a well-established imaging modality and is considered the gold standard for myocardial tissue viability assessment and ventricular volumes quantification. Recent technological hardware and software advancements in magnetic resonance imaging technology have allowed the development of new methods that can improve clinical cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. The advent of a new generation of higher magnetic field scanners can be beneficial to various clinical applications. Also, the development of faster acquisition techniques have allowed mapping of the magnetic relaxation properties T1, T2, and T2* in the myocardium that can be used to quantify myocardial diffuse fibrosis, determine the presence of edema or inflammation, and measure iron within the myocardium, respectively. Another recent major advancement in CMR has been the introduction of three-dimension (3D) phase contrast imaging, also known as 4D flow. The following review discusses key advances in cardiac magnetic resonance technology and their potential to improve clinical cardiovascular diagnosis and outcomes.

  20. Evaluation of cardiac structures and function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To assess the capability of magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)in evaluating the cardiac structures and function in the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(HCM).Methods:Fourteen healthy volunteers and eighteen cases with HCM verified by history,clinical presentation,electrocardiogram and echocardiography(ECG)were performed with MRI.The myocardial thickness of interventricular septum at the basal segment and that of posterolateral free wall of the left ventricle(LV)were measured.Some indexes for evaluating cardiac function were measured using ARGUS auto-quantitative program.Resuits:The myocardial thickness of septum at the basal segment had significant difference between the HCM patients and the healthy volunteers.There was no significant difference between MRI and ECG in examining end-diastolic volume,ejection fraction of the LV.Conclusion:MRI can fully provide more information on the abnormalities of cardiac anatomy and function;thus,it is of great value in clinical application.

  1. Valve area and cardiac output in aortic stenosis: quantification by magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Hildebrandt, P; Lindvig, K;

    1993-01-01

    Valve area and cardiac output were determined with magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping in 12 patients with aortic stenosis. Heart catheterization, Doppler echocardiography, and indicator dilution were performed for comparison. Left ventricle could be catheterized in only nine patients; in...... material, MR measured a mean area of 1.1 cm2 compared with 1.2 cm2 derived from Doppler echocardiography data, with a mean difference of 0.1 cm2 and [-0.5, +0.6] cm2 as limits of agreement. In 11 patients the cardiac output was quantified by MR to a mean of 4.9 L/min and by indicator dilution to 5.0 L......--the valvular area and the cardiac output--may be quantified, MR has potential to become a clinical tool in assessment of severity in aortic stenosis....

  2. The role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging following acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Dennis T.L.; Richardson, James D.; Puri, Rishi; Nelson, Adam J.; Teo, Karen S.L.; Worthley, Matthew I. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Adelaide (Australia); University of Adelaide, Department of Medicine, Adelaide (Australia); Bertaso, Angela G. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Adelaide (Australia); Worthley, Stephen G. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Adelaide (Australia); University of Adelaide, Department of Medicine, Adelaide (Australia); Cardiovascular Investigational Unit, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    Advances in the management of myocardial infarction have resulted in substantial reductions in morbidity and mortality. However, after acute treatment a number of diagnostic and prognostic questions often remain to be answered, whereby cardiac imaging plays an essential role. For example, some patients will sustain early mechanical complications after infarction, while others may develop significant ventricular dysfunction. Furthermore, many individuals harbour a significant burden of residual coronary disease for which clarification of functional ischaemic status and/or viability of the suspected myocardial territory is required. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is well positioned to fulfil these requirements given its unparalleled capability in evaluating cardiac function, stress ischaemia testing and myocardial tissue characterisation. This review will focus on the utility of CMR in resolving diagnostic uncertainty, evaluating early complications following myocardial infarction, assessing inducible ischaemia, myocardial viability, ventricular remodelling and the emerging role of CMR-derived measures as endpoints in clinical trials. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of apical subtype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebed, Kalie Y; Al Adham, Raed I; Bishu, Kalkidan; Askew, J Wells; Klarich, Kyle W; Araoz, Philip A; Foley, Thomas A; Glockner, James F; Nishimura, Rick A; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2014-09-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is an uncommon variant of HC. We sought to characterize cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among apical HC patients. This was a retrospective review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of apical HC who underwent cardiac MRI examinations at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from August 1999 to October 2011. Clinical and demographic data at the time of cardiac MRI study were abstracted. Cardiac MRI study and 2-dimensional echocardiograms performed within 6 months of the cardiac MRI were reviewed; 96 patients with apical HC underwent cardiac MRI examinations. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 130.7 ± 39.1 ml and 44.2 ± 20.9 ml, respectively. Maximum LV thickness was 19 ± 5 mm. Hypertrophy extended beyond the apex into other segments in 57 (59.4%) patients. Obstructive physiology was seen in 12 (12.5%) and was more common in the mixed apical phenotype than the pure apical (19.3 vs 2.6%, p = 0.02). Apical pouches were noted in 39 (40.6%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 70 (74.5%) patients. LGE was associated with severe symptoms and increased maximal LV wall thickness. In conclusion, cardiac MRI is well suited for studying the apical form of HC because of difficulty imaging the cardiac apex with standard echocardiography. Cardiac MRI is uniquely suited to delineate the presence or absence of an apical pouch and abnormal myocardial LGE that may have implications in the natural history of apical HM. In particular, the presence of abnormal LGE is associated with clinical symptoms and increased wall thickness. PMID:25037678

  4. Extracardiac findings detected by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyttenbach, Rolf; Medioni, Nathalie; Santini, Paolo [Ospedale San Giovanni Bellinzona (EOC), Department of Radiology, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Vock, Peter [University Hospital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [University Hospital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Spitalzentrum Biel AG, Department of Radiology, Biel (Switzerland)

    2012-06-15

    To determine the prevalence and importance of extracardiac findings (ECF) in patients undergoing clinical CMR and to test the hypothesis that the original CMR reading focusing on the heart may underestimate extracardiac abnormalities. 401 consecutive patients (mean age 53 years) underwent CMR at 1.5 T. Main indications were ischaemic heart disease (n = 183) and cardiomyopathy (n = 164). All CMR sequences, including scout images, were reviewed with specific attention to ECF in a second reading by the same radiologist who performed the first clinical reading. Potentially significant findings were defined as abnormalities requiring additional clinical or radiological follow-up. 250 incidental ECF were detected, of which 84 (34%) had potentially significant ECF including bronchial carcinoma (n = 1), lung consolidation (n = 7) and abdominal abnormalities. In 166 CMR studies (41%) non-significant ECF were detected. The number of ECF identified at second versus first reading was higher for significant (84 vs. 47) and non-significant (166 vs. 36) findings (P < 0.00001). About one fifth of patients undergoing CMR were found to have potentially significant ECF requiring additional work-up. The second dedicated reading detected significantly more ECF compared with the first clinical reading emphasising the importance of active search for extracardiac abnormalities when evaluating CMR studies. circle Many patients undergoing cardiac MR have significant extracardiac findings (ECF) circle These impact on management and require additional work-up. circle Wide review of scout and cine sequences will detect most ECFs. circle Education of radiologists is important to identify ECFs on CMR studies. (orig.)

  5. Ventricular function following coronary artery bypass grafting: comparison between Gated SPECT and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Hospital Pro-Cardiaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pessoa, Maria Carolina Pinheiro [Pro-Echo Hospital Samaritano, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Paulo Pontes [Centro de Diagnostico por Imagens (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira Junior, Amarino Carvalho [Hospital Pro-Cardiaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Dohmann, Hans Fernando Rocha [Hospital Pro-Cardiaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Reis, Adair Gomes dos [Nuclear Diagnosticos, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa da [Pro-Echo Hospital Samaritano, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    Background: The assessment of left ventricular function may be impaired by the abnormal interventricular septal motion frequently found after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Studies on the validation of gated SPECT as a tool for the assessment of left ventricular function in this patient group are scarce. Objective: We investigated the agreement and correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) as obtained using electrocardiogram-gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (gated SPECT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in 20 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: Correlation was measured using Spearman's correlation coefficient ({rho}). Agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis. Results: A good correlation was found between gated SPECT and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients after CABG with regard to left ventricular ejection fraction ({rho} = 0.85; p =0.0001), moderate correlation for end-diastolic volume ({rho} = 0.51; p = 0.02), and non-significant correlation for end-diastolic volume ({rho} = 0.13; p = 0.5). Agreement ranges for LVEF, ESV and EDV were: -20% to 12%; -38 to 54 ml and; -96 to 100 ml, respectively. Conclusion: A reliable correlation was found for left ventricular ejection fraction as obtained by gated SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging in patients undergoing CABG. For ventricular volumes, however, the correlation is not adequate. (author)

  6. A review of heart chamber segmentation for structural and functional analysis using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Lekadir, Karim; Gooya, Ali; Shao, Ling; Petersen, Steffen E; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a key imaging modality in clinical cardiology practice due to its unique capabilities for non-invasive imaging of the cardiac chambers and great vessels. A wide range of CMR sequences have been developed to assess various aspects of cardiac structure and function, and significant advances have also been made in terms of imaging quality and acquisition times. A lot of research has been dedicated to the development of global and regional quantitative CMR indices that help the distinction between health and pathology. The goal of this review paper is to discuss the structural and functional CMR indices that have been proposed thus far for clinical assessment of the cardiac chambers. We include indices definitions, the requirements for the calculations, exemplar applications in cardiovascular diseases, and the corresponding normal ranges. Furthermore, we review the most recent state-of-the art techniques for the automatic segmentation of the cardiac boundaries, which are necessary for the calculation of the CMR indices. Finally, we provide a detailed discussion of the existing literature and of the future challenges that need to be addressed to enable a more robust and comprehensive assessment of the cardiac chambers in clinical practice.

  7. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Pontone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT, functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.

  8. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: an Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro de; Assunção, Fernanda Boldrini; Santos, Alair Agusto Sarmet Moreira Damas Dos; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease and represents the main cause of sudden death in young patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods with high sensitivity and specificity, useful for the establishment of diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and for the screening of patients with subclinical phenotypes. The improvement of image analysis by CMR and CCT offers the potential to promote interventions aiming at stopping the natural course of the disease. This study aims to describe the role of RCM and CCT in the diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and how these methods can be used in the management of these patients. PMID:27305111

  9. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro; Assunção, Fernanda Boldrini; dos Santos, Alair Agusto Sarmet Moreira Damas; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease and represents the main cause of sudden death in young patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods with high sensitivity and specificity, useful for the establishment of diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and for the screening of patients with subclinical phenotypes. The improvement of image analysis by CMR and CCT offers the potential to promote interventions aiming at stopping the natural course of the disease. This study aims to describe the role of RCM and CCT in the diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and how these methods can be used in the management of these patients. PMID:27305111

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Boldrini Assunção

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI and cardiac computed tomography (CCT are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complementarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies.

  11. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Fernanda Boldrini; de Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro; Souza, Vitor Frauches; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complementarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies.

  12. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complimentarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies. (author)

  13. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao, Fernanda Boldrini; Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro de; Nacif, Marcelo Souto, E-mail: msnacif@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Medicina; Souza, Vitor Frauches [Complexo Hospitalar de Niteroi (CHN), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complimentarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies. (author)

  14. [Research of Left Ventricle Function Analysis Using Real-time Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; He, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging is a reproducible method with shorter acquisition time and without breath-hold for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. However, the detection of end-diastole and end-systole frames of real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging for left ventricle function analysis is commonly completed by visual identification, which is time-consuming and laborious. In order to save processing time, we propose a method for semi-automatic identification of end-diastole and end-systole frames. The method fits respiratory motion signal and acquires the expiration phase, end-diastole and end-systole frames by cross correlation coefficient. The procedure successfully worked on ten healthy volunteers and validated by the analysis of left ventricle function compared to the standard breath-hold steady-state free precession cardiac cine imaging without any significant statistical differences. The results demonstrated that the present method could correctly detect end-diastole and end-systole frames. In the future, this technique may be used for rapid left ventricle function analysis in clinic. PMID:27079101

  15. The developing role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of congenital cardiac anomalies: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over the last few years have resulted in the exploring the use of fetal MRI to detect congenital cardiac anomalies. Early detection of congenital cardiac anomalies can help more appropriately manage the infant's delivery and neonatal management. MRI offers anatomical and functional studies and is a safe adjunct that can help more fully understand a fetus' cardiac anatomy. It is important for the obstetricians and pediatric cardiologists to be aware of the recent advancements in fetal MRI and it's potential utility in diagnosing congenital cardiac anomalies

  16. The developing role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of congenital cardiac anomalies: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit S Loomba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI over the last few years have resulted in the exploring the use of fetal MRI to detect congenital cardiac anomalies. Early detection of congenital cardiac anomalies can help more appropriately manage the infant′s delivery and neonatal management. MRI offers anatomical and functional studies and is a safe adjunct that can help more fully understand a fetus′ cardiac anatomy. It is important for the obstetricians and pediatric cardiologists to be aware of the recent advancements in fetal MRI and it`s potential utility in diagnosing congenital cardiac anomalies.

  17. Measurements of pericardial adipose tissue using contrast enhanced cardiac multidetector computed tomography—comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Marie Bayer; Lønborg, Jacob; Rasmussen, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) located in close vicinity to the epicardial coronary arteries may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. PAT has primarily been measured with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) or with non...... tested, and the smallest difference in PAT was noted when -30 to -190 HU were used in MDCT measures. The median difference between MDCT and CMRI for the assessment of PAT was 9 ml (SD 50) suggesting a reasonable robust method for the assessment of PAT in a large-scale study. Pericardial adipose tissue...... and CMRI scans were performed. The optimal fit for measuring PAT using contrast MDCT was developed and validated by the corresponding measures on CMRI. The median for PAT volume in patients was 175 ml (SD 68) and 153 ml (SD 60) measured by MDCT and CMRI respectively. Four different attenuation values were...

  18. Cardiac pathologies in female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe dystrophinopathy. DMD carriers rarely present with clinical symptoms, but may suffer from cardiac involvement. Because echocardiographic findings are inconsistent and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) data are limited, this study sought to investigate asymptomatic carriers for cardiac abnormalities using CMRI. Fifteen genetically confirmed DMD carriers (age, 32.3 ± 10.2 years) were prospectively examined on a 1.5T MR system. Cine, T2, and late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images were acquired, and were evaluated in consensus by two experienced readers. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were analysed semiautomatically, normalized to BSA. Normalized LV end-diastolic volume was increased in 7 % (73.7 ± 16.8 ml/m2; range, 48-116 ml/m2) and normalized LV end-systolic volume in 20 % (31.5 ± 13.3 ml/m2; range, 15-74 ml/m2). EF was reduced in 33 % (58.4 ± 7.6 %; range, 37-69 %) and normalized LV myocardial mass in 80 % (40.5 ± 6.8 g/m2; range, 31-55 g/m2). In 80 %, regional myocardial thinning was detected in more than one segment. In 13 % and 40 %, apical-lateral accentuation of LV non-compaction was present. LGE was found in 60 % (midmyocardial inferolateral accentuation). Given the high frequency of cardiac pathologies detected by CMRI, regular cardiac risk assessment is advisable for DMD carriers. Besides clinical examination, CMRI is an excellent tool for this purpose. (orig.)

  19. Reference Values for Cardiac and Aortic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy, Young Caucasian Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikendal, Anouk L. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Haaring, Cees; Saam, Tobias; van der Geest, Rob J.; Westenberg, Jos J. M.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Hoefer, Imo E.; Leiner, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Reference values for morphological and functional parameters of the cardiovascular system in early life are relevant since they may help to identify young adults who fall outside the physiological range of arterial and cardiac ageing. This study provides age and sex specific reference values for aortic wall characteristics, cardiac function parameters and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a population-based sample of healthy, young adults using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods In 131 randomly selected healthy, young adults aged between 25 and 35 years (mean age 31.8 years, 63 men) of the general-population based Atherosclerosis-Monitoring-and-Biomarker-measurements-In-The-YOuNg (AMBITYON) study, descending thoracic aortic dimensions and wall thickness, thoracic aortic PWV and cardiac function parameters were measured using a 3.0T MR-system. Age and sex specific reference values were generated using dedicated software. Differences in reference values between two age groups (25–30 and 30–35 years) and both sexes were tested. Results Aortic diameters and areas were higher in the older age group (all p<0.007). Moreover, aortic dimensions, left ventricular mass, left and right ventricular volumes and cardiac output were lower in women than in men (all p<0.001). For mean and maximum aortic wall thickness, left and right ejection fraction and aortic PWV we did not observe a significant age or sex effect. Conclusion This study provides age and sex specific reference values for cardiovascular MR parameters in healthy, young Caucasian adults. These may aid in MR guided pre-clinical identification of young adults who fall outside the physiological range of arterial and cardiac ageing. PMID:27732640

  20. Cardiac pathologies in female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelhorn, Juliane; Schemuth, Haemi; Nensa, Felix; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Schlosser, Thomas [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schoenecker, Anne; Neudorf, Ulrich [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Essen (Germany); Schara, Ulrike [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe dystrophinopathy. DMD carriers rarely present with clinical symptoms, but may suffer from cardiac involvement. Because echocardiographic findings are inconsistent and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) data are limited, this study sought to investigate asymptomatic carriers for cardiac abnormalities using CMRI. Fifteen genetically confirmed DMD carriers (age, 32.3 ± 10.2 years) were prospectively examined on a 1.5T MR system. Cine, T2, and late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images were acquired, and were evaluated in consensus by two experienced readers. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were analysed semiautomatically, normalized to BSA. Normalized LV end-diastolic volume was increased in 7 % (73.7 ± 16.8 ml/m{sup 2}; range, 48-116 ml/m{sup 2}) and normalized LV end-systolic volume in 20 % (31.5 ± 13.3 ml/m{sup 2}; range, 15-74 ml/m{sup 2}). EF was reduced in 33 % (58.4 ± 7.6 %; range, 37-69 %) and normalized LV myocardial mass in 80 % (40.5 ± 6.8 g/m{sup 2}; range, 31-55 g/m{sup 2}). In 80 %, regional myocardial thinning was detected in more than one segment. In 13 % and 40 %, apical-lateral accentuation of LV non-compaction was present. LGE was found in 60 % (midmyocardial inferolateral accentuation). Given the high frequency of cardiac pathologies detected by CMRI, regular cardiac risk assessment is advisable for DMD carriers. Besides clinical examination, CMRI is an excellent tool for this purpose. (orig.)

  1. Structural and functional cardiac changes in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermans Mieke CE

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1 is a neuromuscular disorder with potential involvement of the heart and increased risk of sudden death. Considering the importance of cardiomyopathy as a predictor of prognosis, we aimed to systematically evaluate and describe structural and functional cardiac alterations in patients with MD1. Methods Eighty MD1 patients underwent physical examination, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Blood samples were taken for determination of NT-proBNP plasma levels and CTG repeat length. Results Functional and structural abnormalities were detected in 35 patients (44%. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction was found in 20 cases, left ventricular dilatation in 7 patients, and left ventricular hypertrophy in 6 patients. Myocardial fibrosis was seen in 10 patients (12.5%. In general, patients had low left ventricular mass indexes. Right ventricular involvement was uncommon and only seen together with left ventricular abnormalities. Functional or structural cardiac involvement was associated with age (p = 0.04, male gender (p Conclusions CMR can be useful to detect early structural and functional myocardial abnormalities in patients with MD1. Myocardial involvement is strongly associated with conduction abnormalities, but a normal ECG does not exclude myocardial alterations. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that MD1 patients have a complex cardiac phenotype, including both myocardial and conduction system alteration.

  2. Clinical usefulness of cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the clinical usefulness of cine mode magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) from aspects of image quality and cardiac function. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the myocardium was significantly (p<0.05) lower in patients with AF than those with normal sinus rhythm. Two radiologists who did not know any patient's information evaluated the image quality visually by marking method on a scale of 12 points. There was no difference of image quality between the two groups. The standard deviation of R-R interval was significantly (r=-0.92, p<0.001) correlated with the S/N ratio in myocardium. Consequently, it was not favorable to estimate visually cardiac cine MR image in patients with AF, when standard deviation of R-R interval was large. The left ventricular (LV) end diastolic, end systolic and stroke volumes and ejection fraction were closely (r=0.82∼0.95, p<0.05∼0.001) correlated between MR imaging and M-mode echocardiography, respectively. The ability to detect left side valvular regurgitation was almost equal in both MR imaging and color Doppler echocardiography. This result was coincided to previous papers in patients with normal sinus rhythm. In conclusion, cine mode MR imaging was also useful to analyze cardiac function and detect valvular regurgitation in patients with AF. (author)

  3. Myocardial Infarct Segmentation From Magnetic Resonance Images for Personalized Modeling of Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Li, Kristina; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy

    2016-06-01

    Accurate representation of myocardial infarct geometry is crucial to patient-specific computational modeling of the heart in ischemic cardiomyopathy. We have developed a methodology for segmentation of left ventricular (LV) infarct from clinically acquired, two-dimensional (2D), late-gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) images, for personalized modeling of ventricular electrophysiology. The infarct segmentation was expressed as a continuous min-cut optimization problem, which was solved using its dual formulation, the continuous max-flow (CMF). The optimization objective comprised of a smoothness term, and a data term that quantified the similarity between image intensity histograms of segmented regions and those of a set of training images. A manual segmentation of the LV myocardium was used to initialize and constrain the developed method. The three-dimensional geometry of infarct was reconstructed from its segmentation using an implicit, shape-based interpolation method. The proposed methodology was extensively evaluated using metrics based on geometry, and outcomes of individualized electrophysiological simulations of cardiac dys(function). Several existing LV infarct segmentation approaches were implemented, and compared with the proposed method. Our results demonstrated that the CMF method was more accurate than the existing approaches in reproducing expert manual LV infarct segmentations, and in electrophysiological simulations. The infarct segmentation method we have developed and comprehensively evaluated in this study constitutes an important step in advancing clinical applications of personalized simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:26731693

  4. ABC of the cardiac magnetic resonance. Part 1: perfusion, viability and coronary anatomy; ABC da ressonancia magnetica cardiaca. Part 2: perfusao, viabilidade e anatomia coronariana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Ricardo; Rached, Heron; Castro, Claudio C.; Cerri, Giovanni G. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: rlradiol@bol.com.br; Favaro, Daniele; Baptista, Luciana; Andrade, Joalbo; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Parga Filho, Jose; Avila, Luiz F.; Piva, Rosa M.V. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Secao de Ressonancia Magnetica

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the fundamental concepts, the basic sequences and the clinical and potential applications of cardiac magnetic resonance as a diagnostic technique in updated radiology and cardiology practices. In this second part, we present basic aspects of the cardiac magnetic resonance application in the coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion and viability. (author)

  5. Improved myocardial strain measured by strain-encoded magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with cardiac sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shintaro; Kimura, Fumiko; Osman, Nael; Sugi, Keiki; Tanno, Jun; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Shiono, Ayako; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    2013-11-01

    A woman aged 64 years with cardiac sarcoidosis responded favourably to corticosteroid therapy in terms of recovered longitudinal myocardial strain, as evaluated by strain-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (SENC-MRI). In contrast, circumferential myocardial strain and late gadolinium enhancement demonstrated minimal improvement, suggesting relatively advanced pathology of the myocardial middle layer. We propose SENC-MRI as a marker of disease at an early stage of cardiac sarcoidosis.

  6. Cardiac metabolism during exercise in healthy volunteers measured by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, M A; Bristow, J D; Blackledge, M J; Rajagopalan, B; Radda, G K

    1991-01-01

    A technique was devised for individuals to exercise prone in a magnet during magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the heart and phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectra of the heart were obtained by the phase modulated rotating frame imaging technique in six healthy volunteers during steady state dynamic quadriceps exercise. During prone exercise heart rate, blood pressure, and total body oxygen consumption were measured at increasing loads and the results were compared with those during Bruce protocol treadmill exercise. During prone exercise with a 5 kg load the heart rate was similar and the systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher than those during stage 1 of the Bruce protocol. The rate-pressure products were similar but the total body oxygen consumption was lower during prone exercise. There was no difference in the ratio of phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate during rest and exercise.Thus during exercise that produced a local cardiac stress equal to or greater than that during stage 1 of the Bruce protocol treadmill exercise, the energy requirements of the normal human myocardium were adequately supplied by oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:1993127

  7. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogabathina, Hari; Olson, Peter; Rathi, Vikas K.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient's cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos. PMID:24826266

  8. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  9. Serum lipidomics meets cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: profiling of subjects at risk of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysi-Aho, Marko; Koikkalainen, Juha; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Kaartinen, Maija; Kuusisto, Johanna; Peuhkurinen, Keijo; Kärkkäinen, Satu; Antila, Margareta; Lauerma, Kirsi; Reissell, Eeva; Jurkko, Raija; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Heliö, Tiina; Orešič, Matej

    2011-01-20

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction, constitutes a significant cause for heart failure, sudden cardiac death or need for heart transplantation. Lamin A/C gene (LMNA) on chromosome 1p12 is the most significant disease gene causing DCM and has been reported to cause 7-9% of DCM leading to cardiac transplantation. We have previously performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to LMNA carriers to describe the early phenotype. Clinically, early recognition of subjects at risk of developing DCM would be important but is often difficult. Thus we have earlier used the MRI findings of these LMNA carriers for creating a model by which LMNA carriers could be identified from the controls at an asymptomatic stage. Some LMNA mutations may cause lipodystrophy. To characterize possible effects of LMNA mutations on lipid profile, we set out to apply global serum lipidomics using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the same LMNA carriers, DCM patients without LMNA mutation and controls. All DCM patients, with or without LMNA mutation, differed from controls in regard to distinct serum lipidomic profile dominated by diminished odd-chain triglycerides and lipid ratios related to desaturation. Furthermore, we introduce a novel approach to identify associations between the molecular lipids from serum and the MR images from the LMNA carriers. The association analysis using dependency network and regression approaches also helped us to obtain novel insights into how the affected lipids might relate to cardiac shape and volume changes. Our study provides a framework for linking serum derived molecular markers not only with clinical endpoints, but also with the more subtle intermediate phenotypes, as derived from medical imaging, of potential pathophysiological relevance.

  10. Serum lipidomics meets cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: profiling of subjects at risk of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Sysi-Aho

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, characterized by left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction, constitutes a significant cause for heart failure, sudden cardiac death or need for heart transplantation. Lamin A/C gene (LMNA on chromosome 1p12 is the most significant disease gene causing DCM and has been reported to cause 7-9% of DCM leading to cardiac transplantation. We have previously performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to LMNA carriers to describe the early phenotype. Clinically, early recognition of subjects at risk of developing DCM would be important but is often difficult. Thus we have earlier used the MRI findings of these LMNA carriers for creating a model by which LMNA carriers could be identified from the controls at an asymptomatic stage. Some LMNA mutations may cause lipodystrophy. To characterize possible effects of LMNA mutations on lipid profile, we set out to apply global serum lipidomics using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the same LMNA carriers, DCM patients without LMNA mutation and controls. All DCM patients, with or without LMNA mutation, differed from controls in regard to distinct serum lipidomic profile dominated by diminished odd-chain triglycerides and lipid ratios related to desaturation. Furthermore, we introduce a novel approach to identify associations between the molecular lipids from serum and the MR images from the LMNA carriers. The association analysis using dependency network and regression approaches also helped us to obtain novel insights into how the affected lipids might relate to cardiac shape and volume changes. Our study provides a framework for linking serum derived molecular markers not only with clinical endpoints, but also with the more subtle intermediate phenotypes, as derived from medical imaging, of potential pathophysiological relevance.

  11. Late gadolinium enhancement by magnetic resonance explains adverse cardiac events in individuals with ventricular arrhythmia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine whether the presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) predict adverse cardiac events in patients with ventricular arrhythmia. Methods: We selected 74 consecutive patients with symptomatic ventricular arrhythmia (premature ventricular contractions and ventricular tachycardia) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >55% sent to CMR for evaluation of structural heart disease previously undetected by other complementary methods. LGE, systolic function and volumes of both ventricles were analyzed. At follow-up was assessed a combined end point: hospitalization for ventricular arrhythmia, appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and cardiac death. Results: During a median follow up of 575 days (interquartile range 24-1120 days) and by analyzing the population according to the presence (n=9, 12%) or not (n=65, 88%) LGE was observed that the group with positive Gd had lower LVEF (58% vs. 66% respectively, p=0.01) and larger volumes (EDV: 185 ml vs. 123 ml respectively, p=0.01 and ESV: 81 ml vs. 42 ml respectively, p=0.01) than the other group. Two (22%) patients in the LGE + group vs. one (4%) of those without LGE showed the combined endpoint (p=0.01) and when performing a logistic regression analysis it was found that the LGE is a predictor of adverse cardiac events analyzed (p=0.029). Conclusions: In this consecutive series of patients with ventricular arrhythmia we demonstrate a strong association between myocardial LGE and adverse cardiac events; this supports the hypothesis that myocardial fibrosis is an important arrhythmogenic substrate. In addition, almost all individuals without LGE were free of events during follow-up suggesting that it is possible to identify through the CMR low-risk individuals who can be treated conservatively. (authors)

  12. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion and cardiac enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Nagata, Seiki; Sakakibara, Hiroshi

    1988-05-01

    Gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion, and 12 patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abnormal thickening of the septal wall and normal left ventricular dimensions, while the patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy had focal wall thinning (usually involving the apical-septal wall) and dilated left ventricle in addition to hypertrophied heart. The quantitative measurement for cardiac dimensions using MRI was similar to that found on echocardiography in all cases. In addition, inhomogeneous signal intensities at left ventricular wall were observed in 3 cases of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may suggest the existence of myocardial fibrosis. Gated MRI should be performed for early detection and follow-up of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, since some patients will progress from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to dilated cardiomyopathy.

  14. ABC of the cardiac magnetic resonance. Part 1: anatomy and function; ABC da ressonancia magnetica cardiaca. Part 1: anatomia e funcao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Ricardo; Rached, Heron; Castro, Claudio C.; Cerri, Giovanni G. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: rlradiol@bol.com.br; Favaro, Daniele; Baptista, Luciana; Andrade, Joalbo; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Parga Filho, Jose; Avila, Luiz F.; Piva, Rosa M.V. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Secao de Ressonancia Magnetica

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the fundamental concepts, the basic sequences and the clinical and potential applications of cardiac magnetic resonance as a diagnostic technique in updated radiology and cardiology practices. In this first part, we present the basic planning of the cardiac image acquisition, the nomenclature and standardized myocardial segmentation, image synchronization principles for electrocardiogram and the heart functional and anatomical evaluation by cardiac magnetic resonance. (author)

  15. Performance of automated software in the assessment of segmental left ventricular function in cardiac CT: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China); Meinel, Felix G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Malvern, PA (United States); Spearman, James V. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Departments of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the accuracy, reliability and time saving potential of a novel cardiac CT (CCT)-based, automated software for the assessment of segmental left ventricular function compared to visual and manual quantitative assessment of CCT and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Forty-seven patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD) were enrolled in the study. Wall thickening was calculated. Segmental LV wall motion was automatically calculated and shown as a colour-coded polar map. Processing time for each method was recorded. Mean wall thickness in both systolic and diastolic phases on polar map, CCT, and CMR was 9.2 ± 0.1 mm and 14.9 ± 0.2 mm, 8.9 ± 0.1 mm and 14.5 ± 0.1 mm, 8.3 ± 0.1 mm and 13.6 ± 0.1 mm, respectively. Mean wall thickening was 68.4 ± 1.5 %, 64.8 ± 1.4 % and 67.1 ± 1.4 %, respectively. Agreement for the assessment of LV wall motion between CCT, CMR and polar maps was good. Bland-Altman plots and ICC indicated good agreement between CCT, CMR and automated polar maps of the diastolic and systolic segmental wall thickness and thickening. The processing time using polar map was significantly decreased compared with CCT and CMR. Automated evaluation of segmental LV function with polar maps provides similar measurements to manual CCT and CMR evaluation, albeit with substantially reduced analysis time. (orig.)

  16. Prevention of Cardiomyopathy in Transfusion-Dependent Homozygous Thalassaemia Today and the Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassios Aessopos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion and iron chelation therapy revolutionised survival and reduced morbidity in patients with transfusion-dependent beta thalassaemia major. Despite these improvements, cardiac disease remained the most common cause of death in those patients. Recently the ability to determine the degree of cardiac iron overload, through cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR has allowed more logical approaches to iron removal, particularly from the heart. The availability of two oral chelators, deferiprone and deferasirox has reduced the need for the injectable chelator deferrioxamine and an additional benefit has been that deferiprone has been shown to be more cardioprotective than deferrioxamine. This review on the prevention of cardiac disease makes recommendations on the chelation regime that would be desirable for patients according to their cardiac iron status as determined by CMR determined by CMR. It also discusses approaches to chelation management should CMR not be available.

  17. Cardiac resynchronization therapy guided by late gadolinium-enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Russell EA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial scarring at the LV pacing site leads to incomplete resynchronization and a suboptimal symptomatic response to CRT. We sought to determine whether the use of late gadolinium cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR to guide left ventricular (LV lead deployment influences the long-term outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT. Methods 559 patients with heart failure (age 70.4 ± 10.7 yrs [mean ± SD] due to ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy underwent CRT. Implantations were either guided (+CMR or not guided (-CMR by LGE-CMR prior to implantation. Fluoroscopy and LGE-CMR were used to localize the LV lead tip and and myocardial scarring retrospectively. Clinical events were assessed in three groups: +CMR and pacing scar (+CMR+S; CMR and not pacing scar (+CMR-S, and; LV pacing not guided by CMR (-CMR. Results Over a maximum follow-up of 9.1 yrs, +CMR+S had the highest risk of cardiovascular death (HR: 6.34, cardiovascular death or hospitalizations for heart failure (HR: 5.57 and death from any cause or hospitalizations for major adverse cardiovascular events (HR: 4.74 (all P Conclusions Compared with a conventional implantation approach, the use of LGE-CMR to guide LV lead deployment away from scarred myocardium results in a better clinical outcome after CRT. Pacing scarred myocardium was associated with the worst outcome, in terms of both pump failure and sudden cardiac death.

  18. Echocardiography to magnetic resonance image registration for use in image-guided cardiac catheterization procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Yingliang; Penney, Graeme P; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S [Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Rinaldi, C Aldo; Cooklin, Mike [Department of Cardiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: y.ma@kcl.ac.uk

    2009-08-21

    We present a robust method to register three-dimensional echocardiography (echo) images to magnetic resonance images (MRI) based on anatomical features, which is designed to be used in the registration pipeline for overlaying MRI-derived roadmaps onto two-dimensional live x-ray images during cardiac catheterization procedures. The features used in image registration are the endocardial surface of the left ventricle and the centre line of the descending aorta. The MR-derived left ventricle surface is generated using a fully automated algorithm, and the echo-derived left ventricle surface is produced using a semi-automatic segmentation method provided by the QLab software (Philips Healthcare) that it is routinely used in clinical practice. We test our method on data from six volunteers and four patients. We validated registration accuracy using two methods: the first calculated a root mean square distance error using expert identified anatomical landmarks, and the second method used catheters as landmarks in two clinical electrophysiology procedures. Results show a mean error of 4.1 mm, which is acceptable for our clinical application, and no failed registrations were observed. In addition, our algorithm works on clinical data, is fast and only requires a small amount of manual input, and so it is applicable for use during cardiac catheterization procedures.

  19. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging fusion for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinwoo; Radau, Perry; Xu, Robert; Wright, Graham A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) can effectively treat left ventricle (LV) driven Heart Failure (HF). However, 30% of the CRT recipients do not experience symptomatic benefit. Recent studies show that the CRT response rate can reach 95% when the LV pacing lead is placed at an optimal site at a region of maximal LV dyssynchrony and away from myocardial scars. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) can identify the optimal site in three dimensions (3D). 3D CMR data can be registered to clinical standard x-ray fluoroscopy to achieve an optimal pacing of the LV. We have developed a 3D CMR to 2D x-ray image registration method for CRT procedures. We have employed the LV pacing lead on x-ray images and coronary sinus on MR data as landmarks. The registration method makes use of a guidewire simulation algorithm, edge based image registration technique and x-ray C-arm tracking to register the coronary sinus and pacing lead landmarks. PMID:27025953

  20. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance: Impact on diagnosis and management of patients with congenital cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, F., E-mail: francescosecchimd@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Di Leo, G. [S.C. di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Papini, G.D.E. [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Nardella, V.G. [Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Negura, D.; Carminati, M. [S.C. di Cardiologia Pediatrica, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, F. [S.C. di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Medico-Chirurgiche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    Aim: To estimate the clinical impact of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with congenital cardiovascular disease (CCD). Materials and methods: Since 2003, 1.5 T CMR was used at our university hospital to evaluate morphology, cardiac kinetics, aortic and pulmonary flow, and vascular anatomy in patients with CCD. The present study considered a consecutive series of these patients from 2003 to 2006. A paediatric cardiologist judged our reports as expected or unexpected and, secondarily, as not reliable (level 0), describing findings already known (level 1), not changing therapy/suggested lifestyle (level 2), changing therapy/suggested lifestyle (level 3) or changing diagnosis (level 4). Results: CMR reports were judged to be expected in 187/214 (87%) and unexpected in 27/214 (13%). Less than 2% of CMRs were judged as levels 0 or 1, 66% as level 2, and 5% as level 4. During 2005-2006 the clinical impact improved toward higher impact levels (p < 0.001, chi-square test). Conclusions: In patients with CCD, more than one in 10 CMR reports were unexpected to cardiologists and over seven in 10 prompted a change of diagnosis or therapy.

  2. Optimized protocols for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with thoracic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cross, Russell R.; O' Brien, Kendall E. [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Hansen, Michael S. [National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable tool in congenital heart disease; however patients frequently have metal devices in the chest from the treatment of their disease that complicate imaging. Methods are needed to improve imaging around metal implants near the heart. Basic sequence parameter manipulations have the potential to minimize artifact while limiting effects on image resolution and quality. Our objective was to design cine and static cardiac imaging sequences to minimize metal artifact while maintaining image quality. Using systematic variation of standard imaging parameters on a fluid-filled phantom containing commonly used metal cardiac devices, we developed optimized sequences for steady-state free precession (SSFP), gradient recalled echo (GRE) cine imaging, and turbo spin-echo (TSE) black-blood imaging. We imaged 17 consecutive patients undergoing routine cardiac MR with 25 metal implants of various origins using both standard and optimized imaging protocols for a given slice position. We rated images for quality and metal artifact size by measuring metal artifact in two orthogonal planes within the image. All metal artifacts were reduced with optimized imaging. The average metal artifact reduction for the optimized SSFP cine was 1.5+/-1.8 mm, and for the optimized GRE cine the reduction was 4.6+/-4.5 mm (P < 0.05). Quality ratings favored the optimized GRE cine. Similarly, the average metal artifact reduction for the optimized TSE images was 1.6+/-1.7 mm (P < 0.05), and quality ratings favored the optimized TSE imaging. Imaging sequences tailored to minimize metal artifact are easily created by modifying basic sequence parameters, and images are superior to standard imaging sequences in both quality and artifact size. Specifically, for optimized cine imaging a GRE sequence should be used with settings that favor short echo time, i.e. flow compensation off, weak asymmetrical echo and a relatively high receiver bandwidth. For static

  3. Cardiac remodeling following percutaneous mitral valve repair. Initial results assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radunski, U.K [University Heart Center, Hamburg (Germany). Cardiology; Franzen, O. [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Cardiology; Barmeyer, A. [Klinikum Dortmund (Germany). Kardiologie; and others

    2014-10-15

    Percutaneous mitral valve repair with the MitraClip device (Abbott Vascular, Redwood City, California, USA) is a novel therapeutic option in patients with mitral regurgitation. This study evaluated the feasibility of cardiac volume measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) to assess reverse myocardial remodeling in patients after MitraClip implantation. 12 patients underwent CMR at baseline (BL) before and at 6 months follow-up (FU) after MitraClip implantation. Cine-CMR was performed in short- and long-axes for the assessment of left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) volumes. Assessment of endocardial contours was not compromised by the device-related artifact. No significant differences in observer variances were observed for LV, RV and LA volume measurements between BL and FU. LV end-diastolic (median 127 [IQR 96-150] vs. 112 [86-150] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.03) and LV end-systolic (82 [54-91] vs. 69 [48-99] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.03) volume indices decreased significantly from BL to FU. No significant differences were found for RV end-diastolic (94 [75-103] vs. 99 [77-123] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.91), RV end-systolic (48 [42-80] vs. 51 [40-81] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.48), and LA (87 [55-124] vs. 92 [48-137]R ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.20) volume indices between BL and FU. CMR enables the assessment of cardiac volumes in patients after MitraClip implantation. Our CMR findings indicate that percutaneous mitral valve repair results in reverse LV but not in RV or LA remodeling.

  4. Visualization of a Small Ventricular Septal Defect at First-pass Contrast-enhanced Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Secchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular septal defect (VSD is a congenital heart disease that accounts for up to 40% of all congenital cardiac malformations. VSD is a connection between right and left ventricle, through the ventricular septum. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI help identify this entity. This case presents a 12-year-old male diagnosed with a small muscular apical VSD of 3 mm in diameter, at echocardiography. Cardiac MRI using first-pass perfusion sequence, combining the right plane of acquisition with a short bolus of contrast material, clearly confirmed the presence of VSD.

  5. The Use of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnostic Workup and Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Haemers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and imposes a huge clinical and economic burden. AF is correlated with an increased morbidity and mortality, mainly due to stroke and heart failure. Cardiovascular imaging modalities, including echocardiography, computed tomography (CT, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, play a central role in the workup and treatment of AF. One of the major advantages of CMR is the high contrast to noise ratio combined with good spatial and temporal resolution, without any radiation burden. This allows a detailed assessment of the structure and function of the left atrium (LA. Of particular interest is the ability to visualize the extent of LA wall injury. We provide a focused review of the value of CMR in identifying the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of AF, its role in stroke prevention and in the guidance of radiofrequency catheter ablation. CMR is a promising technique that could add valuable information for therapeutic decision making in specific subpopulations with AF.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Whiteside

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver.

  7. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Wendy; Christensen, Jason; Zampi, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver.

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver

  9. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in a Patient with Ebstein’s Anomaly and Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Nasim Naderi; Ahmad Amin; Hamidreza Pouraliakbar

    2013-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is characterized by apical displacement of the septal and posterior tricuspid valve leaflets, leading to atrialization of the right ventricle and could be diagnosed in a routine transthoracic echocardiography exam. We reported a young man with right sided heart failure symptoms who was found to have biventricular failure with suspected apical displacement of septal leaflet of tricuspid valve. For better evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was performed and nic...

  10. Moderate intensity supine exercise causes decreased cardiac volumes and increased outer volume variations: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Jablonowski, Robert; Arvidsson, Per M;

    2013-01-01

    The effects on left and right ventricular (LV, RV) volumes during physical exercise remains controversial. Furthermore, no previous study has investigated the effects of exercise on longitudinal contribution to stroke volume (SV) and the outer volume variation of the heart. The aim of this study ...... was to determine if LV, RV and total heart volumes (THV) as well as cardiac pumping mechanisms change during physical exercise compared to rest using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR)....

  11. Magnetic Resonance Elastography as a Method for the Assessment of Effective Myocardial Stiffness throughout the Cardiac Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Kolipaka, Arunark; Araoz, Philip A; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique in which images of externally generated waves propagating in tissue are used to measure stiffness. The first aim is to determine, from a range of driver configurations the optimal driver for the purpose of generating waves within the heart in vivo. The second aim is to quantify the shear stiffness of normal myocardium throughout the cardiac cycle using MRE and to compare MRE stiffness to left ventricular (LV) chamber pressure in...

  12. Angiographic correlations of patients with small vessel disease diagnosed by adenosine-stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Scheck Roland; Hoefling Berthold; Ali Eman; Klos Markus; Pilz Guenter; Bernhardt Peter

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with adenosine-stress myocardial perfusion is gaining importance for the detection and quantification of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there is little knowledge about patients with CMR-detected ischemia, but having no relevant stenosis as seen on coronary angiography (CA). The aims of our study were to characterize these patients by CMR and CA and evaluate correlations and potential reasons for the ischemic findings. 73 patients with...

  13. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Hasbak, Philip; Larsson, Henrik B W;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent ...

  14. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis following tetralogy of Fallot repair: a T1 mapping cardiac magnetic resonance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, Marcelo F.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars [The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics and Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Redington, Andrew [The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto (Canada); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Adverse ventricular remodeling after tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair is associated with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. The goal of this study was to measure post-contrast myocardial T1 in pediatric patients after TOF repair as surrogates of myocardial fibrosis. Children after TOF repair who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with T1 mapping using the modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence were included. In addition to routine volumetric and flow data, we measured post-contrast T1 values of the basal interventricular septum, the left ventricular (LV) lateral wall, and the inferior and anterior walls of the right ventricle (RV). Results were compared to data from age-matched healthy controls. The scans of 18 children who had undergone TOF repair and 12 healthy children were included. Post-contrast T1 values of the left ventricular lateral wall (443 ± 54 vs. 510 ± 77 ms, P = 0.0168) and of the right ventricular anterior wall (333 ± 62 vs. 392 ± 72 ms, P = 0.0423) were significantly shorter in children with TOF repair than in controls, suggesting a higher degree of fibrosis. In children with TOF repair, but not in controls, post-contrast T1 values were shorter in the right ventricle than the left ventricle and shorter in the anterior wall of the right ventricle than in the inferior segments. In the TOF group, post-contrast T1 values of the RV anterior wall correlated with the RV end-systolic volume indexed to body surface area (r = 0.54; r{sup 2} = 0.30; P = 0.0238). In children who underwent tetralogy of Fallot repair the myocardium of both ventricles appears to bear an abnormally high fibrosis burden. (orig.)

  15. Unrecognized Myocardial Infarction Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging--Prognostic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Nordenskjöld

    Full Text Available Clinically unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMI are not uncommon and may be associated with adverse outcome. The aims of this study were to determine the prognostic implication of UMI in patients with stable suspected coronary artery disease (CAD and to investigate the associations of UMI with the presence of CAD.In total 235 patients late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR imaging and coronary angiography were performed. For each patient with UMI, the stenosis grade of the coronary branch supplying the infarcted area was determined. UMIs were present in 25% of the patients and 67% of the UMIs were located in an area supplied by a coronary artery with a stenosis grade ≥70%. In an age- and gender-adjusted model, UMI independently predicted the primary endpoint (composite of death, myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, hospitalization for unstable angina pectoris or heart failure within 2 years of follow-up with an odds ratio of 2.9; 95% confidence interval 1.1-7.9. However, this association was abrogated after adjustment for age and presence of significant coronary disease. There was no difference in the primary endpoint rates between UMI patients with or without a significant stenosis in the corresponding coronary artery.The presence of UMI was associated with a threefold increased risk of adverse events during follow up. However, the difference was no longer statistically significant after adjustments for age and severity of CAD. Thus, the results do not support that patients with suspicion of CAD should be routinely investigated by LGE-CMR for UMI. However, coronary angiography should be considered in patients with UMI detected by LGE-CMR.ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01257282.

  16. Cardiac magnetic resonance determinants of functional mitral regurgitation in ischemic and non ischemic left ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; De Agustin, Alberto; Manzano, M Carmen; Bustos, Ana; Sánchez, Tibisay; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Fuentes, Manuel; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, José

    2011-04-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is frequent in left ventricular (LV) dilatation/dysfunction. Echocardiographic predictors of FMR are known. However, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of FMR have not been fully addressed. The aim of the study was to evaluate CMR mitral valve (MV) parameters associated with FMR in ischemic and non ischemic LV dysfunction. 80 patients with LV ejection fraction below 45% and/or left ventricular dilatation of ischemic and non ischemic etiology were included. Cine-MR images (steady state free-precession) were acquired in a short-axis and 4 chambers views where MV evaluation was performed. Delayed enhancement was performed as well. Significant FMR was established as more than mild MR according to the echocardiographic report. Mean age was 59 years, males 79%. FMR was detected in 20 patients (25%) Significant differences were noted in LV functional parameters and in most MV parameters according to the presence of significant FMR. However, differences were noted between ischemic and non ischemic groups. In the first, differences in most MV parameters remained significant while in the non ischemic, only systolic and diastolic interpapillary muscle distance (1.60 vs. 2.19 cm, P = 0.001; 2. 51 vs. 3.04, P = 0.008) were predictors of FMR. FMR is associated with a more severe LV dilatation/dysfunction in the overall population. CMR MV parameters are associated with the presence of significant FMR and are different between ischemic and non ischemic patients. CMR evaluation of these patients may help in risk stratification as well as in surgical candidate selection.

  17. Relationship between myocardial T2* values and cardiac volumetric and functional parameters in β-thalassemia patients evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance in association with serum ferritin levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Myocardial T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides a rapid and reproducible assessment of cardiac iron load in thalassemia patients. Although cardiac involvement is mainly characterized by left ventricular dysfunction caused by iron overload, little is known about right ventricular function. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between T2* value in myocardium and left–right ventricular volumetric and functional parameters and to evaluate the existing associations between left–right ventricles volumetric and functional parameter, myocardial T2* values and blood ferritin levels. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of 208 patients with β-thalassemia major and thalassemia intermedia was performed (109 males and 99 females; mean age 37.7 ± 13 years; 143 thalassemia major, 65 thalassemia intermedia). Myocardial iron load was assessed by T2* measurements, and volumetric functions were analyzed using the steady state free precession sequence. Results: A significant correlation was observed between EFLV and T2* (p = 0.0001), EFRV and T2* (p = 0.0279). An inverse correlation was present between DVLV and T2* (p = 0.0468), SVLV and T2* (p = 0.0003), SVRV and T2* (p = 0.0001). There was no significant correlation between cardiac T2* and LV–RV mass indices. A significant correlation was observed between T2* and serum ferritin levels (p < 0.001) and between EFLV and serum ferritin (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Myocardial iron load assessed by T2* cardiac magnetic resonance is associated with deterioration in left–right ventricular function; this is more evident when T2* values fall below 14 ms. CMR appears to be a promising approach for cardiac risk evaluation in TM patients

  18. Relationship between myocardial T2* values and cardiac volumetric and functional parameters in β-thalassemia patients evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance in association with serum ferritin levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Carlo, E-mail: c.liguori@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Pitocco, Francesca, E-mail: f.pitocco@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Di Giampietro, Ilenia, E-mail: i.digiampietro@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Vivo, Aldo Eros de, E-mail: devivoeros@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Schena, Emiliano, E-mail: e.schena@unicampus.it [Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Cianciulli, Paolo, E-mail: CIANCIULLI.PAOLO@aslrmc.it [Thalassemia Unit, Ospedale Sant Eugenio, Piazzale dell’Umanesimo 10, 00143 Rome (Italy); Zobel, Bruno Beomonte, E-mail: b.zobel@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Myocardial T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides a rapid and reproducible assessment of cardiac iron load in thalassemia patients. Although cardiac involvement is mainly characterized by left ventricular dysfunction caused by iron overload, little is known about right ventricular function. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between T2* value in myocardium and left–right ventricular volumetric and functional parameters and to evaluate the existing associations between left–right ventricles volumetric and functional parameter, myocardial T2* values and blood ferritin levels. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of 208 patients with β-thalassemia major and thalassemia intermedia was performed (109 males and 99 females; mean age 37.7 ± 13 years; 143 thalassemia major, 65 thalassemia intermedia). Myocardial iron load was assessed by T2* measurements, and volumetric functions were analyzed using the steady state free precession sequence. Results: A significant correlation was observed between EFLV and T2* (p = 0.0001), EFRV and T2* (p = 0.0279). An inverse correlation was present between DVLV and T2* (p = 0.0468), SVLV and T2* (p = 0.0003), SVRV and T2* (p = 0.0001). There was no significant correlation between cardiac T2* and LV–RV mass indices. A significant correlation was observed between T2* and serum ferritin levels (p < 0.001) and between EFLV and serum ferritin (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Myocardial iron load assessed by T2* cardiac magnetic resonance is associated with deterioration in left–right ventricular function; this is more evident when T2* values fall below 14 ms. CMR appears to be a promising approach for cardiac risk evaluation in TM patients.

  19. Severe Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Small Pericardial Effusion, and Diffuse Late Gadolinium Enhancement by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Suspecting Cardiac Amyloidosis: Endomyocardial Biopsy Reveals an Unexpected Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Hofmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular (LV hypertrophy can be related to a multitude of cardiac disorders, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, cardiac amyloidosis, and hypertensive heart disease. Although the presence of LV hypertrophy is generally associated with poorer cardiac outcomes, the early differentiation between these pathologies is crucial due to the presence of specific treatment options. The diagnostic process with LV hypertrophy requires the integration of clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography, biochemical markers, and if required CMR and endomyocardial biopsy in order to reach the correct diagnosis. Here, we present a case of a patient with severe LV hypertrophy (septal wall thickness of 23 mm, LV mass of 264 g, and LV mass index of 147 g/m2, severely impaired longitudinal function, and preserved radial contractility (ejection fraction = 55%, accompanied by small pericardial effusion and diffuse late gadolinium enhancement (LGE by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR. Due to the imaging findings, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, such as cardiac amyloidosis, was suspected. However, amyloid accumulation was excluded by endomyocardial biopsy, which revealed the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in an advanced hypertensive heart disease.

  20. Stenosis of the branches of the neopulmonary artery after the arterial switch operation: A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neonatal arterial switch operation (ASO) is now the standard of care for children born with transposition of the great arteries. Stenosis of the neopulmonary artery on long-term follow up is a known complication. We performed a retrospective analysis of eleven patients who underwent a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to echocardiographic evidence suggestive of stenosis of the neopulmonary artery or its branches (mean estimated Doppler gradient 48 mmHg, min 30 mmHg, max 70 mmHg). A comprehensive evaluation of anatomy and perfusion was done by cardiac MRI. The branches of the neopulmonary artery (neo PA) showed decreased caliber in three patients unilaterally and in two patients, bilaterally. Magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion studies showed concomitant decreased flow, with discrepancy between the two lungs of 35/65% or worse, only in the three patients with unilateral obstruction, by two different MR perfusion methods. Cardiac MR can be used as a comprehensive non-invasive imaging technique to diagnose stenosis of the branches of the neopulmonary after the ASO, allowing evaluation of anatomy and function of the neoPA, its branches, and the differential perfusion to each lung, thus facilitating clinical decision making

  1. Characteristics and clinical relevance of late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Makoto; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suwa, Kenichiro; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Shimoyama, Kumiko; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ogawa, Noriyoshi; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is considerably frequent in autopsy, but the early identification is clinically difficult. Recent advantages in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) enabled to detect myocardial fibrotic scar as late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). We aimed to examine the prevalence and distribution of LGE in patients with SSc, and associate them with clinical features, electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac function. Forty patients with SSc (58 ± 14 years-old, 35 females, limited/diffuse 25/15, disease duration 106 ± 113 months) underwent serological tests, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and CMR. Seven patients (17.5 %) showed LGE in 26 segments of left ventricle (LV). LGE distributed mainly in the basal to mid inter-ventricular septum and the right ventricular (RV) insertion points, but involved all the myocardial regions. More patients with LGE showed NYHA functional class II and more (71 vs. 21 %, p 125 pg/ml). When cardiac involvement of SSc was defined as low LVEF, ECG abnormalities or high NT-proBNP, the sensitivity, specificity positive and negative predictive values of LGE were 36, 92, 71 and 72 %, respectively. We could clarify the prevalence and distribution of LGE in Japanese patients with SSc. The presence of LGE was associated with cardiac symptom, conduction disturbance and impaired LV/RV contraction.

  2. Characteristics and clinical relevance of late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Makoto; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suwa, Kenichiro; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Shimoyama, Kumiko; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ogawa, Noriyoshi; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is considerably frequent in autopsy, but the early identification is clinically difficult. Recent advantages in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) enabled to detect myocardial fibrotic scar as late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). We aimed to examine the prevalence and distribution of LGE in patients with SSc, and associate them with clinical features, electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac function. Forty patients with SSc (58 ± 14 years-old, 35 females, limited/diffuse 25/15, disease duration 106 ± 113 months) underwent serological tests, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and CMR. Seven patients (17.5 %) showed LGE in 26 segments of left ventricle (LV). LGE distributed mainly in the basal to mid inter-ventricular septum and the right ventricular (RV) insertion points, but involved all the myocardial regions. More patients with LGE showed NYHA functional class II and more (71 vs. 21 %, p 125 pg/ml). When cardiac involvement of SSc was defined as low LVEF, ECG abnormalities or high NT-proBNP, the sensitivity, specificity positive and negative predictive values of LGE were 36, 92, 71 and 72 %, respectively. We could clarify the prevalence and distribution of LGE in Japanese patients with SSc. The presence of LGE was associated with cardiac symptom, conduction disturbance and impaired LV/RV contraction. PMID:24996373

  3. Value of cardiac 320-multidetector computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of myocardial perfusion defects in patients with known chronic ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Kühl, Jørgen T; Mathiasen, Anders B;

    2013-01-01

    The challenge for therapies targeting perfusion abnormalities is to identify and evaluate the region of interest. The aim of this study was to compare rest and stress myocardial perfusion measured by cardiac multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging...... in patients with invasive coronary angiography demonstrated occluded vessels. Twenty-four patients with refractory angina due to occluded coronary arteries underwent perfusion imaging obtained by 320-MDCT scanner and 1.5 T MR scanner. Rest and adenosine stress images were obtained and interpreted using......) or 1 (abnormal). The summed rest and stress scores were calculated. MDCT and CMR had a high probability to identify perfusion defects. An excellent correlation between MDCT and CMR summed rest (r = 0.916) and stress scores (r = 0.915) was found. The interobserver reproducibility was high for MDCT...

  4. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). PMID:27660737

  5. Reproducibility of small animal cine and scar cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 3.0 tesla system

    OpenAIRE

    Manka, Robert; Jahnke, Cosima; Hucko, Thomas; Dietrich, Thore; Gebker, Rolf; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Graf, Kristof; Paetsch, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the inter-study, inter-reader and intra-reader reproducibility of cardiac cine and scar imaging in rats using a clinical 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Methods Thirty-three adult rats (Sprague–Dawley) were imaged 24 hours after surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery using a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) equipped with a dedicated 70 mm solenoid receive-only coil. Left-ventricular (LV) volu...

  6. Cardiac effects of 3 months treatment of acromegaly evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and B-type natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Faber, Jens Oscar; Kjær, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    Long-term treatment of acromegaly prevents aggravation and reverses associated heart disease. A previous study has shown a temporary increase in serum levels of the N-terminal fraction of pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) suggesting an initial decline in cardiac function when treatment...... of acromegaly is initiated. This was a three months prospective study investigating short-term cardiac effects of treatment in acromegalic patients. Cardiac function was evaluated by the gold standard method cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptides (BNP......) (95% CI 3-14), P = 0.007) and an increase in levels of BNP (median (ranges) 7 (0.58-286) vs. 20 (1-489) pg/mL, P = 0.033) and of NT-proBNP (63 (20-1004) vs. 80 (20-3391) pg/mL, P = 0.027). Assessed by the highly sensitive and precise CMRI method, 3 months treatment of acromegaly resulted...

  7. Longitudinal monitoring of cardiac siderosis using cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2* in patients with thalassemia major on various chelation regimens: a 6-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Srikanth R; Randolph, Rachel E; Mennitt, Kevin; Kleinert, Dorothy A; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Giardina, Patricia J

    2013-08-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become reliable noninvasive tools to monitor iron excess in thalassemia major (TM) patients. However, long-term studies are lacking. We reviewed CMR and hepatic MRI T2* imaging on 54 TM patients who had three or more annual measurements. They were managed on various chelation regimens. Patients were grouped according to their degree of cardiac siderosis: severe (T2*, cardiac siderosis (T2*, >20 msec). We looked at the change in cardiac T2*, liver iron concentration (LIC) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) at years 3 and 5. In patients with severe cardiac siderosis, cardiac T2* (mean ± SD) improved from 6.9 ± 1.6 at baseline to 13.6 ± 10.0 by year 5, mean ΔT2* = 6.7 (P = 0.04). Change in cardiac T2* at year 3 was not significant in the severe group. Patients with mild to moderate cardiac siderosis had mean cardiac T2* of 14.6 ± 2.9 at baseline which improved to 26.3 ± 9.5 by year 3, mean ΔT2* =  1.7 (P = 0.01). At baseline, median LICs (mg/g dry weight) in patients with severe, mild-moderate, and no cardiac siderosis were 3.6, 2.8, and 3.3, whereas LVEFs (mean ± SD) (%) were 56.3 ± 10.1, 60 ± 5, and 66 ± 7.6, respectively. No significant correlation was noted between Δ cardiac T2* and Δ LIC, Δ cardiac T2*, and Δ LVEF at years 3 and 5. Throughout the observation period, patients with no cardiac siderosis maintained their cardiac T2* above 20 msec. The majority of patients with cardiac siderosis improve cardiac T2* over time with optimal chelation.

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in cardiac sarcoidosis with MR conditional pacemaker in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Hausenloy Derek; Harkness Allan; Plant Gordon T; Holdright Diana R; Quarta Giovanni; Hyare Harpreet; Moon James C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices represent important limitations to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, MRI-conditional dual chamber pacemakers and leads have become available. We describe a case of a patient with neuro-sarcoidosis presenting with diplopia and hydrocephalus requiring an MRI-conditional programmable ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, who developed complete heart block. In view of the ongoing need for neuro-imaging, MRI-conditional dual chamber pacemaker...

  9. Early recurrence of atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation with left atrial fibrosis identified at cardiac magnetic resonance by late gadolinium enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totaro, Antonio; Casavecchia, Graziapia; Gravina, Matteo; Ieva, Riccardo; Santoro, Francesco; Grimaldi, Massimo; Pellegrino, Pier Luigi; Macarini, Luca; Di Biase, Matteo; Brunetti, Natale Daniele

    2016-08-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), extensive atrial tissue fibrosis identified by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging has been associated with early recurrence of AF after catheter ablation. We present a case of a patient with extensive atrial fibrosis and AF recurrence.The study of late gadolinium enhancement with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with AF could be a valuable noninvasive tool for the selection of patients suitable for successful catheter ablation. PMID:26826170

  10. Detection of Left Ventricular Regional Dysfunction and Myocardial Abnormalities Using Complementary Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis without Cardiac Symptoms: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Hitomi; T Giles, Jon; Yokoe, Isamu; Hirano, Masaharu; Nakajima, Yasuo; Takei, Masami

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to detect the presence of left ventricular regional dysfunction and myocardial abnormalities in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients without cardiac symptoms using a complementary cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging approach. Methods Consecutive patients with SSc without cardiac symptoms and healthy controls underwent CMR on a 1.5 T scanner. The peak systolic regional function in the circumferential and radial strain (Ecc, % and Err, %) were calculated using a feature tracking analysis on the mid-left ventricular slices obtained with cine MRI. In addition, we investigated the myocardial characteristics by contrast MRI. Pharmacological stress and rest perfusion scans were performed to assess perfusion defect (PD) due to micro- or macrovascular impairment, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were obtained for the assessment of myocarditis and/or fibrosis. Results We compared 15 SSc patients with 10 healthy controls. No statistically significant differences were observed in the baseline characteristics between the patients and healthy controls. The mean peak Err and Ecc of all segments was significantly lower in the patients than the controls (p=0.011 and p=0.003, respectively). Four patients with LGE (28.6%) and seven patients with PD (50.0%) were observed. PD was significantly associated with digital ulcers (p=0.005). Utilizing a linear regression model, the presence of myocardial LGE was significantly associated with the peak Ecc (p=0.024). After adjusting for age, the association between myocardial LGE and the peak Ecc was strengthened. Conclusion A subclinical myocardial involvement, as detected by CMR, was prevalent in the SSc patients without cardiac symptoms. Regional dysfunction might predict the myocardial abnormalities observed in SSc patients without cardiac symptoms.

  11. Resonancia magnética cardíaca: aplicaciones clínicas Cardiac magnetic resonance: clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bastarrika

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad cardiovascular es la causa más frecuente de mortalidad en los países desarrollados y constituye un grave problema social, económico y sanitario. Aunque existen muy diversas técnicas útiles para diagnosticar las enfermedades cardíacas, con frecuencia es preciso realizar más de una prueba para llegar a un diagnóstico concreto. La resonancia magnética es una técnica inocua, bien tolerada y segura que actualmente se encuentra disponible en la mayoría de los centros hospitalarios. Esta técnica permite estudiar en una única exploración la anatomía del corazón y valorar de forma cualitativa, semicuantitativa y cuantitativa los parámetros de función cardíaca. Es útil para el estudio de las enfermedades valvulares, miocardiopatías y de la enfermedad pericárdica. Aporta información de la anatomía y función cardíaca y vascular en las cardiopatías congénitas complejas. Además, con la administración de contraste intravenoso, permite conocer la viabilidad miocárdica en la cardiopatía isquémica. Por tanto, la resonancia magnética cardíaca se perfila como una de las técnicas más prometedoras para el estudio de la patología cardíaca congénita y adquirida.Cardiovascular disease is the most frequent cause of mortality in the developed countries and represents a serious social, economic and health problem. Although very diverse, useful techniques exist for diagnosing cardiac diseases, it is frequently necessary to ask for more than one test to reach a specific diagnosis. Magnetic resonance is a harmless, well tolerated and safe technique, which is currently available in the majority of hospitals. This technique makes it possible in a single exploration to study the anatomy of the heart and to make a qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment of the parameters of cardiac function. It provides information of cardiac and vascular anatomy and function in complex congenital cardiopathies. Besides

  12. Early detection of cardiac involvement in Miyoshi myopathy: 2D strain echocardiography and late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Byoung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Miyoshi myopathy (MM is an autosomal recessive distal myopathy characterized by early adult onset. Cardiomyopathy is a major clinical manifestation in other muscular dystrophies and an important prognostic factor. Although dysferlin is highly expressed in cardiac muscle, the effect of dysferlin deficiency in cardiac muscle has not been studied. We hypothesized that early myocardial dysfunction could be detected by 2D strain echocardiography and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Method Five consecutive MM patients (3 male in whom we detected the DYSF gene mutation and age-matched healthy control subjects were included. None of the patients had history of cardiac disease or signs and symptoms of overt heart failure. Patients were studied using 2D strain echocardiography and CMR, with 2D strain being obtained using the Automated Function Imaging technique. Results All patients had preserved left ventricular systolic function. However, segmental Peak Systolic Longitudinal Strain (PSLS was decreased in 3 patients. Global PSLS was significantly lower in patients with MM than in control subjects (p = 0.005. Basal anterior septum, basal inferior septum, mid anterior, and mid inferior septum PSLS were significantly lower in patients with MM than in control subjects (P Conclusions Patients with MM showed subclinical involvement of the heart. 2D strain and LGE are sensitive methods for detecting myocardial dysfunction prior to the development of cardiovascular symptoms. The prognostic significance of these findings warrants further longitudinal follow-up.

  13. Acoustic cardiac triggering: a practical solution for synchronization and gating of cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 7 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff Florian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To demonstrate the applicability of acoustic cardiac triggering (ACT for imaging of the heart at ultrahigh magnetic fields (7.0 T by comparing phonocardiogram, conventional vector electrocardiogram (ECG and traditional pulse oximetry (POX triggered 2D CINE acquisitions together with (i a qualitative image quality analysis, (ii an assessment of the left ventricular function parameter and (iii an examination of trigger reliability and trigger detection variance derived from the signal waveforms. Results ECG was susceptible to severe distortions at 7.0 T. POX and ACT provided waveforms free of interferences from electromagnetic fields or from magneto-hydrodynamic effects. Frequent R-wave mis-registration occurred in ECG-triggered acquisitions with a failure rate of up to 30% resulting in cardiac motion induced artifacts. ACT and POX triggering produced images free of cardiac motion artefacts. ECG showed a severe jitter in the R-wave detection. POX also showed a trigger jitter of approximately Δt = 72 ms which is equivalent to two cardiac phases. ACT showed a jitter of approximately Δt = 5 ms only. ECG waveforms revealed a standard deviation for the cardiac trigger offset larger than that observed for ACT or POX waveforms. Image quality assessment showed that ACT substantially improved image quality as compared to ECG (image quality score at end-diastole: ECG = 1.7 ± 0.5, ACT = 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.04 while the comparison between ECG vs. POX gated acquisitions showed no significant differences in image quality (image quality score: ECG = 1.7 ± 0.5, POX = 2.0 ± 0.5, p = 0.34. Conclusions The applicability of acoustic triggering for cardiac CINE imaging at 7.0 T was demonstrated. ACT's trigger reliability and fidelity are superior to that of ECG and POX. ACT promises to be beneficial for cardiovascular magnetic resonance at ultra-high field strengths including 7.0 T.

  14. The examination of cardiac metabolism of patients with hypercholesterolemia by phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Martinek, M

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: we decided to investigate weather alterations in high energy phosphates occur in the myocardium of persons with hypercholesterolemia. Background: myocardial high energy phosphates have been shown to be reduced in various diseases of the heart such as coronary artery disease, heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. The latest studies on hypercholesterolemia show direct effects of high serum cholesterol on heart muscle cells, so do studies on statins. Methods: in the present study 32 male patients (mean age 48) with hypercholesterolemia and 27 male healthy volunteers (mean age 44,5) as age matched controls were included. The patients were divided into a statin-treated (n = 17) and an untreated subgroup (n = 15). Using a 1,5 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance scanner (Siemens, Germany) phosphor-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (31P MRSI) of the heart was performed in all subjects. The 31P MRSI slab (slab thickness = 40 mm, field of view = 320 mm, matrix 32 x 32, TR = 323 ms, TE 3 ms) co...

  15. Association of Right Ventricular Pressure and Volume Overload with Non-Ischemic Septal Fibrosis on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwon Kim

    Full Text Available Non-ischemic fibrosis (NIF on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR has been linked to poor prognosis, but its association with adverse right ventricular (RV remodeling is unknown. This study examined a broad cohort of patients with RV dysfunction, so as to identify relationships between NIF and RV remodeling indices, including RV pressure load, volume and wall stress.The population comprised patients with RV dysfunction (EF 6-fold more common in the highest, vs. the lowest, common tertile of PASP and RV size (p<0.001.Among wall stress components, NIF was independently associated with RV chamber dilation and afterload, supporting the concept that NIF is linked to adverse RV chamber remodeling.

  16. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease; Kardiale MRT bei Patienten mit angeborenen Herzfehlern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainz Univ. Universitaetsmedizin Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kaufmann, Lilly [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Sorantin, Erich [Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Graz (Austria). Klinische Abt. fuer Kinderradiologie

    2015-06-15

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  17. Contrast-optimized composite image derived from multigradient echo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging improves reproducibility of myocardial contours and T2*measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triadyaksa, Pandji; Handayani, Astri; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Aryanto, Kadek Y. E.; Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Xie, Xueqian; Willems, Tineke P.; Prakken, Niek H. J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Sijens, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Reproducibility of myocardial contour determination in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is important, especially when determining T2* values per myocardial segment as a prognostic factor of heart failure or thalassemia. A method creating a composite image with contrasts optimized for drawing myoca

  18. Contrast-optimized composite image derived from multigradient echo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging improves reproducibility of myocardial contours and T2* measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triadyaksa, Pandji; Handayani, Astri; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Aryanto, Kadek Y E; Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Xie, Xueqian; Willems, Tineke P; Prakken, Niek H J; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Sijens, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Reproducibility of myocardial contour determination in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is important, especially when determining T2* values per myocardial segment as a prognostic factor of heart failure or thalassemia. A method creating a composite image with contrasts optimized for d

  19. The examination of cardiac metabolism of patients with hypercholesterolemia by phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: we decided to investigate weather alterations in high energy phosphates occur in the myocardium of persons with hypercholesterolemia. Background: myocardial high energy phosphates have been shown to be reduced in various diseases of the heart such as coronary artery disease, heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. The latest studies on hypercholesterolemia show direct effects of high serum cholesterol on heart muscle cells, so do studies on statins. Methods: in the present study 32 male patients (mean age 48) with hypercholesterolemia and 27 male healthy volunteers (mean age 44,5) as age matched controls were included. The patients were divided into a statin-treated (n = 17) and an untreated subgroup (n = 15). Using a 1,5 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance scanner (Siemens, Germany) phosphor-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (31P MRSI) of the heart was performed in all subjects. The 31P MRSI slab (slab thickness = 40 mm, field of view = 320 mm, matrix 32 x 32, TR = 323 ms, TE 3 ms) contained the left anterior ventricular wall (region of interest = 32 ml). The measurement was triggered on electrocardiography. The ratios of phosphocreatinine (PCr) to β-adenosine-triphosphate (β-ATP) were calculated. Results: the myocardium of untreated patients with hypercholesterolemia shows significantly decreased ratios of PCr/β-ATP compared with patients treated with statins (2,09 vs. 2,45). When comparing the untreated group with healthy persons there was a trend to significance for a difference of the groups (2,09 vs. 2,34). Conclusion: with this study we demonstrate the first time alterations of high energy phosphates in the myocardium of persons with hypercholesterolemia and the beneficial effects of statins on these parameters. (author)

  20. A unique pattern of delayed enhancement of a large cardiac fibroma on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yaman, Malek M; Vos, Jeffrey A; Gustafson, Robert A

    2015-06-01

    MRI is a valuable noninvasive tool that helps in predicting the type of cardiac tumors and guiding management decisions. Several reports have described the appearance of cardiac fibromas on MRI, which typically show hyperenhancement on myocardial delayed enhancement (MDE) imaging, with or without a dark core. This report demonstrates the unique appearance of a large solitary ventricular septal cardiac fibroma in a 5-month-old patient on MDE imaging, with two discrete dark cores, each surrounded by a hyperenhancing pseudocapsule.

  1. Novel phase-based noise reduction strategy for quantification of left ventricular function and mass assessment by cardiac CT: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Bryan, E-mail: bwai@partners.org [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thai, Wai-ee [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brown, Heather [Qi Imaging, Redwood City, California (United States); Truong, Quynh A. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Background: Tube current modulation in retrospective ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) results in increased image noise and may reduce the accuracy of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and mass assessment. Objective: To examine the effects of a novel CT phase-based noise reduction (NR) algorithm on LV EF and mass quantification as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: In 40 subjects, we compared the LV EF and mass between CT and CMR. In a subset of 24 subjects with tube current modulated CT, the effect of phase-based noise reduction strategies on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the assessment of LV EF and mass was compared to CMR. Results: There was excellent correlation between CT and CMR for EF (r = 0.94) and mass (r = 0.97). As compared to CMR, the limits of agreement improved with increasing strength of NR strategy. There was a systematic underestimation of LV mass by CT compared to CMR with no NR (−10.3 ± 10.1 g) and low NR (−10.3 ± 12.5 g), but was attenuated with high NR (−0.5 ± 8.3 g). Studies without NR had lower CNR compared to low and high NR at both the ES phase and ED phase (all p < 0.01). Conclusions: A high NR strategy on tube current modulated functional cardiac CT improves correlation of EF compared to CMR and reduces variability of EF and mass evaluation by increasing the CNR. In an effort to reduce radiation dose with tube current modulation, this strategy provides better image quality when LV function and mass quantification is needed.

  2. Novel phase-based noise reduction strategy for quantification of left ventricular function and mass assessment by cardiac CT: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Tube current modulation in retrospective ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) results in increased image noise and may reduce the accuracy of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and mass assessment. Objective: To examine the effects of a novel CT phase-based noise reduction (NR) algorithm on LV EF and mass quantification as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: In 40 subjects, we compared the LV EF and mass between CT and CMR. In a subset of 24 subjects with tube current modulated CT, the effect of phase-based noise reduction strategies on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the assessment of LV EF and mass was compared to CMR. Results: There was excellent correlation between CT and CMR for EF (r = 0.94) and mass (r = 0.97). As compared to CMR, the limits of agreement improved with increasing strength of NR strategy. There was a systematic underestimation of LV mass by CT compared to CMR with no NR (−10.3 ± 10.1 g) and low NR (−10.3 ± 12.5 g), but was attenuated with high NR (−0.5 ± 8.3 g). Studies without NR had lower CNR compared to low and high NR at both the ES phase and ED phase (all p < 0.01). Conclusions: A high NR strategy on tube current modulated functional cardiac CT improves correlation of EF compared to CMR and reduces variability of EF and mass evaluation by increasing the CNR. In an effort to reduce radiation dose with tube current modulation, this strategy provides better image quality when LV function and mass quantification is needed

  3. Assessment of sub-clinical acute cellular rejection after heart transplantation: comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieghoff, Christian; Hildebrand, Lysann; Grothoff, Matthias; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Luecke, Christian; Andres, Claudia; Nitzsche, Stefan; Riese, Franziska; Gutberlet, Matthias [University Leipzig - Heart Centre, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Barten, Markus J.; Strueber, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm [University Leipzig - Heart Centre, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Comparing the diagnostic value of multi-sequential cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) for sub-clinical cardiac allograft rejection. One hundred and forty-six examinations in 73 patients (mean age 53 ± 12 years, 58 men) were performed using a 1.5 Tesla system and compared to EMB. Examinations included a STIR (short tau inversion recovery) sequence for calculation of edema ratio (ER), a T1-weighted spin-echo sequence for assessment of global relative enhancement (gRE), and inversion-recovery sequences to visualize late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Histological grade ≥1B was considered relevant rejection. One hundred and twenty-seven (127/146 = 87 %) EMBs demonstrated no or mild signs of rejection (grades ≤1A) and 19/146 (13 %) a relevant rejection (grade ≥1B). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, and negative predictive values were as follows: ER: 63 %, 78 %, 30 %, and 93 %; gRE: 63 %, 70 %, 24 %, and 93 %; LGE: 68 %, 36 %, 13 %, and 87 %; with the combination of ER and gRE with at least one out of two positive: 84 %, 57 %, 23 %, and 96 %. ROC analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.724 for ER and 0.659 for gRE. CMR parameters for myocarditis are useful to detect sub-clinical acute cellular rejection after heart transplantation. Comparable results to myocarditis can be achieved with a combination of parameters. (orig.)

  4. Clinical study on the adriamycin induced cardiomyopathy using the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Total dose and cardiac dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Teraoka, Kunihiko; Hirano, Masaharu [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    We studied cardiac functional disorders caused by Adoriamycin using gadolinium (Gd) contrast cine MRI. Forty-eight patients were given ACT (31 men and 17 women; mean age, 52{+-}15 years). First, the relationship between dose and the left ventricular volume, cardiac function, left ventricular cardiac mass and localized wall motion were examined in all patients. Patients given a total dose of 300 mg/m{sup 2} or higher were assigned to the high dose group and those given doses under 300 mg/m{sup 2} to the low dose group. The same parameters were studied in both groups and compared. A 1.5-Tesla superconductive MRI was used for all studies. Cine images of the long and short axes at the papillary muscle level were obtained by ECG R-wave synchronized Gd contrast cine MRI. Left ventricular volume and cardiac function were analyzed using the long-axis cine images and the wall thickness in diastole and systole was measured at each site using the short-axis cine images. The percentage of wall thickness was calculated at each site. The mean ACT dose was 273.3{+-}218.2 mg/m{sup 2}. In all patients the total dose directly correlated with ESVI and inversely correlated with the ejection fraction (EF). In the high dose group, the total dose and EF were inversely correlated, but no significant differences were observed in the low dose group. In the high dose group, the ESVI was significantly greater and the SVI and EF were more significantly reduced than in the low dose group. In the high dose group, the thickness of the anterior, lateral and posterior walls, excluding the septum, was significantly lower than in the low dose group. However, changes in wall thickness were not significantly different between the groups. Gd contrast cine MRI was useful in examining cardiac functional disorders caused by anthracyclines. The total dose of anthracycline correlated directly with the ESVI, and inversely with the EF. A total dose of 300 mg/m{sup 2} appeared to be the borderline dose beyond

  5. 自触发心脏磁共振成像%Self-gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓尚友; 方可; 王旭霞; 谭萍

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨和实现一种自触发磁共振心脏成像(CMRI).方法 将心电图(ECG)信号和呼吸信号从监测信号中提取出来,然后将K空间数据重新排列、重建,得到心脏图像.结果 自触发CMRI克服了传统的导联法难以获得稳定ECG信号的缺点,可提高扫描效率,得到高品质的亮血和黑血小鼠心脏电影图像.结论 采用自触发CMRI可以实现小鼠心脏电影成像以及黑血成像,并用于评价其心脏结构和功能.%Objective To discuss and realize a type of self-gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Methods K space data were rearranged according to electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration signals, and the cardiac images were reconstructed. Results ECG and respiration signals were extracted from the Navigator, which overcame the difficulty to get stable ECG signal using conventional lead. The method improved CMRI scanning efficiency. High quality bright-blood and black-blood mouse cardiac cine images were acquired. Conclusion Self-gated CMRI can realize cine CMRI and black-blood CMRI, which can be used to evaluate the structure and function of the heart in mice.

  6. Reproducibility of small animal cine and scar cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 3.0 tesla system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the inter-study, inter-reader and intra-reader reproducibility of cardiac cine and scar imaging in rats using a clinical 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Thirty-three adult rats (Sprague–Dawley) were imaged 24 hours after surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery using a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) equipped with a dedicated 70 mm solenoid receive-only coil. Left-ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, ejection fraction and amount of myocardial scar tissue were measured. Intra-and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed in all animals. In addition, repeat MR exams were performed in 6 randomly chosen rats within 24 hours to assess inter-study reproducibility. The MR imaging protocol was successfully completed in 32 (97%) animals. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated high intra-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), -1.7%; LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), -2.2%; LV ejection fraction (LVEF), 1.0%; LV mass, -2.7%; and scar mass, -1.2%) and high inter-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LVEDV, 3.3%; LVESV, 6.2%; LVEF, -4.8%; LV mass, -1.9%; and scar mass, -1.8%). In addition, a high inter-study reproducibility was found (mean bias%: LVEDV, 0.1%; LVESV, -1.8%; LVEF, 1.0%; LV mass, -4.6%; and scar mass, -6.2%). Cardiac MR imaging of rats yielded highly reproducible measurements of cardiac volumes/function and myocardial infarct size on a clinical 3.0 Tesla MR scanner system. Consequently, more widely available high field clinical MR scanners can be employed for small animal imaging of the heart e.g. when aiming at serial assessments during therapeutic intervention studies

  7. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in dilated cardiomyopathy in adults - towards identification of myocardial inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, Antje; Beling, Mark; Stangl, Karl [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Cardiology, Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Elgeti, Thomas; Durmus, Tahir; Idiz, Merve Ece; Schilling, Rene; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Moritz [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Butler, Craig [University of Alberta, Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, Edmonton (Canada); Klingel, Karin; Kandolf, Reinhard [University Hospital, Department of Molecular Pathology, Tuebingen (Germany); Kivelitz, Dietmar [Asklepios Klinik St. Georg, Department of Radiology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    To assess active myocardial inflammation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) amongst adult patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We evaluated 23 adults with chronic DCM, who had successfully undergone both CMR and EMB within 3.5 {+-} 2.6 days. EMB was considered the gold standard. CMR assessment of myocardial inflammation used the following parameters as recommended by the recently published ''Lake Louise Criteria'': global myocardial oedema, global relative enhancement (RE), and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). According to ''Lake Louise Criteria'', myocardial inflammation was diagnosed if two or more of the three above-mentioned parameters were positive. Myocardial inflammation was confirmed by immunohistology in 12 patients (52.2%). Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of CMR to detect immunohistologically confirmed myocardial inflammation were 75.0%, 72.7%, and 73.9%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the individual CMR parameters to detect myocardial inflammation were as follows: global myocardial oedema, 91.7%, 81.8%, and 87.0%, respectively; global RE, 58.3%, 63.6%, and 60.9%, respectively; LGE, 58.3%, 45.4%, and 52.2%, respectively. Global myocardial oedema was identified as a promising CMR parameter for assessment of myocardial inflammation in patients with DCM. In these patients, global myocardial oedema yielded superior diagnostic performance compared to ''Lake Louise Criteria''. (orig.)

  8. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    OpenAIRE

    van Rossum Albert C; Raman Subha V; McConnell Michael V; Lawson Mark A; Higgins Charles B; Friedrich Matthias G; Bogaert Jan G; Bluemke David; Hundley W Gregory; Flamm Scott; Kramer Christopher M; Nagel Eike; Neubauer Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations.

  9. Early assessment of sub-clinical cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) using delayed enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (CE-MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Battisti, Sara; Di Sibio, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Cipriani, Paola; Giacomelli, Roberto; Liakouli, Vasiliky; Ruscitti, Piero [Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine and Public Health, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Objectives: Systemic sclerosis heart involvement (SHI) is one of systemic sclerosis (SSc) most frequent complications, both in diffuse (dcSSc) and limited (lcSSc) cutaneous forms of disease. Nowadays, SHI is a major factor decreasing SSc survival rate because, when clinically evident, is associated with 70% of mortality at 5 years. SHI shows different forms, primary and/or secondary. Primary myocardial SHI is characterized by fibrosis. Aim of our study is to assess the presence and pattern of fibrosis as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in systemic sclerosis. Methods: In this study, we used CE-MRI (contrast enhanced-MRI) in 58 female SSc patients. Images were evaluated to obtain functional parameters and to see presence, location and pattern (nodular, linear or diffuse) of myocardial LE, sign of fibrosis. CE-MRI findings were correlated with patients clinical setting. Results: Myocardial fibrosis was detected in 25 of 58 patients (43%). The main finding observed in 16 of these 25 patients was a late enhancement showing a linear pattern, without coronary distribution and sparing the sub-endocardial myocardial layers. A patchy nodular enhancement pattern was observed in 9 patients (36%). Patients with linear pattern presented dcSSc, on the contrary patients with nodular LE displayed the lcSSc form. Conclusions: This study shows that CE-MRI is a reliable technique to detect SHI earlier than other methods. SHI increase passive myocardial stiffness, proportional to collagen deposition degree, leading to cardiac remodelling with possible development of heart failure, even with normal ejection fraction. An early treatment of SHI might improve SSc patients outcome.

  10. Assessing Late Cardiopulmonary Function in Patients with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot Using Exercise Cardiopulmonary Function Test and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Ming-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Lu, Chun-Wei; Huang, Shu-Chien; Wu, Mei-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) usually experience progressive right ventricle (RV) dysfunction due to pulmonary regurgitation (PR). This could further worsen the cardiopulmonary function. This study aimed to compare the changes in patient exercise cardiopulmonary test and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and consider the implication of these changes. Methods Our study examined repaired TOF patients who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) to obtain maximal (peak oxygen consumption, peak VO2) and submaximal parameters (oxygen uptake efficiency plateau, oxygen uptake efficiency plateau (OUEP), and ratio of minute ventilation to carbon dioxide production, VE/VCO2 slope). Additionally, the hemodynamic status was assessed by using cardiac magnetic resonance. Criteria for exclusion included TOF patients with pulmonary atresia, atrioventricular septal defect, or absence of pulmonary valve syndrome. Results We enrolled 158 patients whose mean age at repair was 7.8 ± 9.1 years (range 0.1-49.2 years) and the mean patient age at CPET was 29.5 ± 12.2 years (range 7.0-57.0 years). Severe PR (PR fraction ≥ 40%) in 53 patients, moderate in 55, and mild (PR fraction 163 ml/m2. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 63 ± 8%, left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVi) was 65 ± 12 ml/m2, and LVESVi was 25 ± 14 ml/m2. CPET revealed significantly decreased peak VO2 (68.5 ± 14.4% of predicted), and fair OUEP (90.3 ± 14.1% of predicted) and VE/VCO2 slope (27.1 ± 5.3). PR fraction and age at repair were negatively correlated with maximal and submaximal exercise indicators (peak VO2 and OUEP). Left ventricular (LV) function and size were positively correlated with peak VO2 and OUEP. Conclusions The results of CPET showed that patients with repaired TOF had a low maximal exercise capacity (peak VO2), but a fair submaximal exercise capacity (OUEP and VE/VCO2 slope), suggesting limited exercise capability in high

  11. Safety of cardiac magnetic resonance and contrast angiography for neonates and small infants: a 10-year single-institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangamani, Sheela; Li, Ling; Harvey, Lisa; Fletcher, Scott E.; Danford, David A.; Kutty, Shelby [University of Nebraska College of Medicine/Creighton University School of Medicine, Joint Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Varghese, Joby [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Cardiac Anesthesia, Omaha, NE (United States); Hammel, James M.; Duncan, Kim F. [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2012-11-15

    With increasing applications of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for evaluation of congenital heart disease (CHD), safety of this technology in the very young is of particular interest. We report our 10-year experience with CMR in neonates and small infants with particular focus on the safety profile and incidence of adverse events (AEs). We reviewed clinical, anesthesia and nursing records of all children {<=}120 days of age who underwent CMR. We recorded variables including cardiac diagnosis, study duration, anesthesia type and agents, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) dependence and gadolinium (Gd) use. Serially recorded temperature, systemic saturation (SpO{sub 2}) and cardiac rhythm were analyzed. Primary outcome measure was any AE during or <24 h after the procedure, including minor AEs such as hypothermia (axillary temperature {<=}95 F), desaturation (SpO{sub 2} drop {>=}10% below baseline) and bradycardia (heart rate {<=}100 bpm). Secondary outcome measure was unplanned overnight hospitalization of outpatients. Children (n = 143; 74 boys, 69 girls) had a median age of 6 days (1-117), and 98 were {<=}30 days at the time of CMR. The median weight was 3.4 kg (1.4-6 kg) and body surface area 0.22 m{sup 2} (0.13-0.32 m{sup 2}). There were 118 (83%) inpatients (108 receiving intensive care) and 25 (17%) outpatients. Indications for CMR were assessment of aortic arch (n = 57), complex CHD (n = 41), pulmonary veins (n = 15), vascular ring (n = 8), intracardiac mass (n = 8), pulmonary artery (n = 7), ventricular volume (n = 4), and systemic veins (n = 3). CMR was performed using a 1.5-T scanner and a commercially available coil. CMR utilized general anesthesia (GA) in 86 children, deep sedation (DS) in 50 and comforting methods in seven. MRA was performed in 136 children. Fifty-nine children were PGE1-dependent and 39 had single-ventricle circulation. Among children on PGE1, 43 (73%) had GA and 10 (17%) had DS. Twelve children (9%) had

  12. Safety of cardiac magnetic resonance and contrast angiography for neonates and small infants: a 10-year single-institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With increasing applications of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for evaluation of congenital heart disease (CHD), safety of this technology in the very young is of particular interest. We report our 10-year experience with CMR in neonates and small infants with particular focus on the safety profile and incidence of adverse events (AEs). We reviewed clinical, anesthesia and nursing records of all children ≤120 days of age who underwent CMR. We recorded variables including cardiac diagnosis, study duration, anesthesia type and agents, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) dependence and gadolinium (Gd) use. Serially recorded temperature, systemic saturation (SpO2) and cardiac rhythm were analyzed. Primary outcome measure was any AE during or 2 drop ≥10% below baseline) and bradycardia (heart rate ≤100 bpm). Secondary outcome measure was unplanned overnight hospitalization of outpatients. Children (n = 143; 74 boys, 69 girls) had a median age of 6 days (1-117), and 98 were ≤30 days at the time of CMR. The median weight was 3.4 kg (1.4-6 kg) and body surface area 0.22 m2 (0.13-0.32 m2). There were 118 (83%) inpatients (108 receiving intensive care) and 25 (17%) outpatients. Indications for CMR were assessment of aortic arch (n = 57), complex CHD (n = 41), pulmonary veins (n = 15), vascular ring (n = 8), intracardiac mass (n = 8), pulmonary artery (n = 7), ventricular volume (n = 4), and systemic veins (n = 3). CMR was performed using a 1.5-T scanner and a commercially available coil. CMR utilized general anesthesia (GA) in 86 children, deep sedation (DS) in 50 and comforting methods in seven. MRA was performed in 136 children. Fifty-nine children were PGE1-dependent and 39 had single-ventricle circulation. Among children on PGE1, 43 (73%) had GA and 10 (17%) had DS. Twelve children (9%) had adverse events (AEs) - one major and 11 minor. Of those 12, nine children had GA (10%) and three had DS (6%). The single major AE was

  13. Novel cardiac nuclear magnetic resonance method for noninvasive assessment of myocardial fibrosis in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Brown, Matthew P M; March, Daniel S; Churchward, Darren R; Stensel, David J; Singh, Anvesha; Arnold, Ranjit; Burton, James O; McCann, Gerry P

    2016-10-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis frequently occur in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis therapy and are associated with poor prognosis. Native T1 mapping is a novel cardiac magnetic resonance imaging technique that measures native myocardial T1 relaxation, a surrogate of myocardial fibrosis. Here we compared global and segmental native myocardial T1 time and global longitudinal, circumferential and segmental strain, and cardiac function of 35 hemodialysis patients and 22 control individuals. The median native global T1 time was significantly higher in the hemodialysis than the control group (1270 vs. 1085 ms), with the septal regions of hemodialysis patients having significantly higher median T1 times than nonseptal regions (1293 vs. 1252 ms). The mean peak global circumferential strain and global longitudinal strain were both significantly reduced in hemodialysis patients compared with controls (-18.3 vs. -21.7 and -16.1 vs. -20.4, respectively). Systolic strain was also significantly reduced in the septum compared with the nonseptal myocardium in hemodialysis patients (-16.2 vs. -21.9) but not in control subjects. Global circumferential strain and longitudinal strain significantly correlated with global native T1 values (r = 0.41 and 0.55, respectively), and the septal native T1 significantly correlated with the septal systolic strain (r = 0.46). Thus, myocardial fibrosis may be assessed noninvasively with native T1 mapping; the interventricular septum appears to be particularly prone to the development of fibrosis in hemodialysis patients.

  14. Inter- and intra-rater reproducibility of semiautomatic determination of volume parameters in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trieb, Thomas [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: thomas.trieb@i-med.ac.at; Glodny, Bernhard; Scheiblhofer, Martin; Wolf, Christian [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Metzler, Bernhard; Pachinger, Otmar [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jaschke, Werner R.; Schocke, Michael F.H. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2008-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate inter- and intra-rater reproducibility in volume assessment using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Methods: Twenty-five healthy volunteers and 106 patients were included into this retrospective study and received CMRI. The patients were divided in three groups (group I, 80 patients with arrhythmia; group II, 20 patients with cardiomyopathy; group III, 6 patients after correction of septum defects). Therefore, the images were semiautomatically segmented by an experienced and an unexperienced radiologists. The analysis of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and stroke volume (SV) as well as ejection fraction (EF) and myocardial mass (MM) were performed twice by an experienced and an unexperienced radiologists. The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were determined for the evaluation of inter- and intra-rater variance. Results: The intra-rater reproducibility for determination of EF, ESV, EDV and MM was excellent with ICCs ranging from 0.88 to 0.99 (all p < 0.001). The inter-observer reproducibility for these parameters was also excellent with ICCs ranging from 0.91 to 0.98 (all p < 0.001). The assessment of the SV showed an excellent intra-rater agreement with ICCs of 0.96 and 0.92 (both p < 0.001), but only a moderate ICC for the inter-rater reproducibility (0.54, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study shows that assessment of cardiac volumes can be performed on CMRIs with an excellent reproducibility by both experienced and unexperienced investigators.

  15. The effect of obesity on electrocardiographic detection of hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy: recalibration against cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, J C L; McIntyre, B; Dastidar, A G; Lyen, S M; Ratcliffe, L E; Burchell, A E; Hart, E C; Bucciarelli-Ducci, C; Hamilton, M C K; Paton, J F R; Nightingale, A K; Manghat, N E

    2016-03-01

    Electrocardiograph (ECG) criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) are a widely used clinical tool. We recalibrated six ECG criteria for LVH against gold-standard cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and assessed the impact of obesity. One hundred and fifty consecutive tertiary hypertension clinic referrals for CMR (1.5 T) were reviewed. Patients with cardiac pathology potentially confounding hypertensive LVH were excluded (n=22). The final sample size was 128 (age: 51.0±15.2 years, 48% male). LVH was defined by CMR. From a 12-lead ECG, Sokolow-Lyon voltage and product, Cornell voltage and product, Gubner-Ungerleidger voltage and Romhilt-Estes score were evaluated, blinded to the CMR. ECG diagnostic performance was calculated. LVH by CMR was present in 37% and obesity in 51%. Obesity significantly reduced ECG sensitivity, because of significant attenuation in mean ECG values for Cornell voltage (22.2±5.7 vs 26.4±9.4 mm, PECG specificity, because of significantly higher prevalence of LV remodeling (no LVH but increased mass-to-volume ratio) in obese subjects without LVH (36% vs 16%, PECG LVH criteria values. Obesity-specific partition values were generated at fixed 95% specificity; Cornell voltage had highest sensitivity in non-obese (56%) and Sokolow-Lyon product in obese patients (24%). Obesity significantly lowers ECG sensitivity at detecting LVH, by attenuating ECG LVH values, and lowers ECG specificity through changes associated with LV remodeling. Our obesity-specific ECG partition values could improve the diagnostic performance in obese patients with hypertension. PMID:26040440

  16. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  17. Myocardial inflammation after binge drinking assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Aiche, Sascha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronic alcohol abuse leads to inflammatory changes in myocardium. The aim of this study was to determine acute effects of excessive consumption of alcohol – binge drinking – and hangover on the heart especially in myocardium. We assumed that binge drinking leads to detectable changes in myocardium. Methods: Cardiac-MRI (CMR) was the diagnostic method. Evaluated parameters were T2-Ratio, relative enhancement, late enhancement and left ventricular function. Additionally humoral...

  18. Correlation between myocardial fibrosis and the occurrence of atrial fibrillation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) often shows delayed contrast enhancement (DE) representing regions of focal myocardial fibrosis. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a commonly reported complication of HCM. We determined the relationship between the presence of left ventricular myocardial fibrosis (LVMF) detected by DE-CMR and the occurrence AF in a series of patients with HCM. 67 patients with HCM (47 males; mean age 50.1 ± 18.5 years) were studied by CMR measuring mass of LVMF, left ventricular mass, volume and function, and left atrial (LA) area. AF was present in 17 (25%) patients. LVMF was observed in 57% of patients. AF was significantly more frequent in patients who also showed LVMF, compared with the group without LVMF (42.1% vs. 3.4%, respectively; p 2; respectively, p = 0.0001). AF in HCM is related with myocardial fibrosis detected by DE-CMR and dilatation of the LA. This fact adds to the proven adverse prognostic value of myocardial fibrosis in HCM, thus, reinforcing the usefulness of this technique in the assessment of these patients.

  19. Correlation between myocardial fibrosis and the occurrence of atrial fibrillation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujadas, S., E-mail: sandrapujadas@gmail.co [Cardiac Imaging Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Vidal-Perez, R. [Cardiac Imaging Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Hidalgo, A. [Radiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Leta, R.; Carreras, F.; Barros, A. [Cardiac Imaging Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Bayes-Genis, A. [Cardiomyopathy and Cardiac Transplant Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Subirana, M.T. [Congenital Heart Disease Unit, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Pons-Llado, Guillem [Cardiac Imaging Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) often shows delayed contrast enhancement (DE) representing regions of focal myocardial fibrosis. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a commonly reported complication of HCM. We determined the relationship between the presence of left ventricular myocardial fibrosis (LVMF) detected by DE-CMR and the occurrence AF in a series of patients with HCM. 67 patients with HCM (47 males; mean age 50.1 {+-} 18.5 years) were studied by CMR measuring mass of LVMF, left ventricular mass, volume and function, and left atrial (LA) area. AF was present in 17 (25%) patients. LVMF was observed in 57% of patients. AF was significantly more frequent in patients who also showed LVMF, compared with the group without LVMF (42.1% vs. 3.4%, respectively; p < 0.0001). LA size was larger in patients showing DE (LA area: 37.4 {+-} 11.1 vs. 25.9 {+-} 6.8 cm{sup 2}; respectively, p = 0.0001). AF in HCM is related with myocardial fibrosis detected by DE-CMR and dilatation of the LA. This fact adds to the proven adverse prognostic value of myocardial fibrosis in HCM, thus, reinforcing the usefulness of this technique in the assessment of these patients.

  20. Prognostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension before initiating intravenous prostacyclin therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because few have reported the prognostic significance of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), in this study we evaluated the value of CMR measurements as a prognostic predictor of IPAH before starting intravenous prostacyclin therapy. A total of 121 consecutive CMR studies for evaluating right ventricular (RV) function were reviewed. Forty-one patients were diagnosed with IPAH and served as the study group. Factors, such as age, sex, New York Heart Association functional class (NYHAFC), 6-min walk test, plasma brain natriuretic peptide level, serum uric acid level and CMR measurements were analyzed as predictors of first hospitalization and death. The mean follow-up period was 1,350±769 days. Nine patients were hospitalized because of heart failure, and 4 patients died from cardiopulmonary causes. The univariate analyses suggested that the left ventricular (LV) mass index, the left and right ventricular end-diastolic volume indices (LVEDVI, RVEDVI), the LV and RV end-systolic volume indices (LVESVI, RVESVI) and NYHAFC predicted the risk for hospitalization and that RVEDVI, RVESVI and NYHAFC predicted mortality. The multivariate analyses suggested that RVEDVI and NYHAFC are independent predictors of both hospitalization and mortality. The effects of RVEDVI and NYHAFC on hospitalization were not substantially affected by the concomitant medication. In IPAH patients, the RVEDVI predicts both hospitalization for right heart failure and mortality before initiating intravenous prostacyclin therapy. (author)

  1. 7 Tesla (T) human cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging using FLASH and SSFP to assess cardiac function: validation against 1.5 T and 3 T

    OpenAIRE

    Suttie, J. J.; DelaBarre, L; Pitcher, A.; van de Moortele, P. F.; Dass, S; Snyder, C. J.; Francis, J M; Metzger, G. J.; Weale, P.; Ugurbil, K; Neubauer, S.; Robson, M; Vaughan, T

    2011-01-01

    We report the first comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T field strengths using steady state free precession (SSFP) and fast low angle shot (FLASH) cine sequences. Cardiac volumes and mass measurements were assessed for feasibility, reproducibility and validity at each given field strength using FLASH and SSFP sequences. Ten healthy volunteers underwent retrospectively electrocardiogram (ECG) gated CMR at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T using FLASH and SSFP se...

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRA; Angiography - magnetic resonance ... Kwong RY. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . ...

  3. Clinical relevance and indications for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging 2013. An interdisciplinary expert statement; Klinischer Stellenwert und Indikationen zur Magnetresonanztomografie des Herzens 2013. Ein interdisziplinaeres Expertenstatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergan, Klaus [Universitaetsklinikum Salzburg (Austria). Universitaetsinst. fuer Radiologie; Globits, S. [Herz-Kreislauf-Zentrum Gross Gerungs (Austria); Schuchlenz, H. [Landeskrankenhaus Graz-West (Austria). Dept. fuer Kardiologie/Intensivmedizin] [and others

    2013-03-15

    During the last years the indications of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) have been continuously expanded. However, the acceptance of the method by cardiologists and radiologists does not correlate with respect to the diagnostic potential. Several factors, such as expensive equipment, relatively long examination times, high technical know how and lack of remuneration, limit the application of CMRI in everyday clinical practice. Furthermore, doctors tend to apply more conventional, well established diagnostic procedures, the access to the method is still limited and there exist difficulties in the interdisciplinary collaboration. The interdisciplinary Austrian approach to Cardiac Imaging is aimed to improve the aforementioned problems and to support the implementation of CMRI in the diagnostic tree of cardiac diseases thus enabling a cost efficient management of patients in cardiology. (orig.)

  4. Cardiac function in growth hormone deficient patients before and after 1 year with replacement therapy: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Faber, Jens Oscar; Petersen, Claus Leth;

    2011-01-01

    gold standard method cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and measurements of circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptides. Sixteen patients (8 males and 8 females, mean age 49 years (range 18-75)) with severe GHD and 16 matched control subjects were included. CMRI was performed at baseline......Assessed by conventional echocardiography the influence of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and effects of replacement therapy on left ventricle (LV) function and mass (LVM) have shown inconsistent results. We aimed to evaluate cardiac function before and during replacement therapy employing the...... (range 63-80%), cardiac output index and levels of BNP and NT-proBNP were similar at baseline in patients compared to controls (P-values from 0.09 to 0.37). The patients had significantly smaller LV end-diastolic volume index (P = 0.032) and end-systolic volume index (P = 0.038). No significant change in...

  5. Preliminary assessment of cardiac short term safety and efficacy of manganese chloride for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaf Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manganese based agents are intracellular and accumulate inside myocytes allowing for different imaging strategies compared to gadolinium contrasts. While previous agents release manganese very slowly in the circulation, MnCl2 allows for rapid Mn2+ uptake in myocytes, creating a memory effect that can be potentially explored. Data on animal models are very encouraging but the safety and efficacy of this approach in humans has not yet been investigated. Therefore, our objectives were to study the safety and efficacy of a rapid infusion of manganese chloride (MnCl2 for cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in humans. Methods Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent a CMR scan on a 1.5 T scanner. Before the infusion, cardiac function was calculated and images of a short axis mid-ventricular slice were obtained using a 2D and 3D gradient-echo inversion recovery (GRE-IR sequence, a phase-sensitive IR sequence and a single breath-hold segmented IR prepared steady-state precession acquisition for T1 calculations. MnCl2 was infused over three minutes at a total dose of 5 μMol/kg. Immediately after the infusion, and at 15 and 30 minutes later, new images were obtained and cardiac function re-evaluated. Results There was a significant decrease in T1 values compared to baseline, sustained up to 30 minutes after the MnCl2 infusion (pre,839 ± 281 ms; 0 min, 684 ± 99; 15 min, 714 ± 168; 30 min, 706 ± 172, P = 0.003. The 2D and 3D GRE-IR sequence showed the greatest increase in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the other sequences (baseline 6.6 ± 4.2 and 9.7 ± 5.3; 0 min, 11.3 ± 4.1 and 15.0 ± 8.7; 15 min, 10.8 ± 4.0 and 16.9 ± 10.2; 30 min, 10.6 ± 5.2 and 16.5 ± 8.3, P 2 with no major adverse events, despite all reporting transient facial flush. Conclusions In the short term, MnCl2 appears safe for human use. It effectively decreases myocardium T1, maintaining this effect for a relatively long period of time and allowing for the

  6. Angiographic correlations of patients with small vessel disease diagnosed by adenosine-stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheck Roland

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR with adenosine-stress myocardial perfusion is gaining importance for the detection and quantification of coronary artery disease (CAD. However, there is little knowledge about patients with CMR-detected ischemia, but having no relevant stenosis as seen on coronary angiography (CA. The aims of our study were to characterize these patients by CMR and CA and evaluate correlations and potential reasons for the ischemic findings. 73 patients with an indication for CA were first scanned on a 1.5T whole-body CMR-scanner including adenosine-stress first-pass perfusion. The images were analyzed by two independent investigators for myocardial perfusion which was classified as subendocardial ischemia (n = 22, no perfusion deficit (n = 27, control 1, or more than subendocardial ischemia (n = 24, control 2. All patients underwent CA, and a highly significant correlation between the classification of CMR perfusion deficit and the degree of coronary luminal narrowing was found. For quantification of coronary blood flow, corrected Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI frame count (TFC was evaluated for the left anterior descending (LAD, circumflex (LCX and right coronary artery (RCA. The main result was that corrected TFC in all coronaries was significantly increased in study patients compared to both control 1 and to control 2 patients. Study patients had hypertension or diabetes more often than control 1 patients. In conclusion, patients with CMR detected subendocardial ischemia have prolonged coronary blood flow. In connection with normal resting flow values in CAD, this supports the hypothesis of underlying coronary microvascular impairment. CMR stress perfusion differentiates non-invasively between this entity and relevant CAD.

  7. Regional heterogeneity in cardiac sympathetic innervation in acute myocardial infarction: relationship with myocardial oedema on magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Pasanisi, Emilio Maria; Lombardi, Massimo [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana, Pisa (Italy); Liga, Riccardo; Grigoratos, Chrysanthos [University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Marzullo, Paolo [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana, Pisa (Italy); Institute of Clinical Physiology, CNR, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    To assess the relationships between myocardial structure and function on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and sympathetic tone on {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) scintigraphy early after myocardial infarction (MI). Ten patients underwent {sup 123}I-MIBG and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin rest cadmium zinc telluride scintigraphy 4 ± 1 days after MI. The segmental left ventricular (LV) relative radiotracer uptake of both {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and early {sup 123}I-MIBG was calculated. The day after scintigraphy, on CMR imaging, the extent of ischaemia-related oedema and of myocardial fibrosis (late gadolinium enhancement, LGE) was assessed. Accordingly, the extent of oedema and LGE was evaluated for each segment and segmental wall thickening determined. Based on LGE distribution, LV segments were categorized as ''infarcted'' (56 segments), ''adjacent'' (66 segments) or ''remote'' (48 segments). Infarcted segments showed a more depressed systolic wall thickening and greater extent of oedema than adjacent segments (p < 0.001) and remote segments (p < 0.001). Interestingly, while uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin was significantly depressed only in infarcted segments (p < 0.001 vs. both adjacent and remote segments), uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG was impaired not only in infarcted segments (p < 0.001 vs. remote) but also in adjacent segments (p = 0.024 vs. remote segments). At the regional level, after correction for {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and LGE distribution, segmental {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake (p < 0.001) remained an independent predictor of ischaemia-related oedema. After acute MI the regional impairment of sympathetic tone extends beyond the area of altered myocardial perfusion and is associated with myocardial oedema. (orig.)

  8. Acute oedema in the evaluation of microvascular reperfusion and myocardial salvage in reperfused myocardial infarction with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phrommintikul, Arintaya, E-mail: apromint@mail.med.cmu.ac.t [Baker Heart Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Abdel-Aty, Hassan, E-mail: hassan.abdel-sty@charite.d [Franz-Volhard-Klinik, Helios-Klinikum Berlin, Kardiologie, Charite Campus Berlin-Buch, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Department of Cardiac Sciences, Foothills Medical Centre, University of Calgary, 1403-29th Street NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Schulz-Menger, Jeanette, E-mail: jeanette.schulz-menger@charite.d [Franz-Volhard-Klinik, Helios-Klinikum Berlin, Kardiologie, Charite Campus Berlin-Buch, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Friedrich, Matthias G., E-mail: matthias.friedrich@ucalgary.c [Franz-Volhard-Klinik, Helios-Klinikum Berlin, Kardiologie, Charite Campus Berlin-Buch, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Department of Cardiac Sciences, Foothills Medical Centre, University of Calgary, 1403-29th Street NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Taylor, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.taylor@baker.edu.a [Baker Heart Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    The accurate measurement of myocardial salvage is critical to the ongoing refinement of reperfusion strategies in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) can define the area at risk in AMI by the presence of myocardial oedema, identified by high signal intensity on T{sub 2}-weighted imaging with a short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence. In addition, myocardial necrosis can be identified with CMR delayed contrast enhanced imaging. In this prospective study we examined the relationship of acute oedema and necrosis with impaired microvascular reperfusion. We also evaluated acute oedema as a marker of the area at risk in AMI, for the purposes of documenting myocardial salvage. CMR was performed on 15 patients with (AMI), within 24 h of successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction was defined by a systolic thickening <40% (severe <20%). Microvascular reperfusion was evaluated during the acute phase of contrast wash-in. CMR was repeated 3 months post-PCI to evaluate recovery of LV function and final infarct size. Myocardial salvage was defined as the percentage of the area at risk that was not infarcted on follow up CMR. There was a significant correlation between impaired microvascular reperfusion and the extent of segmental oedema (R = 0.363, P < 0.01), but not myocardial necrosis (R = 0.110, P > 0.5). The extent of myocardial salvage correlated with recovery of systolic function (R = 0.241, P < 0.05), which was strongest in LV segments with severely reduced systolic function (R = 0.422, P < 0.01). Conclusions: In acutely reperfused AMI, oedema can be used to identify the area at risk for the purpose of calculating myocardial salvage. The correlation between myocardial oedema and reperfusion status suggests a pathological role of acute oedema in the impairment of microvascular reperfusion.

  9. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis evaluation using cardiac magnetic resonance T1 mapping: sample size considerations for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Songtao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR T1 mapping has been used to characterize myocardial diffuse fibrosis. The aim of this study is to determine the reproducibility and sample size of CMR fibrosis measurements that would be applicable in clinical trials. Methods A modified Look-Locker with inversion recovery (MOLLI sequence was used to determine myocardial T1 values pre-, and 12 and 25min post-administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent at 3 Tesla. For 24 healthy subjects (8 men; 29 ± 6 years, two separate scans were obtained a with a bolus of 0.15mmol/kg of gadopentate dimeglumine and b 0.1mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine, respectively, with averaged of 51 ± 34 days between two scans. Separately, 25 heart failure subjects (12 men; 63 ± 14 years, were evaluated after a bolus of 0.15mmol/kg of gadopentate dimeglumine. Myocardial partition coefficient (λ was calculated according to (ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood, and ECV was derived from λ by adjusting (1-hematocrit. Results Mean ECV and λ were both significantly higher in HF subjects than healthy (ECV: 0.287 ± 0.034 vs. 0.267 ± 0.028, p=0.002; λ: 0.481 ± 0.052 vs. 442 ± 0.037, p Conclusion ECV and λ quantification have a low variability across scans, and could be a viable tool for evaluating clinical trial outcome.

  10. Effect of thyroid hormones on cardiac function, geometry, and oxidative metabolism assessed noninvasively by positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengel, F M; Nekolla, S G; Ibrahim, T; Weniger, C; Ziegler, S I; Schwaiger, M

    2000-05-01

    Thyroid hormones influence cardiac performance directly and indirectly via changes in peripheral circulation. Little, however, is known about the effect on myocardial oxidative metabolism and its relation to cardiac function and geometry. Patients with a history of thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer present a unique model to investigate the cardiac effects of hypothyroidism. Ten patients without heart disease were investigated in the hypothyroid state and again 4-6 weeks later under euthyroid conditions. Myocardial oxidative metabolism was measured by positron emission tomography with [11C]acetate and the clearance constant k(mono). Cine magnetic resonance imaging was applied to determine left ventricular geometry. A stroke work index (SWI = stroke volume x systolic blood pressure/ventricular mass) was calculated. Then, to estimate myocardial efficiency, a work metabolic index [WMI = SWI x heart rate/k(mono)] was obtained. Compared to hormone replacement, systemic vascular resistance and left ventricular mass were significantly higher in hypothyroidism. Ejection fraction and SWI were significantly lower. Despite an additional reduction of k(mono), the WMI was significantly lower, too. In summary, cardiac oxygen consumption is reduced in hypothyroidism. This reduction is associated with increased peripheral resistance and reduced contractility. Estimates of cardiac work are more severely suppressed than those of oxidative metabolism, suggesting decreased efficiency. These findings may provide an explanation for development or worsening of heart failure in hypothyroid patients with preexisting heart disease. PMID:10843159

  11. D-Dimer Levels Predict Myocardial Injury in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Bin; Lima, Joao A. C.; Guallar, Eliseo; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Hwang, Jin Kyung; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang-Chol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Elevated D-dimer levels on admission predict prognosis in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), but the association of D-dimer levels with structural markers of myocardial injury in these patients is unknown. Methods We performed cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in 208 patients treated with primary PCI for STEMI. CMR was performed a median of 3 days after the index procedure. Of the 208 patients studied, 75 patients had D-dimer levels above the normal range on admission (>0.5 μg/mL; high D-dimer group) while 133 had normal levels (≤0.5 μg/mL; low D-dimer group). The primary outcome was myocardial infarct size assessed by CMR. Secondary outcomes included area at risk (AAR), microvascular obstruction (MVO) area, and myocardial salvage index (MSI). Results In CMR analysis, myocardial infarct size was larger in the high D-dimer group than in the low D-dimer group (22.3% [16.2–30.5] versus 18.8% [10.7–26.7]; p = 0.02). Compared to the low D-dimer group, the high D-dimer group also had a larger AAR (38.1% [31.7–46.9] versus 35.8% [24.2–45.3]; p = 0.04) and a smaller MSI (37.7 [28.2–46.9] versus 47.1 [33.2–57.0]; p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, high D-dimer levels were significantly associated with larger myocardial infarct (OR 2.59; 95% CI 1.37–4.87; p<0.01) and lower MSI (OR 2.62; 95% CI 1.44–4.78; p<0.01). Conclusions In STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI, high D-dimer levels on admission were associated with a larger myocardial infarct size, a greater extent of AAR, and lower MSI, as assessed by CMR data. Elevated initial D-dimer level may be a marker of advanced myocardial injury in patients treated with primary PCI for STEMI. PMID:27513758

  12. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a two-stage recovery of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahtarovski, Kiril Aleksov; Iversen, Kasper Karmark; Christensen, Thomas Emil;

    2014-01-01

    -12) 16 patients (mean age 66, range 39-84 years) diagnosed with TTC and 20 healthy matched controls. We performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at admission, pre-discharge, and 3-month follow-up. Diastolic function was assessed by LV peak filling rate (LVPFR) and left atrial (LA) emptying...... imaging demonstrated non-coronary distributed apical oedema without contrast enhancement. CONCLUSION: Patients with TTC undergo fast systolic recovery. However, at discharge, profound diastolic dysfunction is demonstrated by CMR. At follow-up, both LV systolic and diastolic function is normalized in...

  13. Advanced echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease : insights in right ventricular mechanics and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, Anna Elisabeth van der

    2011-01-01

    The thesis provides new insights into advanced echocardiographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques for comprehensive mechanical assessment of the right ventricle in healthy children and in pediatric patients with right ventricular dysfunction. It is shown that the right ventricle does not co

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  15. Assessment of cerebellar pulsation in dogs with and without Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia using cardiac-gated cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, C J; Watts, V; Bunck, A C; Van Ham, L M; Volk, H A

    2013-10-01

    Canine Chiari-like malformation (CM) is characterised by herniation of part of the cerebellum through the foramen magnum. In humans with Chiari type I malformation (CM-I), abnormal pulsation of the cerebellum during the cardiac cycle has been documented and is pivotal to theories for the pathogenesis of syringomyelia (SM). In this retrospective study, cardiac-gated cine balanced fast field echo (bFEE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess pulsation of the brain in dogs and to objectively measure the degree of cerebellar pulsation with the neck in a flexed position. Overall, 17 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS) with CM, including eight with SM and nine without SM, were compared with six small breed control dogs. Linear regions of interest were generated for the length of cerebellar herniation from each phase of the cardiac cycle and the degree of cerebellar pulsation was subsequently calculated. Age, bodyweight and angle of neck flexion were also compared. CKCS with CM and SM had significantly greater pulsation of the cerebellum than control dogs (P=0.003) and CKCS with CM only (P=0.031). There was no significant difference in age, bodyweight and angle of neck flexion between the three groups. Cardiac-gated cine bFEE MRI permitted the dynamic visualisation of cerebellar pulsation in dogs. These findings support the current theories regarding the pathogenesis of SM secondary to CM and further highlight the similarities between canine CM and human CM-I.

  16. Automation analysis of cardiac wall deformation from tagged magnetic resonance images; Analise automatica de deformacao do miocardio em imagens marcadas por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piva, R.M.V. [Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Div. de Informatica; Kitney, R.I. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Automation of cardiac wall deformation analysis from tagged magnetic resonance images (MRI) derives, basically, from the automatic detection of MR tags and left ventricle contours. In this work, it was adopted an approach based on image processing techniques and fuzzy logic to extract and classify image features as belonging to tags or ventricular borders. The use of fuzzy logic and IF-THEN rules, which involve image features such as length and curvature of valleys and gradients, allow the estimation of the membership of the pixels in the searched classes. The myocardial deformation is estimated in regions circumvented by contiguous tag intersections. The proposed method was applied to cine SPAMM (Spatial Modulation of Magnetization) short-axis images of the left ventricle obtained from human volunteers. (author)

  17. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  18. Cardiac magnetic resonance tomography in the diagnostics of restrictive and unclassified cardiopathies; Kardiale Magnetresonanztomographie in der Diagnostik der restriktiven und unklassifizierten Kardiomyopathien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, U.; Mangold, S.; Krumm, P.; Claussen, C.D. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Tuebingen (Germany); May, A.E. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Medizinische Klinik III, Abteilung fuer Kardiologie und Kreislauferkrankungen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Besides ischemic heart disease cardiomyopathies are common causes of heart failure and sudden cardiac death. The diagnostic spectrum in cardiomyopathies comprises non-invasive and invasive examination techniques. The exact verification of certain cardiomyopathies necessitates knowledge of the latest classification of cardiomyopathies as well as dedicated examination protocols. Modern imaging modalities, such as echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have emerged as useful imaging tools in the investigation of patients suspected of having many different types of cardiomyopathies. Based on a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology several diagnostic criteria have been defined using cardiac MRI. In particular there is an increasing importance of cardiac MRI in the description of patients with restrictive and unclassified cardiomyopathies. Echocardiography still remains the modality of choice in the diagnostics of unclear left ventricular heart failure. Further diagnostic work-up should include cardiac MRI in case of any lack of clarity. (orig.) [German] Kardiomyopathien stellen neben den ischaemischen Herzerkrankungen eine wesentliche Ursache fuer die Entwicklung einer Herzinsuffizienz und den ploetzlichen Herztod dar. Das diagnostische Spektrum bei Kardiomyopathien umfasst nichtinvasive und invasive Untersuchungsmethoden. Die exakte Diagnosesicherung einzelner Krankheitsbilder erfordert zum einen die Kenntnis der aktuellen Klassifikationen der heterogenen Gruppe der Kardiomyopathien, zum anderen sind oft spezielle Untersuchungstechniken erforderlich. Moderne bildgebende Verfahren stellen einen zentralen Bestandteil der diagnostischen Moeglichkeiten bei der Abklaerung einer Kardiomyopathie dar. Neben der Echokardiographie ist hier insbesondere die kardiale Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zu nennen. Mit zunehmendem Verstaendnis ueber die Pathogenese einzelner Kardiomyopathien konnten diagnostische Kriterien fuer die kardiale MRT

  19. Comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging features of isolated left ventricular non-compaction in adults versus dilated cardiomyopathy in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H. [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Institute and Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Zhao, S., E-mail: cjrzhaoshihua2009@163.com [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Institute and Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Jiang, S.; Lu, M.; Yan, C.; Ling, J.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Q.; Ma, N.; Yin, G.; Wan, J. [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Institute and Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Yang, Y. [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Institute and Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Li, L. [Department of Pathology, Cardiovascular Institute and Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Jerecic, R. [MR Research and Development, Siemens Medical Solutions, Chicago, IL (United States); He, Z. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cardiovascular Institute and Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Aim: To compare cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features between isolated left ventricular non-compaction (IVNC) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in adults. Materials and methods: A consecutive series of 50 patients with IVNC from a single institution were reviewed. During the same period, 50 patients with DCM who had prominent trabeculations, who were matched for age, gender, and body surface area, were prospectively included. Left ventricular (LV) morphology and function were assessed using cardiac MRI. Results: Compared with patients with DCM, patients with IVNC had a significantly lower LV sphericity index and end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) and a greater LV ejection fraction (LVEF), number of trabeculated segments, and ratio of non-compacted to compacted myocardium (NC/C ratio). There were no significant differences in stroke volume index, cardiac output, and cardiac index between the two patient groups. In patients with IVNC, the number of trabeculated segments and the NC/C ratio correlated positively with LVEDVI (r = 0.626 and r = 0.559, respectively) and negatively with LVEF (r = -0.647 and r = -0.521, respectively, p < 0.001 for all). In patients with DCM, the number of non-compacted segments and the NC/C ratio had no correlation with either the LVEDVI (r = -0.082 and r = -0.135, respectively) or the LVEF (r = 0.097 and r = 0.205, respectively). Conclusion: There are demonstrable morphological and functional differences between IVNC and DCM at LV assessment using cardiac MRI. The occurrence of trabeculated myocardium might be due to a different pathophysiological mechanism.

  20. Fast 3-Breath-Hold 3-Dimensional Tagging Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Patients with Hypertrophic Myocardial Diseases: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Amano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tagging CMR has been established as the standard reference for measurement of myocardial strain. The current 2D tagging technique requires multiple breath-holds to cover the whole heart and cannot show the 3D motions of the left ventricle. We performed fast 3-breath-hold 3D tagging with localized tagging preparation and complementary spatial modulation of magnetization in 10 patients with hypertrophic myocardial diseases and 6 normal volunteers. The left wall motion was observed at any view angle, which allowed for the identification of regional and global hypokinesis using the fast 3D tagging. Although a decrease in the circumferential strain and LGE were observed at the basal septum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, they were not located together in each patient. In hypertensive heart disease, the decrease in circumferential strain was observed more widely than LGE, and the summed strain of all segments was significantly decreased. The decrease in strain and LGE were observed diffusely in cardiac amyloidosis. In conclusion, fast 3-breath-hold 3D tagging is feasible for the regional and global strain analysis. The location of reduced circumferential strain is not necessarily the same as that of LGE and is related to the global cardiac function in patients with hypertrophic myocardial diseases.

  1. The first description of cardiac magnetic resonance findings in a severe scorpion envenomation: Is it a stress-induced (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Carlos H; Braggion-Santos, Maria F; Schmidt, André; Pazin-Filho, Antônio; Cupo, Palmira

    2015-06-01

    There are more than 1 million cases of scorpion envenomation worldwide. Severe complications due to myocardial depression can happen in some patients, mainly children. A catecholamine-induced myocarditis probably causes this cardiac dysfunction. We describe a case of a 7-year-old boy with a severe scorpion envenomation complicated by pulmonary edema in which the cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)was performed during the acute phase. The CMR showed an apical ballooning in the left ventricle associated with a left ventricle ejection fraction of 29% and a global edema of the midmyocardium and apical myocardiumin the T2-weighted triple inversion recovery images. The CMR was repeated after 7 months and showed complete recovery of the wall motion in the apical region and of the myocardial function (left ventricle ejection fraction, 60%) associated with normalization of the signal in the T2-weighted triple inversion recovery images. These clinical and laboratory findings, mainly the CMR images, are similar to those observed in stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo) reinforcing the hypothesis that the catecholamine's excess has a pivotal function in the pathophysiology of the cardiac dysfunction in these 2 conditions. PMID:25601163

  2. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  3. Value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing coronary heart disease%心脏磁共振在冠心病诊断中的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵世华

    2011-01-01

    @@ 心脏磁共振(cardiac magnetic resonance,CMR)扫描不仅无电离辐射,且与超声、CT及核素等常见的无创性检查相比,其空间和时间分辨率的组合堪称最佳.不仅如此,CMR具有大视野、多成像序列、高度的组织分辨力及不断呈现的新方法、新技术,能对心脏形态、功能、心肌灌注、血管造影、动脉斑块及分子显像等进行"一站式"检查.

  4. Left atrial and ventricular function during dobutamine and glycopyrrolate stress in healthy young and elderly as evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahtarovski, Kiril A; Iversen, Kasper K; Lønborg, Jacob T;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe phasic volume changes of the left atrium (LA) in healthy young and elderly subjects at rest and during pharmacological stress (PS). LA maximum size is related to cardiovascular mortality. LA has passive, active, and conduit function for left ventricular (LV......) filling. We hypothesized that changes in LV compliance from normal aging are reflected in LA volume changes and that PS will augment these differences. We enrolled twenty young (20-30 yr) and twenty elderly (60-70 yr) healthy subjects and measured their LV and LA volumes by cardiac magnetic resonance...... but not in the young. At rest, LVPFR was lower in the elderly, and during PS this difference was augmented. The aging heart has reduced LVPFR, which is reflected in reduced LA passive and compensatory increased LA active volumetric contribution to LV stroke volume. These age-related differences are evident at rest...

  5. Influence of pre-infarction angina, collateral flow, and pre-procedural TIMI flow on myocardial salvage index by cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Kelbæk, Henning Skov; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove;

    2012-01-01

    salvage index (MSI) and infarct size adjusting for area at risk in patients with STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) was used to measure myocardial area at risk within 1-7 days and final infarct size 90±21 days after the...

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived pulmonary artery distensibility index correlates with pulmonary artery stiffness and predicts functional capacity in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased stiffness of the pulmonary vascular bed is known to increase mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); and pulmonary artery (PA) stiffness is also thought to be associated with exercise capacity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI)-derived PA distensibility index correlates with PA stiffness estimated on right heart catheterization (RHC) and predicts functional capacity (FC) in patients with PAH. Thirty-five consecutive PAH patients (23% male, mean age, 44±13 years; 69% idiopathic) underwent CMRI, RHC, and 6-min walk test (6MWT). PA distensibility indices were derived from cross-sectional area change (%) in the transverse view, perpendicular to the axis of the main PA, on CMRI [(maximum area-minimum area)/minimum area during cardiac cycle]. Among the PA stiffness indices, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and PA capacitance were calculated using hemodynamic dataset from RHC. CMRI-derived PA distensibility was inversely correlated with PVR (R2=0.34, P2=0.35, P2=0.61, P<0.001). Furthermore, PA distensibility <20% predicted poor FC (<400 m in 6MWT) with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 94%. Non-invasive CMRI-derived PA distensibility index correlates with PA stiffness and can predict FC in patients with PAH. (author)

  7. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  8. Termination of dobutamine infusion causes transient rebound left heart diastolic dysfunction in healthy elderly women but not in men: a cardiac magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtarovski, Kiril A; Iversen, Kasper K; Lønborg, Jacob T; Madsen, Per L; Engstrøm, Thomas; Vejlstrup, Niels G

    2013-10-01

    Men and women are known to react differently to stress. Thus, stress cardiomyopathy almost solely strikes women. Stress cardiomyopathy is suggested to relate to sex differences in catecholamine reaction. Left heart function during dobutamine stress is well described, but sex-specific inotropic and lusitropic response to abrupt termination of dobutamine stress is not. We aimed to investigate sex differences in left ventricular (LV) and atrial (LA) function during and after dobutamine stress. We enrolled 20 healthy elderly subjects (60-70 yr, 10 females) and measured their LV and LA volumes throughout the cardiac cycle by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at rest, during dobutamine stress (15 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), 15 min after termination (T15), and 30 min after termination (T30) of dobutamine stress. We calculated LV ejection fractions, LV stroke volumes, LV peak filling rates, and LA passive, active, and conduit volumes. Sex differences were not observed at rest or during dobutamine stress. Compared with prestress values, at T15 a rebound decrease in LV peak filling rate was observed in women (-22 ± 3%, P causes greater stress to the female heart. This is revealed after termination of dobutamine stress where the left heart recovers in men, whereas women experience rebound LV stiffening with reduced diastolic relaxation. This is the first report of a sex-specific transient rebound phenomenon in cardiovascular response to catecholamines.

  9. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 ± 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 ± 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in corticosteroid-naive patients with conduction system disease due to cardiac sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a cause of conduction system disease (CSD). 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG PET) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) are used for detection of CS. The relative diagnostic value of these has not been well studied. The aim was to compare these imaging modalities in this population. We recruited steroid-naive patients with newly diagnosed CSD due to CS. All CS patients underwent both imaging studies within 12 weeks of each other. Patients were classified into two groups: group A with chronic mild CSD (right bundle branch block and/or axis deviation), and group B with new-onset atrioventricular block (AVB, Mobitz type II or third-degree AVB). Thirty patients were included. Positive findings on both imaging studies were seen in 72 % of patients (13/18) in group A and in 58 % of patients (7/12) in group B. The remainder (28 %) of the patients in group A were positive only on CMR. Of the patients in group B, 8 % were positive only on CMR and 33 % were positive only on FDG PET. Patients in group A were more likely to be positive only on CMR, and patients in group B were more likely to be positive only on FDG PET (p = 0.02). Patients in group B positive only on FDG PET underwent CMR earlier relative to their symptomatology than patients positive only on CMR (median 7.0, IQR 1.5 - 34.3, vs. 72.0, IQR 25.0 - 79.5 days; p = 0.03). The number of positive FDG PET and CMR studies was different in patients with CSD depending on their clinical presentation. This study demonstrated that CMR can adequately detect cardiac involvement associated with chronic mild CSD. In patients presenting with new-onset AVB and a negative CMR study, FDG PET may be useful for detecting cardiac involvement due to CS. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in corticosteroid-naive patients with conduction system disease due to cardiac sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira, Hiroshi; Birnie, David H.; Mc Ardle, Brian; Dick, Alexander; Klein, Ran; Renaud, Jennifer; DeKemp, Robert A.; Davies, Ross; Hessian, Renee; Liu, Peter; Nery, Pablo B. [University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Molecular Function and Imaging Program, National Cardiac PET Centre, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Arrhythmia Service, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Pena, Elena; Dennie, Carole [The Ottawa Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa, Department of Radiology, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bernick, Jordan; Wells, George A. [University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Cardiovascular Research Methods Center, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Leung, Eugene [The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Hokkaido (Japan); Tsujino, Ichizo; Sato, Takahiro; Nishimura, Masaharu [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, First Department of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Oyama-Manabe, Noriko [Hokkaido University Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido (Japan); Ruddy, Terrence D.; Beanlands, Rob S.B. [University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Molecular Function and Imaging Program, National Cardiac PET Centre, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Arrhythmia Service, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); The Ottawa Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa, Department of Radiology, Ottawa, ON (Canada); The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Benjamin J.W. [University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Molecular Function and Imaging Program, National Cardiac PET Centre, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Arrhythmia Service, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); The Ottawa Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa, Department of Radiology, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a cause of conduction system disease (CSD). {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG PET) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) are used for detection of CS. The relative diagnostic value of these has not been well studied. The aim was to compare these imaging modalities in this population. We recruited steroid-naive patients with newly diagnosed CSD due to CS. All CS patients underwent both imaging studies within 12 weeks of each other. Patients were classified into two groups: group A with chronic mild CSD (right bundle branch block and/or axis deviation), and group B with new-onset atrioventricular block (AVB, Mobitz type II or third-degree AVB). Thirty patients were included. Positive findings on both imaging studies were seen in 72 % of patients (13/18) in group A and in 58 % of patients (7/12) in group B. The remainder (28 %) of the patients in group A were positive only on CMR. Of the patients in group B, 8 % were positive only on CMR and 33 % were positive only on FDG PET. Patients in group A were more likely to be positive only on CMR, and patients in group B were more likely to be positive only on FDG PET (p = 0.02). Patients in group B positive only on FDG PET underwent CMR earlier relative to their symptomatology than patients positive only on CMR (median 7.0, IQR 1.5 - 34.3, vs. 72.0, IQR 25.0 - 79.5 days; p = 0.03). The number of positive FDG PET and CMR studies was different in patients with CSD depending on their clinical presentation. This study demonstrated that CMR can adequately detect cardiac involvement associated with chronic mild CSD. In patients presenting with new-onset AVB and a negative CMR study, FDG PET may be useful for detecting cardiac involvement due to CS. (orig.)

  12. Macrophage Uptake of Ultra-Small Iron Oxide Particles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Acute Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penno, E.; Johnsson, C.; Johansson, L.; Ahlstroem, H. [Uppsala Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology and of Transplantation Surgery

    2006-04-15

    Purpose: To discriminate between acutely rejecting and non-rejecting transplanted hearts using a blood pool contrast agent and T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a clinical 1.5T scanner. Material and Methods: Allogeneic and syngeneic heterotopic heart transplantations were performed in rats. One allogeneic and one syngeneic group each received either the ultra-small iron oxide particle (USPIO), at two different doses, or no contrast agent at all. MRI was performed on postoperative day 6. Immediately after the MR scanning, contrast agent was injected and a further MRI was done 24 h later. Change in T2 was calculated. Results: No significant difference in change in T2 could be seen between rejecting and non-rejecting grafts in either of the doses, or in the control groups. There was a difference between the allogeneic group that received the higher contrast agent dose and the allogeneic group that did not receive any contrast agent at all. Conclusion: In our rat model, measurements of T2 after myocardial macrophage uptake of AMI-227 in a clinical 1.5T scanner were not useful for the diagnosis of acute rejection.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  15. Efficient isotropic magnetic resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, O. J. F.; Gay-Balmaz, P.

    2002-01-01

    We study experimentally and numerically a novel three-dimensional magnetic resonator structure with high isotropy. It is formed by crossed split-ring resonators and has a response independent of the illumination direction in a specific plane. The utilization of such elements to build a finite left-handed medium is discussed. (C) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is prevalent in cardiorenal patients but not associated with left ventricular function and myocardial fibrosis as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emans Mireille E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS is common in cardiovascular diseases and associated with hypertension, renal dysfunction and/or heart failure. There is a paucity of data about the prevalence and the role of ARAS in the pathophysiology of combined chronic heart failure (CHF and chronic kidney disease (CKD. We investigated the prevalence in patients with combined CHF/CKD and its association with renal function, cardiac dysfunction and the presence and extent of myocardial fibrosis. Methods The EPOCARES study (ClinTrialsNCT00356733 investigates the role of erythropoietin in anaemic patients with combined CHF/CKD. Eligible subjects underwent combined cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI, including late gadolinium enhancement, with magnetic resonance angiography of the renal arteries (MRA. Results MR study was performed in 37 patients (median age 74 years, eGFR 37.4 ± 15.6 ml/min, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF 43.3 ± 11.2%, of which 21 (56.8% had ARAS (defined as stenosis >50%. Of these 21 subjects, 8 (21.6% had more severe ARAS >70% and 8 (21.6% had a bilateral ARAS >50% (or previous bilateral PTA. There were no differences in age, NT-proBNP levels and medication profile between patients with ARAS versus those without. Renal function declined with the severity of ARAS (p = 0.03, although this was not significantly different between patients with ARAS versus those without. Diabetes mellitus was more prevalent in patients without ARAS (56.3% against those with ARAS (23.8% (p = 0.04. The presence and extent of late gadolinium enhancement, depicting myocardial fibrosis, did not differ (p = 0.80, nor did end diastolic volume (p = 0.60, left ventricular mass index (p = 0.11 or LVEF (p = 0.15. Neither was there a difference in the presence of an ischemic pattern of late enhancement in patients with ARAS versus those without. Conclusions ARAS is prevalent in combined CHF

  17. Stenosis of the branches of the neopulmonary artery after the arterial switch operation: A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boban Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Cardiac MR can be used as a comprehensive non-invasive imaging technique to diagnose stenosis of the branches of the neopulmonary after the ASO, allowing evaluation of anatomy and function of the neoPA, its branches, and the differential perfusion to each lung, thus facilitating clinical decision making.

  18. Churg-Strauss syndrome cardiac involvement evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography: a prospective study on 20 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) cardiac involvement is associated with a poor prognosis. Recently cardiac MRI (CMRI) has emerged as a promising technique to detect early CSS cardiac involvement. However, CMRI-detected myocardial delayed enhancement (MDE) could correspond to fibrosis or inflammation. Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) was previously used in other systemic diseases to distinguish between them. To determine whether the CMRI-MDE detected in CSS patients reflected fibrosis or myocardial inflammation, patients in CSS remission underwent FDG-PET. Twenty consecutive CSS patients in remission (BVAS = 0) were recruited. Fourteen patients [eight men, six women; mean (S.D.) age 49 (9) years; mean disease duration 3.5 (2.9) years] with CMRI-detected MDE, and six patients [four men, two women; mean (S.D.) age 44 (15) years; mean disease duration 3.5 (5.3) years] with normal CMRI underwent FDG-PET. Segments with MDE on CMRI were analysed on FDG-PET images, with myocardial FDG hypo-fixation defining fibrosis and hyper-fixation corresponding inflammation. Among the 14 patients with MDE on CMRI, FDG-PET showed 10 had hypo-fixation, 2 had hyper-fixation and 2 had normal scans. CSS duration at the time of CMRI was shorter for patients with myocardial inflammation than in those with fibrosis. The six patients with normal CMRI had normal FDG-PET images. For CSS patients in remission, CMRI detected subclinical active myocardial lesions and could be recommended to assess cardiac involvement. However, because CMRI-detected MDE can reflect fibrosis or inflammation, FDG-PET might help to distinguish between the two. (authors)

  19. Major prognostic impact of persistent microvascular obstruction as assessed by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance in reperfused acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare the prognostic significance of microvascular obstruction (MO) and persistent microvascular obstruction (PMO) as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). CMR was performed in 184 patients within the week following successfully reperfused first AMI. First-pass images were performed to evaluate extent of MO and late gadolinium-enhanced images to assess PMO and infarct size (IS). Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were collected at 1-year follow-up. MO and PMO were found in 127 (69%) and 87 (47%) patients, respectively. By using univariate logistic regression analysis, high Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score (odds ratio [OR] 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.6 [1.8-7.4], p < 0.001), IS greater than 10% (OR [95% CI]: 2.7 [1.1-6.9], p = 0.036), left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40% (OR [95% CI]: 2.4 [1.1-5.2], p = 0.027), presence of MO (OR [95% CI]: 3.1 [1.3-7.3], p = 0.004) and presence of PMO (OR [95% CI]:10 [4.1-23.9], p < 0.001) were shown to be significantly associated with the outcome. By using multivariate analysis, presence of MO (OR [95% CI]: 2.5 [1.0-6.2], p = 0.045) or of PMO (OR [95% CI]: 8.7 [3.6-21.1], p < 0.001), associated with GRACE score, were predictors of MACE. Presence of microvascular obstruction and persistent microvascular obstruction is very common in AMI patients even after successful reperfusion and is associated with a dramatically higher risk of subsequent cardiovascular events, beyond established prognostic markers. Moreover, our data suggest that the prognostic impact of PMO might be superior to MO. (orig.)

  20. Coronary microembolization with normal epicardial coronary arteries and no visible infarcts on nitrobluetetrazolium chloride-stained specimens: Evaluation with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a swine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hang; Yun, Hong; Zeng, Meng Su [Dept. of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai (China); Ma, Jian Ying; Chen, Zhang Wei; Chang, Shu Fu [Dept. of Cardiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-15

    To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of coronary microembolization in a swine model induced by small-sized microemboli, which may cause microinfarcts invisible to the naked eye. Eleven pigs underwent intracoronary injection of small-sized microspheres (42 µm) and catheter coronary angiography was obtained before and after microembolization. Cardiac MRI and measurement of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were performed at baseline, 6 hours, and 1 week after microembolization. Postmortem evaluation was performed after completion of the imaging studies. Coronary angiography pre- and post-microembolization revealed normal epicardial coronary arteries. Systolic wall thickening of the microembolized regions decreased significantly from 42.6 ± 2.0% at baseline to 20.3 ± 2.3% at 6 hours and 31.5 ± 2.1% at 1 week after coronary microembolization (p < 0.001 for both). First-pass perfusion defect was visualized at 6 hours but the extent was largely decreased at 1 week. Delayed contrast enhancement MRI (DE-MRI) demonstrated hyperenhancement within the target area at 6 hours but not at 1 week. The microinfarcts on gross specimen stained with nitrobluetetrazolium chloride were invisible to the naked eye and only detectable microscopically. Increased cTnT was observed at 6 hours and 1 week after microembolization. Coronary microembolization induced by a certain load of small-sized microemboli may result in microinfarcts invisible to the naked eye with normal epicardial coronary arteries. MRI features of myocardial impairment secondary to such microembolization include the decline in left ventricular function and myocardial perfusion at cine and first-pass perfusion imaging, and transient hyperenhancement at DE-MRI.

  1. Magnetic resonance elastography as a method for the assessment of effective myocardial stiffness throughout the cardiac cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolipaka, Arunark; Araoz, Philip A; McGee, Kiaran P; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L

    2010-09-01

    MR elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique in which images of externally generated waves propagating in tissue are used to measure stiffness. The first aim is to determine, from a range of driver configurations, the optimal driver for the purpose of generating waves within the heart in vivo. The second aim is to quantify the shear stiffness of normal myocardium throughout the cardiac cycle using MRE and to compare MRE stiffness to left ventricular chamber pressure in an in vivo pig model. MRE was performed in six pigs with six different driver setups, including no motion, three noninvasive drivers, and two invasive drivers. MRE wave displacement amplitudes were calculated for each driver. During the same MRI examination, left ventricular pressure and MRI-measured left ventricular volume were obtained, and MRE myocardial stiffness was calculated for 20 phases of the cardiac cycle. No discernible waves were imaged when no external motion was applied, and a single pneumatic drum driver produced higher amplitude waves than the other noninvasive drivers (P < 0.05). Pressure-volume loops overlaid onto stiffness-volume loops showed good visual agreement. Pressure and MRE-measured effective stiffness showed good correlation (R(2) = 0.84). MRE shows potential as a noninvasive method for estimating effective myocardial stiffness throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:20578052

  2. Plaque vulnerability of coronary artery lesions is related to left ventricular dilatation as determined by optical coherence tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Burgmaier, Mathias; Frick, Michael; Liberman, Ana; Battermann, Simone; Hellmich, Martin; Lehmacher, Walter; Jaskolka, Agnes; Marx, Nikolaus; Reith, Sebastian Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for both, left ventricular (LV)-dilatation and myocardial infarction (MI) following the rupture of a vulnerable plaque. This study investigated the to date incompletely understood relationship between plaque vulnerability and LV-dilatation using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients with type 2 diabetes and stable coronary artery disease. Methods CMR was performed in 58 patient...

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  4. Cardiac effects of 3 months treatment of acromegaly evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and B-type natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Faber, Jens; Kjær, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    Long-term treatment of acromegaly prevents aggravation and reverses associated heart disease. A previous study has shown a temporary increase in serum levels of the N-terminal fraction of pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) suggesting an initial decline in cardiac function when treatment of...... NT-proBNP). CMRI was performed at baseline and after 3 months of treatment. Levels of IGF-I, BNP and NT-proBNP were measured after 0, 1, 2 and 3 months. Eight patients (5 males and 3 females, mean age 53 ± 12 years (range 30-70)) and 8 matched healthy control subjects were included. Median IGF-I Z...

  5. Association between diffuse myocardial fibrosis by cardiac magnetic resonance contrast-enhanced T(1) mapping and subclinical myocardial dysfunction in diabetic patients: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, A.C.; Auger, D.; Delgado, V.; Elderen, S.G. van; Bertini, M.; Siebelink, H.M.; Geest, R.J. van der; Bonetti, C.; Velde, E.T. van der; Roos, A. de; Smit, J.W.A.; Leung, D.Y.; Bax, J.J.; Lamb, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetic patients have increased interstitial myocardial fibrosis on histological examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T(1) mapping is a previously validated imaging technique that can quantify the burden of global and regional interstitial fibrosis. However, the association bet

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  7. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain ( ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining very ...

  10. Resonant magnetic vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the complex angular momentum method, we provide a semiclassical analysis of electron scattering by a magnetic vortex of Aharonov-Bohm type. Regge poles of the S matrix are associated with surface waves orbiting around the vortex and supported by a magnetic field discontinuity. Rapid variations of sharp characteristic shapes can be observed on scattering cross sections. They correspond to quasibound states which are Breit-Wigner-type resonances associated with surface waves and which can be considered as quantum analogues of acoustic whispering-gallery modes. Such a resonant magnetic vortex could provide a different kind of artificial atom while the semiclassical approach developed here could be profitably extended in various areas of the physics of vortices

  11. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  12. Clinical feasibility of a myocardial signal intensity threshold-based semi-automated cardiac magnetic resonance segmentation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the accuracy and efficiency of a threshold-based, semi-automated cardiac MRI segmentation algorithm in comparison with conventional contour-based segmentation and aortic flow measurements. Short-axis cine images of 148 patients (55 ± 18 years, 81 men) were used to evaluate left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass (LVM) using conventional and threshold-based segmentations. Phase-contrast images were used to independently measure stroke volume (SV). LV parameters were evaluated by two independent readers. Evaluation times using the conventional and threshold-based methods were 8.4 ± 1.9 and 4.2 ± 1.3 min, respectively (P < 0.0001). LV parameters measured by the conventional and threshold-based methods, respectively, were end-diastolic volume (EDV) 146 ± 59 and 134 ± 53 ml; end-systolic volume (ESV) 64 ± 47 and 59 ± 46 ml; SV 82 ± 29 and 74 ± 28 ml (flow-based 74 ± 30 ml); ejection fraction (EF) 59 ± 16 and 58 ± 17 %; and LVM 141 ± 55 and 159 ± 58 g. Significant differences between the conventional and threshold-based methods were observed in EDV, ESV, and LVM measurements; SV from threshold-based and flow-based measurements were in agreement (P > 0.05) but were significantly different from conventional analysis (P < 0.05). Excellent inter-observer agreement was observed. Threshold-based LV segmentation provides improved accuracy and faster assessment compared to conventional contour-based methods. (orig.)

  13. Clinical feasibility of a myocardial signal intensity threshold-based semi-automated cardiac magnetic resonance segmentation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U.J.; Suranyi, Pal; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Fox, Mary A. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Muscogiuri, Giuseppe [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Rome (Italy); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Cannao, Paola M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Milan, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milan (Italy); Renker, Matthias [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Ruzsics, Balazs [Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals, Department of Cardiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficiency of a threshold-based, semi-automated cardiac MRI segmentation algorithm in comparison with conventional contour-based segmentation and aortic flow measurements. Short-axis cine images of 148 patients (55 ± 18 years, 81 men) were used to evaluate left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass (LVM) using conventional and threshold-based segmentations. Phase-contrast images were used to independently measure stroke volume (SV). LV parameters were evaluated by two independent readers. Evaluation times using the conventional and threshold-based methods were 8.4 ± 1.9 and 4.2 ± 1.3 min, respectively (P < 0.0001). LV parameters measured by the conventional and threshold-based methods, respectively, were end-diastolic volume (EDV) 146 ± 59 and 134 ± 53 ml; end-systolic volume (ESV) 64 ± 47 and 59 ± 46 ml; SV 82 ± 29 and 74 ± 28 ml (flow-based 74 ± 30 ml); ejection fraction (EF) 59 ± 16 and 58 ± 17 %; and LVM 141 ± 55 and 159 ± 58 g. Significant differences between the conventional and threshold-based methods were observed in EDV, ESV, and LVM measurements; SV from threshold-based and flow-based measurements were in agreement (P > 0.05) but were significantly different from conventional analysis (P < 0.05). Excellent inter-observer agreement was observed. Threshold-based LV segmentation provides improved accuracy and faster assessment compared to conventional contour-based methods. (orig.)

  14. Technology Development of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Experimental Mice%实验小鼠心脏磁共振成像技术进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张焕; 范占明; 马晓海

    2014-01-01

    实验小鼠模型逐渐被应用于各个领域,尤其是转基因和基因敲除小鼠在心血管疾病方面的研究更是与日俱增。心脏磁共振(CMR)成像技术为无创性检查心脏的解剖和功能、心肌灌注以及心肌活性提供了方便。对于实验小鼠CMR技术而言,因小鼠自身特点的特殊性,在磁共振扫描设备、成像线圈、实验动物的准备和监测、心脏成像序列以及磁共振成像的分析和后处理等这些方面,都必须进行相关的调整和研究。本文将从上述几个方面综述近年来实验小鼠CMR技术的最新进展。%Experimental mice models have been gradually used in various fields, especially transgenic and knockout mice in cardiovascular disease. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) could provide noninvasive, high resolution images of heart anatomy, viability, perfusion and function. Further research of mice CMR technology should be performed, due to the special features of the mice as well as special MRI equipment, coil, mice preparation and monitoring, image analysis and post-processing. Latest progress of mice CMR in technology will be reviewed in this article.

  15. Relation of fragmented QRS complex to right ventricular fibrosis detected by late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance in adults with repaired tetralogy of fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Jung; On, Young Keun; Kim, June Soo; Park, Seung Woo; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook; Kang, I-Seok; Lee, Heung Jae; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Huh, June

    2012-01-01

    Fragmented QRS (fQRS) on 12-lead electrocardiography reflects conduction delay caused by myocardial fibrosis and dysfunction. Ventricular fibrosis detected by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is reportedly correlated with worse clinical outcomes in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of fQRS is associated with right ventricular (RV) fibrosis or dysfunction in this patient group. In 37 consecutive patients (median age 30 years, median age at repair 6.6 years), the number of leads showing fQRS, defined as the presence of >2 notches on the R/S wave in ≥2 contiguous leads, was counted. RV systolic function, dilatation, and LGE score were measured using LGE CMR. Ventricular LGE was observed mainly at the previous surgical sites: the RV outflow tract (33 of 37), ventricular septal defect patch region (15 of 37), and RV anterior wall (11 of 37). Fragmented QRS was found mostly in the right and mid precordial leads. The fQRS group (n = 20) demonstrated higher RV LGE scores (p <0.001) and lower RV ejection fractions (p = 0.02) and a trend toward larger RV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (p = 0.12 and p = 0.06, respectively) compared to the non-fQRS group (n = 17). The number of electrocardiographic leads showing fQRS was positively correlated with RV LGE score (r = 0.75, p <0.001). The presence of fQRS remained independently associated with the presence of supramedian RV LGE score, even after adjusting for relevant parameters. In conclusion, fQRS was closely associated with more extensive RV fibrosis and dysfunction in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

  16. The Correlation between Left and Right Ventricular Ejection Fractions in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease, Documented by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eshraghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The correlation between right and left ventricular ejection fractions (RVEF and LVEF, respectively has been studied in only a small number of patients with a marked decrease in RVEF and LVEF. The aim of the present study was to compare LVEF and RVEF in patients with ischemic heart disease. RVEF and LVEF were measured by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR imaging. Materials and Methods: This observational study was done in Ghaem general hospital in 2014.  LVEF and RVEF were measured in a series of 33 patients with ischemic heart disease, undergoing CMR for the evaluation of myocardial viability. The correlation between RVEF and LVEF in patients with ischemic heart disease was studied, using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient analysis.   This study was done in Ghaem general hospital in 2014 with simple sapling. Results: Right ventricular end diastolic volume (186.33±58.90 and left ventricular end diastolic volume (121.72±61.64 were significantly correlated (r=0.223, P=0.005. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between right ventricular end systolic volume (88.18±40.90 and left ventricular end systolic volume (140.96±35.33 (r=0.329, P=0.000. The most significant association was observed between RVEF and LVEF (r=0.913, P=0.000. Conclusion: Based on the findings, RVEF and LVEF were significantly correlated in patients with ischemic heart disease, although this association was not always present in all cardiac patients. The cause of this discrepancy is still unknown.

  17. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, Abbas A., E-mail: abbas.ali.qayyum@regionh.dk [Department of Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory 2014, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Hasbak, Philip, E-mail: philip.hasbak@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsson, Henrik B.W., E-mail: henrik.larsson@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Functional Imaging Unit, Diagnostic Department, Glostrup Hospital, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Ndr. Ringvej 57, 2600 Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.emil.christensen@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Ghotbi, Adam A., E-mail: adam.ali.ghotbi@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mathiasen, Anders B., E-mail: anders.b.mathiasen@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory 2014, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent rest and adenosine stress imaging by 1.5-Tesla MR Scanner and a mCT/PET 64-slice Scanner. CMRI were analyzed based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution without specifying an explicit compartment model using our own software. PET images were analyzed using standard clinical software. CMRI and PET data was compared with Spearman's rho and Bland–Altman analysis. Results: CMRI results were strongly and significantly correlated with PET results for the absolute global myocardial perfusion differences (r = 0.805, p = 0.001) and for global myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) (r = 0.886, p < 0.001). At vessel territorial level, CMRI results were also significantly correlated with absolute PET myocardial perfusion differences (r = 0.737, p < 0.001) and MPR (r = 0.818, p < 0.001). Each vessel territory had similar strong correlation for absolute myocardial perfusion differences (right coronary artery (RCA): r = 0.787, p = 0.001; left anterior descending artery (LAD): r = 0.796, p = 0.001; left circumflex artery (LCX): r = 0.880, p < 0.001) and for MPR (RCA: r = 0.895, p < 0.001; LAD: r = 0.886, p < 0.001; LCX: r = 0.886, p < 0.001). Conclusion: On a global and vessel territorial basis, CMRI-measured absolute myocardial perfusion differences and MPR were strongly and significantly correlated with the Rb-82 PET findings.

  18. Electro-mechanical characteristics of myocardial infarction border zones and ventricular arrhythmic risk: novel insights from grid-tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Dennis T.L.; Weightman, Michael J.; Baumert, Mathias; Tayeb, Hussam; Richardson, James D.; Puri, Rishi; Bertaso, Angela G.; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C.; Sanders, Prashanthan; Worthley, Matthew I. [University of Adelaide, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Royal Adelaide Hospital and Discipline of Medicine, SA (Australia); Worthley, Stephen G. [University of Adelaide, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Royal Adelaide Hospital and Discipline of Medicine, SA (Australia); Royal Adelaide Hospital, Cardiovascular Investigational Unit, SA (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    To investigate whether grid-tag myocardial strain evaluation can characterise 'border-zone' peri-infarct region and identify patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia as the peri-infarct myocardial zone may represent an important contributor to ventricular arrhythmia following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Forty-five patients with STEMI underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on days 3 and 90 following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Circumferential peak circumferential systolic strain (CS) and strain rate (CSR) were calculated from grid-tagged images. Myocardial segments were classified into 'infarct', 'border-zone', 'adjacent' and 'remote' regions by late-gadolinium enhancement distribution. The relationship between CS and CSR and these distinct myocardial regions was assessed. Ambulatory Holter monitoring was performed 14 days post myocardial infarction (MI) to estimate ventricular arrhythmia risk via evaluation of heart-rate variability (HRV). We analysed 1,222 myocardial segments. Remote and adjacent regions had near-normal parameters of CS and CSR. Border-zone regions had intermediate CS (-9.0 {+-} 4.6 vs -5.9 {+-} 7.4, P < 0.001) and CSR (-86.4 {+-} 33.3 vs -73.5 {+-} 51.4, P < 0.001) severity compared with infarct regions. Patients with 'border-zone' peri-infarct regions had reduced very-low-frequency power on HRV analysis, which is a surrogate for ventricular arrhythmia risk (P = 0.03). Grid-tagged CMR-derived myocardial strain accurately characterises the mechanical characteristics of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region. Presence of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region correlated with a surrogate marker of heightened arrhythmia risk following STEMI. (orig.)

  19. Electro-mechanical characteristics of myocardial infarction border zones and ventricular arrhythmic risk: novel insights from grid-tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether grid-tag myocardial strain evaluation can characterise 'border-zone' peri-infarct region and identify patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia as the peri-infarct myocardial zone may represent an important contributor to ventricular arrhythmia following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Forty-five patients with STEMI underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on days 3 and 90 following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Circumferential peak circumferential systolic strain (CS) and strain rate (CSR) were calculated from grid-tagged images. Myocardial segments were classified into 'infarct', 'border-zone', 'adjacent' and 'remote' regions by late-gadolinium enhancement distribution. The relationship between CS and CSR and these distinct myocardial regions was assessed. Ambulatory Holter monitoring was performed 14 days post myocardial infarction (MI) to estimate ventricular arrhythmia risk via evaluation of heart-rate variability (HRV). We analysed 1,222 myocardial segments. Remote and adjacent regions had near-normal parameters of CS and CSR. Border-zone regions had intermediate CS (-9.0 ± 4.6 vs -5.9 ± 7.4, P < 0.001) and CSR (-86.4 ± 33.3 vs -73.5 ± 51.4, P < 0.001) severity compared with infarct regions. Patients with 'border-zone' peri-infarct regions had reduced very-low-frequency power on HRV analysis, which is a surrogate for ventricular arrhythmia risk (P = 0.03). Grid-tagged CMR-derived myocardial strain accurately characterises the mechanical characteristics of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region. Presence of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region correlated with a surrogate marker of heightened arrhythmia risk following STEMI. (orig.)

  20. Disappearance of myocardial perfusion defects on prone SPECT imaging: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients without established coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedén Bo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is of great clinical importance to exclude myocardial infarction in patients with suspected coronary artery disease who do not have stress-induced ischemia. The diagnostic use of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT in this situation is sometimes complicated by attenuation artifacts that mimic myocardial infarction. Imaging in the prone position has been suggested as a method to overcome this problem. Methods In this study, 52 patients without known prior infarction and no stress-induced ischemia on SPECT imaging were examined in both supine and prone position. The results were compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR with delayed-enhancement technique to confirm or exclude myocardial infarction. Results There were 63 defects in supine-position images, 37 of which disappeared in the prone position. None of the 37 defects were associated with myocardial infarction by CMR, indicating that all of them represented attenuation artifacts. Of the remaining 26 defects that did not disappear on prone imaging, myocardial infarction was confirmed by CMR in 2; the remaining 24 had no sign of ischemic infarction but 2 had other kinds of myocardial injuries. In 3 patients, SPECT failed to detect small scars identified by CMR. Conclusion Perfusion defects in the supine position that disappeared in the prone position were caused by attenuation, not myocardial infarction. Hence, imaging in the prone position can help to rule out ischemic heart disease for some patients admitted for SPECT with suspected but not documented ischemic heart disease. This would indicate a better prognosis and prevent unnecessary further investigations and treatment.

  1. Assessment of left ventricular ejection fraction: comparison of two dimensional echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and 64-row multi-detector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chee Khoon LIEW; Kui Hian SIM; Rapaee ANNUAR; Tiong Kiam ONG; Sze Piaw CHIN; Tobias Seyfarth; Yean Yip FONG; Wei Ling CHAN; Choon Kiat ANG; Houng Bang LIEW

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To compare left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) determined from 64-row multi-detector computed tomography (64-row MDCT) with those determined from two dimensional echocardiography (2D echo) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods Thirty-two patients with coronary artery disease underwent trans-thoracic 2D echo, CMR and contrast-enhanced 64-row MDCT for assessment of LVEF within 48 hours of each other. 64-row MDCT LVEF was derived using the Syngo Circulation software; CMR LVEF was by Area Length Ejection Fraction (ALEF) and Simpson method and 2D echo LVEF by Simpson method.Results The LVEF was 49.13 ± 15.91% by 2D echo, 50.72 ± 16.55% (ALEF method) and 47.65 ± 16.58%(Simpson method) by CMR and 50.00 ± 15.93% by 64-row MDCT. LVEF measurements by 64-row MDCT correlated well with LVEF measured with CMR using either the ALEF method (Pearson correlation r = 0.94, P <0.01) or Simpson method (r = 0.92, P<0.01). It also correlated well with LVEF measured using 2D echo (r = 0.80, P < 0.01). Conclusion LVEF measurements by 64-row MDCT correlated well with LVEF measured by CMR and 2D echo. The correlation between 64-row MDCT and CMR was better than the correlation between 2D echo with CMR. Standard data set from a 64-row MDCT coronary study can be reliably used to calculate the LVEF.

  2. Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance images using tag motion constraints and multi-level b-splines interpolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Yan, Meng; Song, Enmin; Wang, Jie; Wang, Qian; Jin, Renchao; Jin, Lianghai; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance (TCMR) images is of great significance in clinical diagnosis and the treatment of heart disease. Currently, the harmonic phase analysis method (HARP) and the local sine-wave modeling method (SinMod) have been proven as two state-of-the-art motion estimation methods for TCMR images, since they can directly obtain the inter-frame motion displacement vector field (MDVF) with high accuracy and fast speed. By comparison, SinMod has better performance over HARP in terms of displacement detection, noise and artifacts reduction. However, the SinMod method has some drawbacks: 1) it is unable to estimate local displacements larger than half of the tag spacing; 2) it has observable errors in tracking of tag motion; and 3) the estimated MDVF usually has large local errors. To overcome these problems, we present a novel motion estimation method in this study. The proposed method tracks the motion of tags and then estimates the dense MDVF by using the interpolation. In this new method, a parameter estimation procedure for global motion is applied to match tag intersections between different frames, ensuring specific kinds of large displacements being correctly estimated. In addition, a strategy of tag motion constraints is applied to eliminate most of errors produced by inter-frame tracking of tags and the multi-level b-splines approximation algorithm is utilized, so as to enhance the local continuity and accuracy of the final MDVF. In the estimation of the motion displacement, our proposed method can obtain a more accurate MDVF compared with the SinMod method and our method can overcome the drawbacks of the SinMod method. However, the motion estimation accuracy of our method depends on the accuracy of tag lines detection and our method has a higher time complexity. PMID:26712656

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging tracing of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model of cardiac arrest-induced global brain ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Fu; Xiangshao Fang; Tong Wang; Jiwen Wang; Jun Jiang; Zhigang Luo; Xiaohui Duan; Jun Shen; Zitong Huang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect survival and migration of super paramagnetic iron oxide-labeled stem cells in models of focal cerebral infarction. OBJECTIVE: To observe distribution of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in a rat model of global brain ischemia following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and to investigate the feasibility of tracing iron oxide-labeled BMSCs using non-invasive MRI. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The randomized, controlled, molecular imaging study was performed at the Linbaixin Medical Research Center, Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, and the Institute of Cardiopulmonary Cerebral Resuscitation, Sun Yat-sen University, China from October 2006 to February 2009.MATERIALS: A total of 40 clean, Sprague Dawley rats, aged 6 weeks and of either gender, were supplied by the Experimental Animal Center, Sun Yat-sen University, China, for isolation of BMSCs. Feridex (iron oxide), Gyroscan Inetra 1.5T MRI system, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation device were used in this study. METHODS: A total of 30 healthy, male Sprague Dawley rats, aged 6 months, were used to induce ventricular fibrillation using alternating current. After 8 minutes, the rats underwent 6-minute chest compression and mechanical ventilation, followed by electric defibrillation, to establish rat models of global brain ischemia due to cardiac arrest and resuscitation. A total of 24 successful models were randomly assigned to Feridex-labeled and non-labeled groups (n=12 for each group). At 2 hours after resuscitation, 5 x 10 6 Feddex-labeled BMSCs, with protamine sulfate as a carrier, and 5 × 10 6 non-labeled BMSCs were respectively transplanted into both groups of rats through the right carotid artery (cells were harvested in 1 mL phosphate buffered saline). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Feridex-labeled BMSCs were observed by Prussian blue staining and electron microscopy. Signal intensity, celluar viability

  7. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.;

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper review...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8......Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  9. Comparison of accuracy of aortic root annulus assessment with cardiac magnetic resonance versus echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Gripari, Paola; Loguercio, Monica; Cortinovis, Sarah; Baggiano, Andrea; Conte, Edoardo; Beltrama, Virginia; Annoni, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Guaricci, Andrea; Alamanni, Francesco; Ballerini, Giovanni; Pepi, Mauro

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of the aortic root in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation is crucial. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) evaluation of the aortic annulus (AoA) with transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In 50 patients, maximum diameter, minimum diameter and AoA, length of the left coronary, right coronary, and noncoronary aortic leaflets, degree (grades 1 to 4) of aortic leaflet calcification, and distance between AoA and coronary artery ostia were assessed. AoA maximum diameter, minimum diameter, and area by CMR were 26.4 ± 2.8 mm, 20.6 ± 2.3 mm, 449.8 ± 86.2 mm(2), respectively. The length of left coronary, right coronary, and noncoronary leaflets by CMR were 13.9 ± 2.2, 13.3 ± 2.1, and 13.4 ± 1.8 mm, respectively, whereas the score of aortic leaflet calcifications was 2.9 ± 0.8. Finally, the distances between AoA and left main and right coronary artery ostia were 16.1 ± 2.8 and 16.1 ± 4.4 mm, respectively. Regarding AoA area, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography showed an underestimation (p <0.01), with a moderate agreement (r: 0.5 and 0.6, respectively, p <0.01) compared with CMR. No differences and excellent correlation were observed between CMR and MDCT for all parameters (r: 0.9, p <0.01), except for aortic leaflet calcifications that were underestimated by CMR. In conclusion, aortic root assessment with CMR including AoA size, aortic leaflet length, and coronary artery ostia height is accurate compared with MDCT. CMR may be a valid imaging alternative in patients unsuitable for MDCT. PMID:24045059

  10. Microvascular obstruction on delayed enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, compared with myocardial {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-BMIPP dual SPECT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hiroaki [Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Cardiology, Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Isobe, Satoshi, E-mail: sisobe@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Sakai, Shinichi [Department of Cardiology, Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Yamada, Takashi [Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Watanabe, Naoki; Miura, Manabu [Department of Cardiology, Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Uchida, Yasuhiro; Kanashiro, Masaaki; Ichimiya, Satoshi [Department of Cardiology, Yokkaichi Municipal Hospital, Yokkaichi (Japan); Okumura, Takahiro; Murohara, Toyoaki [Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The percentage infarct size (%IS) was significantly greater in the microvascular obstruction (MO) group than in the non-MO group. • The percentage mismatch score (%MMS) on dual scintigraphy significantly correlated with the %IS and the percentage MO. • The %MMS was significantly greater in the non-MO group than in the MO group, and was an independent predictor for MO. - Abstract: Background: The hypo-enhanced regions within the hyper-enhanced infarct areas detected by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging reflect microvascular obstruction (MO) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The combined myocardial thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl)/iodine-123-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid ({sup 123}I-BMIPP) dual single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a useful tool for detecting myocardial reversibility after AMI. We evaluated whether MO could be an early predictor of irreversible myocardial damage in comparison with {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-BMIPP dual SPECT findings in AMI patients. Methods: Sixty-two patients with initial AMI who successfully underwent coronary revascularization were enrolled. MO was defined by CMR imaging. Patients were divided into 2 groups as follows: MO group (n = 32) and non-MO group (n = 30). Scintigraphic defect scores were calculated using a 17-segment model with a 5-point scoring system. The mismatch score (MMS) was calculated as follows: the total sum of (Σ) {sup 123}I-BMIPP defect score minus Σ{sup 201}Tl defect score. The percentage mismatch score (%MMS) was calculated as follows: MMS/(Σ{sup 123}I-BMIPP score) × 100 (%). Results: The percentage infarct size (%IS) was significantly greater in the MO group than in the non-MO group (32.2 ± 13.8% vs. 18.3 ± 12.1%, p < 0.001). The %MMS significantly correlated with the %IS and the percentage MO (r = −0.26, p = 0.03; r = −0.45, p < 0.001, respectively). The %MMS was significantly greater in the non-MO group than in the MO group (45.4

  11. Determinants of discrepancies in detection and comparison of the prognostic significance of left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiogram and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Chen, Haiying; Estes, E Harvey; Mateasik, Anton; Bluemke, David A; Lima, Joao A C; Burke, Gregory L; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2015-02-15

    Despite the low sensitivity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), ECG-LVH is known to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular risk. Understanding reasons for the discrepancies in detection of LVH by ECG versus imaging could help improve the diagnostic ability of ECG. We examined factors associated with false-positive and false-negative ECG-LVH, using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard. We also compared the prognostic significance of ECG-LVH and MRI-LVH as predictors of cardiovascular events. This analysis included 4,748 participants (mean age 61.9 years, 53.5% females, 61.7% nonwhites). Logistic regression with stepwise selection was used to identify factors associated with false-positive (n = 208) and false-negative (n = 387), compared with true-positive (n = 208) and true-negative (n = 4,041) ECG-LVH, respectively. A false-negative ECG-LVH status was associated with increased odds of Hispanic race/ethnicity, current smoking, hypertension, increased systolic blood pressure, prolongation of QRS duration, and higher body mass index and with lower odds of increased ejection fraction (model-generalized R(2) = 0.20). A false-positive ECG-LVH status was associated with lower odds of black race, Hispanic race/ethnicity, minor ST-T abnormalities, increased systolic blood pressure, and presence of any major electrocardiographic abnormalities (model-generalized R(2) = 0.29). Both ECG-LVH and MRI-LVH were associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease events (hazard ratio 1.51, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 2.20 and hazard ratio 1.81, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 2.46, respectively). In conclusion, discrepancy in LVH detection by ECG and MRI can be relatively improved by considering certain participant characteristics. Discrepancy in diagnostic performance, yet agreement on predictive ability, suggests that LVH by ECG and LVH by imaging are likely to be two distinct but somehow related

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging - a pictorial review

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Dahya; Spottiswoode, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a powerful problem-solving tool and arguably offers the most comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function, as well as the opportunity of rebuilding the bridge between cardiologists and radiologists. The role of CMR-trained imaging physicists is also valuable, and many CMR centres harmoniously incorporate these three sub-specialty fields. This paper comprises an overview of several CMR techniques, outlining both the strengths...

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging - a pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Dahya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR is a powerful problem-solving tool and arguably offers the most comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function, as well as the opportunity of rebuilding the bridge between cardiologists and radiologists. The role of CMR-trained imaging physicists is also valuable, and many CMR centres harmoniously incorporate these three sub-specialty fields. This paper comprises an overview of several CMR techniques, outlining both the strengths and limitations of the modality.

  14. Myocardial area at risk after ST-elevation myocardial infarction measured with the late gadolinium enhancement after scar remodeling and T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Mathiasen, Anders B;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the myocardial area at risk (AAR) measured by the endocardial surface area (ESA) method on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) when applied after scar remodeling (3 months after index infarction) compared to T2-weighted CMR imaging. One hundred...

  15. Myocardial area at risk after ST-elevation myocardial infarction measured with the late gadolinium enhancement after scar remodeling and T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Mathiasen, Anders B;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the myocardial area at risk (AAR) measured by the endocardial surface area (ESA) method on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) when applied after scar remodeling (3 months after index infarction) compared to T2-weighted CMR imaging. One hundred...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  17. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  18. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new examination technique used in diagnostic medicine. Its use has increased notably during the last few years in Finland, too. The biological effects of electromagnetic fields used in MRI are quite different from the effects of x-rays. This report introduces the physics and the techniques of MRI; the biological effects of magnetic fields and the hazards associated with the use of MRI systems are briefly discussed. The major national and international recommendations are summarized, too. Furthermore, a description is given how safety aspects are considered in Finnish MRI units. Finally, recommendations are given to restrict the exposure caused by MRI and to ensure the safe use of MRI. Diagnostic applications and clinical or economic aspects fall outside the scope of this report. (orig.)

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  3. 心脏磁共振成像技术在扩张型心肌病中的应用及研究进展%Application and Research Progress of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖雪(综述); 赵新湘; 孙勇(审校)

    2016-01-01

    扩张型心肌病是心肌病中最常见的类型,其病因复杂、病情呈进行性加重,预后较差。如何对其潜在的风险进行预测,对临床具有重要的意义,而心脏磁共振技术已成为一种有效的“一站式”心脏检查手段,可对此提供明确有效的帮助。现就多种心脏磁共振技术在扩张型心肌病中的研究进展做一综述。%Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common type of cardiomyopathy , the cause of which is complicated , the disease is pro-gressive and the prognosis is poor .How to predict the potential risk has important significance to the clinic .Cardiac magnetic resonance ima-ging technology has become an effective “one-stop” method for the diagnosis of heart disease ,which can provide a clear and effective help . The research progress of multiple cardiac magnetic resonance imaging technology in dilated cardiomyopathy is summarized in this article .

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscholakoff, D; Higgins, C B

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a completely noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. With a multi-section technique and the spin echo pulse sequence the entire heart can be examined within six to ten minutes. All our cardiac MR studies were performed with electrocardiographic (ECG) gating, to obtain adequate resolution of the cardiac structures. With this technique, patients and animals with a variety of cardiac abnormalities were studied. The examined pathologic conditions included acute and chronic myocardial infarctions and their complications, hypertrophic and congestive cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases and pericardial diseases. MRI offers an enormous potential for cardiovascular diagnosis, even beyond the demonstration of pathoanatomy, because of the capability for direct tissue characterization and blood flow measurements.

  5. Effects of High-dose Atorvastatin Pretreatment in Patients with ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Song, Young Bin; Chang, Sung-A; Choi, Jin-Ho; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang-Chol; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Lee, Sang Hoon; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    It is uncertain that atorvastatin pretreatment can reduce myocardial damage in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of atorvastatin pretreatment on infarct size measured by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) in STEMI patients. Patients undergoing primary PCI for STEMI within 12 hr after symptom onset were randomized to an atorvastatin ...

  6. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  8. Gated SPECT evaluation of left ventricular function using a CZT camera and a fast low-dose clinical protocol: comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgetti, Assuero; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Marras, Gavino; Gimelli, Alessia; Genovesi, Dario; Lombardi, Massimo [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Pisa (Italy); Rustamova, Yasmine K. [Azerbaijan Medical University, Department of internal medicine Central Customs Hospital, Baku (Azerbaijan); Marzullo, Paolo [Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica del CNR, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    CZT technology allows ultrafast low-dose myocardial scintigraphy but its accuracy in assessing left ventricular function is still to be defined. The study group comprised 55 patients (23 women, mean age 63 {+-} 9 years) referred for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. The patients were studied at rest using a CZT camera (Discovery NM530c; GE Healthcare) and a low-dose {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin clinical protocol (mean dose 264 {+-} 38 MBq). Gated SPECT imaging was performed as a 6-min list-mode acquisition, 15 min after radiotracer injection. Images were reformatted (8-frame to 16-frame) using Lister software on a Xeleris workstation (GE Healthcare) and then reconstructed with a dedicated iterative algorithm. Analysis was performed using Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS) software. Within 2 weeks patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI, 1.5-T unit CVi; GE Healthcare) using a 30-frame acquisition protocol and dedicated software for analysis (MASS 6.1; Medis). The ventricular volumes obtained with 8-frame QGS showed excellent correlations with the cMRI volumes (end-diastolic volume (EDV), r = 0.90; end-systolic volume (ESV), r = 0.94; p < 0.001). However, QGS significantly underestimated the ventricular volumes (mean differences: EDV, -39.5 {+-} 29 mL; ESV, -15.4 {+-} 22 mL; p < 0.001). Similarly, the ventricular volumes obtained with 16-frame QGS showed an excellent correlations with the cMRI volumes (EDV, r = 0.92; ESV, r = 0.95; p < 0.001) but with significant underestimations (mean differences: EDV, -33.2 {+-} 26 mL; ESV, -17.9 {+-} 20 mL; p < 0.001). Despite significantly lower values (47.9 {+-} 16 % vs. 51.2 {+-} 15 %, p < 0.008), 8-frame QGS mean ejection fraction (EF) was closely correlated with the cMRI values (r = 0.84, p < 0.001). The mean EF with 16-frame QGS showed the best correlation with the cMRI values (r = 0.91, p < 0.001) and was similar to the mean cMRI value (49.6 {+-} 16 %, p not significant). Regional analysis showed a good

  9. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  12. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ... CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine ...

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  19. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Wealth of Cardiovascular Information

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sangeeta; Chryssos, Emanuel D.; Parker, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively new noninvasive imaging modality that provides insight into multiple facets of the human myocardium not available by other imaging modalities. This one test allows for the assessment of ventricular and valvular function, ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies, congenital heart disease, and cardiac tumors. It has been coined by many as “one-stop shopping.” As with any imaging modality, it is important to understand not only the indications ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    OpenAIRE

    Sax, Steven L.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent noninvasive method for evaluating thoracic aortic dissections. A variety of magnetic resonance scans of aortic dissections are shown, documenting the ability of magnetic resonance to image the true lumen, the false channel, and the intimal septum. Detail is provided on magnetic resonance imaging techniques and findings. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:262-70)

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  3. Exploring the elusive link between subclinical fibrosis and clinical events in end-stage renal disease: does cardiac magnetic resonance imaging hold the key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Gautam R; Raggi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Extensive myocardial fibrosis is known to occur in patients undergoing dialysis due to a variety of mechanisms not necessarily restricted to coronary artery disease. Fibrosis may predispose to reentry arrhythmias and long-term myocardial dysfunction, and sudden death and congestive heart failure are the most frequent causes of death in patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. Despite the high accuracy of magnetic resonance for imaging of myocardial fibrosis, its use has been restricted by the risk of inducing nephrogenic systemic sclerosis with the injection of gadolinium. The development of new sequences that allow the detection and quantifying of the severity of extracellular myocardial fibrosis offers a chance to study the pathogenesis of this condition and identify potential interventions to retard or reverse it. Whether these will lead to an improved outcome needs to be prospectively tested.

  4. Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Diagnosis and Research of Cardiac Diseases%核磁共振成像在心脏病诊断及研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余昕

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging method that does not involve ionizing radiation. Because of its high imaging resolution and high soft tissue contrast, it has increasingly been used in both clinical and basic science research. This review focuses on the applications of MRI in the evaluation of cardiac function. Specifically, two methods will be discussed:the assessment of ventricular anatomy and global cardiac function by cine MRI, and the quantification of regional myocardial wall motion mechanics by MRI tagging.%磁共振成像(MRI)具有无创、无电离辐射、分辨率高、软组织造影清晰等特点,被越来越多地应用于临床和基础研究。本文综述了磁共振成像在心功能评价方面的应用,包括磁共振电影对心脏结构和宏观功能指数的评价,以及它的临床应用,并重点介绍了MRI心肌标记技术,及其在心肌收缩力学分析方面的应用。

  5. The 20 year evolution of dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Hundley W; Charoenpanichkit Charaslak

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, investigators world-wide have developed and utilized dobutamine magnetic resonance stress testing procedures for the purpose of identifying ischemia, viability, and cardiac prognosis. This article traces these developments and reviews the data utilized to substantiate this relatively new noninvasive imaging procedure.

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance findings in a case of Danon disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kosieradzka Agnieszka; Walczak Ewa; Kuch Marek; Kownacki Lukasz; Piotrowska-Kownacka Dorota; Fidzianska Anna; Krolicki Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Danon disease is a rare X-linked dominant lysosomal glycogen storage disease that can lead to severe ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. We report a case of Danon disease with cardiac involvement evaluated with cardiovascular magnetic resonance, including late gadolinium enhancement and perfusion studies.

  7. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  8. Practical value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in unstable angina diagnosis%心脏核磁共振在不稳定型心绞痛诊治中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐新宇; 欧阳容

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the value of magnetic resonance imaging of heart in diagnosis of unstable angina pectoris.Methods A total of 24 patients with unstable angina pectoris including 15 male and 9 female confirmed by coronary angiography (CAG) were enrolled.All 24 patients were scanned by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging ( CMR),and then the analyses of the first pass images and the delayed contrast enhancement images were carried out for comparison.The findings of cardiac structure,cardiac function,myocardial ischemia,myocardial necrosis,myocardial edema were taken for answering to the images made by echocardiography (UCG) and coronary angiography (CAG) linked with conventional examinations for the diagnosis of coronary disease.Results Compared with the UCG,CMR provided more detailed information about the right ventricle,and the information about left ventricular structure and function given by UCG was very good consistent with that offered by CMR,and CMR could detect myocardial ischemia,myocardial edema and the myocardial necrosis,which were of good consistency with findings often observed by conventional inspection methods.Conclusions Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is of high value in diagnosis and evaluation of unstable angina pectoris and is far superior over other conventional methods for examinations of unstable angina pectoris.%目的 研究心脏核磁共振在不稳定型心绞痛诊治中的价值.方法 选择确诊不稳定性心绞痛患者24例,其中男性15例,女性9例,均行冠脉造影.对24例患者进行心脏核磁共振(CMR)扫描,对图像进行首过灌注和延迟扫描分析(LEG),记录其在心脏结构、功能、心肌缺血、坏死、水肿等方面的信息,并使之与超声心动图(UCG)、冠脉造影(CAG)等传统检查结果对比.结果 CMR与UCG相比,可以提供更多右心室方面的信息.在左心室结构及功能方面,两者有很好的一致性;CMR能发现并检测心肌缺血、水肿及坏死,

  9. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  10. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31P, 13C, 1H (and possibly 19F and 23Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  12. The relation between hypointense core, microvascular obstruction and intramyocardial haemorrhage in acute reperfused myocardial infarction assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandler, Diana; Luecke, Christian; Grothoff, Matthias; Andres, Claudia; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Nitzsche, Stefan; Riese, Franziska; Gutberlet, Matthias [University Leipzig - Heart Centre, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Mende, Meinhard [University Leipzig, Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials, Leipzig (Germany); Waha, Suzanne de; Desch, Steffen; Lurz, Philipp; Eitel, Ingo [University Leipzig - Heart Centre, Department of Internal Medicine/ Cardiology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) and microvascular obstruction (MVO) represent reperfusion injury after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with prognostic impact and ''hypointense core'' (HIC) appearance in T{sub 2}-weighted images. We aimed to distinguish between IMH and MVO by using T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and analysed influencing factors for IMH development. A total of 151 patients with acute STEMI underwent CMR after primary angioplasty. T{sub 2}-STIR sequences were used to identify HIC, late gadolinium enhancement to visualise MVO and T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted sequences to detect IMH. IMH{sup +}/IMH{sup -} patients were compared considering infarct size, myocardial salvage, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow, reperfusion time, ventricular volumes, function and pre-interventional medication. Seventy-six patients (50 %) were IMH{sup +}, 82 (54 %) demonstrated HIC and 100 (66 %) MVO. IMH was detectable without HIC in 16 %, without MVO in 5 % and HIC without MVO in 6 %. Multivariable analyses revealed that IMH was associated with significant lower left ventricular ejection fraction and myocardial salvage index, larger left ventricular volume and infarct size. Patients with TIMI flow grade ≤1 before angioplasty demonstrated IMH significantly more often. IMH is associated with impaired left ventricular function and higher infarct size. T{sub 2} and HIC imaging showed moderate agreement for IMH detection. T{sub 2}{sup *} imaging might be the preferred CMR imaging method for comprehensive IMH assessment. (orig.)

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pericardial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francone Marco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pericardium and pericardial diseases in particular have received, in contrast to other topics in the field of cardiology, relatively limited interest. Today, despite improved knowledge of pathophysiology of pericardial diseases and the availability of a wide spectrum of diagnostic tools, the diagnostic challenge remains. Not only the clinical presentation may be atypical, mimicking other cardiac, pulmonary or pleural diseases; in developed countries a shift for instance in the epidemiology of constrictive pericarditis has been noted. Accurate decision making is crucial taking into account the significant morbidity and mortality caused by complicated pericardial diseases, and the potential benefit of therapeutic interventions. Imaging herein has an important role, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is definitely one of the most versatile modalities to study the pericardium. It fuses excellent anatomic detail and tissue characterization with accurate evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of the haemodynamic consequences of pericardial constraint on cardiac filling. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge how CMR can be used to study the most common pericardial diseases.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  15. Quantification of left ventricular mechanics using vector-velocity imaging, a novel feature tracking algorithm, applied to echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Peng; MENG Hong; LIU Shi-zhen; Mani A Vannan

    2012-01-01

    Background Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the non-invasive golden standard to measure myocardial deformity.Tissue Doppler Imaging can be used to assess myocardial deformity,however,it has the limitation of angle-dependence.Our study aimed to compare left ventricular torsion and strains measured by velocity-vector imaging (VVI) using echocardiography (echo-VVI) and MRI (MRI-VVI),and to validate them against harmonic phase tagged MRI (HARP MRI).Methods A total number of 34 subjects (14 normal and 20 patients) were evaluated.Apical and basal image of left ventricular short axis view were acquired for measurements of apical and basal rotation.circumferential and radial strain using both echo-VVI and MRI-VVl.An apical four-chamber view was obtained for measuring the distance between the apical and basal levels.Results The correlations of segmental rotations,circumferential and radial strains were high between echo-VVI and HARP MRI,while the agreement of apical rotation was poor.Left ventricular torsion showed much better correlation and agreement between echo-VVI and HARP MRI than apical rotation:the coefficient was 0.97,P <0.001.The correlation between MRI-VVI and HARP MRI in quantifying rotational parameters and strains was similar with echo-VVI and HARP MRI.Echo-VVI could discriminate normal and dysfunctional ventricles on either hypertensive or dilated cardiomyopathy.Conclusion The data from this study show that (1) it is feasible to quantify left ventricular torsion and myocardial strain using echo-VVI and MRI-VVI in normal subjects,patients with left ventricular global systolic dysfunction and segment systolic dysfunction; (2) the agreement among all mechanical parameters derived from echo-VVl,MRI-VVI,and HARP MRI remained with clinically acceptable ranges.

  16. Comparing cardiac magnetic resonance with echocardiogram on diagnosis of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy%心尖肥厚型心肌病的MRI与超声心动图对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁思殊; 李志伟; 夏黎明

    2015-01-01

    AbrtractObjective:To discuss the character of cardiac magnetic resonance and echocardiogram findings of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (AHCM), and evaluate the diagnostic value of CMR and echocardiogram in AHCM.Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients (male 16, female 5) with AHCM underwent Cardiac Magnetic Resonance, echocardiogram, ECG and coronary angiography. Results:The cardiac magnetic resonance revealed apical hypertrophic in all the patients. Among them, 13 patients were pure form P-AHCM, 1 patient was pure form T-AHCM, 1 patient was mixed form P-AHCM, and 6 patients were mixed form T-AHCM. Magnetic resonance imaging showed “ace of spades” morphology of the left ventricle in all the T-AHCM patients. Four patients underwent myocardial contrast enhancement MR scanning: 3 patients presented LGE, 2 patients presented myocardial ischemia, and 2 patients presented myocardial infarction. Echocardiography provided correct diagnoses in 6/21 patients (28.6%), while in 10 patients echocardiographic results were normal. All of our patients showed electrocardiographic alterations of the ventricular repolarization: 14 patients (67.7%) with LV high voltage. Seventeen patients (80.9%) with giant negative T waves. Sixteen patients (76.2%) with a signiifcant descending ST segment. Four patients had arrhythmia in different degrees.Conclusions: MR has higher sensitivity in diagnosing AHCM than echocardiogram. The ECG is a helpful tool to screen AHCM. To the patients who is suspected of AHCM, cardiac magnetic resonance could make a deifnite diagnosis.%目的:分析心尖肥厚型心肌病(AHCM)的MRI与超声心动图影像征象,比较MRI与超声心动图对心尖肥厚型心肌病的诊断价值。材料与方法对21例心尖型肥厚型心肌病患者(男16例,女5例)行心脏MRI、超声心动图、心电图等检查。结果21例患者心脏MRI均提示心尖部心肌肥厚,单纯型P-AHCM 13例,单纯型T-AHCM 1例,混合型P-AHCM 1

  17. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  19. Magnetometer of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer that measures magnetic fields, between 2,500 gauss and 5,000 gauss, with an accuracy of a few parts per million. The circuit of the magnetometer, based on a marginal oscillator, permits a continuous tunning in the frequency range comprised between 10.0 MHz, with a signal to noise ratio of about 20. The radiofrequency amplifier is of the cascode type in integrated circuit and it operates with two 9V batteries. The modulation is at 35 Hz and it is provided by an external oscillator. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and easy to operate; it can also be used for didactic purposes to show the phenomenon of magnetic nuclear resonance and its main characteristics. (author)

  20. Use of a semi-automated cardiac segmentation tool improves reproducibility and speed of segmentation of contaminated right heart magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Animesh; Byrne, Nicholas; Nieves Velasco Forte, Maria de Las; Zhang, Song; Dyer, Adrian K; Dillenbeck, Jeanne M; Greil, Gerald F; Hussain, Tarique

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional printing has an increasing number of clinical applications in pediatric cardiology. Time required for dataset segmentation and conversion to stereolithography (STL) format remains a significant limitation. We investigated the impact of semi-automated cardiovascular-specific segmentation software on time and reproducibility of segmentation. Magnetic resonance angiograms (MRAs) of 19 patients undergoing intervention for right ventricular outflow lesions were segmented to demonstrate the right heart. STLs were created by two independent clinicians using semi-automated cardiovascular segmentation (SAS) and traditional manual segmentation (MS). Time was recorded and geometric STL disagreement was determined (0 % = no disagreement, 100 % = complete disagreement). MRA datasets were categorized as clean when only right heart structures were present in the MRA, or contaminated when left heart structures were also present and required removal. Eighteen (seven clean and 11 contaminated) cases were successfully segmented with both methods. Time to STL for clean datasets was faster with MS than SAS [median 209 s (IQR 192-252) vs. 296 s (272-317), p = 0.018] while contaminated datasets were faster with SAS [455 s (384-561) vs. 866 s (310-1429), p = 0.033]. Interobserver STL geometric disagreement was significantly lower using SAS than MS overall (0.70 ± 1.15 % vs. 1.31 ± 1.52 %, p = 0.030), and for the contaminated subset (0.81 ± 1.08 % vs. 1.75 ± 1.57 %, p = 0.036). Most geometric disagreement occurred at areas where left heart contamination was removed. Semi-automated segmentation was faster and more reproducible for contaminated datasets, while MS was faster but equally reproducible for clean datasets. Semi-automated segmentation methods are preferable for contaminated datasets and continued refinement of these tools should be supported. PMID:27173489

  1. Use of a semi-automated cardiac segmentation tool improves reproducibility and speed of segmentation of contaminated right heart magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Animesh; Byrne, Nicholas; Nieves Velasco Forte, Maria de Las; Zhang, Song; Dyer, Adrian K; Dillenbeck, Jeanne M; Greil, Gerald F; Hussain, Tarique

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional printing has an increasing number of clinical applications in pediatric cardiology. Time required for dataset segmentation and conversion to stereolithography (STL) format remains a significant limitation. We investigated the impact of semi-automated cardiovascular-specific segmentation software on time and reproducibility of segmentation. Magnetic resonance angiograms (MRAs) of 19 patients undergoing intervention for right ventricular outflow lesions were segmented to demonstrate the right heart. STLs were created by two independent clinicians using semi-automated cardiovascular segmentation (SAS) and traditional manual segmentation (MS). Time was recorded and geometric STL disagreement was determined (0 % = no disagreement, 100 % = complete disagreement). MRA datasets were categorized as clean when only right heart structures were present in the MRA, or contaminated when left heart structures were also present and required removal. Eighteen (seven clean and 11 contaminated) cases were successfully segmented with both methods. Time to STL for clean datasets was faster with MS than SAS [median 209 s (IQR 192-252) vs. 296 s (272-317), p = 0.018] while contaminated datasets were faster with SAS [455 s (384-561) vs. 866 s (310-1429), p = 0.033]. Interobserver STL geometric disagreement was significantly lower using SAS than MS overall (0.70 ± 1.15 % vs. 1.31 ± 1.52 %, p = 0.030), and for the contaminated subset (0.81 ± 1.08 % vs. 1.75 ± 1.57 %, p = 0.036). Most geometric disagreement occurred at areas where left heart contamination was removed. Semi-automated segmentation was faster and more reproducible for contaminated datasets, while MS was faster but equally reproducible for clean datasets. Semi-automated segmentation methods are preferable for contaminated datasets and continued refinement of these tools should be supported.

  2. Prenatal magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of fetal cardiac malposition%胎儿胸腔异常心脏位置的产前磁共振成像诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董素贞; 朱铭; 李奋; 钟玉敏; 张弘; 潘慧红

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨产前磁共振成像(MRI)在胎儿胸腔异常心脏位置诊断中的应用价值.方法 57例孕妇,孕龄20 ~36周.产前常规行超声检查后24 -48 h内行MRI检查,采用二维快速平衡稳态采集(2D FIESTA)序列、单次激发快速自旋回波(SSFSE)序列、快速反转恢复运动抑制(FIRM)序列以及动态FIESTA序列,行胎儿颅脑、胸部腹部常规及胸部(肺、心脏)重点冠状面、矢状面及横断面扫描,将产前MRI、超声表现与出生后影像表现或手术(n=49)、引产后尸体解剖结果 (n=8)对照.结果 原发性心脏位置异常即右位心5例;继发性心脏位置异常52例,其中右肺发育不良7例、先天性膈疝(CDH)18例、先天性肺囊腺瘤样畸形(CCAM)24例、支气管肺隔离症(BPS)2例和纵隔占位1例.结论 MRI各序列综合应用在胎儿胸腔异常心脏位置及病因诊断方面其有一定的应用价值;FIESTA序列同一切面能同时显示异常心脏位置和导致其异常的胸部其他病变,动态FIESTA序列能动态显示较明显的心脏血流异常;SSFSE和FIRM序列能较好显示引起心脏位置异常的其他胸部病变.%Objective To explore the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging ( MR!) on fetal cardiac malposition. Methods MRI examinations were performed 24 to 48 h after routine ultrasound examinations on 57 pregnant women with gestation of 20 to 36 weeks. The imaging protocols included 2 dimension fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (2D FIESTA), single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE), T, -weighted fast inversion recovery motion insensitive (FIRM) and dynamic FIESTA sequences in the axial, frontal and sagittal planes relative to the fetal brain, thorax, abdomen, especially lung and heart. Prenatal ultrasound and MRI findings were compared with postnatal diagnoses (n = 49) or autopsy ( n = 8). Postnatal evaluation included a variety of imaging and surgery. Results There were 5 cases of primary fetal cardiac

  3. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors

  4. Left Ventricle: Fully Automated Segmentation Based on Spatiotemporal Continuity and Myocardium Information in Cine Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (LV-FAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijia Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CMR quantification of LV chamber volumes typically and manually defines the basal-most LV, which adds processing time and user-dependence. This study developed an LV segmentation method that is fully automated based on the spatiotemporal continuity of the LV (LV-FAST. An iteratively decreasing threshold region growing approach was used first from the midventricle to the apex, until the LV area and shape discontinued, and then from midventricle to the base, until less than 50% of the myocardium circumference was observable. Region growth was constrained by LV spatiotemporal continuity to improve robustness of apical and basal segmentations. The LV-FAST method was compared with manual tracing on cardiac cine MRI data of 45 consecutive patients. Of the 45 patients, LV-FAST and manual selection identified the same apical slices at both ED and ES and the same basal slices at both ED and ES in 38, 38, 38, and 41 cases, respectively, and their measurements agreed within -1.6±8.7 mL, -1.4±7.8 mL, and 1.0±5.8% for EDV, ESV, and EF, respectively. LV-FAST allowed LV volume-time course quantitatively measured within 3 seconds on a standard desktop computer, which is fast and accurate for processing the cine volumetric cardiac MRI data, and enables LV filling course quantification over the cardiac cycle.

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Setor de Tomografia Computarizada e Ressonancia Magnetica Cardiovascular]. E-mail: rochitte@incor.usp.br; Kim, Raymond J. [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tassi, Eduardo Marinho [Diagnosticos da America S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sector of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography

    2007-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  6. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  7. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad;

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  8. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. Allan

    1999-11-01

    The lung presents both challenges and opportunities for study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The technical challenges arise from respiratory and cardiac motion, limited signal from the tissues, and unique physical structure of the lung. These challenges are heightened in magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) where the spatial resolution may be up to a million times higher than that of conventional MRI. The development of successful techniques for MRM of the lung present enormous opportunities for basic studies of lung structure and function, toxicology, environmental stress, and drug discovery by permitting investigators to study this most essential organ nondestructively in the live animal. Over the last 15 years, scientists at the Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy have developed techniques for MRM in the live animal through an interdisciplinary program of biology, physics, chemistry, electrical engineering, and computer science. This talk will focus on the development of specialized radiofrequency coils for lung imaging, projection encoding methods to limit susceptibility losses, specialized support structures to control and monitor physiologic motion, and the most recent development of hyperpolarized gas imaging with ^3He and ^129Xe.

  9. Determinants of Discrepancies in Detection and Comparison of the Prognostic Significance of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy by Electrocardiogram and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Chen, Haiying; Estes, E. Harvey; Mateasik, Anton; Bluemke, David A.; Lima, Joao A. C.; Burke, Gregory L; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2014-01-01

    Despite the low sensitivity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), ECG-LVH is known to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular risk. Understanding reasons for the discrepancies in detection of LVH by ECG versus imaging could help improve the diagnostic ability of ECG. We examined factors associated with false-positive and false-negative ECG-LVH, using cardiac MRI as the gold standard. We also compared the prognostic significance of ECG-LVH and MRI-LVH ...

  10. Ultra-high frequency magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Magill, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of radiofrequency probe design for Ultra High Frequency Magnetic Resonance Imaging (7T). The signal-to-noise ratio available in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is determined by the static magnetic field strength, causing a continued drive toward higher fields to enable faster image acquisition at finer spatial resolution. The resonant frequency increases linearly with static field strength. At 7T the proton resonant frequency is 300MHz, with a wavelength...

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and PET-CT of left atrial paraganglioma

    OpenAIRE

    Ruehm Stefan; Lai Chi; Tomasian Anderanik; Krishnam Mayil S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac paragangliomas are among the rarest primary cardiac tumors. We present a case of left atrial paraganglioma in a patient who presented with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess in which cardiovascular magnetic resonance in multiple orientations and PET-CT played an important role in the diagnosis and tissue characterization.

  12. Organ perfusion during voluntary pulmonary hyperinflation; a magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhl, Kasper; Drvis, Ivan; Barak, Otto;

    2016-01-01

    . Myocardial, pulmonary, skeletal muscle, kidney, and liver perfusion were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging in 10 elite breath-hold divers at rest and during moderate GPI. Cardiac chamber volumes, stroke volume, and thus CO were determined from cardiac short-axis cine images. Organ volumes were assessed...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging derived left ventricular global and region function parameters in healthy adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆莉莎

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish cardiac magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)derived left ventricular(LV)global and region function parameters in normal adults.Methods Twenty normal adults were examined with fast imaging employing steady-state(Fiesta)acquisition sequence of cardiac MRI,LV global function and LV region function were measured at basal,middle,apical level and at 16

  14. Low dose prospective ECG-gated delayed enhanced dual-source computed tomography in reperfused acute myocardial infarction comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Rui, E-mail: rui_wang1979@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Zhang Zhaoqi, E-mail: zhaoqi5000@vip.sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Xu Lei, E-mail: leixu2001@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Ma Qin, E-mail: tel1367@gmail.com [Department of Emergency, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); He Yi, E-mail: heyi139@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Lu Dongxu, E-mail: larry.hi@163.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Yu Wei, E-mail: yuwei02@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Fan Zhanming, E-mail: fanzm120@tom.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated delayed contrast-enhanced dual-source computed tomography (DCE-DSCT) can accurately delineate the extension of myocardial infarction (MI) compared with delayed enhanced cardiac MR (DE-MR). Material and methods: Eleven patients were examined using dual-source CT and cardiac MR in 2 weeks after a first reperfused MI. DCE-DSCT scan protocol was performed with prospective ECG-gating sequential scan model 7 min after contrast administration. In a 17-model, infarcted myocardium detected by DE-MR was categorized as transmural and subendocardial extension. Segment of infarcted location and graded transmurality were compared between DCE-MDCT and DE-MR. Results: In all eleven patients, diagnostic quality was obtained for depicting delayed enhanced myocardium. Agreement between DCE-DSCT and MR was good on myocardial segment based comparison (kappa = 0.85, p < 0.001), and on transmural and subendocardial infarction type comparison (kappa = 0.82, p < 0.001, kappa = 0.52, p < 0.001, respectively). CT value was higher on infarcted region than that of normal region (100.02 {+-} 9.57 HU vs. 72.63 {+-} 7.32 HU, p < 0.001). Radiation dose of prospectively ECG-gating protocol were 0.99 {+-} 0.08 mSv (0.82-1.19 mSv). Conclusions: Prospective ECG-gated DCE-DSCT can accurately assess the extension and the patterns of myocardial infarction with low radiation dose.

  15. Value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study summarizes an experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of twelve patients with a variety of cardiac abnormalities (myocardial infarction, mural thrombi, obstructive cardiomyopathy, pericarditis). The results are compared with clinical data, with measurements from other techniques such as two-dimensional echocardiography and with the images in normal subjects. An anticipated advantage of MRI is the ability to provide better tissue characterization, than has been attained with other imaging techniques, by relaxation time measurement

  16. The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Noureldin Radwa A; Liu Songtao; Nacif Marcelo S; Judge Daniel P; Halushka Marc K; Abraham Theodore P; Ho Carolyn; Bluemke David A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic disease of the heart. HCM is characterized by a wide range of clinical expression, ranging from asymptomatic mutation carriers to sudden cardiac death as the first manifestation of the disease. Over 1000 mutations have been identified, classically in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. Noninvasive imaging is central to the diagnosis of HCM and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used to characterize morp...

  17. Value of black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter John Paul; Smith Gillian C; He Taigang; Alam Mohammed H; Firmin David N; Pennell Dudley J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To assess whether black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance is superior to conventional white blood imaging of cardiac iron in patients with thalassaemia major (TM). Materials and methods We performed both conventional white blood and black blood T2* CMR sequences in 100 TM patients to determine intra and inter-observer variability and presence of artefacts. In 23 patients, 2 separate studies of both techniques were performed to assess interstudy reproducibility. Resu...

  18. Heart valve disease: investigation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Myerson Saul G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a valuable investigative tool in many areas of cardiac medicine. Its value in heart valve disease is less well appreciated however, particularly as echocardiography is a powerful and widely available technique in valve disease. This review highlights the added value that CMR can bring in valve disease, complementing echocardiography in many areas, but it has also become the first-line investigation in some, such as pulmonary valve di...

  19. Visualization of coronary venous anatomy by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Crean Andrew; Plein Sven; Younger John F; Ball Stephen G; Greenwood John P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Coronary venous imaging with whole-heart cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) angiography has recently been described using developmental pulse sequences and intravascular contrast agents. However, the practical utility of coronary venous imaging will be for patients with heart failure in whom cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is being considered. As such complementary information on ventricular function and myocardial viability will be required. The aim of this s...

  20. Automatic slice-alignment method in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of the right ventricle in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Nitta, Shuhei; Kuhara, Shigehide; Ishimura, Rieko; Kariyasu, Toshiya; Imai, Masamichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Takeguchi, Tomoyuki; Shiodera, Taichiro

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new automatic slice-alignment method, which enables right ventricular scan planning in addition to the left ventricular scan planning developed in our previous work, to simplify right ventricular cardiac scan planning and assess its accuracy and the clinical acceptability of the acquired imaging planes in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension. Steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences covering the whole heart in the end-diastolic phase with ECG gating were used to acquire 2D axial multislice images. To realize right ventricular scan planning, two morphological feature points are added to be detected and a total of eight morphological features of the heart were extracted from these series of images, and six left ventricular planes and four right ventricular planes were calculated simultaneously based on the extracted features. The subjects were 33 patients (25 with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and 8 with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension). The four right ventricular reference planes including right ventricular short-axis, 4-chamber, 2-chamber, and 3-chamber images were evaluated. The acceptability of the acquired imaging planes was visually evaluated using a 4-point scale, and the angular differences between the results obtained by this method and by conventional manual annotation were measured for each view. The average visual scores were 3.9±0.4 for short-axis images, 3.8±0.4 for 4-chamber images, 3.8±0.4 for 2-chamber images, and 3.5±0.6 for 3-chamber images. The average angular differences were 8.7±5.3, 8.3±4.9, 8.1±4.8, and 7.9±5.3 degrees, respectively. The processing time was less than 2.5 seconds in all subjects. The proposed method, which enables right ventricular scan planning in addition to the left ventricular scan planning developed in our previous work, can provide clinically acceptable planes in a short time and is useful because special proficiency in performing cardiac MR for

  1. Fast magnetization reversal of nanoclusters in resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    An effective method for ultrafast magnetization reversal of nanoclusters is suggested. The method is based on coupling a nanocluster to a resonant electric circuit. This coupling causes the appearance of a magnetic feedback field acting on the cluster, which drastically shortens the magnetization reversal time. The influence of the resonator properties, nanocluster parameters, and external fields on the magnetization dynamics and reversal time is analyzed. The magnetization reversal time can ...

  2. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  4. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation....... Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical...

  5. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging.

  6. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  7. Complementarity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography for the in vivo investigation of human cardiac metabolism and neurotransmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET is quantitative and very sensitive, and therefore only tracer amounts of molecules need to be injected. It allows neurotransmitters and receptors to be studied and a global view of metabolism to oxygen consumption, glucose and fatty acid utilization to be obtained. SPET also has good sensitivity, but uses gamma-emitting isotopes of heteroatoms. Their longer half-lives allow follow-up for hours or days. MRS is based on stable elements with high or low natural abundance. It has very low sensitivity and only millimolar concentrations of substrates can be detected, but various parts of metabolism can be studied. The in vivo measurement of myocardial concentration of substances has many problems that are common to all three techniques. The complementarity of the techniques is illustrated by their applications to the study of cardiac metabolism. For instance, the energy metabolism can be studied by 31P-MRS, which detects the high-energy compounds ATP and phosphocreatine, and 13C-MRS yields information on the tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. PET and SPET allow the utilization of fatty acids, the normal fuels of the heart, to be studied. During ischaemia, PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose can determine the glucose consumption and 1H-MRS shows the increase in lactic acid, reflecting anaerobic glycolysis. Comparison of the use of acetate labelled with 11C for PET or 13C for MRS shows the potentials and limitations of each technique. Myocardial perfusion can be evaluated directly with various PET tracers or indirectly with thallium 201 or various technetium-99m-labelled tracers by SPET. No MRS marker of perfusion is so far clinically available. Mainly SPET and PET are used clinically for the investigation of ischaemic heart disease as well as cardiomyophathies, but some initial results using 31P-MRS are being obtained. (orig./MG)

  8. Application of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Fibrilla-tion%心脏磁共振成像在心房颤动消融手术前后的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明鲜(综述); 周胜华(审校)

    2015-01-01

    随着科学的进步、技术的发展,射频消融已成为治疗心房颤动的重要手段,其在心房颤动的治疗中起举足轻重作用,但仍有部分患者消融术无效,其中一个主要原因系无法正确评估肺静脉和左心房结构。心脏磁共振成像( cMRI)具有高分辨率的优点,能准确地评估软组织结构,cMRI近年来运用于心房颤动评估逐渐增多,有助于提高心房颤动射频消融成功率和减少手术并发症。%With the development of current technology, radiofrequency ablation has become a critical treatment method for atrial fibrillation .Radiofrequency ablation plays a pivotal role in atrial fibrillation thera-py,however,it still remains ineffective to a few patients .One of the main shortcoming is its inability to cor-rectly assess the structure of pulmonary vein and left atrium .The major advantages of cardiac magnetic reso-nance imaging(cMRI) are is the high temporal and spatial resolution and the ability to characterize the com-position of soft tissues,therefore,cMRI has been gradually used to assess atrial fibrillation in order to improve ablation outcome and reduce complications .

  9. Bidimensional measurements of right ventricular function for prediction of survival in patients with pulmonary hypertension: comparison of reproducibility and time of analysis with volumetric cardiac magnetic resonance imaging analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Kamel, Ihab R; Rastegar, Neda; Damico, Rachel; Kolb, Todd M; Boyce, Danielle M; Sager, Ala-Eddin S; Skrok, Jan; Shehata, Monda L; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Bluemke, David A; Girgis, Reda E; Mathai, Stephen C; Hassoun, Paul M; Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2015-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that bidimensional measurements of right ventricular (RV) function obtained by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are faster than volumetric measures and highly reproducible, with comparable ability to predict patient survival. CMR-derived tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), RV fractional shortening (RVFS), RV fractional area change (RVFAC), standard functional and volumetric measures, and ventricular mass index (VMI) were compared with right heart catheterization data. CMR analysis time was recorded. Receiver operating characteristic curves, Kaplan-Meier, Cox proportional hazard (CPH), and Bland-Altman test were used for analysis. Forty-nine subjects with PAH and 18 control subjects were included. TAPSE, RVFS, RVFAC, RV ejection fraction, and VMI correlated significantly with pulmonary vascular resistance and mean pulmonary artery pressure (all P < 0.05). Patients were followed up for a mean (± standard deviation) of 2.5 ± 1.6 years. Kaplan-Meier curves showed that death was strongly associated with TAPSE <18 mm, RVFS <16.7%, and RVFAC <18.8%. In CPH models with TAPSE as dichotomized at 18 mm, TAPSE was significantly associated with risk of death in both unadjusted and adjusted models (hazard ratio, 4.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-11.3; P = 0.005 for TAPSE <18 mm). There was high intra- and interobserver agreement. Bidimensional measurements were faster (1.5 ± 0.3 min) than volumetric measures (25 ± 6 min). In conclusion, TAPSE, RVFS, and RVFAC measures are efficient measures of RV function by CMR that demonstrate significant correlation with invasive measures of PAH severity. In patients with PAH, TAPSE, RVFS, and RVFAC have high intra- and interobserver reproducibility and are more rapidly obtained than volumetric measures. TAPSE <18 mm by CMR was strongly and independently associated with survival in PAH. PMID:26401254

  10. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buff, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, C. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); MacMathuana, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gilligan, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ennis, J.T. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  13. Endocardium and epicardium segmentation of left ventricle in cardiac magnetic resonance images based on directional Snake model%基于方向Snake模型的心脏磁共振图像左心室内外膜分割

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁; 余学飞; 卢广文

    2012-01-01

    Concerning that the edges of the endocardium and epicardium of the left ventricle in the cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( MR1) images have different directions, a new directional active contour model in curve evolution framework was proposed for segmentation of endocardium and epicardium of the left ventricle. The curve evolution equation included a hybrid geometric flow with edge and region gray characteristics that were obtained from the image itself. The edge-based term in the geometric flow borrowed from extended Dynamic Directional Gradient Vector Flow ( DDGVF) with fast marching method was utilized to guide the curve evolution towards the object boundaries with different direction. The region-based term borrowed from Chan-Vese (CV) model was utilized to prevent the curve from leakage under the influence of other edge components. The final curve evolution equation was dealt with level set method. The experimental results for gray and cardiac MRI images show that the proposed method can get better segmentation effects. It has certain application value for realizing myocardium auto-segmentation, evaluation and analysis of heart function based on cardiac MRI images.%针对心脏磁共振图像(MRI)左心室内膜与外膜边缘方向不同的特点,提出一种基于曲线演化框架的方向主动轮廓模型进行左心室内外膜分割.曲线演化方程中包含基于图像边缘与区域灰度特征的混合几何流.几何流中的边缘信息项由经Fast Marching方法扩展后的动态方向梯度矢量流场(DDGVF)构成,用以引导曲线向具有不同方向的目标边缘运动,而区域友度信息项则由Chan-Vese (CV)模型构成,用以防止曲线在演化过程中受其他边缘成分的影响而发生泄漏.最终的曲线演化方程采用水平集方法求解.实验结果表明,所提方法能够较为准确地分割出心脏MRI图像中的左心室内外膜并具有较好的鲁棒性,对于实现基于心脏MRI图像的左心室心

  14. The Clinic Application of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation the Cardiac Function Combined with Echocardiography%心脏磁共振结合心脏超声对左心室功能评价的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨向峰; 董光; 耿海; 葛敏; 方龙江

    2015-01-01

    目的:应用心脏磁共振( CMR)评价左心室功能,并通过对比UCG探讨CMR在临床中的应用价值。方法选取行CMR检查患者22例,采用Siemens Magnetom Skyra 3.0 T超导型磁共振仪进行扫描,均进行MR平扫、电影扫描,所有检查者行CMR前均行超声心动图检查。结果对比CMR和超声心动图测量所得EDV,ESV,EF值,CMR测量EDV,EF值较超声心动图略低,ESV值高于超声心动图。两组间EDV,ESV值无统计学意义(P>0.05),EF值具有统计学差异(P<0.05)。结论 CMR在评价左心室功能方面准确性及可靠性好,评价指标全面,可应用于各种复杂疾病心脏功能的检查。%Objective To evaluate the left ventricular function by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging( CMR) ,and to explore the fesibility and value of CMR in clinical application.Methods The lefe ventricular function of twenty-two patients were evaluated by Siemens Magnetom Skyra 3.0T magnetic resonance Machine.Before that,all patients underwent echocardiographic measurements.Results The value of EDV,ESV,EF measured by CMR and echocardiography showed the EDV,EF measured by CMR was slightly lower than the value meas-ured by echocardiography;The ESV measured by CMR was slightly higher than the value measured by echocardiography.Linear correlation a-nalysis of the two methods were highly correlated(r=0.843-0.936).The consistency was also higher.The value of EDV,ESV had no statisti-cal significance(P>0.05).While the value of EF was statistically significant(P<0.05).Conclusion CMR shows the left ventricular func-tion with good accuracy,reliability and comprehensive assessment criteria,and can be used to check cardiac function in a variety of complex diseases.

  15. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J;

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...... was seen when the single slice technique was used (r = 0.06, p greater than 0.80). The results indicate that MRI is a reliable method for left ventricular volume determination when the multislice technique is used....

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in patients with cardiac pace makers. in-vitro- and in-vivo-evaluation at 1.5 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In-vitro and In-vivo evaluation of feasibility and safety of MRI of the brain at 1.5 T in patients with implanted pacemakers (PM). Materials and Methods: 24 PM models and 45 PM electrodes were tested In-vitro with respect to translational forces, heating of PM leads, behaviour of reed switch (activated vs. deactivated) and function at a 1.5 T MRI-system (actively shielded, maximum field gradient: 30 mT/m; rise time: 150 T/m/s). Based on these results, 63 MRI examinations in 45 patients with implanted PM were performed. Prior to MRI the PM were re-programmed in an asynchronous mode. The maximum SAR of MRI-sequences was limited to 1.2 W/kg. Continuous monitoring of ECG and pulse oximetry was performed during MRI. PM inquiry was performed prior to MRI, immediately after MRI and - to assess long-term damages - three months after the MRI exams, including determination of stimulation thresholds to assess potential thermal myocardial injuries at the lead tips. Results: Translational forces (Fmax≤560 mN) and temperature increase (ΔTmax≤2.98 C) were in a range which does not represent a safety concern from a biophysical point of view. No changes to the programmed parameters of the PM or damage of PM components were observed neither In-vitro (n=0/24) nor In-vivo (n=0/63). Despite the strong magnetic field, the reed switch remained deactivated in 54% (13/24) of the cases during In-vitro simulated MRI exams of the brain. All patient studies (n=63/63) could be completed without any complications. Atrial and ventricular stimulation thresholds (expressed as pulse duration at 2-fold rheobase) did not change significantly immediately post-MRI nor in the 3 months follow-up (pre-MRI: 0.17 ms±0.13 ms, post-MRI: 0.18 ms±0.14 ms, 3 months follow-up: 0.17 ms±0.12 ms). (orig.)

  17. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. II. The heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, Nadja M.; Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2014-07-01

    One third of all deaths worldwide in 2008 were caused by cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and the incidence of CVD related deaths rises ever more. Thus, improved imaging techniques and modalities are needed for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is a minimally invasive technique that is increasingly important due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, its high soft tissue contrast and its ability of functional and quantitative imaging. It is widely accepted as the gold standard of cardiac functional analysis. In the short period of small animal MRI, remarkable progress has been achieved concerning new, fast imaging schemes as well as purpose-built equipment. Dedicated small animal scanners allow for tapping the full potential of recently developed animal models of cardiac disease. In this paper, we review state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques and applications in small animals at ultra-high fields (UHF).

  18. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Ginat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosarcoidosis is an uncommon condition with protean manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often used in the diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of patients with neurosarcoidosis. Therefore, familiarity with the variety of MRI appearances is important. In this pictorial essay, the range of possible patterns of involvement in neurosarcoidosis are depicted and discussed. These include intracranial and spine leptomeningeal involvement, cortical and cerebral white matter lesions, corpus callosum involvement, sellar and suprasellar involvement, periventricular involvement, cranial nerve involvement, cavernous sinus involvement, hydrocephalus, dural involvement, ischemic lesions, perivascular involvement, orbit lesions, osseous involvement, nerve root involvement, and spinal cord intramedullary involvement. Differential diagnoses for each pattern of involvement of neurosarcoidosis are also provided.

  20. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C;

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C;

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  4. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of erythrocyte membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, D.; Kamat, V.B.; Gier, J. de; Penkett, S.A.

    1968-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for studying molecular interactions in biological membranes has been investigated using erythrocyte membrane fragments. Sonic dispersion of these fragments produces a sharp and well-defined high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. The sp

  7. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  8. Magnetic non-collinear neutron wave resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Khaidukov, Yu N

    2009-01-01

    The expression are received for amplitude of neutron reflection from layered magnetic non-collinear structure (neutron wave resonator (NWR)). It is showed the magnetic non-collinear NWR is characterized by the system of pairs of resonances for the spin flipped neutrons. The conditions are defined at which amplifying of spin-flipped neutron flux in wave resonator is multiple increased in comparison with amplifying of neutron absorption.

  9. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as step...

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helbing, Willem A. [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Paediatrics (Division of Cardiology), Sp-2.429, P.O. Box 2060, CB, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ouhlous, Mohamed [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    MRI is an important additional tool in the diagnostic work-up of children with congenital heart disease. This review aims to summarise the role MRI has in this patient population. Echocardiography remains the main diagnostic tool in congenital heart disease. In specific situations, MRI is used for anatomical imaging of congenital heart disease. This includes detailed assessment of intracardiac anatomy with 2-D and 3-D sequences. MRI is particularly useful for assessment of retrosternal structures in the heart and for imaging large vessel anatomy. Functional assessment includes assessment of ventricular function using 2-D cine techniques. Of particular interest in congenital heart disease is assessment of right and single ventricular function. Two-dimensional and newer 3-D techniques to quantify flow in these patients are or will soon become an integral part of quantification of shunt size, valve function and complex flow patterns in large vessels. More advanced uses of MRI include imaging of cardiovascular function during stress and tissue characterisation of the myocardium. Techniques used for this purpose need further validation before they can become part of the daily routine of MRI assessment of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  11. Myocardial deformation imaging by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in comparison to late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance for analysis of myocardial fibrosis in severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Rainer; Altiok, Ertunc; Friedman, Zvi; Becker, Michael; Frick, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Myocardial deformation analysis by speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) has been used for analysis of myocardial viability and myocardial fibrosis. Patients with severe aortic stenosis are known to develop myocardial fibrosis. This study evaluated the association between myocardial fibrosis determined by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and 2-dimensional STE in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In 30 patients (78±7 years) with severe aortic stenosis (mean gradient 53±21 mm Hg), peak systolic circumferential strain based on 2-dimensional echocardiographic parasternal short-axis views and peak systolic longitudinal strain based on apical views were determined for analysis of regional function. LGE CMR was performed to define the amount of fibrosis in each segment within 24 hours of echocardiography. Relative amount of fibrosis was determined based on LGE CMR as gray-scale threshold 6 SDs above the mean signal intensity of the normal remote myocardium. There was a decrease in LGE from base to apex (14.4±8.7% for basal segments, 3.4±3.0% for midventricular segments, and 2.1±3.0% for apical segments; pmyocardial deformation expressed as peak systolic longitudinal strain from base to apex (-11.6±7.0% for basal segments, -16.9±6.5% for midventricular segments, and -17.4±7.7% for apical segments; p=0.001). There was a negative correlation between the amount of myocardial fibrosis determined by LGE CMR and peak systolic longitudinal strain for the total left ventricle (r=-0.538, p=0.007). Myocardial fibrosis defined as LGE>10% could be identified by peak systolic longitudinal strain less than -11.6%, with a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 75% (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.69). In conclusion, myocardial fibrosis increases from apical to basal left ventricular segments in patients with severe aortic stenosis. There is an association between severity of myocardial fibrosis defined by LGE CMR

  12. The regional myocardial microvascular dysfunction differences in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with or without left ventricular outflow tract obstruction: Assessment with first-pass perfusion imaging using 3.0-T cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hua-yan [Department of Radiology, National Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37# Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Yang, Zhi-gang, E-mail: yangzg666@163.com [Department of Radiology, National Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37# Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Sun, Jia-yu; Wen, Ling-yi; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Shuai [Department of Radiology, National Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37# Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Guo, Ying-kun [Department of Radiology, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University (China)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To assess regional myocardial microvascular dysfunction differences in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients with or without left ventricular outflow tract obstruction using 3.0-T cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) first-pass perfusion imaging. Materials and methods: Forty-two HCM patients, including 25 HCM patients with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (HOCM), 17 HCM patients without left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (NOHCM), and 14 healthy subjects underwent CMR. The left ventricular (LV) function, left ventricular end-diastolic wall thickness (EDTH), and diameter of left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) were measured and calculated. Based on the signal–time curve of the first-pass myocardium perfusion imaging, perfusion parameters including upslope, time to peak, and peak intensity, were assessed and compared by using one-way analysis of variance and independent t tests. Results: On the first-pass perfusion imaging, lower upslope and peak intensity and longer time to peak were found in HCM patients compared with normal subjects (all p < 0.05). In contrast to the NOHCM group, the average time to peak of the HOCM group was increased (13.30 ± 4.82 s vs 16.28 ± 4.90 s, p < 0.05), but first-pass perfusion upslope was reduced (4.96 ± 2.55 vs 2.58 ± 0.77, p < 0.05). According to the bull's-eye model, the HOCM group's average thickness of basal segments was thicker than the NOHCM group, especially the anteroseptal, inferolateral, and anterior wall values, with a corresponding lower first-pass perfusion upslope than the NOHCM group (all p < 0.05). A significant correlation was observed between first-pass perfusion upslope and LV EDTH (r = −0.551, p < 0.001) and LVOT diameter (r = 0.472, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The regional myocardial microvascular dysfunction differences in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients with or without left ventricular outflow tract obstruction can be detected with first-pass perfusion CMR

  13. A Preliminary Study of the Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Multi-low-b DWI Technology%多个低b值DWI技术在心脏成像中的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明熙; 张挽时; 张子衡; 孟利民; 龚万沣; 刘洁; 方红; 王萍

    2016-01-01

    目的:初步研究多个低b值DWI技术在心脏检查中的成像技术和成像特点。方法对符合入组和排除条件的已签署知情同意书的30例健康志愿者行3.0T CMR Cine电影、T2WI和多b值DWI序列扫描,探讨此序列临床应用的可行性,统计分析心肌在各节段、不同供血区、年龄和性别中有无差异,并讨论行DWI序列扫描时,选择何种b值能够更好地反映心肌血流灌注情况。结果当b=20、60 s/mm2时,图像质量较好。健康志愿者各节段心肌ADC值不全相等(F=6.315,P<0.001)。左前降支供血区,右冠状动脉供血区和左旋支供血区ADC值有差异(F=27.804,P<0.001),分别为(0.01186±0.00422)mm2/s,(0.01032±0.00333)mm2/s和(0.00902±0.00248)mm2/s。从基底部到心尖部,心肌平均ADC值无差异。结论多个低b值DWI技术在CMR检查中具有较好的可行性和可重复性。健康志愿者各节段心肌ADC值存在节段性差异。当b=20,60 s/mm2(<100 s/mm2)时,图像质量较好,可能提示此DWI图像可更好地显示心肌血流灌注特点,为今后选择合理b值进行相关研究提供参考。%Objective To investigate the imaging technology and characteristics of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) multi-low-b DWI technology.Methods With a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, cardiovascular magnetic imaging, including MR Cine, T2WI and multi-low-b DWI technology, was performed in 30 healthy volunteers who had given written informed consent to investigate the clinical feasibility of multi-low-b DWI technology and to explore whether ADC values in different segmental myocardium, differentblood supply areas, different age-groups and gender were similar or not. A discussion was made on whichb value shouldbe selected tobetter relfect the perfusion of myocardium when using DWI technology to scan cardiac structure.Results The image quality of multi-low-b DWI technology wasbetter when theb

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of intraventricular dyssynchrony and delayed enhancement as predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure of ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petryka, Joanna, E-mail: joannapetryka@hotmail.com [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Miśko, Jolanta [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Radiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Przybylski, Andrzej [Department of Arrhythmia, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Śpiewak, Mateusz [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Małek, Łukasz A. [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Cardiology and Interventional Angiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Werys, Konrad [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz, Łukasz [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Cardiomyopathy, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Gepner, Katarzyna [Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Croisille, Pierre [Creatis Laboratory, UMR CNRS 5515, INSERM, U1044, CHU Saint-Etienne, Universite de Lyon (France); Demkow, Marcin [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Rużyłło, Witold [Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the value of dyssynchrony and myocardial viability assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure (HF) of both ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled for CRT in NYHA class II–IV, left ventricular ejection fraction <35%, QRS ≥ 120 ms were included. Tagged cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were performed. Dyssynchrony was assessed with inTag toolbox and LGE was quantified using cutoff value at half of maximal signal in the scar. Cardiopulmonary exercise test, echocardiography and blood testing for NT-proBNP levels were done at baseline and 6 months after CRT. Results: 52 patients (age 60.3 ± 13 years) were included. 26 patients (50%) met response criteria. The ischaemic etiology of HF was more frequent (69% vs. 31%, p = 0.002), the percent of LGE was higher (7.7% [0–13.5%] vs. 19.0% (0–31.9%], p = 0.013), regional vector of circumferential strain variance (RVV) was lower (0.27 ± 0.08 vs. 0.34 ± 0.09, p = 0.009) and uniformity of radial strain was higher (0.72 ± 0.25 vs. 0.56 ± 0.29, p = 0.046) in non-responders vs. responders. Multivariate logistic regression showed that RVV predicted response to CRT (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.02–5.02, p = 0.0430) independently of LGE and the etiology of heart failure. In the subgroup of patients with ischaemic HF the extend of transmural scar within myocardium was higher in non-responders vs. responders (26.3% vs. 15.0% respectively, p = 0.01) and was a predictor of response to CRT in univariable analysis (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77–0.98, p = 0.025) providing the sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 75% at the cutoff point of 18% in the prediction of poor response to CRT. In patients with non-ischaemic HF QRS was wider (162 ms vs. 140 ms, p = 0.04), regional vector of strain variance (RVV) was higher (0.39 vs. 0.25, p = 0.002) and uniformity of radial

  15. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Yumin Hou

    2013-01-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE osci...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in mucopolysaccharidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Seijun; Tanaka, Akemi; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu; Murata, Ryosuke; Isshiki, Gen; Inoue, Yuichi

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images in six patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), two with type I S, one with type II A, two with type III B, and one with type VI MPS, were reviewed and compared with reported pathological findings and with CT scans. We used a Picker International MR imager with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The pulse sequences involved the inversion recovery technique (TR, 2,100 msec ; TI, 600 msec ; TE, 40 msec) for the T/sub 1/-weighted images and spin echo technique (TR, 1,800 msec ; TE, 120 msec) for the T/sub 2/-weighted images. The TC scanner was a Somatom 2 or DR3. In the patients with type II A and type VI MPS, there were multi-focal lesions of various sizes that showed prolonged T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ in the white matter. These lesions, which were not detected by CT, seemed to be correlated with the pathological findings of cavitation and dilated periadventitial space with viscous fluid. In the patients with type II A and type III B MPS, the T/sub 2/-weighted images showed a reduced contrast between gray and white matters, which may be related to the deposition of glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides in the lysosomes of the neurons and astrocytes of the gray and white matters. These findings seemed to be correlated with the clinical finding of mental retardation. In the patient of type II A MPS, there were lesions that showed prolonged T/sub 2/ of the periventricular white matter, suggesting periventricular edema. But CT hardly detected these lesions. In the patients with type I S MPS, no abnormal findings were found in MR imaging. It was concluded that MR imaging was far more sensitive for the detection of MPS lesions than CT, and was a useful method for differential diagnosis in MPS.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in mucopolysaccharidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images in six patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), two with type I S, one with type II A, two with type III B, and one with type VI MPS, were reviewed and compared with reported pathological findings and with CT scans. We used a Picker International MR imager with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The pulse sequences involved the inversion recovery technique (TR, 2,100 msec ; TI, 600 msec ; TE, 40 msec) for the T1-weighted images and spin echo technique (TR, 1,800 msec ; TE, 120 msec) for the T2-weighted images. The TC scanner was a Somatom 2 or DR3. In the patients with type II A and type VI MPS, there were multi-focal lesions of various sizes that showed prolonged T1 and T2 in the white matter. These lesions, which were not detected by CT, seemed to be correlated with the pathological findings of cavitation and dilated periadventitial space with viscous fluid. In the patients with type II A and type III B MPS, the T2-weighted images showed a reduced contrast between gray and white matters, which may be related to the deposition of glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides in the lysosomes of the neurons and astrocytes of the gray and white matters. These findings seemed to be correlated with the clinical finding of mental retardation. In the patient of type II A MPS, there were lesions that showed prolonged T2 of the periventricular white matter, suggesting periventricular edema. But CT hardly detected these lesions. In the patients with type I S MPS, no abnormal findings were found in MR imaging. It was concluded that MR imaging was far more sensitive for the detection of MPS lesions than CT, and was a useful method for differential diagnosis in MPS. (author)

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic-resonance velocity mapping of the central circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise

    1994-01-01

    In magnetic-resonance (MR) velocity mapping there exists a linear relationship between the velocity and signal in each element of a tomographic image. The technique can be used for quantitative measurements of linear velocities (m s-1) and flow rates (1 min-1). By using cinematographic images...... the flow profile during the cardiac cycle can be determined. This allows quantification of forward flow, regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction in cases of heart-valve insufficiency. In valvular stenosis the transvalvular pressure gradient and valve area can be determined. Magnetic-resonance velocity...... mapping may also provide information about diastolic function of left ventricular function. Together with other MR imaging techniques, velocity mapping gives an accurate assessment of the severity of aortic dissection. Recent studies indicate that MR velocity mapping provides quantification of renal blood...

  1. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  2. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    All-dielectric “magnetic light” nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses.

  3. Bioimpedância transtorácica comparada à ressonância magnética na avaliação do débito cardíaco Transthoracic impedance compared to magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of cardiac output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Villacorta Junior

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A ressonância magnética cardíaca é considerada o método padrão-ouro para o cálculo de volumes cardíacos. A bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca avalia o débito cardíaco. Não há trabalhos que validem essa medida comparada à ressonância. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o desempenho da bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca no cálculo do débito cardíaco, índice cardíaco e volume sistólico, utilizando a ressonância como padrão-ouro. MÉTODOS: Avaliados 31 pacientes, com média de idade de 56,7 ± 18 anos, sendo 18 (58% do sexo masculino. Foram excluídos os pacientes cuja indicação para a ressonância magnética cardíaca incluía avaliação sob estresse farmacológico. A correlação entre os métodos foi avaliada pelo coeficiente de Pearson, e a dispersão das diferenças absolutas em relação à média foi demonstrada pelo método de Bland-Altman. A concordância entre os métodos foi realizada pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasses. RESULTADOS: A média do débito cardíaco pela bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca e pela ressonância foi, respectivamente, 5,16 ± 0,9 e 5,13 ± 0,9 L/min. Observou-se boa correlação entre os métodos para o débito cardíaco (r = 0,79; p = 0,0001, índice cardíaco (r = 0,74; p = 0,0001 e volume sistólico (r = 0,88; p = 0,0001. A avaliação pelo gráfico de Bland-Altman mostrou pequena dispersão das diferenças em relação à média, com baixa amplitude dos intervalos de concordância. Houve boa concordância entre os dois métodos quando avaliados pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasses, com coeficientes para débito cardíaco, índice cardíaco e volume sistólico de 0,78, 0,73 e 0,88, respectivamente (p BACKGROUND: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the gold-standard method for the calculation of cardiac volumes. Transthoracic impedance cardiography assesses the cardiac output. No studies validating this measurement, in comparison to that obtained

  4. Bioimpedância transtorácica comparada à ressonância magnética na avaliação do débito cardíaco Transthoracic impedance compared to magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of cardiac output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Villacorta Junior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A ressonância magnética cardíaca é considerada o método padrão-ouro para o cálculo de volumes cardíacos. A bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca avalia o débito cardíaco. Não há trabalhos que validem essa medida comparada à ressonância. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o desempenho da bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca no cálculo do débito cardíaco, índice cardíaco e volume sistólico, utilizando a ressonância como padrão-ouro. MÉTODOS: Avaliados 31 pacientes, com média de idade de 56,7 ± 18 anos, sendo 18 (58% do sexo masculino. Foram excluídos os pacientes cuja indicação para a ressonância magnética cardíaca incluía avaliação sob estresse farmacológico. A correlação entre os métodos foi avaliada pelo coeficiente de Pearson, e a dispersão das diferenças absolutas em relação à média foi demonstrada pelo método de Bland-Altman. A concordância entre os métodos foi realizada pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasses. RESULTADOS: A média do débito cardíaco pela bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca e pela ressonância foi, respectivamente, 5,16 ± 0,9 e 5,13 ± 0,9 L/min. Observou-se boa correlação entre os métodos para o débito cardíaco (r = 0,79; p = 0,0001, índice cardíaco (r = 0,74; p = 0,0001 e volume sistólico (r = 0,88; p = 0,0001. A avaliação pelo gráfico de Bland-Altman mostrou pequena dispersão das diferenças em relação à média, com baixa amplitude dos intervalos de concordância. Houve boa concordância entre os dois métodos quando avaliados pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasses, com coeficientes para débito cardíaco, índice cardíaco e volume sistólico de 0,78, 0,73 e 0,88, respectivamente (p BACKGROUND: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the gold-standard method for the calculation of cardiac volumes. Transthoracic impedance cardiography assesses the cardiac output. No studies validating this measurement, in comparison to that obtained

  5. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  6. Contribution to nuclear magnetic resonance imager using permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After some recalls of nuclear magnetic resonance, ways to get a stable and homogeneous magnetic field are studied with permanent magnets. Development of correction coils on integrated circuits has been particularly stressed. Gradient coil specific systems have been studied taking in account ferromagnetic material presence. Antenna system has been improved and possibility of image obtention with the prototype realized has been shown

  7. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join the ISMRM Journals History & Mission Central Office Society Award Winners Strategic Plan Policies Corporate Members Contact ... E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, ...

  8. Magnetic moment of the Roper resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Gegelia, J., E-mail: gegelia@kph.uni-mainz.de [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute of TSU, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Scherer, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2012-08-29

    The magnetic moment of the Roper resonance is calculated in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory of the strong interactions. A systematic power-counting procedure is implemented by applying the complex-mass scheme.

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  11. Magnetic moment of the Roper resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, T.; Gegelia, J.; Scherer, S.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the Roper resonance is calculated in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory of the strong interactions. A systematic power-counting procedure is implemented by applying the complex-mass scheme.

  12. Advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Peng; 曹鹏

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a well-known non-invasive technique that provides spectra (by MR spectroscopy, MRS) and images (by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) of the examined tissue with detailed metabolic, structural, and functional information. This doctoral work is focused on advanced methodologies and applications of MRS for probing cellular and molecular changes in vivo. A single-voxel diffusion-weighted (DW) MRS method was first developed for monitoring the size changes of intramyocellu...

  13. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Dielectric Lens

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, F.; Marrufo, O.; MARTIN,R; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, metamaterials have been introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of magnetic resonance images with very promising results. However, the use polymers in the generation of high quality images in magnetic resonance imaging has not been fully been investigated. These investigations explored the use of a dielectric periodical array as a lens to improve the image SNR generated with single surface coils. Commercial polycarbonate glazing sheets were used together with a circula...

  16. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  17. Late gadolinium enhancement in cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy complicated by life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkow-Dimitrow, Pawel; Klimeczek, Piotr; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Pasowicz, Mieczyslaw; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Podolec, Piotr; Dubiel, Jacek S.; Tracz, Wieslawa

    2009-01-01

    Background: Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has been shown to be associated with ventricular arrhythmias, however, its prognostic role in predicting sudden cardiac death has not yet been established. Aim: To explore a potential relationship between LGE v

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within blood vessels nearly all cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers You ... called MR angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels in the ... the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, William G

    2016-04-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a syndrome found in the elderly, which is characterized by ventriculomegaly and deep white matter ischemia (DWMI) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the clinical triad of gait disturbance, dementia, and urinary incontinence. NPH has been estimated to account for up to 10% of cases of dementia and is significant because it is treatable by ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Patients with a known cause of chronic communicating hydrocephalus, that is, meningitis or hemorrhage, tend to respond better than patients with the so-called "idiopathic" form, most likely because of poor selection criteria in the past. Good response to shunting has been associated with hyperdynamic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the aqueduct. In the early days of MRI, patients with a large CSF flow void extending from the foramen of Monro through the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle had an excellent chance of responding to ventriculoperitoneal shunting (P < 0.003). Today, we use phase-contrast MRI to measure the volume of CSF flowing through the aqueduct in either direction over a cardiac cycle. When this aqueductal CSF stroke volume is sufficiently elevated, there is an excellent chance of shunt responsiveness (100% positive predictive value in 1 study). Idiopathic NPH appears to be a "two-hit" disease-benign external hydrocephalus (BEH) in infancy followed by DWMI in late adulthood. As BEH occurs when the sutures are still open, these infants present with large heads, a finding also noted in patients with NPH. Although BEH has been attributed to immature arachnoidal granulations with decreased CSF resorptive capacity, this now appears to be permanent and may lead to a parallel pathway for CSF resorption via the extracellular space of the brain. With DWMI, the myelin lipid is lost, exposing the polar water molecules to myelin protein, increasing resistance to CSF outflow and leading to backing up of CSF and hydrocephalus. PMID:27063662

  1. Coherence of magnetic resonators in a metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The coherence of periodic magnetic resonators (MRs under oblique incidence is studied using simulations. The correlated phase of interaction including both the retardation effect and relative phase difference between two MRs is defined, and it plays a key role in the MR interaction. The correlated phase is anisotropic, as is the coherence condition. The coherence condition is the same as the Wood's anomaly and verified by the Fano resonance. This study shows that the applications of the Fano resonance of periodic MRs will become widespread owing to achieving the Fano resonance simply by tuning the incident angle.

  2. 170 Nanometer Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Thurber, K R; Smith, D D; Thurber, Kent R.; Harrell, Lee E.; Smith, Doran D.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the semiconductor GaAs with 170 nanometer slice separation and resolve two regions of reduced nuclear spin polarization density separated by only 500 nanometers. This is achieved by force detection of the magnetic resonance, Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM), in combination with optical pumping to increase the nuclear spin polarization. Optical pumping of the GaAs creates spin polarization up to 12 times larger than the thermal nuclear spin polarization at 5 K and 4 T. The experiment is sensitive to sample volumes containing $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{11}$ $^{71}$Ga$/\\sqrt{Hz}$. These results demonstrate the ability of force-detected magnetic resonance to apply magnetic resonance imaging to semiconductor devices and other nanostructures.

  3. Cardiovascular magnetics resonance diagnosis of cystic tumor of the atrioventricular node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xuedong

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has proven to be the gold standard for viability assessment. LGE CMR is also useful for identifying the nature of cardiac masses or lesions. We report a case of a rare primary cystic tumor of the atrioventricular node, in which CMR proved to be valuable.

  4. Cardiovascular magnetics resonance diagnosis of cystic tumor of the atrioventricular node

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xuedong; Starnes Vaughn; Tran Thao T; Getzen James; Ross Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has proven to be the gold standard for viability assessment. LGE CMR is also useful for identifying the nature of cardiac masses or lesions. We report a case of a rare primary cystic tumor of the atrioventricular node, in which CMR proved to be valuable.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  6. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  7. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  8. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Paulo C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br; Santos, Judes G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Skeff Neto, K. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil); Cuyper, Marcel de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2005-05-15

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mala; Tanna, Neil; Margolies, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have significantly evolved since their introduction half a century ago, yet implant rupture remains a common and expected complication, especially in patients with earlier-generation implants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary modality for assessing the integrity of silicone implants and has excellent sensitivity and specificity, and the Food and Drug Administration currently recommends periodic magnetic resonance imaging screening for silent silicone breast implant rupture. Familiarity with the types of silicone implants and potential complications is essential for the radiologist. Signs of intracapsular rupture include the noose, droplet, subcapsular line, and linguine signs. Signs of extracapsular rupture include herniation of silicone with a capsular defect and extruded silicone material. Specific sequences including water and silicone suppression are essential for distinguishing rupture from other pathologies and artifacts. Magnetic resonance imaging provides valuable information about the integrity of silicone implants and associated complications.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  11. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. MAGNETIC RESONANCE SEMIOTICS OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Serebryakova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC that is the most common malignancy in women presents an indubitable threat to their life and health. The basis for this investigation was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data of 203 women with histologically verified malignan- cies. The patients' mean age was 53±10.2 years. The paper describes the magnetic resonance semiotics of BC; the authors have developed criteria for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography used in the differential diagnosis of nodules.Due to high soft-tissue contrast, the use of thin sections, and the possibility of examining in any projection, MRI allows one not only to accurately visualize a pathological mass as compared with X-ray mammography or ultrasound study, but also to characterize its vascularization, which is a major criteria for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast nodules.

  13. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  14. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, ... magnetic field is not harmful in itself, implanted medical devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. ... still during imaging. A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of certain ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  3. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip–sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip–sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium. (paper)

  4. Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Emsley, J W; Sutcliffe, L H

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Part 1 is a two-chapter text that reviews significant developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications.The first chapter discusses NMR studies of molecules physisorbed on homogeneous surfaces. This chapter also describes the phase changes in the adsorbed layer detected by following the variation in the NMR parameters. The second chapter examines the process to obtain a plotted, data reduced Fourier transform NMR spectrum. This chapter highlights the pitfalls that can cause a decrease in information content in a NMR spectrum. The

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Dielectric Lens

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, F; Martin, R; Rodriguez, A O

    2009-01-01

    Recently, metamaterials have been introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of magnetic resonance images with very promising results. However, the use polymers in the generation of high quality images in magnetic resonance imaging has not been fully been investigated. These investigations explored the use of a dielectric periodical array as a lens to improve the image SNR generated with single surface coils. Commercial polycarbonate glazing sheets were used together with a circular coil to generate phantom images at 3 Tesla on a clinical MR imager.

  6. The progress of coronary magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a kind of disease with high morbidity and mortality. The early detection and treatment has important significance to patient. With the features of noninvasive, no radiation, good soft tissue contrast and multi parameter, and displaying anatomy in arbitrary plane, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was gradually applied in coronary artery imaging. In this paper, the main sequence and scanning technology of coronary MRI were reviewed, factors that affecting the quality of coronary magnetic resonance imaging were summarized, and the main advantages and disadvantages were concluded. (authors)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mink, J.H.; Reicher, M.A.; Crues, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    Introducing a comprehensive, practical guide to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting and evaluating knee disorders and planning arthroscopic surgery) This book integrates MRI findings with pertinent anatomy, physiology, and clinical signs to assist radiologists in selecting imaging protocols and interpreting scans. Detailed chapters focus on magnetic resonance imaging of the menisci and ligaments and evaluation of osteonecrosis, osteochondrosis, and osteochondritis. The authors demonstrate the potential of MRI for diagnosing various knee disorders such as arthritis, fractures, popliteal cysts, synovial disease, plicae, popliteal artery aneurysms, tumors, and bone marrow disorders.

  8. Fractionated magnetic-resonance elastography on the human heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging, belong to the most important tools in modern medical diagnostics. Another diagnostic aid is palpation, which is suitable for the qualitative characterization of pathological changes in organs near the surface. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a combination of these techniques. In principle, MRE uses motionsensitive MR-imaging to depict tissue deformation caused by externally induced shear waves. The type of deformation supply useful information about the elasticity of the tissue. Cardiac disorders are among the most common diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a method of applying in-vivo MRE to the human heart. The development of the mechanical stimulus, ultimately resulting in the introduction of an audio speaker as the source of vibration, provided the necessary means to introduce vibrations into inner organs. A crucial factor in applying MRE to the heart is the speed of the recording, which led to the development of ''fractional MRE''. The currently conventional fast heart imaging techniques were used as a starting point. The use of an unbalanced phase preparation gradient in the balanced steady-state imaging technique resulted in an improved phase-to-noise ratio. Along with the spoiled steady-state MRE imaging technique, initial MRE-studies on the human heart were performed. For the first time, externally induced mechanical vibrations were successfully introduced into the heart and were detected using fractional MRE with a high temporal resolution. The modulation of the shear wave amplitudes observed in the myocard of 6 healthy subjects correlated with the phases of the cardiac cycle. The techniques and methods developed here are a step toward routine clinical application of MRE of the heart and indicate high potential in the area of early diagnosis of cardiac disease. (orig.)

  9. Cardiac magnetic source imaging based on current multipole model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Fa-Kuan; Wang Qian; Hua Ning; Lu Hong; Tang Xue-Zheng; Ma Ping

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the heart current source can be reduced into a current multipole. By adopting three linear inverse methods, the cardiac magnetic imaging is achieved in this article based on the current multipole model expanded to the first order terms. This magnetic imaging is realized in a reconstruction plane in the centre of human heart, where the current dipole array is employed to represent realistic cardiac current distribution. The current multipole as testing source generates magnetic fields in the measuring plane, serving as inputs of cardiac magnetic inverse problem. In the heart-torso model constructed by boundary element method, the current multipole magnetic field distribution is compared with that in the homogeneous infinite space, and also with the single current dipole magnetic field distribution.Then the minimum-norm least-squares (MNLS) method, the optimal weighted pseuDOInverse method (OWPIM), and the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM) are selected as the algorithms for inverse computation based on current multipole model innovatively, and the imaging effects of these three inverse methods are compared. Besides,two reconstructing parameters, residual and mean residual, are also discussed, and their trends under MNLS, OWPIM and OCLIM each as a function of SNR are obtained and compared.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance of thermally oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more recent developments in the spectroscopy of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on Oriented Nuclei (NMRON) are reviewed; both theoretical and experimental advances are summarised with applications to On-Line and Off-Line determination of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine parameters. Some emphasis is provided on solid state considerations with indications of where likely enhancements in technique will lead in conventional hyperfine studies. (orig.)

  11. Multi-dimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image...

  12. Value of black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter John Paul

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess whether black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance is superior to conventional white blood imaging of cardiac iron in patients with thalassaemia major (TM. Materials and methods We performed both conventional white blood and black blood T2* CMR sequences in 100 TM patients to determine intra and inter-observer variability and presence of artefacts. In 23 patients, 2 separate studies of both techniques were performed to assess interstudy reproducibility. Results Cardiac T2* values ranged from 4.5 to 43.8 ms. The mean T2* values were not different between black blood and white blood acquisitions (20.5 vs 21.6 ms, p = 0.26. Compared with the conventional white blood diastolic acquisition, the coefficient of variance of the black blood CMR technique was superior for intra-observer reproducibility (1.47% vs 4.23%, p Conclusions Black blood T2* CMR has superior reproducibility and reduced imaging artefacts for the assessment of cardiac iron, in comparison with the conventional white blood technique, which make it the preferred technique for clinical practice.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  14. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  15. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, S.R. (Univ. Dept. of Otolaryngology, Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)); Birzgalis, A.R. (Univ. Dept. of Otolaryngology, Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)); Ramsden, R.T. (Univ. Dept. of Otolaryngology, Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare benign tumours which present with progressive or fluctuant audiovestibular symptoms and may mimic Menieres disease. The size and position of these lesions make preoperative diagnosis unusual and most are discovered incidentally at labyrinthectomy. A case is reported which was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery. (orig.)

  16. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  17. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  18. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  19. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  20. Use of Magnetic Resonance in Pancreaticobiliary Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David D B; LeBedis, Christina A; Soto, Jorge A; Gupta, Avneesh

    2016-05-01

    This article presents the magnetic resonance protocols, imaging features, diagnostic criteria, and complications of commonly encountered emergencies in pancreaticobiliary imaging. Pancreatic trauma, bile leak, acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, and pancreatitis are discussed. Various classifications and complications that can arise with these conditions, as well as artifacts that may mimic pathology, are also included. PMID:27150328

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  3. Magnetic Resonance Lithography with Nanometer Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad AlGhannam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach for super-resolution optical lithography which is based on the inverse of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The technique uses atomic coherence in an ensemble of spin systems whose final state population can be optically detected. In principle, our method is capable of producing arbitrary one and two dimensional high-resolution patterns with high contrast.

  4. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  6. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  7. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Maceira Alicia M; Mohiaddin Raad H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue char...

  9. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  10. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  11. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yumin, E-mail: ymhou@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  13. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  15. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  17. Cardiovascular assessment of patients with Ullrich-Turner's Syndrome on Doppler echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Ana Valéria Barros de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the cardiovascular features of Ullrich-Turner's syndrome using echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging, and to correlate them with the phenotype and karyotype of the patients. The diagnostic concordance between the 2 methods was also assessed. METHODS: Fifteen patients with the syndrome were assessed by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (cardiac chambers, valves, and aorta. Their ages ranged from 10 to 28 (mean of 16.7 years. The karyotype was analyzed in 11 or 25 metaphases of peripheral blood lymphocytes, or both. RESULTS: The most common phenotypic changes were short stature and spontaneous absence of puberal development (100%; 1 patient had a cardiac murmur. The karyotypes detected were as follows: 45,X (n=7, mosaics (n=5, and deletions (n=3. No echocardiographic changes were observed. In regard to magnetic resonance imaging, coarctation and dilation of the aorta were found in 1 patient, and isolated dilation of the aorta was found in 4 patients. CONCLUSION: The frequencies of coarctation and dilation of the aorta detected on magnetic resonance imaging were similar to those reported in the literature (5.5% to 20%, and 6.3% to 29%, respectively. This confirmed the adjuvant role of magnetic resonance imaging to Doppler echocardiography for diagnosing cardiovascular alterations in patients with Ullrich-Turner's syndrome.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  19. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. (a) Identification. A magnetic resonance diagnostic device is intended for general diagnostic...

  20. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  1. Ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography of physiological brain activity - Glymphatic pulsation mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Wang, Xindi; Korhonen, Vesa; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Autio, Joonas; LeVan, Pierre; Keilholz, Shella; Zang, Yu-Feng; Hennig, Jürgen; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-06-01

    The theory on the glymphatic convection mechanism of cerebrospinal fluid holds that cardiac pulsations in part pump cerebrospinal fluid from the peri-arterial spaces through the extracellular tissue into the peri-venous spaces facilitated by aquaporin water channels. Since cardiac pulses cannot be the sole mechanism of glymphatic propulsion, we searched for additional cerebrospinal fluid pulsations in the human brain with ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography. We detected three types of physiological mechanisms affecting cerebral cerebrospinal fluid pulsations: cardiac, respiratory, and very low frequency pulsations. The cardiac pulsations induce a negative magnetic resonance encephalography signal change in peri-arterial regions that extends centrifugally and covers the brain in ≈1 Hz cycles. The respiratory ≈0.3 Hz pulsations are centripetal periodical pulses that occur dominantly in peri-venous areas. The third type of pulsation was very low frequency (VLF 0.001-0.023 Hz) and low frequency (LF 0.023-0.73 Hz) waves that both propagate with unique spatiotemporal patterns. Our findings using critically sampled magnetic resonance encephalography open a new view into cerebral fluid dynamics. Since glymphatic system failure may precede protein accumulations in diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia, this methodological advance offers a novel approach to image brain fluid dynamics that potentially can enable early detection and intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26690495

  2. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10-3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  3. Primary Heart Angiosarcoma Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valeviciene, N.; Mataciunas, M.; Tamosiunas, A.; Petrulioniene, Z.; Briediene, R. [Vilnius Univ. Hospital (Lithuania). Centre of Radiology

    2006-09-15

    We present a case of primary heart angiosarcoma in a 38-year-old male. The patient presented with severe dyspnoea and arrhythmia. Echocardiography showed multiple solid masses in the pericardium and pericardial effusion. Chest radiography revealed left-sided pleural effusion and suspicion of a mass projected on the right atrium. Non-enhanced chest computed tomography raised the suspicion of a pericardial neoplasm projected on the right atrium adjacent to ascending aorta with markedly thickened pericardium and multiple round-shaped masses around the heart. Cardiac-gated magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an inhomogeneous mass in the free wall of the right atrium adjacent to ascending aorta and multiple pericardial masses. Biopsy performed through thoracoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of a primary heart angiosarcoma.

  4. Thin layer and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this text, magnetometers with sensitive elements in the form of thin cylindrical ferromagnetic layers are described. These layers are anisotropic, uniaxial, C orientated and single domains. In the second part of the text, the principles of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer realized at the LETI are presented. This instrument is accurate, of high efficiency, and isotropic. Very small variations in magnetic field intensity (10-7 oersteds) can be detected with a 1Hz pass band at zero frequency

  5. Magnetic resonance semiotics of breast fibroadenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Serebryakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various benign breast abnormalities are diagnosed in 60% of women in Russia today. This is associated with failure of preoperative recognition of the histological class of an identified nodular mass – its detection is an indication for surgical treatment. By using 67 histologically verified breast fibroadenomas (FA as an example, the authors describe their magnetic resonance semiotics and present the differential diagnostic criteria used during dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography. FAs are characterized by well-defined uniform outlines, homogeneous internal structure, centrifugal and homogeneous accumulation of contrast media through- out the study, without deforming the breast vasculature around. One of the criteria that permit differential diagnosis of FA with malignan- cies is their estimated vascularization.

  6. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid;

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus)......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  7. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavieille, J.; Amalric, R.; Stanoyevitch, J.F.; Hopf, M.A.; Antipoff, G.M.; Roux, H.

    1986-11-01

    The authors report their experience with magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology, established on more than 250 examinations. The method seems interesting for the study of discal and somatic spine diseases, and especially for the evaluation of tumor extension, the diagnosis of herniated disc, the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, the exploration of the cervico-occipital joint. As compared to tomodensitometry, this method presents at the same time advantages and drawbacks. Peripherally, magnetic resonance imaging is useful for the exploration of bony tumors and evaluation of their extension. It gives excellent images of the knees and the hips where it seems to improve the results of tomodensitometry and bony scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. It is likely that advances will broaden the scope of the indications and capabilities of this method.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  9. High speed functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, A M

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to October 2001. This thesis documents the implementation and application of a novel high-speed imaging technique, the multi-slice, echo shifted, echo planar imaging technique. This was implemented on the Nottingham 3 T imaging system, for functional magnetic resonance imaging. The technique uses echo shifting over the slices in a multi-slice echo planar imaging acquisition scheme, making the echo time longer than the repetition time per slice. This allows for rapid volumar sampling of the blood oxygen level dependent effect in the human brain. The new high-speed technique was used to investigate the variability of measuring the timing differences between haemodynamic responses, at the same cortical location, to simple cued motor tasks. The technique was also used in an investigation into motor cortex functional connect...

  10. Female pelvic anatomy: magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated in this study. Conventional imaging methods like sonography and X-ray computerised tomography generally provide accurate data. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be very suitable for studying the pelvis because it has the capacity to produce direct multidirectional images. By recording alterations in T1 and T2 values, it provides a wide range of information. A 1.5 T imaging system was used. Pulse sequences used always included T1 and T2 weighted spin-echo scans. The T2 scan was performed in the best plane for the organ of interest. The comparison between these different acquisitions provides good tissue differentiation. Results of 73 studies are exposed

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance...

  12. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  13. "PALPATION BY IMAGING": MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Pei-yi Gao

    2006-01-01

    Elasticity is an important physical property of human tissues.There is a tremendous difference in elasticity between normal and pathological tissues.Noninvasive evaluation of the elasticity of human tissues would be valuable for clinical practice.Magnetic resonance elastography(MRE)is a recently developed noninvasive imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity.This article reviewed the MRE technique and its current status.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Elastography: Inversions in Bounded Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J; Glaser, Kevin J.; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, MRE inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord in which the s...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up ...

  16. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Huijun; Wang Jinnan; Li Rui; Ferguson Marina S; Kerwin William S; Dong Li; Canton Gador; Hatsukami Thomas S; Yuan Chun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) of the carotid vessel wall is one promi...

  17. Myocardial tissue tagging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Bluemke David A; Osman Nael F; Cheng Susan; Shehata Monda L; Lima João AC

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently the gold standard for assessing both global and regional myocardial function. New tools for quantifying regional function have been recently developed to characterize early myocardial dysfunction in order to improve the identification and management of individuals at risk for heart failure. Of particular interest is CMR myocardial tagging, a non-invasive technique for assessing regional function that provides a detailed and compreh...

  18. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Bradlow William M; R Gibbs J Simon; Mohiaddin Raad H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension represents a group of conditions characterized by higher than normal pulmonary artery pressures. Despite improved treatments, outcomes in many instances remain poor. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in patients with pulmonary hypertension. This technique offers certain advantages over other imaging modalities since it is well suited to the assessment of the right ventricle and the proximal pu...

  19. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance for molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza Gregory M; Caruthers Shelton D; Winter Patrick M; Wickline Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) molecular imaging aims to identify and map the expression of important biomarkers on a cellular scale utilizing contrast agents that are specifically targeted to the biochemical signatures of disease and are capable of generating sufficient image contrast. In some cases, the contrast agents may be designed to carry a drug payload or to be sensitive to important physiological factors, such as pH, temperature or oxygenation. In this review, examp...

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2010-01-01

    The integration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with cognitive and affective neuroscience paradigms enables examination of the brain systems underlying the behavioral deficits manifested in schizophrenia; there have been a remarkable increase in the number of studies that apply fMRI in neurobiological studies of this disease. This article summarizes features of fMRI methodology and highlights its application in neurobehavioral studies in schizophrenia. Such work has helped elu...

  1. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Nakayama

    Full Text Available This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG. The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  2. Feasibility of Leadless Cardiac Pacing Using Injectable Magnetic Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y; Gabay, Hovav; Etzion, Yoram; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive, effective approach for immediate and painless heart pacing would have invaluable implications in several clinical scenarios. Here we present a novel strategy that utilizes the well-known mechano-electric feedback of the heart to evoke cardiac pacing, while relying on magnetic microparticles as leadless mechanical stimulators. We demonstrate that after localizing intravenously-injected magnetic microparticles in the right ventricular cavity using an external electromagnet, the application of magnetic pulses generates mechanical stimulation that provokes ventricular overdrive pacing in the rat heart. This temporary pacing consistently managed to revert drug-induced bradycardia, but could only last up to several seconds in the rat model, most likely due to escape of the particles between the applied pulses using our current experimental setting. In a pig model with open chest, MEF-based pacing was induced by banging magnetic particles and has lasted for a longer time. Due to overheating of the electromagnet, we intentionally terminated the experiments after 2 min. Our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of external leadless temporary pacing, using injectable magnetic microparticles that are manipulated by an external electromagnet. This new approach can have important utilities in clinical settings in which immediate and painless control of cardiac rhythm is required. PMID:27091192

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of primary tumors of the heart: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieno, David S; Saouaf, Rola; Thomson, Louise E J; Abidov, Aiden; Friedman, John D; Berman, Daniel S

    2006-01-01

    Overall, the prevalence of primary cardiac neoplasms is approximately 0.3% and these masses should be distinguished from the myriad of other primary and secondary processes that can occur in the heart. Tumors within, attached to, or near the heart can cause direct cardiac damage, can result in thrombus formation, can compromise blood flow and can embolize distally. Hence, proper diagnosis is clinically important. It has been suggested that cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a useful tool for diagnosing and characterizing cardiac tumors. In this report, we present a case example of a patient with a large, mobile right atrial myxoma imaged by CMR with results of histopathologic analysis after excision. We also demonstrate the utilization of CMR for characterization of cardiac lesions, review the basic characteristics of primary cardiac neoplasms, provide an overview of published cases describing use of CMR, and give suggested guidelines for imaging of cardiac masses with emphasis on diagnosis of cardiac tumors. CMR is an important technique for diagnosing and characterizing cardiac tumors. PMID:17060107

  4. Method for Segmentation of the Endocardium and Epicardium of the Left Ventricle in Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images%一种心脏核磁共振图像左室壁内、外膜分割方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王元全; 贾云得

    2009-01-01

    为了充分利用心脏核磁共振图像(magnetic resonance image,简称 MRI)中关于左心室的解剖和功能信息,必须先分割左室壁内、外膜.提出-种基于Snake模型的左室壁内、外膜分割方法.首先提出了Snake模型的卷积虚拟静电场外力模型CONVEF(convolutional virtual electricfield),该外力场捕捉范围大、抗噪能力强,在C形凹陷区域等问题上性能突出,而且基于卷积运算,采用快速Fourier变换可以实时计算.就左室壁内膜的分割而言,考虑到左室壁的形状近似为圆形,引入基于圆形约束的能量项.对于左室壁外膜的分割,充分挖掘了左室壁内、外膜形状上的相似性和位置上的相关性,构造了形状相似性内能和-个新的边缘图,该边缘图用来计算新的外力场.基于所有这些策略并采用内膜的分割结果初始化,可以自动、准确地分割外膜.通过对-套活体心脏MR(magnetic resonance)图像进行分割并和手工分割结果和GGVF(generaJJized gadient vector flow)Snake模型的分割结果进行比较,结果表明该方法是有效的.

  5. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...

  6. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  7. 心脏磁共振成像新技术及其在肥厚型心肌病研究中的应用%Cardiac Magnetic Resonance New Technologies and Its Application for Investigation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷晓琳; 陈石(综述); 陈玉成(审校)

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has recently emerged as a important non-invasive imaging modality in cardio-vascular disease.Newer technique of late gadolinium enhancement, T1 and T2 mapping enable histologic characterization of myocardium in vivo.Application of these new imaging techniques for investigation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy provide unique information on a wide range and even some promotion in clinical practice.So we will review related studies in this article.%心脏磁共振成像在心血管疾病影像学中的地位日益显著。近年来随着一系列新的心脏磁共振成像新技术如钆延迟强化显像、T1及T2 mapping的出现,使得人们可以从组织学水平观察活体的心脏组织。这些新的磁共振成像技术应用于肥厚型心肌病的临床研究中,大大扩展了人们的视野,使人们对该种疾病有了全新的认识,甚至推动临床诊疗工作产生了巨大进步。现将近年来相关研究进行综述。

  8. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  9. Cine magnetic resonance imaging in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 33 patients aged 19 days to 18 years (mean 5.1 years), who had congenital heart disease comfirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI with spin echo (SE) sequence was perfomed to evaluate cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30 deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30∼40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128X128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients. Intracardiac and intravasucular blood flow were visualized with high signal intensity area, whereas ventricular filling flow and left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect and atrial septal defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. However, in the patients who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts. Gated MRI with SE sequence provides excellent visualization of fine structures, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  10. First national meeting of magnetic resonance and hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Works performed at CNEA's: Magnetic Resonance Division; Moessbauer Spectroscopy; Solid State Physics Division; Nuclear magnetic Resonance Laboratory and Theoretical Physics Group; Mossbauer Spectroscopy Group; Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance; Physics and Materials Group; Perturbed Angular Correlation and Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Physics Department. (M.E.L.)

  11. High ventricular lead impedance of a DDD pacemaker after cranial magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Kazim; Guray, Umit; Durukan, Mine; Demirkan, Burcu

    2012-09-01

    Management of electromagnetic interference in the form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with pacemakers (PMs) may be challenging. Serious consequences, especially in PM-dependent patients, may be encountered. Changes in device programming, asynchronous pacing, heating of the lead tip(s), and increased thresholds or even device dislocation may be experienced. We report of a patient with a DDD PM who underwent an emergent MRI, after which there was an increase in ventricular impedance as well as increased cardiac biomarkers.

  12. Extraction of the magnetohydrodynamic blood flow potential from the surface electrocardiogram in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijm, Grace M; Swiryn, Steven; Larson, Andrew C; Sahakian, Alan V

    2008-07-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic effect generates voltages related to blood flow, which are superimposed on the electrocardiogram (ECG) used for gating during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A method is presented for extracting the magnetohydrodynamic signal from the ECG. The extracted magnetohydrodynamic blood flow potential may be physiologically meaningful due to its relationship to blood flow. Removal of the magnetohydrodynamic voltages from the ECG can potentially lead to improved gating and diagnostically useful ECGs.

  13. Assessment of pulmonary veins after atrio-pericardial anastomosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Greenway Steven C; Yoo Shi-Joon; Baliulis Giedrius; Caldarone Christopher; Coles John; Grosse-Wortmann Lars

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The atrio-pericardial anastomosis (APA) uses a pericardial pouch to create a large communication between the left atrium and the pulmonary venous contributaries in order to avoid direct suturing of the pulmonary veins during the repair of congenital cardiac malformations. Post-operative imaging is routinely performed by echocardiography but Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) offers excellent anatomical imaging and quantitative information about pulmonary blood flow. W...

  14. Recovery of methamphetamine associated cardiomyopathy predicted by late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Buonocore Michael; Caputo Gary; Yeo Khung; Lopez Javier E; Schaefer Saul

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Methamphetamine is known to cause a cardiomyopathy which may be reversible with appropriate medical therapy and cessation of use. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been shown to identify fibrosis in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We present a case of severe methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy in which cardiac function recovered after 6 months. Evaluation by CMR using late gadolinium enhancement was notable for an absence of enh...

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method based on the detecting signal from hydrogen nuclei of water molecules and fat. Performances of MRI are continuously increasing, and its domains of investigation of the human body are growing in both morphological and functional study. MRI also allows It also performing advanced management of tumours especially in the brain, by combining anatomical information (morphological MRI), functional (diffusion, perfusion and BOLD contrast) and metabolic (tissue composition in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). The MRI techniques have an important role in cancerology. These techniques allow essential information for the diagnosis and answering therapist's questions before, during or after the treatment. The MR allows clarifying the localization of expanding processes, the differential diagnosis between brain tumour and a lesion confined by another structural aspect, the diagnosis of the tumoral aspect of a lesion, the histological ranking in case of glial tumour and the extension of its localization as well as the therapeutic follow-up (pre-therapeutic and post-therapeutics assessments). A better combination between the morphological, functional and metabolic studies, as well as integrating new technical developments, especially while using a multichannel bird cage coils the 3T magnet and suitable computing software, would allow significant improvements of the exploration strategies and management of brain tumors.

  16. Heart valve disease: investigation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myerson Saul G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has become a valuable investigative tool in many areas of cardiac medicine. Its value in heart valve disease is less well appreciated however, particularly as echocardiography is a powerful and widely available technique in valve disease. This review highlights the added value that CMR can bring in valve disease, complementing echocardiography in many areas, but it has also become the first-line investigation in some, such as pulmonary valve disease and assessing the right ventricle. CMR has many advantages, including the ability to image in any plane, which allows full visualisation of valves and their inflow/outflow tracts, direct measurement of valve area (particularly for stenotic valves, and characterisation of the associated great vessel anatomy (e.g. the aortic root and arch in aortic valve disease. A particular strength is the ability to quantify flow, which allows accurate measurement of regurgitation, cardiac shunt volumes/ratios and differential flow volumes (e.g. left and right pulmonary arteries. Quantification of ventricular volumes and mass is vital for determining the impact of valve disease on the heart, and CMR is the 'Gold standard' for this. Limitations of the technique include partial volume effects due to image slice thickness, and a low ability to identify small, highly mobile objects (such as vegetations due to the need to acquire images over several cardiac cycles. The review examines the advantages and disadvantages of each imaging aspect in detail, and considers how CMR can be used optimally for each valve lesion.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  18. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1H, 13C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  19. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  20. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  1. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  3. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  4. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus [Medical Genetics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.hengstschlaeger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-02-15

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in Kimura's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although early diagnosis of Kimura's disease, a rare chronic inflammatory disorder most commonly presenting with asymmetric swelling in the head and neck region, is helpful in avoiding unnecessary diagnostic tests and starting prompt treatment, only a few reports emphasized radiological findings in detail. Magnetic resonance imaging findings showing the infiltrative nature of the disease and diffuse loss of fat tissue even in nonpalpable normally appearing regions of the head and neck in a young man with Kimura's disease are presented in this report. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chosa, Hirofumi; Yamano, Kouichirou; Ihara, Fumitoshi; Ueda, Yoshiaki; Maekawa, Masayuki; Tokuhisa, Ginichirou; Kuwano, Tadashi; Kamo, Yoshi; Nomura, Shigeharu (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Forty-three patients operated for cervical myelopathy were examined with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cord compression was demonstrated directly on the sagittal image in cases of cervical disc herniation, cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. Herniated disc material was seen positive on axial image. But factors of cord compression in cases of cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. were not clearly confirmed, so additional examinations such as myelogram, tomogram and CT was needed. (author).

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Liquids and Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper outlines the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, trying wherever possible to compare and contrast the method with that of slow neutron scattering as a technique for studying the properties of condensed phases and especially of molecular and atomic motions. It is emphasized that this is not a review of nmr for an expert audience but has a pedagogical aim. It is hoped to give persons with a main interest in neutron scattering some appreciation of the scope and limitations of the nmr method. This is illustrated by recent results on one substance which covers many but by no means all of the important points. (author)

  8. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  9. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic Resonance of Pelvic and Gastrointestinal Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Dattwyler, Matthew; Abujudeh, Hani H; Singh, Ajay K

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is gaining increased acceptance in the emergency setting despite the continued dominance of computed tomography. MR has the advantages of more precise tissue characterization, superior soft tissue contrast, and a lack of ionizing radiation. Traditional barriers to emergent MR are being overcome by streamlined imaging protocols and newer rapid-acquisition sequences. As the utilization of MR imaging in the emergency department increases, a strong working knowledge of the MR appearance of the most commonly encountered abdominopelvic pathologies is essential. In this article, MR imaging protocols and findings of acute pelvic, scrotal, and gastrointestinal pathologies are discussed. PMID:27150327

  11. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, M A; Adamis, M K

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized the assessment of pathology involving the musculoskeletal system. The soft tissue contrast, superb resolution, multiplanar acquisition potential, and the ability to monitor physiologic processes combine the best features of other imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for a wide range of disease processes matches or supersedes conventional radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical examination. This article provides a brief overview of the use of MR imaging for some of the more common clinical situations confronting the rheumatologist.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  14. Magnetic resonance-guided prostate interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Steven J; Mulkern, Robert V; Roebuck, Joseph R; Barnes, Agnieska Szot; Dimaio, Simon; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M C

    2005-10-01

    We review our experience using an open 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) interventional unit to guide procedures in the prostate. This system allows access to the patient and real-time MR imaging simultaneously and has made it possible to perform prostate biopsy and brachytherapy under MR guidance. We review MR imaging of the prostate and its use in targeted therapy, and describe our use of image processing methods such as image registration to further facilitate precise targeting. We describe current developments with a robot assist system being developed to aid radioactive seed placement. PMID:16924169

  15. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  16. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  17. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    for chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were 150 nm in size with spherical shape, which contained PFOB in the inner core and Dox and ICG in the polymeric shell. More importantly, they could target folate receptor expressing cancer cells, which provide positive in vitro and in vivo NIR and 19F MRI results. In project......Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...

  18. Enhancement of magnetic resonance imaging with metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Slobozhanyuk, A P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Berg, C A T van den; Kozachenko, A V; Dubrovina, I A; Melchakova, I V; Kivshar, Yu S; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the cornerstone technique for diagnostic medicine, biology, and neuroscience. This imaging method is highly innovative, noninvasive and its impact continues to grow. It can be used for measuring changes in the brain after enhanced neural activity, detecting early cancerous cells in tissue, as well as for imaging nanoscale biological structures, and controlling fluid dynamics, and it can be beneficial for cardiovascular imaging. The MRI performance is characterized by a signal-to-noise ratio, however the spatial resolution and image contrast depend strongly on the scanner design. Here, we reveal how to exploit effectively the unique properties of metasurfaces for the substantial improvement of MRI efficiency. We employ a metasurface created by an array of wires placed inside the MRI scanner under an object, and demonstrate a giant enhancement of the magnetic field by means of subwavelength near-field manipulation with the metasurface, thus strongly increasing the scanner sen...

  19. Magnetic levitation of metamaterial bodies enhanced with magnetostatic surface resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Bingham, Chris; Padilla, Willie; Smith, David R

    2011-01-01

    We propose that macroscopic objects built from negative-permeability metamaterials may experience resonantly enhanced magnetic force in low-frequency magnetic fields. Resonant enhancement of the time-averaged force originates from magnetostatic surface resonances (MSR) which are analogous to the electrostatic resonances of negative-permittivity particles, well known as surface plasmon resonances in optics. We generalize the classical problem of MSR of a homogeneous object to include anisotropic metamaterials, and consider the most extreme case of anisotropy where the permeability is negative in one direction but positive in the others. It is shown that deeply subwavelength objects made of such indefinite (hyperbolic) media exhibit a pronounced magnetic dipole resonance that couples strongly to uniform or weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field and provides strong enhancement of the magnetic force, enabling applications such as enhanced magnetic levitation.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging.

  1. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridgway John P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many excellent specialised texts and articles that describe the physical principles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR techniques. There are also many texts written with the clinician in mind that provide an understandable, more general introduction to the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR techniques and applications. There are however very few texts or articles that attempt to provide a basic MR physics introduction that is tailored for clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. This is the first of two reviews that are intended to cover the essential aspects of CMR physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to this group. It begins by explaining the basic physical principles of MR, including a description of the main components of an MR imaging system and the three types of magnetic field that they generate. The origin and method of production of the MR signal in biological systems are explained, focusing in particular on the two tissue magnetisation relaxation properties (T1 and T2 that give rise to signal differences from tissues, showing how they can be exploited to generate image contrast for tissue characterisation. The method most commonly used to localise and encode MR signal echoes to form a cross sectional image is described, introducing the concept of k-space and showing how the MR signal data stored within it relates to properties within the reconstructed image. Before describing the CMR acquisition methods in detail, the basic spin echo and gradient pulse sequences are introduced, identifying the key parameters that influence image contrast, including appearances in the presence of flowing blood, resolution and image acquisition time. The main derivatives of these two pulse sequences used for cardiac imaging are then described in more detail. Two of the key requirements for CMR are the need for data acquisition first to be to be synchronised with the subject's ECG and to be

  2. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, John P

    2010-01-01

    There are many excellent specialised texts and articles that describe the physical principles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques. There are also many texts written with the clinician in mind that provide an understandable, more general introduction to the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and applications. There are however very few texts or articles that attempt to provide a basic MR physics introduction that is tailored for clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. This is the first of two reviews that are intended to cover the essential aspects of CMR physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to this group. It begins by explaining the basic physical principles of MR, including a description of the main components of an MR imaging system and the three types of magnetic field that they generate. The origin and method of production of the MR signal in biological systems are explained, focusing in particular on the two tissue magnetisation relaxation properties (T1 and T2) that give rise to signal differences from tissues, showing how they can be exploited to generate image contrast for tissue characterisation. The method most commonly used to localise and encode MR signal echoes to form a cross sectional image is described, introducing the concept of k-space and showing how the MR signal data stored within it relates to properties within the reconstructed image. Before describing the CMR acquisition methods in detail, the basic spin echo and gradient pulse sequences are introduced, identifying the key parameters that influence image contrast, including appearances in the presence of flowing blood, resolution and image acquisition time. The main derivatives of these two pulse sequences used for cardiac imaging are then described in more detail. Two of the key requirements for CMR are the need for data acquisition first to be to be synchronised with the subject's ECG and to be fast enough for the subject

  3. 心脏核磁共振成像技术对心力衰竭患者心肌纤维化的评估与临床应用%Evaluation and clinical application of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for myocardial fibrosis in patients with heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王吉佳

    2015-01-01

    In the myocardial tissue of most patients with heart failure,there are different degree of myocardial fibrosis,it can speed up the process of heart failure,therefore,the non-invasive assessment of myocardial fibrosis has important significance on early diagnosis and treatment,so as to take corresponding myocardial fibrosis targeted therapy to improve the prognosis of patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has high accuracy,clear imaging and other features on myocardial fibrosis,which has become an important means of inspection,at the same time,it has certain advantages in the prediction of sudden cardiac death,prediction of ventricular resynchronization therapy response ratio,it is possible to become an important method to the non-invasive assessment of myocardial fibrosis and prognosis.%目的:多数心力衰竭患者心肌组织中往往产生不同程度的心肌纤维化,它可以加快心力衰竭进程,因此无创性评估心肌纤维化对于早期诊断治疗具有重要的意义,从而采取相应心肌纤维化的靶向治疗措施改善患者预后效果.心脏核磁共振对心肌纤维化检测具有准确性高、成像清晰等特点,从而成为重要的检查手段,同时在临床中预测心源性猝死、预测心室再同步化治疗的应答比例等情况中具有一定优势,有可能成为临床无创评估心肌纤维化并判断预后的重要方法.

  4. Reproducibility of area at risk assessment in acute myocardial infarction by T1- and T2-mapping sequences in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in comparison to Tc99m-sestamibi SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Birgit; Nadjiri, Jonathan; Jähnichen, Christin; Kastrati, Adnan; Martinoff, Stefan; Hadamitzky, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Area at risk (AAR) is an important parameter for the assessment of the salvage area after revascularization in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). By combining AAR assessment by T2-weighted imaging and scar quantification by late gadolinium enhancement imaging cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) offers a promising alternative to the "classical" modality of Tc99m-sestamibi single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Current T2 weighted sequences for edema imaging in CMR are limited by low contrast to noise ratios and motion artifacts. During the last years novel CMR imaging techniques for quantification of acute myocardial injury, particularly the T1-mapping and T2-mapping, have attracted rising attention. But no direct comparison between the different sequences in the setting of AMI or a validation against SPECT has been reported so far. We analyzed 14 patients undergoing primary coronary revascularization in AMI in whom both a pre-intervention Tc99m-sestamibi-SPECT and CMR imaging at a median of 3.4 (interquartile range 3.3-3.6) days after the acute event were performed. Size of AAR was measured by three different non-contrast CMR techniques on corresponding short axis slices: T2-weighted, fat-suppressed turbospin echo sequence (TSE), T2-mapping from T2-prepared balanced steady state free precession sequences (T2-MAP) and T1-mapping from modified look locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequences. For each CMR sequence, the AAR was quantified by appropriate methods (absolute values for mapping sequences, comparison with remote myocardium for other sequences) and correlated with Tc99m-sestamibi-SPECT. All measurements were performed on a 1.5 Tesla scanner. The size of the AAR assessed by CMR was 28.7 ± 20.9 % of left ventricular myocardial volume (%LV) for TSE, 45.8 ± 16.6 %LV for T2-MAP, and 40.1 ± 14.4 %LV for MOLLI. AAR assessed by SPECT measured 41.6 ± 20.7 %LV. Correlation analysis revealed best correlation with SPECT for T2-MAP at a T2-threshold of 60 ms

  5. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1H, 31P, 13C, 23Na, 7Li, 19F, 14N, 15N, 17O, 39K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1H and 31P. This lecture is focused on Proton (1H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  8. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  10. Resonances and dipole moments in dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A.; Arslanagic, Samel; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis of metamat......An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis...

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the charcoal heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grill Howard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of malignant melanoma metastasis to the heart presenting as complete heart block. The highlight of the case is to demonstrate that silent cardiac metastasis is not uncommon and CMR has the potential to characterize these cardiac metastases and should be used routinely as a screening tool for those cancers with a high chance of cardiac involvement.

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the charcoal heart

    OpenAIRE

    Grill Howard; Yamrozik June; Williams Ronald B; Rathi Vikas K; Biederman Robert WW

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of malignant melanoma metastasis to the heart presenting as complete heart block. The highlight of the case is to demonstrate that silent cardiac metastasis is not uncommon and CMR has the potential to characterize these cardiac metastases and should be used routinely as a screening tool for those cancers with a high chance of cardiac involvement.

  13. Fusion of color Doppler and magnetic resonance images of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Ming; Zhao, Jiang-Min; Liu, Yi

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to establish and analyze color Doppler and magnetic resonance fusion images of the heart, an approach for simultaneous testing of cardiac pathological alterations, performance, and hemodynamics. Ten volunteers were tested in this study. The echocardiographic images were produced by Philips IE33 system and the magnetic resonance images were generated from Philips 3.0-T system. The fusion application was implemented on MATLAB platform utilizing image processing technology. The fusion image was generated from the following steps: (1) color Doppler blood flow segmentation, (2) image registration of color Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging, and (3) image fusion of different image types. The fusion images of color Doppler blood flow and magnetic resonance images were implemented by MATLAB programming in our laboratory. Images and videos were displayed and saved as AVI and JPG. The present study shows that the method we have developed can be used to fuse color flow Doppler and magnetic resonance images of the heart. We believe that the method has the potential to: fill in information missing from the ultrasound or MRI alone, show structures outside the field of view of the ultrasound through MR imaging, and obtain complementary information through the fusion of the two imaging methods (structure from MRI and function from ultrasound). PMID:21656081

  14. Quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT: validation of an elastic surface model approach in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, 4D-MSPECT and QGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegger, Lars; Kies, Peter; Schober, Otmar; Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital, Westfaelische Wilhelms-University Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Lipke, Claudia S.A.; Nowak, Bernd; Buell, Udalrich; Schaefer, Wolfgang M. [University Hospital,Aachen University of Technology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    The segmentation algorithm ESM based on an elastic surface model was validated for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Additionally, it was compared with the commercially available quantification packages 4D-MSPECT and QGS. Cardiac MRI was used as the reference method. SPECT and MRI were performed on 70 consecutive patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease. End-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were derived from SPECT studies by using the segmentation algorithms ESM, 4D-MSPECT and QGS and from cardiac MRI. ESM-derived values for EDV and ESV correlated well with those from cardiac MRI (correlation coefficients R = 0.90 and R = 0.95, respectively), as did the measurements for LVEF (R = 0.86). Both EDV and ESV were slightly overestimated for larger ventricles but not for smaller ventricles; LVEF was slightly overestimated irrespective of ventricle size. The above correlation coefficients are comparable to those for the 4D-MSPECT and QGS segmentation algorithms. However, results obtained with the three segmentation algorithms are not interchangeable. The ESM algorithm can be used to assess EDV, ESV and LVEF from gated perfusion SPECT images. Overall, the performance was similar to that of 4D-MSPECT and QGS when compared with cardiac MRI. Results obtained with the three tested segmentation methods are not interchangeable, so that the same algorithm should be used for follow-up studies and control subjects. (orig.)

  15. Optimal Magnetic Sensor Vests for Cardiac Source Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephan; Petković, Bojana; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) non-invasively provides functional information about the heart. New room-temperature magnetic field sensors, specifically magnetoresistive and optically pumped magnetometers, have reached sensitivities in the ultra-low range of cardiac fields while allowing for free placement around the human torso. Our aim is to optimize positions and orientations of such magnetic sensors in a vest-like arrangement for robust reconstruction of the electric current distributions in the heart. We optimized a set of 32 sensors on the surface of a torso model with respect to a 13-dipole cardiac source model under noise-free conditions. The reconstruction robustness was estimated by the condition of the lead field matrix. Optimization improved the condition of the lead field matrix by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to a regular array at the front of the torso. Optimized setups exhibited distributions of sensors over the whole torso with denser sampling above the heart at the front and back of the torso. Sensors close to the heart were arranged predominantly tangential to the body surface. The optimized sensor setup could facilitate the definition of a standard for sensor placement in MCG and the development of a wearable MCG vest for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27231910

  16. Optimal Magnetic Sensor Vests for Cardiac Source Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Lau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetocardiography (MCG non-invasively provides functional information about the heart. New room-temperature magnetic field sensors, specifically magnetoresistive and optically pumped magnetometers, have reached sensitivities in the ultra-low range of cardiac fields while allowing for free placement around the human torso. Our aim is to optimize positions and orientations of such magnetic sensors in a vest-like arrangement for robust reconstruction of the electric current distributions in the heart. We optimized a set of 32 sensors on the surface of a torso model with respect to a 13-dipole cardiac source model under noise-free conditions. The reconstruction robustness was estimated by the condition of the lead field matrix. Optimization improved the condition of the lead field matrix by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to a regular array at the front of the torso. Optimized setups exhibited distributions of sensors over the whole torso with denser sampling above the heart at the front and back of the torso. Sensors close to the heart were arranged predominantly tangential to the body surface. The optimized sensor setup could facilitate the definition of a standard for sensor placement in MCG and the development of a wearable MCG vest for clinical diagnostics.

  17. Ultra-high-field magnetic resonance: Why and when?

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Ewald

    2010-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the development of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in medicine. Aspects of magnetic resonancephysics and -technology relevant at ultra-high magnetic fields as well as current limitations are highlighted. Based on the first promising studies, potential clinical applications at 7 Tesla are suggested. Other aims are to stimulate awareness of the potential of ultra-high field magnetic resonance and to stimulate active participation in much needed basic or...

  18. Purely electric and magnetic dipole resonances in metamaterial dielectric resonators through perturbation theory inspired geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Campione, Salvatore; Warne, Larry K; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology for tailoring the design of metamaterial dielectric resonators, which represent a promising path toward low-loss metamaterials at optical frequencies. We first describe a procedure to decompose the far field scattered by subwavelength resonators in terms of multipolar field components, providing explicit expressions for the multipolar far fields. We apply this formulation to confirm that an isolated high-permittivity cube resonator possesses frequency separated electric and magnetic dipole resonances, as well as a magnetic quadrupole resonance in close proximity to the electric dipole resonance. We then introduce multiple dielectric gaps to the resonator geometry in a manner suggested by perturbation theory, and demonstrate the ability to overlap the electric and magnetic dipole resonances, thereby enabling directional scattering by satisfying the first Kerker condition. We further demonstrate the ability to push the quadrupole resonance away from the degenerate dipole ...

  19. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  20. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ∼5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C–C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (∼5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV−). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV− defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size <20 nm), which are contained in the dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV− content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ∼2  ×  1019 spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV− centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the

  1. Theory and validation of magnetic resonance fluid motion estimation using intensity flow data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin Kian Loong Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motion tracking based on spatial-temporal radio-frequency signals from the pixel representation of magnetic resonance (MR imaging of a non-stationary fluid is able to provide two dimensional vector field maps. This supports the underlying fundamentals of magnetic resonance fluid motion estimation and generates a new methodology for flow measurement that is based on registration of nuclear signals from moving hydrogen nuclei in fluid. However, there is a need to validate the computational aspect of the approach by using velocity flow field data that we will assume as the true reference information or ground truth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we create flow vectors based on an ideal analytical vortex, and generate artificial signal-motion image data to verify our computational approach. The analytical and computed flow fields are compared to provide an error estimate of our methodology. The comparison shows that the fluid motion estimation approach using simulated MR data is accurate and robust enough for flow field mapping. To verify our methodology, we have tested the computational configuration on magnetic resonance images of cardiac blood and proved that the theory of magnetic resonance fluid motion estimation can be applicable practically. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this work will allow us to progress further in the investigation of fluid motion prediction based on imaging modalities that do not require velocity encoding. This article describes a novel theory of motion estimation based on magnetic resonating blood, which may be directly applied to cardiac flow imaging.

  2. Basic concepts from magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has grown exponentially, due in part to excellent anatomic and pathologic detail provided by the modality, as recent technological advances that have led to more rapid acquisition times. Radiology residents in different parts of the world now receive training in MR images from their first year of residence, included the pulse sequences training spin-echo, gradient-echo, inversion-recovery, echo-planar image and MR angiographic sequences, commonly used in medical imaging. However, to optimize the use of this type of study, it has been necessary to understand the basic concepts of physics, included the concepts of recovery T1, degradation T2* and T2, repetition time, echo time, and the effects of chemical shift. Additionally, it has been important to understand the contrast weighting for better representation of specific tissues and thus perform an appropriate differential diagnosis of various pathological processes. (author)

  3. Valuation for magnetic resonance of neuro tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased incidence of neuro tuberculosis (NTB), due to the world epidemic of resistant strains and AIDS, has made of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the study of choice for the early detection of lesions that lead the clinicians to an effective treatment. We present our experience with six cases of NTB, with meningoencephalic (4 cases), spinal, (1 case) and epidural (1 case) involvement. We identified basal arachnoiditis that was also seen on CT. Two cases demonstrated non-classifying tuberculomas, the spinal lesion consisted of casseifying tuberculoma that responded to treatment and disappeared on a follow up MR study. Epidural involvement consisted of Pott's disease with displacement and edema of the spinal cord. The differential diagnosis of these lesions includes mycoses, cysticercosis, sarcoidosis and leptomeningeal metastases

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd;

    2011-01-01

    of prior fMRI research related to consumer behavior and highlights the features that make fMRI an attractive method for consumer and marketing research. The authors discuss advantages and limitations and illustrate the proposed procedures with an applied study, which investigates loss aversion when buying......Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...... and selling a common product. Results reveal a significantly stronger activation in the amygdala while consumers estimate selling prices versus buying prices, suggesting that loss aversion is associated with the processing of negative emotion. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  5. Pulsed nuclear-electronic magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Morley, Gavin W; Mohammady, M Hamed; Aeppli, Gabriel; Kay, Christopher W M; Jeschke, Gunnar; Monteiro, Tania S

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed magnetic resonance is a wide-reaching technology allowing the quantum state of electronic and nuclear spins to be controlled on the timescale of nanoseconds and microseconds respectively. The time required to flip either dilute electronic or nuclear spins is orders of magnitude shorter than their decoherence times, leading to several schemes for quantum information processing with spin qubits. We investigate instead the novel regime where the eigenstates approximate 50:50 superpositions of the electronic and nuclear spin states forming "nuclear-electronic" qubits. Here we demonstrate quantum control of these states, using bismuth-doped silicon, in just 32 ns: orders of magnitude shorter than previous experiments where pure nuclear states were used. The coherence times of our states are over four orders of magnitude longer, being 1 ms or more at 8 K, and are limited by the naturally-occurring 29Si nuclear spin impurities. There is quantitative agreement between our experiments and no-free-parameter anal...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with panhypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi Mucelli, R.S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Frezza, F. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Magnaldi, S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Proto, G. [Servizio di Endocrinologia, Ospedale Civile di Udine (Italy)

    1992-02-01

    Primary panhypopituitarism consists of functional deficiency of the anterior pituitary lobe, which appears during infancy or adolescence. The magnetic resonance findings in 10 patients with a history of primary hypopituitarism are presented. The findings include: reduced pituitary size in all cases; partially (8 cases) or totally (2 cases) empty sella; thin (4 cases), partially visible (3 cases) or absent (2 cases) pituitary stalk; absence of the posterior lobe in 9 cases; bright spot corresponding to an ectopic posterior lobe in 8 cases. These findings are similar to those already reported in pituitary dwarfism and may help understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, which seems to be related to a pituitary stalk lesion. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging after exposure to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Adrian

    1993-01-01

    A number of physiological changes were demonstrated in bone, muscle, and blood from exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long-duration space missions is an important NASA goal. Historically, NASA has had to rely on tape measures, x-ray, and metabolic balance studies with collection of excreta and blood specimens to obtain this information. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of greatly extending these early studies in ways not previously possible; MRI is also non-invasive and safe; i.e., no radiation exposure. MRI provides both superb anatomical images for volume measurements of individual structures and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. This investigation will apply MRI technology to measure muscle, intervertebral disc, and bone marrow changes resulting from exposure to microgravity.

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.H.; Nathanson, J.A.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.; Lownie, S.P.

    1995-06-01

    In order to demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the brain in patients with clinical brain death, high-field MRI was performed on 5 patients using conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted imaging. The study showed MRI exhibited similar features for all of the patients, features which were not found in MRI of comatose patients who were not clinically brain dead. It was stated that up to now the most important limitation in MRI of patients with suspected brain death has been the extreme difficulty of moving them out of the intensive care setting. If this problem can be overcome, and it appears possible with with the advent of MRI-compatible ventilators and noninvasive monitoring, MRI could become an excellent alternative for confirming clinical diagnosis of brain death for such patients. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, we plan to continue our dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foram Gala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in occult spinal dysraphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study was carried out in 100 cases of suspected occult spinal dysraphic anomalies with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in order to determine its diagnostic efficacy as the initial imaging modality. MR imaging provided accurate preoperative information in 91 out of 92 cases (98.9%). Some of the unusual and interesting findings in the series were: presence of intrinsic cord abnormality in 19 out of 21 cases (90.4%) with a normal plain radiography, 4 cases of diastematomyelia with a dermoid in the dorsal and lumbar region associated with syringohydromyelia, intradural fibrous/glial bands, syringo-hydromyelia/myelomalacia of the conus with tethered cord syndrome having a normally paced conus, and myelocystocele. It is concluded that MRI is an excellent primary diagnostic tool, together with a plain radiography, for complete preoperative evaluation of mid-line spinal anomalies. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  13. Safety of magnetic resonance contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, V M

    2001-08-01

    Intravenous contrast media, specifically the gadolinium chelates, are well accepted for use in the clinical practice of magnetic resonance imaging. The gadolinium chelates are considered to be very safe and lack (in intravenous use) the nephrotoxicity found with iodinated contrast media. Minor adverse reactions, including nausea and hives, occur in a low percentage of cases. The four agents currently available in the United States cannot be differentiated on the basis of these adverse reactions. Severe anaphylactoid reactions are also known to occur with all agents, although these are uncommon. This review discusses the safety issues involved with intravenous administration of the gadolinium chelates and off-label use. The latter is common in clinical practice and permits broader application of these agents. PMID:11687717

  14. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Cummins, H K

    2001-01-01

    as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class o...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  16. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    -angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation......When a tumor reaches a certain size it can no longer rely on passive perfusion for nutrition. The tumor therefore emits signaling molecules which stimulating surrounding vessels to divide and grow towards the tumor, a process known as angiogenesis. Very little angiogenesis is present in healthy...... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  18. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  19. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance petrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) opens a wide area for exploration in petrophysics and has significant impact to petroleum logging technology. When there are multiple fluids with different diffusion coefficients saturated in a porous medium, this information can be extracted and clearly delineated from CPMG measurements of such a system either using regular pulsing sequences or modified two window sequences. The 2D NMR plot with independent variables of T2 relaxation time and diffusion coefficient allows clear separation of oil and water signals in the rocks. This 2D concept can be extended to general studies of fluid-saturated porous media involving other combinations of two or more independent variables, such as chemical shift and T1/T2 relaxation time (reflecting pore size), proton population and diffusion contrast, etc. PMID:15833623

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, K.S.; Brockwell, J.; Chan, F.L.; Janus, E.D.; Lam, K.S.L.

    1995-02-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare genetic disorder in which cholestanol and cholesterol accumulate in the nervous system and other tissues. It has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Most patients are of low intelligence with poor school performance. Specific clinical manifestations include xanthomas of the tendons. Furthermore, patients develop cataracts and a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia. There is slight mental deterioration. Death usually occurs in the sixth or seventh decade and is often due to unrelated causes. Plasma cholesterol levels are normal or only moderately elevated. The pattern of serum lipids is normal, and only serum cholestanol is significantly increased. Radiological features of the disease are infrequently described in the literature. We report a case of CTX in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to image the brain, lumbar spine and the tendinous xanthomas of the lower limbs. 15 refs., 5 figs.