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Sample records for cardiac fdg pet

  1. Significance of 18 F-FDG PET and immunohistochemical GLUT-1 expression for cardiac myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Yukio; Yamada, Sohsuke; Kitada, Shohei; Matsunaga, Iwao; Nogami, Eijirou; Watanabe, Teruo; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Honma, Yutaka; Itou, Tsuyoshi

    2014-06-16

    Cardiac tumours are relatively rare and are difficult to diagnose merely with imaging techniques. We demonstrated an unusual case of left atrial myxoma, displaying the successful detection by positron emission tomography using 2-deoxy-2-[18 F] fluoro-D-glucose (18 F-FDG PET), correlated closely to more intense and enhanced immunoreactivity with glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) in a substantial number of cardiac myxoma cells. Further prospective studies are needed to validate the significance of 18 F-FDG PET findings for cardiac myxoma and the association with immunohistochemical GLUT-1 expression in its tumour cells, after collecting and investigating a larger number of surgical cases examined with both of them. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2991481941253449.

  2. 18F-FDG PET-CT for Evaluation of Cardiac Angiosarcoma: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Singh Dhull

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac angiosarcomas are rare neoplasms. We here present the case of a 24 year old male with a cardiac mass which was characterised as malignant on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PETCT. In addition 18F-FDG PET-CT also demonstrated pericardial infiltration and bone metastases. The tumor was confirmed to be angiosarcoma on biopsy and palliative chemotherapy was started. Here we have highlighted the potential role of 18F-FDG PET-CT in patients with cardiac angiosarcoma and presented a brief review

  3. Myocardial Fibrosis in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Demonstrated by Integrated Cardiac F-18 FDG PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Eunjung; Lee, Sanghee; Cho, Ihnho [Yeungnam Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common condition defined as a diffuse or segmental left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy with a nondilated and hyperdynamic chamber as well as cardiac arrhythmias. Cardiac MR (CMR) imaging is a key modality for evaluation of HCM. In addition to the assessment of LV wall thickness, LV function and aortic flow, CMR is capable of estimation of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in affected myocardium which has been shown to have a direct correlation with incidence and severity of arrhythmias in HCM. In patients with HCM, LGE on CMR is presumed to represent intramyocardial fibrosis. Meanwhile, F-18 FDG myocardial PET has been sporadically studied in HCM, mostly for evaluation of the metabolic status of a hypertrophic myocardial segment, especially after interventions or to demonstrate partial myocardial fibrosis. We presented here the case of a 25-year-old male patient referred for simultaneous F-18 FDG cardiac PET/MR for the evaluation of septal hypertrophy. The PET/MR revealed myocardial fibrosis in the septum associated with FDG-defect and LGE.

  4. Use of [18F]FDG PET to Monitor The Development of Cardiac Allograft Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Kevin P.; Dearling, Jason L. J.; Seto, Tatsuichiro; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic; Packard, Alan B.; Briscoe, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has the potential to be a specific, sensitive and quantitative diagnostic test for transplant rejection. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and 13N-labeled ammonia ([13N]NH3) small animal PET imaging in a well-established murine cardiac rejection model. Methods Heterotopic transplants were performed using minor MHC mismatched B6.C-H2bm12 donor hearts in C57BL/6(H-2b) recipients. C57BL/6 donor hearts into C57BL/6 recipients served as isograft controls. [18F]FDG PET imaging was performed weekly between post-transplant days 7 and 42 and the percent injected dose was computed for each graft. [13N]NH3 imaging was performed to evaluate myocardial perfusion. Results There was a significant increase in [18F]FDG uptake in allografts from day 14 to day 21 (1.6% to 5.2%; Ptransplant days 21 (5.2% vs. 0.9%; P=0.005) and 28 (4.8% vs. 0.9%; P=0.006) compared to isograft controls. Furthermore, [18F]FDG uptake correlated with an increase in rejection within allografts between days 14 and 28 post-transplant. Finally, the uptake of [13N]NH3 was significantly lower relative to the native heart in allografts with chronic vasculopathy compared to isograft controls on day 28 (P=0.01). Conclusions PET imaging with [18F]FDG can be used following transplantation to monitor the evolution of rejection. In addition, decreased uptake of [13N]NH3 in rejecting allografts may be reflective of decreased myocardial blood flow. These data suggest that combined [18F]FDG and [13N]NH3 PET imaging could be used as a non-invasive, quantitative technique for serial monitoring of allograft rejection and has potential application in human transplant recipients. PMID:25675207

  5. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

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    Vontobel, Jan; Liga, Riccardo; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F.; Mikulicic, Fran; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Stehli, Julia; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Benz, Dominik C.; Graeni, Christoph; Gaemperli, Oliver; Herzog, Bernhard; Buechel, Ronny R.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac {sup 18}F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT in prosthetic infective endocarditis and cardiac implantable electronic device infection: comparison of different interpretation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Ballve, Ana; Jesus Perez-Castejon, Maria; Carreras-Delgado, Jose L.; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C.; Sanchez-Enrique, Cristina; Vilacosta, Isidre; Vivas, David; Olmos, Carmen; Ferrer, Manuel E.F.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve (PV) infective endocarditis (IE) and infection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in these patients and analyse the interpretation criteria. We included 41 patients suspected of having IE by the Duke criteria who underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The criteria applied for classifying the findings as positive/negative for IE were: (a) visual analysis of only PET images with attenuation-correction (AC PET images); (b) visual analysis of both AC PET images and PET images without AC (NAC PET images); (c) qualitative analysis of NAC PET images; and (d) semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images. 18 F-FDG PET/CT was considered positive for IE independently of the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake. The gold standard was the Duke pathological criteria (if tissue was available) or the decision of an endocarditis expert team after a minimum 4 months follow-up. We studied 62 areas with suspicion of IE, 28 areas (45 %) showing definite IE and 34 (55 %) showing possible IE. Visual analysis of only AC PET images showed poor diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 20 %, specificity 57 %). Visual analysis of both AC PET and NAC PET images showed excellent sensitivity (100 %) and intermediate specificity (73 %), focal uptake being more frequently associated with IE. The accuracy of qualitative analysis of NAC PET images depended on the threshold: the maximum sensitivity, specificity and accuracy achieved were 88 %, 80 %, 84 %, respectively. In the semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images, SUVmax was higher in areas of confirmed IE than in those without IE (∇SUVmax 2.2, p < 0.001). When FDG uptake was twice that in the liver, IE was always confirmed, and SUVmax 5.5 was the optimal threshold for IE diagnosis using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve 0.71). The value of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected IE of PVs and CIEDs is highly

  7. The value of FDG-PET/CT in the diagnostic work-up of extra cardiac infectious manifestations in infectious endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozcan, C; Asmar, A; Gill, S

    2013-01-01

    method to standard work-up in evaluating primary and distant infective foci. A retrospective cohort study of 72 IE patients admitted from 2008 to 2010, which had an (18)F-FDG-PET/CT performed. Findings were assessed in relation to the routine work-up, which served as the "gold standard". One hundred......-uptake/secretion, the corresponding values increased to 87 and 52 %, respectively. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT may be an important diagnostic tool in detecting extra cardiac infections in patients with IE, particularly in organs with low physiological glucose uptake....

  8. Non FDG PET

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    Nanni, C., E-mail: cristina.nanni@aosp.bo.i [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S.Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Fantini, L.; Nicolini, S.; Fanti, S. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S.Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    2- [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the radiopharmaceutical most frequently used for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). However, FDG cannot be used for many oncological, cardiological, or neurological conditions, either because the abnormal tissue does not concentrate it, or because the tissues under investigation demonstrate high physiological glucose uptake. Consequently, alternative PET tracers have been produced and introduced into clinical practice. The most important compounds in routine practice are {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-choline, mainly for the evaluation of prostate cancer; {sup 1}C-methionine for brain tumours; {sup 118}F-DOPA ({sup 18}F- deoxiphenilalanine) for neuroendocrine tumours and movement disorders; {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC (tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid-[1-Nal3]-octreotide) and other somatostatin analogues for neuroendocrine tumours; 11C-acetate for prostate cancer and hepatic masses and 18F-FLT (3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine) for a number of malignant tumours. Another impetus for the development of new tracers is to enable the investigation of biological processes in tumours other than glucose metabolism. This is especially important in the field of response assessment, where there are new agents that are targeted more specifically at angiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis and other processes.

  9. FDG PET imaging dementia

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    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  10. Semi-quantitative metabolic values on FDG PET/CT including extracardiac sites of disease as a predictor of treatment course in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Mitsutomi; Soine, Laurie A; Vesselle, Hubert J

    2017-08-18

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is associated with major adverse cardiac events including cardiac arrest, for which anti-inflammatory treatment is indicated. Oral corticosteroid is the mainstay among treatment options; however, adverse effects are a major concern with long-term use. It would be beneficial for providers to predict treatment response and prognosis for proper management strategy of sarcoidosis, though it remains challenging. Fluorine (F)-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography(PET)/computed tomography(CT) has an advantage over anatomical imaging in providing semi-quantitative functional parameters such as standard uptake value (SUV), metabolic volume, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), which are well-established biomarkers in oncology. However, the relationship between these parameters and treatment response has not been fully investigated in cardiac sarcoidosis. Also, the prognostic value of extracardiac active inflammation noted on FDG-PET/CT in the setting of cardiac sarcoidosis is unclear. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the prognostic value of semi-quantitative values of both cardiac and extracardiac disease sites derived from FDG-PET/CT in predicting treatment course in cardiac sarcoidosis. Sixteen consecutive patients with suspected cardiac sarcoidosis, who demonstrated abnormal myocardial activity on cardiac-inflammation FDG-PET/CT encompassing the entire chest/upper abdomen and subsequently underwent corticosteroid therapy for diagnosis of active cardiac sarcoidosis, were included. Semi-quantitative values of hypermetabolic lesions were derived from all visualized organ system and were compared to daily corticosteroid dose at 6 months.  Of the 16 patients, 81.3% (13/16) of the patients showed extracardiac involvement. The lesion with the greatest SUV was identified in the heart in 11 patients (68.7%), in the liver in 1 patient (6.3%), and in lymph nodes in 4 patients (25%). The maximum SUV across all visualized

  11. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of unexpected extracardiac septic embolisms in patients with suspected cardiac endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Nanni, Cristina; Morigi, Joshua James; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Graziosi, Maddalena; Rapezzi, Claudio [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Cardiology, Bologna (Italy); Trapani, Filippo; Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pier Luigi [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Infective Diseases, Bologna (Italy); Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico [Azienda Ospedaliera S. Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Radiology, Neuroradiology, Medical Physics, Rovigo (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Acute infective endocarditis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Its outcome strongly depends on systemic embolization and extracardiac infections. When present, these conditions usually lead to a more aggressive therapeutic approach. However, the diagnosis of peripheral septic embolism is very challenging. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has proven to be accurate for the detection of inflammatory diseases and occult infections. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of extracardiac embolisms in the evaluation of patients with suspected valvular endocarditis (VE). Seventy-one patients with suspected infective endocarditis, enrolled between June 2010 and December 2012, underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT with the standard procedure on a dedicated PET/CT scanner. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. Of the 71 patients with suspicion of infective endocarditis, we found unexpected extracardiac findings in 17 patients (24 %) without any clinical suspicion. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. PET/CT detected unexpected extra sites of infection in 24 % of cases, leading to changes in therapeutic management in a very relevant percentage of patients. These findings may have important therapeutic implications. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in prosthetic infective endocarditis and cardiac implantable electronic device infection: comparison of different interpretation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Ballve, Ana; Jesus Perez-Castejon, Maria; Carreras-Delgado, Jose L. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), University of La Rioja, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, La Rioja (Spain); Sanchez-Enrique, Cristina; Vilacosta, Isidre; Vivas, David; Olmos, Carmen [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Madrid (Spain); Ferrer, Manuel E.F. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Research Unit, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve (PV) infective endocarditis (IE) and infection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in these patients and analyse the interpretation criteria. We included 41 patients suspected of having IE by the Duke criteria who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The criteria applied for classifying the findings as positive/negative for IE were: (a) visual analysis of only PET images with attenuation-correction (AC PET images); (b) visual analysis of both AC PET images and PET images without AC (NAC PET images); (c) qualitative analysis of NAC PET images; and (d) semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was considered positive for IE independently of the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake. The gold standard was the Duke pathological criteria (if tissue was available) or the decision of an endocarditis expert team after a minimum 4 months follow-up. We studied 62 areas with suspicion of IE, 28 areas (45 %) showing definite IE and 34 (55 %) showing possible IE. Visual analysis of only AC PET images showed poor diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 20 %, specificity 57 %). Visual analysis of both AC PET and NAC PET images showed excellent sensitivity (100 %) and intermediate specificity (73 %), focal uptake being more frequently associated with IE. The accuracy of qualitative analysis of NAC PET images depended on the threshold: the maximum sensitivity, specificity and accuracy achieved were 88 %, 80 %, 84 %, respectively. In the semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images, SUVmax was higher in areas of confirmed IE than in those without IE (∇SUVmax 2.2, p < 0.001). When FDG uptake was twice that in the liver, IE was always confirmed, and SUVmax 5.5 was the optimal threshold for IE diagnosis using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve 0.71). The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected IE of PVs

  13. Role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis in patients with an implanted cardiac device: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziosi, Maddalena; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Diemberger, Igor; Pasquale, Ferdinando; Ziacchi, Matteo; Biffi, Mauro; Martignani, Cristian; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rapezzi, Claudio [Alma Mater-University of Bologna, and S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Cardiology Unit, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Nanni, Cristina; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Fanti, Stefano [Alma Mater-University of Bologna, and S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pier Luigi [Alma Mater-University of Bologna, and S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is widely underdiagnosed or diagnosed after a major delay. The diagnosis is currently based on the modified DUKE criteria, where the only validated imaging technique is echocardiography, and remains challenging especially in patients with an implantable cardiac device. The aim of this study was to assess the incremental diagnostic role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with an implanted cardiac device and suspected IE. We prospectively analysed 27 consecutive patients with an implantable device evaluated for suspected device-related IE between January 2011 and June 2013. The diagnostic probability of IE was defined at presentation according to the modified DUKE criteria. PET/CT was performed as soon as possible following the clinical suspicion of IE. Patients then underwent medical or surgical treatment based on the overall clinical evaluation. During follow-up, we considered: lead cultures in patients who underwent extraction, direct inspection and lead cultures in those who underwent surgery, and a clinical/instrumental reevaluation after at least 6 months in patients who received antimicrobial treatment or had an alternative diagnosis and were not treated for IE. After the follow-up period, the diagnosis was systematically reviewed by the multidisciplinary team using the modified DUKE criteria and considering the new findings. Among the ten patients with a positive PET/CT scan, seven received a final diagnosis of ''definite IE'', one of ''possible IE'' and two of ''IE rejected''. Among the 17 patients with a negative PET/CT scan, four were false-negative and received a final diagnosis of definite IE. These patients underwent PET/CT after having started antibiotic therapy (≥48 h) or had a technically suboptimal examination. In patients with a cardiac device, PET/CT increases the diagnostic accuracy of the modified Duke criteria for IE, particularly in the subset of

  14. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based ( CB ) PET. CB PET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CB PET in operation than cPET in the USA. CB PET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  15. Clinical impact of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Ozcan, Cengiz; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2014-01-01

    , the prognosis relies crucially on the presence of systemic infectious embolism. METHODS: Seventy-two patients (71% males and mean age 63 ± 17 years) with IE were evaluated with (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in addition to standard work-up including patient history, physical examination, conventional imaging modalities......, and weekly interdisciplinary conferences. When previous unknown lesions detected by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT were confirmed by succeeding examinations, they were considered true positive new findings and were further assessed for their clinical importance. Number needed to investigate was calculated as the number...

  16. Work flow with manual re-registration of cardiac 18F-FDG PET and attenuation correction CT to compensate for respiratory motion: Effects and inter-operator variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Christian; Christensen, Nana Louise; Møller, Lone W.

    Aim: Cardiac PET exams with CT for attenuation correction are increasing in number. However, due to different natures of the PET (average over many respiratory cycles) and the CT exam (snap-shot during one respiratory cycle) and the large difference in density of the cardiac and lung tissue......-registration is currently the most feasible. In this study, we examine both the effect on misalignment artefacts and the inter-operator variability of manual re-registration performed by the technologist in a step before the final image reconstruction and verified by a second technologist before image analysis. Method: 40...... 18F-FDG viability scans were examined. After the patient scan, a fast image reconstruction of low quality was made and used for manual re-registration of PET and AC CT, before starting the high quality reconstruction used for analysis. The left ventricle was reoriented and segmented in QPS (Cedar...

  17. FDG-PET in Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe, C.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Sabri, O.; Kluge, R.; Schober, O.

    2008-01-01

    The high negative predictive value of FDG-PET in therapy control of Hodgkin lymphoma is proven by the data acquired up to now. Thus, the analysis of the HD15 trial has shown that consolidation radiotherapy might be omitted in PET negative patients after effective chemotherapy. Further response adapted therapy guided by PET seems to be a promising approach in reducing the toxicity for patients undergoing chemotherapy. The criteria used for the PET interpretation have been standardized by the German study groups for Hodgkin lymphoma patients and will be reevaluated in the current studies. (orig.)

  18. FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT for therapy monitoring and restaging in malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghy, F.M.; Krause, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET allows to assess residual masses in patients with malignant lymphoma differentiating vital tumor from scar tissue. This approach is not applicable with conventional imaging methods (CDM) such as CT or MRI. On the other hand circumscribed results often cannot be definitely allocated in PET, therefore the combined morphological-biochemical approach using the now available PET/CT systems promises to be a pathbreaking technical progress. There is no doubt that stand alone PET is superior to CDM differentiating residual scar tissue from vital tumor as has been shown in 15 recently published studies. The median sensitivity for detecting active disease with FDG PET across the studies was 91%; the corresponding specificity was 89%. As a result FDG PET had a high negative predictive value of 94%. In contrast, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of CDM in the 9 studies were a direct comparison was available were low (31% and 46%, one study 82%). PET positive residual masses were associated with a progression-free survival of 0 - 55%. Only a few studies have included FDG-PET in therapy response monitoring studies, however also these results are promising. At the moment FDG-PET seems to be the best possibility to characterize and qualitatively visualize vitality of tumor masses and also hold promises for efficient therapy response monitoring in patients with malignant lymphoma. Therefore it should be included in standard diagnostic protocols in lymphoma patients. The combined PET/CT has to be ranked superior to conventional PET studies as in many cases the combined structural and functional imaging brings a clearer diagnostic statement. (orig.) [de

  19. Late infectious endocarditis of surgical patch closure of atrial septal defects diagnosed by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose gated cardiac computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnorat, Estelle; Seng, Piseth; Riberi, Alberto; Habib, Gilbert; Stein, Andreas

    2016-08-24

    In contrast to percutaneous atrial septal occluder device, surgical patch closure of atrial defects was known to be no infective endocarditis risk. We herein report the first case of late endocarditis of surgical patch closure of atrial septal defects occurred at 47-year after surgery. On September 2014, a 56-year-old immunocompetent French Caucasian man was admitted into the Emergency Department for 3-week history of headache, acute decrease of psychomotor performance and fever at 40 °C. The diagnosis has been evoked during his admission for the management of a brain abscess and confirmed using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose gated cardiac computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT). Bacterial cultures of surgical deep samples of brain abscess were positive for Streptococcus intermedius and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus as identified by the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and confirmed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patient was treated by antibiotics for 8 weeks and surgical patch closure removal. In summary, late endocarditis on surgical patch and on percutaneous atrial septal occluder device of atrial septal defects is rare. Cardiac imaging by the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose gated cardiac computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) could improve the diagnosis and care endocarditis on surgical patch closure of atrial septal defects while transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography remained difficult to interpret.

  20. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2011-01-01

    and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27.......0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number...

  1. FDG-PET evaluation of vaginal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Zoberi, Imran; Powell, Matthew A.; Gibb, Randall K.; Rader, Janet S.; Mutch, David G.; Siegel, Barry A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the results of CT and positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the detection of the primary tumor and lymph node metastases in carcinoma of the vagina. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective registry study of 23 consecutive patients with carcinoma of the vagina, in which we respectively compared the results of CT and whole-body FDG-PET. The tumor was clinical Stage II in 16 patients, Stage III in 6, and Stage IVa in 1 patient. The primary tumor ranged in size from 2 to 10 cm (mean 4.9), and 4 patients had palpable groin lymph nodes. All patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy, 14 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 2 underwent primary tumor excision before the imaging evaluation. The median follow-up was 21 months in those patients alive without disease. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Of the 21 patients with an intact primary tumor, CT visualized it in 9 (43%). CT also demonstrated abnormally enlarged groin lymph nodes in 3 patients and both groin and pelvic lymph nodes in 1 patient (4 of 23, 17%). FDG-PET identified abnormal uptake in all 21 intact primary tumors (100%). Abnormal uptake was found in the groin lymph nodes in 4 patients, pelvic lymph nodes in 2, and both groin and pelvic lymph nodes in 2 patients (8 of 23, 35%). The 3-year progression-free and overall survival estimate was 73% and 68%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated that FDG-PET detects the primary tumor and abnormal lymph nodes more often than does CT

  2. FDG-PET identification of infected pulmonary artery conduit following tetralogy of fallot (TOF) repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yu Yang; Williams, Hadyn; Pucar, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is one of the most common forms of cyanotic congenital heart disease usually managed by serial surgical repairs. The repaired prosthetic valve or conduit is susceptible to life-threatening infection. FDG-PET is an effective alternative to evaluate the source of infection when other examinations are inconclusive. We report an unusual case of an infected pulmonary artery conduit after TOF repair although the echocardiogram was negative for vegetation, which was later confirmed by surgery and pathology. The case highlights the role of FDG-PET as a problem-solving tool for potential endocarditis and cardiac device infection cases after complex cardiac surgery

  3. FDG-PET identification of infected pulmonary artery conduit following tetralogy of fallot (TOF) repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu Yang; Williams, Hadyn; Pucar, Darko [Dept. of Radiology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is one of the most common forms of cyanotic congenital heart disease usually managed by serial surgical repairs. The repaired prosthetic valve or conduit is susceptible to life-threatening infection. FDG-PET is an effective alternative to evaluate the source of infection when other examinations are inconclusive. We report an unusual case of an infected pulmonary artery conduit after TOF repair although the echocardiogram was negative for vegetation, which was later confirmed by surgery and pathology. The case highlights the role of FDG-PET as a problem-solving tool for potential endocarditis and cardiac device infection cases after complex cardiac surgery.

  4. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M D′souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin′s disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique.

  5. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique

  6. How much can a negative FDG-PET be trusted?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuxia

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: False-negative FDG-PET constituted 22.7% of all clinically identified negative PET in a ten year retrospective review about FDG-PET on irradiated brain tumour. Uncovering possible influencing factors of false-negative FDG-PET may have significant value. Material and methods: 10 patients with a first negative and then a second positive PET during very short time separation and 6 patients with surgically confirmed false-negative PET were traced. Histological type, irradiation parameter, steroids effect were discussed. To define temporary irradiation effect on FDG uptake, interval between radiation treatment to PET examination of these two groups were compared with 24 surgically confirmed true-positive PET, 5 surgically confirmed true-negative PET Results: 80% negative-positive PET transformation happened within 31 weeks. No statistically significant difference with regard to time from irradiation could be found between groups. Steroids medication closely before PET examination was about the same before the first negative and second positive PET scan. 5/6 surgically confirmed false-negative PET patients did not take steroids before PET examination. Conclusion: Tumour histology type, temporary irradiation effect and steroids medication did not constitute the reasons for false negative PET in our patient series. PET could not identify tumour relapse in the very early stage. Therefore, if clinically indicated, second FDG-PET might be a better selection to pick up tumour relapse instead of exploratory surgery or biopsy. In that case, the suitable time point for the second PET could be within 31 weeks after the first PET examination. Keywords: false-negative, FDG-PET, influencing factor, irradiation effect, steroids. (author)

  7. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong

    2008-01-01

    FDG PET has been used as a diagnostic tool for localization of seizure focus for last 2-3 decades. In this article, the clinical usefulness of FDG PET in the management of patients with epilepsy has been reviewed, which provided the evidences to justify the medicare reimbursement for FDG PET in management of patients with epilepsy. Literature review demonstrated that FDG PET provides an important information in localization of seizure focus and determination whether a patients is a surgical candidate or not. FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance in localization of seizure focus in neocortical epilepsy as well as temporal lobe epilepsy regardless of the presence of structural lesion on MRI. Particularly, FDG PET can provide the additional information when the results from standard diagnositic modality such as interictal or video-monitored EEG, and MRI are inconclusive or discordant, and make to avoid invasive study. Furthermore, the presence of hypometabolism and extent of metabolic extent has been reported as an important predictor for seizure free outcome. However, studies suggested that more accurate localization and better surgical outcome could be expected with multimodal approach by combination of EEG, MRI, and functional studies using FDG PET or perfusion SPECT rather than using a single diagnostic modality in management of patients with epilepsy. Complementary use of FDG PET in management of epilepsy is worth for good surgical outcome in epilepsy patients

  8. FDG-PET template MNI152 1mm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A FDG-PET template in MNI space aligned to the MNI152 atlas This PET-FDG template is provided as is free of charge for all purposes, provided that the following paper is cited......(to appear) when ever the template is used. The authors cannot, under any circumstances, be held responsible for any...

  9. Oncological applications of 18F-FDG PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin

    2000-01-01

    Considering normal distribution of 18 F-FDG in human body, 18 F-FDG imaging using PET can be applied to brain tumors, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, melanoma, lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The author briefly focuses on application of 18 F-FDG PET imaging to breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, musculoskeletal neoplasms, endocrine neoplasms, genitourinary neoplasms, esophageal and gastric carcinomas

  10. FDG-PET in the clinical management of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Eigtved, Annika I; Specht, Lena

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a molecular functional imaging technique that provides qualitative and quantitative information about the localization and activity of pathophysiological processes. The most commonly used tracer for oncological purposes is 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG......-PET detects more disease sites and involved organs than conventional staging procedures including computerized tomography (CT) and has a large influence on staging. FDG-PET during and after therapy appears to provide considerable prognostic information. However, the impact on patient outcome is not clear......). FDG-PET has within recent years become the most important nuclear medicine imaging modality in the management of lymphoma. This review summarizes the data published so far concerning the value of FDG-PET in staging, treatment monitoring, therapy planning, and follow-up of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). FDG...

  11. Possibilities of FDG-PET in diagnosis of urological tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Ken; Nakagawa, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in evaluating patients with urological tumors. FDG-PET scans were taken in 116 patients with urological diseases. The number of patients with prostatic disease, renal disease and adrenal disease was 86 (74.1%), 10 and 10, respectively. Seven patients with bladder tumors who had previously undergone either cystectomy or transurethral resection of bladder cancer (TUR-Bt) received FDG-PET scan for medical check-up. Three patients with testicular disease were also included in this series. In patients with prostatic disease, 41 patients were already diagnosed as having prostate cancer and FDG-PET was performed for medical check-up. Forty-five patients were suspected of having prostate cancer because of the FDG accumulation and/or a rise in serum prostatic specific antigen (PSA). Of these patients, 9 were diagnosed as having prostate cancer by biopsy. Serum PSA levels were elevated in all 9 patients, however FDG-PET findings were false-negative in 4 of the 9 patients. In patients with renal disease, 2 of the 4 patients suspected of having renal cell carcinoma actually had benign diseases. In one patient with a renal mass, FDG-PET was false-negative. All 6 patients with metastatic adrenal tumors showed positive findings in FDG-PET, and the patients with nonhypersecreting adrenal masses showed negative findings in FDG-PET. In three patients with seminoma, viable metastatic foci were successfully detected by FDG-PET after chemotherapy. In the present study, FDG-PET was not superior to tumor markers, such as serum PSA and conventional imaging modalities for the detection of prostate cancer and renal cell carcinoma. However, in patients with nonhypersecreting adrenal masses or a metastatic adrenal tumor, FDG-PET may provide significant functional information for tissue characterization. Moreover FDG-PET can be useful for the detection of residual viable carcinoma

  12. FDG PET in early stage cutaneous malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIvor, Jody; Siew, Teck; McCarthy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) is not recommended in early stage melanoma; however, a significant number of cases are referred to our institution for FDG PET. We refer to early stage disease as American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I and II, which includes all cases without metastases. A retrospective review was undertaken to determine the clinical utility of FDG PET in this patient group. A retrospective study of FDG scans on all patients presenting to the WA PET Centre with early stage melanoma over a 5½ year period was undertaken. The positivity rate of the initial study for detection of malignant melanoma was determined. In patients with an initially negative FDG PET, the time from initial diagnosis to a positive surveillance study was determined. Both the initial positivity rate and time to a positive study were correlated with Breslow staging. Three hundred twenty-two patients were included in the study, of which 74 had initial positive FDG PET scans (23%). Adequate follow-up was available in 51 patients with the PET result confirmed as true positive in 37 (positive predictive value 73%). One hundred eight of 248 patients initially negative had follow-up scans during the follow-up period, of which 48 became positive. The 73% of recurrences were over 12 months post-diagnosis. No correlation with Breslow thickness was demonstrated. Despite FDG PET not being recommended for early cutaneous malignant melanoma, 27% of melanoma cases referred for FDG PET during the study period were AJCC stage I or II. Our results suggest FDG PET in early stage melanoma demonstrates occult disease in 17% of cases.

  13. The FDG-PET diagnosis of head and neck malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, Shinpei; Hayashi, Masahiko; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the utility of whole body FDG-PET in patients with head and neck malignant tumor, retrospectively. Fifty four FDG-PET studies were performed in 45 patients. Regarding the primary tumor and nodal metastasis, we compared the diagnosis of only FDG-PET with diagnosis using CT, MRI, and physical examination without FDG-PET (diagnosis without FDG-PET). These FDG-PET images were evaluated with visual interpretation qualitatively. At the primary tumor, sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET diagnoses were 90% and 93%, and those of the diagnoses without FDG-PET were 95% and 100%, respectively; for nodal metastasis, sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET diagnoses were 90% and 84%, and those of the diagnoses without FDG-PET were 72% and 80%, respectively. In nodal metastasis, the diagnosis of FDG-PET was superior to the diagnosis without FDG-PET. However, it is important to be careful of false positive findings of FDG-PET such as inflammatory lymph nodes, and false negative findings such as very thin tumors. By combining the FDG-PET diagnosis with other examinations, we could achieve almost perfect diagnosis. Farthermore, we perform FDG-PET repeatedly to improve diagnosis accuracy. (author)

  14. FDG and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the imaging of prosthetic joint infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Sabire Yilmaz; Asa, Sertac; Ozhan, Meftune; Sager, M.S.; Halac, Metin; Kabasakal, Levent; Soenmezoglu, Kerim; Kanmaz, Bedii [University of Istanbul, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Aksaray, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [University of Istanbul, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Istanbul (Turkey); Erkan, Melih Engin [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Duzce (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    The demand for arthroplasty is rapidly growing as a result of the ageing of the population. Although complications such as heterotrophic ossification, fracture and dislocation are relatively rare, differentiating aseptic loosening, the most common complication of arthroplasty from infection, is a major challenge for clinicians. Radionuclide imaging is currently the imaging modality of choice since it is not affected by orthopaedic hardware. Whereas FDG PET/CT imaging has been widely used in periprosthetic infection, it cannot discriminate aseptic from septic inflammation. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of FDG PET/CT and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the diagnosis of periprosthetic infection. Of 54 patients with painful joint arthroplasty who were imaged by FDG PET/CT for diagnosis of periprosthetic infection examined, 46 (36 women, 10 men; mean age 61.04 ± 12.2 years, range 32 - 89 years) with 54 painful joint prostheses (19 hip, 35 knee) with grade 2 (above liver uptake) FDG accumulation on FDG PET/CT were included in the study and these 46 patients also underwent FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT. Final diagnoses were made by histopathological-microbiological culture or clinical follow-up. The final diagnosis showed infection in 15 (28 %) and aseptic loosening in 39 (72 %) of the 54 prostheses. FDG PET/CT was found to have a positive predictive value of 28 % (15/54). Since patients with no FDG uptake on FDG PET/CT were excluded from the study, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy could not be calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT were 93.3 % (14/15), 97.4 % (38/39), 93.3 % and 97.4 %, respectively. Since FDG is not specific to infection, the specificity of FDG PET/CT was very low. FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT with its high specificity may be a useful method and better than labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in periprosthetic infection

  15. 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in Burkitt's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanis, Dimitrios; Durski, Jolanta M.; Lowe, Val J.; Nathan, Mark A.; Mullan, Brian P.; Georgiou, Evangelos; Johnston, Patrick B.; Wiseman, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of 18 F fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in Burkitt's lymphoma. Methods: All Burkitt's lymphoma patients referred for FDG PET or FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) exams at our institution from June 2003 to June 2006 were included. Selected patients were followed and clinical information was reviewed retrospectively. Results from FDG PET-PET/CT, as blindly reviewed by a consensus of two experienced readers, were compared with the status of the disease as determined by other laboratory, clinical and imaging exams and clinical follow-up. FDG PET-PET/CT results were classified as true positive or negative and false positive or negative. The degree of FDG uptake in the positive lesions was semiquantified as maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax). Results: Fifty-seven FDG PET-PET/CT exams were done in 15 patients. Seven exams were done for initial staging, 8 during and 14 after the completion of therapy, and 28 for disease surveillance. For nodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 8, true negative in 47 and false positive in 2 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 96%). For extranodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 6, true negative in 48 and false positive in 3 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%). The mean SUVmax for the positive nodal lesions was 15.7 (range 6.9-21.7, median 18.5) and for extranodal lesions was 14.2 (range 6.2-24.3, median 12.4). Conclusions: FDG PET-PET/CT is sensitive for the detection of viable disease in Burkitt's lymphoma. Affected areas demonstrated high degree of uptake that was reversible upon successful implementation of treatment.

  16. FDG PET/CT in children and adolescents with lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluge, Regine; Kurch, Lars [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Montravers, Francoise [Hospital Tenon, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Mauz-Koerholz, Christine [University Hospital Halle, Department of Paediatrics, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of FDG PET/CT applications in children and adolescents with lymphoma. Today, FDG PET is used for tailoring treatment intensity in children with Hodgkin lymphoma within the framework of international treatment optimisation protocols. In contrast, the role of this method in children with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is not well defined. This paper overviews clinical appearance and metabolic behaviour of the most frequent lymphoma subtypes in childhood. The main focus of the review is to summarise knowledge about the role of FDG PET/CT for initial staging and early response assessment. (orig.)

  17. [18F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [18F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars; Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas; Schaefers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [ 18 F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [ 18 F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast agent is contraindicated. (orig.)

  18. Imaging of the myocardium using {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiří, E-mail: ferda@fnplzen.cz [Clinic of the Imaging Methods, University Hospital Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Hromádka, Milan, E-mail: hromadkam@fnplzen.cz [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Baxa, Jan, E-mail: baxaj@fnplzen.cz [Clinic of the Imaging Methods, University Hospital Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzeň (Czech Republic)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The natural combination of the metabolic and structural information is the most important strenghtof myocardial PET/MRI. • Metabolic conversion to glycolysis is needed in the assesment ov the viable myocardium. • Metabolic conversion to the fatty acid metabolism is the crucial in the assesment of the ischemic memory and myocardial inflammation. - Abstract: The introduction of the integrated hybrid PET/MRI equipment creates the possibility to perform PET and MRI simultaneously. Depending on the clinical question, the metabolic conversion to glycolytic activity or beta-oxidation is performed before the application of FDG. Since FDG aids to evaluate the energetic metabolism of the myocytes and myocardial MRI reaches the imaging capabilities of perfusion and tissue characterization in the daily routine, FDG-PET/MRI looks to be a promising method of PET/MRI exploitation in cardiac imaging. When myocardial FDG uptake should be evaluated in association with the perfusion distribution, the cross-evaluation of FDG accumulation distribution and perfusion distribution pattern is necessary. The different scenarios may be used in the assessment of myocardium, the conversion to glycolytic activity is used in the imaging of the viable myocardium, but the glycolytic activity suppression might be used in the indications of the identification of injured myocardium by ischemia or inflammation. FDG-PET/MRI might aid to answer the clinical tasks according to the structure, current function and possibilities to improve the function in ischemic heart disease or to display the extent or activity of myocardial inflammation in sarcoidosis. The tight coupling between metabolism, perfusion and contractile function offers an opportunity for the simultaneous assessment of cardiac performance using one imaging modality.

  19. System immune response to vaccination on FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingos, Mark; Howard, Stephanie; Giaclone, Micholas; Kozono, David; Jacene, Heather [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A patient with newly diagnosed right lung cancer had transient 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid left axillary lymph nodes and intense splenic FDG uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). History revealed that the patient received a left-sided influenza vaccine 2-3 days before the examination. Although inflammatory FDG uptake in ipsilateral axillary nodes is reported, to our knowledge, this is the first report of visualization of the systemic immune response in the spleen related to the influenza vaccination on FDG-PET/CT. The history, splenic uptake and time course on serial FDG-PET/CT helped to avoid a false-positive interpretation for progressing lung cancer and alteration of the radiation therapy plan.

  20. Comparison of F-18-FLT PET and F-18-FDG PET in esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westreenen, HL; Cobben, DCP; Jager, PL; van Dullemen, HM; Wesseling, J; Elsinga, PH; Plukker, JT

    F-18-FDG PET has gained acceptance for staging of esophageal cancer. However, FDG is not tumor specific and false-positive results may occur by accumulation of FDG in benign tissue. The tracer F-18-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-L-fluorothymidine (F-18-FLT) might not have these drawbacks. The aim of this study

  1. FDG-PET in monitoring therapy of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Bender, H.; Palmedo, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been used successfully for the staging and re-staging of breast cancer. Another significant indication is the evaluation of therapy response. Only limited data are available on the use of FDG-PET in breast cancer after radiation therapy. The same holds true for chemotherapy. Only the therapy response in locally advanced breast cancer after chemotherapy has been investigated thoroughly. Histopathological response could be predicted with an accuracy of 88-91% after the first and second courses of therapy. A quantitative evaluation is, of course, a prerequisite when FDG-PET is used for therapy monitoring. Only a small number of studies have focussed on hormone therapy. In this context, a flare phenomenon with increasing standardised uptake values after initiation of tamoxifen therapy has been observed. More prospective multicentre trials will be needed to make FDG-PET a powerful tool in monitoring chemotherapy in breast cancer. (orig.)

  2. Metastasis of the gastrointestinal tract. FDG-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayasaka, Kazumasa; Nihashi, Takashi; Matsuura, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    We assess the usefulness of F-18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of gastrointestinal metastases. Four cases (five lesions) in which metastases from three lung cancers and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of the femur were found in the gastrointestinal tract were reviewed (men/women 3:1, age 63-78 years, mean 72 years). The five lesions were duodenal, jejunal metastasis, and two stomach metastases from lung carcinoma, and rectal metastasis from MFH of the femur. FDG-PET was unable to detect small masses, but it was able to detect unforeseen lesions such as gastrointestinal metastases because FDG-PET is a whole-body scan in a single-operation examination. FDG-PET imaging provided valuable information for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal metastasis. (author)

  3. FDG-PET/CT in Skeletal Muscle: Pitfalls and Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-07-01

    FDG-PET/CT is an integral part of modern-day practice of medicine. By detecting increased cellular metabolism, FDG-PET/CT can help us detect infection, inflammatory disorders, or tumors, and also help us in prognostication of patients. However, one of the most important challenges is to correctly differentiate the abnormal uptake that is potentially pathologic from the physiological uptake. So while interpreting a PET/CT, one must be aware of normal biodistribution and different physiological variants of FDG uptake. Skeletal muscles constitute a large part of our body mass and one of the major users of glucose. Naturally, they are often the site of increased FDG uptake in a PET study. We as a nuclear medicine physician must be aware of all the pitfalls of increased skeletal muscle uptake to differentiate between physiological and pathologic causes. In this review, we have discussed the different causes and patterns of physiological FDG uptake in skeletal muscles. This knowledge of normal physiological variants of FDG uptake in the skeletal muscles is essential for differentiating pathologic uptake from the physiological ones. Also, we reviewed the role of FDG-PET/CT in various benign and malignant diseases involving skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. FDG PET/CT Imaging of Prostate Carcinosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Chin, Bennett B

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of carcinosarcoma of the prostate. Workup of urinary retention after a previously treated squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate led to a transurethral prostate resection revealing carcinosarcoma of the prostate, which on F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated moderate to high avidity of this atypical prostate cancer, with partial obstruction of the urinary system and lung metastases. While FDG PET is not avid for typical prostatic adenocarcinomas, it should be considered for evaluation of atypical prostate cancers.

  5. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2003-01-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test

  6. Guidelines for 18F-FDG PET and PET-CT imaging in paediatric oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauss, J.; Franzius, C.; Pfluger, T.

    2008-01-01

    tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) in paediatric oncology. The Oncology Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) has published excellent procedure guidelines on tumour imaging with (18)F-FDG PET (Bombardieri et al., Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 30:BP115-24, 2003). These guidelines, published...

  7. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of prolonged febrile states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaruskova, M.; Belohlavek, O. [Na Homolce Hospital, PET Center, Prague 5 (Czech Republic)

    2006-08-15

    The role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients whose main symptom is prolonged fever has not yet been defined. We addressed this topic in a retrospective study. A total of 124 patients (referred between May 2001 and December 2004) with fever of unknown origin or prolonged fever due to a suspected infection of a joint or vascular prosthesis were included in the study. The patients underwent either FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT scanning. Sixty-seven patients had a negative focal FDG-PET finding; in this group the method was regarded as unhelpful in determining a diagnosis, and no further investigation was pursued. We tried to obtain clinical confirmation for all patients with positive PET findings. Fifty-seven (46%) patients had positive FDG-PET findings. In six of them no further clinical information was available. Fifty-one patients with positive PET findings and 118 patients in total were subsequently evaluated. Systemic connective tissue disease was confirmed in 17 patients, lymphoma in three patients, inflammatory bowel disease in two patients, vascular prosthesis infection in seven patients, infection of a hip or knee replacement in seven patients, mycotic aneurysm in two patients, abscess in four patients and AIDS in one patient. In eight (16%) patients the finding was falsely positive. FDG-PET or PET/CT contributed to establishing a final diagnosis in 84% of the 51 patients with positive PET findings and in 36% of all 118 evaluated patients with prolonged fever. (orig.)

  8. FDG PET in the diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y. H.; Zuo, C.T.; Zhao, J.; Hua, F.C.; Lin, X.T.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Meningeal involvement is frequent in metastatic lymphoma, leukemia, and other metastatic tumor. Functional signs may be misleading and the neurological examination may be normal or non-specific. Certain diagnosis requires identification of tumor cells in the cerebrospinal fluid. CSF cytology is however sometimes negative and MRI maybe help in providing the diagnosis. The aim of our retrospective study was to assess the role of FDG PET in the diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis. Patients and Methods: The diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis was made in 5 patients between 1999 and 2001. Two of the patients were suffer from lymphoma, two were lung cancer patients, and another was a breast cancer patient. Cytology examination of the cerebrospinal fluid provided the diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis in these 5 patients. All the patients had signs of neurological function impairment, but the neurological examination cannot demonstrate the site of lesions. Therefore, All the patients had MRI examination, but only 1 case was diagnosis correctly (the MRI showing meningeal enhancement). 3 patients' MRI results show normal .Another MRI was suspicious of ischemic change. Results: A brain FDG PET using an ECAT HR + PET examined all the 5 patients. All the FDG PET results show the hypermetabolic foci respectively. The foci were diffused on the brain meninges. Their size is bigger than the foci detected by MRI . 3 of the patients repeated the FDG PET scan after treatment (chemotherapy and radiotherapy). The therapeutic effect can be reflecting by FDG PET (the foci dismissed as the neurological symptoms disappeared), although the simultaneity MRI shows no change before and after treatment. Conclusion: 5 patients proven meningeal carcinomatosis FDG PET has better sensitivity than brain MRI scans and other anatomic modality. The patients who suffer from metastatic lymphoma, leukemia, and other metastatic tumor with nonspecific neurological signs should be explored

  9. Patient Preparation for Oncological FDG-PET/CT Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevin Ayaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In oncology patients who undergo positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT, radiolabeled [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG is utilized to obtain qualitative and quantitative data about tumour metabolism. The process of patient preparation before FDG-PET/CT imaging (scanning primarily includes acquisition of patient data, fasting before imaging, regulation of blood glucose and insulin levels, administration of FDG and radiologic contrast material, administration of adjunctive agents, scheduling of the imaging in recently treated patients, imaging during pregnancy and lactation, and final arrangements before imaging. Standardization of procedures for patient preparation in oncological FDG-PET/CT imaging is extremely important to obtain high-quality images, to decrease false-negative and false-positive findings and to reduce the patient radiation dose as much as possible.

  10. F-18 FDG PET in Detecting Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ak, I.; Can, C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of F-18 FDG imaging with a dual head coincidence mode gamma camera (Co-PET) in the detection of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients with renal masses. Material and Methods: An F-18 FDG Co-PET study was performed in 19 patients (7 F, 12 M; mean age 58.15±2.5 years, age range 45-79 years) with suspected primary renal tumors based on conventional imaging techniques, including computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) before nephrectomy or surgical resection of the mass. Results: Histologically documented RCC was present in 15 patients. Of the 19 patients with suspected primary renal tumors, F-18 FDG Co-PET was true-positive in 13, false-negative in 2, true-negative in 3, and false-positive in 1 patient. Twangiomyolipomas and one renal mass due to infarction and hemorrhage showed a true-negative Co-PET result. The patient with false-positive FDG Co-PET study was diagnosed as xantogranulomatous pyelonephritis. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FDG Co-PET for RCC were 86% (13/15), 75% (3/4), and 84% (16/19), respectively. Positive predictive value for RCC was 92% and negative predictive value 60%. Conclusion: These findings suggest that F-18 FDG Co-PET may have a role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with RCC and primary staging of disease. Positive F-18 FDG study may be predictive of the presence of RCC. However, a negative study does not exclude the RCC

  11. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, R.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Weber, W.A.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Lonsdale, M.N.; Stroobants, S.G.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kotzerke, J.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Pruim, J.; Marsden, P.K.; Tatsch, K.; Hoekstra, C.J.; Visser, E.P.; Arends, B.; Verzijlbergen, F.J.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Comans, E.F.I.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Paans, A.M.; Willemsen, A.T.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Delbeke, D.; Baum, R.P.; Chiti, A.; Krause, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed

  12. The pivotal role of FDG-PET/CT in modern medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Zhu, Hongyun June

    2014-01-01

    to the emergence of hybrid scanners combining PET with computed tomography (PET/CT). Molecular imaging has enormous potential for advancing biological research and patient care, and FDG-PET/CT is currently the most widely used technology in this domain. In this review, we discuss contemporary applications of FDG......-PET and FDG-PET/CT as well as novel developments in quantification and potential future indications including the emerging new modality PET/magnetic resonance imaging....

  13. Patterns of FDG uptake in stomach on FDG PET: correlation with endoscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Seong Eun; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to find out the significant findings of stomach on FDG PET. Thirty-nine patients who underwent both FDG PET and endoscopy from Jun. 2003, to Aug. 2004 were included in our study. In all of them, FDG PET and gastrofibroscopy were performed within one week. One man who had undergone subtotal gastrectomy was excluded. We reviewed 38 cases (18 for medical check up, 15 for work up of other malignancies, and 5 for the evaluation of stomach lesion). Their mean age was 56 years old (range:32{approx}79), men and women were 28 and 10, respectively. On interpretation of FDG PET scan, two nuclear physician evaluated five parameters on FDG-PET findings of stomach with a concensus : 1) visual grades 2) maximum SUV (SUVmax), 3) focality, 4) asymmetry, and 5) gross appearance. We correlated FDG PET findings of stomach with those of endoscopy. On endoscopy, six of 38 patients were proven as gastric cancer, and others had inflammatory lesion (ulcer in 3, chronic gastritis in 12, uncommon from gastritis in 5) or benign noninflammatory lesions (polyp and varix in 3, and normal limit). On the visual analysis, FDG uptake of stomach cancer had the tendency of higher uptake than the other lesions. SUVmax of gastric cancer was 7.95{+-}4.83 which was significantly higher than the other benign lesions (2.9{+-}0.69 in ulcer, 3.08{+-}1.2 in chronic gastritis 3.2{+-}1.49 in uncommon from gastritis). In the appearance of stomach on PET, gastric cancer was shown as focal lesion (5 of 6), and those of benign inflammatory lesions were asymmetric (14 of 20), and diffuse (9 of 20). Some cases of chronic inflammatory lesions, such as ulcer, and chronic gastritis, showed focal appearance and mimicked cancerous lesion (4 of 15). On FDG PET, the lesions of stomach cancer had higher FDG uptake and focal appearance comparing with the other benign inflammatory lesions. However, ulcer, and chronic gastritis showed focal appearance on PET, which could be mimicked as cancerous

  14. Patterns of FDG uptake in stomach on FDG PET: correlation with endoscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Seong Eun; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to find out the significant findings of stomach on FDG PET. Thirty-nine patients who underwent both FDG PET and endoscopy from Jun. 2003, to Aug. 2004 were included in our study. In all of them, FDG PET and gastrofibroscopy were performed within one week. One man who had undergone subtotal gastrectomy was excluded. We reviewed 38 cases (18 for medical check up, 15 for work up of other malignancies, and 5 for the evaluation of stomach lesion). Their mean age was 56 years old (range:32∼79), men and women were 28 and 10, respectively. On interpretation of FDG PET scan, two nuclear physician evaluated five parameters on FDG-PET findings of stomach with a concensus : 1) visual grades 2) maximum SUV (SUVmax), 3) focality, 4) asymmetry, and 5) gross appearance. We correlated FDG PET findings of stomach with those of endoscopy. On endoscopy, six of 38 patients were proven as gastric cancer, and others had inflammatory lesion (ulcer in 3, chronic gastritis in 12, uncommon from gastritis in 5) or benign noninflammatory lesions (polyp and varix in 3, and normal limit). On the visual analysis, FDG uptake of stomach cancer had the tendency of higher uptake than the other lesions. SUVmax of gastric cancer was 7.95±4.83 which was significantly higher than the other benign lesions (2.9±0.69 in ulcer, 3.08±1.2 in chronic gastritis 3.2±1.49 in uncommon from gastritis). In the appearance of stomach on PET, gastric cancer was shown as focal lesion (5 of 6), and those of benign inflammatory lesions were asymmetric (14 of 20), and diffuse (9 of 20). Some cases of chronic inflammatory lesions, such as ulcer, and chronic gastritis, showed focal appearance and mimicked cancerous lesion (4 of 15). On FDG PET, the lesions of stomach cancer had higher FDG uptake and focal appearance comparing with the other benign inflammatory lesions. However, ulcer, and chronic gastritis showed focal appearance on PET, which could be mimicked as cancerous lesion on PET

  15. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon Young

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical use of 18 F-FDG PET to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). When SPN or mass without calcification is found on chest X-ray or CT, 18 F-FDG PET is an effective modality to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. For initial staging of NSCLC, 18 F-FDG PET is useful, and proved to be cost-effective in several countries. 18 F-FDG PET is useful for detecting recurrence, restaging and evaluating residual tumor after curative therapy in NSCLC. For therapy response assessment, 18 F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy or radiation therapy. 18 F-FDG PET is useful to predict pathological response after neoadjuvant therapy in NSCLC. For radiation therapy planning, 18 F-FDG PET may be helpful, but requires further investigations. PET/CT is better for evaluating NSCLC than conventional PET

  16. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in Endometrial Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Tae Joo [Pochon CHA University College of Medicine, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Endometrial carcinoma is one of the most common gynecologic malignancies and which is predominant in postmenopausal women. Clinically many patients are hospitalized in early stage due to clinical sign and symptom such as vaginal bleeding and in this case, patient's prognosis is known to be good. However, considerable number of patients with advanced and relapsed disease reveal poor prognosis. Therefore, exact staging work up is essential for proper treatment as is primary lesion detection. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET has been widely used for the evaluation of gynecologic malignancies such as cervical carcinoma and ovarian cancer. In contrast, FDG PET application to endometrial carcinoma is limited until now and there is no sufficient data to validate the usefulness of FDG PET for this disease yet. However, several studies showed promising results that FDG PET is sensitive and specific in detection of recurrent or metastatic lesions. Therefore further active investigation in this field can facilitate the use of FDG PET for endometrial carcinoma.

  17. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boellaard, Ronald; O'Doherty, Mike J; Weber, Wolfgang A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomogr......-computed tomography (PET/CT) and is provided to help the physician and physicist to assist to carrying out,interpret, and document quantitative FDG PET/CT examinations,but will concentrate on the optimisation of diagnostic quality and quantitative information....

  18. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.......7) min(-1), P PET...

  19. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis and management of vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerizer, Imene; Tan, Kathryn; Khan, Sameer; Barwick, Tara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom); Marzola, Maria Cristina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Radiology and Medical Physics, ' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Radiology and Medical Physics, ' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy)], E-mail: domenico.rubello@libero.it; Al-Nahhas, Adil [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: to investigate the role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the evaluation of vasculitis. Materials and methods: a systematic revision of the papers published in PubMed/Medline until December 2009 was done. Results: FDG-PET and PET/CT have been proven to be valuable in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis, especially giant cells arteritis with sensitivity values ranging 77% to 92%, and specificity values ranging 89% to 100%. In particular, FDG-PET/CT has demonstrated the potential to non-invasively diagnose the onset of the vasculitis earlier than traditional anatomical imaging techniques, thus enabling prompt treatment. False positive results mainly occur in the differential diagnosis between vasculitis and atherosclerotic vessels in elderly patients. Another area where FDG-PET/CT is gaining wider acceptance is in monitoring response to therapy; it can reliably detect the earliest changes of disease improvement post-therapy, and persistent activity is an indicator of non-responders to therapy. A few data have been reported about medium/small vessel vasculitis. Discussion: FDG-PET and PET/CT have proven utility: (a) in the initial diagnosis of patients suspected of having vasculitis particularly in those who present with non-specific symptoms; (b) in the identification of areas of increased FDG uptake in which a biopsy should be done for obtaining a diagnosis; (c) in evaluating the extent of the disease; (d) in assessing response to treatment.

  20. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis and management of vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerizer, Imene; Tan, Kathryn; Khan, Sameer; Barwick, Tara; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico; Al-Nahhas, Adil

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate the role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the evaluation of vasculitis. Materials and methods: a systematic revision of the papers published in PubMed/Medline until December 2009 was done. Results: FDG-PET and PET/CT have been proven to be valuable in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis, especially giant cells arteritis with sensitivity values ranging 77% to 92%, and specificity values ranging 89% to 100%. In particular, FDG-PET/CT has demonstrated the potential to non-invasively diagnose the onset of the vasculitis earlier than traditional anatomical imaging techniques, thus enabling prompt treatment. False positive results mainly occur in the differential diagnosis between vasculitis and atherosclerotic vessels in elderly patients. Another area where FDG-PET/CT is gaining wider acceptance is in monitoring response to therapy; it can reliably detect the earliest changes of disease improvement post-therapy, and persistent activity is an indicator of non-responders to therapy. A few data have been reported about medium/small vessel vasculitis. Discussion: FDG-PET and PET/CT have proven utility: (a) in the initial diagnosis of patients suspected of having vasculitis particularly in those who present with non-specific symptoms; (b) in the identification of areas of increased FDG uptake in which a biopsy should be done for obtaining a diagnosis; (c) in evaluating the extent of the disease; (d) in assessing response to treatment.

  1. Measuring cardiac efficiency using PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grand; Aparici, Carina Mari; Brooks, Gabriel; Liu, Jing; Guccione, Julius; Saloner, David; Seo, Adam Youngho; Ordovas, Karen Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome that is projected by the American Heart Association to cost $160 billion by 2030. In HF, significant metabolic changes and structural remodeling lead to reduced cardiac efficiency. A normal heart is approximately 20-25% efficient measured by the ratio of work to oxygen utilization (1 ml oxygen = 21 joules). The heart requires rapid production of ATP where there is complete turnover of ATP every 10 seconds with 90% of ATP produced by mitochondrial oxidative metabolism requiring substrates of approximately 30% glucose and 65% fatty acids. In our preclinical PET/MRI studies in normal rats, we showed a negative correlation between work and the influx rate constant for 18FDG, confirming that glucose is not the preferred substrate at rest. However, even though fatty acid provides 9 kcal/gram compared to 4 kcal/gram for glucose, in HF the preferred energy source is glucose. PET/MRI offers the potential to study this maladapted mechanism of metabolism by measuring work in a region of myocardial tissue simultaneously with the measure of oxygen utilization, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and to study cardiac efficiency in the etiology of and therapies for HF. MRI is used to measure strain and a finite element mechanical model using pressure measurements is used to estimate myofiber stress. The integral of strain times stress provides a measure of work which divided by energy utilization, estimated by the production of 11CO2 from intravenous injection of 11C-acetate, provides a measure of cardiac efficiency. Our project involves translating our preclinical research to the clinical application of measuring cardiac efficiency in patients. Using PET/MRI to develop technologies for studying myocardial efficiency in patients, provides an opportunity to relate cardiac work of specific tissue regions to metabolic substrates, and measure the heterogeneity of LV efficiency.

  2. Measuring cardiac efficiency using PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grand [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Aparici, Carina Mari; Brooks, Gabriel [University of California San Francisco (United States); Liu, Jing; Guccione, Julius; Saloner, David; Seo, Adam Youngho; Ordovas, Karen Gomes [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome that is projected by the American Heart Association to cost $160 billion by 2030. In HF, significant metabolic changes and structural remodeling lead to reduced cardiac efficiency. A normal heart is approximately 20-25% efficient measured by the ratio of work to oxygen utilization (1 ml oxygen = 21 joules). The heart requires rapid production of ATP where there is complete turnover of ATP every 10 seconds with 90% of ATP produced by mitochondrial oxidative metabolism requiring substrates of approximately 30% glucose and 65% fatty acids. In our preclinical PET/MRI studies in normal rats, we showed a negative correlation between work and the influx rate constant for 18FDG, confirming that glucose is not the preferred substrate at rest. However, even though fatty acid provides 9 kcal/gram compared to 4 kcal/gram for glucose, in HF the preferred energy source is glucose. PET/MRI offers the potential to study this maladapted mechanism of metabolism by measuring work in a region of myocardial tissue simultaneously with the measure of oxygen utilization, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and to study cardiac efficiency in the etiology of and therapies for HF. MRI is used to measure strain and a finite element mechanical model using pressure measurements is used to estimate myofiber stress. The integral of strain times stress provides a measure of work which divided by energy utilization, estimated by the production of 11CO2 from intravenous injection of 11C-acetate, provides a measure of cardiac efficiency. Our project involves translating our preclinical research to the clinical application of measuring cardiac efficiency in patients. Using PET/MRI to develop technologies for studying myocardial efficiency in patients, provides an opportunity to relate cardiac work of specific tissue regions to metabolic substrates, and measure the heterogeneity of LV efficiency.

  3. F-18-FLT PET for visualization of laryngeal cancer : Comparison with F-18-FDG PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobben, DCP; van der Laan, BFAM; Maas, B; Vaalburg, W; Suurmeijer, AJH; Hoekstra, HJ; Jager, PL; Elsinga, PH

    The feasibility of F-18-3'-fluoro-3'-deoxy-L-thymidine PET (FLT PET) for detecting laryngeal cancer was investigated and compared with F-18-FDG PET. Methods: Eleven patients diagnosed with or strongly suspected of having recurrent laryngeal cancer and 10 patients with histologically proven primary

  4. FDG-PET Contributions to the Pathophysiology of Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segobin, Shailendra; La Joie, Renaud; Ritz, Ludivine; Beaunieux, Hélène; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël; Pitel, Anne Lise; Eustache, Francis

    2015-09-01

    Measurement of synaptic activity by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and its relation to cognitive functions such as episodic memory, working memory and executive functions in healthy humans and patients with neurocognitive disorders have been well documented. In this review, we introduce the concept of PET imaging that allows the observation of a particular biological process in vivo through the use of radio-labelled compounds, its general use to the medical world and its contributions to the understanding of memory systems. We then focus on [(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), the radiotracer that is used to measure local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose that is indicative of synaptic activity in the brain. FDG-PET at rest has been at the forefront of functional neuroimaging over the past 3 decades, contributing to the understanding of cognitive functions in healthy humans and how these functional patterns change with cognitive alterations. We discuss methodological considerations that are important for optimizing FDG-PET imaging data prior to analysis. We then highlight the contribution of FDG-PET to the understanding of the patterns of functional differences in non-degenerative pathologies, normal ageing, and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Through reasonable temporal and spatial resolution, its ability to measure synaptic activity in the whole brain, independently of any specific network and disease, makes it ideal to observe regional functional changes associated with memory impairment.

  5. Guidance for reading FDG PET scans in dementia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    2014-01-01

    18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful method for detection of disease-related impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neuro degenerative diseases. It is of particular interest for early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Reading FDG PET scans requires training to recognise deviations from normal functional brain anatomy and its variations. This paper provides guidance for displaying FDG PET brain scans in a reproducible manner that allows reliable recognition of characteristic disease-related metabolic changes. It also describes typical findings in Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies and possible confounding factors, such as vascular changes and brain atrophy. It provides a brief overview on findings in other neuro degenerative diseases and addresses the potential and limitations of software packages for comparison of individual scans with reference data.

  6. FDG PET in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Yeung, H.W.D.; Pui, J.; Macapinlac, H.; Liebovitz, E.; Rusch, V.; Goy, A.; Larson, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate the role of PET in the diagnosis of vasculitis. Methods: We report a case of giant cell arteritis diagnosed by FDG-PET in a 75-year-old woman with a fever of unknown origin. The patient presented with a 3 month history of fatigue, fevers, headaches, visual disturbance and jaw claudication. Diagnosis of temporal arteritis was initially excluded because of a normal ESR. CT scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass, suspicious for malignancy. An FDG-PET scan for pre-operative evaluation was acquired 45 minutes after intravenous injection of 10 mCi F18-FDG, on a dedicated PET scanner. Image reconstruction was performed using an iterative algorithm with segmented attenuation correction. The study identified striking localisation of FDG to the entire aorta, left main coronary artery, and subclavian, carotid and common iliac arteries bilaterally (SUV max range 4-4.5 g/ml), suggestive of large vessel arteritis. Subsequent excisional biopsy of the mediastinal mass confirmed giant cell vasculitis of a large muscular artery in thymic tissue. No malignancy was detected. A repeat ESR was 129 mm/hr. The patient was commenced on oral Prednisone, with prompt improvement of symptoms, ESR and anaemia and complete normalisation of the FDG-PET scan within two weeks. This case suggests a potential role of FDG-PET in the non-invasive diagnosis, classification and follow-up of giant cell arteritis, and possibly other vasculitides, so far notoriously difficult to diagnose, relying usually on a constellation of non-specific symptoms, laboratory investigations or invasive pathologic and angiographic means. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Improved clinical staging of esophageal cancer with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Yong Soo; Lee, Eun Jeong; Chung, Hyun Woo; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Kyung Han; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Byung Tae

    2004-01-01

    Since preoperative staging in esophageal cancer is important in both therapy and prognosis, there had been many efforts to improve its accuracy. Recent studies indicate that whole body FDG-PET has high sensitivity in detection of metastasis in esophageal cancer. Therefore, we added FDG-PET to other conventional methods in staging esophageal cancer to evaluate the usefulness of this method. Subjects were 142 esophageal cancer patients (average 62.3±8.3 yrs) who received CT and PET just before operation. First, we compared N stage and M stage of the CT or PET with those of the post-operative results. Then we compared the stage according to the EUS (T stage) and CT (N and M stage) or EUS (T stage) and CT and PET (N and M stage) to that according to the post-operative results. Among 142 patients, surgical staging of 69 were N0 and 73 were N1. In M staging, 128 were M0 and 14 were M1. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of N staging were 35.6%, 89.9%, 62.0% with CT and 58.9%, 71.0%, 64.7% with PET, respectively. In M staging, 14.3%, 96.9%, 88.7% with CT and 50.0%, 94.5%, 90.1% with PET, respectively. The concordances of [EUS+CT] and [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative results were 41.2% and 54.6%, respectively and there was significant improvement of staging with additional PET scan (p<0.005). The concordance of [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative result was significantly increased compared to that of [EUS+CT]. Thus, the addition of FDG-PET with other conventional methods may enable more accurate preoperative staging

  8. Effect of glucose level on brain FDG-PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Young; Lee, Yong Ki; Ahn, Sung Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In addition to tumors, normal tissues, such as the brain and myocardium can intake {sup 18}F-FDG, and the amount of {sup 18}F-FDG intake by normal tissues can be altered by the surrounding environment. Therefore, a process is necessary during which the contrasts of the tumor and normal tissues can be enhanced. Thus, this study examines the effects of glucose levels on FDG PET images of brain tissues, which features high glucose activity at all times, in small animals. Micro PET scan was performed on fourteen mice after injecting {sup 18}F-FDG. The images were compared in relation to fasting. The findings showed that the mean SUV value w as 0 .84 higher in fasted mice than in non-fasted mice. During observation, the images from non-fasted mice showed high accumulation in organs other than the brain with increased surrounding noise. In addition, compared to the non-fasted mice, the fasted mice showed higher early intake and curve increase. The findings of this study suggest that fasting is important in assessing brain functions in brain PET using {sup 18}F-FDG. Additional studies to investigate whether caffeine levels and other preprocessing items have an impact on the acquired images would contribute to reducing radiation exposure in patients.

  9. Evaluation of prostate cancer using FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanamaru, Hiroshi; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Akino, Hironobu; Okada, Kenichiro [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The clinical usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was examined in 54 patients with prostate cancer. FDG accumulation was positive in 38 of 54 the prostates (70%), 3 of 8 the lymph node metastases (38%) and 10 of 16 the bone metastases (63%), which suggested that FDG-PET is not superior to other conventional imaging methods as a tool for tumor detection. On the other hand, a quantitative value for FDG uptake in the prostate, expressed as a standardized uptake value (SUV), significantly correlated to the histological grade, clinical stage and serum PSA of the patients. A decrease of SUV was observed in all the patients who responded to endocrine treatment, and the patients with high pre-treatment SUV were shown to be at the risk for disease progression after initial treatment. The present results indicated that FDG-PET could provide us with useful prognostic information for the patients with prostate cancer by evaluating the malignant potential of the tumor. (author)

  10. Hyperinsulinemic Euglycemic Clamp for cardiac PET: An Initial Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Saumya; Salgia, Ritu; Baikerikar, Sushanti; Khandare, Hemant; Lele, Vikram

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Aim: To study the adequacy of hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp to yield technically adequate and clinically meaningful cardiac scans in diabetic patients. 18 F- FDG scans are of suboptimal quality as high level of glucose competes with flurodeoxyglucose for cardiac uptake. Thus to allow quick stabilization of metabolic environment and to get superior quality images, insulin clamp is an accepted technique. Methods: 8 patients (7 males and 1 female) of ages ranging from 43 to 69 years were evaluated in this ongoing study, referred for estimation of myocardial viability post myocardial infarction. All patients were required 6 hours fasting. Initially they were injected with 20 milicurie of Technetium Tetrofosmin and myocardial perfusion imaging done 1 hour later on GE dual head gamma camera. Blood glucose levels were checked. Their blood sugars were in the range of 130mg% - 170mg%. Insulin clamp was applied depending upon the glucose level obtained, according to ASNC guidelines for PET Myocardial Glucose Metabolism and Perfusion Imaging. On stabilization of blood glucose levels, 10 milicurie of 18 F- FDG was injected. Imaging was done 1 hour later on Dedicated 16 slice STE PET CT scanner. There was no incidence of hypoglycemia or any other side effects during the procedure. Entire procedure including tetrofosmin imaging took approximately 4 hours. Results: Good quality images were obtained after the use of insulin clamp. Conclusion: Infusion of insulin and glucose gives stable plasma glucose and serum insulin levels during imaging. The insulin clamp technique makes it possible to adjust and maintain a metabolic steady state during PET study. It does not alter 18F-FDG uptake patterns in different myocardial areas. It permits the use of smaller FDG doses for the patient and gives superior quality images. The technique is safe and should improve both the clinical use and cost effectiveness of FDG-PET imaging for identification of injured but viable myocardium

  11. Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis: CT and FDG-PET Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jonathan H. [National Jewish Health, Denver (United States); Wu, Carol C.; Gilman, Matthew D.; Palmer, Edwin L.; Hasserjian, Robert P.; Sphepar, Jo-Anne O. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LG) is a rare, aggressive extranodal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B-cell lymphoproliferative disease. The purpose of our study was to analyze the CT and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings of pulmonary LG. Between 2000 and 2009, four patients with pathologically proven pulmonary LG and chest CT were identified. Two of these patients also had FDG-PET. Imaging features of LG on CT and PET were reviewed. Pulmonary nodules or masses with peribronchovascular, subpleural, and lower lung zonal preponderance were present in all patients. Central low attenuation (4 of 4 patients), ground-glass halo (3 of 4 patients), and peripheral enhancement (4 of 4 patients) were observed in these nodules and masses. An air-bronchogram and cavitation were seen in three of four patients. FDG-PET scans demonstrated avid FDG uptake in the pulmonary nodules and masses. Pulmonary LG presents with nodules and masses with a lymphatic distribution, as would be expected for a lymphoproliferative disease. However, central low attenuation, ground-glass halo and peripheral enhancement of the nodules/masses are likely related to the angioinvasive nature of this disease. Peripheral enhancement and ground-glass halo, in particular, are valuable characteristic not previously reported that can help radiologists suggest the diagnosis of pulmonary LG.

  12. Joint accumulations of FDG in whole body PET scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, G.K. von; Meier, N.; Stumpe, K.D.M. [Dept. of Medical Radiology: Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2001-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate FDG accumulations in major joints in a large series of non-absorption corrected partial body and whole body FDG-PET scans, and to determine the frequency and intensity of accumulation. Materials and methods: 354 consecutive PET partial- and whole body non-transmission corrected scans of patients obtained for tumor staging were examined with respect to FDG accumulations in the acromio-clavicular (AC)-, gleno-humeral-, hip,, knee- and talo-tibial joints. FDG-uptake was graded using a semi-quantitative scale from 0 (no accumulation) to 4 (very strong accumulation comparable to brain uptake). Results: Joint activity of grade 1-2 was noted frequently, while grade 3 was rare, occurring only in the knee and shoulder joints, and grade 4 was inexistent. The 43 patients with grade 3 accumulations or with at least 4 joints showing grade 2 uptake were interviewed, but all denied pain specifically referred to a joint. Joint accumulations were seen in 50% of the acromio-clavicular-, 80% in the gleno-humeral-, 50% in the hip-, 90% in the knee and 80% in the talo-tibial joints. The intensities of joint accumulations correlated positively and significantly with patient age, ranging from r = 0.7 and p <0.05 in the knee to r = 0.96 and p <0.0001 in the AC joint. Conclusions: FDG accumulations in the joints in whole body FDG-PET scans are frequent and are very likely not related to symptoms. As there is a strong age correlation, and FDG is known to accumulate in inflammatory lesions, the findings are most likely a result of sub-clinical inflammatory synovial proliferation or other chronic inflammatory processes occurring in aging joints. (orig.)

  13. Costs of F-18-FDG PET: experience with a satellite concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lottes, G.; Kuwert, T.; Schober, O.; Gorschlueter, P.; Adam, D.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: One of the main arguments against the acceptance and introduction of FDG PET as a regular benefit in the statutory Medical Insurance system in Germany are its (alleged) high costs. The aim of the present study has been to determine empirically over a period of twelve months the costs of FDG PET, making use of a satellite concept. Methods: Documentation on performance and consumption data have been assembled for purposes of cost analysis. After analysis these data provided the basis for an assessment of the costs. In view of the high proportion of fixed overheads and strong fluctuations in consumption values, it was not possible to allocate reliably in an individual FDG PET investigation the various types of costs to individual causes. A monthly cost assessment procedure was therefore adopted. For this purpose data were recorded in the Department for Nuclear Medicine, while the statistical assessment of the consumption data and analysis of the costs were undertaken in the Institute of Industrial and Hospital Management. Results: Over the twelve month observation period (November 1995 to October 1996, 177 working days) 433 patients were included in the study: 244 with brain diseases, 37 cardiac patients, 130 whole body studies and 22 combined studies (brain and whole body scans). The non volume based costs, maintenance charges and depreciation accounted for the highest proportion of the total costs (48%). The FDG-related costs accounted for 41% of the total costs, while the personnel costs amounted to 11% and the film costs to only 0.45%. The total costs incurred amounted to DM 1,205,050. Conclusion: These data represent a first empirical cost analysis for FDG PET based on a satellite concept and form a starting point for a cost/benefit analysis of this procedure. (orig.) [de

  14. Principal component analysis of FDG PET in amnestic MCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobili, Flavio; Girtler, Nicola; Brugnolo, Andrea; Dessi, Barbara; Rodriguez, Guido; Salmaso, Dario; Morbelli, Silvia; Piccardo, Arnoldo; Larsson, Stig A.; Pagani, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the combined accuracy of episodic memory performance and 18 F-FDG PET in identifying patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) converting to Alzheimer's disease (AD), aMCI non-converters, and controls. Thirty-three patients with aMCI and 15 controls (CTR) were followed up for a mean of 21 months. Eleven patients developed AD (MCI/AD) and 22 remained with aMCI (MCI/MCI). 18 F-FDG PET volumetric regions of interest underwent principal component analysis (PCA) that identified 12 principal components (PC), expressed by coarse component scores (CCS). Discriminant analysis was performed using the significant PCs and episodic memory scores. PCA highlighted relative hypometabolism in PC5, including bilateral posterior cingulate and left temporal pole, and in PC7, including the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, both in MCI/MCI and MCI/AD vs CTR. PC5 itself plus PC12, including the left lateral frontal cortex (LFC: BAs 44, 45, 46, 47), were significantly different between MCI/AD and MCI/MCI. By a three-group discriminant analysis, CTR were more accurately identified by PET-CCS + delayed recall score (100%), MCI/MCI by PET-CCS + either immediate or delayed recall scores (91%), while MCI/AD was identified by PET-CCS alone (82%). PET increased by 25% the correct allocations achieved by memory scores, while memory scores increased by 15% the correct allocations achieved by PET. Combining memory performance and 18 F-FDG PET yielded a higher accuracy than each single tool in identifying CTR and MCI/MCI. The PC containing bilateral posterior cingulate and left temporal pole was the hallmark of MCI/MCI patients, while the PC including the left LFC was the hallmark of conversion to AD. (orig.)

  15. Incremental diagnostic utility of gastric distension FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Brest University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brest (France); Duong, Cuong P.; Cabalag, Carlos S. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Surgical Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Parameswaran, Bimal K.; Callahan, Jason [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    To assess the diagnostic utility of gastric distension (GD) FDG PET/CT in both patients with known gastric malignancy and those not known to have gastric malignancy but with incidental focal FDG uptake in the stomach. This retrospective analysis included 88 patients who underwent FDG PET/CT following GD with hyoscine N-butylbromide (Buscopan registered) and water ingestion as part of routine clinical evaluation between 2004 and 2014. FDG PET/CT scans before and after GD were reported blinded to the patient clinical details in 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy and 39 patients who underwent GD following incidental suspicious gastric uptake. The PET findings were validated by a composite clinical standard. In the 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy, GD improved PET detection of the primary tumour (from 80 % to 90 %). PET evaluation of tumour extent was concordant with endoscopic/surgical reports in 31 % (interpreter 1) and 45 % (interpreter 2) using pre-GD images and 73 % and 76 % using GD images. Interobserver agreement also improved with GD (κ = 0.29 to 0.69). Metabolic and morphological quantitative analysis demonstrated a major impact of GD in normal gastric wall but no significant effect in tumour, except a minor increase in SUV related to a delayed acquisition time. The tumour to normal stomach SUVmax ratio increased from 3.8 ± 2.9 to 9.2 ± 8.6 (mean ± SD) with GD (p < 0.0001), facilitating detection and improved assessment of the primary tumour. In 25 (64 %) of the 39 patients with incidental suspicious gastric uptake, acquisition after GD correctly excluded a malignant process. In 10 (71 %) of the remaining 14 patients with persistent suspicious FDG uptake despite GD, malignancy was confirmed and in 3 (21 %) an active but benign pathology was diagnosed. GD is a simple way to improve local staging with FDG PET in patients with gastric malignancy. In the setting of incidental suspicious gastric

  16. Incremental diagnostic utility of gastric distension FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Duong, Cuong P.; Cabalag, Carlos S.; Parameswaran, Bimal K.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic utility of gastric distension (GD) FDG PET/CT in both patients with known gastric malignancy and those not known to have gastric malignancy but with incidental focal FDG uptake in the stomach. This retrospective analysis included 88 patients who underwent FDG PET/CT following GD with hyoscine N-butylbromide (Buscopan registered) and water ingestion as part of routine clinical evaluation between 2004 and 2014. FDG PET/CT scans before and after GD were reported blinded to the patient clinical details in 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy and 39 patients who underwent GD following incidental suspicious gastric uptake. The PET findings were validated by a composite clinical standard. In the 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy, GD improved PET detection of the primary tumour (from 80 % to 90 %). PET evaluation of tumour extent was concordant with endoscopic/surgical reports in 31 % (interpreter 1) and 45 % (interpreter 2) using pre-GD images and 73 % and 76 % using GD images. Interobserver agreement also improved with GD (κ = 0.29 to 0.69). Metabolic and morphological quantitative analysis demonstrated a major impact of GD in normal gastric wall but no significant effect in tumour, except a minor increase in SUV related to a delayed acquisition time. The tumour to normal stomach SUVmax ratio increased from 3.8 ± 2.9 to 9.2 ± 8.6 (mean ± SD) with GD (p < 0.0001), facilitating detection and improved assessment of the primary tumour. In 25 (64 %) of the 39 patients with incidental suspicious gastric uptake, acquisition after GD correctly excluded a malignant process. In 10 (71 %) of the remaining 14 patients with persistent suspicious FDG uptake despite GD, malignancy was confirmed and in 3 (21 %) an active but benign pathology was diagnosed. GD is a simple way to improve local staging with FDG PET in patients with gastric malignancy. In the setting of incidental suspicious gastric

  17. [18F]FDG-PET in large vessel vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, A.S.D.; Walter, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    [ 18 F]FDG-PET is a non-invasive metabolic imaging modality based on the regional distribution of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose that is highly effective in assessing the activity and the extent of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis. It has shown to identify more affected vascular regions than morphologic imaging with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in both diseases. A visual grading of vascular [ 18 F]FDG-uptake helps to discriminate arteritis from atherosclerosis und therefore provides high specificity. High sensitivity is reached by scanning during the active inflammatory phase. [ 18 F]FDG-PET has the potential to develop into a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis, respectively, and might become a first-line investigation technique. Therefore consensus regarding the most favorable imaging procedure as well as further clinical evidence is needed. The purpose of this review is to summarize current information on the present clinical data and to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing and interpreting the results of [ 18 F]FDG-PET in patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis. (orig.)

  18. [18F] FDG PET in gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Ahlstroem, H.; Sundin, A.; Rehn, S.; Hagberg, H.; Glimelius, B.; Sundstroem, C.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of using [ 18 F] FDG PET for assessment of tumor extension in primary gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) was studied in 8 patients (6 high-grade and 2 low-grade, one of the MALT type) and in a control group of 7 patients (5 patients with NHL without clinical signs of gastric involvement, 1 patient with NHL and benign gastric ulcer and 1 patient with adenocarcinoma of the stomach). All patients with gastric NHL and the two with benign gastric ulcer and adenocarcinoma, respectively, underwent endoscopy including multiple biopsies for histopathological diagnosis. All patients with high-grade and one of the two with low-grade NHL and the patient with adenocarcinoma displayed high gastric uptake of [ 18 F] FDG corresponding to the pathological findings at endoscopy and/or CT. No pathological tracer uptake was seen in the patient with low-grade gastric NHL of the MALT type. In 6/8 patients with gastric NHL, [ 18 F] FDG PET demonstrated larger tumor extension in the stomach than was found at endoscopy, and there was high tracer uptake in the stomach in two patients who were evaluated as normal on CT. [ 18 F] FDG PET correctly excluded gastric NHL in the patient with a benign gastric ulcer and in the patients with NHL without clinical signs of gastric involvement. Although the experience is as yet limited, [ 18 F] FDG PET affords a novel possibility for evaluation of gastric NHL and would seem valuable as a complement to endoscopy and CT in selected patients, where the technique can yield additional information decisive for the choice of therapy. (orig.)

  19. Effects of blood glucose level on FDG uptake by liver: a FDG-PET/CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Kazuo, E-mail: kkubota@cpost.plala.or.j [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshige; Murata, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Yukihiro, Masashi; Ito, Kimiteru; Morooka, Miyako; Minamimoto, Ryogo [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Hori, Ai [Department of Epidemiology and International Health, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    In FDG-PET for abdominal malignancy, the liver may be assumed as an internal standard for grading abnormal FDG uptake both in early images and in delayed images. However, physiological variables of FDG uptake by the liver, especially the effects of blood glucose level, have not yet been elucidated. Methods: FDG-PET studies of 70 patients examined at 50 to 70 min after injection (60{+-}10 min: early images) and of 68 patients examined at 80 to 100 min after injection (90{+-}10 min: delayed images) were analyzed for liver FDG uptake. Patients having lesions in the liver, spleen and pancreas; patients having bulk tumor in other areas; and patients early after chemotherapy or radiotherapy were excluded; also, patients with blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl were excluded. Results: Mean standardized uptake value (SUV) of the liver, blood glucose level and sex showed no significant differences between early images and delayed images. However, liver SUV in the delayed image showed a larger variation than that in the early image and showed significant correlation to blood glucose level. The partial correlation coefficient between liver SUV and blood glucose level in the delayed image with adjustment for sex and age was 0.73 (P<.0001). Multivariate regression coefficient (95% confidence interval) of blood glucose was 0.017 (0.013-0.021). Conclusion: Blood glucose level is an important factor affecting the normal liver FDG uptake in nondiabetic patients. In the case of higher glucose level, liver FDG uptake is elevated especially in the delayed image. This may be due to the fact that the liver is the key organ responsible for glucose metabolism through gluconeogenesis and glycogen storage.

  20. Diagnostic usefulness of FDG PET for pancreatic mass lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Koichi; Okamura, Terue; Kawabe, Joji; Nakata, Bunzo; Hirakawa, Kosei; Chung, Y.S.; Ochi, Hironobu; Yamada, Ryusaku [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Medical School

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of [{sup 18}F]2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with a pancreatic mass by comparing the results with those of X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Eighty-six patients with pancreatic lesions, included 65 malignant tumors and 21 benign masses (55 masses were proven histologically and the others were diagnosed clinically), were studied. The diagnostic factors of CT and MR imaging were evaluated, and those of FDG PET were also evaluated for malignant and benign masses by visual interpretation and quantitative interpretation with the standardized uptake value (SUV) and SUVgluc which was designed to reduce the effects of a high blood sugar level. Visual interpretations were evaluated only in FDG PET images, and quantitative interpretations were evaluated by referring to CT and/or MR imaging. The correlation between SUV and the degree of histological differentiation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was investigated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy for CT imaging were 91, 62, 88, 68 and 84%, and for MR imaging 78, 70, 88, 54 and 76%, respectively. In visual interpretation of FDG PET images, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 82, 81, 93, 59 and 81%, respectively. Significant differences between malignant and benign lesions existed in SUV and SUVgluc (p<0.0001, each). With the cutoff value of SUV as 2.1 and SUVgluc as 2.2, the accuracy of diagnosis was maximal. With that cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for SUV were 89, 76, 92, 70 and 86%, and for SUVgluc 91, 76, 92, 73 and 87%, respectively. The sensitivity and NPV of SUVgluc were higher than those of SUV, which suggests that SUVgluc may be more useful in reducing the number of overlooked malignant tumors. The specificity and PPV of FDG PET were superior to

  1. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in large vessel vasculitis; [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET bei Grossgefaess-Vaskulitiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, A.S.D.; Walter, M.A. [Universitaetsspital Basel (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-06-15

    [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET is a non-invasive metabolic imaging modality based on the regional distribution of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose that is highly effective in assessing the activity and the extent of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis. It has shown to identify more affected vascular regions than morphologic imaging with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in both diseases. A visual grading of vascular [{sup 18}F]FDG-uptake helps to discriminate arteritis from atherosclerosis und therefore provides high specificity. High sensitivity is reached by scanning during the active inflammatory phase. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET has the potential to develop into a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis, respectively, and might become a first-line investigation technique. Therefore consensus regarding the most favorable imaging procedure as well as further clinical evidence is needed. The purpose of this review is to summarize current information on the present clinical data and to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing and interpreting the results of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis. (orig.)

  2. FDG PET/CT in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Henrik; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD), covering 1.2 of Denmark's 5.6 million inhabitants, established a task force to (1) retrieve literature evidence for the clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and provide consequent recommendations and further to (2) compare the actual...... use of PET/CT in the RSD with these recommendations. This article summarizes the results. METHODS: A Work Group appointed a professional Subgroup which made Clinician Groups conduct literature reviews on six selected cancers responsible for 5,768 (62.6 %) of 9,213 PET/CT scans in the RSD in 2012...... and rated with regard to strength and evidence level. Consequent recommendations for applications of PET/CT were established. The actual use of PET/CT was compared with these, where grades A and B indicated "established" and "useful" and grades C and D "potentially useful" and "non...

  3. FDG-PET/CT imaging of elastofibroma dorsi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yumiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Kayo [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of PET Diagnosis, Kobe (Japan); Senda, Michio [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Sakamoto, Setsu [Dokkyo Medical University Hospital, Department of PET Center, Mibu (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the characteristics of FDG uptake in elastofibroma dorsi using integrated PET/CT. From 10,261 oncology FDG-PET/CT scans performed over a 2-year period, findings suggestive of elastofiboma dorsi were observed in 46 FDG-PET/CT scans of 34 patients. As 20 patients had bilateral lesions and 14 had unilateral lesions, a total of 75 elastofibroma dorsi lesions on images were identified in this study. For visual analysis of intensity of FDG uptake, a four-point grading system was used: grade 0 for no uptake, grade 1 for less uptake than the liver, grade 2 for uptake comparable to the liver, and grade 3 for intense uptake greater than the liver. For quantitative analysis, the standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. The relationships between SUV and age, blood glucose level, lesion size, and related symptoms were also assessed. Among the 75 lesions, 4 had an uptake grade of 0, 41 had grade 1, 25 had grade 2, and 5 had grade 3. The mean SUV ({+-}SD) of the 75 lesions was 2.0 {+-} 0.63 (range 0-5.1). The Pearson correlation coefficient test indicated a weak positive correlation between SUV and lesion size and no correlation between SUV and either age or blood glucose level. The SUVs of patients with symptoms due to the disease and patients without symptoms were almost the same. Mild and moderate uptake of FDG is frequently observed in elastofibroma dorsi, which should not be misinterpreted as abnormal accumulation observed in malignant lesions. (orig.)

  4. FDG-PET/CT imaging of elastofibroma dorsi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yumiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Kayo; Senda, Michio; Sakamoto, Setsu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the characteristics of FDG uptake in elastofibroma dorsi using integrated PET/CT. From 10,261 oncology FDG-PET/CT scans performed over a 2-year period, findings suggestive of elastofiboma dorsi were observed in 46 FDG-PET/CT scans of 34 patients. As 20 patients had bilateral lesions and 14 had unilateral lesions, a total of 75 elastofibroma dorsi lesions on images were identified in this study. For visual analysis of intensity of FDG uptake, a four-point grading system was used: grade 0 for no uptake, grade 1 for less uptake than the liver, grade 2 for uptake comparable to the liver, and grade 3 for intense uptake greater than the liver. For quantitative analysis, the standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. The relationships between SUV and age, blood glucose level, lesion size, and related symptoms were also assessed. Among the 75 lesions, 4 had an uptake grade of 0, 41 had grade 1, 25 had grade 2, and 5 had grade 3. The mean SUV (±SD) of the 75 lesions was 2.0 ± 0.63 (range 0-5.1). The Pearson correlation coefficient test indicated a weak positive correlation between SUV and lesion size and no correlation between SUV and either age or blood glucose level. The SUVs of patients with symptoms due to the disease and patients without symptoms were almost the same. Mild and moderate uptake of FDG is frequently observed in elastofibroma dorsi, which should not be misinterpreted as abnormal accumulation observed in malignant lesions. (orig.)

  5. FDG PET/CT features of ovarian metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, K.; Suzuki, K.; Senda, M.; Kita, M.; Onishi, Y.; Maeda, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Ohno, Y.; Sugimura, K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess the characteristics of [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in cases of ovarian metastasis using positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Materials and methods: Twelve patients with 16 ovarian metastases arising from colon cancer (n = 6), breast cancer (n = 4), gastric cancer (n = 3), and pancreatic cancer (n = 3) who underwent FDG-PET/CT examination were included in this study. The effect of lesion size and morphological pattern (predominantly solid or cystic) on FDG uptake was evaluated using the quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). Results: The mean maximum SUV for the 16 lesions was 4.6 ± 2.4 (range 1.8 ∼ 9.9). The Pearson correlation coefficient test showed no significant correlation between maximum SUV and lesion size (r = 0.21, p = 0.42). The maximum SUV of solid (n = 5) and cystic (n = 11) lesions was 5.5 ± 2.7 and 4.3 ± 2.2, respectively, and the difference was not significant (p = 0.43). Breast cancer showed the highest maximum SUV (6.4 ± 3.6), followed by colon cancer (5.3 ± 1.4), gastric cancer (3.3 ± 0.5), and pancreatic cancer (2.2 ± 0.6). Conclusion: Ovarian metastases show a variable maximum SUV with mild to intense FDG uptake.

  6. FDG PET/CT features of ovarian metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, K., E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.j [Department of PET Diagnosis, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Suzuki, K. [Department of PET Diagnosis, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Senda, M. [Department of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Kita, M. [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Onishi, Y.; Maeda, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Ohno, Y.; Sugimura, K. [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Aim: To assess the characteristics of [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in cases of ovarian metastasis using positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Materials and methods: Twelve patients with 16 ovarian metastases arising from colon cancer (n = 6), breast cancer (n = 4), gastric cancer (n = 3), and pancreatic cancer (n = 3) who underwent FDG-PET/CT examination were included in this study. The effect of lesion size and morphological pattern (predominantly solid or cystic) on FDG uptake was evaluated using the quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). Results: The mean maximum SUV for the 16 lesions was 4.6 {+-} 2.4 (range 1.8 {approx} 9.9). The Pearson correlation coefficient test showed no significant correlation between maximum SUV and lesion size (r = 0.21, p = 0.42). The maximum SUV of solid (n = 5) and cystic (n = 11) lesions was 5.5 {+-} 2.7 and 4.3 {+-} 2.2, respectively, and the difference was not significant (p = 0.43). Breast cancer showed the highest maximum SUV (6.4 {+-} 3.6), followed by colon cancer (5.3 {+-} 1.4), gastric cancer (3.3 {+-} 0.5), and pancreatic cancer (2.2 {+-} 0.6). Conclusion: Ovarian metastases show a variable maximum SUV with mild to intense FDG uptake.

  7. Dual time-point FDG PET/CT and FDG uptake and related enzymes in lymphadenopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christlieb, Sofie Bæk; Nørgaard Strandholdt, Casper; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann

    2016-01-01

    ) was not able to discriminate between malignant and benign lesions. Volume, SUVmax, TLG and cTLG for both scans were able to discriminate between the two groups statistically, but without complete separation. Glucose metabolism/hypoxia markers were assessed in 15 lesions. TLG and cTLG were correlated with GLUT...... with immunohistochemistry and enzyme activity was determined for HK and G6Pase. RESULTS: FDG uptake was assessed in 203 lesions (146 malignant and 57 benign). Besides volume, there were significant increases over time for all parameters, with generally higher levels in the malignant lesions. The retention index (RI......PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of dual time-point (DTP) PET/CT with (18)F-FDG to discriminate between malignant and benign lymphadenopathies. The relationship between DTP FDG uptake and glucose metabolism/hypoxia markers in lymphadenopathies was also assessed...

  8. Brown adipose tissue {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in pediatric PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Terence S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Shammas, Amer; Charron, Martin [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Zukotynski, Katherine A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Drubach, Laura A. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine/PET, Boston, MA (United States); Lim, Ruth [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) fused with CT ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) has been widely adopted in oncological imaging. However, it is known that benign lesions and other metabolically active tissues, such as brown adipose tissue (BAT), can accumulate {sup 18}F-FDG, potentially resulting in false-positive interpretation. Previous studies have reported that {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in BAT is more common in children than in adults. We illustrate BAT FDG uptake in various anatomical locations in children and adolescents. We also review what is known about the effects of patient-related physical attributes and environmental temperatures on BAT FDG uptake, and discuss methods used to reduce BAT FDG uptake on {sup 18}F-FDG PET. (orig.)

  9. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Westfaelische Wilhelms University Muenster, European Institute for Molecular Imaging, Muenster (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [{sup 18}F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast

  10. Localization of Epileptogenic Zones using Partical Volume Corrected FDG Uptake on FDG PET and Voxel Based Morphometry on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Won Jun; Lee, Ho Young; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang Kun; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Univ. of Seoul National, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Partial volume corrected (PVC) FDG uptake yields information about regional metabolic level void of volume change, and voxel based morphometry (VBM) yields objective information regarding gray matter concentration. We investigated the roles of PVC PET and VBM to localize epileptogenic zones in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. As a control group for PVC, 40 normal volunteers without history of neurologic or psychiatric diseases underwent FDG PET and MRI. Seventeen mTLE patients (M: F=7: 10, age=309 y) and nine neocortical epilepsy patients (M: F=6: 3, age=246, lateral temporal: 5, frontal: 3, occipital: 1) confirmed by surgery or epilepsy board meeting were enrolled. Standard VBM analysis was performed using individual MRI images compared with those of age-matched controls. For PVC, FDG PET was co-registered with its own MRI. PVC PET was obtained by dividing spillover-corrected PET by smoothed gray matter image pixel by pixel. SPAM was applied as a mask of volume of interest (VOI) to calculate gyral FDG uptake on PVC-FDG PET. Hippocampus, amygdala, superior, middle, inferior temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were the gyral SPAM VOIs in mTLE. Globally normalized PVC-FDG counts were compared with those of age-matched controls in mTLE and neocortical epilepsy patients. In mTlE, PVC-FDG PET correctly localized epileptogenic zones with the accuracy of 76% (13/17) in hippocampus and 82% (14/17) in any of six regions. VBM correctly localized 59% (10/17) in mTLE. In neocortical epilepsy, PVC-FDG PET localized epileptogenic zones in 44%, and VBM in 33%, Using VBM and PVC-FDG PET altogether, epileptogenic zones were localized in 66% (6/9). In mTLE, gyral PVC FDG uptake of temporal lobes was useful in localizing epileptogenic zones by demonstrating partial volume-void FDG concentration. In non-lesional cryptogenic neocortical epilepsy, combination of PVC-FDG PET and VBM is recommended to localize epileptogenic zones.

  11. Comparison of the diagnosis using FDG-PET and AC-PET with histopathological features in lung adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a useful tool for lung cancer diagnosis because of its good sensitivity and specificity. However, FDG-PET is problematically causing the false negative in cases of well differentiated lung adenocarcinomas which are low grade malignancies. Acetate (AC)-PET using 11 C-acetate is thought to be a superior detection tool for low grade malignancies. In this study, comparison of each type of PET in relation with histopathological features of lung adenocarcinomas was conducted. Samples obtained from 81 lesions in 75 patients with a lung adenocarcinoma who were operated at various institutions of our collaborators between 2005 and 2009 following FDG-PET and AC-PET procedures were examined. These samples consisted of fifty-seven cases of a well differentiated adenocarcinoma and twenty-four cases of a moderately- or a poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Relationships between the histopathological factors (ly, v, p) as well as the lymphatic microvessel and microvessel densities in a tumor and FDG- and AC-PET findings were evaluated. AC-PET was more sensitive than FDG-PET (0.58 vs 0.74, p=0.0001). FDG-PET showed a correlation with invasiveness of the tumor and intratumoral lymphatic microvessel density (p<0.05). Furthermore, AC-PET possessed a superior sensitivity for the detection of well differentiated adenocarcinomas, and tumors without ly, v, or p factors. In lung adenocarcinoma AC-PET showed better sensitivity than FDG-PET and true positive in all cases of stage I B or more. FDG-PET showed the correlation with the pathological invasiveness (ly, v, p) of a tumor and the intratumoral lymphatic microvessel density. (author)

  12. F-18 FDG PET scan findings in patients with pulmonary involvement in the hypereosinophilic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin

    2005-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is an infiltrative disease of eosinophils affecting multiple organs including the lung. F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection, making interpretation of whole body PET scan difficult in patients with cancer. This study was to evaluate the PET findings of HES with lung involvement and to find out differential PET features between lung malignancy and HES with lung involvement. F-18 FDG PET and low dose chest CT scan was performed for screening of lung cancer. Eight patients who showed ground-glass attenuation (GGA) and consolidation on chest CT scan with peripheral blood eosinophilia were included in this study. The patients with history of parasite infection, allergy and collagen vascular disease were excluded. CT features and FDG PET findings were meticulously evaluated for the distribution of GGA and consolidation and nodules on CT scan and mean and maximal SUV of abnormalities depicted on F-18 FDG PET scan. In eight patients, follow-up chest CT scan and FDG PET scan were done one or two weeks after initial study. F-18 FDG PET scan identified metabolically active lesions in seven out of eight patients. Maximal SUV was ranged from 2.8 to 10.6 and mean SUV was ranged from 2.2 to 7.2. Remaining one patient had maximal SUV of 1.3. On follow-up FDG PET scan taken on from one to four weeks later showed decreased degree of initially noted FDG uptakes or migration of previously noted abnormal FDG uptakes. Lung involvement in the HES might be identified as abnormal uptake foci on FDG PET scan mimicking lung cancer. Follow-up FDG PET and CT scan for the identification of migration or resolution of abnormalities and decrement of SUV would be of help for the differentiation between lung cancer and HES with lung involvement

  13. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shyh-Jen [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jay [Institute of Radiological science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S.P. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: g39220003@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880, Sec.2, Chien-kuo Rd. Hualien 970, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tzung-Chi, E-mail: tzungchi.huang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, No.91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-21

    Background: Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications. Materials: Image quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan. Results: Radiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2{+-}4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95{+-}0.82 and 4.13{+-}0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53{+-}0.5 to 0.16{+-}0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols. Conclusion: The proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  14. Detection of histologically proven peritoneal carcinomatosis with fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirisamer, Albert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: albert.dirisamer@meduniwien.ac.at; Schima, Wolfgang [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Heinisch, Martin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Lehner, Hans Peter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Krankenhaus, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse 30, 1140 Vienna (Austria); Langsteger, Werner [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria)

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate peritoneal carcinomatosis in patients with gastrointestinal and gynecologic malignancies and to assess the diagnostic role for 18-FDG-PET and MDCT alone in comparison to the diagnostic accuracy of fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT by using surgical and histopathological findings as the standard of reference. Methods and subjects: Sixty-two patients (13 males, 49 females; age range 43-81; mean age, 62 years with suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis were reviewed for the presence of peritoneal lesions on 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT scans (Discovery LS, GE Medical Systems). The results were compared with the histological findings at laparatomy. Thirty-one patients had peritoneal metastases, while 31 patients had negative histological findings at laparotomy. Results: CT detected peritoneal seeding in 26/31 patients, 18F-FDG-PET in 25/31 patients, and 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT in 30/31 patients, for a sensitivity of 88%, 88%, and 100%, respectively. False-positive findings were seen in MDCT in one patient, in 18F-FDG-PET in two patients, and in 18F-MDCT-PET/MDCT in one patient, for a specificity of 97%, 94%, and 97%, respectively. Conclusion: Fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT is superior to MDCT and 18F-FDG-PET alone for the detection of peritoneal carcinomatosis especially in small lesions and it offers exact anatomic information for surgical treatment.

  15. Brain {sup 18}F-FDG, {sup 18}F-florbtaben PET/CT, {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT and cardiac {sup 123}I-MBG imaging for diagnosis of a 'cerebral type' of Lewy Body disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gucht, Axel Van Der; Bélissant, Ophélie; Rabu, Corenti; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Bonnot-Lours, Sophie; Fénelon, Gilles; Itti, Emmanuel [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, AP-HP, Henri-Mondor Teaching Hospital, Crteil (France); De Langavant, Laurent Cleret [Cognitive Neurology Unit, H. Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France)

    2016-09-15

    A 67-year-old man was referred for fluctuating neuropsychiatric symptoms, featuring depression, delirious episodes, recurrent visual hallucinations and catatonic syndrome associated with cognitive decline. No parkinsonism was found clinically even under neuroleptic treatment. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed hypometabolism in the posterior associative cortex including the occipital cortex, suggesting Lewy body dementia, but {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT was normal and cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging showed no signs of sympathetic denervation. Alzheimer's disease was excluded by a normal {sup 18}F-florbetaben PET/CT. This report suggests a rare case of α-synucleinopathy without brainstem involvement, referred to as 'cerebral type' of Lewy body disease.

  16. Assessment of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation can be improved by delayed time point FDG PET CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn; Thomassen, Anders; Hildebrandt, Malene

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Blood pool FDG activity can cloud the atherosclerotic plaque FDG signal. Over time, blood pool FDG activity declines. Therefore, delayed time point FDG PET CT imaging can potentially enhance the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers...... without traditional cardiovascular risk factors and three subjects with angina pectoris were prospectively assessed by dual time point 18-FDG PET CT imaging at 90 and 180 minutes after tracer injection. The ratio between aortic SUVmax and the blood pool SUVmean (TBR) was calculated to show the change...

  17. FDG PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Susan E.; Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shulkin, Barry L.; McCarville, M.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric malignant bone tumor, frequently surgically managed with limb salvage rather than amputation. Local recurrences are seen in up to 9% of osteosarcoma patients, with CT and MRI imaging often limited by metal artifacts. To describe the [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences with correlation to findings on other imaging modalities. A retrospective review of pediatric osteosarcoma patients imaged with FDG PET/CT was performed in patients with pathologically proven local recurrences. FDG PET/CT findings were reviewed and correlated with available comparison imaging studies. Ten local osteosarcoma recurrences in eight pediatric osteosarcoma patients were imaged with FDG PET/CT. All eight patients had a local recurrence after limb salvage; two patients had a second local recurrence after amputation. All local recurrences were seen with FDG PET/CT, demonstrating solid (n=5) or peripheral/nodular (n=5) FDG uptake patterns. Maximum standard uptake values (SUVs) ranged from 3.0 to 15.7. In five recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and MRI, MRI was limited or nondiagnostic in three. In four recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and bone scan, the bone scan was negative in three. Local osteosarcoma recurrences are well visualized by FDG PET/CT, demonstrating either solid or peripheral/nodular FDG uptake with a wide range of maximum SUVs. FDG PET/CT demonstrates the full extent of local recurrences, while MRI can be limited by artifact from metallic hardware. PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than bone scan in detecting local osteosarcoma recurrences. (orig.)

  18. Patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis on FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussan, Michael; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Mekinian, Arsène; Khafagy, Abrahim; Nicolas, Patrick; Vessieres, Annie; Brauner, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to describe patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) on FDG-PET/CT. Methods: All patients with a diagnosis of TB and who underwent FDG-PET/CT between January 2009 and June 2010 were included. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed. TB was proven either on bacteriological or histopathological studies (n = 13) or on a clinical and imaging basis (n = 3). Results: Sixteen patients (11 men; median age 56, range 22–84 years) were included. Two distinct patterns were identified. In the lung pattern (9/16), patients had predominantly pulmonary symptoms (6/9 patients, 67%) with a parenchymal involvement: uptakes on lung consolidation ± cavitation surrounded by micronodules. Mediastino-hilar lymph nodes were slightly enlarged (15 mm, 10–27) with moderate uptake (3.9, 2.5–13.4). In the lymphatic pattern (7/16), patients had predominantly systemic symptoms (5/7 cases, 71%) and all had extra-thoracic involvement. Mediastino-hilar lymph nodes were more enlarged (30 mm, 18–35, p = 0.03) and with higher uptake (6.8, 5.7–16.8, p = 0.034) than in the lung pattern. Conclusion: We identified two distinct patterns of pulmonary TB on FDG-PET/CT. The lung pattern related to a restricted and slight hypermetabolic infection and the lymphatic pattern related to a systemic and intense infection. Combined interpretation of PET and CT findings improves the specificity of images, especially for the lung pattern

  19. Hepatosplenic Candidiasis Detected by 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Bertoli, Mattia; Petrilli, Giulia; Bertagna, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosplenic candidiasis is a fungal infection, which mostly affects patients with hematologic malignancies such as leukemia. The pathogenesis of this infection is not clear yet, and the liver is the most commonly affected organ. Diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis can be only established via biopsy, since computed tomography (CT) scan, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yield non-specific results. The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography /computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis remains undetermined, considering a few evidences in the literature. In this case report, we present the case of a 47-year-old patient, affected by acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy, resulting in the development of neutropenia and fever following the last cycle. The 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan showed some foci of intense FDG uptake in the liver and spleen. The subsequent diagnostic investigations (i.e., abdominal CT scan and biopsy) were suggestive of hepatosplenic candidiasis. The patient was started on antifungal treatment with fluconazole. After one month, the clinical conditions were resolved, and the subsequent abdominal CT scan was negative

  20. Suture Granuloma Showing False-Positive Findings on FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Takahara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 33-year-old male with a mixed germ-cell testicular tumor. Postoperative follow-up FDG-PET revealed concentration of FDG in the left inguinal area which is not tumor metastasis or local recurrence but suture reactivity granuloma. In this paper, we reviewed suture granulomas associated with false-positive findings on FDG-PET after surgery. If FDG-PET will be used more frequently in the future, it will be necessary to refrain from using silk thread in order to prevent any unnecessary surgery.

  1. FDG-PET for imaging of non-osseous infection and inflammation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, F.J.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Kullberg, B.J.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    FDG-PET is emerging as a promising imaging technique in non-osseous infectious and inflammatory diseases, as an increasing number of reports are appearing in literature. In general, sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing non-osseous infections compares favorably to other diagnostic modalities. Lower

  2. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy......Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy...

  3. Efficacy of FDG PET/CT Imaging for Venous Thromboembolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning; Iversen, Else Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In recent years, several case reports have described venous thromboembolism (VTE) on FDG PET/CT. In this short communication, we present results from a proof-of-concept pilot study aimed at providing some preliminary data on the efficacy of FDG PET/CT in prospective patients with suspected...

  4. Comparative study of FDG-PET and sestamibi-SPECT in the diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, T.; Ozawa, K.; Oriuchi, N.; Khan, N.; Endo, K.; Otake, H.; Matsubara, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: FDG-PET is reported to be more accurate in preoperative localization of hyper functioning parathyroid gland of primary hyperparathyroidism in comparison with sestamibi-SPECT by Neumann et al. However, its usefulness in the diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism has not been reported yet. In this study, we've performed the direct comparison of the usefulness of FDG-PET and sestamibi-SPECT in the detection of abnormal parathyroid tissue in the patients of secondary hyperparathyroidism under hemodilysis. Material and Methods: One primary and 5 secondary hyperparathyroidism patients underwent FDG-PET and sestamibi-SPECT. After overnight fasting, 300 to 400 MBq of FDG was intravenously injected, followed by whole body PET image acquisition after 50 minutes. In the same day before FDG-PET, 600 MBq of sestamibi was injected and early and delayed planar image and delayed SPECT image has been obtained. Visual interpretation of the abnormal parathyroid uptake has been performed by 2 experienced nuclear physician independently. Results: In the secondary cases, FDG-PET shows no hyper functioning gland in all 5 cases, whereas sestamibi-SPECT shows 8 hyper functioning glands. In contrast, hyper functioning gland of the primary hyperparathyroidism case has been clearly visualized only by FDG-PET. Conclusion: Although FDG-PET is very useful in detecting hyper functioning gland in primary hyperparathyroidism, it is not useful in secondary hyperparathyroidism. Further pathological analysis about the different glucose metabolism of primary and secondary hyper functioning gland should be added in the future study

  5. Clinical value of FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected recurrent ovarian cancer: is there an impact of FDG PET/CT on patient management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Ahmet; Ustaalioglu, Bala Basak Oven; Seker, Mesut; Salepci, Taflan; Gumus, Mahmut; Canpolat, Nesrin; Tekinsoy, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of FDG PET/CT in patients with suspected ovarian cancer recurrence as compared with diagnostic CT, and to assess the impact of the results of FDG PET/CT on treatment planning. Included in this retrospective study were 60 patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer who had previously undergone primary debulking surgery and had been treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Diagnostic CT and FDG PET/CT imaging were performed for all patients as clinically indicated. The changes in the clinical management of patients according to the results of FDG PET/CT were also analysed. FDG PET/CT was performed in 21 patients with a previously negative or indeterminate diagnostic CT scan, but an elevated CA-125 level, and provided a sensitivity of 95% in the detection of recurrent disease. FDG PET/CT revealed recurrent disease in 19 patients. In 17 of 60 patients, the indication for FDG PET/CT was an elevated CA-125 level and an abnormal diagnostic CT scan to localize accurately the extent of disease. FDG PET/CT scans correctly identified recurrent disease in 16 of the 17 patients, a sensitivity of 94.1%. Moreover, FDG PET/CT was performed in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of ovarian cancer recurrence, an abnormal diagnostic CT scan, but a normal CA-125 level. In this setting, FDG PET/CT correctly confirmed recurrent disease in seven patients providing a sensitivity of 100% in determining recurrence. In four patients, FDG PET/CT was carried out for the assessment of treatment response. Three of four scans were classified as true-negative indicating a complete response. In the other patient, FDG PET/CT identified progression of disease. In total, 45 (75%) of the 60 patients had recurrent disease, in 14 (31.1%) documented by histopathology and in 31 (68.9%) on clinical follow-up, while 15 (25%) had no evidence of recurrent disease. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive value

  6. F-18-FDG-PET in autonomous goiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, A.R.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Gain-of-function mutations of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) gene have been invoked as one of the major causes of toxic thyroid adenomas. This study evaluates F-18-FDG-PET in these patients. Methods: Twenty patients with focal autonomous nodules and ten with disseminated autonomy were investigated the day before radioiodine therapy. Twenty patients with cancer of the head or neck and normal thyroid function served as controls. Results: F-18-FDG-Uptake was higher in patients than in controls. Focal autonomous nodules were associated with focally enhanced glucose metabolism. Disseminated autonomous goiters showed various patterns of focal or global hypermetabolism. Conclusion: Autonomous thyroid tissue caused by constitutive mutations of the TSH receptor is characterised by simultaneous increases in glucose and iodine metabolism which are correlated. (orig.) [de

  7. Impact of F-18 FDG-PET for the Clinical Multidisciplinary Evaluation of Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prakash, Vineet; Vestergård, Karsten; Frost, Majbritt

    PURPOSE            Dementia is a challenging clinical diagnosis. Compared with conventional clinical evaluations, F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET has been reported to improve not only the diagnostic accuracy of dementia but also help better define the underlying  type. This is because FDG PET...... patients had FDG-PET scans with visual and automated analyses. At a multidisciplinary meeting attended by a neuroradiologist and PET specialist, a pre-PET diagnosis, type of dementia and management plan was composed by a neurologist on the basis of clinical assessment, MRI, neuropsychometry...... and cerebrospinal fluid results. This process was repeated after PET review and the management plans were compared. Management impact was rated as nil (discordant result ignored), low (PET concordant but no change in management), moderate (PET changed diagnosis or dementia type or followup plan) and high (PET...

  8. Monitoring Vasculitis with 18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan BUCERIUS, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Whereas in the past the term “vasculitis” was most frequently used in context with systemic vasculitides, such as the large vessel vasculitides (LVV) Takayasa arteritis and giant cell arteritis, characterized by inflammation of blood vessel walls, it nowadays comprises also inflammatory changes of the vessel wall as a substantial part of the atherosclerotic disease process. Implementing non-invasive imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as well as positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnostic algorithm of atherosclerosis and LVV, depicts a promising step towards an earlier detection with a, consecutively, improved therapeutic approach and potentially prognostic benefit in patients suffering from vasculitis. Mainly molecular imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET seems to be promising in offering an early and sensitive identification of inflammatory changes in both, atherosclerosis and LVV. This review will therefore provide an overview on the diagnostic performance and clinical relevance of FDG-PET in monitoring vasculitis in atherosclerosis and LVV, with a focus on LVV.

  9. Concordance between brain 18F-FDG PET and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubí, S; Noguera, A; Tarongí, S; Oporto, M; García, A; Vico, H; Espino, A; Picado, M J; Mas, A; Peña, C; Amer, G

    Cortical posterior hypometabolism on PET imaging with 18 F-FDG (FDG-PET), and altered levels of Aß 1-42 peptide, total Tau (tTau) and phosphorylated Tau (pTau) proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are established diagnostic biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). An evaluation has been made of the concordance and relationship between the results of FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers in symptomatic patients with suspected AD. A retrospective review was carried out on 120 patients with cognitive impairment referred to our Cognitive Neurology Unit, and who were evaluated by brain FDG-PET and a lumbar puncture for CSF biomarkers. In order to calculate their Kappa coefficient of concordance, the result of the FDG-PET and the set of the three CSF biomarkers in each patient was classified as normal, inconclusive, or AD-compatible. The relationship between the results of both methods was further assessed using logistic regression analysis, including the Aß 1-42 , tTau and pTau levels as quantitative predictors, and the FDG-PET result as the dependent variable. The weighted Kappa coefficient between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.35-0.57). Logistic regression analysis showed that the Aß 1-42 and tTau values together were capable of discriminating an FDG-PET result metabolically suggestive of AD from one non-suggestive of AD, with a 91% sensitivity and 93% specificity at the cut-off line Aß 1-42 =44+1.3×tTau. The level of concordance between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was moderate, indicating their complementary value in diagnosing AD. The Aß 1-42 and tTau levels in CSF help to predict the patient FDG-PET cortical metabolic status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterizing bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin's lymphoma by FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kagna, Olga; Dann, Eldad J.; Ben-Barak, Ayelet; Israel, Ora

    2014-01-01

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is superior to iliac bone marrow biopsy (iBMB) for detection of bone marrow involvement (BMI) in staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The present study aims to characterize the patterns and distribution of BMI in HL as determined by FDG-PET/CT. Reports of FDG-PET/CT studies performed for staging of HL were reviewed. BMI was defined as positive iBMB and/or foci of pathological FDG uptake in the skeleton that behaved in concordance with other sites of lymphoma in studies following chemotherapy. Number of FDG uptake foci, their specific location in the skeleton and the presence of corresponding lesions in the CT component of the study, and stage according to the Ann Arbor staging system, were recorded. The study included 473 patients. iBMB was performed in 336 patients. Nine patients had positive iBMB (9/336, 3 %). Seventy-three patients (73/473, 15 %) had FDG-PET/CT-defined BMI. The BM was the only extranodal site of HL in 52/473 patients (11 %). Forty-five patients had three or more foci of pathological skeletal FDG uptake (45/73, 62 %). Sixty-four patients (64/73, 88 %) had at least one uptake focus in the pelvis or vertebrae. In 60 patients (60/73, 82 %), the number of skeletal FDG uptake foci without corresponding CT lesions was equal to or higher than the number of foci with morphological abnormalities. FDG-PET/CT demonstrated BMI in 15 % of patients with newly diagnosed HL. Diagnosis of BMI in HL by FDG-PET/CT was more sensitive than iBMB with potential upstage in 11 % of patients. The most common pattern of FDG-PET/CT BMI was multifocal (at least three foci) skeletal FDG uptake, with at least one focus in the pelvis or vertebrae and no corresponding CT lesions. (orig.)

  11. Accuracy of whole-body FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT in M staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ming-Che; Chen, Jin-Hua; Liang, Ji-An; Yang, Kuang-Tao; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/CT in M staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Through a search of relevant English language studies from October 1996 to September 2011, pooled estimated sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios, negative likelihood ratios, and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves of whole-body PET or PET/CT in M staging of NPC were calculated. Results: Three PET and 5 PET/CT studies were identified. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of FDG-PET or PET/CT were 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77–0.88), 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95–0.98), 23.38 (95% CI, 16.22–33.69), and 0.19 (95% CI, 0.13–0.25), respectively. The area under curve was 0.9764 and Q* index estimate was 0.9307 for FDG-PET or PET/CT. Conclusion: Current evidence confirms the good diagnostic performance of the whole-body FDG-PET or PET/CT in M staging of NPC

  12. Accuracy of whole-body FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT in M staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ming-Che, E-mail: 135834@cch.org.tw [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Changhua Christian Hospital, No. 135, Nanxiao Street, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 666, Buzih Road, Beitun District, Taichung City 40601, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jin-Hua, E-mail: chenjh12@gmail.com [Biostatistics Center and Graduate Institute of Biostatistics, China Medical University, No. 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An, E-mail: hope.jal@msa.hinet.net [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2, Yuh-Der Road, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Yang, Kuang-Tao, E-mail: 135834@cch.org.tw [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Changhua Christian Hospital, No. 135, Nanxiao Street, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Kai-Yuan, E-mail: kycheng@ctust.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 666, Buzih Road, Beitun District, Taichung City 40601, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Hung, E-mail: d10040@mail.cmuh.org.tw [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2, Yuh-Der Road, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/CT in M staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Through a search of relevant English language studies from October 1996 to September 2011, pooled estimated sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios, negative likelihood ratios, and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves of whole-body PET or PET/CT in M staging of NPC were calculated. Results: Three PET and 5 PET/CT studies were identified. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of FDG-PET or PET/CT were 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77–0.88), 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95–0.98), 23.38 (95% CI, 16.22–33.69), and 0.19 (95% CI, 0.13–0.25), respectively. The area under curve was 0.9764 and Q* index estimate was 0.9307 for FDG-PET or PET/CT. Conclusion: Current evidence confirms the good diagnostic performance of the whole-body FDG-PET or PET/CT in M staging of NPC.

  13. FDG-PET and ultrasound as complementary modalities in malignant melanoma restaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, T.; Aigner, R.M.; Wolf, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Both FDG-PET and ultrasound are common modalities for restaging malignant melanoma patients although ultrasound is still the first quality in restaging lymph nodes (neck, axilla, inguen) and liver. The aim of our study was to show the benefit of complementary use of these modalities in patients with suspicious findings. In our study 37 patients were included. All of them were alter surgical and additionally zytostatic and/or Interferon therapy. Ultrasound and FDG-PET examination happened within 9 weeks. In 19 cases first ultrasound was done and afterwards FDG-PET, in 18 cases FDG-PET was the first examination. Criterion for suspiciousness in ultrasound was size and sonographic texture of lymph nodes and liver lesions relatively. Criterion for suspiciousness in FDG-PET was pathological FDG uptake. The results were verified by histology and /or CT, MR, long-term follow-up. In 22 cases highly suspicious (11) or non suspicious (11) findings in one examination were confirmed by the other one. FDG-PET showed additionally findings in 5 cases (lung/1, lien/2, liver/2) ultrasound in one case (suprarenal gland). In 8 cases suspicious findings in one examination (ultrasound 1/ FDG-PET 7) had been cleared up by the other one. Only 7 cases showed completely different findings (liver/3, lymph nodes/2) or in both modalities not clear findings (liver/1, lymph node/1). Complementary use of FDG-PET and ultrasound for restaging in malignant melanoma patients is a good chance to clear up suspect findings. FDG-PET as whole body examination in a higher rate than ultrasound has the opportunity of additional findings although ultrasound is even out of cost - effectiveness the first quality in restaging. (author)

  14. Evaluation of gross tumor size using CT, 18F-FDG PET, integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT and pathological analysis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Huiming; Liu Yunfang; Hou Ming; Liu Jie; Li Xiaonan; Yu Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The correlation of gross tumor sizes between combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT images and macroscopic surgical samples has not yet been studied in detail. In the present study, we compared CT, 18 F-FDG PET and combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT for the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and validated the results through examination of the macroscopic surgical specimen. Methods: Fifty-two operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients had integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans preoperatively and pathological examination post-operation. Four separate maximal tumor sizes at X (lateral direction), Y (ventro-dorsal direction) and Z (cranio-caudal direction) axis were measured on 18 F-FDG PET, CT, combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT and surgical specimen, respectively. Linear regression was calculated for each of the three imaging measurements versus pathological measurement. Results: No significant differences were observed among the tumor sizes measured by three images and pathological method. Compared with pathological measurement, CT size at X, Y, Z axis was larger, whereas combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT and 18 F-FDG PET size were smaller. Combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT size was more similar to the pathological size than that of 18 F-FDG PET or CT. Results of linear regressions showed that integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT was the most accurate modality in measuring the size of cancer. Conclusions: 18 F-FDG PET/CT correlates more faithfully with pathological findings than 18 F-FDG PET or CT. Integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT is an effective tool to define the target of GTV in radiotherapy.

  15. Current role of FDG PET/CT in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostakoglu, Lale [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Radiology, One Gustave Levy Place, Box 1141, New York, NY (United States); Cheson, Bruce D. [Georgetown University Hospital, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The management approach in Hodgkin's (HL) and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) has shifted towards reducing the toxicity and long-term adverse effects associated with treatment while maintaining favorable outcomes in low-risk patients. The success of an individualized treatment strategy depends largely on accurate diagnostic tests both at staging and during therapy. In this regard, positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) with computed tomography (CT) has proved effective as a metabolic imaging tool with compelling evidence supporting its superiority over conventional modalities, particularly in staging and early evaluation of response. Eventually, this modality was integrated into the routine staging and restaging algorithm of lymphomas. This review will summarize the data on the proven and potential utility of PET/CT imaging for staging, response assessment, and restaging, describing current limitations of this imaging modality. (orig.)

  16. FDG-PET changes in brain glucose metabolism from normal cognition to pathologically verified Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosconi, Lisa; Mistur, Rachel; Switalski, Remigiusz; Glodzik, Lidia; Li, Yi; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; De Santi, Susan; Reisberg, Barry; Tsui, Wai Hon; De Leon, Mony J.; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We report the first clinicopathological series of longitudinal FDG-PET scans in post-mortem (PM) verified cognitively normal elderly (NL) followed to the onset of Alzheimer's-type dementia (DAT), and in patients with mild DAT with progressive cognitive deterioration. Four NL subjects and three patients with mild DAT received longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and dynamic FDG-PET examinations with arterial input functions. NL subjects were followed for 13 ± 5 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 7 ± 2 years, and autopsy 6 ± 3 years after the last FDG-PET. Two NL declined to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and two developed probable DAT before death. DAT patients were followed for 9 ± 3 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 3 ± 2 years, and autopsy 7 ± 1 years after the last FDG-PET. Two DAT patients progressed to moderate-to-severe dementia and one developed vascular dementia. The two NL subjects who declined to DAT received a PM diagnosis of definite AD. Their FDG-PET scans indicated a progression of deficits in the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) from the hippocampus to the parietotemporal and posterior cingulate cortices. One DAT patient showed AD with diffuse Lewy body disease (LBD) at PM, and her last in vivo PET was indicative of possible LBD for the presence of occipital as well as parietotemporal hypometabolism. Progressive CMRglc reductions on FDG-PET occur years in advance of clinical DAT symptoms in patients with pathologically verified disease. The FDG-PET profiles in life were consistent with the PM diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. F-18 FDG PET in the initial evaluation of high risk melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, T.; Zerdoud, S.; Faurie, C.; Chevreau, C.; Courbon, F. [Institut Claudius Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction. - Localized melanoma is a potentially aggressive tumor. Its prognosis depends mainly on pathologic factors, namely: thickness (Breslow index), presence of ulceration and microscopic nodal metastasis. FDG PET is the modality of choice for evaluation of advanced melanoma and has proven its superiority in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy compared to conventional imaging. Early stages of melanoma do not seem to benefit from PET FDG. However the value of PET FDG in staging localized high risk melanoma is yet to be determined. Patients and methods. - We have evaluated 87 patients with high risk melanoma with PET FDG. 32 patients presented with a Breslow index superior or equal to 4 mm, 21 with a Breslow index inferior to 4 mm and ulceration and 34 with a positive sentinel lymphadenectomy. PET FDG was realized after at least 6 h of fasting on a hybrid PET-CT G.E. Discovery S.T. scan for 65 of them. The rest of the patients were evaluated on a Siemens Ecat H.R. + scan. Scans were interpreted by an experimented nuclear medicine physician and were classified as positive or negative. All equivocal scans or cases for which there was discordance between the scan result and follow up were reviewed by 2 experimented nuclear medicine physicians and a consensus was reached. Results. - FDG PET was positive in seven patients, four scans were true positive and identified regional metastatic disease. No distant metastatic visceral disease was found. The three false positive scans consisted of a cyst adeno-lymphoma in one case, mediastinal and axillary uptake in the other two cases and no sign of evolution more than six months after the scan. Four patients with a negative scan showed metastatic disease in the six months following the PET scan. FDG PET had an impact on therapeutic management on two patients (2%). When evaluating FDG PET for regional disease with sentinel node biopsy as a reference, we found values of sensitivity, specificity, predictive

  18. Spectrum of the Breast Lesions With Increased 18F-FDG Uptake on PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jianping; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interpretation of 18F-FDG PET/CT studies in breast is challenging owing to nonspecific FDG uptake in various benign and malignant conditions. Benign conditions include breast changes in pregnancy and lactation, gynecomastia, mastitis, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Among malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma are common histological types of breast carcinoma. Rarely, other unusual histological types of breast carcinomas (eg, intraductal papillary carcinoma, invasive micropapillary carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma), lymphoma, and metastasis can be the causes. Knowledge of a wide spectrum of hypermetabolic breast lesions on FDG PET/CT is essential in accurate reading of FDG PET/CT. The purpose of this atlas article is to demonstrate features of various breast lesions encountered at our institution, both benign and malignant, which can result in hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT imaging. PMID:26975010

  19. The value of FDG-PET in diagnosing peritoneal seeding of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Moon, Sun Mi; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Hwang, Dae Yong; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Peritoneal seeding of colon cancer cells is a common cause of morbidity and eventual mortality with recurrent disease. This study evaluated the role of F -18 FDG PET in detecting peritoneal seeding in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and to identify characteristic patterns of abdominal F-18 FDG uptake. We reviewed the FDG PET and CT images and clinical charts of 49 patients with peritoneal seeding and 22 cancer patients without peritoneal seeding. We also assessed FDG PET scans from 20 healthy volunteers as a baseline study. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax) over peritoneal lesions in cancer patients and over the area of most intense intestinal uptake in healthy volunteers and cancer patients without peritoneal carcinomatosis were measured. The result were correlated with either biopsy or ascitic aspirate. The characteristics of FDG uptake were evaluated: overall pattern (focal or diffuse), heterogeneity (yes or none), intensity (low, or equal, faint to moderate, intense). The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of FDG PET were superior to CT for the detection of peritoneal lesions (sensitivity: 71.4% vs 57.1%, specificity: 72.7% vs 54.5%: PPV: 85.4% vs 73.7%, NPV: 53.3 % vs 36.4% ). The FDG uptake in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis was divided into nodular(14), diffuse (23) and mixed pattern (12). An SUVmax threshold of 5.2 produced a diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET of 78%. The additional information provided by FDG PET allowed a more accurate diagnosis in 12 patients (24 %), and led to alteration of the therapeutic strategy in 6 (12.2%) of the enrolled patients (n=49) with peritoneal seeding. FDG-PET was more sensitive than CT for the detection of peritoneal seeding in CRC, and altered patient management. Thus, the application of PET may be beneficial to the management of peritoneal seeding in patient with CRC.

  20. The value of FDG-PET in diagnosing peritoneal seeding of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Moon, Sun Mi; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Hwang, Dae Yong; Lim, Sang Moo

    2004-01-01

    Peritoneal seeding of colon cancer cells is a common cause of morbidity and eventual mortality with recurrent disease. This study evaluated the role of F -18 FDG PET in detecting peritoneal seeding in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and to identify characteristic patterns of abdominal F-18 FDG uptake. We reviewed the FDG PET and CT images and clinical charts of 49 patients with peritoneal seeding and 22 cancer patients without peritoneal seeding. We also assessed FDG PET scans from 20 healthy volunteers as a baseline study. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax) over peritoneal lesions in cancer patients and over the area of most intense intestinal uptake in healthy volunteers and cancer patients without peritoneal carcinomatosis were measured. The result were correlated with either biopsy or ascitic aspirate. The characteristics of FDG uptake were evaluated: overall pattern (focal or diffuse), heterogeneity (yes or none), intensity (low, or equal, faint to moderate, intense). The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of FDG PET were superior to CT for the detection of peritoneal lesions (sensitivity: 71.4% vs 57.1%, specificity: 72.7% vs 54.5%: PPV: 85.4% vs 73.7%, NPV: 53.3 % vs 36.4% ). The FDG uptake in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis was divided into nodular(14), diffuse (23) and mixed pattern (12). An SUVmax threshold of 5.2 produced a diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET of 78%. The additional information provided by FDG PET allowed a more accurate diagnosis in 12 patients (24 %), and led to alteration of the therapeutic strategy in 6 (12.2%) of the enrolled patients (n=49) with peritoneal seeding. FDG-PET was more sensitive than CT for the detection of peritoneal seeding in CRC, and altered patient management. Thus, the application of PET may be beneficial to the management of peritoneal seeding in patient with CRC

  1. Clinical significance of FDG-PET/CT at the postoperative surveillance in the breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Na Young; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Chae, Byung Joo; Seo, Ye Young

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical role of [(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) compared with conventional imaging (CI) to detect locoregional recurrence or distant metastasis during postoperative surveillance of patients with breast cancer. We included 1,819 examinations of 1,161 patients, who underwent FDG-PET/CT and CI, including mammography, breast ultrasound, whole-body bone scintigraphy, and chest radiography for postoperative surveillance. All patients had a history of surgery with or without adjuvant treatment due to more than stage II breast cancer between November 2003 and November 2009. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of CI, FDG-PET/CT, and combined CI and FDG-PET/CT for detecting locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, and incidental cancer. We also analyzed false-positive and false-negative results in both FDG-PET/CT and CI. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CI were 75.4, 98.7, 93.4, and 94.3 %. Those of FDG-PET/CT were 97.5, 98.8, 95.4, and 99.4 %. Those of the combined results were 98.6, 98.2, 96.7, and 99.7 %. Sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT was significantly higher than that of CI (P diagnostic imaging modality for postoperative surveillance of patients with breast cancer.

  2. Evaluation of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of head and neck tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takane, Yoko; Sakamoto, Kikuo; Miyajima, Yoshimi; Umeno, Hirohito; Nakashima, Tadashi; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the diagnostic value of FDG-PET for malignant head and neck tumor in 179 patients who received FDG-PET at our hospital in 2004. In the analyses, we compared diagnoses of the primary lesion, nodal and distant metastases obtained from FDG-PET with those from echogram, CT, MRI and scintigram. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 94% (92/98), 86% (70/81), and 91% (162/179), respectively. The present analyses indicate that FDG-PET diagnoses of the primary tumor, nodal and distant metastases can be accurately achieved in head and neck tumors. Furthermore, as FDG-PET conducts systemic tomographing, it is useful not only for the diagnosis of distant metastasis but also for the reccurence cancer. However, careful attention should be paid to false positive findings on FDG-PET by such as reactive lymph nodes or inflammation after radiotherapy. In order to acquire better diagnostic results, combined examination by FDG-PET, CT and MRI are highly recommended. (author)

  3. The role of FDG-PET/CT in the detection of recurrent colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Votrubova, Jana; Belohlavek, Otakar; Jaruskova, Monika [Na Homolce Hospital, PET Centre, Prague (Czech Republic); Oliverius, Martin [Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Lohynska, Radka [University Hospital Motol, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Prague (Czech Republic); Trskova, Kristina [Na Homolce Hospital, Department of Oncology, Prague (Czech Republic); Sedlackova, Eva [General Teaching Hospital and 1st Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Prague (Czech Republic); Lipska, Ludmila [Thomayer' s Teaching Hospital and 1st Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Prague (Czech Republic); Stahalova, Vladimira [Na Bulovce Teaching Hospital, Institute of Radiation Oncology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-15

    The conventional diagnostic techniques used to assess recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRCR) often yield unspecific findings. Integrated FDG-PET/CT seems to offer promise for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lesions. The aim of this study was to compare the value of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the detection of CRCR subsequent to colonic resection or rectal amputation. The population for this retrospective study comprised 84 patients with suspected CRCR. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET and PET/CT were calculated for (a) intra-abdominal extrahepatic recurrences, (b) extra-abdominal and/or hepatic recurrences and (c) all recurrences, and tumour marker levels were analysed. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of PET in detecting intra-abdominal extrahepatic CRCR were 82%, 88% and 86%, respectively, compared with 88%, 94% and 92%, respectively, for PET/CT. The corresponding figures for detection of extra-abdominal and/or hepatic CRCR were 74%, 88% and 85% for PET and 95%, 100% and 99% for PET/CT. Considering the entire population, the sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of PET were 80%, 69% and 75%, respectively, compared with 89%, 92% and 90%, respectively, for PET/CT. FDG-PET/CT examination correctly detected 40 out of a total of 45 patients with CRCR. Two of five patients with falsely negative FDG-PET/CT findings had local microscopic recurrences and one had miliary liver metastases. Of 39 patients without CRCR, three showed false positive FDG-PET/CT results. Two of these cases were due to increased accumulation in inflammatory foci in the bowel wall, while one was due to haemorrhaging into the adrenal gland. FDG-PET/CT appears to be a very promising method for distinguishing a viable tumour from fibrous changes, thereby avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. (orig.)

  4. Incidental benign parotid lesions on FDG-PET: prevalence and clinico-pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Il Han; Lee, Won Woo; Chung, Jin Haeng; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Incidental parotid lesions on F-18 FDG-PET can mimic distant metastasis of underlying malignancy. The prevalence and the clinico-pathologic findings of PET positive parotid lesions have not been known. We investigated how often incidental parotid lesions are found on clinical FDG-PET studies and what the clinico-pathologic characteristics of those parotid lesions are in the present study. We retrospectively reviewed 3, 344 cases of FDG-PET which had been obtained in our hospital from May 2003 to Dec 2006. The indications of FDG-PET were: evaluation of known/suspected cancer (n=3, 212) or screening of cancer in healthy subjects (n=132). Incidental parotid lesion on FDG-PET was defined as an un-expected FDG uptake in one of parotid glands which was not primary target lesion of current FDG-PET. FDG uptake was represented by maximum standardized uptake value (maxSUV). Final diagnosis was made by pathologic analysis or clinical follow-up assessment. Fifteen (0.45% = 15/3, 344) incidental parotid lesions were found and they were all benign lesions. The maxSUV ranged from 1.7 to 8.6 (means.d.=3.71.9). Final diagnoses of the incidental parotid lesions were; Warthin's tumor (n=2), pleomorphic adenoma (n=1), other un-specified benign lesion (n=1), and benign lesions under bases of imaging studies (n=3) and of clinical follow-up (n=8). All of incidentally found parotid lesions in clinical FDG-PET studies were confirmed as benign lesions with prevalence of 0.45%. Close follow up using PET or CT might be a reasonable approach for determining the nature of incidentally found parotid lesions

  5. Role of [18F]FDG-PET/CT after radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travaini, Laura L.; Trifiro, Giuseppe; Paganelli, Giovanni; Ravasi, Laura; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Della Vigna, Paolo; Bonomo, Guido; Orsi, Franco; Chiappa, Antonio; Mallia, Andrew; Ferrari, Mahila

    2008-01-01

    Focal metastasis may be treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), a low invasive method yet limited by the lack of direct evidence of radicality of treatment. We, hereby, aimed at assessing the role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) with fluoride radiolabeled deoxy-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) in RFA treatment success evaluation and early diagnosis of local relapse of liver metastasis after RFA procedure. RFA was performed in nine patients on 12 liver metastasis, serially imaged through [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT and multidetector CT (MDCT) at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months after treatment. Eight lesions were also scanned with [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT at 1 week after treatment. Imaging analyses were performed on 47 [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT and 51 MDCT. Imaging reading outcomes were compared to each other and to biopsy tissue results when available. In one case, [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT revealed radiotracer uptake at RFA site a week after procedure. Negative concordant outcome was obtained on eight lesions at 1 month after RFA, on eight cases at 3 months, on four at 6 months, and on two cases at 9 months. Extra-liver (peritoneal) disease was detected in one case by both [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT and MDCT. In seven cases, [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT revealed the presence of local recurrence earlier than MDCT. In no cases did MDCT detect local relapse earlier than [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT. [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT may detect RFA treatment failure as well as local relapse after RFA earlier than MDCT. (orig.)

  6. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    PET of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose is increasingly used to support the clinical diagnosis in the examination of patients with suspected major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very high sensitivity in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of therapeutic efficacy. According to clinical research data hitherto, {sup 18}F-FDG PET is expected to be an effective diagnostic tool in early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Since 2004, Medicare covers {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans for the differential diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) under specific requirements; or, its use in a CMS approved practical clinical trial focused on the utility of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the diagnosis or treatment of dementing neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Work flow with manual re-registration of cardiac 18F-FDG PET and attenuation correction CT to compensate for respiratory motion: Effects and inter-operator variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Christian; Christensen, Nana Louise; Møller, Lone W.

    , attenuation artefacts are often observed on the lateral wall of the left ventricle. Many strategies has been proposed to reduce these artefacts, including averaging multiple CTs, respiratory gating and manual re-registration1-3. However, for scanner platform-independent implementation, manual re......-registration is currently the most feasible. In this study, we examine both the effect on misalignment artefacts and the inter-operator variability of manual re-registration performed by the technologist in a step before the final image reconstruction and verified by a second technologist before image analysis. Method: 40...... 18F-FDG viability scans were examined. After the patient scan, a fast image reconstruction of low quality was made and used for manual re-registration of PET and AC CT, before starting the high quality reconstruction used for analysis. The left ventricle was reoriented and segmented in QPS (Cedar...

  8. Comparison of volumetric and functional parameters in simultaneous cardiac PET/MR: feasibility of volumetric assessment with residual activity from prior PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecke, C.; Brenneis, B.; Grothoff, M.; Gutberlet, M. [University Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Oppolzer, B.; Werner, P.; Jochimsen, T.; Sattler, B.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Foldyna, B. [University Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Massachusetts General Hospital - Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Lurz, P. [University Leipzig - Heart Center, Clinic for Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Leipzig (Germany); Lehmkuhl, L. [Herz- und Gefaess-Klinik GmbH, Radiologische Klinik, Bad Neustadt (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To compare cardiac left ventricular (LV) parameters in simultaneously acquired hybrid fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F] FDG) positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) in patients with residual tracer activity of upstream PET/CT. Twenty-nine patients (23 men, age 58±17 years) underwent cardiac PET/MRI either directly after a non-cardiac PET/CT with homogenous cardiac [18F] FDG uptake (n=20) or for viability assessment (n=9). Gated cardiac [18F] FDG PET and cine MR sequences were acquired simultaneously and evaluated blinded to the cross-imaging results. Image quality (IQ), end-diastolic (LVEDV), end-systolic volume (LVESV), ejection fraction (LVEF) and myocardial mass (LVMM) were measured. Pearson correlation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), regression and a Bland-Altman analysis were assessed. Except LVMM, volumetric and functional LV parameters demonstrated high correlations (LVESV: r=0.97, LVEDV: r=0.95, LVEF: r=0.91, LVMM: r=0.87, each p<0.05), but wide limits of agreement (LOA) for LVEDV (-25.3-82.5ml); LVESV (-33.1-72.7ml); LVEF (-18.9-14.8%) and LVMM (-78.2-43.2g). Intra- and interobserver reliability were very high (ICC≥0.95) for all parameters, except for MR-LVEF (ICC=0.87). PET-IQ (0-3) was high (mean: 2.2±0.9) with significant influence on LVMM calculations only. In simultaneously acquired cardiac PET/MRI data, LVEDV, LVESV and LVEF show good agreement. However, the agreement seems to be limited if cardiac PET/MRI follows PET/CT and only the residual activity is used. (orig.)

  9. [Business administration of PET facilities: a cost analysis of three facilities utilizing delivery FDG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, Naohiro; Oku, Shinya; Fujii, Ryo; Furui, Yuji; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2008-05-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) has been proved to be a powerful imaging tool in clinical oncology. The number of PET facilities in Japan has remarkably increased over the last decade. Furthermore, the approval of delivery FDG in 2005 resulted in a tremendous expansion of the PET institutions without a cyclotron facility. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost analysis of PET institutions that utilized delivery FDG. Three PET facilities using delivery FDG were investigated about the costs for PET service. Fixed costs included depreciation costs for construction and medical equipments such as positron camera. Variable costs consisted of costs for medical materials including delivery FDG. The break-even point was analyzed in each of three institutions. In the three hospitals (A, B and C), the annual number of PET scan was 1,591, 1,637 and 914, while cost per scan was accounted as yen 110,262, yen 111,091, and yen 134,192, respectively. The break-even point was calculated to be 2,583, 2,679 and 2,081, respectively. PET facilities utilizing delivery FDG seemed to have difficulty in business administration. Such a situation suggests the possibility that the current supply of PET facilities might exceed actual demand for the service. The efficiency of resource allocation should be taken into consideration in the future health service researches on PET.

  10. Business administration of PET facilities. A cost analysis of three facilities utilizing delivery FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutake, Naohiro; Oku, Shinya; Fujii, Ryo; Furui, Yuji; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) has been proved to be a powerful imaging tool in clinical oncology. The number of PET facilities in Japan has remarkably increased over the last decade. Furthermore, the approval of delivery fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in 2005 resulted in a tremendous expansion of the PET institutions without a cyclotron facility. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost analysis of PET institutions that utilized delivery FDG. Three PET facilities using delivery FDG were investigated about the costs for PET service. Fixed costs included depreciation costs for construction and medical equipments such as positron camera. Variable costs consisted of costs for medical materials including delivery FDG. The break-even point was analyzed in each of three institutions. In the three hospitals (A, B and C), the annual number of PET scan was 1,591, 1,637 and 914, while cost per scan was accounted as 110,262 yen, 111,091 yen, and 134,192 yen, respectively. The break-even point was calculated to be 2,583, 2,679 and 2,081, respectively. PET facilities utilizing delivery FDG seemed to have difficulty in business administration. Such a situation suggests the possibility that the current supply of PET facilities might exceed actual demand for the service. The efficiency of resource allocation should be taken into consideration in the future health service researches on PET. (author)

  11. Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, combined FDG-PET/CT and EUS in diagnosing primary pancreatic carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Shuang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Huang Gang, E-mail: huang2802@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Liu Jianjun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Liu Tao [Department of Orthopedics, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Treven, Lyndal [Faculty of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Song Saoli; Zhang Chenpeng; Pan Lingling [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Zhang Ting [Department of Anesthesiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2011-04-15

    The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET), combined {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in diagnosing patients with pancreatic carcinoma. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library and some other databases, from January 1966 to April 2009, were searched for initial studies. All the studies published in English or Chinese relating to the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, PET/CT and EUS for patients with pancreatic cancer were collected. Methodological quality was assessed. The statistic software called 'Meta-Disc 1.4' was used for data analysis. Results: 51 studies were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity estimate for combined PET/CT (90.1%) was significantly higher than PET (88.4%) and EUS (81.2%). The pooled specificity estimate for EUS (93.2%) was significantly higher than PET (83.1%) and PET/CT (80.1%). The pooled DOR estimate for EUS (49.774) was significantly higher than PET (32.778) and PET/CT (27.105). SROC curves for PET/CT and EUS showed a little better diagnostic accuracy than PET alone. For PET alone, when interpreted the results with knowledge of other imaging tests, its sensitivity (89.4%) and specificity (80.1%) were closer to PET/CT. For EUS, its diagnostic value decreased in differentiating pancreatic cancer for patients with chronic pancreatitis. In conclusion, PET/CT was a high sensitive and EUS was a high specific modality in diagnosing patients with pancreatic cancer. PET/CT and EUS could play different roles during different conditions in diagnosing pancreatic carcinoma.

  12. Excretion of FDG into saliva and its significance for PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, A.; Dzewas, B.; Schwaiger, M.; Weber, W.A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Aim: Assessment of the salivary excretion of FDG and its significance during PET imaging. Methods: Salivary samples from 16 patients were obtained during the first three hours after FDG injection and their activity concentrations were measured. Furthermore, regional FDG accumulations in whole body PET scans (60 min p.i., ROI technique) were determined in the following locations: vestibulum oris, floor of the mouth, hypopharynx, parotid gland, submandibular gland. This ROI analysis was repeated after drinking water (0.2 l) and a second scan (120 min p.i.). Results: The salivary FDG concentrations (SUV) at the first, second and third hour p.i. were 0.2 {+-} 0.1, 0.4 {+-} 0.2, and 0.3 {+-} 0.2, respectively. The FDG uptake in the investigated cranial and cervical sites ranged from SUV 1.2 {+-} 0.5 in the major salivary glands to 2.1 {+-} 0.5 in the floor of the mouth. These values remained unchanged after drinking of water. Conclusion: The salivary FDG concentration is higher than expected from the low physiologic content of glucose. This may - similarly to renal excretion - reflect a different behavior of FDG and glucose during reabsorption processes. Nevertheless, the salivary concentration of FDG is so low that no relevant influence on PET imaging is to be expected. Accordingly, the drinking of water prior to the scan is of no benefit for FDG PET imaging of the head and the neck. (orig.)

  13. Excretion of FDG into saliva and its significance for PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, A; Dzewas, B; Schwaiger, M; Weber, W A

    2002-10-01

    Assessment of the salivary excretion of FDG and its significance during PET imaging. Salivary samples from 16 patients were obtained during the first three hours after FDG injection and their activity concentrations were measured. Furthermore, regional FDG accumulations in whole body PET scans (60 min p.i., ROI technique) were determined in the following locations: vestibulum oris, floor of the mouth, hypopharynx, parotid gland, submandibular gland. This ROI analysis was repeated after drinking water (0.2 l) and a second scan (120 min p.i.). The salivary FDG concentrations (SUV) at the first, second and third hour p.i. were 0.2 +/- 0.1, 0.4 +/- 0.2, and 0.3 +/- 0.2, respectively. The FDG uptake in the investigated cranial and cervical sites ranged from SUV 1.2 +/- 0.5 in the major salivary glands to 2.1 +/- 0.5 in the floor of the mouth. These values remained unchanged after drinking of water. The salivary FDG concentration is higher than expected from the low physiologic content of glucose. This may--similarly to renal excretion--reflect a different behavior of FDG and glucose during reabsorption processes. Nevertheless, the salivary concentration of FDG is so low that no relevant influence on PET imaging is to be expected. Accordingly, the drinking of water prior to the scan is of no benefit for FDG PET imaging of the head and the neck.

  14. 11C-methionine PET as a prognostic marker in patients with glioma: comparison with18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungeun; Chung, June-Key; Jeong, Jae Min; Im, So-Hyang; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jung, Hee Won; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the prognostic value of 11 C-methionine (MET) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in glioma patients. The study population comprised 47 patients with gliomas (19 glioblastoma, 28 others). Pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, MET PET and FDG PET were performed within a time interval of 2 weeks in all patients. The uptake ratio and standard uptake values were calculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done to determine significant prognostic factors. Ki-67 index was measured by immunohistochemical staining, and compared with FDG and MET uptake in glioma. Among the several clinicopathological prognostic factors, tumour pathology (glioblastoma or not), age (≥60 or <60 years), Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (≥70 or <70) and MET PET (higher uptake or not compared with normal cortex) were found to be significant predictors by univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, tumour pathology, KPS and MET PET were identified as significant independent predictors. The Ki-67 proliferation index was significantly correlated with MET uptake (r=0.64), but not with FDG uptake. Compared with FDG PET in glioma, MET PET was an independent significant prognostic factor and MET uptake was correlated with cellular proliferation. MET PET may be a useful biological prognostic marker in glioma patients. (orig.)

  15. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...

  16. Analysis of 18F-FDG PET mapping in malignant tumor patients with depression by SPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liang; Zuo Chuantao; Guan Yihui; Zhao Jun; Shi Shenxun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate brain 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET mapping in malignant tumor patients with depressive emotion. Methods: 18 F-FDG PET imaging was performed in 21 malignant tumor patients (tumor group) and 21 healthy controls (control group). All were evaluated by self-rating depression scale (SDS)and 24 questions Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAMD). Results: (1) The standard total score of SDS and HAMD of the tumor group were higher than those of the control group (P 18 F-FDG PET imagings. The abnormalities of glucose metabolism might be related to their depressive emotion. (authors)

  17. The impact of FDG-PET in the management of patients with salivary gland malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Hideaki; Graham, M.M.; Kogame, Masahiro; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET in the management of patients with salivary gland malignancy. We performed 45 FDG PET studies in 31 patients with salivary malignant tumors, using PET (33 studies) and PET/CT (12 studies). Patients comprised 21 males and 10 females with a mean age of 69 y (range 38-89). Nineteen patients had a single study, ten patients had 2 and two patients had 3 studies. Twelve studies were performed for initial staging and 33 studies for restaging. Four patients of the initial staging group were restaged with PET after therapy. Histology consisted of 8 adenocarcinomas, 8 squamous cell carcinomas, 4 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 4 carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenomas, 2 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 2 poorly differentiated carcinomas, 1 salivary duct carcinoma, 1 lymphoepithelial carcinoma and 1 melanoma. PET findings were reviewed with the clinical and radiologic findings and the impact of PET on staging and patient management was determined. In the initial staging group, all 12 primary lesions (100%) showed positive FDG uptake (5 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 adenocarcinomas, 2 poorly differentiated carcinomas, 1 carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma, 1 salivary duct carcinoma, 1 lymphoepithelial carcinoma). Three patients (25%) had FDG positive distant disease (liver, bone, lymph nodes); surgery was canceled and therapy changed to chemoradiation. One patient (9%) with no FDG uptake in the neck nodes avoided a planned neck dissection. In the restaging group (33 studies in 23 patients), 5 patients (22%) had FDG positive distant disease, which changed the treatment from surgery to chemoradiation or other. A second primary lesion was detected in one patient (4%). One patient (4%) with clinically suspected recurrence was able to avoid other invasive procedures because of the negative PET. Overall, FDG PET resulted in a major change in management in 11 of 31 patients (35%). This study shows that FDG PET has a

  18. Practical Aspects of 18F-FDG PET When Receiving 18F-FDG from a Distant Supplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Jaylene; Goertzen, Andrew L; Patterson, Judy; Demeter, Sandor

    2009-09-01

    With PET becoming more widely used, there is an increase in the number of imaging centers being forced to rely on distant suppliers of (18)F-FDG. Because of the large distances between major urban centers, this is particularly true for PET centers in Canada. Our PET center, located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, currently purchases (18)F-FDG from a commercial vendor located more than 1,000 km from Winnipeg, necessitating transport by commercial airline cargo. This dependence on air transport and a distant supplier creates a situation in which our (18)F-FDG supply is less reliable than it would be with onsite production. In this article, we offer insight into the obstacles we have encountered in imaging with a distant supplier of (18)F-FDG and the solutions we have implemented to minimize the disruption to our patients and maximize the number of scans performed each year. The development of contingency plans and protocols designed to suit our operating environment has allowed us to increase the number of patient scans obtained from 659 in year 1 to 993 in year 3, an increase of 51%, despite an increase in our actual number of scan days of only 24%. (18)F-FDG injection timetables are presented for a variety of scenarios including normal delivery, low shipped activity, and delayed delivery. Through the careful establishment of contingency protocols and management of (18)F-FDG shipments, patient throughput can be increased and disruptions minimized.

  19. F 18 FDG PET/CT of a Gastric Schwannoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Il Ki; Kim, Deog Yoon [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    transporter on the neuronal surface. However, for diagnostic purposes, intense F 18 FDG uptake does not distinguish benign Schwannomas from potentially malignant GISTs, which also have high F 18 FDG PET is of of limited value as a preoperative diagnostic technique for the assessment of schwannoma versus GIST.

  20. F 18 FDG PET/CT of a Gastric Schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Il Ki; Kim, Deog Yoon

    2011-01-01

    transporter on the neuronal surface. However, for diagnostic purposes, intense F 18 FDG uptake does not distinguish benign Schwannomas from potentially malignant GISTs, which also have high F 18 FDG PET is of of limited value as a preoperative diagnostic technique for the assessment of schwannoma versus GIST.

  1. Carbon-11 choline or FDG-PET for staging of oesophageal cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, P.L.; Que, T.H.; Vaalburg, W.; Pruim, J.; Elsinga, P.; Plukker, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using carbon-11 choline (CHOL) positron emission tomography (PET) for the staging of oesophageal cancer, in comparison with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, using histopathological findings as the gold standard. Eighteen patients were studied: 16 patients with cancer of the oesophagus or gastro-oesophageal junction and two with in situ carcinoma/high-grade dysplasia. PET imaging was performed 5 min (CHOL) or 90 min (FDG) after injection of 370 MBq of the tracer. PET images were analysed by two independent and blinded physicians using visual and standardised uptake value (SUV) analysis. PET results were compared with surgical and histopathological findings. FDG-PET was able to detect all (100%) of the 16 malignant primary lesions, while CHOL-PET detected 73%. In situ carcinoma (n=1) and high-grade dysplasia (n=1) were not visualised with either tracer. Diffuse uptake of the tracers was noted in areas of Barrett's oesophagitis. Twelve patients had locoregional metastases (N1) that were not detected with either FDG or CHOL. Six patients had additional distant nodal (M1a) metastases; four of six (66%) were visualised by FDG, and three of five (60%) by CHOL-PET. On a lesion basis, FDG-PET detected 10/12 non-regional metastases (sensitivity 83%), while CHOL-PET detected 5/12 (sensitivity 42%). Haematogenous distant metastases (M1b) were positive on FDG-PET in three of four patients, and on CHOL-PET in two of four. SUV values were significantly higher for FDG (FDG 6.6±3.5, CHOL 5.5±2.5, P=0.04). CHOL-PET is able to visualise oesophageal carcinoma and its metastases, but appears to be inferior to FDG-PET. Presumably this is the result of lower tumoural uptake and considerable non-specific uptake of CHOL in liver, stomach wall, pancreas and small intestine. Further studies are needed to confirm these data. (orig.)

  2. F.D.G. PET role in the management of refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papathanassiou, D.; Domange-Testard, A.; Bruna-Muraille, C.; Cuif-Job, A.; Liehn, J.C.; Thiriaux, A.; Motte, J.

    2009-01-01

    The work-up of drug-resistant partial epilepsy is intended to localize epileptogenic foci in the purpose of a possible surgery. We aimed to assess the role of fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (F.D.G. PET) in this scope. This study involved 34 patients who underwent brain F.D.G. PET, with a final diagnosis in 21. The value of F.D.G. PET for lateralization and localisation of the epileptogenic focus was evaluated by a blinded interpretation, and compared with the value of standard investigations. The impact of F.D.G. PET was assessed by the means of questions intended for the neurologist in each case. All the epilepsy types together, F.D.G. PET lateralized and localised the foci in 65 and 47% of the 34 subjects respectively. Among the 19 subjects with final diagnosis (patients with bilateral foci excluded), lateralization was correct in 84% and localisation in 63% (and the values were greater for temporal epilepsy than for extra temporal foci). PET frequently provided additional information compared with MRI, but not with EEG. F.D.G. PET was useful in 82.5% of cases (confirming management in 65% and changing it in 17.5% of the patients). Our experience corroborated the value of F.D.G. PET for lateralization and localisation of epileptogenic foci, and its role in case of normal MRI. However, F.D.G. PET appears as a confirmation tool rather than an examination resulting in a change in management rate. (authors)

  3. Anesthesia condition for 18F-FDG imaging of lung metastasis tumors using small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, June-Youp; Jung, Jae Ho; Kang, Joo Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2008-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-FDG has been increasingly used for tumor imaging in the murine model. The aim of this study was to establish the anesthesia condition for imaging of lung metastasis tumor using small animal 18 F-FDG PET. Methods: To determine the impact of anesthesia on 18 F-FDG distribution in normal mice, five groups were studied under the following conditions: no anesthesia, ketamine and xylazine (Ke/Xy), 0.5% isoflurane (Iso 0.5), 1% isoflurane (Iso 1) and 2% isoflurane (Iso 2). The ex vivo counting, standard uptake value (SUV) image and glucose SUV of 18 F-FDG in various tissues were evaluated. The 18 F-FDG images in the lung metastasis tumor model were obtained under no anesthesia, Ke/Xy and Iso 0.5, and registered with CT image to clarify the tumor region. Results: Blood glucose concentration and muscle uptake of 18 F-FDG in the Ke/Xy group markedly increased more than in the other groups. The Iso 2 group increased 18 F-FDG uptake in heart compared with the other groups. The Iso 0.5 anesthesized group showed the lowest 18 F-FDG uptake in heart and chest wall. The small size of lung metastasis tumor (2 mm) was clearly visualized by 18 F-FDG image with the Iso 0.5 anesthesia. Conclusion: Small animal 18 F-FDG PET imaging with Iso 0.5 anesthesia was appropriate for the detection of lung metastasis tumor. To acquire 18 F-FDG PET images with small animal PET, the type and level of anesthetic should be carefully considered to be suitable for the visualization of target tissue in the experimental model

  4. FDG whole-body PET/MRI in oncology: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Becker, Ann-Katharina [Rheinisch Westfalische Technische Hochschule Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Goo, Jin Mo; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Seoul National University, College of Medicine,Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The recent advance in hybrid imaging techniques enables offering simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in various clinical fields. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET has been widely used for diagnosis and evaluation of oncologic patients. The growing evidence from research and clinical experiences demonstrated that PET/MRI with FDG can provide comparable or superior diagnostic performance more than conventional radiological imaging such as computed tomography (CT), MRI or PET/CT in various cancers. Combined analysis using structural information and functional/molecular information of tumors can draw additional diagnostic information based on PET/MRI. Further studies including determination of the diagnostic efficacy, optimizing the examination protocol, and analysis of the hybrid imaging results is necessary for extending the FDG PET/MRI application in clinical oncology.

  5. A Score-Based Approach to 18F-FDG PET Images as a Tool to Describe Metabolic Predictors of Myocardial Doxorubicin Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bauckneht

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To verify the capability of 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT to identify patients at higher risk of developing doxorubicin (DXR-induced cardiotoxicity, using a score-based image approach. Methods: 36 patients underwent FDG-PET/CT. These patients had shown full remission after DXR-based chemotherapy for Hodgkin’s disease (DXR dose: 40–50 mg/m2 per cycle, and were retrospectively enrolled. Inclusion criteria implied the presence of both pre- and post-chemotherapy clinical evaluation encompassing electrocardiogram (ECG and echocardiography. Myocardial metabolism at pre-therapy PET was evaluated according to both standardized uptake value (SUV- and score-based approaches. The capability of the score-based image assessment to predict the occurrence of cardiac toxicity with respect to SUV measurement was then evaluated. Results: In contrast to the SUV-based approach, the five-point scale method does not linearly stratify the risk of the subsequent development of cardiotoxicity. However, converting the five-points scale to a dichotomic evaluation (low vs. high myocardial metabolism, FDG-PET/CT showed high diagnostic accuracy in the prediction of cardiac toxicity (specificity = 100% and sensitivity = 83.3%. In patients showing high myocardial uptake at baseline, in which the score-based method is not able to definitively exclude the occurrence of cardiac toxicity, myocardial SUV mean quantification is able to further stratify the risk between low and intermediate risk classes. Conclusions: the score-based approach to FDG-PET/CT images is a feasible method for predicting DXR-induced cardiotoxicity. This method might improve the inter-reader and inter-scanner variability, thus allowing the evaluation of FDG-PET/CT images in a multicentral setting.

  6. Evaluation of thymic tumors with 18F-FDG PET-CT - A pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Punit; Singhal, Abhinav; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Kumar, Rakesh [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)], e-mail: rkphulia@yahoo.com; Kumar, Arvind [Dept. of Surgical Disciplines, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2013-02-15

    Thymic tumors represent a broad spectrum of neoplastic disorders and pose considerable diagnostic difficulties. A non-invasive imaging study to determine the nature of thymic lesions can have significant impact on management of such tumors. 18F-flurorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has shown promising results in characterization of thymic tumors. The objective of this article is to provide an illustrative tutorial highlighting the clinical utility of 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging in patients with thymic tumors. We have pictorially depicted the 18F-FDG PET-CT salient imaging characteristics of various thymic tumors, both epithelial and non-epithelial. Also discussed is the dynamic physiology of thymus gland which is to be kept in mind when evaluating thymic pathology on 18F-FDG PET-CT, as it can lead to interpretative pitfalls.

  7. Role of FDG-PET imaging in assessing the response to theralymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natasha Singh; Krishna, B.A.; Hinduja, P.D.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of FDG-PET imaging in assessing the response to therapy in Lymphoma. Totally 61 patients with lymphoma, 17 of Hodgkins disease and 44 of Non-Hodgkins lymphoma were included in the study. The FDG-PET imaging was done after completion of therapy in 43 patients (post 6 courses of chemotherapy) and during therapy in 18 patients (post 1,2,3,4 courses of chemotherapy). In 13 patients FDG-PET was done as a follow up after 1 year of therapy. Results: In 22 out of 61 patients there was evidence of active disease suggesting poor response to therapy, while in the rest of 39 out of 61 patients there was no active disease either at the primary site or rest of the body. Conclusions: Our study highlights the role of FDG-PET scan in assessing the response to chemotherapy in lymphoma. (authors)

  8. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a rare case of Stewart-Treves syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Friberg, Lars; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to illustrate the possible applications of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in chronic extremity lymphedema and its complications....

  9. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Findings in a Patient with Chikungunya Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Michala Vaaben; Kjaer, Anna Sophie L; Markova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with Chikungunya infection. An (18)F-FDG PET/CT performed four weeks after debut of symptoms revealed pathological (18)F-FDG uptake in enlarged lymph nodes on both side of the diaphragm, and inflammation of both...

  10. Malignancy rate of biopsied suspicious bone lesions identified on FDG PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; de Klerk, John M H; Heggelman, Ben G F; Dubois, Stefan V.; Kwee, Thomas C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314079394

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the malignancy rate of bone lesions identified on FDG PET/CT in patients who have undergone CT-guided biopsy because of the suspicion of malignancy. Methods: This single-centre retrospective study spanned eight consecutive years and included all patients who underwent both FDG

  11. Multimodal correlation of dynamic [18F]-AV-1451 perfusion PET and neuronal hypometabolism in [18F]-FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Jochen; Leuwer, Isabel; Bischof, Gérard N; Drzezga, Alexander; van Eimeren, Thilo

    2017-12-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism measured with [18F]-FDG PET is a well established marker of neuronal dysfunction in neurodegeneration. The tau-protein tracer [18F]-AV-1451 PET is currently under evaluation and shows promising results. Here, we assess the feasibility of early perfusion imaging with AV-1451 as a substite for FDG PET in assessing neuronal injury. Twenty patients with suspected neurodegeneration underwent FDG and early phase AV-1451 PET imaging. Ten one-minute timeframes were acquired after application of 200 MBq AV-1451. FDG images were acquired on a different date according to clinical protocol. Early AV-1451 timeframes were coregistered to individual FDG-scans and spatially normalized. Voxel-wise intermodal correlations were calculated on within-subject level for every possible time window. The window with highest pooled correlation was considered optimal. Z-transformed deviation maps (ZMs) were created from both FDG and early AV-1451 images, comparing against FDG images of healthy controls. Regional patterns and extent of perfusion deficits were highly comparable to metabolic deficits. Best results were observed in a time window from 60 to 360 s (r = 0.86). Correlation strength ranged from r = 0.96 (subcortical gray matter) to 0.83 (frontal lobe) in regional analysis. ZMs of early AV-1451 and FDG images were highly similar. Perfusion imaging with AV-1451 is a valid biomarker for assessment of neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Radiation exposure and complexity of the diagnostic workup could be reduced significantly by routine acquisition of early AV-1451 images, sparing additional FDG PET.

  12. Prognostic value of FDG-PET in patients with ovarian carcinoma following surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Okazaki, Atsushi; Oriuchi, Noboru

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of FDG-PET after surgical resection in patients with ovarian carcinoma, we compared the results of FDG-PET and serum CA-125 level and prognosis of patients. Eighteen patients underwent a total of 32 FDG-PET examinations following surgery for ovarian carcinoma from October 2001 to December 2002 at our hospital (median follow-up period, 31 months). Age of the patients at the time of the initial FDG-PET examination ranged from 31 to 73 years (mean 52 years) and the period from surgery to the initial FDG-PET examination ranged from 5 to 109 months (mean 30 months). Serum CA-125 levels were determined on the occasion of each FDG-PET examination. Recurrent tumors were treated with surgery in 5 cases, radiotherapy in 2 cases, and chemotherapy in 9 cases. The initial FDG-PET examinations revealed that 13 cases had positive and 5 cases had negative findings, which included 2 false positive cases. The survival rate for all patients at 1 year and 2 years after the initial examination was 82% and 63%, respectively. Two-year survival rates in patients with positive and negative FDG-PET findings were 51% and 83%, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.19). Furthermore, 4 patients with normal CA-125 levels and 14 patients with elevated CA-125 levels showed 2-year survival rates of 100% and 51%, respectively, and they were not significantly different (p=0.11). For all 32 examinations, the 2-year survival rates for patients with normal CA-125 levels (100%) were significantly higher (p=0.025) than that for patients with elevated CA-125 levels (47%), however there was no significant difference (p=0.20) between FDG-PET positive cases (53%) and negative cases (83%). The prognosis of patients with positive FDG-PET findings was less favorable than that of patients with negative findings. However, over the mean extended observation period of about 2.5 years, no significant difference in the

  13. Molecular pathology in vulnerable carotid plaques: correlation with [18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, M; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Borgwardt, L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Atherosclerosis is recognised as an inflammatory disease, and new diagnostic tools are warranted to evaluate plaque inflammatory activity and risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated [18]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in vulnerable carotid plaques visualised by positron emission...... tomography (PET). Uptake was correlated to quantitative gene expression of known markers of inflammation and plaque vulnerability. METHODS: Ten patients with recent transient ischaemic attack and carotid artery stenosis (>50%) underwent combined FDG-PET and computed tomography angiography (CTA) the day...

  14. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Nonmelanomatous Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Nonmelanomatous skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, merkel cell carcinoma and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance. So far, there have been a few reports that {sup 18}F-FDG PET was useful in the evaluation of metastasis and therapeutic response in nonmelanomatous skin cancer, however, those are very weak evidences. Therefore, further studies on the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in nonmelanomatous skin cancer are required.

  15. Diagnostic value of combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI for staging and restaging in paediatric oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfluger, Thomas; Melzer, Henriette I.; Mueller, Wolfgang P.; Bartenstein, Peter [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Albert, Michael H.; Schmid, Irene [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Paediatric Oncology/Haematology, Munich (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    The present study compares the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and MRI to combined/registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI for staging and restaging in paediatric oncology. Over 8 years and 2 months, 270 {sup 18}F-FDG PET and 270 MRI examinations (mean interval 5 days) were performed in 132 patients with proven (n = 117) or suspected (n = 15) malignant disease: solid tumours (n = 64), systemic malignancy (n = 53) and benign disease (n = 15). A total of 259 suspected tumour lesions were analysed retrospectively during primary diagnosis and 554 lesions during follow-up. Image analysis was performed separately on each modality, followed by analysis of combined and registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI imaging. A total of 813 lesions were evaluated and confirmed by histopathology (n = 158) and/or imaging follow-up (n = 655) after 6 months. In the separate analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI, sensitivity was 86 %/94 % and specificity 85 %/38 %. Combined/registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI led to a sensitivity of 97 %/97 % and specificity of 81 %/82 %. False-positive results ({sup 18}F-FDG PET n = 69, MRI n = 281, combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 85, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 80) were due to physiological uptake or post-therapeutic changes. False-negative results ({sup 18}F-FDG PET n = 50, MRI n = 20, combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 11, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 11) were based on low uptake or minimal morphological changes. Examination-based evaluation during follow-up showed a sensitivity/specificity of 91 %/81 % for {sup 18}F-FDG PET, 93 %/30 % for MRI and 96 %/72 % for combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI. For the detection of single tumour lesions, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI proved to be the methodology of choice for adequate tumour staging. In the examination-based evaluation, MRI alone performed better than {sup 18}F-FDG PET and combined/registered imaging during primary diagnosis. At follow

  16. Investigations with FDG-PET Scanning in Prostate Cancer Show Limited Value for Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, Eeva [Univ. of Turku (Finland). Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy; Hogg, Annette; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney [The Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, East Melbourne, Vic (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging; Frydenberg, Mark [Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic (Australia)

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate FDG-PET (fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Twenty-two patients were studied during different disease phases of prostate cancer, for staging or restaging to clarify specific clinical questions. FDG-PET was performed encompassing the thorax, abdomen and pelvis using the Penn PET 300H scanner. Scanning was begun 60 min after {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose marker. Patients were catheterized and administered diuretics to minimize urinary activity. Information obtained with FDG-PET was concordant with findings from other investigations in 7/22 (32%) patients, discordant in 15/22 (68%) patients and equivalent in one patient (4%). PET indicated progressive disease in five patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <4 ng/L. The impact on management of the patients was high in 46% of cases, low in 41% and for 14% there was no impact on management. The accuracy of FDG-PET was 72% (95% CI 50-89) as confirmed by invasive diagnostics/follow-up. FDG-PET can provide useful information and improve the clinician's decision on further management procedures in selected patients with low PSA and bone or lymph node changes. A negative PET scan in prostate cancer should be interpreted with caution.

  17. [F-18]FDG imaging of head and neck tumors: comparison of hybrid PET, dedicated PET and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresel, S.; Brinkbaeumer, K.; Schmid, R.; Poepperl, G.; Hahn, K.; Szeimies, U.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Aim of the study was to evaluate [F-18]FDG imaging of head and neck tumors using a Hybrid-PET device of the 2nd or 3rd generation. Examinations were compared to dedicated PET and Spiral-CT. Methods: 54 patients suffering from head and neck tumors were examined using dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET after injection of 185-350 MBq [F-18]FDG. Examinations were carried out on the dedicated PET first followed by a scan on the Hybrid-PET. Dedicated PET was acquired in 3D mode, Hybrid-PET was performed in list mode using an axial filter. Reconstruction of data was performed iteratively on both, dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET. All patients received a CT scan in multislice technique. All finding have been verified by the goldstandard histology or in case of negative histology by follow up. Results: Using dedicated PET the primary or recurrent lesion was correctly diagnosed in 47/48 patients, using Hybrid-PET in 46/48 patients and using CT in 25/48 patients. Metastatic disease in cervical lymph nodes was diagnosed in 17/18 patients with dedicated PET, in 16/18 patients with Hybrid-PET and in 15/18 with CT. False positive results with regard to lymph node metastasis were seen with one patient for dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET, respectively, and with 18 patients for CT. In a total of 11 patients unknown metastastic lesions were seen with dedicated PET and with Hybrid-PET elsewhere in the body. Additional malignant disease other than the head and neck tumor was found in 4 patients. Conclusion: Using Hybrid-PET for [F-18]FDG imaging reveals a loss of sensitivity and specificity of about 1-5% as compared to dedicated PET in head and neck tumors. [F-18]FDG PET with both, dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET is superior to CT in the diagnosis of primary or recurrent lesions as well as in the assessment of lymph node involvement. (orig.) [de

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumours: a systematic review and a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treglia, Giorgio [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Positron Emission Tomography Centre, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Salsano, Marco; Stefanelli, Antonella; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Giordano, Alessandro [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    To systematically review and meta-analyse literature data on the diagnostic performance of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumours (ESFT). PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases were searched for articles that evaluated FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients with ESFT from inception to 31 May 2011. Studies that fulfilled the three following criteria were included in the systematic review: FDG-PET or PET/CT performed in patients with ESFT; articles about the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET and PET/CT; sample size of at least 10 patients with ESFT were included. Studies in which there were sufficient data to reassess sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET or PET/CT in ESFT were included in the meta-analysis, excluding duplicate publications. Finally, pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of FDG-PET or PET/CT in ESFT were calculated. We found 13 studies comprising a total of 342 patients with ESFT. The main findings of the studies included are presented. The meta-analysis of five selected studies provided these results about FDG-PET and PET/CT in ESFT: pooled sensitivity: 96% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-99%); pooled specificity: 92% (95% CI 87-96%); area under the ROC curve: 0.97. With regard to the staging and restaging of patients with ESFT, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG-PET and PET/CT are high; the combination of FDG-PET or PET/CT with conventional imaging is a valuable tool for the staging and restaging of ESFT and has a relevant impact on the treatment strategy plan. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumours: a systematic review and a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treglia, Giorgio; Salsano, Marco; Stefanelli, Antonella; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Giordano, Alessandro; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    To systematically review and meta-analyse literature data on the diagnostic performance of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumours (ESFT). PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases were searched for articles that evaluated FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients with ESFT from inception to 31 May 2011. Studies that fulfilled the three following criteria were included in the systematic review: FDG-PET or PET/CT performed in patients with ESFT; articles about the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET and PET/CT; sample size of at least 10 patients with ESFT were included. Studies in which there were sufficient data to reassess sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET or PET/CT in ESFT were included in the meta-analysis, excluding duplicate publications. Finally, pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of FDG-PET or PET/CT in ESFT were calculated. We found 13 studies comprising a total of 342 patients with ESFT. The main findings of the studies included are presented. The meta-analysis of five selected studies provided these results about FDG-PET and PET/CT in ESFT: pooled sensitivity: 96% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-99%); pooled specificity: 92% (95% CI 87-96%); area under the ROC curve: 0.97. With regard to the staging and restaging of patients with ESFT, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG-PET and PET/CT are high; the combination of FDG-PET or PET/CT with conventional imaging is a valuable tool for the staging and restaging of ESFT and has a relevant impact on the treatment strategy plan. (orig.)

  20. Diagnostic value of [18F] FDG-PET and PET/CT in urinary bladder cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huojun; Xing, Wei; Kang, Qinqin; Chen, Chao; Wang, Linhui; Lu, Jianping

    2015-05-01

    An early diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer is crucial for early treatment and management. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the overall diagnostic accuracy of 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in urinary bladder cancer with meta-analysis. The PubMed and CNKI databases were searched for the eligible studies published up to June 01, 2014. The sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer were pooled along with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to summarize overall test performance. Ten studies met our inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer in meta-analysis were as follows: a pooled sensitivity, 0.82 (95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 0.88); a pooled specificity, 0.92 (95 % CI, 0.87 to 0.95); positive likelihood ratio, 6.80 (95 % CI, 4.31 to 10.74); negative likelihood ratio, 0.27 (95 % CI, 0.19 to 0.36); and diagnostic odds ratio, 25.18 (95 % CI, 17.58 to 70.4). The results indicate that 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT are relatively high sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer.

  1. Clinical utility of FDG-PET in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Orini, Stefania; Gandolfo, Federica; Boccardi, Marina; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Nobili, Flavio; Walker, Zuzana; Pagani, Marco

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the incremental value of FDG-PET over clinical tests in: (i) diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); (ii) picking early signs of neurodegeneration in patients with a genetic risk of Huntington's disease (HD); and detecting metabolic changes related to cognitive impairment in (iii) ALS and (iv) HD patients. Four comprehensive literature searches were conducted using the PICO model to extract evidence from relevant studies. An expert panel then voted using the Delphi method on these four diagnostic scenarios. The availability of evidence was good for FDG-PET utility to support the diagnosis of ALS, poor for identifying presymptomatic subjects carrying HD mutation who will convert to HD, and lacking for identifying cognitive-related metabolic changes in both ALS and HD. After the Delphi consensual procedure, the panel did not support the clinical use of FDG-PET for any of the four scenarios. Relative to other neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical use of FDG-PET in ALS and HD is still in its infancy. Once validated by disease-control studies, FDG-PET might represent a potentially useful biomarker for ALS diagnosis. FDG-PET is presently not justified as a routine investigation to predict conversion to HD, nor to detect evidence of brain dysfunction justifying cognitive decline in ALS and HD.

  2. Osteoblastoma is a metabolically active benign bone tumor on 18F-FDG PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Muqbel, Kusai M; Al-Omari, Ma'moon H; Audat, Ziad A; Alqudah, Mohammad A

    2013-12-01

    We describe a case of a 9-y-old girl who on (18)F-FDG PET imaging was found to have a highly metabolically active sacral tumor with an average standarized uptake value of 6.2. The tumor was proven to be osteoblastoma by pathologic examination. Osteoblastoma is a relatively rare benign primary bone tumor and occurs predominantly in patients younger than 20 y. The most common area of involvement is the spine. Osteoblastoma has been reported to be metabolically active on (18)F-FDG PET imaging, with an average standarized uptake value of 3.2, which renders (18)F-FDG PET imaging unable to differentiate benign from malignant primary bone tumors. To our knowledge, only 5 cases of osteoblastoma evaluated by (18)F-FDG PET imaging have been reported in the literature; all were metabolically active on (18)F-FDG PET imaging. The objective of this case report is to show that a metabolically active primary bone tumor on (18)F-FDG PET imaging might be benign and not necessarily malignant.

  3. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...... to elucidate the potential value of FDG-PET/CT for staging of CRC. Data were retrieved from 67 consecutive patients (24-84 years) with histopathologically proven CRC who had undergone FDG-PET/CT in addition to conventional imaging for initial staging. Treatment plans before and after FDG-PET/CT were compared...

  4. Assessment of the role of FDG PET in the diagnosis and management of children with refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollenberger, Glenn P.; Byrne, Amanda J.; Berlangieri, Salvatore U.; Pathmaraj, Kunthi; Rowe, Christopher C.; Reutens, David C.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Scott, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of the results of FDG PET scans in children with refractory epilepsy referred to our centre over an 8-year period, with a view to ascertaining the impact of FDG PET on subsequent patient management. A questionnaire was used to assess the impact of FDG PET scan on diagnosis, management and clinical decision-making processes for epilepsy surgery from the managing clinician's perspective. FDG PET scan results were also compared with MRI, EEG and SPECT results and coded according to whether the FDG PET scan provided independent information and localisation of epileptogenic regions. A total of 118 eligible patients under the age of 14 years were identified, with questionnaires being completed on 113 evaluable patients (96%). The pre-PET management plan consisted of consideration for surgery in 92 patients (81%) and medical therapy for the remaining 21 patients (19%). Managing physicians rated FDG PET as providing information additional to that obtained with other investigations regarding epileptogenic sites in 88 patients (77%). FDG PET had either a minor or a major impact on clinical management in 58 patients (51%), principally with regard to surgical candidacy. FDG PET has a definite role in the assessment of paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy who are being considered for surgery. In the future, analysis of FDG PET data in specific subpopulations of children with refractory epilepsy may lead to novel insights regarding aetiology. (orig.)

  5. Assessment of the role of FDG PET in the diagnosis and management of children with refractory epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollenberger, Glenn P.; Byrne, Amanda J.; Berlangieri, Salvatore U.; Pathmaraj, Kunthi [University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Melbourne (Australia); Rowe, Christopher C. [University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Reutens, David C.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E. [University of Melbourne, Department of Neurology, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Austin Hospital, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Heidelberg, Victoria (Australia)

    2005-11-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of the results of FDG PET scans in children with refractory epilepsy referred to our centre over an 8-year period, with a view to ascertaining the impact of FDG PET on subsequent patient management. A questionnaire was used to assess the impact of FDG PET scan on diagnosis, management and clinical decision-making processes for epilepsy surgery from the managing clinician's perspective. FDG PET scan results were also compared with MRI, EEG and SPECT results and coded according to whether the FDG PET scan provided independent information and localisation of epileptogenic regions. A total of 118 eligible patients under the age of 14 years were identified, with questionnaires being completed on 113 evaluable patients (96%). The pre-PET management plan consisted of consideration for surgery in 92 patients (81%) and medical therapy for the remaining 21 patients (19%). Managing physicians rated FDG PET as providing information additional to that obtained with other investigations regarding epileptogenic sites in 88 patients (77%). FDG PET had either a minor or a major impact on clinical management in 58 patients (51%), principally with regard to surgical candidacy. FDG PET has a definite role in the assessment of paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy who are being considered for surgery. In the future, analysis of FDG PET data in specific subpopulations of children with refractory epilepsy may lead to novel insights regarding aetiology. (orig.)

  6. Clinical Significance of 18F-FDG-PET in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takaaki; Yajima, Reina; Kurozumi, Sasagu; Higuchi, Toru; Obayashi, Sayaka; Tokiniwa, Hideaki; Nagaoka, Rin; Takata, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Jun; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The diagnostic utility of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) for breast cancer is controversial. The histological type or tumor size of breast cancer has been reported to be associated with a greater likelihood of positive FDG uptake. Compared to invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs), invasive lobular carcinomas (ILCs) have a lower level of FDG uptake and are detected at a significantly lower sensitivity. The role of preoperative FDG-PET for ILCs may, thus, be limited. Few data evaluating the significance of FDG-PET in ILCs are available. Here, we evaluated the clinical significance of FDG-PET for ILC patients. We retrospectively investigated the cases of 196 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who were diagnosed as having ILC (n=15) or IDC (n=181) and underwent FDG-PET preoperatively. Fifteen (7.7%) of patients were histopathologically diagnosed as ILC. A univariate analysis revealed that tumor size, extent of tumor, estrogen receptor (ER) expression and progesterone receptor (PgR) expression were significantly different between the ILC and IDC groups. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) values of the primary tumors were not significantly different between the two groups but, regardless of the larger size of tumor or ductal spread, the SUV max was relatively lower in the ILC group compared to the IDC group. The tumors in two ILC cases showed no FDG uptake. Among the ILC cases, there were linear associations between SUV max and tumor size and between SUV max and the nuclear grade by Pearson correlation (r=0.447, p=0.048 and r=0.519, p=0.024, respectively). Our findings imply that the preoperative FDG uptake in ILC may be reflective of the tumor size and the nuclear grade of the tumor. FDG uptake may be useful and predictive of aggressive features or prognosis in ILC patients. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical value of FDG-PET in cutaneous malignant melanoma: First experience in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, S.; Niin, M.; Paats, A.; Tonnov, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In November 2002 first 18F-FDG-PET was performed in Estonia using a mobile truck-mounted scanning technology (Accel, Siemens) provided by the International Healthcare Group (IHG, Amersfoort, Netherlands). The FDG was provided by MAP Medical Technologies, Schering, (Helsinki, Finland). In 2003 this scheme was repeated for further scanning sessions. Evaluation of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) using nuclear technique is of particular interest in Estonia as its incidence is on the rise. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in CMM has a well-documented high diagnostic accuracy, especially in staging of the disease. The aim of the current study was to assess the impact of 18F-FDG-PET on detailed staging and clinical management in CMM. 30 patients of CMM, 16 males and 14 females, all non-diabetic, in the age range of 26 to 69 years were studied. Of these 30 patients, 12 were of high risk primary CMM, 7 had regional lymph node metastases and 11 had distant metastases. Patients were asked to consume a low-carbohydrate diet 3 days prior to the FDG-PET scan. 194 to 410 MBq (average 335 MBq) 18F-FDG was administered to the patients who were asked to come fasting for a minimum of 6 hours. Whole body scan was performed 40 to 65 minutes after the administration of FDG on the mobile PET. In 13 of the 30 patients (43%) 18F-FDG-PET changed the staging. In remaining 17 patients (57%) 18F-FDG-PET increased confidence level for the chosen treatment. Lymphadenectomy was planned in 2 patients showing lymph node involvement on FDG-PET. In other 2 patients, one with small pulmonary and other with a liver lesions found on PET but negative on radiological examination 'wait-and-watch' strategy was chosen. An unexpected hypermetabolic lesion seen in 1 case turned out to be a benign focus of connective tissue. One patient shown to have multiple distant metastases was started on chemotherapy. Finally in 8 of the 30 (27%) patients an immediate positive

  8. 18F-FDG-PET and 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the detection of recurrent or metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xu; Bao, Lihua; Xu, Zhaoqiang; Li, Dianfu; Li, Yongjun; Wang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detection of recurrent or metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in patients after surgery with a meta-analysis. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for relevant articles. Two investigators independently extracted the data about study characteristics and examination results. Pooled estimates of sensitivity of FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT were obtained. Fifteen studies met all inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of FDG-PET ranged from 0.47 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.21–0.73) to 0.96 (95%CI: 0.86–0.99), the sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT ranger from 0.47 (95% CI: 0.31–0.64) to 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65–0.90). The pooled sensitivities of FDG-PET and PET/CT were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.64–0.72) and 0.69 (95% CI: 0.64–0.74), respectively. There was no statistic significant between FDG-PET and PET/CT. Our results indicate that FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT has reasonable sensitivity in detecting recurrent or metastatic MTC after primary surgery. However, no single diagnostic technique is able to reliably demonstrate the full extent of disease in patients with recurrent or metastatic MTC, the combination of cross-sectional radiography with FDG-PET or PET/CT is recommended.

  9. Recurrent bladder carcinoma: clinical and prognostic role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo [San Raffaele G. Giglio Institute, Department of Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Cefalu (Italy); Caobelli, Federico [Basel University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Gentile, Roberta; Baldari, Sergio [University of Messina, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Morphological and Functional Images, Messina (Italy); Stefano, Alessandro; Russo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Maria Carla [IBFM-CNR, Cefalu (Italy); Albano, Domenico [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, DIBIMEF - Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Palermo (Italy); Midiri, Massimo [San Raffaele G. Giglio Institute, Department of Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Cefalu (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Palermo, DIBIMEF - Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Palermo (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    A small number of studies evaluated the detection rate of lesions from bladder carcinoma (BC) of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the restaging process. However, the prognostic role of FDG PET/CT still remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy, the effect upon treatment decision, and the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in patients with suspected recurrent BC. Forty-one patients affected by BC underwent FDG PET/CT for restaging purpose. The diagnostic accuracy of visually interpreted FDG PET/CT was assessed compared to histology (n = 8), other diagnostic imaging modalities (contrast-enhanced CT in 38/41 patients and MRI in 15/41) and clinical follow-up (n = 41). Semiquantitative PET values (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUL, MTV, TLG) were calculated using a graph-based method. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by using Kaplan-Meier curves. The risk of progression (hazard ratio, HR) was computed by Cox regression analysis by considering all the available variables. PET was considered positive in 21 of 41 patients. Of these, recurrent BC was confirmed in 20 (95 %). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of FDG PET/CT were 87 %, 94 %, 95 %, 85 %, 90 %. AUC was 0.9 (95 %IC 0.8-1). Bayesian positive and negative likelihood ratios were 14.5 and 0.13, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings modified the therapeutic approach in 16 patients (modified therapy in 10 PET-positive patients, watch-and-wait in six PET-negative patients). PFS was significantly longer in patients with negative scan vs. those with pathological findings (85 % vs. 24 %, p < 0.05; HR = 12.4; p = 0.001). Moreover, an unremarkable study was associated with a longer OS (88 % vs. 47 % after 2 years and 87 % vs. 25 % after 3 years, respectively, p < 0.05). Standardized uptake value (SUV)max > 6 and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) > 8.5 were recognized as the most accurate thresholds to predict PFS (2-year PFS 62 % for

  10. FDG gamma camera PET equipped with one inch crystal and XCT. Assessment of myocardial viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheshti, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET CT Centre, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Linz (Austria); Khorsand, A.; Graf, S. [Dept. of Cardiology, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Dobrozemsky, G. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria); Oezer, S.; Kletter, K.; Dudczak, R. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Pirich, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine und Endocrinology, Paracelsus Private Medical Univ., SALK, Salzburg (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Metabolic imaging with 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is actually considered as the best method to detect and quantitatively assess myocordial tissue viability. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of FDG gamma camera positron emission tomography (GCPET) imaging equipped with one inch NaI crystals in comparison to FDG dedicated PET (dPET) imaging as a ''gold standard'' in phantom and clinical studies. Patients, methods: nineteen patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent both imaging modalities. Phantom and clinical GCPET imaging were performed with a dual-headed, coincidence based gamma camera equipped with 1 inch thick NaI crystals and an X-ray tube (XCT) for attenuation correction (AC), as well as with a dedicated PET scanner with AC. {sup 99m}Tc tetrofosmin single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies were performed for assessment of myocardial perfusion, with AC. Results: phantom studies showed a significant relation in segmental activity between FDG imaging with AC using GCPET and dPET (r = 0.91, p < 0.001). In clinical studies with AC correlation coefficients of mean segmental FDG uptake and regional defect size were r = 0.87 (p < 0.0001) and r = 0.83 (p < 0.0001), respectively. In regional analysis close agreement was even found in the most attenuated regions of the heart if AC was used in GCPET imaging. The overall agreement for detection of viable myocardium was 81% between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (AC) and 74% between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (NC). Conclusions: suggests that the assessment of myocardial metabolism by means of FDG is feasible with a coincidence based gamma camera equipped with 1 inch thick NaI crystal if AC is performed. The results reveal a close concordance and agreement between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (AC) as compared to FDG-GCPET (NC). (orig.)

  11. Small Animal [18F]FDG PET Imaging for Tumor Model Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2008-01-01

    PET allows non-invasive, quantitative and repetitive imaging of biological function in living animals. Small animal PET imaging with [ 18 F]FDG has been successfully applied to investigation of metabolism, receptor, ligand interactions, gene expression, adoptive cell therapy and somatic gene therapy. Experimental condition of animal handling impacts on the biodistribution of [ 18 F]FDG in small animal study. The small animal PET and CT images were registered using the hardware fiducial markers and small animal contour point. Tumor imaging in small animal with small animal [ 18 F]FDG PET should be considered fasting, warming, and isoflurane anesthesia level. Registered imaging with small animal PET and CT image could be useful for the detection of tumor. Small animal experimental condition of animal handling and registration method will be of most importance for small lesion detection of metastases tumor model

  12. The role of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of residual germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballok, Z.E.; Scott, A.M.; Hannah, A.; Berlangieri, S.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Chan, J.G.; Hicks, R.; Burns, I.; McKendrich, J.; Tauro, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The role of FDG-PET is not well established in the assessment of patients with germ cell tumours. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of FDG-PET in detecting residual disease in patients with germ cell tumours, and its potential role in patient management. A total of 34 FDG-PET scans in 29 patients (23 patients (IF:22M) with nonseminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT), and 6 male patients with advanced seminoma) performed over a 4 yr period were evaluated. Results of FDG-PET studies were compared to pathology or follow-up. For NSGCT patients, pathological evidence of residual high grade tumour was seen in 9 patients on subsequent surgical specimens. FDG-PET studies were true positive in all of these patients. In 8 NSGCT patients pathology revealed fibrosis or teratoma at subsequent surgery: all had negative FDG-PET studies. There were no false positive, nor false negative FDG-PET studies. Resection was not performed in the remaining 6 patients, and on follow-up 2 patients had a progressive clinical course after positive FDG-PET scans, and 2 patients were in clinical remission 3 and 29 months after a negative FDG-PET study, respectively. Two patients were not evaluable. Of the 6 seminoma patients, 5 underwent further chemotherapy /radiotherapy after having abnormal FDG-PET studies due to clinical evidence of disease. The 6th pt with a negative FDG-PET study had stable retroperitoneal lymph node enlargement after 3 years follow-up. In our series FDG-PET was able to predict the presence of high grade malignancy within residual masses in patients with NSGCT and seminoma with a high accuracy. These initial results encourage further evaluation

  13. The value of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of thromboangiitis obliterans--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Gerald; Milosavljevic, Robert; Belaj, Klara; Gary, Thomas; Rief, Peter; Hafner, Franz; Lipp, Rainer W; Brodmann, Marianne

    2015-04-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO) is an inflammatory vascular disease affecting dominantly the vessels of the extremities and is etiologically strongly associated with tobacco consumption. Different imaging techniques are generally used to exclude potential differential diagnoses. We investigated the value of (18) F-flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([(18) F]FDG-PET) in the diagnosis of TAO. All consecutive patients with diagnosed TAO between Nov 2001 and Nov 2003 at our institution who underwent [(18) F]FDG-PET in the diagnostic workup were analyzed retrospectively. Whole-body scans were conducted after a fasting period of at least 6 h and blood glucose levels lower than 180 mg/dl. The primary endpoint was defined as significantly increased vascular FDG uptake. Tracer uptake was visually determined and, in accordance with strength, divided into grades 0 to 3. In total, ten patients were statistically evaluated. The median patient age at the date of the first [(18) F]FDG-PET was 41.5 years. Repetitive FDG-PET imaging was performed in seven out of ten patients (70 %). The endpoint was objectified in one of the initial examinations (10 %) and in another one out of seven follow-up scans (14.3 %). One positive [(18) F]FDG-PET was observed in the pelvic vessels and the other in the infrapopliteal arteries. Therefore, increased tracer uptake could be observed in two examinations on two different patients (both with grade 3 tracer uptake) out of 17 conducted [(18) F]FDG-PETs in total. The [(18) F]FDG-PET was not a suitable investigative procedure for the diagnosis of TAO in the present patient cohort.

  14. Food residue granuloma mimicking metastatic disease on FDG-PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucitti, Antonio; Grossi, Ugo; Leccisotti, Lucia; Maggi, Fabio; Ricci, Riccardo; Mazzari, Andrea; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina M C; Giordano, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    A 31-year-old woman presenting with acute abdomen underwent an emergency Hartmann's procedure for fecal peritonitis due to perforated adenocarcinoma of the left colon. Shortly after a 7-month course of adjuvant chemotherapy, follow-up contrast-enhanced CT showed multiple peritoneal and hepatic nodules, showing focal intense and homogeneous FDG uptake on FDG-PET/CT, highly suspected for recurrence of disease. Excisional biopsy of the nodules revealed foreign body granulomas made up of alimentary materials surrounded by a fibrous wall. We report a unique case of a false-positive finding secondary to food residues mimicking metastatic disease on FDG-PET in a patient with colon cancer.

  15. When to image carotid plaque inflammation with FDG PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græbe, Martin; Borgwardt, Lise; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in inflamed high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques is challenged by the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) and luminal blood activity. Late acquisition protocols have been used to overcome these challenges to enhance...... the contrast between the plaque and blood-pool FDG activity. However, for prospective studies the late acquisition is inconvenient for the patient and staff, and most retrospective studies of plaque uptake use data from early acquisition protocols. The objective was to evaluate changes in the quantification...... methods of FDG uptake in carotid artery plaques between early and late PET scans....

  16. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Parkinson's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Hyoung; Chung, Yong An

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. It is slowly progressive disease that affects a small area of cells in the mid brain known as the substantia nigra. Gradual degeneration of these cells causes a reduction in a vital chemical known as dopamine. In the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, it has difficulty in biopsy and limits in radiologic modalities. 18F-FDG PET shows various findings from normal to diffuse decrement of FDG uptake. 18 F-FDG PET is expected to be a evaluation tool in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

  17. Rapid evaluation of the cost-effectiveness o FDG-PET in recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.; Keith, C.J.; Wong, D.C.; Griffiths, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of FDG-PET in recurrent colorectal cancer using Australian data whilst avoiding the time delays, costs and ethical difficulties associated with intensive patient follow-up. A decision tree sensitivity analysis was used. The study population comprised patients with recurrent colorectal under consideration for resection of apparently isolated hepatic metastasis in whom demonstration of extra-hepatic tumour would preclude surgery.The results of FDG-PET in a consecutive series of 75 such patients referred to the Wesley PET centre were used to determine the range of possible values for disease prevalence and specificity, assuming the value for PET sensitivity as reported in the federal government's PET review. These values, along with the diagnostic accuracy of CT and Australian costs for procedures (PET = $1200), were entered into decision trees modelling a diagnostic strategy comprising CT only and an alternative strategy where patients without extrahepatic tumour on CT also undergo FDG-PET. The cost per patient, accuracy and Incremental Cost-Accuracy Ratio (ICAR) were determined for each strategy. The PET strategy is cheaper for all possible values of disease prevalence and PET specificity ($306-328 / patient) and is more cost-effective for values of disease prevalence above 0.18 or PET specificity above 0.86. At a typical disease prevalence of 0.3 (PET specificity 0.92), the ICAR for the PET strategy is $9700 versus $11,200 for CT. PET remains cost saving even if the best reported values for sensitivity of CT and worse values for PET are used. FDG-PET for recurrent colorectal cancer in Australia would be cost saving and most probably cost-effective. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Giant cell tumor of the rib: Two cases of F-18 FDG PET/CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Lim; Yoo, Le Ryung; Lee, Yeong Joo; Jung, Chan Kwon [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sonya Young Ju [Molecular Imaging Program, Dept. of Radiology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    We report two cases of giant cell tumor arising from the rib and their F-18 FDG PET/CT findings. The two patients complained of chest wall pain, and large lobulated soft tissue masses with intense FDG uptake were seen on F-18 FDG PET/CT. A malignant tumor such as osteosarcoma or chondrosarcoma was suspected due to the large size of the mass, bony destruction, and intense FDG uptake. En bloc resection was performed and final pathologic results revealed giant cell tumor of the rib. Giant cell tumor of the rib is very rare, and larger lesions with high FDG uptake can be misdiagnosed as an intrathoracic malignancy arising from the rib, pleura, or chest wall.

  19. Assessment of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation can be improved by delayed time point FDG PET CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn; Thomassen, Anders; Hildebrandt, Malene

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Blood pool FDG activity can cloud the atherosclerotic plaque FDG signal. Over time, blood pool FDG activity declines. Therefore, delayed time point FDG PET CT imaging can potentially enhance the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers...... without traditional cardiovascular risk factors and three subjects with angina pectoris were prospectively assessed by dual time point 18-FDG PET CT imaging at 90 and 180 minutes after tracer injection. The ratio between aortic SUVmax and the blood pool SUVmean (TBR) was calculated to show the change...... the data. Results: At 90 minutes, the aortic TBR was 2.072 ± 0.599. At 180 minutes, the aortic TBR significantly increased to 3.488 ± 1.138 (P = relationship was observed between aortic cSUV, aging (β = 0.019; t = 2.79; df = 12; P...

  20. Poor predictive value of positive interim FDG-PET/CT in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarovici, Julien; Petrovanu, Cynthia; Danu, Alina; Ferme, Christophe; Ribrag, Vincent; Ghez, David [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Hematology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Terroir, Marie [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Arfi-Rouche, Julia [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Radiology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Michot, Jean-Marie [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Drug Development (DITEP); Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Mussot, Sacha; Florea, Valentina [Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Le Plessis Robinson (France). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery; Ghigna, Maria-Rosa [Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Le Plessis Robinson (France). Dept. of Pathology; Dartigues, Peggy [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Pathology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France)

    2017-11-15

    Though commonly used to assess response to therapy, the prognostic value of interim FDG-PET/CT in Primary Mediastinal Large B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL) is unclear. We conducted a retrospective study on 36 consecutive patients treated at our institution for a PMBCL between 2006 and 2014. All patients with a positive interim FDG-PET/CT had undergone histological restaging consisting either in a surgical debulking of the residual lesion (15 patients) or a CT-guided core needle biopsy (two patients). All FDG-PET/CT were secondarily reviewed according to the more recent Deauville criteria. Interim FDG-PET/CT was considered positive in 17/36 patients using visual evaluation. Among these patients, 14 had a Deauville score of 4. Histological restaging was negative in all but one case, showing inflammation and/or fibrosis. After a median follow-up of 48.5 months, a total of five patients have relapsed, two patients in the positive FDG-PET/CT group, and three patients in the negative FDG-PET/CT group, respectively. These data indicate that a positive interim FDG-PET/CT does not reflect persistence of active disease in the vast majority of PMBCL cases. The relapse rate appears similar regardless of interim FDG-PET/CT results and interpretation criteria. This suggests that interim FDG-PET/CT has a poor positive predictive value, thus kt should be used with caution in PMBCL. (orig.)

  1. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Lundgren, J D; Da Cunha-Bang, C

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies.18F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic...... unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. METHODS: Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET...

  2. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Lundgren, J D; Da Cunha-Bang, C

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. (18)F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic...... unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. METHODS: Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET...

  3. Modification of staging and treatment of head and neck cancer by FDG-PET/CT prior to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyuk, A.; University Hospital Dresden; Appold, S.; Zoephel, K.; Baumann, M.; University Hospital Dresden; Abolmaali, N.; University Hospital Dresden

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reliable tumor staging is a fundamental pre-requisite for efficient tumor therapy and further prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare head and neck cancer (HNC) staging before and after FDG-PET/CT, evaluating the stage modifications for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Patients and methods: A total of 102 patients with untreated primary HNC, who underwent conventional staging and staging including FDG-PET/CT before RT, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Blinded pre-FDG-PET/CT and post-FDG-PET/CT staging data were compared. The impact on patient management was tested by comparing the intention before and after FDG-PET/CT. Results: Significant modifications of T, N, and M stage as well as clinical stage were detected after inclusion of FDG-PET/CT data (p = 0.002, 0.0006, 0.001, 0.03, respectively). Overall, the implementation of FDG-PET/CT led to modification of RT intention decision in 14 patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT demonstrates essential influence on tumor staging in HNC patients scheduled for irradiation. Implementation of FDG-PET/CT in imaging protocol improves selection of candidates for curative and palliative RT and allows further optimization of treatment management and therapy intention. (orig.)

  4. FDG-PET/CT in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients with suspected cyst infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijl, Jordy Pieter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Kwee, Thomas Christian

    2018-04-13

    Purpose: To determine the value of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing renal or hepatic cyst infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Methods: This retrospective single-center study included all patients with ADPKD who underwent FDG-PET/CT because of suspected cyst infection between 2010 and 2017. Results: Thirty FDG-PET/CT scans of thirty individual patients were included, of which 19 were positive for cyst infection. According to a previously established clinical and biochemical reference standard, FDG-PET/CT achieved sensitivity of 88.9%, specificity of 75.0%, positive predictive value of 84.2%, and negative predictive value of 81.8% for the diagnosis of cyst infection. In 5 cases, FDG-PET/CT suggested a different pathologic process that explained the symptoms, including pneumonia ( n = 1), generalized peritonitis ( n = 1), pancreatitis ( n = 1), colitis ( n = 1), and cholangitis ( n = 1). Total duration of hospital stay and duration between FDG-PET/CT scan and hospital discharge of patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection were significantly longer than those with a negative scan ( P = 0.005 and P = 0.009, respectively). Creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection than in patients with a negative scan ( P = 0.015). Other comparisons of clinical parameters (age, gender, presence of fever (>38.5°C) for more than 3 days, abdominal pain, history of solid organ transplantation and nephrectomy, immune status), laboratory values (C-reactive protein level (CRP), leukocyte count, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and microbiologic results (blood and urine cultures) were not significantly different ( P = 0.13-1.00) between FDG-PET/CT-positive and -negative patients. Conclusion: FDG-PET/CT is a useful and recommendable (upfront) imaging modality for the evaluation of

  5. Emerging role of FDG-PET/CT in assessing atherosclerosis in large arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wengen; Bural, Gonca G.; Torigian, Drew A.; Alavi, Abass; Rader, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a dynamic inflammatory disorder. The biological composition and inflammatory state of an atherosclerotic plaque, rather than the degree of stenosis or its size are the major determinants of acute clinical events. A noninvasive technique to detect vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque is critically needed. FDG-PET/CT, a combined functional and structural whole-body imaging modality, holds great potential for this purpose. FDG uptake in large arteries has been frequently observed and is associated with cardiovascular risk factors. FDG accumulates in plaque macrophages and uptake is correlated with macrophage density. It is known that vascular FDG uptake and calcification do not overlap significantly and changes of FDG uptake are common, suggesting that FDG uptake may represent a dynamic inflammatory process. It has been reported that vascular FDG uptake can be attenuated by simvastatin in patients, and by the antiinflammatory drug probucol in rabbits. Vascular FDG uptake has been linked to cardiovascular events in some preliminary studies. Data from basic sciences, and animal and clinical studies support the emerging role of FDG-PET/CT in assessing atherosclerosis in large arteries in humans. (orig.)

  6. Amyloid- and FDG-PET imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A.; Pytel, Vanesa; Galan, Lucia; Valles-Salgado, Maria; Guerrero, Antonio; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Matias-Guiu, Jorge [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, San Carlos Institute for Health Research (IdISSC), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Department of Neurology, Madrid (Spain); Cabrera-Martin, Maria Nieves; Carreras, Jose Luis [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, San Carlos Institute for Health Research (IdISSC), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    We aimed to study brain metabolism and presence of beta-amyloid deposits using positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This prospective cross-sectional study included 18 patients with definite or probable ALS according to the revised El Escorial diagnostic criteria, and 24 healthy controls. Patients underwent neurological and neuropsychological assessments, PET with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and amyloid-PET with {sup 18}F-florbetaben. Patients with ALS showed hypometabolism in the frontal area and hypermetabolism in the cerebellum compared to healthy controls. Four patients (22 %) displayed cognitive impairment and decreased metabolism in the frontal area extending bilaterally to the parietal regions, and increased metabolism in the posterior area of the cerebellum. In patients with no cognitive impairment, metabolism was lower in the left superior frontal gyrus and higher in the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum. In the individual analysis, six patients (35 %) displayed more anterior involvement with hypometabolism affecting the superior frontal, medial, and inferior gyri; six patients (35 %) exhibited a more posterior pattern with hypometabolism in the precentral and postcentral gyri and in the superior and inferior parietal lobules; two patients (11 %) showed a mixed pattern; and three patients (17 %) showed no alterations in brain metabolism. Three (16 %) showed increased {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake compared to controls. We have identified two main patterns of brain metabolism with an association to cognitive status. Only a subgroup of patients showed an increased uptake of the amyloid tracer. Our results suggest that ALS is heterogeneous from a clinical, metabolic, and molecular standpoint. (orig.)

  7. 18F-FDG PET/CT in detection of gynecomastia in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin-Yi; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lin, Ming-Chia; Chao, Chih-Hao; Lin, Wan-Yu; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively investigate the prevalence of gynecomastia as false-positive 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Among the 127 male HCC patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, the 18FDG uptakes at the bilateral breasts in 9 patients with gynecomastia were recorded as standard uptake value (SUVmax) and the visual interpretation in both early and delayed images. The mean early SUVmax was 1.58/1.57 (right/left breast) in nine gynecomastia patients. The three patients with early visual score of 3 had higher early SUVmaxs. Gynecomastia is a possible cause of false-positive uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Y. S.; Yun, J. G.; Lee, M. H.; Cho, C. W.; Yun, S. N

    2004-01-01

    Oral contrast media might help in interpreting PET/CT images, allowing better discrimination between physiologic and pathologic abdominal uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast on FDG PET/CT. A total of 435 cancer patients received 200mL of oral Barium with water(200mL) immediately before FDG injection. PET images were reconstructed using attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction. The FDG uptake in gastrointestinal(GI) tract were analyzed by visual and semiquantitative method in transaxial, coronal and sagittal planes. Seventy patients(16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake(pSUV>4.0) : 50(74%, 84 sites) with diffuse uptake and 20(26%, 29sites) with focal uptake. The most common distribution site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n=27, 39%) and others were small bowel with transverse colon(n=6, 8%), small bowel with ascending and sigmoid colon(n=6, 8%) and etc. In PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast was showed in 26 patients(54%) with diffuse pattern and 9(45%) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38(45%) and 9(31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the most common distribution site, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29 in the total 47 sites). Application of low dose contrast agent can be helpful in the evaluation of intestinal uptake in FDG PET/CT image

  9. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y. S.; Yun, J. G.; Lee, M. H.; Cho, C. W.; Yun, S. N [Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Oral contrast media might help in interpreting PET/CT images, allowing better discrimination between physiologic and pathologic abdominal uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast on FDG PET/CT. A total of 435 cancer patients received 200mL of oral Barium with water(200mL) immediately before FDG injection. PET images were reconstructed using attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction. The FDG uptake in gastrointestinal(GI) tract were analyzed by visual and semiquantitative method in transaxial, coronal and sagittal planes. Seventy patients(16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake(pSUV>4.0) : 50(74%, 84 sites) with diffuse uptake and 20(26%, 29sites) with focal uptake. The most common distribution site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n=27, 39%) and others were small bowel with transverse colon(n=6, 8%), small bowel with ascending and sigmoid colon(n=6, 8%) and etc. In PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast was showed in 26 patients(54%) with diffuse pattern and 9(45%) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38(45%) and 9(31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the most common distribution site, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29 in the total 47 sites). Application of low dose contrast agent can be helpful in the evaluation of intestinal uptake in FDG PET/CT image.

  10. Natural history of atherosclerotic disease progression as assessed by (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetterich, Holger; Rominger, Axel; Walter, Lisa; Habs, Maximilian; Volpers, Sarah; Hacker, Marcus; Reiser, Maximilian F; Bartenstein, Peter; Saam, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cardiovascular risk factors and plaque inflammation on the progression of atherosclerosis as assessed by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging with (18)F-radiolabled fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Patients who received a (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan and follow-up scan 9-24 months later without systemic inflammation or steroid medication were eligible for the study. (18)F-FDG PET/CT included a full diagnostic contrast enhanced CT scan. Cardiovascular risk factors and medication were documented. Calcified plaque volume, lumen area and (18)F-FDG uptake, quantified by the target-to-background ratio (TBR), were measured in the carotid arteries, aorta and iliac arteries. Influence of cardiovascular risk factors and vessel wall inflammation on atherosclerotic disease progression was analyzed. Ninety-four patients underwent baseline and follow-up whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT (mean follow-up time 14.5 ± 3.5 months). Annualized calcified plaque volume increased by 15.4 % (p history of atherosclerotic disease burden in multiple vascular beds and emphasize the value of morphological and physiologic information provided by (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

  11. Evaluation of malignant solid tumor in childhood with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Amane; Goto, Hiroaki; Kuroki, Fumiko

    2006-01-01

    Usefulness of FDG-PET (18F-deoxyglucose PET) was examined in evaluation of diagnosis and therapeutic efficacy of childhood malignant solid tumors. Subjects were 32 patients (16 males) of the median age of 7 y (1 - 27 y), involving those with neuroblastoma (9 cases), hepatoblastoma (4), chronic granulomatous disorder (4) and others (each ≤2). They underwent 75 FDG-PET examinations for diagnosis before and during treatment in authors' hospital in the period from May 2001 to December 2003. Standard uptake value (SUV), 1 x 1 cm region of interest (ROI) of abnormally high distribution area of radioactivity in the lesion/FDG dose/kg body wt., was used for evaluation: SUV>1.5 was defined positive. In neuroblastoma, FDG was found to be highly distributed and kinetics of SUV, to be useful for evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and early metastasis detection. In some cases of hepatoblastoma, the therapeutic effectiveness and recurrence were not satisfactorily evaluative. The distribution of FDG was not satisfactory in Wilms' tumor relative to other tumors. The PET was thought to be useful, despite their small case number examined, for those evaluations of Ewing's tumor, dysgerminoma and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Thus FDG-PET was found useful for detection, evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and early metastasis detection of pediatric malignant solid tumors. (T.I.)

  12. FDG PET/MR for lymph node staging in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.platzek@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina, E-mail: bettina.beuthien-baumann3@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias, E-mail: m.schneider@mkgdresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker, E-mail: volker.gudziol@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kitzler, Hagen H., E-mail: hagen.kitzler@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Maus, Jens, E-mail: j.maus@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schramm, Georg, E-mail: g.schramm@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Popp, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.popp@praxisklinik-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Laniado, Michael, E-mail: michael.laniado@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Jörg, E-mail: Joerg.Kotzerke@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Hoff, Jörg van den, E-mail: j.van_den_hoff@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of PET/MR (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for lymph node staging in head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by the local ethics committee; all patients signed informed consent. Thirty-eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MR on a whole-body hybrid system after a single intravenous injection of FDG. The accuracy of PET, MR and PET/MR for lymph node metastases were compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Histology served as the reference standard. Results: Metastatic disease was confirmed in 16 (42.1%) of 38 patients and 38 (9.7%) of 391 dissected lymph node levels. There were no significant differences between PET/MR, MR and PET and MR (p > 0.05) regarding accuracy for cervical metastatic disease. Based on lymph node levels, sensitivity and specificity for metastatic involvement were 65.8% and 97.2% for MR, 86.8% and 97.0% for PET and 89.5% and 95.2% for PET/MR. Conclusions: In head and neck cancer, FDG PET/MR does not significantly improve accuracy for cervical lymph node metastases in comparison to MR or PET.

  13. Characterizing bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin's lymphoma by FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kagna, Olga [Rambam Health Care Campus, Nuclear Medicine Department, Haifa (Israel); Dann, Eldad J. [Rambam Health Care Campus and B. and R. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Hematology Department, Haifa (Israel); Ben-Barak, Ayelet [Rambam Health Care Campus and B. and R. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Department, Haifa (Israel); Israel, Ora [Rambam Health Care Campus and B. and R. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Nuclear Medicine Department, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-06-15

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is superior to iliac bone marrow biopsy (iBMB) for detection of bone marrow involvement (BMI) in staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The present study aims to characterize the patterns and distribution of BMI in HL as determined by FDG-PET/CT. Reports of FDG-PET/CT studies performed for staging of HL were reviewed. BMI was defined as positive iBMB and/or foci of pathological FDG uptake in the skeleton that behaved in concordance with other sites of lymphoma in studies following chemotherapy. Number of FDG uptake foci, their specific location in the skeleton and the presence of corresponding lesions in the CT component of the study, and stage according to the Ann Arbor staging system, were recorded. The study included 473 patients. iBMB was performed in 336 patients. Nine patients had positive iBMB (9/336, 3 %). Seventy-three patients (73/473, 15 %) had FDG-PET/CT-defined BMI. The BM was the only extranodal site of HL in 52/473 patients (11 %). Forty-five patients had three or more foci of pathological skeletal FDG uptake (45/73, 62 %). Sixty-four patients (64/73, 88 %) had at least one uptake focus in the pelvis or vertebrae. In 60 patients (60/73, 82 %), the number of skeletal FDG uptake foci without corresponding CT lesions was equal to or higher than the number of foci with morphological abnormalities. FDG-PET/CT demonstrated BMI in 15 % of patients with newly diagnosed HL. Diagnosis of BMI in HL by FDG-PET/CT was more sensitive than iBMB with potential upstage in 11 % of patients. The most common pattern of FDG-PET/CT BMI was multifocal (at least three foci) skeletal FDG uptake, with at least one focus in the pelvis or vertebrae and no corresponding CT lesions. (orig.)

  14. FDG-PET/CT findings in systemic mastocytosis: a French multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djelbani-Ahmed, S. [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny (France); Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Bobigny (France); Chandesris, M.O. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (France); Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Department of Haematology, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (France); Mekinian, A.; Fain, O. [Saint Antoine Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine and Inflammation-Immunopathology-Biotherapy Department (DHU i2B), AP-HP, Paris (France); Canioni, D. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (France); Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Brouzes, C. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (France); Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Laboratory of Haematology, Paris (France); Hanssens, K. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (France); Aix-Marseille University, INSERM U1068, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de Marseille (Signaling, Hematopoiesis and Mechanism of Oncogenesis), Paoli Calmettes Institute, Marseille (France); Pop, G.; Eder, V. [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny (France); Durieu, I.; Durupt, S. [Universite de Lyon, Department of Internal and Vascular Medicine, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Groupe Hopitalier Sud, Pierre-Benite (France); Grosbois, B.; Besnard, S. [Rennes University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Rennes (France); Tournilhac, O. [Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Beyne-Rauzy, O. [Purpan University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Toulouse (France); Agape, P. [Saint-Denis University Hospital, Department of Oncology and Haematology, Saint-Denis de la Reunion (France); Delmer, A. [Reims University Hospital, Department of Haematology, Reims (France); Ranta, D. [Brabois University Hospital, Department of Haematology, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Jeandel, P.Y. [Nice University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Nice (France); Georgin-Lavialle, S. [Tenon Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Paris (France); Frenzel, L.; Hermine, O. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (FR); Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Department of Haematology, Paris (FR); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (FR); Damaj, G. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (FR); Caen University Hospital, Department of Haematology, Caen (FR); Lortholary, O. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (FR); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (FR); Pasteur Institute, Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Paris (FR); Soussan, M. [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny (FR); Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Bobigny (FR)

    2015-12-15

    Mastocytosis is a clonal haematological disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation and the activation of mast cells. The value of FDG-PET/CT (FDG-PET) in mastocytosis has yet to be determined. We retrospectively identified patients with an established diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis (SM), according to the WHO criteria, who underwent PET using the French Reference Centre for Mastocytosis database. Semi-quantitative and visual analysis of FDG-PET was performed and compared to the clinico-biological data. Our cohort included 19 adult patients, median age 65 years [range 58-74], including three with smouldering SM (SSM), three with aggressive SM (ASM), 10 with an associated clonal haematological non-mast-cell lineage disease (SM-AHNMD), and three with mast cell sarcoma (MCS). FDG-PET was performed at the time of the SM diagnosis (15/19), to evaluate lymph node (LN) activity (3/19) or the efficacy of therapy (1/19). FDG uptake was observed in the bone marrow (BM) (9/19, 47 %), LN (6/19, 32 %), spleen (12/19, 63 %), or liver (1/19, 5 %). No significant FDG uptake was observed in the SSM and ASM patients. A pathological FDG uptake was observed in the BM of 6/10 patients with SM-AHNMD, appearing as diffuse and homogeneous, and in the LN of 5/10 patients. All 3 MCS patients showed intense and multifocal BM pathological uptake, mimicking metastasis. No correlation was found between the FDG-PET findings and serum tryptase levels, BM mast cell infiltration percentage, and CD30 and CD2 expression by mast cells. FDG uptake does not appear to be a sensitive marker of mast cell activation or proliferation because no significant FDG uptake was observed in most common forms of mastocytosis (notably purely aggressive SM). However, pathological FDG uptake was observed in the SM-AHNMD and in MCS cases, suggesting a role of FDG-PET in their early identification and as a tool of therapeutic assessment in this subgroup of patients. (orig.)

  15. FDG-PET/CT findings in systemic mastocytosis: a French multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djelbani-Ahmed, S.; Chandesris, M.O.; Mekinian, A.; Fain, O.; Canioni, D.; Brouzes, C.; Hanssens, K.; Pop, G.; Eder, V.; Durieu, I.; Durupt, S.; Grosbois, B.; Besnard, S.; Tournilhac, O.; Beyne-Rauzy, O.; Agape, P.; Delmer, A.; Ranta, D.; Jeandel, P.Y.; Georgin-Lavialle, S.; Frenzel, L.; Hermine, O.; Damaj, G.; Lortholary, O.; Soussan, M.

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a clonal haematological disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation and the activation of mast cells. The value of FDG-PET/CT (FDG-PET) in mastocytosis has yet to be determined. We retrospectively identified patients with an established diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis (SM), according to the WHO criteria, who underwent PET using the French Reference Centre for Mastocytosis database. Semi-quantitative and visual analysis of FDG-PET was performed and compared to the clinico-biological data. Our cohort included 19 adult patients, median age 65 years [range 58-74], including three with smouldering SM (SSM), three with aggressive SM (ASM), 10 with an associated clonal haematological non-mast-cell lineage disease (SM-AHNMD), and three with mast cell sarcoma (MCS). FDG-PET was performed at the time of the SM diagnosis (15/19), to evaluate lymph node (LN) activity (3/19) or the efficacy of therapy (1/19). FDG uptake was observed in the bone marrow (BM) (9/19, 47 %), LN (6/19, 32 %), spleen (12/19, 63 %), or liver (1/19, 5 %). No significant FDG uptake was observed in the SSM and ASM patients. A pathological FDG uptake was observed in the BM of 6/10 patients with SM-AHNMD, appearing as diffuse and homogeneous, and in the LN of 5/10 patients. All 3 MCS patients showed intense and multifocal BM pathological uptake, mimicking metastasis. No correlation was found between the FDG-PET findings and serum tryptase levels, BM mast cell infiltration percentage, and CD30 and CD2 expression by mast cells. FDG uptake does not appear to be a sensitive marker of mast cell activation or proliferation because no significant FDG uptake was observed in most common forms of mastocytosis (notably purely aggressive SM). However, pathological FDG uptake was observed in the SM-AHNMD and in MCS cases, suggesting a role of FDG-PET in their early identification and as a tool of therapeutic assessment in this subgroup of patients. (orig.)

  16. FDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagna, Olga; Keidar, Zohar; Srour, Saher; Militianu, Daniela; Melamed, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Osteomyelitis, the most serious complication of the diabetic foot, occurs in about 20 % of patients. Early diagnosis is crucial. Appropriate treatment will avoid or decrease the likelihood of amputation. The objective of this study was to assess the value of FDG PET/CT in diabetic patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis. Enrolled in this prospective study were 39 consecutive diabetic patients (29 men and 10 women, mean age 57 years, range 28-71 years) with 46 suspected sites of foot infection. Of these 39 patients, 38 had type 2 and 1 type 1 diabetes for 4-25 years, and 28 were receiving treatment with insulin. FDG PET/CT was interpreted for the presence, intensity (SUVmax) and localization of increased FDG foci. Final diagnosis was based on histopathology and bacteriology of surgical samples, or clinical and imaging follow-up. Osteomyelitis was correctly diagnosed in 18 and excluded in 21 sites. Of 20 lesions with focal bone FDG uptake, 2 were false-positive with no further evidence of osteomyelitis. Five sites of diffuse FDG uptake involving more than one bone on CT were correctly diagnosed as diabetic osteoarthropathy. FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 100 %, 92 % and 95 % in a patient-based analysis and 100 %, 93 % and 96 % in a lesion-based analysis, respectively, for the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot. FDG PET/CT was found to have high performance indices for evaluation of the diabetic foot. The PET component identified FDG-avid foci in sites of acute infection which were precisely localized on fused PET/CT images allowing correct differentiation between osteomyelitis and soft-tissue infection. (orig.)

  17. FDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagna, Olga; Keidar, Zohar [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, POB 9602, Haifa (Israel); Srour, Saher; Militianu, Daniela [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Haifa (Israel); Melamed, Eyal [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Orthopedics, Haifa (Israel)

    2012-10-15

    Osteomyelitis, the most serious complication of the diabetic foot, occurs in about 20 % of patients. Early diagnosis is crucial. Appropriate treatment will avoid or decrease the likelihood of amputation. The objective of this study was to assess the value of FDG PET/CT in diabetic patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis. Enrolled in this prospective study were 39 consecutive diabetic patients (29 men and 10 women, mean age 57 years, range 28-71 years) with 46 suspected sites of foot infection. Of these 39 patients, 38 had type 2 and 1 type 1 diabetes for 4-25 years, and 28 were receiving treatment with insulin. FDG PET/CT was interpreted for the presence, intensity (SUVmax) and localization of increased FDG foci. Final diagnosis was based on histopathology and bacteriology of surgical samples, or clinical and imaging follow-up. Osteomyelitis was correctly diagnosed in 18 and excluded in 21 sites. Of 20 lesions with focal bone FDG uptake, 2 were false-positive with no further evidence of osteomyelitis. Five sites of diffuse FDG uptake involving more than one bone on CT were correctly diagnosed as diabetic osteoarthropathy. FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 100 %, 92 % and 95 % in a patient-based analysis and 100 %, 93 % and 96 % in a lesion-based analysis, respectively, for the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot. FDG PET/CT was found to have high performance indices for evaluation of the diabetic foot. The PET component identified FDG-avid foci in sites of acute infection which were precisely localized on fused PET/CT images allowing correct differentiation between osteomyelitis and soft-tissue infection. (orig.)

  18. Clinical Significance of Focal Breast Lesions Incidentally Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Seok; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence and malignant risk of focal breast lesions incidentally detected by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Various PET/CT findings of the breast lesions were also analyzed to improve the differentiation between benign from malignant focal breast lesions. The subjects were 3,768 consecutive 18 F-FDG PET/CT exams performed in adult females without a history of breast cancer. A focal breast lesion was defined as a focal 18 F-FDG uptake or a focal nodular lesion on CT image irrespective of 18 F-FDG uptake in the breasts. The maximum SUV and CT pattern of focal breast lesions were evaluated, and were compared with final diagnosis. The incidence of focal breast lesions on PET/CT in adult female subjects was 1.4% (58 lesions in 53 subjects). In finally confirmed 53 lesions of 48 subjects, 11 lesions of 8 subjects (20.8%) were proven to be malignant. When the PET/CT patterns suggesting benignancy (maximum attenuation value > 75 HU or 20) were added as diagnostic criteria of PET/CT to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions along with maximum SUV, the area under ROC curve of PET/CT was significantly increased compared with maximum SUV alone (0.680±0.093 vs. 0.786±0.076, p 18 F-FDG PET/CT is not low, deserving further diagnostic confirmation. Image interpretation considering both 18 F-FDG uptake and PET/CT pattern may be helpful to improve the differentiation from malignant and benign focal breast lesion

  19. Utility of 18FDG-PET/CT in breast cancer diagnostics--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warning, Karina; Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Kristensen, Bent

    2011-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) is a non-invasive method for visualization of focally increased metabolism in the presence of discrete morphological changes. Based on a systematic review of current literature, PET/CT cannot be recommended...

  20. FDG PET/CT : EANM procedure guidelines for tumour imaging: version 2.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Giammarile, Francesco; Tatsch, Klaus; Eschner, Wolfgang; Verzijlbergen, Fred J.; Barrington, Sally F.; Pike, Lucy C.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Stroobants, Sigrid; Delbeke, Dominique; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Holbrook, Scott; Graham, Michael M.; Testanera, Giorgio; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Zijlstra, Josee; Visser, Eric; Hoekstra, Corneline J.; Pruim, Jan; Willemsen, Antoon; Arends, Bertjan; Kotzerke, Joerg; Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Chiti, Arturo; Krause, Bernd J.

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist physicians in recommending, performing, interpreting and reporting the results of FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging of adult patients. PET is a quantitative imaging technique and therefore requires a common quality control (QC)/quality assurance (QA)

  1. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  2. FDG-PET/CT for differentiating between aseptic and septic delayed union in the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Kirsten E; de Jong, Vincent M; Termaat, M Frank; Schepers, Tim; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Goslings, J Carel; Schep, Niels W L

    2018-02-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has proven to have a high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of bone infections. In patients with delayed union it may be clinically important to differentiate between aseptic and septic delayed union. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and to assess the optimal diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in differentiating between aseptic and septic delayed union in the lower extremity. This is a retrospective study of consecutive patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning for suspicion of septic delayed union of the lower extremity. Diagnosis of aseptic delayed union or septic delayed union was made based on surgical deep cultures following PET/CT scanning and information on clinical follow-up. FDG-uptake values were measured at the fractured site by use of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ). Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET/CT were calculated at various SUV max cut-off points. A total of 30 patients were included; 13 patients with aseptic delayed unions and 17 patients with septic delayed unions. Mean SUV max in aseptic delayed union patients was 3.23 (SD ± 1.21). Mean SUV max in septic delayed union patients was 4.77 (SD ± 1.87). A cut-off SUV max set at 4.0 showed sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET/CT were 65, 77 and 70% to differentiate between aseptic and septic delayed union, respectively. Using a semi-quantitative measure (SUV max ) for interpretation of FDG-PET/CT imaging seems to be a promising tool for the discrimination between aseptic and septic delayed union.

  3. Assessing FDG-PET diagnostic accuracy studies to develop recommendations for clinical use in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Marina; Festari, Cristina; Altomare, Daniele; Gandolfo, Federica; Orini, Stefania; Nobili, Flavio; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2018-04-30

    FDG-PET is frequently used as a marker of synaptic damage to diagnose dementing neurodegenerative disorders. We aimed to adapt the items of evidence quality to FDG-PET diagnostic studies, and assess the evidence available in current literature to assist Delphi decisions for European recommendations for clinical use. Based on acknowledged methodological guidance, we defined the domains, specific to FDG-PET, required to assess the quality of evidence in 21 literature searches addressing as many Population Intervention Comparison Outcome (PICO) questions. We ranked findings for each PICO and fed experts making Delphi decisions for recommending clinical use. Among the 1435 retrieved studies, most lacked validated measures of test performance, an adequate gold standard, and head-to-head comparison of FDG-PET and clinical diagnosis, and only 58 entered detailed assessment. Only two studies assessed the accuracy of the comparator (clinical diagnosis) versus any kind of gold-/reference-standard. As to the index-test (FDG-PET-based diagnosis), an independent gold-standard was available in 24% of the examined papers; 38% used an acceptable reference-standard (clinical follow-up); and 38% compared FDG-PET-based diagnosis only to baseline clinical diagnosis. These methodological limitations did not allow for deriving recommendations from evidence. An incremental diagnostic value of FDG-PET versus clinical diagnosis or lack thereof cannot be derived from the current literature. Many of the observed limitations may easily be overcome, and we outlined them as research priorities to improve the quality of current evidence. Such improvement is necessary to outline evidence-based guidelines. The available data were anyway provided to expert clinicians who defined interim recommendations.

  4. Nuclear Medicine Imaging of Infection in Cancer Patients (With Emphasis on FDG-PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Fidel J.; van der Graaf, Winette T.A.; Oyen, Wim J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Infections are a common cause of death and an even more common cause of morbidity in cancer patients. Timely and adequate diagnosis of infection is very important. This article provides clinicians as well as nuclear medicine specialists with a concise summary of the most important and widely available nuclear medicine imaging techniques for infectious and inflammatory diseases in cancer patients with an emphasis on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). 67Ga-citrate has many unfavorable characteristics, and the development of newer radiopharmaceuticals has resulted in the replacement of 67Ga-citrate scintigraphy by scintigraphy with labeled leukocytes or FDG-PET for the majority of conditions. The sensitivity of labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in non-neutropenic cancer patients is comparable with that in patients without malignancy. The specificity, however, is lower because of the uptake of labeled leukocytes in many primary tumors and metastases, most probably as a result of their inflammatory component. In addition, labeled leukocyte scintigraphy cannot be used for febrile neutropenia because of the inability to harvest sufficient peripheral leukocytes for in vitro labeling. FDG-PET has several advantages over these conventional scintigraphic techniques. FDG-PET has shown its usefulness in diagnosing septic thrombophlebitis in cancer patients. It has also been shown that imaging of infectious processes using FDG-PET is possible in patients with severe neutropenia. Although larger prospective studies examining the value of FDG-PET in cancer patients suspected of infection, especially in those with febrile neutropenia, are needed, FDG-PET appears to be the most promising scintigraphic technique for the diagnosis of infection in this patient group. PMID:21680576

  5. A Japanese nationwide survey on the FDG-PET scans for dementia. Analysis on the predicted costs and benefits of FDG-PET for early diagnosis of Alzheimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Michio; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Ishii, Kazunari

    2003-01-01

    A nation-wide survey was carried out on the FDG-PET scans for the diagnosis of dementia by the FDG-PET Working Group organized by both the Japan Radioisotope Association and the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. A total of 406 case reports were presented by 15 PET centers for one year. The purpose of the PET scans included early diagnosis of Alzheimer-type Dementia (154 cases, group A) and differential diagnosis of degenerative dementia (144 cases, group B), which was achieved by the PET scan in most cases. The PET scan turned out to allow omitting cerebral blood flow (CBF)-SPECT scans. Since donepezil treatment of the Alzheimer patients prevents the progress of the disease and reduces the care cost, an economic evaluation was performed on the two-year projected cost and benefit of FDG-PET. The reduction of the total cost by incorporating PET into the protocol was predicted to be 61500 yen (group A) and 13700 yen (group B) per person. The increase of the quality adjusted life year (QALY) was predicted to be 0.0442 (group A) and 0.0137 (group B). Therefore, incorporation of PET into the clinical pass was shown to be an economically dominant. As the number of potential subjects for early diagnosis of dementia is estimated to be 9000 across the country every year, PET is expected to increase their quality of life equivalent to 398 intact persons per year while reducing the cost of health care by 554 million yen. (author)

  6. Primary Liver Carcinosarcoma and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beilei; Zhang, Yiqiu; Hou, Jun; Yu, Haojun; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-08-01

    Primary liver carcinosarcoma is a very rare, malignant neoplasm that is concomitantly composed of a mixture of sarcomatous and carcinomatous elements. In the present study, an initial staging FDG PET/CT showed intense FDG uptake in a patient with liver carcinosarcoma composed of hepatocellular carcinoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Two months after surgical resection, a restaging PET/CT showed rapid progression of the disease with abdominal and lung metastases, indicating aggressive feature of the disease. The case shows the importance to repeat a restaging PET/CT at early time after surgery for a patient with liver carcinosarcoma to monitor disease progression.

  7. Usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base: comparison with FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Shin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choline is a new PET tracer that is useful for the detection of malignant tumor. Choline is a precursor of the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid in the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells. Malignant tumors have an elevated level of phosphatidylcholine in cell membrane. Thus, choline is a marker of tumor malignancy. Method The patient was a 51-year-old man with repeated recurrent hemangiopericytoma in the skull base. We performed Choline-PET in this patient after various treatments and compared findings with those of FDG-PET. Results Choline accumulated in this tumor, but FDG did not accumulate. We diagnosed this tumor as residual hemangiopericytoma and performed the resection of the residual tumor. FDG-PET is not appropriate for skull base tumor detection because uptake in the brain is very strong. Conclusion We emphasize the usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base after various treatments, compared with FDG-PET.

  8. Diagnostic performance of FDG PET or PET/CT in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, H.; Yuan, L.; Li, C.; Kan, Y.; Yang, J.; Hao, R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and perform a meta-analysis of published data regarding the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty. A comprehensive computer literature search of studies published through May 31, 2012 regarding PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection on a per prosthesis-based analysis were calculated. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated to measure the accuracy of PET or PET/CT in patients with suspicious of prosthetic infection. Fourteen studies comprising 838 prosthesis with suspicious of prosthetic infection after arthroplasty were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 82-90%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The pooled specificity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% CI 83-89%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The area under the ROC curve was 0.93 on a per prosthesis-based analysis. In patients suspicious of prosthetic infection, FDG PET or PET/CT demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. FDG PET or PET/CT are accurate methods in this setting. Nevertheless, possible sources of false positive results and influcing factors should kept in mind.

  9. (18)F-FDG PET imaging of murine atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Christoffersen, Christina

    2012-01-01

    To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice....

  10. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan in the patients with primary or recurrent gynecologic malignancies: clinical experiences with FDG-PET scan in cervical carcinoma of uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    1998-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan in patients with cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed in 74 patients with cervical carcinoma from March, 1998 to September, 1998. Fourteen cases were done at pretreatment period and sixty cases were done at post-treatment follow up period. In this study, the scans were obtained after bladder emptying by foley catheter insertion and diuretics to reduce the tracer activity in the bladder and improve the images of central lesions. We could find some incidental recurrent or metastatic lesions by FDG-PET scan (at pretreatment; 5 cases, at post-treatment; clinically no evidence of disease; 8 cases). FDG-PET scan had high sensitivity (100%) for central lesions and metastatic lymph nodes of cervical cancer but could not precisely define the anatomic location of the cancer and the sensitivity was not superior than MRI. Earlier detection of metastatic lymph nodes was superior than CT/MRI (sensitivity; 100 %) for metastatic lymph nodes. Also we found 3 double primary cancers incidentally (2 lung cancers and 1 thyroid cancer). In conclusion, FDG-FET scan might be useful for the earlier of hidden lesions that cannot be detected by routine conventional methods and differential diagnosis with radiation fibrosis and benign lymph adenophy.

  11. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan in the patients with primary or recurrent gynecologic malignancies: clinical experiences with FDG-PET scan in cervical carcinoma of uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    1998-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan in patients with cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed in 74 patients with cervical carcinoma from March, 1998 to September, 1998. Fourteen cases were done at pretreatment period and sixty cases were done at post-treatment follow up period. In this study, the scans were obtained after bladder emptying by foley catheter insertion and diuretics to reduce the tracer activity in the bladder and improve the images of central lesions. We could find some incidental recurrent or metastatic lesions by FDG-PET scan (at pretreatment; 5 cases, at post-treatment; clinically no evidence of disease; 8 cases). FDG-PET scan had high sensitivity (100%) for central lesions and metastatic lymph nodes of cervical cancer but could not precisely define the anatomic location of the cancer and the sensitivity was not superior than MRI. Earlier detection of metastatic lymph nodes was superior than CT/MRI (sensitivity; 100 %) for metastatic lymph nodes. Also we found 3 double primary cancers incidentally (2 lung cancers and 1 thyroid cancer). In conclusion, FDG-FET scan might be useful for the earlier of hidden lesions that cannot be detected by routine conventional methods and differential diagnosis with radiation fibrosis and benign lymph adenophy

  12. Clinical significance of parotid gland incidentalomas on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Gotra, Akshat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and clinical significance of incidental focal uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the parotid glands of cancer patients. A retrospective review of 7,252 oncologic PET/CT studies was done. FDG positive parotid incidentalomas occurred in 0.4% of PET/CT scans, of which only 4% were malignant. PET/CT was unable to differentiate benign from malignant parotid lesions based on SUVmax alone. (18)F-FDG positive parotid incidentalomas can be managed conservatively, however patients with a prior history of lymphoma had a much higher risk of parotid malignancy and require further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma Mimicking Peritoneal Carcinomatosis on F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Suk; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    Malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum is a rare neoplasm with a rapidly fatal course. The tumour arises from the mesothelial cells lining the pleura and peritoneum or, rarely, in the pericardium or tunica vaginalis. This neoplasm is characterized by being difficult to diagnose, having a rapid evolution and a poor response to therapy. Mesothelioma is very glucose avid, and malignant pleural mesothelioma has been reported concerning the utility of F-18 FDG PET or PET/CT. But little has been known about the imaging finding of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma on F-18 FDG PET/CT. We report a case of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma mimicking peritoneal carcinomatosis of F-18 FDG PET/CT.

  14. Biopsy versus FDG PET/CT in the initial evaluation of bone marrow involvement in pediatric lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Gang; Chamroonrat, Wichana; Torigian, Drew A.; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, Wengen [University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhuang, Hongming [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The objective is to assess the role of {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT versus bone marrow biopsy (BMB) in the initial evaluation of bone marrow (BM) involvement in pediatric lymphoma patients. Fifty-four pediatric patients with pathologically proven lymphoma [31 Hodgkin's disease (HD), 23 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)] were included in this study. All patients had soft tissue biopsy and BMB and had FDG PET/CT scans within 2 weeks of biopsy. Among the 31 HD patients, FDG PET/CT revealed positive BM involvement in 4 patients, while BMB revealed BM involvement in 2 patients who were also positive on FDG PET/CT imaging. Among the 23 NHL patients, FDG PET/CT revealed positive BM involvement in 8 patients, while biopsy revealed BM involvement in 5 patients on initial studies (4 of them were also positive on FDG PET/CT, and 1 was BMB positive but was negative on FDG PET/CT), plus 1 false-negative BMB study initially but positive on repeat biopsy after FDG PET/CT. The overall sensitivity of detecting BM involvement by lymphoma was 92 and 54% (p < 0.05) for FDG PET/CT and BMB, respectively. It is noted that there were more positive BMB findings in patients with abnormal FDG activities seen in the biopsy sites on PET/CT. Our study demonstrates that FDG PET/CT has high sensitivity and accuracy and a substantial complementary value to BMB in the initial diagnosis of pediatric lymphoma, and should be employed as a first-line study. (orig.)

  15. Can FDG-PET/CT replace blind bone marrow biopsy of the posterior iliac crest in Ewing sarcoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasalak, Oemer; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Overbosch, Jelle; Kwee, Thomas C.; Jutte, Paul C.

    2018-01-01

    To determine and compare the value of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) to blind bone marrow biopsy (BMB) of the posterior iliac crest in detecting metastatic bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma. This retrospective study included 20 patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma who underwent pretreatment FDG-PET/CT and a total of 38 blind BMBs (two unilateral and 18 bilateral) of the posterior iliac crest. FDG-PET/CT scans were evaluated for bone marrow involvement, both in the posterior iliac crest and other sites, and compared to blind BMB results. FDG-PET/CT was positive for bone marrow involvement in 7/38 posterior iliac crests, whereas BMB was positive in 5/38 posterior iliac crests. FDG-PET/CT and BMB results in the posterior iliac crest agreed in 36/38 cases (94.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 82.7-98.5%). On a patient level, FDG-PET/CT was positive for bone marrow involvement in 4/20 patients, whereas BMB of the posterior iliac crest was positive in 3/20 patients. On a patient level, FDG-PET/CT and BMB results agreed in 19/20 patients (95.0%, 95% CI: 76.4-99.1%). The only discrepancies between FDG-PET/CT and BMB were observed in two BMBs of one patient. Both BMBs in this patient were negative, whereas FDG-PET/CT indicated bilateral posterior iliac crest involvement and also extensive bone marrow involvement elsewhere. FDG-PET/CT appears to be a valuable method for metastatic bone marrow assessment in newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma. The routine use of blind BMB of the posterior iliac crest should be reconsidered when FDG-PET/CT is available. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of F-18 FDG PET and I-131 whole body scan in diagnosis of suspicious metastatic thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Ju Won; Chung, June Key

    2005-01-01

    There are several reports about the usefulness of F-18 FDG PET in thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of F-18 FDG PET and I-131 whole body scan in suspicious metastatic thyroid cancer. There were 46 patients (11 men, 35 women; age range, 18-74yr; mean age, 47.3yr) with suspicious metastatic thyroid cancer after total thyroidectomy who performed FDG PET and I-131 scan. The interval of FDG PET and I-131 scan was within 6 months. An overall clinical evaluation was performed including cytology, thyroglobulin level, sonography, MRI and CT. Metastatic regions were divided into four areas: neck, mediastinum, lung and bone. Among 46 patients, the number of patients, metastatic lesions were detected, totaled 36 (78.3%). Twenty-nine patients (63.0%) were detected by FDG PET and 18 patients (39.1%) were detected by I-131 scan. Twenty-one patients were detected in neck by two methods. Nineteen patients (90.5%) were detected by FDG PET and 7 patients (33.3%) were detected by I-131 scan. Eighteen patients were detected in mediastinum by two methods. Ten patients (55.5%) were detected by FDG PET and 10 patients (55.5%) were detected by I-131 scan. Ten patients were detected in lung by two methods. Nine patients (90.0%) were detected by FDG PET and 3 patients (30.0%) were detected by I-131 scan. Three patients were detected in bone by two methods. Three patients (100%) were detected by FDG PET and 0 patients (0%) were detected by I-131 scan. These data indicate that for detecting metastatic lesions, F-18 FDG PET and I-131 whole body scan may provide complementary information. Thus, the combination of FDG PET and I-131 scan is the method of choice for detecting suspicious metastatic thyroid cancer after total thyroidectomy

  17. Direct comparison of [18F]FDG PET/CT with PET alone and with side-by-side PET and CT in patients with malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghy, Felix M.; Wohlfart, Petra; Blumstein, Norbert M.; Neumaier, Bernd; Glatting, Gerhard; Buck, Andreas K.; Reske, Sven N.; Sunderkoetter, Cord; Schubert, Roland; Oezdemir, Cueneyt; Scharfetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective, blinded study was to evaluate the additional value of [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT in comparison with PET alone and with side-by-side PET and CT in patients with malignant melanoma (MM). A total of 127 consecutive studies of patients with known MM referred for a whole-body PET/CT examination were included in this study. PET alone, side-by-side PET and CT and integrated PET/CT study were independently and separately interpreted without awareness of the clinical information. One score each was applied for certainty of lesion localisation and for certainty of lesion characterisation. Verification of the findings was subsequently performed using all available clinical, pathological (n = 30) and follow-up information. The number of lesions with an uncertain localisation was significantly (p 18 F]FDG. (orig.)

  18. Role of 18FDG-PET imaging in management of recurrent ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadparvar, S.; Kumar, R.; Lee, B.; Zhuang Hongming; Alavi, A.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Serial assays of CA-125 have been established as a tumor marker for monitoring recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma following initial surgery and chemotherapy. The anatomical imaging is performed to localize the tumor site for possible resection. This retrospective study analyzed the efficacy of 18FDG-PET to detect suspected recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Materials and methods: Sixty consecutive patients, age range 40-83 years, mean age 55.8 years with known Ovarian Carcinoma underwent 76 PET-FDG studies. All patients were status post total abdominal Hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo- oopherectomy and were treated with chemo and/or radiation therapy. The imaging was performed at approximately 60 minutes following intravenous injection of average dose of 5.7 mCi 18FDG. Fifty concomitant CA-125 serum assays and 58 anatomical imaging (CT/MRI) were available for comparison. Thirty-eight combined PET, CA-125 and CT/MRI studies were available for evaluation. In addition to ovarian carcinoma in fifteen patients secondary tumors including lung, breast and colon carcinoma and lymphoma were diagnosed. The final diagnoses were based on clinical follow up and other relevant findings. Results: The comparison of the three studies including CA-125, 18FDG-PET and anatomical imaging Revealed. There was no significant difference among all three studies with regard to the diagnosis of recurrent ovarian carcinoma (p=ns). The combined studies improved the sensitivity to 0.98. Among 18 patients with normal CA-125 level, 5 had negative PET and 13 had positive PET studies. Conclusion: 18FDG-PET studies play a major role in detection of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. The Combination of all three studies improves the sensitivity. We recommend routine use of 18FDG- PET in the management of recurrent ovarian carcinoma especially when anatomical imaging is inconclusive. (authors)

  19. Incidental ovarian {sup 18}F-FDG accumulation on PET: correlation with the menstrual cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seok-Ki; Kang, Keon Wook; Roh, Ju Won; Sim, Jung Suk; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, Sang-Yoon [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Gyeonggi (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the nature of incidental ovarian {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) accumulation on positron emission tomography (PET) and the correlation with the menstrual cycle and menopause. We identified 19 incidental FDG accumulations in the ovary (FAOs). FDG PET images were compared with other anatomical imaging methods [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography (US)]. Pathological findings, FDG PET scan during the next menstrual cycle and follow-up images (PET, CT and MRI) were reviewed. To establish the relation of FAOs to the menstrual cycle, we reviewed whole-body FDG PET acquired from 207 consecutive women and the pre-examination questionnaires, including data regarding the menstrual cycle. All spherical or discoid FAOs were attributed to normally developing ovarian follicles and corpora lutea on the basis of concurrent MRI, US or the follow-up PET scan. Three of the FAOs were proved pathologically to be either normal ovaries or a haemorrhagic corpus luteum. Fifteen FAOs spontaneously disappeared on the short-term follow-up PET scans. Of 207 women, 61 had active menstrual cycles. FAOs were found in 12 out of 61 premenopausal women (20%), appearing between the 10th and 25th days of the menstrual cycle. No FAOs were found in the women who did not have a menstrual cycle. Physiological ovarian FDG accumulation could be found around the time of ovulation and during the early luteal phase of the menstrual cycle in premenopausal woman. Since FAO is dependent on the menstrual cycle, it can be avoided by scheduling PET just after menstruation. (orig.)

  20. Incidental ovarian 18F-FDG accumulation on PET: correlation with the menstrual cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seok-Ki; Kang, Keon Wook; Roh, Ju Won; Sim, Jung Suk; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the nature of incidental ovarian 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) accumulation on positron emission tomography (PET) and the correlation with the menstrual cycle and menopause. We identified 19 incidental FDG accumulations in the ovary (FAOs). FDG PET images were compared with other anatomical imaging methods [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography (US)]. Pathological findings, FDG PET scan during the next menstrual cycle and follow-up images (PET, CT and MRI) were reviewed. To establish the relation of FAOs to the menstrual cycle, we reviewed whole-body FDG PET acquired from 207 consecutive women and the pre-examination questionnaires, including data regarding the menstrual cycle. All spherical or discoid FAOs were attributed to normally developing ovarian follicles and corpora lutea on the basis of concurrent MRI, US or the follow-up PET scan. Three of the FAOs were proved pathologically to be either normal ovaries or a haemorrhagic corpus luteum. Fifteen FAOs spontaneously disappeared on the short-term follow-up PET scans. Of 207 women, 61 had active menstrual cycles. FAOs were found in 12 out of 61 premenopausal women (20%), appearing between the 10th and 25th days of the menstrual cycle. No FAOs were found in the women who did not have a menstrual cycle. Physiological ovarian FDG accumulation could be found around the time of ovulation and during the early luteal phase of the menstrual cycle in premenopausal woman. Since FAO is dependent on the menstrual cycle, it can be avoided by scheduling PET just after menstruation. (orig.)

  1. {sup 18}F-FDG PET: early postoperative period of oro-maxillo-facial flaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, R.M.; Wolf, G.; Sorantin, E. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Graz Univ. (Austria); Schultes, G.; Kaercher, H. [Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Karl-Franzens University Graz (Australia); Yamashita, Y. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2003-10-01

    Aim: We addressed the feasibility of FDG-PET to differentiate between viability and non-viability in the immediate postoperative assessment of flaps (autologous microvascular anastomosed pedicled flaps) in oro-maxillofacial surgery. Methods: 3-7 days after surgery, FDG-PET was done in 38 patients who had received flaps for reconstruction of the mandible after partial resection. The studies were done on a dedicated full ring PET-scanner (ECAT EXACT HR+, Siemens/CTI). Acquisition started between 60 and 80 min post injection. The findings of the tissue component of the flaps were grouped using a three point scale: (I) no defect, (II) small defects, (III) one large defect. The results of PET were compared with the clinical course for at least 3 months. Results: ''No defect'' on the FDG-PET study identified viability of the flap and predicted normal clinical follow-up (22/38 patients). ''Small defects'' visualized areas of decreased perfusion and decreased glucose metabolism indicating risk of non-viability (13/38 patients); adapting the postsurgical management led to delayed but uncomplicated healing of the flaps in these patients. ''One large defect'' demonstrated early necrosis of the flap (3/38 patients). After removal and replacement of this necrotic portion of the flap the second FDG-PET scan of these 3 patients demonstrated the uncomplicated post-operative healing. Conclusion: FDG-PET facilitated the assessment of viability and non viability flaps in the immediate postsurgical period, and demonstrated the usefulness of FDG-PET for postoperative care and prognosis. (orig.)

  2. The value of FDG-PET in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpe, Katrin D.M.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Strobel, Klaus; Romero, Jose; Ziegler, Oliver; Kamel, Ehab M.; Hodler, Juerg

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty and to relate FDG uptake to the location of soft tissue pain. Twenty-eight patients with painful total knee arthroplasty had a clinical examination, standard radiographs, CT measurement of rotation of the femoral component and FDG-PET (18 PET/CT, 10 PET). The diagnosis of infection was based on microbiological examinations of surgical specimens (n=12) or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months (n=16), 99m Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody scintigraphy and joint aspiration. Twenty-seven of 28 patients presented with diffuse synovial FDG uptake. Additional focal extrasynovial FDG uptake was observed in 19 knees. Twenty-four of the 28 patients had a diagnosis of internal femoral malrotation. The remaining four patients showed no rotation (0 ) and 3 , 4 and 7 of external rotation, respectively. Three patients presented with the additional diagnosis of an infected total knee replacement. Pain was described as diffuse (n=10) or focal (n=18). In two knees a relationship between pain location and FDG uptake was observed. Of ten patients with a severe internal femoral component rotation (>6 ), seven had focal uptake, four in the femoral periosteum and three in the tibial periosteum. The difference between knees with severe malrotation and the remaining knees was not significant (p=1.000, Fisher's Exact Test). Diffuse synovial and focal extrasynovial FDG-PET uptake is commonly found in patients with malrotation of the femoral component and is not related to pain location. The information provided by FDG-PET does not contribute to the diagnosis and management of individual patients with persistent pain after total knee replacement. (orig.)

  3. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X.; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Dalen, Jorn A. van; Verstappen, Suzan M.M.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-eight head-and-neck cancer patients underwent coregistered CT- and FDG-PET scans. Lymph nodes were classified as 'enlarged' if the shortest axial diameter on CT was ≥10 mm, and as 'marginally enlarged' if it was 7-10 mm. Subsequently, lymph nodes were assessed on FDG-PET applying eight segmentation methods: visual interpretation (PET VIS ), applying fixed thresholds at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 and at 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity of the primary tumor (PET SUV , PET 40% , PET 50% ) and applying a variable threshold based on the signal-to-background ratio (PET SBR ). Finally, PET 40%N , PET 50%N and PET SBRN were acquired using the signal of the lymph node as the threshold reference. Results: Of 108 nodes classified as 'enlarged' on CT, 75% were also identified by PET VIS , 59% by PET 40% , 43% by PET 50% and 43% by PET SBR . Of 100 nodes classified as 'marginally enlarged', only a minority were visualized by FDG-PET. The respective numbers were 26%, 10%, 7% and 8% for PET VIS , PET 40% , PET 50% and PET SBR . PET 40%N , PET 50%N and PET SBRN , respectively, identified 66%, 82% and 96% of the PET VIS -positive nodes. Conclusions: Many lymph nodes that are enlarged and considered metastatic by standard CT-based criteria appear to be negative on FDG-PET scan. Alternately, a small proportion of marginally enlarged nodes are positive on FDG-PET scan. However, the results are largely dependent on the PET segmentation tool used, and until proper validation FDG-PET is not recommended for target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in routine practice.

  4. Simultaneous hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate MRI and 18F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E.; Henriksen, Sarah T.

    2015-01-01

    corresponded to high 18F-FDG uptake on PET. This is in agreement with the fact that glycolysis and production of lactate are increased in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Yet, most interestingly, also in the muscle of the forepaw of the dog high 18F-FDG uptake was observed. This was due to activity...... between causes of increased glucose uptake. We propose that this new concept of simultaneous hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate MRSI and PET may be highly valuable for image-based non-invasive phenotyping of tumors. This methods may be useful for treatment planning and therapy monitoring....

  5. Persistent non-specific FDG uptake on PET imaging following hip arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Hongming; Chacko, Thomas K.; Hickeson, Marc; Stevenson, Karen; Feng, Qi; Ponzo, Fabio; Alavi, Abass [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, The Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, 110 Donner Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Garino, Jonathan P. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19802 (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Hip arthroplasty is a common surgical procedure, but the diagnosis of infection associated with hip arthroplasty remains challenging. Fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been shown to be a promising imaging modality in settings where infection is suspected. However, inflammatory reaction to surgery can result in increased FDG uptake at various anatomic locations, which may erroneously be interpreted as sites of infection. The purpose of this study was to assess the patterns and time course of FDG accumulation following total hip replacement over an extended period of time. Firstly, in a prospective study nine patients with total hip replacement were investigated to determine the patterns of FDG uptake over time. Three FDG-PET scans were performed in each patient at about 3, 6 and 12 months post arthroplasty. Secondly, in a retrospective analysis, the medical and surgical history and FDG-PET imaging results of 710 patients who had undergone whole-body scans for the evaluation of possible malignant disorders were reviewed. The history of arthroplasty and FDG-PET findings in the hip region were reviewed for this study. Patients with symptomatic arthroplasties or related complaints during FDG-PET scanning were excluded from the analysis. During the entire study period, all nine patients enrolled in the prospective study were demonstrated to have increased FDG uptake around the femoral head or neck portion of the prosthesis that extended to the soft tissues surrounding the femur. Among the patients reviewed in the retrospective study, 18 patients with a history of 21 hip arthroplasties who were asymptomatic at the time of FDG-PET scan met the criteria for inclusion. The time interval between the hip arthroplasty and the FDG-PET study ranged from 3 months to 288 months (mean{+-}SD: 80.4{+-}86.2 months). In 81% (17 of 21) of these prostheses, increased FDG uptake could be noted around the femoral head or neck portion of the

  6. Persistent non-specific FDG uptake on PET imaging following hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Hongming; Chacko, Thomas K.; Hickeson, Marc; Stevenson, Karen; Feng, Qi; Ponzo, Fabio; Alavi, Abass; Garino, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty is a common surgical procedure, but the diagnosis of infection associated with hip arthroplasty remains challenging. Fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been shown to be a promising imaging modality in settings where infection is suspected. However, inflammatory reaction to surgery can result in increased FDG uptake at various anatomic locations, which may erroneously be interpreted as sites of infection. The purpose of this study was to assess the patterns and time course of FDG accumulation following total hip replacement over an extended period of time. Firstly, in a prospective study nine patients with total hip replacement were investigated to determine the patterns of FDG uptake over time. Three FDG-PET scans were performed in each patient at about 3, 6 and 12 months post arthroplasty. Secondly, in a retrospective analysis, the medical and surgical history and FDG-PET imaging results of 710 patients who had undergone whole-body scans for the evaluation of possible malignant disorders were reviewed. The history of arthroplasty and FDG-PET findings in the hip region were reviewed for this study. Patients with symptomatic arthroplasties or related complaints during FDG-PET scanning were excluded from the analysis. During the entire study period, all nine patients enrolled in the prospective study were demonstrated to have increased FDG uptake around the femoral head or neck portion of the prosthesis that extended to the soft tissues surrounding the femur. Among the patients reviewed in the retrospective study, 18 patients with a history of 21 hip arthroplasties who were asymptomatic at the time of FDG-PET scan met the criteria for inclusion. The time interval between the hip arthroplasty and the FDG-PET study ranged from 3 months to 288 months (mean±SD: 80.4±86.2 months). In 81% (17 of 21) of these prostheses, increased FDG uptake could be noted around the femoral head or neck portion of the

  7. Additive value of amyloid-PET in routine cases of clinical dementia work-up after FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendel, Matthias; Schnabel, Jonas; Wagner, Leonie; Brendel, Eva; Meyer-Wilmes, Johanna; Unterrainer, Marcus [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schoenecker, Sonja; Prix, Catharina; Ackl, Nibal [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Schildan, Andreas; Patt, Marianne; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Catak, Cihan [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Munich (Germany); Pogarell, Oliver [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Psychiatry, Munich (Germany); Levin, Johannes; Danek, Adrian [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Munich (Germany); Buerger, Katharina [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Munich (Germany); DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Munich (Germany); Bartenstein, Peter; Rominger, Axel [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    In recent years, several [{sup 18}F]-labeled amyloid-PET tracers have been developed and have obtained clinical approval. Despite their widespread scientific use, studies in routine clinical settings are limited. We therefore investigated the impact of [{sup 18}F]-florbetaben (FBB)-PET on the diagnostic management of patients with suspected dementia that was still unclarified after [{sup 18}F]-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. All subjects were referred in-house with a suspected dementia syndrome due to neurodegenerative disease. After undergoing an FDG-PET exam, the cases were discussed by the interdisciplinary dementia board, where the most likely diagnosis as well as potential differential diagnoses were documented. Because of persistent diagnostic uncertainty, the patients received an additional FBB-PET exam. Results were interpreted visually and classified as amyloid-positive or amyloid-negative, and we then compared the individual clinical diagnoses before and after additional FBB-PET. A total of 107 patients (mean age 69.4 ± 9.7y) were included in the study. The FBB-PET was rated as amyloid-positive in 65/107. In 83% of the formerly unclear cases, a final diagnosis was reached through FBB-PET, and the most likely prior diagnosis was changed in 28% of cases. The highest impact was observed for distinguishing Alzheimer's dementia (AD) from fronto-temporal dementia (FTLD), where FBB-PET altered the most likely diagnosis in 41% of cases. FBB-PET has a high additive value in establishing a final diagnosis in suspected dementia cases when prior investigations such as FDG-PET are inconclusive. The differentiation between AD and FTLD was particularly facilitated by amyloid-PET, predicting a considerable impact on patient management, especially in the light of upcoming disease-modifying therapies. (orig.)

  8. Benign and malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin on FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, M. J.; Go, D. H.; Yoo, Y. H.; Shin, K. H.; Lee, J. D [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The differentiation between benign and malignant nerve sheath tumors is difficult based on conventional radiological imaging. This study was undertaken to investigate the value of FDG PET in distinguishing benign from malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin. We performed a retrospective review of the medical record to select patients with nerve sheath tumors who had underdone FDG PET imaging. Fifteen patients (7F: 8M) with benign or malignant nerve sheath tumors were included in this study. Of the 15 patients, 9 were diagnosed with the known neurofibromatosis type I. A total of 19 nerve sheath tumors were included from the 15 patients. All patients had undergone FDG PET to evaluate for malignant potential of the known lesions. Images of FDG PET were semi-quantitatively analyzed and a region of interest (ROI) was placed over the area of the maximum FDG uptake and an average standardized uptake value was taken for final analysis. There were 5 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 5 schwannomas, and 9 neurofibromas. The mean SUV was 2 (ranged from 1.6 to 3.3) for schwannomas, 1.3 (0.7 to 2.5) for neurofibromas, and 8.4 (4.6 to 12.2) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of 14 benign tumors, all except one schwannoma showed a SUV less than 3. When a cutoff SUV of 4 was used to differentiate the nerve sheath tumors, all tumors were correctly classified as benign or malignant, respectively. Among the 9 patients diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type I. 4 had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and FDG PET accurately detected all the 4 lesions with malignant transformation. According to our results, FDG PET seems to have a great potential for accurately characterizing benign versus malignant nerve sheath tumors. It appears to be extremely useful for patients with neurofibromatosis to localize the lesion with malignant transformation.

  9. Benign and malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin on FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, M. J.; Go, D. H.; Yoo, Y. H.; Shin, K. H.; Lee, J. D

    2004-01-01

    The differentiation between benign and malignant nerve sheath tumors is difficult based on conventional radiological imaging. This study was undertaken to investigate the value of FDG PET in distinguishing benign from malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin. We performed a retrospective review of the medical record to select patients with nerve sheath tumors who had underdone FDG PET imaging. Fifteen patients (7F: 8M) with benign or malignant nerve sheath tumors were included in this study. Of the 15 patients, 9 were diagnosed with the known neurofibromatosis type I. A total of 19 nerve sheath tumors were included from the 15 patients. All patients had undergone FDG PET to evaluate for malignant potential of the known lesions. Images of FDG PET were semi-quantitatively analyzed and a region of interest (ROI) was placed over the area of the maximum FDG uptake and an average standardized uptake value was taken for final analysis. There were 5 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 5 schwannomas, and 9 neurofibromas. The mean SUV was 2 (ranged from 1.6 to 3.3) for schwannomas, 1.3 (0.7 to 2.5) for neurofibromas, and 8.4 (4.6 to 12.2) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of 14 benign tumors, all except one schwannoma showed a SUV less than 3. When a cutoff SUV of 4 was used to differentiate the nerve sheath tumors, all tumors were correctly classified as benign or malignant, respectively. Among the 9 patients diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type I. 4 had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and FDG PET accurately detected all the 4 lesions with malignant transformation. According to our results, FDG PET seems to have a great potential for accurately characterizing benign versus malignant nerve sheath tumors. It appears to be extremely useful for patients with neurofibromatosis to localize the lesion with malignant transformation

  10. Prediction of standard-dose brain PET image by using MRI and low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jiayin [School of Electronics Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang, Jiangsu 222005, China and IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Gao, Yaozong [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shi, Feng [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lalush, David S. [Joint UNC-NCSU Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Lin, Weili [MRI Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technology that produces 3D images reflecting tissue metabolic activity in human body. PET has been widely used in various clinical applications, such as in diagnosis of brain disorders. High-quality PET images play an essential role in diagnosing brain diseases/disorders. In practice, in order to obtain high-quality PET images, a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) needs to be used and injected into a living body. As a result, it will inevitably increase the patient’s exposure to radiation. One solution to solve this problem is predicting standard-dose PET images using low-dose PET images. As yet, no previous studies with this approach have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, the authors propose a regression forest based framework for predicting a standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by using a low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image and its corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. Methods: The authors employ a regression forest for predicting the standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET and MRI images. Specifically, the proposed method consists of two main steps. First, based on the segmented brain tissues (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter) in the MRI image, the authors extract features for each patch in the brain image from both low-dose PET and MRI images to build tissue-specific models that can be used to initially predict standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images. Second, an iterative refinement strategy, via estimating the predicted image difference, is used to further improve the prediction accuracy. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm on a brain dataset, consisting of 11 subjects with MRI, low-dose PET, and standard-dose PET images, using leave-one-out cross-validations. The proposed algorithm gives promising results with well-estimated standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET

  11. Prediction of standard-dose brain PET image by using MRI and low-dose brain [18F]FDG PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jiayin; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technology that produces 3D images reflecting tissue metabolic activity in human body. PET has been widely used in various clinical applications, such as in diagnosis of brain disorders. High-quality PET images play an essential role in diagnosing brain diseases/disorders. In practice, in order to obtain high-quality PET images, a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) needs to be used and injected into a living body. As a result, it will inevitably increase the patient’s exposure to radiation. One solution to solve this problem is predicting standard-dose PET images using low-dose PET images. As yet, no previous studies with this approach have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, the authors propose a regression forest based framework for predicting a standard-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET image by using a low-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET image and its corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. Methods: The authors employ a regression forest for predicting the standard-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET image by low-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET and MRI images. Specifically, the proposed method consists of two main steps. First, based on the segmented brain tissues (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter) in the MRI image, the authors extract features for each patch in the brain image from both low-dose PET and MRI images to build tissue-specific models that can be used to initially predict standard-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET images. Second, an iterative refinement strategy, via estimating the predicted image difference, is used to further improve the prediction accuracy. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm on a brain dataset, consisting of 11 subjects with MRI, low-dose PET, and standard-dose PET images, using leave-one-out cross-validations. The proposed algorithm gives promising results with well-estimated standard-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET image and substantially

  12. Neurolymphomatosis on F 18 FDG PET/CT and MRI Findings: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Chae Moon; Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Hong Je; Song, Bong Il; Kim, Hae Won; Kang, Sungmin; Jeong, Shin Young; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jaetae; Chae, Yee Soo [Kyungpook National Univ. Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Neurolymphomatosis is a rare manifestation of malignant lymphoma. A 74 year old man, in complete remission from diffuse large B cell lymphoma, presented with a loss of pain and temperature sensation in the left hemiface and left upper extremity, and motor weakness in the left upper and both lower extremities. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were negative. Combined fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) revealed multiple linear hypermetabolic lesions along the mandibular branch of the left trigeminal nerve, left brachial plexus, right adrenal gland, right femoral nerve, and both sciatic nerves, which corresponded to the patient's complex neurologic symptoms. C spine and pelvic MRI revealed diffuse thickening with enhancement in the left sciatic nerve, but negative findings for other sites identified by FDG PET/CT. These findings for other sites identified by FDG PET/CT. These findings suggest that FDG PET/CT can detect peripheral nerve infiltration by malignant lymphoma earlier than MRI. Thus, if a patient with a history of lymphoma presents with neurologic symptoms, FDG PET/CT should be performed to evaluate neurolymphomatosis.

  13. Demonstrations of AIDS-associated malignancies and infections at FDG PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.

    2011-01-01

    HIV infection results in profound alterations of immunologic function that render the patient severely immunocompromised, and susceptible to malignancies and opportunistic infections. Three AIDS-defining malignancies include Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and invasive cervical cancer. In AIDS patients, KS is often aggressive and multifocal, with visceral involvement and widespread cutaneous and nodal spread; NHL is always high grade and often widely disseminated at the time of diagnosis with frequent involvement of extranodal sites; cervical cancer is invasive and has greater likelihood of progression and metastasis. Although there are very sparse systemic data available in the literature, limited studies has shown that fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis, staging, restaging and monitoring therapeutic response in these malignancies. In addition, a unique application of FDG PET/CT is the differentiation of cerebral lesions between lymphoma and toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients, which cannot be reliably achieved with either CT or MRI. HIV-associated opportunistic infections may involve different pathogens and multiple tissues, organs or systems. Some preliminary observations have revealed a promising role of FDG PET-CT in the diagnosis and identification of these infections such as tuberculosis, fever of unknown origin, pneumocystis pneumonia and candidiasis. However, it should be stressed that FDG PET-CT alone has no role in identifying the pathology of abnormalities. FDG PET-CT, at best, can localize the sites of abnormalities and impact on patient's management in clinical decision making. (author)

  14. [Study of patients with prolonged fever with (18)F-FDG PET/CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moragas, M; Cozar, M Puig; Buxeda, M; Soler, M; Riera, E; García, J R

    2015-01-01

    To review the findings on (18)F-FDG PET-CT in patients with fever of unknown origin lasting more than 7 days. This retrospective descriptive observational study included 93 (18)F-FDG PET-CT studies to detect a fever-causing focus done at three nuclear medicine centers from October 2006 through February 2014. A nuclear medicine specialist and a radiologist reviewed the images for foci of pathological uptake; another specialist's opinion resolved discrepancies. The findings on (18)F-FDG PET-CT studies were checked against clinical and/or histological findings. Abnormal (18)F-FDG uptake on PET-CT that could explain the cause of the fever was found in 52 (56%) of the 93 studies, and the cause of the fever was confirmed in 50 of these 52 studies. In the 50 cases in which the cause of the fever was confirmed, infection was the most common cause (54%), followed by noninfectious inflammatory disease (28%) and tumors (18%). (18)F-FDG PET-CT is useful in diagnosing the cause of prolonged febrile illness, so it might be practical to use it earlier in the diagnostic process. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlation of PET and AMS analyses for early kinetics of 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo, E-mail: ryogom@yokohama-cu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama (Japan); Hamabe, Yoshimi; Miyaoka, Teiji [Institute of Accelerator Analysis (IAA) Ltd., Kawasaki (Japan); Theeraladanon, Chumpol; Oka, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama (Japan); Matsui, Takao [Institute of Accelerator Analysis (IAA) Ltd., Kawasaki (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    The draft of the guidelines for microdosing in clinical trials was published in Japan in 2008 following the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It recommends utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring drug metabolites in preclinical studies. In this study, we clarified the correlation in measuring result between PET and AMS. The AMS measurement was undergone by using AMS system of Institute of Accelerator Analysis Ltd. (IAA, Kawasaki, Japan). First the back ground {sup 14}C level of blood in mice was measured by AMS. Second, we clarified the relationship between AMS and PET by using 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). The correlation coefficient (r) of the measurements using PET ({sup 18}F-FDG) and AMS ({sup 14}C-FDG) were quite high at 0.97 (Y = 7.54E - 05X + 0.02, p < 0.001). The blood clearance profile of {sup 18}F-FDG was nearly identical with that of {sup 14}C-FDG. These results indicate that the AMS analysis has excellent correlation with the PET method.

  16. {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT Findings in a Breast Cancer Patient with Concomitant Tuberculous Axillary Lymphadenitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won [Jeju National Univ. Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Mi [Soonchunhyang Univ. Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Hyuck [Jeju National Univ. School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Although {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18F} FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive modality for detecting a malignant lesion, increased {sup 18F} FDG uptake is also seen in infected or inflammatory processes. Here, we report the case of a a breast cancer patient with concomitant tuberculous axillary lymphadenitis that showed increased {sup 18F} FDG uptake. A 39 year old woman underwent preoperative {sup 18F} FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) as a part of the work up for right breast cancer. {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT images showed a malignant lesion in the right breast with moderate {sup 18F} FDG uptake, and multiple enlarged right axillary lymph nodes with intense {sup 18F} FDG uptake. Subsequently, the patient underwent right mastectomy and right axillary lymph node dissection. Histopathological examination confirmed breast cancer and tuberculous lymphadenitis, and the patient was treated concomitantly with anti tuberculous therapy.

  17. Using simultaneous PET/MRI to compare the accuracy of diagnosing frontotemporal dementia by arterial spin labelling MRI and FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udunna C. Anazodo

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrated that ASL can detect similar spatial patterns of abnormalities in individual FTD patients compared to FDG-PET, but its sensitivity and specificity for discriminant diagnosis of a patient from healthy individuals remained unmatched to FDG-PET. Further studies at the individual level are required to confirm the clinical role of ASL in FTD management.

  18. FDG avidity and PET/CT patterns in primary gastric lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radan, Lea [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Fischer, Doron [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Haifa (Israel); Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Israel, Ora [Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rambam Health Care Campus and R. and B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Dann, Eldad J. [Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Hematology, Rambam Health Care Campus, and R. and B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Epelbaum, Ron; Haim, Nissim [Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Oncology, Rambam Health Care Campus, and R. and B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Gaitini, Diana [Rambam Health Care Campus, and R. and B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Haifa (Israel)

    2008-08-15

    The use of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in primary gastric lymphoma (PGL) is challenging due to physiologic FDG activity in the stomach and variability in the degree of uptake in various histologic subtypes. This study assesses FDG avidity and PET/CT patterns in newly diagnosed PGL. Sixty-two PET/CT studies of newly diagnosed PGL were reviewed (24 low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue [MALT], 38 aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [AGNHL]). FDG avidity, patterns (focal/diffuse), and intensity (visually vs. the liver and SUVmax) were assessed and compared to 27 controls. Gastric CT abnormalities and extragastric sites were recorded. Gastric FDG uptake was found in 55/62 (89%) PGL (71% MALT vs. 100% AGNHL, p < 0.001) and 63% controls. A diffuse pattern was found in 60% PGL (76% MALT vs. 53% AGNHL, p = NS) and 47% controls. FDG uptake higher than liver was found in 82% PGL (58% MALT vs. 97% AGNHL, p < 0.05) and 63% controls. SUVmax in FDG-avid PGLs was 15.3 {+-} 11.7 (5.4 {+-} 2.9 MALT vs. 19.7 {+-} 11.5 AGNHL, p < 0.001) and 4.6 {+-} 1.4 in controls. CT abnormalities were found in 79% PGL (thickening, n = 49; ulcerations, n = 22). Extra-gastric FDG-avid sites were seen in none of MALT, but 61% of AGNHL (nodal, n = 18; nodal and extranodal, n = 5). FDG avidity was present in 89% of PGLs, including all patients with AGNHL but only 71% of MALT. FDG uptake can be differentiated, in particular in AGNHL-PGL, from physiologic tracer activity by intensity but not by pattern. Extragastric foci on PET and structural CT abnormalities are additional parameters that can improve PET/CT assessment of PGL. Defining FDG avidity and PET/CT patterns in AGNHL and a subgroup of MALT-PGL before treatment may be important for further monitoring therapy response. (orig.)

  19. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Span, P.N.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Merkx, M.A.W.; Slootweg, P.J.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume

  20. FDG-PET imaging in HIV-infected subjects: relation with therapy and immunovirological variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Orunesu, Eva; Cesari, Miriam; Marzo, Katia; Chiti, Arturo; Pacei, Michela; Bechi, Giulia; Gori, Andrea; Gaito, Sabrina; Clerici, Mario

    2009-01-01

    To characterise tissue sites of immune activation and HIV replication we performed FDG-PET in ART-treated and ART-naive HIV-infected individuals. Specific aims were to establish whether HIV-infected patients can be differentiated on the basis of the detection of specific locations of viral replication, even in the presence of an apparently optimal immunovirological response to ART, and whether these FDG-PET findings can be related to immunovirological variables and AIDS history status. Patients were divided into five groups as follows: subgroup A1 (full responders, n=8): current ART treatment, CD4+ T lymphocytes >500/mL, viral load 50,000 copies/mL; group C (ART-naive, n=5): no current or previous ART treatment, increased viral load. PET images revealed different patterns of FDG uptake. All ART-treated patients with either suppressed (<50 copies/mL; Group A) or high viremia (group B) showed a normal pattern of FDG uptake. On the contrary, the ART-naive subjects with high viraemia (group C) displayed multiple foci of increased glucose metabolism in the lymph nodes. In the ART-naive subjects, FDG uptake, apparently related to viraemia level, was observed in the upper torso mainly in the axillary nodes bilaterally in patients with viraemia below 100,000 copies/mL; in those with viraemia higher than 100,000 copies/mL, FDG uptake was also observed in the inguinal lymph nodes. The emergence, in our study, of a correlation between the percentage of CD8+/CD38+/RO+ T cells (well established markers of progression to AIDS independently of CD4+ T lymphocytes) and positive FDG-PET in ART-naive patients is a novel finding that seems to confer prognostic value on FDG uptake. FDG uptake is strongly associated with response to ART independently of a previous AIDS diagnosis. Notably, no differences were observed between ART-treated subjects classed as immunological responders and those classed as non responders. Data herewith indicate that FDG uptake and immunological variables are

  1. Impact of FDG-PET on lung cancer delineation for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morarji, Kavita; Fowler, Allan; Vinod, Shalini K.; Shon, Ivan Ho; Laurence, Jerome M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of fused diagnostic F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and planning FDG-PET/CT scans on voluming of lung cancer for radiotherapy. Five radiation oncologists (ROs), five radiation oncology trainees and a radiologist contoured five cases of non-small cell lung cancer. The CT alone, the diagnostic FDG-PET/CT and planning FDG-PET/CT each registered to the CT, were used to contour three volumes. The concordance index (CI) was used to compare each volume with a reference RO. Although there was considerable inter-observer variability in CT contouring, there was no significant difference between mean volumes of the gross tumour volume for the RO and radiation oncology trainees using any technique. There was no increase in CI with the addition of PET/CT, either diagnostic or planning, for the RO. However, the volumes of the radiation oncology trainees showed a significant increase in CI from 65.8% with CT alone to 68.0% and 72.3% with diagnostic PET/CT and planning PET/CT, respectively (P = 0.028). Mean variation at the tumour/mediastinum interface was significantly reduced with addition of registered PET/CT. The concordance of RO with the reference RO did not significantly increase with use of integrated FDG PET/CT images. However, the contouring of radiation oncology trainees' became more concordant with the reference.

  2. Defining optimal tracer activities in pediatric oncologic whole-body18F-FDG-PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schäfer, Jürgen F

    2016-12-01

    To explore the feasibility of reducing administered tracer activities and to assess optimal activities for combined 18 F-FDG-PET/MRI in pediatric oncology. 30 18 F-FDG-PET/MRI examinations were performed on 24 patients with known or suspected solid tumors (10 girls, 14 boys, age 12 ± 5.6 [1-18] years; PET scan duration: 4 min per bed position). Low-activity PET images were retrospectively simulated from the originally acquired data sets using randomized undersampling of list mode data. PET data of different simulated administered activities (0.25-2.5 MBq/kg body weight) were reconstructed with or without point spread function (PSF) modeling. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV mean and SUV max ) as well as SUV variation (SUV var ) were measured in physiologic organs and focal FDG-avid lesions. Detectability of organ structures and of focal 18 F-FDG-avid lesions as well as the occurrence of false-positive PET lesions were assessed at different simulated tracer activities. Subjective image quality steadily declined with decreasing tracer activities. Compared to the originally acquired data sets, mean relative deviations of SUV mean and SUV max were below 5 % at 18 F-FDG activities of 1.5 MBq/kg or higher. Over 95 % of anatomic structures and all pathologic focal lesions were detectable at 1.5 MBq/kg 18 F-FDG. Detectability of anatomic structures and focal lesions was significantly improved using PSF. No false-positive focal lesions were observed at tracer activities of 1 MBq/kg 18 F-FDG or higher. Administration of 18 F-FDG activities of 1.5 MBq/kg is, thus, feasible without obvious diagnostic shortcomings, which is equivalent to a dose reduction of more than 50 % compared to current recommendations. Significant reduction in administered 18 F-FDG tracer activities is feasible in pediatric oncologic PET/MRI. Appropriate activities of 18 F-FDG or other tracers for specific clinical questions have to be further established in selected patient

  3. Clarifying the diagnosis of clinically suspected recurrence of cervical cancer: impact of 18F-FDG PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veldt, Astrid A. M.; Buist, Marrije R.; van Baal, Marchien W.; Comans, Emile F.; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Molthoff, Carla F. M.

    2008-01-01

    Clarifying the diagnosis of clinically suspected recurrence of cervical cancer can be challenging. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical value of (18)F-FDG PET in this context. The medical records of a cohort of 40 (18)F-FDG PET referrals in whom recurrence of cervical cancer was

  4. The Use of F-18-FDG-PET/CT for Diagnosis and Treatment Monitoring of Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; de Vries, Erik F. J.; Galli, Filippo; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Signore, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    FDG-PET, combined with CT, is nowadays getting more and more relevant for the diagnosis of several infectious and inflammatory diseases and particularly for therapy monitoring. Thus, this paper gives special attention to the role of FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of infectious

  5. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight

  6. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Mathilde; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the clinical picture and imaging on (18)F-FDG PET/CT mimicked malignant lymphoma. Follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan in the patient performed 7 weeks after...

  7. 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings Following Repeated Intramuscular Injections of "Site Enhancement Oil" in the Upper Extremities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejanović, Danijela; Loft, Annika

    2017-01-01

    We present the findings on F-FDG PET/CT in a 50-year-old man known to self-administer intramuscular injections with site enhancement oil in the upper extremities. PET images show diffuse pathological high FDG uptake in soft tissue of the upper arms and in scanned portions of the forearms. On the CT...

  8. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; Diender, Marije G.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Draaisma, Jos M. Th.; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed

  9. (18) F-FDG PET/CT for planning external beam radiotherapy alters therapy in 11% of 581 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Loft-Jakobsen, Annika; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per

    2018-01-01

    of the radiotherapy planning. 'A major change of treatment strategy' was defined as either including more lesions in the gross tumour volume (GTV) distant from the primary tumour or a change in treatment modalities. METHODS: The study includes 581 consecutive patients who underwent an FDG PET/CT scan for radiotherapy...... GTV (GTV-PET). RESULTS: For 63 of the patients (11%), the PET/CT simulation scans resulted in a major change in treatment strategy because of the additional diagnostic information. Changes were most frequently observed in patients with lung cancer (20%) or upper gastrointestinal cancer (12%). In 65......BACKGROUND: (18) F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) used in radiotherapy planning for extra-cerebral malignancy may reveal metastases to distant sites that may affect the choice of therapy. AIM: To investigate the role of FDG PET/CT on treatment strategy changes induced by the use of PET/CT as part...

  10. FDG PET/CT in Initial Staging of Adult Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roberge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft-tissue sarcomas spread predominantly to the lung and it is unclear how often FDG-PET scans will detect metastases not already obvious by chest CT scan or clinical examination. Adult limb and body wall soft-tissue sarcoma cases were identified retrospectively. Ewing’s sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, GIST, desmoid tumors, visceral tumors, bone tumors, and retroperitoneal sarcomas were excluded as were patients imaged for followup, response assessment, or recurrence. All patients had a diagnostic chest CT scan. 109 patients met these criteria, 87% of which had intermediate or high-grade tumors. The most common pathological diagnoses were leiomyosarcoma (17%, liposarcoma (17%, and undifferentiated or pleomorphic sarcoma (16%. 98% of previously unresected primary tumors were FDG avid. PET scans were negative for distant disease in 91/109 cases. The negative predictive value was 89%. Fourteen PET scans were positive. Of these, 6 patients were already known to have metastases, 3 were false positives, and 5 represented new findings of metastasis (positive predictive value 79%. In total, 5 patients were upstaged by FDG-PET (4.5%. Although PET scans may be of use in specific circumstances, routine use of FDG PET imaging as part of the initial staging of soft-tissue sarcomas was unlikely to alter management in our series.

  11. High impact of FDG-PET/CT in diagnostic strategies for ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zytoon, Ashraf Anas [Radiology Dept., Faculty of Medicine, Menoufiya Univ. (Egypt); PET Center, Dokkyo Medical Univ. (Japan)], e-mail: ashradio@gmail.com; Murakami, Koji [PET Center, Dokkyo Medical Univ. (Japan); Eid, Hazem; El-Gammal, Mahmoud [Medical Imaging Sciences and Biostatistics Dept.s, Al-Ghad International Coll.s of Health Sciences (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic malignancies. FDG-PET/CT was proven to be accurate for identification of primary ovarian tumors, regional lymph nodes, and distant metastases. Purpose: To evaluate ovarian masses at FDG-PET/CT in correlation with histopathologic findings. Material and Methods: Ninety-eight patients underwent whole body FDG-PET/CT examination. Eighty-six patients with primary ovarian cancer and 12 patients with metastatic disease to the ovaries were included. Results: PET/CT imaging was true-positive in 87/94 patients with malignant tumors. In 4/4 patients with benign tumors, PET/CT results were true-negative, with sensitivity of 92.6%, specificity 100%, total test accuracy 92.9%. Fifty-seven patients were diagnosed as stage IV ovarian cancer with distant metastasis. Conclusion: The anatomical/functional examination by FDG-PET/CT was proven to be valuable in increasing the diagnostic accuracy that can help improve patient management.

  12. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J.E. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vos, Fidel J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssen, Marcel J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Dijk, Arie P.J. van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was 39 % and specificity was 93 %. The positive predictive value was 64 % and negative predictive value was 82 %. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18 %, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50 % (p = 0.181). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies. (orig.)

  13. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J.E.; Vos, Fidel J.; Janssen, Marcel J.R.; Dijk, Arie P.J. van; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. 18 F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with 18 F-FDG PET/CT was 39 % and specificity was 93 %. The positive predictive value was 64 % and negative predictive value was 82 %. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased 18 F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18 %, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high 18 F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50 % (p = 0.181). 18 F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies. (orig.)

  14. Clinical characteristics of elastofibroma dorsi incidentally detected on FDG-PET/CT for a thoracic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hidenori; Higa, Noboru; Yohena, Tomofumi

    2011-01-01

    When elastofibroma dorsi with FDG accumulation is found by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in patients with a malignant tumor, its differentiation from a metastasis seems to be a difficult and critical problem. As there are few reports on FDG-PET for elastofibroma dorsi, we reviewed those cases of elastofibroma dorsi which were incidentally discovered on FDG-PET/CT. We retrospectively reviewed 306 patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of a lung or mediastinal tumor, and in whom elastofibroma dorsi was detected, and analyzed their clinical characteristics. Elastofibroma dorsi was detected in 16 of the 306 cases (5.2%); 10 of whom were women and 6 were men. Age ranged from 55 to 82 years, with an average of 71.6 years. Woman were predominant among the patients with elastofibroma dorsi, compared with patients without a tumor (p=0.0177). Elderly patients were also predominant among the patients with elastofibroma dorsi, compared with patients without a tumor, but the difference was not significant (p=0.0587). The accumulation of FDG was observed in 8 of the 16 cases (15 of 31 tumors). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) ranged from 2.0 to 2.9, with an average of 2.3, among those cases in which the SUVmax was evaluated. Although elastofibroma is rare, it is important for physicians to know that some elastofibromas exhibit FDG accumulation on PET. This knowledge may help to prevent unnecessary biopsies or surgical interventions, and also prevent excessive anxiety in patients with elastofibroma dorsi. (author)

  15. Solitary pulmonary nodules: cost-savings indicated by Australian experience with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, C.J.; Miles, K.A.; Pitman, A.G.; Hicks, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: To date, decision tree analyses demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of PET in Australia have been constrained by the need to use overseas values for diagnostic performance and disease prevalence. This study uses Australian PET experience to estimate the cost-savings produced by incorporation of FDG-PET into diagnostic algorithms for characterisation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Values for disease prevalence and diagnostic accuracy of PET from a combined series of 89 SPNs from the Wesley Hospital and Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute were applied to two previously published decision tree models. Procedure costs were derived from the Medicare Benefits Schedule and DRG Cost Weights for Australian public hospitals. A cost of $1200 was assigned to PET. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of disease prevalence and PET cost on the cost savings produced by each strategy. The values for disease prevalence (0.54), PET sensitivity (92%) and specificity (95%) from the combined series indicated cost savings per patient of $774 and $554 for the two decision trees. PET would remain cost-saving for values of prevalence up to 0.90 and 0.76, and PET costs of $1974 and $1967, for each model respectively. FDG-PET evaluation of SPNs would produce cost-savings within Australia even with substantial variations in disease prevalence and PET costs. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Detection of prostate cancer by an FDG-PET cancer screening program: results from a Japanese nationwide survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Senda, Michio; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Terauchi, Takashi; Inoue, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze detection rates and effectiveness of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) cancer screening program for prostate cancer in Japan, which is defined as a cancer-screening program for subjects without known cancer. It contains FDG-PET aimed at detection of cancer at an early stage with or without additional screening tests such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 92,255 asymptomatic men underwent the FDG-PET cancer screening program. Of these, 504 cases with findings of possible prostate cancer in any screening method were analyzed. Of the 504 cases, 165 were verified as having prostate cancer. Of these, only 61 cases were detected by FDG-PET, which result in 37.0% relative sensitivity and 32.8% positive predictive value (PPV). The sensitivity of PET/computed tomography (CT) scanner was higher than that of dedicated PET (44.0% vs. 20.4%). However, the sensitivity of FDG-PET was lower than that of PSA and pelvic MRI. FDG-PET did not contribute to improving the sensitivity and PPV when performed as combined screening. PSA should be included in FDG-PET cancer screening programs to screen for prostate cancer

  17. Diagnostic and prognostic correlates of preoperative FDG PET for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Everaert, Hendrik; Lamote, Jan; Voordeckers, Mia; van Parijs, Hilde; Vanhoeij, Marian; Verfaillie, Guy; Fontaine, Christel; Vees, Hansjoerg; Ratib, Osman; Vlastos, Georges; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-10-01

    To explore the preoperative utility of FDG PET for the diagnosis and prognosis in a retrospective breast cancer case series. In this retrospective study, 104 patients who had undergone a preoperative FDG PET scan for primary breast cancer at the UZ Brussel during the period 2002-2008 were identified. Selection criteria were: histological confirmation, FDG PET performed prior to therapy, and breast surgery integrated into the primary therapy plan. Patterns of increased metabolism were recorded according to the involved locations: breast, ipsilateral axillary region, internal mammary chain, or distant organs. The end-point for the survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards was disease-free survival. The contribution of prognostic factors was evaluated using the Akaike information criterion and the Nagelkerke index. PET positivity was associated with age, gender, tumour location, tumour size >2 cm, lymphovascular invasion, oestrogen and progesterone receptor status. Among 63 patients with a negative axillary PET status, 56 (88.9 %) had three or fewer involved nodes, whereas among 41 patients with a positive axillary PET status, 25 (61.0 %) had more than three positive nodes (P < 0.0001). In the survival analysis of preoperative characteristics, PET axillary node positivity was the foremost statistically significant factor associated with decreased disease-free survival (hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI 1.17-6.74). Preoperative PET axillary node positivity identified patients with a higher burden of nodal involvement, which might be important for treatment decisions in breast cancer patients.

  18. Diagnostic and prognostic correlates of preoperative FDG PET for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinh-Hung, Vincent [University of Geneva, Department of Imaging and Medical Information Sciences, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Everaert, Hendrik [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Nuclear Medicine, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Lamote, Jan; Vanhoeij, Marian; Verfaillie, Guy [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Surgery, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Voordeckers, Mia; Parijs, Hilde van; Ridder, Mark de [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Radiotherapy, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Fontaine, Christel [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Medical Oncology UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vees, Hansjoerg; Ratib, Osman [University of Geneva, Department of Imaging and Medical Information Sciences, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Vlastos, Georges [University of Geneva, Department of Surgical Senology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    To explore the preoperative utility of FDG PET for the diagnosis and prognosis in a retrospective breast cancer case series. In this retrospective study, 104 patients who had undergone a preoperative FDG PET scan for primary breast cancer at the UZ Brussel during the period 2002-2008 were identified. Selection criteria were: histological confirmation, FDG PET performed prior to therapy, and breast surgery integrated into the primary therapy plan. Patterns of increased metabolism were recorded according to the involved locations: breast, ipsilateral axillary region, internal mammary chain, or distant organs. The end-point for the survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards was disease-free survival. The contribution of prognostic factors was evaluated using the Akaike information criterion and the Nagelkerke index. PET positivity was associated with age, gender, tumour location, tumour size >2 cm, lymphovascular invasion, oestrogen and progesterone receptor status. Among 63 patients with a negative axillary PET status, 56 (88.9 %) had three or fewer involved nodes, whereas among 41 patients with a positive axillary PET status, 25 (61.0 %) had more than three positive nodes (P < 0.0001). In the survival analysis of preoperative characteristics, PET axillary node positivity was the foremost statistically significant factor associated with decreased disease-free survival (hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI 1.17-6.74). Preoperative PET axillary node positivity identified patients with a higher burden of nodal involvement, which might be important for treatment decisions in breast cancer patients. (orig.)

  19. Whole-body FDG-PET/CT on rheumatoid arthritis of large joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kazuo; Morooka, Miyako; Mitsumoto, Takuya; Kurihara, Kyoko; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuko; Mimori, Akio; Ito, Kimiteru

    2009-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in joint lesions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) reportedly represents the degree of synovial inflammation. Most previous studies have focused on small joints, and the application of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT) (PET/CT) for the evaluation of inflammatory activity in large joints has not been well studied. Eighteen patients with RA underwent FDG-PET/CT. FDG uptake in the knee, hip, carpal, wrist, elbow, shoulder, and atlanto-axial joint (total of 13 joints) and in the axillary lymph nodes was evaluated by calculating the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and the visual uptake scores as follows: 0, no uptake; 1, slight uptake; 2, moderate uptake (same as in liver); 3, higher than in liver; 4, highest uptake. The number of painful/swollen joints, the white blood cell (WBC) count, and the C-reactive protein (CRP) level were also evaluated. Whole-body FDG-PET/CT delineated large-joint lesions in patients with RA, and the metabolic activity of inflammation was accurately overlaid on the joint anatomy. The total FDG score for all 13 joints was significantly correlated with the CRP level (r=0.653, p max and the CRP level were weakly, but not significantly, correlated (r=0.377, p>0.05). The WBC count was not correlated with any other parameter. The mean number of joints per patient with an FDG uptake score of 2 or more was significantly larger than the mean number of painful/swollen joints (6.2±3.3 vs. 3.1±2.7, n=18, p<0.01) and both parameters were strongly correlated (r=0.588, p<0.01, n=18). Also, FDG uptake score and SUV of painful/swollen joints were significantly higher than these of not painful/swollen joints. FDG uptake was significantly different from patients of remission and patients of active arthritis. Uptake in the atlanto-axial joint was observed in five (mostly asymptomatic) patients (5/18, 28%), and the uptake score was significantly correlated

  20. Early clinical experience and impact of 18F-FDG PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    to determine whether and how the results of the FDG PET imaging changed patient management. RESULTS: The response rate was 71% (524 responded). The distribution of all responding physicians included 26 different specialities. The majority were from haematology (23%), oncology (20%), plastic surgery (17......PURPOSE: To determine the influence and impact of [F]- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) in Denmark. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was sent to the referring physicians of 743 consecutive cases between January 2000 and December 2001. The questionnaire was designed......%) and neurology (10%). The primary diagnoses at referral was in the field of oncology (94%), with lymphoma (24%), melanomas (20%), unknown primary neoplasms (13%), nervous system neoplasms (9%), lung cancer (6%) and cancer of the digestive system (4%). FDG PET imaging resulted in a change in the patients...

  1. Feasibility of F-18-FDG PET/CT scan in abdominopelvic regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    F-18-2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan, which simultaneously provides metabolic function and morphology on the same tomographic section, is being the key imaging modality for diagnosis and treatment strategy of makignancies in various organs. FDG PET/CT scanning of the whole body beneficially allows the assessment of primary tumor and regional lymph nodes, and distant metastases and co-existed benign/other malignant lesions, as ''one stop shopping'' fashion. This technique contributes to the selection of the optimal treatment in individual patients, and also can predict histopathologic response to treatment and postoperative/post chemo-radiation therapeutic prognosis. In this paper, we describe the fundamental knowledge required for accurate interpretation of FDG PET/CT scan, and review the utility of this technique for diagnosis and treatment strategy of makignancies in abdominal and pelvic regions. (author)

  2. Diagnosing neuroleukemiosis: Is there a role for 18F-FDG-PET/CT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté-Llobera, A; Cortés-Romera, M; Gamundí-Grimalt, E; Sánchez-Fernández, J J; Rodríguez-Bel, L; Gámez-Cenzano, C

    An imaging case is presented on a patient referred to our department for an 18 F-FDG-PET/CT, as a paraneoplastic syndrome was suspected due to his clinical situation. He had a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated two years earlier, with sustained complete remission to date. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT findings revealed hypermetabolism in almost all nerve roots, suggesting meningeal spread, consistent with the subsequent MRI findings. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings confirmed a leptomeningeal reactivation of AML. Although not many studies have evaluated the role of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT in leukemia, it is a noninvasive tool for detecting extramedullary sites of disease and a good imaging alternative for those patients on whom an MRI cannot be performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. Early clinical experience and impact of 18F-FDG PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    %) and neurology (10%). The primary diagnoses at referral was in the field of oncology (94%), with lymphoma (24%), melanomas (20%), unknown primary neoplasms (13%), nervous system neoplasms (9%), lung cancer (6%) and cancer of the digestive system (4%). FDG PET imaging resulted in a change in the patients...... to determine whether and how the results of the FDG PET imaging changed patient management. RESULTS: The response rate was 71% (524 responded). The distribution of all responding physicians included 26 different specialities. The majority were from haematology (23%), oncology (20%), plastic surgery (17......' management in 224 cases (43%). Of these, surgery was affected in 88 cases. Chemotherapy was affected in 71 cases and radiation therapy in 54 cases. In patients where the intended plan of management was not changed, 78% of the physicians stated that FDG PET was nevertheless clinically helpful; for example...

  4. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p < 0.001). In the WB phase, in contrast, significantly higher FDG accumulation (p < 0.001) was found in RCCs with a higher TNM stage, higher Furman grade, and the presence of V and Ly invasion in both the visual and the semiquantitative evaluations. ED and WB FDG-PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic respiratory gated 18FDG-PET of lung tumors - a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjei Knudtsen, Ingerid; Skretting, Arne; Roedal, Jan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Aaslaug; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Background. 18 FDG-PET/CT imaging is well established for diagnosis and staging of lung tumors. However, more detailed information regarding the distribution of FDG within the tumor, also as a function of time after injection may be relevant. In this study we explore the feasibility of a combined dynamic and respiratory gated (DR) PET protocol. Material and methods. A DR FDG-PET protocol for a Siemens Biograph 16 PET/CT scanner was set up, allowing data acquisition from the time of FDG injection. Breath-hold (BH) respiratory gating was performed at four intervals over a total acquisition time of 50 minutes. Thus, the PET protocol provides both motion-free images and a spatiotemporal characterization of the glucose distribution in lung tumors. Software tools were developed in-house for tentative tumor segmentation and for extracting standard uptake values (SUVs) voxel by voxel, tumor volumes and SUV gradients in all directions. Results. Four pilot patients have been investigated with the DR PET protocol. The procedure was well tolerated by the patients. The BH images appeared sharper, and SUV max /SUV mean was higher, compared to free breathing (FB) images. Also, SUV gradients in the periphery of the tumor in the BH images were in general greater than or equal to the gradients in the FB PET images. Conclusion. The DR FDG-PET protocol is feasible and the BH images have a superior quality compared to the FB images. The protocol may also provide information of relevance for radiotherapy planning and follow-up. A patient trial is needed for assessing the clinical value of the imaging protocol

  6. Detection of recurrent colorectal carcinoma with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.M.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Zalcberg, J.; Fox, R.; Cebon, J.; McLeish, A.; Thomas, D.; Chan, G.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Egan, G.F.; McKay, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The appropriate surgical management of recurrent colorectal carcinoma is dependent on the accurate detection of possible primary site recurrence and distant spread of disease. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the clinical accuracy of 18 F-FDG PET in detecting recurrent colorectal carcinoma. Over a 12-month period we have performed 21 studies in 17 patients (12 M: 5 F, age range 52-73 y) with known or suspected recurrent colorectal carcinoma. All patients underwent PET imaging of the abdomen and pelvis, or whole body imaging, with a whole body PET scanner (Siemens 951/R) following injection of 400 MBq of 18 F-FDG. All PET studies were interpreted with full knowledge of CT findings, and results were compared to subsequent surgical findings, biopsy or follow-up by conventional imaging methods (e.g. CT scan). Of the 21 studies performed, 18 (86%) had abnormal sites of 18 F-FDG uptake; all sites were subsequently confirmed as recurrent colorectal carcinoma. PET identified a total of 30 sites of disease in the pelvis (n = 4), abdomen (n =10), liver (n = 6), thorax (n = 9) and abdominal surgical scar (n 1), and was false negative in one lung lesion. CT scan correctly identified 14 sites as recurrent tumour; 9/12 patients (pts) with equivocal changes on CT scan had recurrent disease identified by PET. In 10 pts with elevated serum CEA but negative or equivocal CT scans, PET correctly identified 8 pts with proven recurrent disease. Previously unsuspected disease was found at six sites by PET. Lesions as small as 1.2 cm proven at surgery were identified with PET. In conclusion, this study shows 18 F-FDG PET to be a promising method for accurate detection of recurrent colorectal carcinoma

  7. Use of FDG PET/CT for investigation of febrile neutropenia: evaluation in high-risk cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, Stephen D.; Tramontana, Adrian R. [Western Health, Department of Infectious Diseases, Private Bag, Footscray, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Worth, Leon J.; Thursky, Karin A.; Slavin, Monica A. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Infectious Diseases, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lau, Eddie; Hicks, Rodney J. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Seymour, John F. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Haematology, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    Febrile neutropenia (FNP) is a frequent complication of cancer care and evaluation often fails to identify a cause. [{sup 18} F]FDG PET/CT has the potential to identify inflammatory and infectious foci, but its potential role as an investigation for persistent FNP has not previously been explored. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in patients with cancer and severe neutropenia and five or more days of persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Adult patients with a diagnosis of an underlying malignancy and persistent FNP (temperature {>=}38 C and neutrophil count <500 cells/{mu}l for 5 days) underwent FDG PET/CT as an adjunct to conventional evaluation and management. The study group comprised 20 patients with FNP who fulfilled the eligibility criteria and underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to conventional evaluation. The median neutrophil count on the day of the FDG PET/CT scan was 30 cells/{mu}l (range 0-730 cells/{mu}l). Conventional evaluation identified 14 distinct sites of infection, 13 (93 %) of which were also identified by FDG PET/CT, including all deep tissue infections. FDG PET/CT identified 9 additional likely infection sites, 8 of which were subsequently confirmed as ''true positives'' by further investigations. FDG PET/CT was deemed to be of 'high' clinical impact in 15 of the 20 patients (75 %). This study supports the utility of FDG PET/CT scanning in severely neutropenic patients with five or more days of fever. Further evaluation of the contribution of FDG PET/CT in the management of FNP across a range of underlying malignancies is required. (orig.)

  8. Use of FDG PET/CT for investigation of febrile neutropenia: evaluation in high-risk cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, Stephen D.; Tramontana, Adrian R.; Worth, Leon J.; Thursky, Karin A.; Slavin, Monica A.; Lau, Eddie; Hicks, Rodney J.; Seymour, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FNP) is a frequent complication of cancer care and evaluation often fails to identify a cause. [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT has the potential to identify inflammatory and infectious foci, but its potential role as an investigation for persistent FNP has not previously been explored. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in patients with cancer and severe neutropenia and five or more days of persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Adult patients with a diagnosis of an underlying malignancy and persistent FNP (temperature ≥38 C and neutrophil count <500 cells/μl for 5 days) underwent FDG PET/CT as an adjunct to conventional evaluation and management. The study group comprised 20 patients with FNP who fulfilled the eligibility criteria and underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to conventional evaluation. The median neutrophil count on the day of the FDG PET/CT scan was 30 cells/μl (range 0-730 cells/μl). Conventional evaluation identified 14 distinct sites of infection, 13 (93 %) of which were also identified by FDG PET/CT, including all deep tissue infections. FDG PET/CT identified 9 additional likely infection sites, 8 of which were subsequently confirmed as ''true positives'' by further investigations. FDG PET/CT was deemed to be of 'high' clinical impact in 15 of the 20 patients (75 %). This study supports the utility of FDG PET/CT scanning in severely neutropenic patients with five or more days of fever. Further evaluation of the contribution of FDG PET/CT in the management of FNP across a range of underlying malignancies is required. (orig.)

  9. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J.; Diender, Marije G.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Medical Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Draaisma, Jos M.T. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Paediatrics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Biomedical Photonic Imaging Group, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in children with FUO and in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. All FDG-PET/(CT) scans performed in the Radboud university medical center for the evaluation of FUO or unexplained fever during immune suppression in the last 10 years were reviewed. Results were compared with the final clinical diagnosis. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 31 children with FUO. A final diagnosis was established in 16 cases (52 %). Of the total number of scans, 32 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in these patients was 80 % and 78 %, respectively. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 12 children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. A final diagnosis was established in nine patients (75 %). Of the total number of these scans, 58 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression was 78 % and 67 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT appears a valuable imaging technique in the evaluation of children with FUO and in the diagnostic process of children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. Prospective studies of FDG-PET/CT as part of a structured diagnostic protocol are warranted to assess the additional diagnostic value. (orig.)

  10. Diagnostic role of 18F-FDG PET in gastric MALT lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, V.; Castellucci, P.; Nanni, C.; Farsad, M.; Fanti, S.; Rubello, D.; Zinzani, P.; Alavi, A.; Tehranipour, N.; Al-Nahhas, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of 18 F-FDG-PET in patients with gastric lymphoma, in particular those affected by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type and aggressive gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The study group consists of 15 patients with a previous diagnosis of gastric NHL referred to our PET centres in Bologna Hospital and Rovigo Hospital, Italy, in the period 2003-2004. In 9/15 patients the subsequent histological evaluation was consistent with a gastric MALT lymphoma, while aggressive gastric NHL was diagnosed in the other 6/15. PET scan was carried out in patients with known active disease in order to stage or re-stage disease prior to treatment or in patients in complete clinical remission to monitor disease during follow up. Patients were considered in complete clinical remission if free from disease for at least 8 months after chemotherapy or surgery. 18 F-FDG PET was performed following standard procedures. 18 F-FDG-PET was true positive in all cases of gastric MALT and non-MALT aggressive NHL with known active disease, while no pathological 18 F-FDG uptake was evident in the subjects who were in complete clinical remission. The degree of 18 F-FDG uptake (mean SUVmax values) in MALT lymphoma was much less intense in comparison to aggressive gastric NHL, suggesting a prognostic role of SUV calculation in gastric lymphomas. Our data demonstrate the significant accuracy of 18 F-FDG-PET in detecting active disease in gastric lymphoma of both MALT and non-MALT NHL type. A higher SUV value appears to be related to a more aggressive disease. (author)

  11. Can 18F-FDG PET improve the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions on MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, Almir G.V., E-mail: almirgvb@yahoo.com.br [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital A.C. Camargo, Fundação Antônio Prudente, R. Professor Antônio Prudente, 211, CEP: 01509-010 São Paulo (Brazil); Lima, Eduardo N.P., E-mail: e.lima-nuclear2@uol.com.br [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital A.C. Camargo, Fundação Antônio Prudente, R. Professor Antônio Prudente, 211, CEP: 01509-010 São Paulo (Brazil); Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: chojniak@uol.com.br [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital A.C. Camargo, Fundação Antônio Prudente, R. Professor Antônio Prudente, 211, CEP: 01509-010 São Paulo (Brazil); Marques, Elvira F., E-mail: elvira.marques@ig.com.br [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital A.C. Camargo, Fundação Antônio Prudente, R. Professor Antônio Prudente, 211, CEP: 01509-010 São Paulo (Brazil); Souza, Juliana A., E-mail: julianaalves79@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital A.C. Camargo, Fundação Antônio Prudente, R. Professor Antônio Prudente, 211, CEP: 01509-010 São Paulo (Brazil); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Prone 18F-FDG PET can improve the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions on MRI. • 18F-FDG PET's results were better for mass lesions higher than 10 mm. • 18F-FDG PET has the potential to identify more aggressive breast tumors. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the impact of adding 18F-fluorine-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Sixty patients with suspicious breast lesions on MRI were selected to perform a PET–CT in prone position, dedicated to the evaluation of the breasts. The areas with increased 18F-FDG concentration relative to normal parenchyma were considered positive on PET–CT. Fusion of PET and MRI images (PET–MRI) was performed on a dedicated workstation to better locate corresponding lesions, and its findings were compared with histological results. Results: 76 lesions were evaluated, including 64 mass lesions (84.2%) and 12 non-mass lesions (15.8%). Lesions’ mean diameter on MRI was 29.6 ± 19.2 mm (range 6–94 mm). PET–CT showed increased metabolically activity on 57 lesions (75.0%), with mean maximum SUV of 5.7 ± 5.0 (range 0.8–23.1). On histopathology, there were 17 (22.4%) benign and 59 (79.7%) malignant lesions. Considering all lesions, PET–MRI fusion provided 89.8% sensitivity, 76.5% specificity and 86.8% accuracy. Considering only mass lesions higher than 10 mm, PET–MRI fusion provided 95.8% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity and 93.3% accuracy. Conclusion: The inclusion of 18F-FDG PET on the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions on MRI helped to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions, especially for mass lesions with a diameter higher than 10 mm.

  12. Intestinal Glycolysis Visualized by FDG PET/CT Correlates With Glucose Decrement After Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Cheol Ryong; Lee, Narae; Hong, Jae Won; Kwon, In Gyu; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Eun Jig; Yun, Mijin; Cho, Arthur

    2017-02-01

    Gastrectomy method is known to influence glucose homeostasis. 18 F-fluoro-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images acquired after gastrectomy often reveals newly developed physiological small bowel uptake. We correlated newly developed small bowel FDG uptake and glucose homeostasis in postgastrectomy gastric cancer patients. We retrospectively analyzed 239 patients without diabetes who underwent staging and follow-up FDG PET/CT scanning before and after gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Postoperative small bowel glycolysis was quantified by recording intestinal total lesion glycolysis (TLG). TLG was assessed with regard to surgical method (Billroth I, Billroth II [BII], Roux-en-Y [RY]), fasting glucose decrement (≥10 mg/dL), and other clinical factors. Patients' weight, fasting glucose, cholesterol, TLG, and body fat levels significantly decreased after surgery. The glucose decrement was significantly associated with fasting glucose, surgical methods, total cholesterol, TLG, and total body fat on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that BII surgery (odds ratio 6.51) and TLG (odds ratio 3.17) were significantly correlated with glucose decrement. High small bowel glycolysis (TLG >42.0 g) correlated with glucose decrement in RY patients. Newly developed small bowel glycolysis on postgastrectomy FDG PET/CT scanning is correlated with a glucose decrement. These findings suggest a potential role of FDG PET/CT scanning in the evaluation of small bowel glycolysis and glucose control. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from 18 FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Methods: Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. Results: The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain, 0.09 h (liver, 0.007 h (spleen, 0.0006 h (adrenals, 0.013 h (kidneys and 0.005 h (stomach whereas it was 0.189 h (brain, 0.11 h (liver, 0.01 h (spleen, 0.0007 h (adrenals, 0.02 h (kidneys and 0.004 h (stomach in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and

  14. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from (18) FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Aruna; Jaimini, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; D'Souza, Maria; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Mishra, Anil K; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain), 0.09 h (liver), 0.007 h (spleen), 0.0006 h (adrenals), 0.013 h (kidneys) and 0.005 h (stomach) whereas it was 0.189 h (brain), 0.11 h (liver), 0.01 h (spleen), 0.0007 h (adrenals), 0.02 h (kidneys) and 0.004 h (stomach) in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and carefully weigh the risk-benefit ratios prior to every 18FDG whole body PET

  15. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Aruna; Jaimini, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; D’Souza, Maria; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Mishra, Anil K.; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Methods: Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. Results: The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain), 0.09 h (liver), 0.007 h (spleen), 0.0006 h (adrenals), 0.013 h (kidneys) and 0.005 h (stomach) whereas it was 0.189 h (brain), 0.11 h (liver), 0.01 h (spleen), 0.0007 h (adrenals), 0.02 h (kidneys) and 0.004 h (stomach) in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and

  16. Simultaneous Hyperpolarized 13C-Pyruvate MRI and 18F-FDG PET (HyperPET) in 10 Dogs with Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Larsen, Majbrit M E

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of combined PET/MR spectroscopic (MRS) imaging, it is now possible to directly and indirectly image the Warburg effect with hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate and (18)F-FDG PET imaging, respectively, via a technique we have named hyperPET. The main purpose of this present study...... was to establish a practical workflow for performing (18)F-FDG PET and hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate MRS imaging simultaneously for tumor tissue characterization and on a larger scale test its feasibility. In addition, we evaluated the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and (13)C-lactate production. Ten dogs...... with biopsy-verified spontaneous malignant tumors were included for imaging. All dogs underwent a protocol of simultaneous (18)F-FDG PET, anatomic MR, and hyperpolarized dynamic nuclear polarization with (13)C-pyruvate imaging. The data were acquired using a combined clinical PET/MR imaging scanner. We found...

  17. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in fever of unknown origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelbo Buch-Olsen, Karen; Andersen, Rikke V; Hess, Søren

    2014-01-01

    : The examination was considered helpful if it corresponded to the final diagnosis by showing uptake in an organ considered responsible for the condition, or if it was without focal findings, thereby excluding the patient from having focal infection or malignancy. It was perceived false positive if it pointed...... towards an organ not regarded by the clinicians as being related to the final diagnosis. It was perceived not helpful if the cause of fever was not visible on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. We found (18)F-FDG-PET/CT helpful in 75% of patients, not helpful in 4%, and false positive in 21% of patients. CONCLUSION: (18)F...

  18. Cowden syndrome detected by FDG PET/CT in an endometrial cancer patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yun Hee; Lee, Hye Kyung [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Geon [Dept. of Radiology, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon Saint Mary' s Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple hamartomas in various tissues and cancers (breast, thyroid, and endometrium). We report CS of the esophagus and gastrointestinal tract that was incidentally detected by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) at postoperative surveillance in an endometrial cancer patient. PET/CT showed mildly increased FDG uptake along the entire esophagus and stomach. Upper GI endoscopy and histologic examination revealed glycogenic acanthosis of the esophagus and several hundred gastric polyps. In our case, increased FDG uptake of the esophageal wall contributed to the diagnosis of CS.

  19. {sup 18}F-FDG hybrid PET in patients with suspected spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratz, S.; Behr, T.M.; Behe, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Philipps University of Marburg (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Georg August University of Goettingen (Germany); Doerner, J. [Department of Orthopedics, Georg August University of Goettingen (Germany); Fischer, U.; Grabbe, E. [Department of Radiology, Georg August University of Goettingen (Germany); Altenvoerde, G.; Meller, J.; Becker, W. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Georg August University of Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-04-01

    This study investigated the value of fluorine-18 2'-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) imaging with a double-headed gamma camera operated in coincidence (hybrid PET) detection mode in patients with suspected spondylitis. Comparison was made with conventional nuclear medicine imaging modalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen patients with suspected spondylitis (nine male, seven female, mean age 59 years) prospectively underwent FDG hybrid PET (296 MBq) and MRI. For intra-individual comparison, the patients were also imaged with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP) (555 MBq) (n=13) and/or gallium-67 citrate (185 MBq) (n=11). For FDG hybrid PET, two or three transverse scans were performed. Ratios of infected (target) to non-infected (background) (T/B) vertebral bodies were calculated. MR images were obtained of the region of interest. Patients found positive for spondylitis with MRI and/or FDG hybrid PET underwent surgical intervention and histological grading of the individual infected foci. Twelve out of 16 patients were found to be positive for spondylitis. Independent of the grade of infection and the location in the spine, all known infected vertebrae (n=23, 9 thoracic, 12 lumbar, 2 sacral) were detected by FDG hybrid PET. T/B ratios higher than 1.45{+-}0.05 (at 1 h p.i.) were indicative of infectious disease, whereas ratios below this value were found in cases of degenerative change. FDG hybrid PET was superior to MRI in patients who had a history of surgery and suffered from a high-grade infection in combination with paravertebral abscess formation (n=2; further computed tomography was needed) and in those with low-grade spondylitis (n=2, no oedema) or discitis (n=2, mild oedema). False-positive {sup 67}Ga citrate images (n=5: 2 spondylodiscitis, 1 aortitis, 1 pleuritis, 1 pulmonary tuberculosis) and {sup 99m}Tc-MDP SPET (n=4: 1 osteoporosis, 2 spondylodiscitis, 1 fracture) were equally well detected by FDG hybrid PET and MRI. No

  20. [Cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma: role of 18FDG PET-CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, Guensi; Sara, Taleb; Ghofrane, Cherkaoui Salhi; Malika, Ait Idir; Majdouline, Houjami; Souha, Sahraoui; Abdelatif, Benider; Najoua, Touil; Ghita, Benmoussa; Zineb, Baroudi; Nabil, Chikhaoui

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin with unpredictable evolution and high metastatic potential. This neoplasm usually occurs in the elderly on their sun-exposed areas. CCM constant greed for 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) defines the role of positron emission tomography (PET) in this pathology. However, no consensus has yet been reached. This study reports the case of a 25 year old woman treated for metastatic MCC, in order to draw attention to this particular tumor and to illustrate the role of 18 FDG PET in the management of this rare entity.

  1. 18F-FDG PET in the management of endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Angel; Chang, Ting-Chang; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Wu, Tzu-I; Ng, Koon-Kwan; Hsueh, Swei; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the clinical impact of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in endometrial cancer. We aimed to assess the value of integrating FDG-PET into the management of endometrial cancer in comparison with conventional imaging alone. All patients with histologically confirmed primary advanced (stage III/IV) or suspicious/documented recurrent endometrial cancer, with poor prognostic features (serum CA-125 >35 U/ml or unfavourable cell types), or surveillance after salvage therapy were eligible. Before FDG-PET scanning, each patient had received magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography (MRI-CT). The receiver operating characteristic curve method with calculation of the area under the curve (AUC) was used to compare the diagnostic efficacy. Clinical impacts were determined on a scan basis. Forty-nine eligible patients were accrued and 60 studies were performed (27 primary staging, 33 post-therapy surveillance or restaging on relapse). The clinical impact was positive in 29 (48.3%) of the 60 scans. Mean standardised uptake values (SUVs) of true-positive lesions were 13.2 (range 5.7-37.4) for central pelvic lesions and 11.1 (range 1.5-37.4) for metastases. The sensitivity of FDG-PET alone (P<0.0001) or FDG-PET plus MRI-CT (P<0.0001) was significantly higher than that of MRI-CT alone in overall lesion detection. FDG-PET plus MRI-CT was significantly superior to MRI-CT alone in overall lesion detection (AUC 0.949 vs 0.872; P=0.004), detection of pelvic nodal/soft tissue metastases (P=0.048) and detection of extrapelvic metastases (P=0.010), while FDG-PET alone was only marginally superior by AUC (P=0.063). Whole-body FDG-PET coupled with MRI-CT facilitated optimal management of endometrial cancer in well-selected cases. (orig.)

  2. Sphenoid wing meningioma behavior on 11C-PiB and 18F-FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Hernan; Bergamo, Yanina; Paz, Santiago; Sanchez, Flavio; Vazquez, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Two patients with mild cognitive impairment underwent C-PiB and F-FDG brain PET. Both patients had previously gone through a contrast-enhanced MRI scan that revealed extra-axial tumors next to the sphenoid wing, suggestive of meningiomas. C-PiB PET images showed a highly increased uptake by the extra-axial masses. These 2 cases represent 1.2% of our C-PiB population (n = 163). No meningioma was found with negative C-PiB uptake. The F-FDG concentration was not increased within the lesions. C-PiB could be used as a meningioma marker.

  3. Detection of synchronous gastric schwannoma on FDG PET/CT aided by discordant metabolic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, June; Huang, Yi-Tung Tom; Lin, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This is a case of an unsuspected synchronous gastric schwannoma demonstrating increased F-FDG accumulation on PET/CT in a 65-year-old female patient diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma on the basis of different metabolic activity to other sites of disease at staging and discordant metabolic response to therapy. The gastric schwannoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry after surgical resection. This case adds to the limited literature on FDG-avid gastric schwannoma and highlights the importance of investigating differential metabolic activity and response on serial PET/CT imaging.

  4. The value of 18F-FDG PET in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Huiqing; Zhang Zhongmin; Lv Zhonghong

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is based on an extensive use of modern medical imaging techniques. Delineation of the gross tumor volume and organs at risk constitutes one of the most important phases of conformal radiotherapy procedures. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET possesses greater sensitivity and accuracy in detecting diseased lymph nodes, is an important staging examination for patients considered for radiation treatment with curative intent. 18 F-FDG PET has an important role in delineation of gross tumor volume for patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. Multicentre assessment and monitored use of [18F]FDG-PET in oncology: the Spanish experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Garrido, Manuel; Asensio-del-Barrio, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic effectiveness of [ 18 F]FDG-PET in oncological diseases and to assess its clinical utility and impact (on the clinical and therapeutic management of these patients). This health technology assessment was performed in Spain, using the monitored use (MU) procedure. A multicentre and prospective follow-up study was performed in a non-consecutive sample of oncological patients who were examined with PET and other conventional diagnostic tests. A protocol for this MU method (PET-MU protocol) was developed, including the three forms used to collect all the information. Enrolment of new patients began in June 2002 and continued until August 2004. A descriptive analysis and an evaluation of the diagnostic effectiveness of FDG-PET were performed. The study population comprised 2,824 oncological patients (the third form relating to follow-up was completed for only 967 of these patients) from 100 Spanish hospitals and 16 PET centres. Seventy-nine percent of cases met the clinical requirements of the PET-MU protocol. Global diagnostic parameters of PET performance and their 95% CI values were as follows: sensitivity 86% (82-89%), specificity 83% (79-86%), positive and negative predictive values 87% (83-90%) and 82% (77-85%) respectively, diagnostic accuracy 84% (82-87%) and diagnostic odds ratio 28.75 (19.75-41.84). PET detected unsuspected new lesions in 39% of patients and avoided other unnecessary diagnostic techniques and treatments in 69% of cases. In 88% of cases, PET was considered useful by the physicians who asked for the PET tests (it was deemed decisive in 30% and very useful in almost 37%). This PET-MU study has confirmed the high diagnostic effectiveness of FDG-PET for oncological indications and demonstrates that it has a great influence on the clinical and therapeutic management of patients. (orig.)

  6. FDG PET in monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlangieri, S. U.; Lee, S. T.; Chan, A. M.; Mitchell, P. L.; Knight, S. R.; Feigen, M. M.; Scott, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Aim: The aim of our study was to correlate 18F-FDG PET response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with histopathology in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma. Methods: All patients with stage III NSCLC planned for surgery following induction chemotherpay and/or radiotherapy who underwent pre- and post-treatment FDG-PET between 2004 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. The PET scans were performed according to standard protocol. The clinical FDG-PET TNM stage was correlated with the histopathology of the surgical specimens. Results: There were 9 patients (6 M :3 F ), median age 59.7 years (range 49 to 73 years). Post-treatment FDG-PET correctly predicted mediastinal pathological N stage in 8/9 patients, with one patient having microsopic disease in two nodes. The post-treatment FDG-PET correctly predicted pathological T stage in 7/9 patients, with 2 patients having small volume T4 disease not detected by PET. Post-treatment FDG-PET correctly downstaged 4 patients. Of the 5 patients, incorrectly staged on the post-treatment FDG-PET, one patient had microscopic pN 2 disease, 2 had pN 1 disease, and 2 had pT 4 disease. Conclusion: Post-treatment FDG-PET is predictive of pathological nodal stage within the mediastinum in patients with locally advanced NSCLC treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. FDG-PET does not detect microscopic or small volume disease, nor is it able to define the boundaries of mediastinal tissue invasion.

  7. FDG PET and CT in locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the distal oesophagus. Clinical relevance of a discordant PET finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, A.; Wieder, H.; Schwaiger, M.; Weber, W.A.; Stollfuss, J.; Ott, K.; Fink, U.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: the incidence of adenocarcinomas of the distal oesophagus (ADE) has dramatically increased in Western countries. The clinical importance of a FDG PET finding discordant with CT was determined in patients with locally advanced ADE. In addition, tumour standardized uptake values (SUV) were correlated with patient survival. Patients, methods: 40 consecutive patients were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent an attenuation corrected FDG PET scan (neck, chest, abdomen) and contrast enhanced helical CT of the chest and abdomen. PET and CT scans were reviewed independently and concomitantly with respect to metastases in predefined lymph node sites and organs. Any discordance between PET and CT was assessed for clinical relevance. Clinical relevance was defined as a change in the overall therapeutic concept (curative vs. palliative). Follow-up imaging and histological evaluation served as the gold standard. Mean tumour SUVs were determined by 1.5 cm regions of interest placed over the tumour's maximum. Results: when read independently from the CT scan FDG PET indicated a clinically relevant change in tumour stage in 9/40 patients (23%) and a non-relevant change in 11/40 patients (28%). PET was correct in 5/9 patients (56%) with clinically relevant discordances. In 4/9 patients PET was incorrect (3 false positive due to suspicion of MI-lymph nodes or lung metastases, 1 false negative in disseminated liver metastases). With concomitant reading, PET indicated a clinically relevant change in tumour stage in 6/40 patients (15%) and a non-relevant change in 5/40 patients (13%). PET was correct in 5/6 patients (83%) with clinically relevant discordances. The patient with disseminated liver disease remained the single false negative. Overall, the benefit from PET was based on its higher diagnostic accuracy at organ sites. Tumour SUV did not correlate with patient survival. Conclusion: about half of discordances between FDG PET and CT are clinically relevant

  8. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan as preoperative diagnostic tool in cervical cancer stage Ib and IIa: comparison between the results of FDG-PET scan and operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    1999-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan for routine preoperative diagnostic methods in cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed from March, 1999 to November, 1999. There were 6 stage Ib and 7 IIa patients and all patients were performed radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissections and were evaluated by FDG-PET scan before operation. The mean age of the patients were 50.3 years old. Six cases had lymph node metastases by pelvis MRI, and three cases by FDG-PET scan. We could not find any lymph node metastases at surgery in 3 patients (50.0%) among 6 patients who were diagnosed by nodal metastases by pelvis MRI. And we found 1 patients with nodal metastases who had negative findings by pelvis MRI. By FDG-PET scan, we could find metastases in all positive patients. But we also found 2 additional metastatic cases in the patients with negative findings. In this study, the comparison was very difficult due to the individual differences in the comparison would be made by site-specific not person. The sensitivity of MRI and FDG-PET scan were 50.0% and 30.0%. The specificity were 94.1 % and 95.6%. The positive predictive value were 55.6 % and 50.0 %. In conclusion, we could find any superiority of FDG-PET scan in the diagnosis of lymph node metastases the pelvis MRI. So there are limitations to use the FDG-PET scan in the routine preoperative diagnostic tools in cervical cancer. But if we have more experiences to use the FDG-PET scan such as precise cut-off value of SUV and combination of other imaging technique, the FDG-PET scan are still promising diagnostic tools in cervical cancer.

  9. Clinical significance of pretreatment FDG PET/CT IN MOBG-avid pediatric neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seo Young; Kim, Yong Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E. Edmund [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rahim, Muhammad Kashif [Nishtar Medical College and Hospital, Multan (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging is well known to have clinical significance in the initial staging and response evaluation of the many kinds of neoplasms. However, its role in the pediatric neuroblastoma is not clearly defined. In the present study, the clinical significance of FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) in 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)-avid pediatric neuroblastoma was investigated. Twenty patients with neuroblastoma who undertook pretreatment FDG PET/CT at our institute between 2008 and 2015 and showed MIBG avidity were retrospectively enrolled in the present study. Clinical information—including histopathology, and serum markers—and several PET parameters—including SUVmax of the primary lesion (Psuv), target-to-background ratio (TBR), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and coefficient of variation (CV)—were analyzed. The prognostic effect of PET parameters was evaluated in terms of progression-free survival (PFS). Total 20 patients (4.5 ± 3.5 years) were divided as two groups by disease progression. Six patients (30.0 %) experienced disease progression and one patient (5.0 %) died during follow-up period. There were not statistically significant in age, stage, MYCN status, primary tumor size, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and ferritin level between two groups with progression or no progression. However, Psuv (p = 0.017), TBR (p = 0.09), MTV (p = 0.02), and CV (p = 0.036) showed significant differences between two groups. In univariate analysis, PFS was significantly associated with Psuv (p = 0.021) and TBR (p = 0.023). FDG-PET parameters were significantly related with progression of neuroblastoma. FDG-PET/CT may have the potential as a valuable modality for evaluating prognosis in the patients with MIBG-avid pediatric neuroblastoma.

  10. The role of 18F-FDG-PET/ceCT in peritoneal mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, Julien; Giammarile, Francesco; Rousset, Pascal; Rubello, Domenico; Bakrin, Naoual; Passot, Guillaume; Isaac, Sylvie; Glehen, Olivier; Skanjeti, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess glucose metabolism of multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma and epithelioid peritoneal mesothelioma by fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG)-PET/contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) and to assess its prognostic impact. Twenty-three (14 women) patients, without previous treatment, underwent F-FDG-PET/ceCT before peritoneal mesothelioma cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. F-FDG-PET/ceCT was interpreted prospectively as positive or negative. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of each lesion was measured retrospectively on the basis of postsurgery data. At laparotomy, disease extension was estimated with the Peritoneal Cancer Index. The median follow-up was 27 months (95% confidence interval: 12.9-37.8); progression-free survival (PFS) was recorded. Nine patients were affected by multicystic and 14 were affected by epithelioid peritoneal mesothelioma. PET showed mild focal uptake in one case of multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma, whereas in eight patients, no abnormal uptake was observed. PET was positive in 12/14 patients with epithelioid peritoneal mesothelioma. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were respectively 86, 89 and 87%; the qualitative assessment was statistically different (P=0.0020, χ). Multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma histology was significantly associated with lower SUVmaxlesion (P=0.0061), SUVmaxlesion/liver (P=0.0025), Peritoneal Cancer Index, younger age, and it was observed only in women.Recurrence was observed on nine patients affected by epithelioid peritoneal mesothelioma, whereas no recurrences were observed among multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma patients. SUVmaxlesion (P=0.0278) and age (P=0.0241) were significantly associated with PFS in patients with epithelioid peritoneal mesothelioma. F-FDG-PET/ceCT showed significant differences between multicystic and epithelioid peritoneal mesothelioma, whereas SUVmaxlesion was associated with PFS in the latter. Although

  11. Factors affecting gastric uptake in whole body FDG-PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Mami; Nakahara, Tadaki; Wu, Jin; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Uno, Kimiichi; Abe, Kinji; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Nishidai Clinic Diagnostic Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is very useful for the detection and staging of tumors. However, FDG is also accumulated in the normal tissues in various degrees. This physiological FDG uptake is often seen in intestine, making confusion with malignant tumor. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the stomach. A total of 136 people who underwent cancer screening or staging of tumors except for gastric cancer using FDG whole-body PET was examined (mean age: 55.6 yrs). All subjects fasted for at least 4 hours before the PET study and were administrated with FDG intravenously (mean FDG dose: 308.9 MBq). Emission images were acquired on a whole-body PET scanner and images were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The intensity of gastric uptake of FDG whole-body PET image was visually classified into 3 grades; grade 2 = the intensity of gastric uptake more than pulmonary uptake, grade 1 = the intensity of gastric uptake equal to or less than pulmonary uptake, grade 0 = no contrast between gastric uptake and background. Twenty-eight subjects (20.6%) were classified into grade 2, 42 subjects (30.9%) were grade 1 and 66 subjects (48.5%) were grade 0. Subjects' age, fasting time, FDG dose, serum glucose level, free fatty acid level and insulin level were not significantly correlated with the intensity of gastric uptake. But the subjects with higher gastric uptake tended to have anti-Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) antibodies. The rate of having anti-H.pylori antibodies in the grade 2 group is significantly higher than the grade 1 group (85.7% vs. 72.5%, p<0.05), and that of the grade 1 group is significantly higher than the grade 0 group (72.5% vs. 42.2%, p<0.01). Gastric uptake was observed in about half of subjects. Especially, approximately 20% of all showed high gastric uptake, which was associated with H.pylori infection. Therefore, most of the subjects

  12. Factors affecting gastric uptake in whole body FDG-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Mami; Nakahara, Tadaki; Wu, Jin; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Uno, Kimiichi; Abe, Kinji; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is very useful for the detection and staging of tumors. However, FDG is also accumulated in the normal tissues in various degrees. This physiological FDG uptake is often seen in intestine, making confusion with malignant tumor. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the stomach. A total of 136 people who underwent cancer screening or staging of tumors except for gastric cancer using FDG whole-body PET was examined (mean age: 55.6 yrs). All subjects fasted for at least 4 hours before the PET study and were administrated with FDG intravenously (mean FDG dose: 308.9 MBq). Emission images were acquired on a whole-body PET scanner and images were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The intensity of gastric uptake of FDG whole-body PET image was visually classified into 3 grades; grade 2 = the intensity of gastric uptake more than pulmonary uptake, grade 1 = the intensity of gastric uptake equal to or less than pulmonary uptake, grade 0 = no contrast between gastric uptake and background. Twenty-eight subjects (20.6%) were classified into grade 2, 42 subjects (30.9%) were grade 1 and 66 subjects (48.5%) were grade 0. Subjects' age, fasting time, FDG dose, serum glucose level, free fatty acid level and insulin level were not significantly correlated with the intensity of gastric uptake. But the subjects with higher gastric uptake tended to have anti-Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) antibodies. The rate of having anti-H.pylori antibodies in the grade 2 group is significantly higher than the grade 1 group (85.7% vs. 72.5%, p<0.05), and that of the grade 1 group is significantly higher than the grade 0 group (72.5% vs. 42.2%, p<0.01). Gastric uptake was observed in about half of subjects. Especially, approximately 20% of all showed high gastric uptake, which was associated with H.pylori infection. Therefore, most of the subjects with high

  13. FDG-PET in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Analysis of clinical-PET correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Dimitri; Castelnovo, Giovanni; Collombier, Laurent; Thouvenot, Eric; Boudousq, Vincent

    2017-11-02

    To assess the relationship between clinical pattern and cerebral glucose metabolism on [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Predefined clinical signs (ataxia, visual, pyramidal, myoclonus, limb apraxia, limb dystonia, sensory, parkinsonism, and corticobasal syndrome [CBS]) and FDG-PET data were assessed in consecutive CJD patients. Two types of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analyses, using stringent level of significance p < 0.001 and extent threshold of 100 voxels, were performed: one comparing CJD patients presenting specific sign against CJD patients without this specific sign (inter-CJD analysis), and one comparing CJD patients with specific sign against 18 healthy controls (CJD-control analysis). Fifteen CJD patients (11 probable and two histologically proven sporadic and two genetic CJD) were analyzed. CJD-control analysis of the entire CJD group showed lateralized frontal and parietal hypometabolism. When analyzing clinical CJD subgroups, inter-CJD analyses showed hypometabolism in more restricted areas than on CJD-control analyses. For CJD patients presenting with ataxia, visual signs and CBS (and CBS-associated signs), additional hypometabolic areas probably related to the specific signs were identified: pons and middle cerebellar peduncles in patients with ataxia; occipital cortex in patients with visual signs; and prerolandic and lateral parietal cortex in patients with CBS. For pyramidal signs, sensory loss, and parkinsonism, no abnormalities in brain areas typically involved in these signs were observed. In addition to lateralized frontal and parietal hypometabolism previously reported in CJD and observed here, hypometabolism in brain areas related to some specific signs (i.e. ataxia, visual signs, and CBS) is also seen.

  14. Diagnostic value of preoperative SUVmax on FDG-PET/CT for the detection of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Yuko; Kobayashi, Aya; Shiro, Michihisa; Ota, Nami; Takano, Rei; Mabuchi, Yasushi; Yagi, Shigetaka; Minami, Sawako; Terada, Masaki; Ino, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the preoperative diagnostic value of F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with ovarian cancer. One hundred sixty patients suspected of having malignant ovarian tumors were included in this study. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before operation, and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of SUVmax for detecting malignancy and its relationship with histological findings. Postoperative pathological diagnoses showed that 67 were malignant, 14 were borderline malignant, and 79 were benign tumors. With the use of a cutoff SUVmax of 2.9 obtained from the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detecting malignancy were 80.6%, 94.6%, 91.5%, and 87.1%, respectively. Positive FDG accumulation (SUVmax ≥ 2.9) was shown in 89.5% of serous adenocarcinoma and in 92.3% of endometrioid adenocarcinoma. In contrast, lower frequencies of positive FDG accumulation were shown in clear cell adenocarcinoma (54.5%), mucinous adenocarcinoma (66.7%), and metastatic carcinoma (66.7%), and the median SUVmax of these 3 histological types were significantly lower than those of serous and endometrioid types. In addition, a positive FDG accumulation was shown in all patients with malignant transformation of mature cystic teratoma. Finally, of the 14 borderline malignant tumors, only 2 (14.3%) showed positive FDG accumulation. The SUVmax on FDG-PET/CT is useful for differentiating ovarian cancer from borderline or benign tumor with a high specificity and positive predictive value. However, our data also demonstrated a lower FDG uptake value in clear cell or mucinous histological finding, suggesting that SUVmax may vary depending on the tumor histological subtype.

  15. Clinical Significance of Myocardial Uptake on F-18 FDG PET/CT Performed in Oncologic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ho Jin; Cho, Eung Hyuck; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake of myocardium is influenced by various factors. Increased glycolysis, and subsequent increased F-18 FDG uptake has been reported in ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, clinical significance of incidentally found myocardial F-18 FDG uptake has not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed the degree and pattern of myocardial uptake in patients without history of ischemic heart disease who underwent torso F-18 FDG PET/CT for evaluation of neoplastic disease. From January 2005 to June 2009, 77 patients who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m sestamibi stress/rest SPECT within 3 months were enrolled. Of 77 patients, 55 (71.4%) showed increased F-18 FDG uptake in the myocardium. In this population, 40 showed uniform uptake pattern, while 15 showed focal uptake. In patients with uniform uptake, 17 showed decreased uptake in the septum without perfusion defect on myocardial SPECT. Remaining 23 patients showed uniform uptake, with 1 reversible perfusion defect and 1 fixed perfusion defect. In 15 patients with focal uptake, 9 showed increased F-18 FDG uptake in the base, and only 1 of them showed reversible perfusion defect on myocardial SPECT. In the remaining 6 focal uptake group, 4 had reversible perfusion defect in the corresponding wall, and 1 had apical hypertrophy. We demonstrated that septal defect pattern and basal uptake pattern in the myocardium may represent normal variants. Focal myocardial uptake other than normal variants on oncologic torso F-18 FDG PET/CT with routine fasting protocol may suggest ischemic heart disease, thus further evaluation is warranted.

  16. Clinical utility of 18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with suspect ocular tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic imaging of patients with suspect ocular tuberculosis include chest X-rays and computed tomography (CT scans. Reports have suggested a role for 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT scans. We report on the clinical utility of 18 FDG PET/CT in two patients. Case 1: A 38-year-old female patient presented with recurrent anterior uveitis. A 18 FDG-PET scan revealed metabolically active supraclavicular and chest lymph nodes. An aspiration cytology of the cervical lymph node revealed caseating granulomas suggestive of tuberculosis. Case 2: A 58-year-old female patient presented with recurrent anterior uveitis. A 18 FDG-PET scan revealed metabolically active lymph nodes in the neck. A biopsy of the cervical lymph node revealed epithelioid granulomas suggestive of tuberculosis. Both patients were started on standard antitubercular therapy with a subsequent marked reduction of activity. PET/CT scans may suggest the sites of safe high-yield biopsies.

  17. Deep Learning based Classification of FDG-PET Data for Alzheimers Disease Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shibani; Srivastava, Anant; Mi, Liang; Caselli, Richard J; Chen, Kewei; Goradia, Dhruman; Reiman, Eric M; Wang, Yalin

    2017-10-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) measures the decline in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, offering a reliable metabolic biomarker even on presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. PET scans provide functional information that is unique and unavailable using other types of imaging. However, the computational efficacy of FDG-PET data alone, for the classification of various Alzheimers Diagnostic categories, has not been well studied. This motivates us to correctly discriminate various AD Diagnostic categories using FDG-PET data. Deep learning has improved state-of-the-art classification accuracies in the areas of speech, signal, image, video, text mining and recognition. We propose novel methods that involve probabilistic principal component analysis on max-pooled data and mean-pooled data for dimensionality reduction, and multilayer feed forward neural network which performs binary classification. Our experimental dataset consists of baseline data of subjects including 186 cognitively unimpaired (CU) subects, 336 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects with 158 Late MCI and 178 Early MCI, and 146 AD patients from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. We measured F1-measure, precision, recall, negative and positive predictive values with a 10-fold cross validation scheme. Our results indicate that our designed classifiers achieve competitive results while max pooling achieves better classification performance compared to mean-pooled features. Our deep model based research may advance FDG-PET analysis by demonstrating their potential as an effective imaging biomarker of AD.

  18. Advantages of 18F FDG-PET/CT over Conventional Staging for Sarcoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zsuzsanna; Boér, Katalin; Borbély, Katalin

    2017-10-09

    The effective management of patients with sarcomas requires accurate diagnosis and staging. Imaging, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most freqently used methods for the detection of the lesion location, size, morphology and structural changes to adjacent tissues; however, these modalities provide little information about tumour biology. MRI is a robust and useful modality in tumour staging of sarcomas, however metabolic-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/ computer tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) provides greater accuracy to overall staging in combination with MRI [1]. The advantages of 18 F-FDG PET/CT method compared with CT and MRI is that it provides a whole body imaging, maps the viability of the tumour or the metabolic activity of the tissue. Additionally, PET detects the most agressive part of the tumour, demonstrates the biological behaviour of the tumour and therefore has a predictive value. Little data ara available on the role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the management of sarcomas. The present manuscript aims to provide a review of the major indications of 18 F-FDG PET/CT for diagnosis, staging, restaging and monitoring response to therapy and to compare its usefulness with the conventional imaging modalities in the management of patients with sarcomas.

  19. Deep-learning-based classification of FDG-PET data for Alzheimer's disease categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shibani; Srivastava, Anant; Mi, Liang; Caselli, Richard J.; Chen, Kewei; Goradia, Dhruman; Reiman, Eric M.; Wang, Yalin

    2017-11-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) measures the decline in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, offering a reliable metabolic biomarker even on presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. PET scans provide functional information that is unique and unavailable using other types of imaging. However, the computational efficacy of FDG-PET data alone, for the classification of various Alzheimers Diagnostic categories, has not been well studied. This motivates us to correctly discriminate various AD Diagnostic categories using FDG-PET data. Deep learning has improved state-of-the-art classification accuracies in the areas of speech, signal, image, video, text mining and recognition. We propose novel methods that involve probabilistic principal component analysis on max-pooled data and mean-pooled data for dimensionality reduction, and multilayer feed forward neural network which performs binary classification. Our experimental dataset consists of baseline data of subjects including 186 cognitively unimpaired (CU) subjects, 336 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects with 158 Late MCI and 178 Early MCI, and 146 AD patients from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. We measured F1-measure, precision, recall, negative and positive predictive values with a 10-fold cross validation scheme. Our results indicate that our designed classifiers achieve competitive results while max pooling achieves better classification performance compared to mean-pooled features. Our deep model based research may advance FDG-PET analysis by demonstrating their potential as an effective imaging biomarker of AD.

  20. Rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma with surrounding ductal hyperplasia mimics breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Hickeson, Marc; Derbekyan, Vilma

    2011-07-01

    A 30-year-old woman was referred for an F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT to rule out lymphoma, and was found to have an incidental FDG-avid right breast nodule that grew significantly in size and FDG uptake on a subsequent scan, raising suspicion of a growing breast malignancy. Histologic evaluation showed a complex fibroadenoma with adenosis and surrounding ductal hyperplasia. Although variable F-18 FDG uptake in fibroadenomas has been described, a distinction between simple and complex fibroadenomas has not been made in the PET literature, even though complex fibroadenomas have a higher propensity to develop into malignancies. This case shows that a rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma can mimic a breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT scans, showing significant increase in both size and FDG-avidity on follow-up studies.

  1. Pilot Study for the Prediction of Response to Radiotherapy Using [18F]Fluorothymidine PET in Nasopharyngeal Cancer: Comparison with [18F]FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, So Ra; Chae, Sun Young; Kim, Hye Ok; Lee, Sang Wook; Oh, Seung Jun; Im, Ki Chun; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Kim, Jae Seung; Ryu, Jin Sook

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to know whether [ 18 F]Fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor early response to radiotherapy in comparison with [ 18 F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, and to establish the optimal imaging time for prediction of therapy response. Two patients with nasopharyngeal cancer underwent serial FLT PET and FDG PET before and during radiotherapy. Three on-treatment FLT and FDG PET scans were performed on 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks (at each time of 10 Gy, 20 Gy and 30 Gy delivered). The peak standardized uptake values (SUV peak ) of primary tumors were measured on FLT and FDG PET. Then, percent changes of SUV peak after therapy were calculated. In two patients, baseline values of SUV peak on FDT PET were higher than those on FLT PET (FLT vs FDG; 3.7 vs 5.0, and 5.7 vs 15.0). In patient 1, FLT SUV peak showed 78%, 78% and 84% of decrease on 1 week, 2 and 3 weeks after treatment, whereas FDG SUV peak showed 18%, 52% and 66% of decrease, respectively. In patient 2, FLT SUV peak showed 75%, 75% and 68% of decrease, whereas FDG SUV peak showed 51%, 49% and 58% of decrease, respectively. Both patients reached to complete remission after radiotherapy. After radiotherapy, the decrease of FLT tumor uptake preceded the decrease of FDG tumor uptake in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer, and 1 week after therapy may be appropriate time for the assessment of early response. FLT PET might be more useful than FDG PET for monitoring early response to radiotherapy

  2. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy/SPECT versus {sup 18}F-FDG PET in paediatric neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melzer, Henriette Ingrid; Bartenstein, Peter; Pfluger, Thomas [Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Schmid, Irene; Albert, Michael H. [Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Department of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology, Munich (Germany); Schweinitz, Dietrich von [Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Munich (Germany); Tudball, Coral [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    To analyse different uptake patterns in {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy/SPECT imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG PET in paediatric neuroblastoma patients. We compared 23 {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy scans and 23 {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans (mean interval 10 days) in 19 patients with a suspected neuroblastic tumour (16 neuroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroma and 1 opsomyoclonus syndrome). SPECT images of the abdomen or other tumour-affected regions were available in all patients. Indications for {sup 18}F-FDG PET were a {sup 123}I-MIBG-negative tumour, a discrepancy in {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake compared to the morphological imaging or imaging results inconsistent with clinical findings. A lesion was found by {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and/or {sup 18}F-FDG PET and/or morphological imaging. A total of 58 suspicious lesions (mean lesion diameter 3.8 cm) were evaluated and 18 were confirmed by histology and 40 by clinical follow-up. The sensitivities of {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and {sup 18}F-FDG PET were 50% and 78% and the specificities were 75% and 92%, respectively. False-positive results (three {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy, one {sup 18}F-FDG PET) were due to physiological uptake or posttherapy changes. False-negative results (23 {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy, 10 {sup 18}F-FDG PET) were due to low uptake and small lesion size. Combined {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy/{sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging showed the highest sensitivity of 85%. In 34 lesions the {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and morphological imaging findings were discrepant. {sup 18}F-FDG PET correctly identified 32 of the discrepant findings. Two bone/bone marrow metastases were missed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and {sup 18}F-FDG PET showed noticeable differences in their uptake patterns. {sup 18}F-FDG PET was more sensitive and specific for the detection of neuroblastoma lesions. Our findings suggest that a {sup 18}F-FDG PET scan may be useful in the event of discrepant or inconclusive

  3. Increased FDG uptake in the wall of the right atrium in people who participated in a cancer screening program with whole-body PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hirofumi; Ide, Michiru; Yasuda, Seiei; Takahashi, Wakoh; Shohtsu, Akira; Kubo, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of patients who showed increased FDG uptake in the wall of the right atrium. We have encountered 10 patients with increased activity in the wall of the right atrium among a total of 2,367 examinees who participated in our cancer screening program with whole-body PET. The mean age of these examinees was 62.9 yr, higher than that of the total population. All suffered from cardiac disorders, especially atrial fibrillation. FDG accumulated almost exclusively in the wall of the right atrium, whereas only slight activity was seen in the wall of the left atrium. Although the average size of the right atria was significantly enlarged, left atria were more severely dilated than right ones. Therefore overload does not seem to account for the FDG accumulation in the wall of the right atrium. In conclusion, the increased activity in the wall of the right atrium was a rare finding that was made in older people who suffered from cardiac disease. Although the mechanism of induction of the high metabolic state of glucose in the wall of the right atrium remains unclear, this unusual activity would be another false positive finding in cancer screening with whole-body FDG PET. (author)

  4. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer

  5. Clinical utility of FDG-PET for the clinical diagnosis in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbizu, Javier; Festari, Cristina; Altomare, Daniele; Walker, Zuzana; Bouwman, Femke; Rivolta, Jasmine; Orini, Stefania; Barthel, Henryk; Agosta, Federica; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Boccardi, Marina; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista; Nobili, Flavio

    2018-04-27

    We aim to report the quality of accuracy studies investigating the utility of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET in supporting the diagnosis of prodromal Alzheimer's Disease (AD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, and the corresponding recommendations made by a panel of experts. Seven panellist, four from the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, and three from the European Academy of Neurology, produced recommendations taking into consideration the incremental value of FDG-PET, as added on clinical-neuropsychological examination, to ascertain the aetiology of MCI (AD, FTLD or DLB). A literature search using harmonized population, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) strings was performed, and an evidence assessment consistent with the European Federation of Neurological Societies guidance was provided. The consensual recommendation was achieved based on Delphi rounds. Fifty-four papers reported the comparison of interest. The selected papers allowed the identification of FDG patterns that characterized MCI due to AD, FTLD and DLB. While clinical outcome studies supporting the diagnosis of MCI due to AD showed varying accuracies (ranging from 58 to 100%) and varying areas under the receiver-operator characteristic curves (0.66 to 0.97), no respective data were identified for MCI due to FTLD or for MCI due to DLB. However, the high negative predictive value of FDG-PET and the existence of different disease-specific patterns of hypometabolism support the consensus recommendations for the clinical use of this imaging technique in MCI subjects. FDG-PET has clinical utility on a fair level of evidence in detecting MCI due to AD. Although promising also in detecting MCI due to FTLD and MCI due to DLB, more research is needed to ultimately judge the clinical utility of FDG-PET in these entities.

  6. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareham, Neval E.; Lundgren, J.D.; Cunha-Bang, C. da; Sengeloev, H.; Gustafsson, F.; Iversen, M.; Johannesen, H.H.; Kjaer, A.; Fischer, B.M.; Rasmussen, A.; Soerensen, S.S.

    2017-01-01

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. 18 F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET/CT. Based on a priori defined criteria and the final diagnosis, results from each scan were classified as true or false, and diagnostic values determined. Among the 1,814 recipients in the cohort, 145 had an FDG PET/CT performed; 122 under the indication of diagnostically unresolved symptoms with a suspicion of malignancy or infection. The remaining (N = 23) had an FDG PET/CT to follow-up on a known disease or to stage a known malignancy. The 122 recipients underwent a total of 133 FDG PET/CT scans performed for a suspected malignancy (66 %) or an infection (34 %). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the FDG PET/CT in diagnosing these conditions were 97, 84, 87, and 96 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT is an accurate diagnostic tool for the work-up of diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients suspected of malignancy or infection. The high sensitivity and NPV underlines the potential usefulness of PET/CT for excluding malignancy or focal infections in this often complex clinical situation. (orig.)

  7. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareham, Neval E.; Lundgren, J.D. [Rigshospitalet, Centre for Health and Infectious Disease Research (CHIP), Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cunha-Bang, C. da; Sengeloev, H. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Haematology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gustafsson, F.; Iversen, M. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Johannesen, H.H.; Kjaer, A.; Fischer, B.M. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Rasmussen, A. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Soerensen, S.S. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Nephrology, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET/CT. Based on a priori defined criteria and the final diagnosis, results from each scan were classified as true or false, and diagnostic values determined. Among the 1,814 recipients in the cohort, 145 had an FDG PET/CT performed; 122 under the indication of diagnostically unresolved symptoms with a suspicion of malignancy or infection. The remaining (N = 23) had an FDG PET/CT to follow-up on a known disease or to stage a known malignancy. The 122 recipients underwent a total of 133 FDG PET/CT scans performed for a suspected malignancy (66 %) or an infection (34 %). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the FDG PET/CT in diagnosing these conditions were 97, 84, 87, and 96 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT is an accurate diagnostic tool for the work-up of diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients suspected of malignancy or infection. The high sensitivity and NPV underlines the potential usefulness of PET/CT for excluding malignancy or focal infections in this often complex clinical situation. (orig.)

  8. A comparison study of esophageal findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Kwan Hyeong; Kim, So Young; Cha, Jong Tae; Hwang, Sang Hyun; Lee, Narae; Yun, Mi Jin; Kang, Won Jun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the esophageal findings of 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). We retrospectively reviewed {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EGD findings of 369 subjects who underwent medical examination between January 2014 and December 2014. The range and intensity of esophageal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were visually analyzed. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the esophagus and around the esophagogastric (EG) junction was measured. EGD results were provided by the gastroenterologist. We compared the esophageal findings obtained using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EGD. There were typical linear FDG uptakes in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT patients who underwent EGD the same day. In visual analysis of the range and intensity of the {sup 18}F-FDG uptake, the patients who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EGD on the same day showed relatively diffuse and discernible {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the esophagus. Reflux esophagitis was diagnosed in 59 subjects, and 27 of these were classified as higher than Los Angeles classification A. With an increasing degree of reflux esophagitis observed on EGD, the SUV{sub max} in the esophagus and around the EG junction was also increased. Our study showed that FDG uptake at the esophagus or the EG junction might be clinically significantly related to esophagitis. However, EGD performed before {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT on the same day may affect the esophageal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake.

  9. Incidentally detected small intestine intussusception caused by primary small intenstine carcinoma on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jong; Oh, So Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong [Dept. of Nuclear MedicineSeoul Metropolitan Government - Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Small intestine intussusception in adults is a rare condition mainly caused by primary or metastatic small intestine malignancy. Here, we present a 72-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with small intestine cancer that was presented as small intestine intussusception on hybrid {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT). The patient was initially referred for an abnormality on a chest radiography and severe anemia. FDG PET/CT showed the lung lesion in the right upper lobe of lung as a high FDG uptake mass. Accidentally, FDG PET demonstrated another intense hypermetabolic intraluminal lesion in the small intestine accompanied with intussusception shown as a circumferential hypermetabolic wall. By pathologic examination, the patient was diagnosed as primary small intestine cancer with lung metastasis. This case highlights usefulness of hybrid FDG PET/CT to identify unexpected malignancy.

  10. Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to detect metastatic mucinous adencarcinoma within an inguinal hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Min, Byung Wook; Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Sun Il; Kang, Sang Hee; Jung, Sung Yup; Oh, Sang Chul; Choe, Jae Gol [Korea University College of Medicine, Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma in an inguinal hernia is a rare disease and the image findings of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) are little known. Here, we introduce a 57-year-old man with metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma in an inguinal hernia. On initial {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, hypermetabolism was observed in mucinous adenocarcinoma of the cecum, and adenocarcinomas of the transverse and ascending colon, respectively. Follow-up {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT revealed newly developed multiple hypermetabolism in peritoneal seeding masses and nodules in the pelvic cavity and scrotum. Peritoneal carcinomatosis in the right pelvic side wall was extended to the incarcerated peritoneum and mesentery in the right inguinoscrotal hernia. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was useful to reveal unexpected peritoneal seeding within the inguinal hernia. Also, this case demonstrated that metastatic mucinous adenocarcinomas had variably intense FDG uptake.

  11. F-18 FDG PET/CT Findings of a Patient with Takayasu Arteritis Before and After Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sait Sağer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Vasculitis is defined as inflammation and necrosis with leukocytic infiltration of the blood vessel wall. Takayasu arteritis is a chronic inflammatory arteritis that primarily involves the aorta and its main branches. A 64-year-old female patient with a 2-month history of fever of unknown origin was presented to our clinic for F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging. Baseline PET/CT images demonstrated intense F-18 FDG uptake in the aorta, bilateral subclavian and brachiocephalic arteries consistent with Takayasu arteritis. After 2 months of immunosuppressive therapy, she was asymptomatic and follow-up FDG PET/CT scan showed almost complete disappearance of large vessels’ F-18 FDG uptake. FDG PET/CT is a sensitive technique for assessing presence of large-vessel vasculitis such as Takayasu arteritis, extent of large-vessel inflammation and disease activity after therapy. (MIRT 2012;21:32-34

  12. Multifocal Colonic Lesions Detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT: Correlation with Histopathology and Gross Specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil

    2010-01-01

    A fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-computer tomography (CT) scan for staging. No definite abnormal FDG uptake of the stomach was shown. Incidentally, variable FDG uptake at the bilateral serrates muscles, abdominal muscles and muscles of both thighs (Fig. 1) was observed. He had no significant past medical history except recently diagnosed stomach cancer. On personal interview, he described having had sexual activity the night before the F-18 FDG PET/CT scan, although he was aware of needing to avoid physical activity before a PET scan. The F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was done at 2:00 p.m. Therefore, the hypermetabolism of individual skeletal muscles following sexual activity lasted over 12 h. This case illustrates the hypermetabolism of skeletal muscles following sexual activity as a normal variation.

  13. F-18 FDG PET/CT Findings of Subcutaneous Panniculitis - Like T- Cell Lymphoma : A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Eun Jung; Cho, Ihn Ho; Chun, Kyung Ah; Bae, Yeung Kyung; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Hyun, Myung Soo

    2009-01-01

    F-18 FDG PET is a metabolic imaging modality that is efficacious in staging and assessment of treatment response for variety of lymphomas. We report usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in evaluating severity of the disease and response to therapy in a patient with subcutaneous panniculitis- like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL). Here we describe a case of SPTCL in 24-year-old man who had wide spread firm and tender nodular lesions with increased F-18 FDG uptake. After chemotherapy follow up F-18 FDG PET/CT image shows disseminated malignancy and then the patient died with hemophagocytic syndrome. This report suggests that F-18 FDG PET/CT may be useful in determining disease activity at the time of initial diagnosis, after treatment, and evaluating a suspected outcome of SPTCL

  14. Skeletal metastasis as detected by 18F-FDG PET with negative CT of the PET/CT: Frequency and impact on cancer staging and or management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Ahmed

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study is to assess the frequency of detection of PET positive CT negative skeletal metastases (SM and determine the impact of such detection on staging and/or management in patients who had FDG PET/CT as part of the cancer work up.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 2000 18F-FDG PET/CT scans of known cancer patients. A log was kept to record cases of suspected SM with or without bone changes from the low-dose non-contrast CT. The presence or absence of SM was evaluated based on available pathological and clinical data. The impact of detection of such lesions on cancer staging and/or management was evaluated by a board certified oncologist.Results: Of the 2000 cases, 18F-FDG PET/CT suggested SM in 146/2000 (7.3%. Of those 146 cases, 105 (72% were positive on both PET and CT. The remaining 41 (28% had PET positive CT negative bone lesions. SM was confirmed in 36/41 (88% PET positive/CT negative cases. This was based on biopsy, imaging or clinical follow-up. The detection of PET positive CT negative SM did not change staging or management in 7/36 (19.4%. However, staging and/or management was affected in 29/36 (80.6%. Conclusions: SM is not uncommon in 18F-FDG PET/CT, as it accounts for 146/2000 (7.3% of cases. PET demonstrated FDG-avid SM without a CT abnormality in at least 36/146 (25%. Patients staging and or management changed in 29/36 (80.5%. We concluded that 18F-FDG PET is sensitive in detection of SM with significant impact on staging & or management. Key words18F-FDG PET/CT, Skeletal metastasis, PET positive, CT negative

  15. Potential role of combined FDG PET/CT and contrast enhancement MRI in a rectal carcinoma model with nodal metastases characterized by a poor FDG-avidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Conti, Giamaica; Merigo, Flavia; Tambalo, Stefano; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea; Quarta, Carmelo; D’Ambrosio, Daniela; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Nanni, Cristina; Rubello, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the additional role of MRI contrast enhancement (CE) in the primary tumor and the FDG uptake at PET in the lymph-node metastases. Materials and methods: A model of colorectal cancer induced by orthotopic HT-29 cells microinjection, producing pelvic lymph node metastases, was assessed using CE-MRI and FDG-PET. Histology and GLUT-1 immunohistochemistry were performed on primary tumors and iliac lymph nodes. Results: Primary tumors were characterized by low FDG-uptake but high CE-MRI, particularly at tumor periphery. Undetectable FDG-uptake characterized the metastatic lymph-nodes. Histology revealed large stromal bundles at tumor periphery and a dense network of stromal fibers and neoplastic cells in the inner portion of the tumors. Both primary tumors and positive lymph nodes showed poor GLUT-1 staining. Conclusion: Our data support the complementary role of MRI-CE and FDG PET in some types of carcinomas characterized by abundant cancer-associated stroma and poor FDG avidity consequent to poor GLUT-1 transported. In these tumors FDG-PET alone may be not completely adequate to obtain an adequate tumor radiotherapy planning, and a combination with dual CE-MRI is strongly recommended.

  16. Various forms of (18)F-FDG PET and PET/CT findings in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehak, Zdenek; Vasina, Jiri; Nemec, Petr; Fojtik, Zdenek; Koukalova, Renata; Bortlicek, Zbynek; Rehakova, Dorota; Adam, Jan; Vavrusova, Alena; Adam, Zdenek

    2015-12-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a disease presenting with pain and stiffness, mainly in shoulders, hip joints and neck. Laboratory markers of inflammation may bolster diagnosis. PMR afflicts patients over 50 years old, predominantly women, and may also accompany giant cell arteritis. 67 patients, who fullfiled Healey´s criteria for PMR in the period between 2004 and 2013 and had positive FDG PET (PET/CT) findings were retrospectively evaluated. FDG uptake was assessed in large arteries, proximal joints (shoulders, hips and sternoclavicular joints), in extraarticular synovial structures (interspinous, ischiogluteal and praepubic bursae). Articular/periarticular involvement (A) was detected in 59/67 (88.1%) patients and extrarticular synovial involvement (E) in 51/67 (76.1%) patients either individually or in combinations. Vascular involvement (V) was detected in 27/67 (40.3%) patients only in combination with articular (A) and/or extraarticular synovial (E) involvement. These combinations were: A+E involvement in 30/67 (44.8%) patients, A+V involvement in 8/67 (11.9%) patients, E+V involvement in 6/67 (9%) patients and A+E+V in 13/67 (19.4%) patients. PMR presents by articular/periarticular synovitis, extraarticular synovitis and can be accompanied by giant cell arteritis. All types of involvement have their distinct FDG PET (PET/CT) finding, which can be seen either individually or in any of their 4 combinations. FDG PET (PET/CT) examination seems to be an advantageous one-step examination for detecting different variants of PMR, for assessing extent and severity and also for excluding occult malignancy.

  17. Role of18F-FDG PET/CT in primary brain lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Bonilla-Damiá, Á; Fernández-López, R; Capote-Huelva, F J; de la Cruz-Vicente, F; Egea-Guerrero, J J; Borrego-Dorado, I

    To study the usefulness of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the initial evaluation and in the response assessment in primary brain lymphoma. A retrospective analysis was carried out on 18 patients diagnosed with primary brain lymphoma, a histological subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, on whom an initial 18 F-FDG PET/CT and MRI was performed, with 7 of the cases being analysed after the completion of treatment in order to assess response and clinical follow up. Initial 18 F-FDG PET/CT showed 26 hypermetabolic foci, whereas 46 lesions were detected by MRI. The average SUV maximum of the lesions was 17.56 with T/N 3.55. The concordance of both tests for identifying the same number of lesions was moderate, obtaining a kappa index of 0.395 (P<.001). In the evaluation of treatment, MRI identified 16 lesions compared to 7 pathological accumulations observed by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The concordance of both tests to assess type of response to treatment was moderate (kappa index 0.41) (P=.04). In both the initial evaluation and the assessment of the response to treatment, PET/CT led to a change strategy in 22% of patients who had lesions outside the cerebral parenchyma. MRI appears to be the method of choice for detecting brain disease in patients with primary brain lymphoma, whereas 18 F-FDG PET/CT seems to play a relevant role in the assessment of extra-cerebral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. 18F FDG PET/CT in differential diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa; Moon, S.; Mahajan, S.; Thapa, P.; Gupta, P.; Sahana; Tripathi, M.; Sharma, R.; Mondal, A.; Batla, A.; Nehru, R.; Kushwaha, S.; Mishra, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Differential diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders can be challenging in the early phase of disease course. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been used to identify characteristic patterns of glucose metabolism in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) as well as variant forms of Parkinsonism such as Multisystem Atrophy (MSA), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and cortico basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). In this study we assessed the utility of 18 F FDG PET/CT in the differential diagnosis Parkinsonian syndromes. 66 Parkinsonian patients with a mean age of 59.6 ± 11.50 years, male: female ratio of 3.12:1, age range of 35-84 years with a disease duration of 2.6 ± .68 years were referred for FDG PET to determine whether their scan patterns could distinguish idiopathic Parkinsons from the Parkinson plus syndromes. Approximately 60 minutes following intravenous injection of 370 MBq of 18 F-FDG, PET/CT scan of the brain was acquired in a whole-body Full Ring PET/CT scanner (Discovery STE16 camera). A low dose CT was obtained on the same area without IV contrast for attenuation correction and coregistration. Images were reconstructed using a 3D VUE algorithm and slices were reformatted into transaxial, coronal and sagittal views. Subsequently the images were processed and visually analyzed on Xeleris workstation. Images were classified by visual analysis into the various subgroups, those with normal to increased basal ganglia uptake were classified into Idiopathic Parkinson's (40/45) and when basal ganglia uptake was decreased they were Parkinsons Plus (19/21). The study demonstrates that 18 F FDG PET performed at the time of initial referral for parkinsonism could accurately classify patients into Parkinson's disease and Parkinson plus subtypes

  19. Performance of FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis in a rare lymphoma: nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grellier, Jean Francois; Weinmann, Pierre [AP-HP- Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Service de medecine nucleaire, Paris (France); Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Berenger, Nathalie [AP-HP- Hopital Saint-Louis, Service de medecine nucleaire, Paris (France); Leblanc, Thierry [Hopital Saint-Louis, Service d' immuno-hematologie, Paris (France); Thieblemont, Catherine [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite - INSERM UMR-S1165, AP-HP- Hopital Saint-Louis, Service d' hemato-Oncologie, Paris (France); Briere, Josette [AP-HP- Hopital Saint-Louis, Service de pathologie, Paris (France); Brice, Pauline [AP-HP- Hopital Saint-Louis, Service d' hemato-Oncologie, Paris (France)

    2014-11-15

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a rare Hodgkin lymphoma distinguished from classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) by the nature of the neoplastic cells which express B-cell markers. We wanted to determine the diagnostic performance of FDG PET/CT in initial assessment and its therapeutic impact on staging. We retrospectively studied a population of 35 patients with NLPHL (8 previously treated for NLHPL, 27 untreated). All patients underwent an initial staging by pretherapeutic FDG PET/CT. The impact on initial stage or relapse stage was assessed by an independent physician. In a per-patient analysis, the sensitivity of the pretherapeutic FDG PET/CT was 100 %. In a per-site analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of pretherapeutic FDG PET/CT were 100 %, 99 %, 97 %, 100 % and 99 %, respectively. Pretherapeutic FDG PET/CT led to a change in the initial stage/relapse stage in 12 of the 35 patients (34 %). In contrast to previous results established without FDG PET/CT, 20 % of patient had osteomedullary lesions. Pretherapeutic FDG PET/CT has excellent performance for initial staging or relapse staging of NLPHL. (orig.)

  20. The diagnostic value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI in suspected vertebral osteomyelitis - a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Scheper, Henk; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Bloem, Johan L; Janssen, Marcel J R; van den Hoven, Leon; Hosman, Allard J F; Visser, Leo G; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. From November 2015 until December 2016, 32 patients with suspected vertebral osteomyelitis were prospectively included. All patients underwent both 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI within 48 h. All images were independently reevaluated by two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physicians who were blinded to each others' image interpretation. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI were compared to the clinical diagnosis according to international guidelines. For 18 F-FDG-PET/CT, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis were 100%, 83.3%, 90.9%, and 100%, respectively. For MRI, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 100%, 91.7%, 95.2%, and 100%, respectively. MRI detected more epidural/spinal abscesses. An important advantage of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT is the detection of metastatic infection (16 patients, 50.0%). 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI are both necessary techniques in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. An important advantage of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT is the visualization of metastatic infection, especially in patients with bacteremia. MRI is more sensitive in detection of small epidural abscesses.

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT prediction of malignant versus benign lesion in patients presenting with adnexal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Majbritt; Iyer, Victor Vishwanath; Fisker, Rune Vincents

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose was to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT in the prediction of malignancy in patients with adnexal masses versus the clinical pathological staging. Our study compared the results of preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT findings with the intra-operative and histopa......Objectives: The purpose was to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT in the prediction of malignancy in patients with adnexal masses versus the clinical pathological staging. Our study compared the results of preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT findings with the intra......-operative and histopathological findings consecutively from January 2008 to April 2010. Methods: 104 patients (mean age 62 years, range: 32-89 years), with adnexal masses suspicious of ovarian cancer and elevated RMI > 200 underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT with intravenous contrast prior to surgery. The 18F-FDG PET/CT findings were...... classified as benign or malignant and the results were compared with the registered intra-operative findings and the final histopathological examination. Preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT-based staging was compared to the final histopathological staging according to FIGO 2003. Results: The preliminary results...

  2. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of malignant and infectious complications after solid organ transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Nastassja; Hubele, Fabrice; Heimburger, Celine; Namer, Izzie-Jacques; Herbrecht, Raoul; Blondet, Cyrille; Imperiale, Alessio [Hautepierre Hospital, University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Kessler, Romain; Caillard, Sophie; Epailly, Eric [Nouvel Hopital Civil, University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2017-03-15

    Infection and malignancy represent two common complications after solid organ transplantation, which are often characterized by poorly specific clinical symptomatology. Herein, we have evaluated the role of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in this clinical setting. Fifty-eight consecutive patients who underwent FDG PET/CT after kidney, lung or heart transplantation were included in this retrospective analysis. Twelve patients underwent FDG PET/CT to strengthen or confirm a diagnostic suspicion of malignancies. The remaining 46 patients presented with unexplained inflammatory syndrome, fever of unknown origin (FUO), CMV or EBV seroconversion during post-transplant follow-up without conclusive conventional imaging. FDG PET/CT results were compared to histology or to the finding obtained during a clinical/imaging follow-up period of at least 6 months after PET/CT study. Positive FDG PET/CT results were obtained in 18 (31 %) patients. In the remaining 40 (69 %) cases, FDG PET/CT was negative, showing exclusively a physiological radiotracer distribution. On the basis of a patient-based analysis, FDG PET/CT’s sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were respectively 78 %, 90 %, 78 % and 90 %, with a global accuracy of 86 %. FDG PET/CT was true positive in 14 patients with bacterial pneumonias (n = 4), pulmonary fungal infection (n = 1), histoplasmosis (n = 1), cutaneous abscess (n = 1), inflammatory disorder (sacroiliitis) (n = 1), lymphoma (n = 3) and NSCLC (n = 3). On the other hand, FDG PET/CT failed to detect lung bronchoalveolar adenocarcinoma, septicemia, endocarditis and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), respectively, in four patients. FDG PET/CT contributed to adjusting the patient therapeutic strategy in 40 % of cases. FDG PET/CT emerges as a valuable technique to manage complications in the post-transplantation period. FDG PET/CT should be considered in patients with severe

  3. 18F-FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of malignant and infectious complications after solid organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Nastassja; Hubele, Fabrice; Heimburger, Celine; Namer, Izzie-Jacques; Herbrecht, Raoul; Blondet, Cyrille; Imperiale, Alessio; Kessler, Romain; Caillard, Sophie; Epailly, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Infection and malignancy represent two common complications after solid organ transplantation, which are often characterized by poorly specific clinical symptomatology. Herein, we have evaluated the role of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in this clinical setting. Fifty-eight consecutive patients who underwent FDG PET/CT after kidney, lung or heart transplantation were included in this retrospective analysis. Twelve patients underwent FDG PET/CT to strengthen or confirm a diagnostic suspicion of malignancies. The remaining 46 patients presented with unexplained inflammatory syndrome, fever of unknown origin (FUO), CMV or EBV seroconversion during post-transplant follow-up without conclusive conventional imaging. FDG PET/CT results were compared to histology or to the finding obtained during a clinical/imaging follow-up period of at least 6 months after PET/CT study. Positive FDG PET/CT results were obtained in 18 (31 %) patients. In the remaining 40 (69 %) cases, FDG PET/CT was negative, showing exclusively a physiological radiotracer distribution. On the basis of a patient-based analysis, FDG PET/CT’s sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were respectively 78 %, 90 %, 78 % and 90 %, with a global accuracy of 86 %. FDG PET/CT was true positive in 14 patients with bacterial pneumonias (n = 4), pulmonary fungal infection (n = 1), histoplasmosis (n = 1), cutaneous abscess (n = 1), inflammatory disorder (sacroiliitis) (n = 1), lymphoma (n = 3) and NSCLC (n = 3). On the other hand, FDG PET/CT failed to detect lung bronchoalveolar adenocarcinoma, septicemia, endocarditis and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), respectively, in four patients. FDG PET/CT contributed to adjusting the patient therapeutic strategy in 40 % of cases. FDG PET/CT emerges as a valuable technique to manage complications in the post-transplantation period. FDG PET/CT should be considered in patients with severe

  4. Interim FDG-PET Scan in Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Hopes and Caveats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. André

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available FDG-PET has recently emerged as an important tool for the management of Hodgkins lymphoma. Although its use for initial staging and response evaluation at the end of treatment is well established, the place of interim PET for response assessment and subsequent treatment tailoring is still quite controversial. The use of interim PET after a few cycles of chemotherapy may allow treatment reduction for good responders, leading to lesser treatment toxicities as well as early treatment adaptation for bad responders with a potential higher chance for cure. Interpretation of interim PET is a rapidly moving field. Actually, visual interpretation is preferred over quantitative interpretation in this situation. The notion of minimal residual uptake emerged for faint persisting FDG uptake, but has evolved during the recent years. Guidelines using mediastinum and liver as references have been proposed at the expert meeting in Deauville 2009. Actually, several trials are ongoing both for localised and advanced disease to evaluate the FDG-PET potential for early treatment monitoring and tailoring. Until the results of these prospective randomized trials become available, treatment changes according to the interim PET results should remain inappropriate and limited to well-conducted clinical trials.

  5. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  6. False positive and false negative FDG-PET scans in various thoracic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jung Min; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Ho Young; Lee, Jong Jin; Chung, June Key; Im, Jung Gi

    2006-01-01

    Fluorodeoxygucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) is being used more and more to differentiate benign form malignant focal lesions and it has been shown to be more efficacious than conventional chest computed tomography (CT). However, FDG is not a cancer-specific agent, and false positive findings in benign diseases have been reported. Infectious diseases (mycobacterial, fungal, bacterial infection), sarcoidosis, radiation pneumonitis and post-operative surgical conditions have shown intense uptake on PET scan. On the other hand, tumors with low glycolytic activity such as adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, carcinoid tumors, low grade lymphomas and small sized tumors have revealed false negative findings on PET scan, Furthermore, in diseases located near the physiologic uptake sites (heart, bladder, kidney, and liver), FDG-PET should be complemented with other imaging modalities to confirm results and to minimize false negative findings. Familiarity with these false positive and negative findings will help radiologists interpret PET scans more accurately and also will help to determine the significance of the findings. In this review, we illustrate false positive and negative findings of PET scan in a variety of diseases

  7. Physiologic uptake of 18F-FDG in transposed ovaries may mimic metastasis on 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Tima; Komisar, Orna; Korach, Jacob; Felder, Shira; Apter, Sara; Ben-Haim, Simona; Perri, Tamar

    2018-02-01

    Ovarian transposition is aimed at preserving ovarian function before irradiation in pelvic malignancies. The extrapelvic location of the ovaries and their physiologic fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG)-uptake is a potential source of misdiagnosis as metastasis on F-FDG PET/CT. We describe the F-FDG PET/CT characteristics of transposed ovaries and their changes over time. We reviewed F-FDG PET/CT studies of all consecutive women with pelvic malignancies who underwent ovarian transposition between 2007 and 2013. Studies were grouped according to the time period over which they were carried out. Findings were categorized by location, size, appearance (solid/mixed/cystic), presence of surgical clips, ovarian F-FDG uptake (maximum standardized uptake value), and attenuation values on CT (Hounsfield units). Group time-period differences were assessed. Seventy-nine F-FDG PET/CT studies were reviewed, 30 before and 49 after transposition. Time-period groups after transposition were up to 4 months (18 studies), 4.1-12 months (n=14), and more than 12 months (n=17). After transposition, ovaries were located mainly in the paracolic gutter (n=32) and subhepatic regions (n=18). Surgical clips were present in 67%. Both ovaries appeared more solid 1 year after surgery than preoperatively (13.7% before vs. 61.3% after surgery; P<0.001). Transient F-FDG-avidity was observed in 11 ovaries. Hounsfield unit values were higher within 4 months after surgery than preoperatively, reverting thereafter to preoperative values. After ovarian transposition, nonanatomic location, loss of cysts formation in favor of solid appearance over time, and intermittent F-FDG uptake of functioning transposed ovaries might mimic metastatic lesions. Careful interpretation of F-FDG PET/CT findings is mandatory in women with pelvic malignancies who have undergone ovarian transposition.

  8. Solitary pulmonary nodules: impact of functional CT on the cost-effectiveness of FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.; Keith, C.J.; Wong, D.C.; Griffiths, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: FDG-PET has been shown to be cost-effective for the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) in Australia. This study evaluates the impact on cost-effectiveness produced by incorporating a novel CT technique, functional CT, into diagnostic algorithms for characterisation of SPNs. Four diagnostic strategies were evaluated using decision tree sensitivity analysis. The first strategy comprised patients undergoing conventional CT alone (CT). The second comprised conventional CT followed by functional CT study (FCT), when the SPN was not benign on conventional CT. The third strategy comprised conventional CT, which if positive is followed by FDG-PET (PET) and a fourth strategy where patients with a positive conventional CT undergo functional CT, which if positive also undergo FDG-PET (FCT+PET). Values for disease prevalence and diagnostic accuracy of PET, CT and functional CT were obtained from a literature review, using Australia values where available. Procedure costs were derived from the Medicare Benefits Schedule and DRG Cost Weights for Australian public hospitals. The cost per patient, accuracy and Incremental Cost-Accuracy Ratio (ICAR) were determined for each strategy. Sensitivity analysis evaluated the effect of disease prevalence on cost-effectiveness. Results: At the prevalence of malignancy reported from Australian series (54%), the FCT strategy incurs the least cost ($5560/patient), followed by the FCT+PET ($5910/patient). The FCT+PET strategy is the most cost-effective strategy with an ICAR of $12059/patient, followed by the PET strategy with an ICAR of $12300/patient. At levels of disease prevalence below 54% the above relationship for cost-effectiveness remains the same. For high levels of disease prevalence, CT or FCT are found to be more cost-effective. At typical prevalence of malignancy the cost-effectiveness of PET is enhanced by the addition of functional CT, but at high prevalence functional CT alone is most cost

  9. Clinical value of whole-body FDG-PET for recurrent gastric cancer. A multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, Yuji; Togashi, Kaori; Kaneta, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for suspected recurrent gastric cancer. We performed a retrospective review of 92 consecutive patients who underwent PET [either integrated PET/computed tomography (CT) or manual fusion of dedicated PET and CT] scans for post-treatment surveillance of gastric cancer between June 2006 and December 2007. Of these patients, 46 patients were suspected of recurrence by other imaging modalities (Group A), 19 patients were suspected of recurrence by tumor markers without definite findings (Group B) and the remaining 27 patients underwent a PET scan without evidence of recurrence (Group C). The diagnostic performance and prevalence of the clinical impact of FDG-PET were analyzed. Recurrence of gastric cancer was confirmed in 31 patients (67%) in Group A, in 11 patients (58%) in Group B and in 2 patients (7%) in Group C. In addition, colon cancer (n=3), lung cancer (n=1) and pulmonary carcinoid (n=1) were identified in five patients (5%). In patient-basis, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of PET for recurrence were 81%, 87% and 83%, respectively, in Group A, 73%, 88% and 79%, respectively, in Group B and 50%, 88% and 85%, respectively, in Group C. Therapeutic management was influenced by PET results in 22 patients (48%) in Group A, in 8 patients (42%) in Group B and in 2 patients (7%) in Group C, including cases in which PET was helpful for detecting second primary cancer. PET with FDG yielded useful information in patients with suspected recurrent gastric cancer, especially when recurrence was suspected in the clinical setting. (author)

  10. {sup 18}F-FDG PET in malignant lymphoma: significance of positive findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellucci, Paolo; Nanni, Cristina; Farsad, Mohsen; Monetti, Nino; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano [Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, UO Medicina Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Zinzani, PierLuigi; Alinari, Lapo; Tani, Monica; Stefoni, Vittorio [Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Istituto di Ematologia, Bologna (Italy); Pourdehnad, Michael; Alavi, Abass [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Battista, Giuseppe; Canini, Romeo [Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Istituto di Radiologia, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [S.Maria della Misericordia, UO Medicina Nucleare, Rovigo (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of increased uptake of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML) studied by positron emission tomography (PET). A total of 1,120 consecutive scans carried out in 848 patients were reviewed; all patients had a diagnosis of ML [574 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and 274 Hodgkin's disease (HD)] and were studied at completion of therapy, for suspected recurrence or during follow-up. PET was carried out after intravenous injection of 370 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG; images were recorded after 60-90 min. Patients were selected whose reports indicated areas of increased FDG uptake. PET findings were considered positive for lymphomatous localisation when uptake occurred at sites of previous disease, in asymmetrical lymph nodes or in nodes unlikely to be affected by inflammation (mediastinal, except for hilar, and abdominal). PET findings were adjudged negative for neoplastic localisations in the following instances: physiological uptake (urinary, muscular, thymic or gastrointestinal in patients without MALT), symmetrical nodal uptake, uptake in lesions unrelated to lymphoma that had already been identified by other imaging methods at the time of PET scan, uptake at sites atypical for lymphoma, very low uptake and non-focal uptake. PET findings were compared with the results of other diagnostic procedures (including CT and ultrasound), biopsy findings and follow-up data. Overall, 354 scans (in 256 patients) showed increased FDG uptake (244 scans in NHL and 110 in HD): in 286 cases, FDG uptake was considered pathological and indicative of ML, in 41 cases the findings were described as uncertain or equivocal and in 37 cases, FDG uptake was considered unrelated to ML (in ten scans, concurrent findings of abnormal FDG uptake attributed to ML and uptake assigned to other causes were obtained). Of the 286 patients with positive PET findings, 274 (95.8%) were found to have residual or

  11. Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in a Patient with AIDS on F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyung Sook; Choi, Byung Wook; Zeon, Seok Kil [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The distinction between primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and nonmalignant lesions due to opportunistic infections, in particular cerebral toxoplasmosis, is important because of the different treatments involved. A 32-year-old patient with AIDS was hospitalized for intermittent headaches. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small well-enhanced nodular lesion in the right frontal lobe. A fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) position emission tomography (PET)/ computed tomography (CT) scan showed moderate FDG uptake in the nodular lesion of the right frontal lobe. We present a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the differential diagnosis of the cerebral toxoplasmosis will be discussed.

  12. Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in a Patient with AIDS on F-18 FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyung Sook; Choi, Byung Wook; Zeon, Seok Kil

    2010-01-01

    The distinction between primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and nonmalignant lesions due to opportunistic infections, in particular cerebral toxoplasmosis, is important because of the different treatments involved. A 32-year-old patient with AIDS was hospitalized for intermittent headaches. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small well-enhanced nodular lesion in the right frontal lobe. A fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) position emission tomography (PET)/ computed tomography (CT) scan showed moderate FDG uptake in the nodular lesion of the right frontal lobe. We present a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the differential diagnosis of the cerebral toxoplasmosis will be discussed.

  13. Central Pontine Myelinolysis and Localized Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Seen on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Frederik; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten; Rørdam, Lene

    2017-01-01

    Case report describing the finding of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) using combined fluorine-18 ( 18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The patient was a known alcoholic who, during admission was under treatment for hyponatremia, showed...... a significant decline in both motor and cognitive function. Combined 18F-FDG PET/CT showed localized FDG uptake in the pons, consistent with the finding of CPM observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CPM is a demyelinating lesion of the pons, resulting in several neurological symptoms. The exact cause...... of CPM is not clear, but a strong relations between loss of myelin and osmotic stress exists, especially during rapid correction of hyponatremia. The osmotic stress is thought to induce disruption of the blood-brain barrier, allowing access for inflammatory mediators in extravascular brain tissue, which...

  14. Use of FDG PET/CT for investigation of febrile neutropenia: evaluation in high-risk cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Stephen D; Tramontana, Adrian R; Worth, Leon J; Lau, Eddie; Hicks, Rodney J; Seymour, John F; Thursky, Karin A; Slavin, Monica A

    2012-08-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FNP) is a frequent complication of cancer care and evaluation often fails to identify a cause. [(18) F]FDG PET/CT has the potential to identify inflammatory and infectious foci, but its potential role as an investigation for persistent FNP has not previously been explored. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in patients with cancer and severe neutropenia and five or more days of persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Adult patients with a diagnosis of an underlying malignancy and persistent FNP (temperature ≥38°C and neutrophil count FNP who fulfilled the eligibility criteria and underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to conventional evaluation. The median neutrophil count on the day of the FDG PET/CT scan was 30 cells/μl (range 0-730 cells/μl). Conventional evaluation identified 14 distinct sites of infection, 13 (93 %) of which were also identified by FDG PET/CT, including all deep tissue infections. FDG PET/CT identified 9 additional likely infection sites, 8 of which were subsequently confirmed as "true positives" by further investigations. FDG PET/CT was deemed to be of 'high' clinical impact in 15 of the 20 patients (75 %). This study supports the utility of FDG PET/CT scanning in severely neutropenic patients with five or more days of fever. Further evaluation of the contribution of FDG PET/CT in the management of FNP across a range of underlying malignancies is required.

  15. Clinical value of FDG-PET/CT in suspected paraneoplastic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine Bjørn; Hess, Søren; Petersen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    patients were included. Main causes for referral were neurological (n = 67), rheumatological (n = 25), dermatological (n = 18), nephrological (n = 6), haematological (n = 2), abnormal biochemistry (n = 11), and others (n = 8). The cancer prevalence was 8.8 %. The FDG-PET/CT results were as follows: nine...

  16. Assessing response to chemotherapy in metastatic melanoma with FDG PET: Early experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Constantinidou, Anastasia; Acland, Katharine; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; O'Doherty, Michael

    2007-12-01

    The management of metastatic melanoma remains challenging with only modest response rates to chemotherapy but the need to identify the best re-staging techniques remains paramount. This study evaluates our early experience in the use of FDG PET-CT in the assessment of early response to chemotherapy in metastatic melanoma. FDG PET-CT was performed at baseline and following two or three cycles of combination or single agent chemotherapy in seven patients. Response was assessed visually as complete, partial metabolic response or progressive disease. There was intense FDG uptake in all metastases at baseline. Following two to three cycles of chemotherapy, there was a complete metabolic response (CMR) in one patient, partial metabolic response (PMR) in two patients and progressive metabolic disease (PMD) in the remaining three patients. Survival was 679 days in the single patient with a CMR, median of 206 and 129 days in the patients with PMR and PMD respectively. This pilot study demonstrates the potential use of FDG PET as a biomarker in early response assessment to chemotherapy in metastatic melanoma. PET-CT already plays in integral role in staging high risk melanoma patients and it may also have a promising role in assessing response to current and novel therapies. Further larger studies examining specific therapies and optimal timing are required.

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Dual time-point FDG PET/CT for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography. (PET) is an accurate non-invasive imaging test for differentiating benign from malignant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). We aimed to assess its diagnostic accuracy for differentiating benign from malignant SPNs in a tuberculosis (TB)-endemic area.

  18. Dual time-point FDG PET/CT for differentiating benign from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) is an accurate non-invasive imaging test for differentiating benign from malignant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). We aimed to assess its diagnostic accuracy for differentiating benign from malignant SPNs in a tuberculosis (TB)-endemic area.

  19. An unusual orbital localization of wegener granulomatosis detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagna, Francesco; Treglia, Giorgio; Rossini, Pierluigi; Giubbini, Raffaele

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old male patient affected by Wegener granulomatosis and left exophthalmos who underwent F-FDG PET/CT during follow-up for rectal cancer. The study was negative for secondary lesions but revealed high uptake at the left orbital mass consistent with Wegener granulomatosis.

  20. FDG-PET/CT for detection of the unknown primary head and neck tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jørgen; Petersen, H; Godballe, C

    2011-01-01

    The benefit of FDG-PET in addition to standard work-up for carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) and metastatic neck lesions has been widely described. However, most studies have been of retrospective nature with large heterogeneities in terms of workup standards and patient selection leaving several...

  1. Detection of penile metastasis from bladder cancer using F 18 FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yun; Lee, Jong Jin [Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    A 74 year old man who had experienced priapism for 2 months after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer visited our hospital, and underwent metastatic work up {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography(PET/CT)showed diffuse hypermetabolic activity along the penis shaft, which was confirmed as a penile metastasis.

  2. The role of 18F-FDG PET in characterising disease activity in Takayasu arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Myles; Chambers, Anthony; AL-Nahhas, Adil; Maudlin, Lucy; Rahman, Lucy; Frank, John; Mason, Justin C.

    2004-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a rare, sporadic and chronic inflammatory arteritis, which predominantly affects the aorta and its branches. Diagnosis can be difficult and there are limitations to the current diagnostic work-up. By detecting areas of active glucose metabolism present in active vasculitis, imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) could potentially have a role in the management of TA. Our aim was to assess this role by reviewing 28 18 F-FDG PET scans performed on 18 patients suspected of having TA. All patients had full clinical and laboratory assessment, cross-sectional imaging and angiography, and 16/18 satisfied the American College of Rheumatologists' criteria for TA. 18 F-FDG PET achieved a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 100%, and negative and positive predictive values of 85% and 100% respectively in the initial assessment of active vasculitis in TA. We conclude that 18 F-FDG PET can be used to diagnose early disease, to detect active disease (even within chronic changes) and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. (orig.)

  3. The role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in characterising disease activity in Takayasu arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Myles; Chambers, Anthony; AL-Nahhas, Adil; Maudlin, Lucy; Rahman, Lucy; Frank, John [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, W12 0HS, London (United Kingdom); Mason, Justin C. [Department of Rheumatology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a rare, sporadic and chronic inflammatory arteritis, which predominantly affects the aorta and its branches. Diagnosis can be difficult and there are limitations to the current diagnostic work-up. By detecting areas of active glucose metabolism present in active vasculitis, imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) could potentially have a role in the management of TA. Our aim was to assess this role by reviewing 28 {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans performed on 18 patients suspected of having TA. All patients had full clinical and laboratory assessment, cross-sectional imaging and angiography, and 16/18 satisfied the American College of Rheumatologists' criteria for TA. {sup 18}F-FDG PET achieved a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 100%, and negative and positive predictive values of 85% and 100% respectively in the initial assessment of active vasculitis in TA. We conclude that {sup 18}F-FDG PET can be used to diagnose early disease, to detect active disease (even within chronic changes) and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. (orig.)

  4. Muscle Activity during Walking Measured Using 3D MRI Segmentations and FDG-PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, S.; Klawer, Edzo M.E.; Schepers, Jan; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Visser, Eric P.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2015-01-01

    AB Purpose: This study aimed to determine the contribution of each muscle of the lower limb to walking using positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Furthermore, we compared our results obtained with volumetric analysis of entire muscles to a more traditional approach

  5. How to perform a comprehensive search for FDG-PET literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijnhout, G. S.; Hooft, L.; van Tulder, M. W.; Devillé, W. L.; Teule, G. J.; Hoekstra, O. S.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive, unbiassed search strategy for identifying literature on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in Medline, Embase and Current Contents was developed, with specific search strategies for each database, using MeSH terms as well as free

  6. Detection ability of FDG-PET/CT comparing with other imaging modalities in multiple myeloma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Lee, Tae Hyun; Pai, Moon Sun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by bone marrow infiltration with malignant plasma cells. It is important to detect involving bone for diagnosis and management of MM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic ability and limitation of 18F-FDG-PET/CT (PET/CT) comparing other imaging modalities (separated PET and CT, whole body plain X-ray (XR), bone scintigraphy (BS), and MRI) in MM. Twenty PET/CT scans were performed in 16 patients (M: F=6: 10, median age=59 y). PET/CT findings were compared with available other images (n of CT=21, XR=21, BS=8, and MRI=5). Concordance with more than 2 image modalities, laboratory data, symptom, and biopsies were used for diagnosis of detected lesions. PET/CT revealed 256 of total 287 sites (sensitivity, 89.2%; accuracy, 84.8%). The sensitivity and accuracy of separating PET, CT, and XR were 86.3%, 70.4%; 47.4%, 50.3%; and 72.8%, 72.4%, respectively. Available BS identified 67 of 202 sites (sensitivity, 33.2%; accuracy, 44.0%). MRI detected 20 of 24 sites (sensitivity, 83.3%; accuracy, 36.3%). False positive rate (FP) of PET, XR, and MRI was as high as 87.8%, 95.1%, and 100%. PET for rib lesion identified 9 of 10 patients (90.0%) but for skull lesion only 4 of 7 patients (57.2%) with underestimation. 5 patients in MRI showed diffuse marrow signal change but only 3 had marrow involvement. But PET/CT showed higher accuracy than MRI. PET/CT was the most useful tool for detecting involving bone of MM comparing with other imaging modalities. Moreover, PET/CT is expected to overcome the limitations for the small osteolytic bone lesions with diffuse FDG uptake on PET

  7. Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake on FDG PET are associated with cardiovascular risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Hyun Yeol; Jun, Sung Min; Pak, Kyoung June; Kim, In Joo

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake are sometimes observed on fluorine-18-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated the potential clinical significance of this uptake pattern related to metabolic syndrome (MS). We retrospectively reviewed data from 264 consecutive males who had undergone general health check-ups, including FDG PET/CT scans. After an overnight fast, the men had their peripheral blood drawn and the levels of various laboratory parameters measured; an FDG PET/CT scan was performed on the same day. We measured the maximum standardized uptake values of the brain and liver from regions of interest manually placed over the frontal cortex at the level of the centrum semiovale and the right lobe of the liver parenchyma, respectively. Fasting blood glucose (FBG; odds ratio [OR] = 1.063, p < 0.001) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; OR = 3.634, p = 0.010) were the strongest predictive factors for low brain FDG uptake, whereas waist circumference (OR = 1.200, p < 0.001) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (OR = 1.012, p = 0.001) were the strongest predictive factors for high liver uptake. Eleven subjects (4.2%) showed concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake, and all but one of these subjects (90.9%) had MS. Systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, FBG, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, insulin resistance (measured by homeostasis model assessment), insulin, HbA1c, and body mass index were higher in subjects with this FDG uptake pattern than in those without (all, p < 0.001). Concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake were closely associated with MS. Moreover, subjects with this pattern had higher values for various cardiovascular risk factors than did those without

  8. Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake on FDG PET are associated with cardiovascular risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun Yeol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Sung Min [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Pak, Kyoung June; Kim, In Joo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake are sometimes observed on fluorine-18-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated the potential clinical significance of this uptake pattern related to metabolic syndrome (MS). We retrospectively reviewed data from 264 consecutive males who had undergone general health check-ups, including FDG PET/CT scans. After an overnight fast, the men had their peripheral blood drawn and the levels of various laboratory parameters measured; an FDG PET/CT scan was performed on the same day. We measured the maximum standardized uptake values of the brain and liver from regions of interest manually placed over the frontal cortex at the level of the centrum semiovale and the right lobe of the liver parenchyma, respectively. Fasting blood glucose (FBG; odds ratio [OR] = 1.063, p < 0.001) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; OR = 3.634, p = 0.010) were the strongest predictive factors for low brain FDG uptake, whereas waist circumference (OR = 1.200, p < 0.001) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (OR = 1.012, p = 0.001) were the strongest predictive factors for high liver uptake. Eleven subjects (4.2%) showed concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake, and all but one of these subjects (90.9%) had MS. Systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, FBG, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, insulin resistance (measured by homeostasis model assessment), insulin, HbA1c, and body mass index were higher in subjects with this FDG uptake pattern than in those without (all, p < 0.001). Concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake were closely associated with MS. Moreover, subjects with this pattern had higher values for various cardiovascular risk factors than did those without.

  9. F-18 FDG PET/CT findings of metastatic ovarian tumors from gastrointestinal tract origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Lim; Yoo, Ie Ryung; O, Joo Hyun; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2015-10-01

    To review the F-18 FDG PET/CT findings of metastatic ovarian tumors and to determine any correlation between FDG uptake by metastatic ovarian tumors and that by the primary tumors. PET/CT performed from June 2005 to March 2011 on patients with metastatic ovarian tumors of gastrointestinal tract origin malignancies was analyzed retrospectively. The SUV(max) of metastatic ovarian tumors and primary tumors, when available, was measured. Thirty-two patients were included. Of the 32 cases, 20 had metastatic tumors in bilateral ovaries and 12 had in a single ovary. The mean SUV(max) of the 52 total lesions was 4.1 ± 3.1 (range 1.2-13.3), and 46 lesions showed a heterogeneous FDG uptake pattern. In 22 cases with available primary tumor SUV(max) values, there was a moderate positive correlation with the SUV(max) of the corresponding metastatic tumors (r = 0.559, p = 0.007). There was no significant correlation between the size and SUV(max) of metastatic ovarian tumors (p = 0.128). The mean SUV(max) of metastatic ovarian tumors from colorectal cancers was significantly higher than that of stomach cancers (p = 0.039). Metastatic ovarian tumors showed FDG uptake of variable intensity, depending on the primary tumor type. The FDG uptake pattern was heterogeneous by PET imaging in vast majority of the cases. When the primary tumor demonstrates a low FDG uptake, careful evaluation is necessary since the metastatic ovarian tumors may also show low FDG uptake.

  10. Thyroid Incidentalomas on 18F-FDG PET/CT: Clinical Significance and Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Makis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the current study is to examine the incidence and clinical significance of unexpected focal uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT in the thyroid gland of oncology patients, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax of benign and malignant thyroid incidentalomas in these patients, and review the literature. Methods: Seven thousand two hundred fifty-two 18F-FDG PET/CT studies performed over four years, were retrospectively reviewed. Studies with incidental focal 18F-FDG uptake in the thyroid gland were further analyzed. Results: Incidental focal thyroid 18F-FDG uptake was identified in 157 of 7252 patients (2.2%. Sufficient follow-up data (≥12 months were available in 128 patients, of whom 57 (45% had a biopsy performed and 71 had clinical follow-up. Malignancy was diagnosed in 14 of 128 patients (10.9%. There was a statistically significant difference between the median SUVmax of benign thyroid incidentalomas (SUVmax 4.8 vs malignant (SUVmax 6.3, but the wide range of overlap between the two groups yielded no clinically useful SUVmax threshold value to determine malignancy. Conclusion: 18F-FDG positive focal thyroid incidentalomas occurred in 2.2% of oncologic PET/CT scans, and were malignant in 10.9% of 128 patients. This is the lowest reported malignancy rate in a North American study to date, and significantly lower than the average malignancy rate (35% reported in the literature. Invasive biopsy of all 18F-FDG positive thyroid incidentalomas, as recommended by some studies, is unwarranted and further research to determine optimal management is needed. There was no clinically useful SUVmax cut-off value to determine malignancy and PET/CT may not be a useful imaging modality to follow these patients conservatively.

  11. Malignancy rate of biopsied suspicious bone lesions identified on FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Hugo J.A.; Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de [Meander Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Heggelman, Ben G.F. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Dubois, Stefan V. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2016-07-15

    To determine the malignancy rate of bone lesions identified on FDG PET/CT in patients who have undergone CT-guided biopsy because of the suspicion of malignancy. This single-centre retrospective study spanned eight consecutive years and included all patients who underwent both FDG PET/CT and CT-guided bone biopsy because of the suspicion of malignancy. The positive predictive value (PPV) for malignancy was calculated, and different patient and imaging characteristics were compared between malignant and benign bone lesions. Of 102 included patients with bone lesions that all showed FDG uptake exceeding mediastinal uptake, bone biopsy showed a malignant lesion in 91 patients, yielding a PPV for malignancy of 89.2 % (95 % CI 81.7 - 93.9 %). In the 94 patients with bone lesions that showed FDG uptake exceeding liver uptake, bone biopsy showed a malignant lesion in 83 patients, yielding a PPV for malignancy of 88.3 % (95 % CI 80.1 - 93.5 %). Higher age, bone marrow replacement of the lesion seen on CT, expansion of the lesion seen on CT, and presence of multifocal lesions on FDG PET/CT were significantly more frequent in patients with malignant lesions than in those with benign bone lesions (P = 0.044, P = 0.009, P = 0.015, and P = 0.019, respectively). Furthermore, there was a trend towards a higher incidence of cortical destruction (P = 0.056) and surrounding soft tissue mass (P = 0.063) in patients with malignant bone lesions. The PPV for malignancy of suspicious bone lesions identified on FDG PET/CT is not sufficiently high to justify changes in patient management without histopathological confirmation. Nevertheless, ancillary patient and imaging characteristics may increase the likelihood of a malignant bone lesion. (orig.)

  12. Reduced FDG-PET brain metabolism and executive function predict clinical progression in elderly healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ewers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain changes reminiscent of Alzheimer disease (AD have been previously reported in a substantial portion of elderly cognitive healthy (HC subjects. The major aim was to evaluate the accuracy of MRI assessed regional gray matter (GM volume, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, and neuropsychological test scores to identify those HC subjects who subsequently convert to mild cognitive impairment (MCI or AD dementia. We obtained in 54 healthy control (HC subjects a priori defined region of interest (ROI values of medial temporal and parietal FDG-PET and medial temporal GM volume. In logistic regression analyses, these ROI values were tested together with neuropsychological test scores (free recall, trail making test B (TMT-B as predictors of HC conversion during a clinical follow-up between 3 and 4 years. In voxel-based analyses, FDG-PET and MRI GM maps were compared between HC converters and HC non-converters. Out of the 54 HC subjects, 11 subjects converted to MCI or AD dementia. Lower FDG-PET ROI values were associated with higher likelihood of conversion (p = 0.004, with the area under the curve (AUC yielding 82.0% (95% CI = (95.5%, 68.5%. The GM volume ROI was not a significant predictor (p = 0.07. TMT-B but not the free recall tests were a significant predictor (AUC = 71% (95% CI = 50.4%, 91.7%. For the combination of FDG-PET and TMT-B, the AUC was 93.4% (sensitivity = 82%, specificity = 93%. Voxel-based group comparison showed reduced FDG-PET metabolism within the temporo-parietal and prefrontal cortex in HC converters. In conclusion, medial temporal and-parietal FDG-PET and executive function show a clinically acceptable accuracy for predicting clinical progression in elderly HC subjects.

  13. Evaluation of 18F-FDG PET in acute ischemic stroke. Assessment of hyper accumulation around the lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Seiji; Hata, Takashi; Nakajima, Tooru; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2002-01-01

    Although pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease has been reported previously, few clinical studies of glucose metabolism in acute stroke have been published. Purpose of this study is to evaluate glucose metabolism in acute stroke patients by 18 F-FDG PET. Twenty-four patients with acute ischemic stroke were involved in this study. All subjects underwent MRI (conventional T1- and T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MR angiography), CT and 18 F-FDG PET. 18 F-FDG PET was performed within 1 to 7 days after the first episode. 18 F-FDG PET images were visually evaluated as well as MRI and CT images. Four patients out of 24 showed no abnormal 18 F-FDG accumulation, while MRI demonstrated abnormal signal area and abnormal vascular findings that suggested acute stroke. Decreased 18 F-FDG accumulation corresponding with abnormal signal area on MR images was noted in 20 cases. In 7 cases among these 20 with decreased 18 F-FDG, hyper accumulation of 18 F-FDG was recognized around the decreased accumulation area. Increased 18 F-FDG accumulation (increased glucose metabolization) around the lesion may be due to: acceleration of anaerobic glycolysis, activated repair process of damaged brain tissue, i.e., phagocytosis and gliosis, and neuronal excitation by excito-toxic amino acids which can be released after ischemia. (author)

  14. Analysis of Metabolism of 6FDG: A PET Glucose Transport Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzic, Raymond F.; Chandramouli, Visvanathan; Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Wu, Chunying; Wang, Yanming; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We are developing 18F-labeled 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]6FDG) as a tracer of glucose transport. As part of this process it is important to characterize and quantify putative metabolites. In contrast to the ubiquitous PET tracer 18F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]2FDG) which is phosphorylated and trapped intracellularly, the substitution of fluorine for a hydroxyl group at carbon 6 in [18F]6FDG should prevent its phosphorylation. Consequently, [18F]6FDG has the potential to trace the transport step of glucose metabolism without the confounding effects of phosphorylation and subsequent steps of metabolism. Herein the focus is to determine whether, and the degree to which, [18F]6FDG remains unchanged following intravenous injection. Methods Biodistribution studies were performed using 6FDG labeled with 18F as well as the longer-lived radionuclides 3H and 14C. Tissues were harvested at 1, 6, and 24 h following intravenous administration and radioactivity was extracted from the tissues and analyzed using a combination of ion exchange columns, high-performance liquid chromatography, and chemical reactivity. Results At the 1 h time-point, the vast majority of radioactivity in the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and blood was identified as 6FDG. At the 6- and 24-h time-points there was evidence of a minor amount of radioactive materials that appeared to be 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-sorbitol and possibly 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-gluconic acid. Conclusion On the time scale typical of PET imaging studies radioactive metabolites of [18F]6FDG are negligible. PMID:21718942

  15. Analysis of metabolism of 6FDG: a PET glucose transport tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzic, Raymond F., E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Chandramouli, Visvanathan [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Huang, Hsuan-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Wu Chunying; Wang Yanming [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz [Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: We are developing {sup 18}F-labeled 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]6FDG) as a tracer of glucose transport. As part of this process it is important to characterize and quantify putative metabolites. In contrast to the ubiquitous positron emission tomography (PET) tracer {sup 18}F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]2FDG) which is phosphorylated and trapped intracellularly, the substitution of fluorine for a hydroxyl group at carbon-6 in [{sup 18}F]6FDG should prevent its phosphorylation. Consequently, [{sup 18}F]6FDG has the potential to trace the transport step of glucose metabolism without the confounding effects of phosphorylation and subsequent steps of metabolism. Herein the focus is to determine whether, and the degree to which, [{sup 18}F]6FDG remains unchanged following intravenous injection. Methods: Biodistribution studies were performed using 6FDG labeled with {sup 18}F or with the longer-lived radionuclides {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C. Tissues were harvested at 1, 6, and 24 h following intravenous administration and radioactivity was extracted from the tissues and analyzed using a combination of ion exchange columns, high-performance liquid chromatography, and chemical reactivity. Results: At the 1 h time-point, the vast majority of radioactivity in the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and blood was identified as 6FDG. At the 6-h and 24-h time points, there was evidence of a minor amount of radioactive material that appeared to be 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-sorbitol and possibly 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-gluconic acid. Conclusion: On the time scale typical of PET imaging studies radioactive metabolites of [{sup 18}F]6FDG are negligible.

  16. Pyelo-cystic Reflux in F-18 FDG PET Scan Due to Ureteral Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyhan, Mehmet [Baskent Univ., Adana (Turkmenistan)

    2013-09-15

    A 72-year-old woman with a history of cervical cancer was treated with brachytherapy and chemotherapy. Combined F-18 FDG PET/CT performed for restaging demonstrated increased FDG uptake in a hypodense cystic lesion at the posterior part of the right renal cortex and a hypermetabolic soft tissue mass at the right parailiac region suggestive of a metastatic lymph node causing ureteral obstruction. There had been no FDG uptake in the cystic lesion on the FDG PET/CT study performed 1 year before. These findings suggest that the increased FDG uptake in the cystic lesion was caused by pyelocystic reflux due to ureteral obstruction secondary to parailiac lymph node metastasis (Figs. 1 and 2). Several renal lesions may have increased metabolism, such as renal cell carcinoma, lymphoma, oncocytoma, adult Wilms' tumor, angiomyolipoma, metastatic lesions, xanthogranulo-matous pyelonephritis and infected cyst. Most of these lesions are solid. Some infected renal cysts may be FDG avid, but in this situation increased FDG uptake is observed on the wall of the cyst. In our case, FDG uptake was seen in the entire cystic lesion. The patient had no symptoms or laboratory findings related to infection. Cysts are the most common space-occupying lesions of the kidney. The vast majority of these are simple cysts that are usually unilateral and solitary. Simple cysts are asymptomatic, except when complications exist such as hemorrhage, infection or rupture. There have been a few reports on spontaneous communications between renal cysts and the pyelocaliceal system, in most cases involving ruptures of the cysts into the pyelocaliceal system due to increased intracystic pressure caused by bleeding or infection of the cyst. In the present case, the cause of the connection between the cystic cavity and the pyelocaliceal system is the increased pressure in the renal pelvic cavity due to the ureteral obstruction secondary to parailiac lymph node metastasis.

  17. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT changes therapy management in high-risk DTC after first radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra J.; Goerges, Rainer; Bockisch, Andreas; Binse, Ina [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Advanced tumour stage and initial metastases are associated with reduced general and tumour-free survival in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Optimal initial therapy is mandatory for a positive patient outcome, but can only be performed if all non-iodine-avid tumour lesions are known before planning treatment. We analysed the benefit of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis in patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma and determined whether the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT results led to a deviation from the standard procedure, which consists of two consecutive radioiodine treatments with thyroid hormone suppression in between and no additional imaging, with individual patient management. The study group comprised 90 consecutive patients with either extensive or metastasized high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma who received {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT after the first radioiodine treatment approximately 4 weeks after thyroidectomy under endogenous TSH stimulation. We carried out PET/CT imaging with low-dose CT without contrast medium, which we only used for attenuation correction of PET images. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 26 patients (29%) and negative in 64 patients (71%). Compared to the results of posttherapeutic {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy, the same lesions were PET-positive in 7 of the 26 patients, different lesions were PET-positive in 15 patients, and some PET-positive lesions were the same and some were different in 4 patients. TNM staging was changed due to the PET results in 8 patients. Management was changed in 19 of the 90 patients (21%), including all patients with only FDG-positive lesions and all patients with both FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions. Age was not a predictive factor for the presence of FDG-positive lesions. FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions were associated with high serum thyroglobulin. However, at low serum thyroglobulin values, tumour lesions (iodine- and/or FDG-avid) were also

  18. Role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the management of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Jin; Lee, Jin Soo; Cheong, Moon Hyun; Byun, Sung Su; Hyun, In Young [Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    We present a case of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to salmonella enteritidis. F-18 FDG PET/CT was performed to diagnosis and during follow-up after antibiotic treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the best diagnostic imaging modality in infected aortic lesions. In this case, a combination of CT and FDG PET/CT provided accurate information for the diagnosis of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm. Moreover, FDG PET/CT made an important contribution of monitoring disease activity during antibiotic treatment.

  19. Lymphadenopathy by scrub typhus mimicking metastasis on FDG PET/CT in a patient with a history of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Kyu Taek; Kim, Sung Young; Han, Sun Wook; Kim, Shin Young [Sooncheonhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman with left-sided breast cancer who showed lymphadenopathy mimicking metastatic lesions. She underwent surveillance 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) after treatment. PET/CT demonstrated multiple lymphadenopathies with increased FDG uptake, most notably in the right axilla. She had an eschar on the right axillary area, and her serologic test was positive for anti-Orientia tsutsugamushi IgM antibody. Ten months after the treatment, follow-up FDG PET/CT and ultrasonography showed improvement in generalized lymphadenopathy.

  20. 18F-FDG PET/CT changes therapy management in high-risk DTC after first radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra J.; Goerges, Rainer; Bockisch, Andreas; Binse, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Advanced tumour stage and initial metastases are associated with reduced general and tumour-free survival in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Optimal initial therapy is mandatory for a positive patient outcome, but can only be performed if all non-iodine-avid tumour lesions are known before planning treatment. We analysed the benefit of 18 F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis in patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma and determined whether the 18 F-FDG PET/CT results led to a deviation from the standard procedure, which consists of two consecutive radioiodine treatments with thyroid hormone suppression in between and no additional imaging, with individual patient management. The study group comprised 90 consecutive patients with either extensive or metastasized high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma who received 18 F-FDG PET/CT after the first radioiodine treatment approximately 4 weeks after thyroidectomy under endogenous TSH stimulation. We carried out PET/CT imaging with low-dose CT without contrast medium, which we only used for attenuation correction of PET images. 18 F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 26 patients (29%) and negative in 64 patients (71%). Compared to the results of posttherapeutic 131 I whole-body scintigraphy, the same lesions were PET-positive in 7 of the 26 patients, different lesions were PET-positive in 15 patients, and some PET-positive lesions were the same and some were different in 4 patients. TNM staging was changed due to the PET results in 8 patients. Management was changed in 19 of the 90 patients (21%), including all patients with only FDG-positive lesions and all patients with both FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions. Age was not a predictive factor for the presence of FDG-positive lesions. FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions were associated with high serum thyroglobulin. However, at low serum thyroglobulin values, tumour lesions (iodine- and/or FDG-avid) were also diagnosed. Thus, the serum

  1. The Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET as a Cancer Screening Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Doo Heun; Choi, Joon Young; Song, Yun Mi; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Lee, Moon Kyu [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects. The subjects were 1,762 men and 259 women who voluntarily underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET for cancer screening as a part of a routine health examination. Final diagnosis was decided by other diagnostic studies, pathological results or clinical follow-up for 1 year. Of 2,021 subjects, 40 (2.0%) were finally proved to have cancer. Abnormal focal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake suggesting malignancy was found in 102 subjects (5.0%). Among them, 21 subjects (1.0%) were proved to have cancer. Other tests in the routine health examination could not find 9 of 21 cancers (42.9%) detected by PET. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PET for cancer screening were 52.5%, 95.9%, 20.6%, and 99.0%, respectively. Pathologies of cancers missed on PET were adenocarcinoma (n=9; 3 colon cancers, 3 prostate cancers, 2 stomach cancers, and 1 rectal cancer), differentiated thyroid carcinoma (n=6), bronchioalveolar cell carcinoma (n=2), urinary bladder cancer (n=1), and melanoma (n=1). More than half of cancers which were not detected by PET were smaller than 1 cm in diameter. {sup 18}F-FDG PET might be useful for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects due to its high specificity and negative predictive value and play a supplementary role to the conventional health check-up, but it could not replace due to limited sensitivity for urological cancers, small-sized tumors and some hypometaboic cancers.

  2. Diffuse occipital hypometabolism on [18 F]-FDG PET scans in patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder: prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Iseki, Eizo; Murayama, Norio; Yamamoto, Ryoko; Higashi, Shinji; Kasanuki, Koji; Suzuki, Masaru; Arai, Heii; Sato, Kiyoshi

    2010-09-01

    Previous longitudinal studies have revealed that specific patterns on [(18) F]-fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scans in patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment can predict Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the significance of particular patterns on [(18) F]-FDG PET scans in prodromal patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) remains unclear. Based on the prevailing evidence that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) often precedes the onset of DLB, [(18) F]-FDG PET scans of nine non-demented patients reporting recurrent nocturnal dream-enactment behavior in our memory clinic were compared with the normative database using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) images. All patients underwent clinical and neuropsychological examinations as well as cardiac [(123) I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine ([(123) I]-MIBG) scintigraphy. Four patients were found to have diffuse areas of reduced cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc), predominantly in the occipital lobe, which is the preferentially affected region in DLB patients. In contrast, five patients showed no such occipital hypometabolism; instead, these five patients showed hypometabolism in the left anterior cingulate gyrus (Broadmann area (BA) 24), right frontal lobe (BA 32) and right anterior temporal lobe (BA 38), which are the preferentially affected regions in Parkinson's disease rather than DLB. The extent of the reduction in CMRglc in the left occipital lobe was correlated with scores on the Bender Gestalt Test, which reflects visuospatial ability, but not with global cognitive measures. All patients showed reduced cardiac [(123) I]-MIBG levels, consistent with underlying Lewy body disease. These variations in [(18) F]-FDG PET scans raise the possibility that the specific pattern of CMRglc reduction may predict developing DLB in patients with idiopathic RBD. Further follow-up studies are needed, particularly on patients with diffuse

  3. Visual and statistical analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in primary progressive aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A.; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Garcia-Ramos, Rocio; Fernandez-Matarrubia, Marta; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Matias-Guiu, Jorge [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Department of Neurology, Madrid (Spain); Cabrera-Martin, Maria Nieves; Perez-Castejon, Maria Jesus; Rodriguez-Rey, Cristina; Ortega-Candil, Aida; Carreras, Jose Luis [San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC) Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosing progressive primary aphasia (PPA) and its variants is of great clinical importance, and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) may be a useful diagnostic technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interobserver variability in the interpretation of FDG PET images in PPA as well as the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the technique. We also aimed to compare visual and statistical analyses of these images. There were 10 raters who analysed 44 FDG PET scans from 33 PPA patients and 11 controls. Five raters analysed the images visually, while the other five used maps created using Statistical Parametric Mapping software. Two spatial normalization procedures were performed: global mean normalization and cerebellar normalization. Clinical diagnosis was considered the gold standard. Inter-rater concordance was moderate for visual analysis (Fleiss' kappa 0.568) and substantial for statistical analysis (kappa 0.756-0.881). Agreement was good for all three variants of PPA except for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant studied with visual analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of each rater's diagnosis of PPA was high, averaging 87.8 and 89.9 % for visual analysis and 96.9 and 90.9 % for statistical analysis using global mean normalization, respectively. In cerebellar normalization, sensitivity was 88.9 % and specificity 100 %. FDG PET demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of PPA and its variants. Inter-rater concordance was higher for statistical analysis, especially for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant. These data support the use of FDG PET to evaluate patients with PPA and show that statistical analysis methods are particularly useful for identifying the nonfluent/agrammatic variant of PPA. (orig.)

  4. Visual and statistical analysis of 18F-FDG PET in primary progressive aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A.; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Garcia-Ramos, Rocio; Fernandez-Matarrubia, Marta; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Matias-Guiu, Jorge; Cabrera-Martin, Maria Nieves; Perez-Castejon, Maria Jesus; Rodriguez-Rey, Cristina; Ortega-Candil, Aida; Carreras, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing progressive primary aphasia (PPA) and its variants is of great clinical importance, and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) may be a useful diagnostic technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interobserver variability in the interpretation of FDG PET images in PPA as well as the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the technique. We also aimed to compare visual and statistical analyses of these images. There were 10 raters who analysed 44 FDG PET scans from 33 PPA patients and 11 controls. Five raters analysed the images visually, while the other five used maps created using Statistical Parametric Mapping software. Two spatial normalization procedures were performed: global mean normalization and cerebellar normalization. Clinical diagnosis was considered the gold standard. Inter-rater concordance was moderate for visual analysis (Fleiss' kappa 0.568) and substantial for statistical analysis (kappa 0.756-0.881). Agreement was good for all three variants of PPA except for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant studied with visual analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of each rater's diagnosis of PPA was high, averaging 87.8 and 89.9 % for visual analysis and 96.9 and 90.9 % for statistical analysis using global mean normalization, respectively. In cerebellar normalization, sensitivity was 88.9 % and specificity 100 %. FDG PET demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of PPA and its variants. Inter-rater concordance was higher for statistical analysis, especially for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant. These data support the use of FDG PET to evaluate patients with PPA and show that statistical analysis methods are particularly useful for identifying the nonfluent/agrammatic variant of PPA. (orig.)

  5. 18F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of asymptomatic malignant melanoma recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Ismaheel; Lengana, Thabo; Ololade, Kehinde; Boshomane, Tebatso; Reyneke, Florette; Modiselle, Moshe; Vorster, Mariza; Sathekge, Mike

    2017-06-12

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT in the detection of asymptomatic recurrence in patients with malignant melanoma who have had resection of their primary lesion. We also aimed to determine the pattern and factors predisposing to disease recurrence. Patients with malignant melanoma who have had surgical resection of their disease and without any clinical evidence of disease recurrence were followed-up with FDG PET/CT. The diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT, pattern of recurrence and factors predictive of disease recurrence were determined. A total of 144 patients were followed-up for a median period of 50.50 months. Asymptomatic recurrence was seen in 37 patients (25.7 %) with a median time to recurrence of 20 months. Lymph node was the commonest site of asymptomatic recurrence. Sex, tumour depth, histology type and presence of nodal metastasis were significant predictors of tumour recurrence. Age, race, site of primary lesion, type of lymph node resection were not significant predictors of disease recurrence. Race has a significant effect on the histological subtype of tumour (nodular maligna was more common in Caucasian while acral lentiginous was more prevalent in the Blacks) and the site of the primary lesion (lower limb in Blacks and trunk in Caucasians). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET/CT for the detection of disease recurrence were 94.5 %, 87.6 % and 89.6 % respectively. FDG PET/CT is a suitable modality for early detection of asymptomatic recurrence of malignant melanoma. Asymptomatic recurrence most commonly occurs in lymph nodes. Sex, nodal metastasis and tumour pathologic features are predictors of recurrence.

  6. FDG PET/CT in infection and inflammation—current and emerging clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Patel, C.N.; Scarsbrook, A.F.; Chowdhury, F.U.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with the glucose analogue, 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), is an evolving hybrid imaging technique in the evaluation of an important and diverse group of pathological conditions, which are characterised by infection and aseptic inflammation. With a rapidly expanding body of evidence, it is being increasingly recognised that, in addition to its established role in oncological imaging, FDG PET/CT also has clinical utility in suspected infection and inflammation. The technique can identify the source of infection or inflammation in a timely fashion ahead of morphological changes on conventional anatomical imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), map the extent and severity of disease, identify sites for tissue sampling, and assess therapy response. FDG PET/CT exhibits distinct advantages over traditional radionuclide imaging techniques in terms of shorter duration of examination, higher spatial resolution, non-invasive nature of acquisition, ability to perform quantitative analyses, and the provision of a synergistic combination of functional and anatomical imaging. With the use of illustrative clinico-radiological cases, this article discusses the current and emerging evidence for the use of FDG PET/CT in a broad spectrum of disorders, such as fever of unknown origin, sarcoidosis, large vessel vasculitis, musculoskeletal infections, joint prosthesis or implant-related complications, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related infections, and miscellaneous indications, such as IgG4-related systemic disease. It will also briefly summarise the role of more novel tracers such as FDG-labelled leukocytes and gallium-68 PET tracers in this arena

  7. Characterization of thymic masses using 18F-FDG PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Regmi, S.K.; Dutta, R.; Kumar, R.; Gupta, S.D.; Das, P.; Halanaik, D.; Jindal, T.

    2009-01-01

    The resectability and survival may be improved in thymoma and thymic carcinoma with multimodality therapy. Various diagnostic imaging modalities are required for accurate diagnosis and preoperative staging of thymic masses. The present prospective study was planned to evaluate if Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-CT can help differentiate various thymic lesions noted on conventional imaging modalities. A prospective study was undertaken in 23 patients who had shown either an anterior mediastinal mass consistent with thymic origin or suspicious for a thymic mass on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. All patients underwent whole body FDG PET-CT after intravenous injection of 370 MBq of FDG. The interpretation of PET-CT images was based on the following criteria: FDG uptake (present or absent), maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), pattern of uptake, invasion to surrounding structures, presence of metastasis and necrosis. The results of PET-CT were correlated with the final histopathology following surgery. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 11.5 for Windows software. The mean SUVmax of the 3 groups of pathology was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis Test. Thymic hyperplasia had an enlarged thymus with mean SUVmax of 1.1. Low risk thymoma had large tumors and their mean SUVmax was 3. High risk thymoma had small tumors with mean SUVmax of 2.1. As a group, thymoma had mean SUVmax value of 2.3. All thymic carcinomas were large, and their mean SUVmax was 7. The difference between the mean SUVmax for thymic hyperplasia, thymoma and thymic carcinoma was statistically significant. The difference between the SUVmax of high risk and low risk thymoma was not significant. 18 F-FDG PET-CT can help characterize various thymic lesions noted on conventional imaging modalities. However, larger prospective studies are further required to substantiate these findings. (author)

  8. Baseline and ongoing PET-derived factors predict detrimental effect or potential utility of 18F-FDG PET/CT (FDG-PET/CT) performed for surveillance in asymptomatic lymphoma patients in first remission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morbelli, Silvia; Capitanio, Selene; Bongioanni, Francesca; Verardi, Maria Teresa; Buschiazzo, Ambra; Fiz, Francesco; Pomposelli, Elena; Sambuceti, Gianmario [IRCCS AOU San Martino - IST, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Genoa (Italy); De Carli, Fabrizio; Marini, Cecilia [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, Genoa-Milan (Italy); De Astis, Enrico; Miglino, Maurizio [IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Genoa (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    To identify both clinical and FDG PET/CT-derived factors predicting the occurrence of relapse, or conversely, the likelihood of false positive findings in surveillance FDG-PET/CT studies (PETsv). The study included 149 asymptomatic patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) (n = 55) or diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 94) in first remission. PETSv studies were performed 12, 18, 24 and 36 months thereafter. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify clinical and imaging-derived predictors of either PET-detected relapse or false-positive (FP) results. Tested clinical variables were:(1) age, (2) HL vs. DLBCL, (3) stage of disease, (4) bulky disease, (5) previous radiotherapy. PET/CT-derived variables were: (1) maximum standardized uptake value at baseline, (2) size-incorporated maximum standardized uptake value (SIMaxSUV) at baseline, (3) positive interim PET(PET-2), (4) presence of hot spots likely to be unrelated to the disease in final PET, (5) residual non-FDG avid mass. Accuracy was 88 % for PETsv1, 95 % for PETsv2, 95 % for PETsv3 and 91 % for PETsv4. However, PPV was relatively low in all PETsv. Best predictors of relapse were result of interim PET, HL versus NHL type, SIMaxSUV, age ≥ 60. Best predictors of FP were previous radiotherapy and hot spots unrelated to the disease in final PET. The present study confirms the need of restricting the use of surveillance PET/CT to patients at high risk of relapse. Information derived from PET/CT performed at baseline (metabolic disease burden), in the course (PET2) and at the end of therapy (unrelated hot spots) can help to select high-risk patients and also to identify patients more likely to present equivocal findings at PETsv. (orig.)

  9. The value of [11C]-acetate PET and [18F]-FDG PET in hepatocellular carcinoma before and after treatment with transarterial chemoembolization and bevacizumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shuren; Ubl, Philipp; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Rainer, Eva; Haug, Alexander; Hacker, Marcus; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Pinter, Matthias; Wang, Hao; Nanoff, Christian; Kaczirek, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    This prospective study was to investigate the value of [ 11 C]-acetate PET and [ 18 F]-FDG PET in the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before and after treatment with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody (bevacizumab). Twenty-two patients (three women, 19 men; 62 ± 8 years) with HCC verified by histopathology were treated with TACE and bevacizumab (n = 11) or placebo (n = 11). [ 11 C]-acetate PET and [ 18 F]-FDG PET were performed before and after TACE with bevacizumab or placebo. Comparisons between groups were performed with t-tests and Chi-squared tests, where appropriate. Overall survival (OS) was defined as the time from start of bevacizumab or placebo until the date of death/last follow-up, respectively. The patient-related sensitivity of [ 11 C]-acetate PET, [ 18 F]-FDG PET, and combined [ 11 C]-acetate and [ 18 F]-FDG PET was 68%, 45%, and 73%, respectively. There was a significantly higher rate of conversion from [ 11 C]-acetate positive lesions to negative lesions in patients treated with TACE and bevacizumab as compared with that in patients with TACE and placebo (p < 0.05). In patients with negative acetate PET, the mean OS in patients treated with TACE and bevacizumab was 259 ± 118 days and was markedly shorter as compared with that (668 ± 217 days) in patients treated with TACE and placebo (p < 0.05). In patients treated with TACE and placebo, there was significant difference in mean OS in patients with positive FDG PET as compared with that in patients with negative FDG PET (p < 0.05). The HCC lesions had different tracer avidities showing the heterogeneity of HCC. Our study suggests that combining [ 18 F]-FDG with [ 11 C]-acetate PET could be useful for the management of HCC patients and might also provide relevant prognostic and molecular heterogeneity information. (orig.)

  10. Cancer-associated stroma affects FDG uptake in experimental carcinomas. Implications for FDG-PET delineation of radiotherapy target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Galie, Mirco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina [University of Verona, Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, Verona (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Fanti, Stefano [Policlinico ' S. Orsola-Malpighi' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Degrassi, Anna [Nerviano Medical Sciences, Milan (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, PET Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    To analyse the influence of cancer-associated stroma on FDG-uptake in two carcinoma models characterized by different stromal degrees. Eight nude mice were subcutaneously injected with DU-145 prostate cancer cells or BXPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, and underwent FDG-PET imaging about 2 weeks after implantation. After the mice were killed, histology, and CD31 and GLUT1 immunohistochemistry were performed. To further evaluate the highly stromalized carcinoma using perfusion-sensitive imaging, four BXPC-3 tumours underwent two successive albumin-binding (MS-325) MRI scans during tumour growth. FDG uptake was significantly higher in the DU-145 than in the BXPC-3 tumours, which were hardly distinguishable from adjacent normal tissue. In the BXPC-3 tumours, histology confirmed the widespread presence of aberrant infiltrated stroma, embedded with numerous vessels marked by CD31. In both tumour types, the stromal matrix was negative for GLUT1. In DU-145 tumour cells, GLUT1 immunostaining was greater than in BXPC-3 tumour cells, but not homogeneously, since it was less evident in the tumour cells which were nearer to vessels and stroma. Finally, MS-325 MRI always clearly showed areas of enhancement in the BXPC-3 tumours. Cancer-associated stroma has been reported to be capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption. Furthermore, it has been proposed that regions with high vascular perfusion exhibit a significantly lower FDG uptake, suggesting some vascular/metabolic reciprocity. Since our results are consistent with these recent findings, they signal a risk of tumour volume underestimation in radiotherapy if FDG uptake alone is used for target delineation of carcinomas, which suggests that additional evaluation should be performed using vasculature/perfusion-sensitive imaging. (orig.)

  11. Detection of Extramedullary Multiple Myeloma in Liver by FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daeweung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Choi, Keum Ha; Kim, Chang Guhn [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    We present the case of a 42-year-old man with a painful mass lesion in the right shoulder that was detected by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Excisional biopsy revealed infiltration of plasma cells with anaplastic features, consistent with solitary plasmacytoma (PC). Serum analysis showed elevation of serum free lambda light chain levels (27.78 mg/l), with an abnormally high kappa:lambda ratio (2.33) and high total proteins (10.4 g/dl). Serum protein electrophoresis revealed an M spike in the gamma-globulin region (56.1 %=5.8 g/dl). Subsequently, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT revealed another hypermetabolic mass in the right lobe of the liver. CT-guided biopsy of the liver lesion revealed plasma cell myeloma, consistent with multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma presenting as nodular liver masses is very rare in clinical practice. In a retrospective review of more than 2,000 patients, Talamo et al. reported only nine cases where there was nodular involvement of the liver by multiple myeloma. The organ most commonly involved was the liver, followed by pancreas, stomach, peritoneum with malignant ascites, colon, rectum, duodenum and ileum. Therefore, the literature published thus far has been limited to a few reports and case series. Among these reports, some had demonstrated the PET or PET/CT findings of nodular liver involvement of multiple myeloma. About 10 % of the solitary myelomas appeared as extramedullary PC or solitary PC of bone. In spite of the advances in therapy, the treatment of multiple myeloma is still palliative. However, solitary PC could be cured by resection or radiation therapy. Thus, differentiation between PC and multiple myeloma is essential in making a decision for the appropriate therapeutic regimen. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has the unique ability to detect and characterize malignant lesions in one single examination. Schirrmeister et al. reported that

  12. Towards real-time topical detection and characterization of FDG dose infiltration prior to PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jason M.; Arlinghaus, Lori R. [Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Rani, Sudheer D. [Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Shone, Martha D. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Abramson, Vandana G. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Pendyala, Praveen [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nashville, TN (United States); Chakravarthy, A.B. [Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nashville, TN (United States); Gorge, William J.; Knowland, Joshua G.; Lattanze, Ronald K.; Perrin, Steven R. [Lucerno Dynamics, LLC, Morrisville, NC (United States); Scarantino, Charles W. [Lucerno Dynamics, LLC, Morrisville, NC (United States); University of North Carolina, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Townsend, David W. [Lucerno Dynamics, LLC, Morrisville, NC (United States); Technology and Research-National University of Singapore, Clinical Imaging Research Centre, Agency for Science, Singapore (Singapore); Abramson, Richard G. [Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E. [The University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Computational and Engineering Sciences, and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Internal Medicine, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-12-15

    To dynamically detect and characterize {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) dose infiltrations and evaluate their effects on positron emission tomography (PET) standardized uptake values (SUV) at the injection site and in control tissue. Investigational gamma scintillation sensors were topically applied to patients with locally advanced breast cancer scheduled to undergo limited whole-body FDG-PET as part of an ongoing clinical study. Relative to the affected breast, sensors were placed on the contralateral injection arm and ipsilateral control arm during the resting uptake phase prior to each patient's PET scan. Time-activity curves (TACs) from the sensors were integrated at varying intervals (0-10, 0-20, 0-30, 0-40, and 30-40 min) post-FDG and the resulting areas under the curve (AUCs) were compared to SUVs obtained from PET. In cases of infiltration, observed in three sensor recordings (30 %), the injection arm TAC shape varied depending on the extent and severity of infiltration. In two of these cases, TAC characteristics suggested the infiltration was partially resolving prior to image acquisition, although it was still apparent on subsequent PET. Areas under the TAC 0-10 and 0-20 min post-FDG were significantly different in infiltrated versus non-infiltrated cases (Mann-Whitney, p < 0.05). When normalized to control, all TAC integration intervals from the injection arm were significantly correlated with SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} measured over the infiltration site (Spearman ρ ≥ 0.77, p < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, testing the ability of the first 10 min of post-FDG sensor data to predict infiltration visibility on the ensuing PET, yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.92. Topical sensors applied near the injection site provide dynamic information from the time of FDG administration through the uptake period and may be useful in detecting infiltrations regardless of PET image field of view. This dynamic information

  13. Areas of normal pulmonary parenchyma on HRCT exhibit increased FDG PET signal in IPF patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Win, Thida [Lister Hospital, Respiratory Medicine, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Thomas, Benjamin A.; Lambrou, Tryphon; Hutton, Brian F.; Endozo, Raymondo; Shortman, Robert I.; Afaq, Asim; Ell, Peter J.; Groves, Ashley M. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Screaton, Nicholas J. [Papworth Hospital, Radiology Department, Papworth Everard (United Kingdom); Porter, Joanna C. [University College London, Centre for Respiratory Diseases, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Maher, Toby M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, London (United Kingdom); Lukey, Pauline [GSK, Fibrosis DPU, Research and Development, Stevenage (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) show increased PET signal at sites of morphological abnormality on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the PET signal at sites of normal-appearing lung on HRCT in IPF. Consecutive IPF patients (22 men, 3 women) were prospectively recruited. The patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/HRCT. The pulmonary imaging findings in the IPF patients were compared to the findings in a control population. Pulmonary uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG (mean SUV) was quantified at sites of morphologically normal parenchyma on HRCT. SUVs were also corrected for tissue fraction (TF). The mean SUV in IPF patients was compared with that in 25 controls (patients with lymphoma in remission or suspected paraneoplastic syndrome with normal PET/CT appearances). The pulmonary SUV (mean ± SD) uncorrected for TF in the controls was 0.48 ± 0.14 and 0.78 ± 0.24 taken from normal lung regions in IPF patients (p < 0.001). The TF-corrected mean SUV in the controls was 2.24 ± 0.29 and 3.24 ± 0.84 in IPF patients (p < 0.001). IPF patients have increased pulmonary uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG on PET in areas of lung with a normal morphological appearance on HRCT. This may have implications for determining disease mechanisms and treatment monitoring. (orig.)

  14. Areas of normal pulmonary parenchyma on HRCT exhibit increased FDG PET signal in IPF patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Win, Thida; Thomas, Benjamin A.; Lambrou, Tryphon; Hutton, Brian F.; Endozo, Raymondo; Shortman, Robert I.; Afaq, Asim; Ell, Peter J.; Groves, Ashley M.; Screaton, Nicholas J.; Porter, Joanna C.; Maher, Toby M.; Lukey, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) show increased PET signal at sites of morphological abnormality on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the PET signal at sites of normal-appearing lung on HRCT in IPF. Consecutive IPF patients (22 men, 3 women) were prospectively recruited. The patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET/HRCT. The pulmonary imaging findings in the IPF patients were compared to the findings in a control population. Pulmonary uptake of 18 F-FDG (mean SUV) was quantified at sites of morphologically normal parenchyma on HRCT. SUVs were also corrected for tissue fraction (TF). The mean SUV in IPF patients was compared with that in 25 controls (patients with lymphoma in remission or suspected paraneoplastic syndrome with normal PET/CT appearances). The pulmonary SUV (mean ± SD) uncorrected for TF in the controls was 0.48 ± 0.14 and 0.78 ± 0.24 taken from normal lung regions in IPF patients (p 18 F-FDG on PET in areas of lung with a normal morphological appearance on HRCT. This may have implications for determining disease mechanisms and treatment monitoring. (orig.)

  15. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET and 11C-PIB PET on early stage posterior cortical atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai LIU

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background  Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a kind of progressive neurodegenerative disease with cortical visual impairment as the first symptom. Because of rare clinical incidence, early onset age, special clinical symptoms and unobvious MRI abnormality, the definitive diagnosis of PCA is difficult. This study used 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG PET and 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PIB PET for PCA patients with unobvious MRI abnormality, so as to discuss the value of PET in the early diagnosis of PCA.  Methods  Five patients diagnosed as PCA in our hospital between April 2012 and March 2015 were enrolled in this study. Cognitive function was measured by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Activities of Daily Living (ADL and Clock Drawing Test (CDT. Brain MRI, 18F-FDG PET and 11C-PIB PET were performed to analyze glucose metabolism and perfusion of posterior cortex.  Results Neuropsychological tests revealed that the ability of writing, calculating, visuospatial and executive function of all these patients were impaired. Color vision tests showed abnormal results. MRI showed that the posterior atrophy (PA scores were 0-2 (average 1 on the left side and 0-1 (average 0.80 on the right side. The medial temporal atrophy (MTA scores were 1-3 (average 1.80 on the left side and 1-4 (average 2 on the right side. The ventricular enlargement (VE scores were 1-2 (average 1.80 on the left side and 1-2 (average 1.60 on the right side. 18F-FDG PET showed glucose metabolism decreased obviously on bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital cortex, precuneus and cingulate gyrus, and slightly on frontal lobes and subcortical structure. 11C-PIB PET showed radioactive 11C-PIB deposition on bilateral frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex, and the outline of cerebellar cortex was clear.  Conclusions  For PCA patients whose parietal and occipital cortical atrophy is not obvious on MRI, 18F-FDG PET

  16. First experience of simultaneous PET/MRI for the early detection of cardiac involvement in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nappi, Carmela; Altiero, Michele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Giudice, Caterina Anna; Spinelli, Letizia; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Diomiaiuti, Claudio Tommaso [IRCCS SDN, Naples (Italy); Pisani, Antonio [University Federico II, Department of Public Health, Naples (Italy)

    2015-03-26

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder associated with severe multiorgan dysfunction and premature death. Early diagnosis and treatment strategies play a key role in patient outcome. We investigated the potential role of hybrid PET/MR imaging in the assessment of early cardiac involvement in AFD patients. Thirteen AFD patients without cardiac symptoms and with normal left ventricular function underwent simultaneous cardiac PET/MR imaging after administration of {sup 18}F-FDG. Cardiac FDG uptake was quantified by measuring the standardized uptake value in 17 myocardial segments in each subject. The coefficient of variation (COV, i.e. the standard deviation divided by the average) of the uptake of the 17 segments was calculated as an index of heterogeneity in the heart. Six patients exhibited focal late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) indicating intramyocardial fibrosis, and four of these also had positive short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. All patients with LGE and positive STIR MR images showed focal FDG uptake in the corresponding myocardial segments indicating inflammation. Of the seven patients with negative LGE and STIR images, five showed homogeneous FDG cardiac uptake and two showed heterogeneous FDG uptake. The COV was significantly greater in patients with focal FDG uptake (0.25 ± 0.02) than in those without (0.14 ± 0.07, p < 0.01). PET/MR imaging is clinically feasible for the early detection of cardiac involvement in patients with AFD. Further studies evaluating the role of hybrid PET/MR imaging in management of the disease in larger patient populations are warranted. (orig.)

  17. Focal thyroid incidentalomas identified with whole-body FDG-PET warrant further investigation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prichard, R S

    2012-02-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) whole body positron emission computed tomography (PET-CT) detects clinically occult malignancy. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and significance of focal thyroid 18F - fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. A retrospective review of all patients who had FDG PET-CT examinations, in a single tertiary referral centre was performed. PET scan findings and the final pathological diagnosis were collated. 2105 scans were reviewed. Focal uptake was identified in 35 (1.66%) patients. Final surgical histology was available on eight patients, which confirmed papillary carcinoma in four (20%) patients and lymphoma and metastatic disease in two patients respectively. This gave an overall malignancy rate in focal thyroid uptake of at least 33%. Thyroid incidentalomas occurred with a frequency of 2.13%, with an associated malignancy rate of at least 33% in focal thyroid uptake. The high malignancy rate associated with focal thyroid uptake mandates further investigation in medically fit patients.

  18. Brown fat in breast cancer patients: analysis of serial {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, C.; Fleury, N.; Bridji, B.; Chatal, J.F.; Resche, I. [Rene Gauducheau Cancer Center, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Nantes-Saint Herblain (France); Bourbouloux, E.; Campone, M. [Rene Gauducheau Cancer Center, Medical Oncology Unit, Nantes-Saint Herblain (France); Campion, L. [Rene Gauducheau Cancer Center, Statistics Unit, Nantes-Saint Herblain (France)

    2006-07-15

    It has recently been suggested that FDG accumulation in the brown adipose tissue varies as a function of age, sex and outdoor temperature. The aim of this study was to assess changes in FDG uptake in brown fat in patients based on serial PET/CT scans and to compare our results with previous findings. Early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 33 female breast cancer patients was assessed by FDG PET. Five PET/CT scans were performed for each patient. PET/CT images were analysed retrospectively. PET scans were considered positive when diffuse, symmetrical, abnormal ''USA'' (uptake in supraclavicular area) fat was detected. A total of 163 PET images were analysed. Seventy-four PET scans (45%) revealed abnormal FDG uptake in the supraclavicular area. These foci were present on uncorrected and attenuation-corrected images. FDG uptake was identical on all five scans in only five patients. No significant relationship was found between abnormal FDG uptake and outdoor temperature, age or time interval between chemotherapy and PET. Abnormal FDG uptake in the neck seemed to predominantly occur in patients with a low body mass index (p<0.05). Most significant changes in the PET/CT scan results were observed during chemotherapy with docetaxel (p<0.05). When observed, bilateral uptake in the neck was more intense than background uptake (p<0.00001). This study shows that FDG uptake in the neck varies as a function of time, that it is unrelated to age or outdoor temperature, and that bilateral uptake is generally intense. (orig.)

  19. Brown fat in breast cancer patients: analysis of serial 18F-FDG PET/CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, C.; Fleury, N.; Bridji, B.; Chatal, J.F.; Resche, I.; Bourbouloux, E.; Campone, M.; Campion, L.

    2006-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that FDG accumulation in the brown adipose tissue varies as a function of age, sex and outdoor temperature. The aim of this study was to assess changes in FDG uptake in brown fat in patients based on serial PET/CT scans and to compare our results with previous findings. Early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 33 female breast cancer patients was assessed by FDG PET. Five PET/CT scans were performed for each patient. PET/CT images were analysed retrospectively. PET scans were considered positive when diffuse, symmetrical, abnormal ''USA'' (uptake in supraclavicular area) fat was detected. A total of 163 PET images were analysed. Seventy-four PET scans (45%) revealed abnormal FDG uptake in the supraclavicular area. These foci were present on uncorrected and attenuation-corrected images. FDG uptake was identical on all five scans in only five patients. No significant relationship was found between abnormal FDG uptake and outdoor temperature, age or time interval between chemotherapy and PET. Abnormal FDG uptake in the neck seemed to predominantly occur in patients with a low body mass index (p<0.05). Most significant changes in the PET/CT scan results were observed during chemotherapy with docetaxel (p<0.05). When observed, bilateral uptake in the neck was more intense than background uptake (p<0.00001). This study shows that FDG uptake in the neck varies as a function of time, that it is unrelated to age or outdoor temperature, and that bilateral uptake is generally intense. (orig.)

  20. Brown fat in breast cancer patients: analysis of serial (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, C; Bourbouloux, E; Campion, L; Fleury, N; Bridji, B; Chatal, J F; Resche, I; Campone, M

    2006-07-01

    It has recently been suggested that FDG accumulation in the brown adipose tissue varies as a function of age, sex and outdoor temperature. The aim of this study was to assess changes in FDG uptake in brown fat in patients based on serial PET/CT scans and to compare our results with previous findings. Early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 33 female breast cancer patients was assessed by FDG PET. Five PET/CT scans were performed for each patient. PET/CT images were analysed retrospectively. PET scans were considered positive when diffuse, symmetrical, abnormal "USA" (uptake in supraclavicular area) fat was detected. A total of 163 PET images were analysed. Seventy-four PET scans (45%) revealed abnormal FDG uptake in the supraclavicular area. These foci were present on uncorrected and attenuation-corrected images. FDG uptake was identical on all five scans in only five patients. No significant relationship was found between abnormal FDG uptake and outdoor temperature, age or time interval between chemotherapy and PET. Abnormal FDG uptake in the neck seemed to predominantly occur in patients with a low body mass index (p<0.05). Most significant changes in the PET/CT scan results were observed during chemotherapy with docetaxel (p<0.05). When observed, bilateral uptake in the neck was more intense than background uptake (p<0.00001). This study shows that FDG uptake in the neck varies as a function of time, that it is unrelated to age or outdoor temperature, and that bilateral uptake is generally intense.

  1. Anesthesia condition for {sup 18}F-FDG imaging of lung metastasis tumors using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, June-Youp; Jung, Jae Ho; Kang, Joo Hyun [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: larry@kcch.re.kr; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-FDG has been increasingly used for tumor imaging in the murine model. The aim of this study was to establish the anesthesia condition for imaging of lung metastasis tumor using small animal {sup 18}F-FDG PET. Methods: To determine the impact of anesthesia on {sup 18}F-FDG distribution in normal mice, five groups were studied under the following conditions: no anesthesia, ketamine and xylazine (Ke/Xy), 0.5% isoflurane (Iso 0.5), 1% isoflurane (Iso 1) and 2% isoflurane (Iso 2). The ex vivo counting, standard uptake value (SUV) image and glucose SUV of {sup 18}F-FDG in various tissues were evaluated. The {sup 18}F-FDG images in the lung metastasis tumor model were obtained under no anesthesia, Ke/Xy and Iso 0.5, and registered with CT image to clarify the tumor region. Results: Blood glucose concentration and muscle uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the Ke/Xy group markedly increased more than in the other groups. The Iso 2 group increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in heart compared with the other groups. The Iso 0.5 anesthesized group showed the lowest {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in heart and chest wall. The small size of lung metastasis tumor (2 mm) was clearly visualized by {sup 18}F-FDG image with the Iso 0.5 anesthesia. Conclusion: Small animal {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging with Iso 0.5 anesthesia was appropriate for the detection of lung metastasis tumor. To acquire {sup 18}F-FDG PET images with small animal PET, the type and level of anesthetic should be carefully considered to be suitable for the visualization of target tissue in the experimental model.

  2. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging factors that predict ischaemic stroke in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun; Choi, Kang-Ho; Kim, Joon-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    18 F-FDG PET/CT can acquire both anatomical and functional images in a single session. We investigated which factors of 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging have potential as biomarkers for an increased risk of ischaemic stroke in cancer patients. From among cancer patients presenting with various neurological symptoms and hemiparesis, 134 were selected as eligible for this retrospective analysis. A new infarct lesion on brain MRI within 1 year of FDG PET/CT defined future ischaemic stroke. The target-to-background ratio (TBR) of each arterial segment was used to define arterial inflammation on PET imaging. Abdominal obesity was defined in terms of the area and proportion of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue and total adipose tissue (TAT) on a single CT slice at the umbilical level. Ischaemic stroke confirmed by MRI occurred in 30 patients. Patients with stroke had higher TBRs in the carotid arteries and abdominal aorta (P < 0.001) and a higher VAT proportion (P = 0.021) and TAT proportion (P = 0.041) than patients without stroke. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that TBRs of the carotid arteries and abdominal aorta, VAT and TAT proportions, and the presence of a metabolically active tumour were significantly associated with future ischaemic stroke. Combining PET and CT variables improved the power for predicting future ischaemic stroke. Our findings suggest that arterial FDG uptake and hypermetabolic malignancy on PET and the VAT proportion on CT could be independent predictors of future ischaemic stroke in patients with cancer and could identify those patients who would benefit from medical treatment. (orig.)

  3. 18-FDG PET/CT assessment of basal cell carcinoma with vismodegib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Curtis A; Weiss, Glen J; Tibes, Raoul; Blaydorn, Lisa; Downhour, Molly; White, Erica; Baldwin, Jason; Hoff, Daniel D; Korn, Ronald L

    2012-10-01

    The use of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) in subjects with advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has not been fully explored due to the rarity of disease presentation. This study evaluated PET/CTs from subjects with advanced BCC participating in a phase I dose-escalation clinical trial of vismodegib. Fourteen subjects with BCC were imaged with 18-FDG PET/CT for lesion identification and response categorizing (European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer [EORTC] and PET response criteria in solid tumors [PERCIST] 1.0). Several parameters including metabolic activity of target lesions, site of disease presentation and spread, treatment response, and prognostic significance of metabolic activity following therapy were evaluated. All subjects exhibited at least one hypermetabolic lesion. Most subjects had only four organ systems involved at study enrollment: skin-muscle (93%), lung (57%), lymph nodes (29%), and bone (21%). SUVmax measured across all lesions decreased (median 33%, SD ± 45%) following therapy with metabolic activity normalizing or disappearing in 42% of lesions. No significant difference was observed between EORTC and PERCIST 1.0. Subjects that demonstrated at least a 33% reduction in SUVmax from baseline had a significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) (median 17 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] ±4 months vs. 9 months, 95% CI ±5 months, P = 0.038) and overall survival (OS) (median 24 months, 95% CI ±4 months vs. 17 months, 95% CI ±13 months, P = 0.019). BCC lesions are hypermetabolic on 18-FDG PET/CT. A decrease in SUVmax was associated with improved PFS and OS. These results further support the incorporation of 18-FDG PET/CT scans in advanced BCC management.

  4. 18-FDG PET/CT assessment of basal cell carcinoma with vismodegib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, Curtis A; Weiss, Glen J; Tibes, Raoul; Blaydorn, Lisa; Downhour, Molly; White, Erica; Baldwin, Jason; Hoff, Daniel D; Korn, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    The use of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) in subjects with advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has not been fully explored due to the rarity of disease presentation. This study evaluated PET/CTs from subjects with advanced BCC participating in a phase I dose-escalation clinical trial of vismodegib. Fourteen subjects with BCC were imaged with 18-FDG PET/CT for lesion identification and response categorizing (European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer [EORTC] and PET response criteria in solid tumors [PERCIST] 1.0). Several parameters including metabolic activity of target lesions, site of disease presentation and spread, treatment response, and prognostic significance of metabolic activity following therapy were evaluated. All subjects exhibited at least one hypermetabolic lesion. Most subjects had only four organ systems involved at study enrollment: skin–muscle (93%), lung (57%), lymph nodes (29%), and bone (21%). SUVmax measured across all lesions decreased (median 33%, SD ± 45%) following therapy with metabolic activity normalizing or disappearing in 42% of lesions. No significant difference was observed between EORTC and PERCIST 1.0. Subjects that demonstrated at least a 33% reduction in SUVmax from baseline had a significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) (median 17 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] ±4 months vs. 9 months, 95% CI ±5 months, P = 0.038) and overall survival (OS) (median 24 months, 95% CI ±4 months vs. 17 months, 95% CI ±13 months, P = 0.019). BCC lesions are hypermetabolic on 18-FDG PET/CT. A decrease in SUVmax was associated with improved PFS and OS. These results further support the incorporation of 18-FDG PET/CT scans in advanced BCC management

  5. FDG-PET imaging in mild traumatic brain injury: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly R Byrnes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI affects an estimated 1.7 million people in the United States and is a contributing factor to one third of all injury related deaths annually. According to the CDC, approximately 75% of all reported TBIs are concussions or considered mild in form, although the number of unreported mild TBIs and patients not seeking medical attention is unknown. Currently, classification of mild TBI (mTBI or concussion is a clinical assessment since diagnostic imaging is typically inconclusive due to subtle, obscure, or absent changes in anatomical or physiological parameters measured using standard magnetic resonance (MR or computed tomography (CT imaging protocols. Molecular imaging techniques that examine functional processes within the brain, such as measurement of glucose uptake and metabolism using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, have the ability to detect changes after mild TBI. Recent technological improvements in the resolution of PET systems, the integration of PET with MRI, and the availability of normal healthy human databases and commercial image analysis software contribute to the growing use of molecular imaging in basic science research and advances in clinical imaging. This review will discuss the technological considerations and limitations of FDG-PET, including differentiation between glucose uptake and glucose metabolism and the significance of these measurements. In addition, the current state of FDG-PET imaging in assessing mild TBI in clinical and preclinical research will be considered. Finally, this review will provide insight into potential critical data elements and recommended standardization to improve the application of FDG-PET to mild TBI research and clinical practice.

  6. Finding of F-18 FDG whole body PET in patients with stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Il; Lee, Jong Inn; Yang, One Il; Lee, Jae Sung; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Sung Woon

    2001-01-01

    Stomach cancer is one of the most common malignancies in Korea, but there is no report on FDG PET in patients with stomach cancer. We observed findings of FDG PET in patients with stomach cancer. In 13 patients with pre-operative stomach cancer, PET and CT were performed. Primary lesion and regional lymph nodes detection were analyzed. Correlation between FDG uptake ratio and each prognostic factor of primary lesion was analyzed. In 19 patients diagnosed as recurrence or displaying suspicious symptoms, conventional work up including tumor marker and PET were performed. Recurrence detection of anastomotic site, distant metastasis, and tumor marker elevation were analyzed. Sensitivity for primary lesion detection was 83.3% (CT 71.4%) and two submucosal lesions were undetected FDG uptake ratio was variable and had no correlation with invasion-depth, size, Borrmann type, staging and differentiation. Sensitivity for regional lymph node detection was 58.3% (CT 58.3%) and the lesions less than 1cm were undetected. Sensitivity for recurrence detection was 100% but there were three false positives. Sensitivity for distant metastasis detection was 64.3% and significantly higher than that of conventional work-up (21.4%). Average of tumor marker level in patients who were confirmed as recurrence was higher than false positive. PET is more useful than conventional work up in distant metastasis detection when recurrence is suspected. In pre-operative stomach cancer PET is comparable to CT for detection of primary lesion and regional lymph node metastasis and detection of distant metastasis requires further study

  7. A Survey of FDG- and Amyloid-PET Imaging in Dementia and GRADE Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perani Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PET based tools can improve the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and differential diagnosis of dementia. The importance of identifying individuals at risk of developing dementia among people with subjective cognitive complaints or mild cognitive impairment has clinical, social, and therapeutic implications. Within the two major classes of AD biomarkers currently identified, that is, markers of pathology and neurodegeneration, amyloid- and FDG-PET imaging represent decisive tools for their measurement. As a consequence, the PET tools have been recognized to be of crucial value in the recent guidelines for the early diagnosis of AD and other dementia conditions. The references based recommendations, however, include large PET imaging literature based on visual methods that greatly reduces sensitivity and specificity and lacks a clear cut-off between normal and pathological findings. PET imaging can be assessed using parametric or voxel-wise analyses by comparing the subject’s scan with a normative data set, significantly increasing the diagnostic accuracy. This paper is a survey of the relevant literature on FDG and amyloid-PET imaging aimed at providing the value of quantification for the early and differential diagnosis of AD. This allowed a meta-analysis and GRADE analysis revealing high values for PET imaging that might be useful in considering recommendations.

  8. 18F-FDG-labeled red blood cell PET for blood-pool imaging: preclinical evaluation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusaka, Yohji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Iwabuchi, Yu; Nishime, Chiyoko; Kajimura, Mayumi; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) labeled with single-photon emitters have been clinically used for blood-pool imaging. Although some PET tracers have been introduced for blood-pool imaging, they have not yet been widely used. The present study investigated the feasibility of labeling RBCs with 18 F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) for blood-pool imaging with PET. RBCs isolated from venous blood of rats were washed with glucose-free phosphate-buffered saline and labeled with 18 F-FDG. To optimize labeling efficiency, the effects of glucose deprivation time and incubation (labeling) time with 18 F-FDG were investigated. Post-labeling stability was assessed by calculating the release fraction of radioactivity and identifying the chemical forms of 18 F in the released and intracellular components of 18 F-FDG-labeled RBCs incubated in plasma. Just after intravenous injection of the optimized autologous 18 F-FDG-labeled RBCs, dynamic PET scans were performed to evaluate in vivo imaging in normal rats and intraabdominal bleeding models (temporary and persistent bleeding). The optimal durations of glucose deprivation and incubation (labeling) with 18 F-FDG were 60 and 30 min, respectively. As low as 10% of 18 F was released as the form of 18 F-FDG from 18 F-FDG-labeled RBCs after a 60-min incubation. Dynamic PET images of normal rats showed strong persistence in the cardiovascular system for at least 120 min. In the intraabdominal bleeding models, 18 F-FDG-labeled RBC PET visualized the extravascular blood clearly and revealed the dynamic changes of the extravascular radioactivity in the temporary and persistent bleeding. RBCs can be effectively labeled with 18 F-FDG and used for blood-pool imaging with PET in rats.

  9. Pre-radiotherapy FDG PET predicts radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Richard; Guerrero, Thomas; Pham, Ngoc; Ansari, Sobiya; Meshkov, Dmitriy; Castillo, Sarah; Li, Min; Olanrewaju, Adenike; Hobbs, Brian; Castillo, Edward

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective analysis is performed to determine if pre-treatment [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) image derived parameters can predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) clinical symptoms in lung cancer patients. We retrospectively studied 100 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging before initiation of radiotherapy (RT). Pneumonitis symptoms were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv4) from the consensus of 5 clinicians. Using the cumulative distribution of pre-treatment standard uptake values (SUV) within the lungs, the 80th to 95th percentile SUV values (SUV 80 to SUV 95 ) were determined. The effect of pre-RT FDG uptake, dose, patient and treatment characteristics on pulmonary toxicity was studied using multiple logistic regression. The study subjects were treated with 3D conformal RT (n = 23), intensity modulated RT (n = 64), and proton therapy (n = 13). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that elevated pre-RT lung FDG uptake on staging FDG PET was related to development of RP symptoms after RT. A patient of average age and V 30 with SUV 95 = 1.5 was an estimated 6.9 times more likely to develop grade ≥ 2 radiation pneumonitis when compared to a patient with SUV 95 = 0.5 of the same age and identical V 30 . Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed the area under the curve was 0.78 (95% CI = 0.69 – 0.87). The CT imaging and dosimetry parameters were found to be poor predictors of RP symptoms. The pretreatment pulmonary FDG uptake, as quantified by the SUV 95 , predicted symptoms of RP in this study. Elevation in this pre-treatment biomarker identifies a patient group at high risk for post-treatment symptomatic RP

  10. Advantage of delayed whole-body FDG-PET imaging for tumour detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Kazuo; Ono, Shuichi; Akaizawa, Takashi; Fukuda, Hiroshi [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Itoh, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Kaoru; Tashiro, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Yamada, Kenji [Sendai Kosei Hospital (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Delayed imaging that coincides with the highest uptake of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) by tumour may be advantageous in oncological positron emission tomography (PET), where delineation of metastasis from normal tissue background is important. In order to identify the better imaging protocol for tumour detection, whole-body FDG-PET images acquired at 1 h and 2 h after injection were evaluated in 22 subjects, with a post-injection transmission scan at 90 min for attenuation correction. After visual interpretation, tumour uptake [tumour standardised uptake ratio (SUR)], normal tissue uptake (normal SUR) and tumour to background contrast (tumour SUR/normal tissue SUR) were evaluated in the images acquired at 1 h and at 2 h. Most malignant lesions, including primary lung cancer, metastatic mediastinal lymph nodes and lymphoma lesions, showed higher FDG uptake at 2 h than at 1 h. By contrast, benign lesions, with the exception of sarcoidosis, showed lower uptake of FDG at 2 h than at 1 h. Among normal tissues, the kidney, liver, mediastinum, lung, upper abdomen and left abdomen showed significant falls in FDG uptake from 1 h to 2 h. The lower abdomen, right abdomen and muscles (shoulder and thigh) showed no significant changes. Consequently, malignant lesions of the lung, mediastinum and upper abdomen showed significant increases in tumour to background contrast from 1 to 2 h. Three lesions (two lung cancers and a malignant lymphoma) that were equivocal on 1-h images became evident on 2-h images, changing the results of interpretation. All other malignant lesions were detected on 1-h images, but were clearer, with higher contrast, on 2-h images. Lesion-based sensitivity was improved from 92% (49/53) to 98% (52/53), and patient-based sensitivity from 78% (14/18) to 94% (17/18). It is concluded that delayed whole-body FDG-PET imaging is a better and more reliable imaging protocol for tumour detection. (orig.)

  11. Early identification of MCI converting to AD: a FDG PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska Hospital Stockholm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Nobili, Flavio; Arnaldi, Dario; Brugnolo, Andrea; Picco, Agnese [University of Genoa and IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Clinical Neurology, Department of Neuroscience (DINOGMI), Genoa (Italy); Morbelli, Silvia; Bauckneht, Matteo; Piva, Roberta; Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa and IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Health Science (DISSAL), Genoa (Italy); Giuliani, Alessandro [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Environment and Health Department, Rome (Italy); Oeberg, Johanna [Karolinska Hospital, Department of Hospital Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Girtler, Nicola [University of Genoa and IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Clinical Neurology, Department of Neuroscience (DINOGMI), Genoa (Italy); IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Clinical Psychology, Genoa (Italy); Chincarini, Andrea [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Genoa section, Genoa (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine [Karolinska University Hospital, Medical Radiation Physics and Nuclear Medicine, Imaging and Physiology, Stockholm (Sweden); De Carli, Fabrizio [AOU San Martino-IST, Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR - Genoa Unit, Genoa (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a transitional pathological stage between normal ageing (NA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although subjects with MCI show a decline at different rates, some individuals remain stable or even show an improvement in their cognitive level after some years. We assessed the accuracy of FDG PET in discriminating MCI patients who converted to AD from those who did not. FDG PET was performed in 42 NA subjects, 27 MCI patients who had not converted to AD at 5 years (nc-MCI; mean follow-up time 7.5 ± 1.5 years), and 95 MCI patients who converted to AD within 5 years (MCI-AD; mean conversion time 1.8 ± 1.1 years). Relative FDG uptake values in 26 meta-volumes of interest were submitted to ANCOVA and support vector machine analyses to evaluate regional differences and discrimination accuracy. The MCI-AD group showed significantly lower FDG uptake values in the temporoparietal cortex than the other two groups. FDG uptake values in the nc-MCI group were similar to those in the NA group. Support vector machine analysis discriminated nc-MCI from MCI-AD patients with an accuracy of 89% (AUC 0.91), correctly detecting 93% of the nc-MCI patients. In MCI patients not converting to AD within a minimum follow-up time of 5 years and MCI patients converting within 5 years, baseline FDG PET and volume-based analysis identified those who converted with an accuracy of 89%. However, further analysis is needed in patients with amnestic MCI who convert to a dementia other than AD. (orig.)

  12. PET-CT beyond FDG. A quick guide to image interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanti, Stefano [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi Medicina Nucleare; Farsad, Mohsen [Central Hospital Bozen, Bolzano (Italy). Nuclear Medicine; Mansi, Luigi [Napoli Univ. (Italy). Ist. Scienze Radiologiche

    2010-07-01

    Although [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) generally shows an excellent performance as a cancer-imaging agent when using PET-CT, there are some settings in which other radiopharmaceuticals offer advantages. Such non-FDG tracers are now gaining widespread acceptance not only in research but also in clinical practice, with the acquisition of promising results in the management of various cancers. This atlas, including about 500 high-quality images, is a user-friendly guide to PET-CT imaging beyond FDG. A wide range of tracers is covered, such as {sup 18}F- and {sup 11}C-choline, {sup 11}C-methionine, {sup 18}F-ethyl-L-tyrosine, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC, {sup 11}C-acetate, {sup 11}C-thymidine, and {sup 18}F-DOPA. Throughout, the emphasis is on image interpretation, with guidance on the recognition of normal, benign, and malignant uptake and clear instruction on learning points and pitfalls. This book is a companion to the editors' recently published Atlas of PET-CT, which focuses exclusively on the use of FDG. It is designed to serve as a reference text for both nuclear physicians and radiologists, and will also be of great benefit to radiographers, technologists, and nuclear medicine and radiology residents. (orig.)

  13. FDG-PET imaging for the assessment of physiologic volume response during radiotherapy in cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lilie L.; Yang Zhiyun; Mutic, Sasa; Miller, Tom R.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the physiologic tumor volume response during treatment in cervical cancer using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Patients and Methods: This was a prospective study of 32 patients. Physiologic tumor volume in cubic centimeters was determined from the FDG-PET images using the 40% threshold method. Results: The mean pretreatment tumor volume was 102 cm 3 . The mean volume by clinical Stages I, II, and III were 54, 79, and 176 cm 3 , respectively. After 19.8 Gy external irradiation to the pelvis, the reduction in tumor volume was 29% (72 cm 3 ). An additional 13 Gy from high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy reduced the mean volume to 15.4 cm 3 , and this was subsequently reduced to 8.6 cm 3 with 13 Gy additional HDR brachytherapy (26 Gy, HDR). Four patients had physiologic FDG uptake in the cervix at 3 months after the completion of therapy. The mean time to the 50% reduction in physiologic tumor volume was 19.9 days and after combined external irradiation and HDR to 24.9 Gy. Conclusion: These results indicate that physiologic tumor volume determination by FDG-PET is feasible and that a 50% physiologic tumor volume reduction occurs within 20 days of starting therapy

  14. Variation in (18)F-FDG PET findings in a patient with synchronous multiple thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatani, Chihiro; Maniwa, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Shoji; Isaka, Mitsuhiro; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Endo, Masahiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Kondo, Haruhiko

    2015-10-01

    We herein present a case of synchronous multiple thymoma that was suspected based on the findings of positron emission tomography with fluorine-18-labeled-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG PET). The patient was a 70-year-old male with two similarly sized and heterogeneously enhanced masses on the right side of the anterior mediastinum on chest computed tomography. (18)F-FDG PET revealed variation in FDG accumulation between the masses, in which the maximum standardized uptake value was 4.4 in Tumor 1 and 8.7 in Tumor 2. Based on these imaging findings, the masses were suspected to be independent, likely synchronous double primary thymoma. Total thymectomy with removal of the two tumors was performed via median sternotomy. A pathological examination identified Tumor 1 as type AB thymoma and Tumor 2 as type A thymoma. This is the first reported case of synchronous multiple thymoma which was suspected based on a variation in the (18)F-FDG PET findings between the tumors.

  15. Relationship between pSUV of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and pathological diagnosis in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Pathological Diagnosis associated with pSUV uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. We had enrolled 39 women that underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT before operative. We evaluated whether there was correlation between the pSUV of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and prognostic factors. As a results, pSUV level increase according to tumor size but pSUV had no significant association with tumor size. pSUV of high histologic grade was higher than low histologic grade, and pSUV showed positive correlations with histologic grade. The ER and PR showed significant negative correlations with the pSUV of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Therefore, our results demonstrated that an correlation exists between pSUV and prognostic factors such as histologic grade, ER and PR.

  16. The Use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT for Diagnosis and Treatment Monitoring of Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andor W. J. M. Glaudemans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available FDG-PET, combined with CT, is nowadays getting more and more relevant for the diagnosis of several infectious and inflammatory diseases and particularly for therapy monitoring. Thus, this paper gives special attention to the role of FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of infectious and inflammatory diseases. Enough evidence in the literature already exists about the usefulness of FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis, management, and followup of patients with sarcoidosis, spondylodiscitis, and vasculitis. For other diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune pancreatitis, and fungal infections, hard evidence is lacking, but studies also point out that FDG-PET/CT could be useful. It is of invaluable importance to have large prospective multicenter studies in this field to provide clear answers, not only for the status of nuclear medicine in general but also to reduce high costs of treatment.

  17. Sequential Change of Hypometabolic Metastasis from Non-small-cell Lung Cancer on Brain FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ah; Yang, Sei Hoon; Yang, Chung Yong; Choi, Keum Ha [Wonkwang Medical Science, Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A 60-year-old woman, who had non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in left lower lobe underwent brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) for evaluation of cerebral metastasis. On follow-up FDG-PET/CT, only hypometaolic lesion was detected and progressed in right frontal lobe at 6 months and 10 months, later. Hypermetabolic metastasis was not detected even at last scan time of FDG-PET/CT. Brain MRI showed brain metastasis in right frontal lobe. As might be expected, the physician should take cerebral metastasis into consideration even though there is only hypometabolic change on subsequent FDG-PET/CT in patients with NSCLC.

  18. FDG PET-CT Finding in Bilateral Renal and Bone Involvement of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ziya Tan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-six year old male patient with pathological fracture of the left tibia underwent intramedullary and soft tissue curettage. The histopathological examination revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The patient underwent F18-FDG PET-CT scanning for initial staging. FDG PET-CT scan revealed hypermetabolic lesions at the left tibia and in bilateral kidneys. After the systemic chemotherapy and local radiotherapy to the tibia, repeated FDG PET/CT scan showed improvement of the previous hypermetabolic lesions, suggesting good response to therapy. Bone and renal involvement is an uncommon variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and FDG PET-CT is an useful whole body imaging modality in these cases.

  19. 18F-FDG PET/CT findings preceded elevation of serum proteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in Wegener granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kimiteru; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Morooka, Miyako; Okasaki, Momoko; Mimori, Akio; Kubota, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman underwent F-FDG PET/CT after developing a fever of unknown origin. PET/CT revealed intensive FDG uptake at the nasal and lung lesions. On the laboratory data, serum myeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) titer was elevated, although serum directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) ANCA titer was within normal limits. One month after treatment, follow-up PET/CT revealed decreased FDG uptake at the lesions. One year later, serum PR3-ANCA titer elevated, which finally led to a diagnosis of Wegener granulomatosis (WG). WG lesions may be detected earlier by FDG PET/CT than by serum PR3-ANCA titers.

  20. The predominant role of 18F-FDG PET/CT over MDCT in assessment of ovarian cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemat A. Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions and recommendations: FDG PET in addition to conventional imaging modalities should represent an important step in the diagnostic flowchart of ovarian cancer patients for evaluating abdominal and extra-abdominal probable metastatic deposits.

  1. Impact of Endoscopic Ultrasonography on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT Upfront Towards Patient Specific Esophageal Cancer Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff, J. B.; Mul, V. E. M.; de Boer, H. E. M.; Noordzij, W.; Korteweg, T.; van Dullemen, H. M.; Nagengast, W. B.; Oppedijk, V.; Pierie, J. P. E. N.; Plukker, John Th. M.

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with potentially resectable esophageal cancer (EC), the value of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) after fluorine-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) is questionable. Retrospectively, we assessed the impact

  2. Unusual Horner's syndrome in recurrent breast cancer: Evaluating using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a widely used imaging modality in the initial diagnosis of cancer, treatment response evaluation and detection of recurrence. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old female who presented right ptosis on the follow-up of breast cancer after surgery. Clinicians suspected Horner's syndrome, and the patient underwent FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of recurrence that could cause Horner's syndrome. FDG PET/CT demonstrated a focal hypermetabolic lesion in the right cervicothoracic junction area, corresponding to the preganglionic cervical sympathetic trunk. A subsequent needle biopsy was done, and the lesion was confirmed as metastatic ductal carcinoma. In this case, we could detect the exact location of the recurring lesion that caused Horner's syndrome using FDG PET/CT.

  3. Physiological uptake values of 18F-FDG in long bones of the lower extremity on PET/CT imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Kirsten E.; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L. F.; de Jong, Vincent M.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.; Termaat, M. Frank

    2016-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET/computed tomography (CT) has proven to be a valuable imaging modality with high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of bone infections. However, the physiological uptake values for F-FDG in the long bones of the lower extremity have not been established

  4. 18 F-FDG PET/CT for planning external beam radiotherapy alters therapy in 11% of 581 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Loft-Jakobsen, Annika; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Højgaard, Liselotte; Roed, Henrik; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2018-03-01

    18 F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) used in radiotherapy planning for extra-cerebral malignancy may reveal metastases to distant sites that may affect the choice of therapy. To investigate the role of FDG PET/CT on treatment strategy changes induced by the use of PET/CT as part of the radiotherapy planning. 'A major change of treatment strategy' was defined as either including more lesions in the gross tumour volume (GTV) distant from the primary tumour or a change in treatment modalities. The study includes 581 consecutive patients who underwent an FDG PET/CT scan for radiotherapy planning in our institution in the year 2008. All PET/CT scans were performed with the patient in treatment position with the use of immobilization devices according to the intended radiotherapy treatment. All scans were evaluated by a nuclear medicine physician together with a radiologist to delineate PET-positive GTV (GTV-PET). For 63 of the patients (11%), the PET/CT simulation scans resulted in a major change in treatment strategy because of the additional diagnostic information. Changes were most frequently observed in patients with lung cancer (20%) or upper gastrointestinal cancer (12%). In 65% of the patients for whom the PET/CT simulation scan revealed unexpected dissemination, radiotherapy was given - changed (n = 38) or unchanged (n = 13) according to the findings on the FDG PET/CT. Unexpected dissemination on the FDG PET/CT scanning performed for radiotherapy planning caused a change in treatment strategy in 11% of 581 patients. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Clinical use of 11C-methionine and 18F-FDG-PET for germinoma in central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okochi, Yoshiyuki; Nihashi, Takashi; Fujii, Masazumi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the 11 C-methionine (MET) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) findings of central nervous system (CNS) germinoma and the diagnostic utility of these findings. We retrospectively evaluated the cases of 10 patients who were diagnosed with CNS germinoma according to their histopathological or clinical findings. All the patients underwent pretreatment MET and/or FDG-PET scans, and the resultant images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. In the qualitative assessments, we used 3- and 5-grade visual scoring systems for the MET- and FDG-PET images, respectively. In the quantitative assessments, the maximal standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and the ratio of the SUV max of the tumor (T) divided by the mean SUV for the normal white or gray matter [T/N (WM), T/N (GM)], was calculated. The mean and SD values of SUV max, T/N (WM), and T/N(GM) were 1.9 ± 1.4, 2.5 ± 1.3, and 1.7 ± 0.9 on MET-PET and 5.8 ± 2.2, 1.6 ± 0.5, and 0.8 ± 0.2 on FDG-PET, respectively. On MET-PET, only one lesion was not detected. On the other hand, on FDG-PET all of the lesions exhibited uptake values that were intermediate between those of the normal white matter and gray matter. In terms of its tumor-contouring ability, MET is a good tracer for diagnosing CNS germinomas; therefore, MET-PET is considered to be useful for planning biopsies or surgery. Although FDG-PET is capable of detecting CNS germinomas, it produced insufficient image contrast in the present study. Further studies are needed before FDG-PET can be used in clinical examinations of CNS germinoma. (author)

  6. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a rare case of Stewart-Treves syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Friberg, Lars; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2011-01-01

    of Stewart-Treves Syndrome (STS), angiosarcoma secondary to chronic extremity lymphedema, are presented. Lymphedema of the extremities is a debilitating disease characterized by chronic swelling due to interstitial edema caused by insufficient lymphatic drainage capacity. Progression with skin thickening...... high (18)F-FDG uptake in STS, but is at the same time an example of the low specificity of this imaging modality. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that (18)F-FDG PET/CT has the potential to become an important tool in the staging and treatment planning of Stewart-Treves syndrome. Furthermore, (18)F...

  7. Spectrum of neurocognitive dysfunction in Indian population on FDG PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rajnish; Tripathi, Madhavi; D’Souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Varshney, Raunak; Panwar, Puja; Kaushik, Aruna; Saw, Sanjeev; Seher, Romana; Pandey, Santosh; Singh, Dinesh; Solanki, Yachna; Mishra, Anil K; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, RP

    2011-01-01

    A variety of neurodegenerative disorders produce significant abnormal brain function which can be detected using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scan even when structural changes are not detected on CT or MRI Scan. A study was undertaken at our institute to evaluate the FDG PET/CT findings in Indian population suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), dementia with lewy body disease (DLBD) and other miscellaneous causes of dementia. 117 subjects having neurocognitive deficits and 36 normals were included in our study. All patients underwent a detailed history and clinical examination. This was followed by a mini mental state examination. Subsequently an FDG brain PET scan and an MRI were done. In the patient population included in our study group 36 were normal, 39 had MCI, 40 had AD, 14 had FTD, and 13 had DLBD and 11 dementia due to other miscellaneous causes. MCI patients showed primarily reduced tracer uptake in the mesio-temporal cortex. AD patients showed reduced tracer concentration in temporo-parietal lobes, while patients with advanced diseases showed frontal lobe disease additionally. In subjects of FTD, reduced radiotracer uptake in the fronto-temporal lobes was noted. In addition, FTD patients also showed basal ganglia defects. In contrast the DLBD patients showed globally reduced FDG uptake including severely affecting the occipital cortices. In the current study the F18-FDG PET scans have been shown to be highly useful in the diagnosis of various neurocognitive disorders of the brain. AD was found to be the most common dementia in the Indian population followed by MCI. Diffuse Lewy body disease, FTD and other miscellaneous categories of dementia had a near similar incidence

  8. Toxoplasmic Lymphadenitis Mimicking a Metastatic Thyroid Carcinoma at 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treglia, Giorgio; Bongiovanni, Massimo; Ceriani, Luca; Paone, Gaetano; Giovanella, Luca

    2013-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman underwent total thyroidectomy for a papillary thyroid carcinoma in the right thyroid lobe (pTx, pN1b). Subsequently a 131 I-ablation (4.4 GBq) was performed. Four years later the patient presented increased thyroglobulin (Tg) serum levels (8.4 μg/l) during thyroxine treatment. Furthermore, enlarged hypoechoic and round-shaped bilateral cervical lymph nodes were detected at cervical ultrasonography (US). Based on laboratory and US findings suspicious for lymph nodal recurrence of thyroid carcinoma, the patient underwent an 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) to check for distant metastases (Fig. 1). The patient underwent a US-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology on an 18 F-FDG-avid cervical lymph-node. The smears were hypercellulated and consisted of numerous small- to medium-sized lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and tingible body macrophages. The cytological diagnosis was consistent with that of reactive lymphadenitis. Serological test revealed elevated IgM and IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies with a very low IgG-avidity, indicating an acute toxoplasmosis. Serum Tg was then measured by using heterophilic antibody blocking tubes, as previously reported, and serum value dropped to 18 F-FDG-PET/CT in oncological patients. Few reports have described toxoplasmic infection mimicking malignancy at 18 F-FDG-PET/CT; these findings were found mainly in immunodepressive patients or with history of lymphoma. Conversely, we described here a case of toxoplasmosis inducing false-positive Tg measurement, neck US and 18 F-FDG-PET/CT findings in a patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma

  9. The use of dual-phase {sup 18}F-FDG PET in characterizing thyroid incidentalomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Y.-C.; Wu, P.-S.; Chiu, N.-T.; Yao, W.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, B.-F., E-mail: bflee@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Peng, S.-L. [Department of Pathology, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To examine the usefulness of dual-phase 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) for the evaluation of thyroid incidentalomas. Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, cases with focal thyroid lesions seen incidentally at FDG PET in which the histopathological diagnosis was available and in which dual-phase FDG PET imaging was performed at 1 and 2 h after FDG injection were reviewed. In the included cases, the 1 and 2 h maximal standard uptake value (1-hour maximal SUV and 2-hour maximal SUV, respectively) and retention index (RI) were calculated, and the differences between benign and malignant thyroid incidentalomas were analysed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate the ability of 1-hour maximal SUV, 2-hour maximal SUV, and RI to discriminate benign from malignant lesions. Results: A total of 39 patients (25 females, 14 males) with 45 lesions (17 malignant, 28 benign) were included. In malignant thyroid incidentalomas, the average 1-hour maximal SUV, 2-hour maximal SUV, and RI were 5.20,