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Sample records for cardiac autonomic responses

  1. Abnormal autonomic cardiac response to transient hypoxia in sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to non-invasively assess cardiac autonomic control in subjects with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by tracking the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) that occur following brief exposure to a hypoxic stimulus. Five African–American SCA patients and seven healthy control subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Each subject was exposed to a controlled hypoxic stimulus consisting of five breaths of nitrogen. Time-varying spectral analysis of HRV was applied to estimate the cardiac autonomic response to the transient episode of hypoxia. The confounding effects of changes in respiration on the HRV spectral indices were reduced by using a computational model. A significant decrease in the parameters related to parasympathetic control was detected in the post-hypoxic responses of the SCA subjects relative to normal controls. The spectral index related to sympathetic activity, on the other hand, showed a tendency to increase the following hypoxic stimulation, but the change was not significant. This study suggests that there is some degree of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in SCA that is revealed by the response to transient hypoxia

  2. Effects of emotion regulation difficulties on the tonic and phasic cardiac autonomic response.

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    Guillaume Berna

    Full Text Available Emotion regulation theory aims to explain the interactions between individuals and the environment. In this context, Emotion Regulation Difficulties (ERD disrupt the physiological component of emotions through the autonomic nervous system and are involved in several psychopathological states.We were interested in comparing the influence of a film-elicited emotion procedure on the autonomic nervous system activity of two groups with different levels of emotion regulation difficulties.A total of 63 women (undergraduate students ranging from 18 to 27 (20.7 ± 1.99 years old were included. Using the upper and lower quartile of a questionnaire assessing the daily difficulties in regulating emotions, two groups, one with low (LERD and one with high (HERD levels of emotion regulation difficulties, were constituted and studied during a film-elicited emotion procedure. Cardiac vagal activity (HF-HRV was analyzed during three periods: baseline, film-elicited emotion, and recovery.The cardiovascular results showed a decrease in HF-HRV from baseline to elicitation for both groups. Then, from elicitation to recovery, HF-HRV increased for the LERD group, whereas a low HF-HRV level persisted for the HERD group.The HERD group exhibited inappropriate cardiac vagal recovery after a negative emotion elicitation had ended. Cardiac vagal tone took longer to return to its initial state in the HERD group than in the LERD group. Prolonged cardiac vagal suppression might constitute an early marker of emotion regulation difficulties leading to lower cardiac vagal tone.

  3. Effects of psychological stress test on the cardiac response of public safety workers: alternative parameters to autonomic balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that public safety workers (PSW) face many stressful situations that yield them as high-risk population for suffering chronic stress diseases. In this multidisciplinary research the cardiac response to induced psychological stress by a short duration Stroop test was evaluated in 20 female and 19 male PSW, in order to compare traditionally used cardiac response parameters with alternative ones. Electrocardiograms have been recorded using the Eindhoven electrodes configuration for 1 min before, 3 min during and 1 min after the test. Signals analysis has been performed for the heart rate and the power spectra of its variability and of the variability of the amplitude of the R-wave, i.e. the highest peak of the electrocardiographic signal periodic sequence. The results demonstrated that the traditional autonomic balance index shows no significant differences between stages. In contrast, the median of the area of the power spectrum of the R-wave amplitude variability in the frequency region dominated by the autonomous nervous system (0.04-to-0.4 Hz) is the more sensitive parameter. Moreover, this parameter allows to identify gender differences consistent with those encountered in other studies

  4. Effects of psychological stress test on the cardiac response of public safety workers: alternative parameters to autonomic balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Franco, M. R.; Vargas-Luna, F. M.; Delgadillo-Holtfort, I.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that public safety workers (PSW) face many stressful situations that yield them as high-risk population for suffering chronic stress diseases. In this multidisciplinary research the cardiac response to induced psychological stress by a short duration Stroop test was evaluated in 20 female and 19 male PSW, in order to compare traditionally used cardiac response parameters with alternative ones. Electrocardiograms have been recorded using the Eindhoven electrodes configuration for 1 min before, 3 min during and 1 min after the test. Signals analysis has been performed for the heart rate and the power spectra of its variability and of the variability of the amplitude of the R-wave, i.e. the highest peak of the electrocardiographic signal periodic sequence. The results demonstrated that the traditional autonomic balance index shows no significant differences between stages. In contrast, the median of the area of the power spectrum of the R-wave amplitude variability in the frequency region dominated by the autonomous nervous system (0.04-to-0.4 Hz) is the more sensitive parameter. Moreover, this parameter allows to identify gender differences consistent with those encountered in other studies.

  5. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and cardiac autonomic responses to transrectal examination differ with behavioral reactivity in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L; Kézér, F L; Kulcsár-Huszenicza, M; Ruff, F; Szenci, O; Jurkovich, V

    2016-09-01

    Behavior, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity were evaluated in response to transrectal examination in nonlactating Holstein-Friesian cows with different behavioral reactivity. According to behavioral reactions shown to the procedure of fixing the heart rate (HR) monitors, the 20 cows with the highest and the 20 cows with the lowest behavioral reactivity were involved in the study (high responder, n=20; and low responder, n=20, respectively). Activity of the ANS was assessed by HR and HR variability parameters. Blood and saliva were collected at 5 min before (baseline) and 0, 5 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 60, and 120 min after the examination to determine cortisol concentrations. The examination lasted for 5 min. Cardiac parameters included HR, the root mean square of successive differences between the consecutive interbeat intervals, the high frequency (HF) component of heart rate variability, and the ratio between the low frequency (LF) and HF parameter (LF/HF). Following the examination, peak plasma and saliva cortisol levels and the amplitude of the plasma and saliva cortisol response were higher in high responder cows than in low responders. Areas under the plasma and saliva cortisol response curves were greater in high responder cows. Plasma and salivary cortisol levels correlated significantly at baseline (r=0.91), right after examination (r=0.98), and at peak levels (r=0.96). Area under the HR response curve was higher in low responder cows; however, maximum HR and the amplitude of the HR response showed no differences between groups. Minimum values of both parameters calculated for the examination were higher in high responders. Following the examination, response parameters of root mean square of successive differences and HF did not differ between groups. The maximum and the amplitude of LF/HF response and area under the LF/HF response curve were lower in low responder cows, suggesting a lower sympathetic

  6. Abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation in mice lacking ASIC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Terry B J; Chen, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3(-/-) mice. Asic3(-/-) mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3(-/-) mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3(-/-) mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24804235

  7. Abnormal Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Mice Lacking ASIC3

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    Ching-Feng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3−/− mice. Asic3−/− mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3−/− mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3−/− mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Reduced cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing: A heritable vulnerability trait in patients with schizophrenia and their healthy first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Yeh, Chin-Bin; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-09-30

    Reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV) has been observed in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives, suggesting genetic predispositions. However, findings have not been consistent. We assessed cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing in first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia (n=45; 26 female; aged 39.69±14.82 years). Data were compared to healthy controls (n=45; 26 female; aged 38.27±9.79 years) matched for age, gender, body mass index and physical activity as well as to unmedicated patients with acute schizophrenia (n=45; 25 female; aged 37.31±12.65 years). Electrocardiograms were recorded under supine resting and deep-breathing conditions (10-12breaths/min). We measured HRV components including variance, low-frequency (LF) power, which may reflect baroreflex function, high-frequency (HF) power, which reflects cardiac parasympathetic activity, and LF/HF ratio, which may reflect sympatho-vagal balance. Patients rather than relatives exhibited lower resting-state HRV (variance, LF, and HF) than controls. As expected, deep breathing induced an increase in variance and HF-HRV in controls. However, such a response was significantly reduced in both patients and their relatives. In conclusion, the diminished cardiac autonomic reactivity to deep breathing seen in patients and their unaffected relatives indicates that this pattern of cardiac autonomic dysregulation may be regarded as a genetic trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:27442977

  9. Autonomic cardiac regulation and morpho-physiological responses to eight week training preparation in junior soccer players

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    Michal Botek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training preparation in soccer is thought to improve body composition and performance level, especially the maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max. However, an enhancement in performance may be attenuated by the increase of fatigue. Heart rate variability (HRV as a non-invasive index of autonomic nervous system (ANS activity has been considered to be a sensitive tool in fatigue assessment. Objective: This study was focused to evaluate the response of ANS activity and morpho-physiological parameters to eight week training preparation. Methods: Study included 12 trained soccer players aged 17.2 ± 1.2 years. Athletes underwent pre- and post-preparation testing that included the ANS activity assessment by spectral analysis of HRV in supine and upright position. Further, body composition was analyzed via electrical bio-impedance method and physiological parameters were assessed during maximal stress tests. ANS activity and subjective feeling of fatigue was assessed continuously within subsequent weeks of preparation. Results: No significant differences in all HRV variables within weeks were found. Pre vs. post analyses revealed a significant (p < .05 increase in body weight, fat free mass, body mass index, and peak power. A significant decline in mean maximal heart rate (HR and resting HR at standing was identified at the end of preparation. Since no significant changes between pre- post-preparation in the mean VO2max occurred, the positive correlation between the individual change in VO2max and the vagally related HRV [supine LnHF (r = .78, Ln rMSSD (r = .63, and the standing LnHF (r = .73, p < .05] was found. Conclusions: This study showed that an 8 week training program modified particularly fat free mass and short-term endurance, whereas both the autonomic cardiac regulation and the feeling of fatigue remained almost unaffected. Standing position seems to be more sensitive in terms of the HR response in relation to fatigue

  10. Early atherosclerosis and cardiac autonomic responses to mental stress: a population-based study of the moderating influence of impaired endothelial function

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    Juonala Markus

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute mental stress may contribute to the cardiovascular disease progression via autonomic nervous system controlled negative effects on the endothelium. The joint effects of stress-induced sympathetic or parasympathetic activity and endothelial function on atherosclerosis development have not been investigated. The present study aims to examine the interactive effect of acute mental stress-induced cardiac reactivity/recovery and endothelial function on the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis. Methods Participants were 81 healthy young adults aged 24-39 years. Preclinical atherosclerosis was assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT and endothelial function was measured as flow-mediated dilatation (FMD using ultrasound techniques. We also measured heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA, and pre-ejection period (PEP in response to the mental arithmetic and speech tasks. Results We found a significant interaction of FMD and cardiac RSA recovery for IMT (p = 0.037, and a significant interaction of FMD and PEP recovery for IMT (p = 0.006. Among participants with low FMD, slower PEP recovery was related to higher IMT. Among individuals with high FMD, slow RSA recovery predicted higher IMT. No significant interactions of FMD and cardiac reactivity for IMT were found. Conclusions Cardiac recovery plays a role in atherosclerosis development in persons with high and low FMD. The role of sympathetically mediated cardiac activity seems to be more important in those with impaired FMD, and parasympathetically mediated in those with relatively high FMD. The development of endothelial dysfunction may be one possible mechanism linking slow cardiac recovery and atherosclerosis via autonomic nervous system mediated effect.

  11. Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Parasympathetic versus sympathetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction often causes lethal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. 123I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) can evaluate cardiac sympathetic dysfunction, and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) can reflect cardiac parasympathetic activity. We examined whether cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction assessed by HRV may correlate with sympathetic dysfunction assessed by MIBG in diabetic patients. In 24-hour electrocardiography, we analyzed 4 HRV parameters: high-frequency power (HF), HF in the early morning (EMHF), rMSSD and pNN50. MIBG planar images and SPECT were obtained 15 minutes (early) and 150 minutes (late) after injection and the heart washout rate was calculated. The defect score in 9 left ventricular regions was scored on a 4 point scale (0=normal - 3=severe defect). In 20 selected diabetic patients without congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and renal failure, parasympathetic HRV parameters had a negative correlation with the sum of defect scores (DS) in the late images (R=-0.47 to -0.59, p<0.05) and some parameters had a negative correlation with the washout rate (R=-0.50 to -0.55, p<0.05). In a total of 64 diabetic patients also, these parameters had a negative correlation with late DS (R=-0.28 to -0.35, p<0.05) and early DS (R=-0.27 to -0.32, p<0.05). The progress of diabetic cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction may parallel the sympathetic one. (author)

  12. Auditory stimulation and cardiac autonomic regulation

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    Vitor E. Valenti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have already demonstrated that auditory stimulation with music influences the cardiovascular system. In this study, we described the relationship between musical auditory stimulation and heart rate variability. Searches were performed with the Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: "auditory stimulation", "autonomic nervous system", "music" and "heart rate variability". The selected studies indicated that there is a strong correlation between noise intensity and vagal-sympathetic balance. Additionally, it was reported that music therapy improved heart rate variability in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that dopamine release in the striatal system induced by pleasurable songs is involved in cardiac autonomic regulation. Musical auditory stimulation influences heart rate variability through a neural mechanism that is not well understood. Further studies are necessary to develop new therapies to treat cardiovascular disorders.

  13. Cardiac autonomic functions in children with familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Murat; Kır, Mustafa; Makay, Balahan; Keskinoğlu, Pembe; Bora, Elçin; Ünsal, Erbil; Ünal, Nurettin

    2016-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common inherited autoinflammatory disease in the world. The long-term effects of subclinical inflammation in FMF are not well recognized. Some studies have suggested that FMF is associated with cardiac autonomic dysfunction in adult FMF patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the cardiac autonomic functions in pediatric FMF patients by using several autonomic tests. Thirty-five patients with FMF and 35 healthy controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Demographic data, disease-specific data, and orthostatic symptoms were recorded. In all participants, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG), 24 h ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, transthoracic echocardiography, treadmill exercise test, and head upright tilt-table (HUTT) test were performed. The heart rate recovery (HRR) indices of the two groups were similar. Also, chronotropic response was similar in both groups. The time-domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV) were similar in both groups, except mean RR (p = 0.024). Frequencies of ventricular and supraventricular ectopic stimuli were similar in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in average QT and average corrected QT interval length, average QT interval dispersion, and average QT corrected dispersion. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the ratio of clinical dysautonomic reactions on HUTT. However, we observed a significantly higher rate of dysautonomic reactions on HUTT in patients with exertional leg pain than that in patients without (p = 0.013). When the fractal dimension of time curves were compared, FMF patients exhibited significantly lower diastolic blood pressure parameters than controls in response to HUTT. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in children with FMF is not prominent. Particularly, patients with exertional leg pain are more prone to have dysautonomic features

  14. High-Intensity Resistance Exercise Promotes Postexercise Hypotension Greater than Moderate Intensity and Affects Cardiac Autonomic Responses in Women Who Are Hypertensive.

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    de Freitas Brito, Aline; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do S; Coutinho de Oliveira, Caio V; Sarmento da Nóbrega, Thereza K; Lúcia de Moraes Forjaz, Cláudia; da Cruz Santos, Amilton

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) sessions on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), cardiac autonomic modulation, and forearm blood flow (FBF). Sixteen trained hypertensive women (n = 16, 56 ± 3 years) completed the following 3 experimental sessions: control (CS), RE at 50% (EX50%), and RE at 80% (EX80%) of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Both EX50% and EX80% comprised a set of 10 repetitions of 10 exercises, with an interval of 90 seconds between exercises. Measurements were taken preintervention and postintervention (at 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 minutes of recovery). Reductions in systolic/diastolic BP after exercise were greater in EX80% (largest declines, -29 ± 4/-14 ± 5 mm Hg) than EX50% (largest declines, -18 ± 6/-8 ± 5 mm Hg, p ≤ 0.05). Heart rate and cardiac sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) increased more in relation to pre-exercise values in EX80% than EX50% (largest increases 96 ± 3 vs. 90 ± 4 b·min, LF/HF = 1.77 ± 0.25 vs. 1.40 ± 0.20, respectively, p ≤ 0.05). Increases in FBF and hyperemia was also higher in EX80% than EX50% compared with pre-exercise (4.97 ± 0.28 vs. 4.36 ± 0.27 ml·min·100 ml and 5.90 ± 0.20 vs. 5.38 ± 0.25 ml·min·100 ml; p ≤ 0.05, respectively). These results suggest that RE of higher intensity promoted greater postexercise hypotension accompanied by greater increases in FBF, vasodilator response, HR, and cardiac sympathovagal balance. PMID:25992658

  15. Cardiac Autonomic Control in Individuals With Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulopoulou, Styliani; Baynard, Tracy; Collier, Scott; Giannopoulou, Ifigenia; Figueroa, Arturo; Beets, Michael; Pitetti, Kenneth; Fernhall, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to compare cardiac autonomic control at rest between 50 individuals with Down syndrome and 24 control participants without disabilities. Resting autonomic function was assessed using analysis of heart rate variability. Participants with Down syndrome had reduced total heart rate variability, which indicates possible…

  16. A single bout of exercise with a flexible pole induces significant cardiac autonomic responses in healthy men

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    Cristiane M. Ogata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Flexible poles can provide rapid eccentric and concentric muscle contractions. Muscle vibration is associated with a "tonic vibration reflex” that is stimulated by a sequence of rapid muscle stretching, activation of the muscle spindles and stimulation of a response that is similar to the myotatic reflex. Literature studies analyzing the acute cardiovascular responses to different exercises performed with this instrument are lacking. We investigated the acute effects of exercise with flexible poles on the heart period in healthy men. METHOD: The study was performed on ten young adult males between 18 and 25 years old. We evaluated the heart rate variability in the time and frequency domains. The subjects remained at rest for 10 min. After the rest period, the volunteers performed the exercises with the flexible poles. Immediately after the exercise protocol, the volunteers remained seated at rest for 30 min and their heart rate variability was analyzed. RESULTS: The pNN50 was reduced at 5-10 and 15-20 min after exercise compared to 25-30 min after exercise (p = 0.0019, the SDNN was increased at 25-30 min after exercise compared to at rest and 0-10 min after exercise (p = 0.0073 and the RMSSD was increased at 25-30 min after exercise compared to 5-15 min after exercise (p = 0.0043. The LF in absolute units was increased at 25-30 min after exercise compared to 5-20 min after exercise (p = 0.0184. CONCLUSION: A single bout of exercise with a flexible pole reduced the heart rate variability and parasympathetic recovery was observed approximately 30 min after exercise.

  17. Analysis of cardiac autonomic modulation in obese and eutrophic children

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; Júnior, Ismael Forte Freitas; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity causes alterations in cardiac autonomic function. However, there are scarce and conflicting data on this function with regard to heart rate variability in obese children. OBJECTIVE: To compare the autonomic function of obese and eutrophic children by analyzing heart rate variability. METHODS: One hundred twenty-one children (57 male and 64 female) aged 8 to 12 years were distributed into two groups based on nutritional status [obese (n  =  56) and eutrophic (ideal weight...

  18. Analysis of cardiac autonomic modulation in obese and eutrophic children

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Carlos Marques Vanderlei; Carlos Marcelo Pastre; Ismael Forte Freitas Júnior; Moacir Fernandes de Godoy

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity causes alterations in cardiac autonomic function. However, there are scarce and conflicting data on this function with regard to heart rate variability in obese children. OBJECTIVE: To compare the autonomic function of obese and eutrophic children by analyzing heart rate variability. METHODS: One hundred twenty-one children (57 male and 64 female) aged 8 to 12 years were distributed into two groups based on nutritional status [obese (n = 56) and eutrophic (ideal weight r...

  19. Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Massiello, Alex; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2013-01-01

    Research on the therapeutic modulation of cardiac autonomic tone by electrical stimulation has yielded encouraging early clinical results. Vagus nerve stimulation has reduced the rates of morbidity and sudden death from heart failure, but therapeutic vagus nerve stimulation is limited by side effects of hypotension and bradycardia. Sympathetic nerve stimulation that has been implemented in the experiment may exacerbate the sympathetic-dominated autonomic imbalance. In contrast, concurrent sti...

  20. Auditory stimulation and cardiac autonomic regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor E Valenti; Guida, Heraldo L.; Frizzo, Ana C F; Cardoso, Ana C. V.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Luiz Carlos de Abreu

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have already demonstrated that auditory stimulation with music influences the cardiovascular system. In this study, we described the relationship between musical auditory stimulation and heart rate variability. Searches were performed with the Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: "auditory stimulation", "autonomic nervous system", "music" and "heart rate variability". The selected studies indicated that there is a strong correlation bet...

  1. Prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in Asian Indian patients with fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes

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    Amrit Nanaiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It was formerly believed that since fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD is a secondary form of diabetes, specific diabetic complications were uncommon. This is no longer considered to be true. Our objective was to study the prevalence and pattern of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN in patients with FCPD. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study on consecutive male patients with FCPD was performed. Using an automated CAN System Analyzer, heart rate response to deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, standing and blood pressure response to standing were measured. The standard Ewing′s criteria were used to define normal, borderline, and abnormal values. Prevalence rates were calculated and the patients were defined to have normal autonomic function, parasympathetic, sympathetic, and combined dysfunction. Results: The prevalence of CAN in this study population was 63.3%. Isolated parasympathetic dysfunction (42.3% was the most common abnormality. Combined sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction was noted in 13.3% of patients. Isolated borderline dysfunction was noted among 13.3% of patients. CAN was detected in six patients with a duration of diabetes of less than 1 year after diagnosis. Patients with autonomic dysfunction were found to have a lower body mass index (BMI and low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol when compared to those with normal autonomic functions, which was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The prevalence of abnormal cardiac autonomic function is as high as 63.3% in the present study population which warrants regular screening of patients with FCPD for autonomic dysfunction. Patients with FCPD and autonomic dysfunction were found to have a lower BMI and lower LDL-cholesterol, which may be indicators of malnutrition in the group with autonomic dysfunction. Whether this malnutrition contributes to autonomic dysfunction needs further exploration.

  2. Cardiac Autonomic Adjustments During Baroreflex Test in Obese and Non-Obese Preadolescents

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    Mário Augusto Paschoal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Recent studies have shown changes in cardiac autonomic control of obese preadolescents. Objective: To assess the heart rate responses and cardiac autonomic modulation of obese preadolescents during constant expiratory effort. Methods: This study assessed 10 obese and 10 non-obese preadolescents aged 9 to 12 years. The body mass index of the obese group was between the 95th and 97th percentiles of the CDC National Center for Health Statistics growth charts, while that of the non-obese group, between the 5th and 85th percentiles. Initially, they underwent anthropometric and clinical assessment, and their maximum expiratory pressures were obtained. Then, the preadolescents underwent a constant expiratory effort of 70% of their maximum expiratory pressure for 20 seconds, with heart rate measurement 5 minutes before, during and 5 minutes after it. Heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate values were analyzed by use of a software. Results: The HRV did not differ when compared before and after the constant expiratory effort intra- and intergroup. The heart rate values differed (p < 0.05 during the effort, being the total variation in non-obese preadolescents of 18.5 ± 1.5 bpm, and in obese, of 12.2 ± 1.3 bpm. Conclusion: The cardiac autonomic modulation did not differ between the groups when comparing before and after the constant expiratory effort. However, the obese group showed lower cardiovascular response to baroreceptor stimuli during the effort, suggesting lower autonomic baroreflex sensitivity.

  3. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12. PMID:11429613

  4. Circadian profile of cardiac autonomic nervous modulation in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Richardt, Gert; Potratz, Jürgen;

    2003-01-01

    , awoke around 7 A.M., and had 6 to 8 hours of sleep. Circadian profiles of vagus-associated HRV parameters revealed a marked day-night pattern, with a peak at nighttime and a plateau at daytime. The characteristic nocturnal peak and the day-night amplitude diminished with aging by decade. Estimates of......UNLABELLED: Circadian Profile of Heart Rate Variability. INTRODUCTION: Although heart rate variability (HRV) has been established as a tool to study cardiac autonomic activity, almost no data are available on the circadian patterns of HRV in healthy subjects aged 20 to 70 years. METHODS AND RESULTS...

  5. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  6. Cardiac autonomic reactivity and salivary cortisol in men and women exposed to social stressors : relationship with individual ethological profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sgoifo, A; Braglia, F; Costoli, T; Musso, E; Meerlo, P; Ceresini, G; Troisi, A

    2003-01-01

    The degree of cardiovascular stress responsivity and its possible implications for the onset and progression of cardiovascular pathologies seem to be linked to the individual strategy of behavioral coping with stressors. This study was designed to investigate the relationship among cardiac autonomic

  7. Regular Football Practice Improves Autonomic Cardiac Function in Male Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS in the cardiovascular regulation is of primal importance. Since it has been associated with adverse conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, sleep disorders, hypertension and obesity. Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the impact of recreational football practice on the autonomic cardiac function of male children, as measured by heart rate variability. Patients and Methods Forty-seven male children aged 9 - 12 years were selected according to their engagement with football oriented practice outside school context. The children were divided into a football group (FG; n = 22 and a control group (CG; n = 25. The FG had regular football practices, with 2 weekly training sessions and occasional weekend matches. The CG was not engaged with any physical activity other than complementary school-based physical education classes. Data from physical activity, physical fitness, and heart rate variability measured in time and frequency domains were obtained. Results The anthropometric and body composition characteristics were similar in both groups (P > 0.05. The groups were also similar in time spent daily on moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (FG vs. CG: 114 ± 64 vs. 87 ± 55 minutes; P > 0.05. However, the FG performed better (P < 0.05 in Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (1394 ± 558 vs. 778 ± 408 m and 15-m sprint test (3.06 ± 0.17 vs. 3.20 ± 0.23 s. Also, the FG presented enhanced autonomic function. Significant differences were detected (P < 0.05 between groups for low frequency normalized units (38.0 ± 15.2 vs. 47.3 ± 14.2 n.u (normalized units, high frequency normalized units (62.1 ± 15.2 vs. 52.8 ± 14.2 n.u., and LF:HF ratio (0.7 ± 0.4 vs. 1.1 ± 0.6 ms2. Conclusions Children engaged with regular football practice presented enhanced physical fitness and autonomic function, by increasing vagal tone at rest.

  8. Cardiac autonomic control in adolescents with primary hypertension

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    Havlíceková Z

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairment in cardiovascular autonomic regulation participates in the onset and maintenance of primary hypertension. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control using long-term heart rate variability (HRV analysis in adolescents with primary hypertension. Subjects and methods Twenty two adolescent patients with primary hypertension (5 girls/17 boys aged 14-19 years and 22 healthy subjects matched for age and gender were enrolled. Two periods from 24-hour ECG recording were evaluated by HRV analysis: awake state and sleep. HRV analysis included spectral power in low frequency band (LF, in high frequency band (HF, and LF/HF ratio. Results In awake state, adolescents with primary hypertension had lower HF and higher LF and LF/HF ratio. During sleep, HF was lower and LF/HF ratio was higher in patients with primary hypertension. Conclusions A combination of sympathetic predominance and reduced vagal activity might represent a potential link between psychosocial factors and primary hypertension, associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity.

  9. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS. The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G). Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0–0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters. AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  10. Impaired cardiac uptake of meta-[123I]iodobenzylguanidine in Parkinson's disease with autonomic failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective - To selectively investigate postganglionic sympathetic cardiac neurons in patients with Parkinson's disease and autonomic failure. Material and methods - Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a pharmacologically inactive analogue of noradrenaline, which is similarly metabolized in noradrenergic neurons. Therefore the uptake of radiolabelled MIBG represents not only the localization of postganglionic sympathetic neurons but also their functional integrity. Ten patients with Parkinson's disease and autonomic failure underwent standardized autonomic testing, assessment of catecholamine plasma levels and scintigraphy with [123I]MIGB. Results - The cardiac uptake of MIBG, as demonstrated by the heart/mediastinum ratio, was significantly lower in patients in comparison with controls. Scintigraphy with MIBG allowed the selective in-vivo investigation of postganglionic sympathetic cardiac efferent in patients with autonomic failure, a procedure which was previously confined to post-mortem examination. Conclusion - These findings point to a relevant postganglionic pattern of involvement of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in Parkinson's disease and autonomic failure. (au)

  11. Diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy: insights from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stables, Catherine L; Glasser, Rebecca L; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a relatively common and often devastating complication of diabetes. The major clinical signs are tachycardia, exercise intolerance, and orthostatic hypotension, but the most severe aspects of this complication are high rates of cardiac events and mortality. One of the earliest manifestations of CAN is reduced heart rate variability, and detection of this, along with abnormal results in postural blood pressure testing and/or the Valsalva maneuver, are central to diagnosis of the disease. The treatment options for CAN, beyond glycemic control, are extremely limited and lack evidence of efficacy. The underlying molecular mechanisms are also poorly understood. Thus, CAN is associated with a poor prognosis and there is a compelling need for research to understand, prevent, and reverse CAN. In this review of the literature we examine the use and usefulness of animal models of CAN in diabetes. Compared to other diabetic complications, the number of animal studies of CAN is very low. The published studies range across a variety of species, methods of inducing diabetes, and timescales examined, leading to high variability in study outcomes. The lack of well-characterized animal models makes it difficult to judge the relevance of these models to the human disease. One major advantage of animal studies is the ability to probe underlying molecular mechanisms, and the limited numbers of mechanistic studies conducted to date are outlined. Thus, while animal models of CAN in diabetes are crucial to better understanding and development of therapies, they are currently under-used. PMID:23562143

  12. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna, Viveka P.; Smita Ambekar; Rajiv Singla; Ansumali Joshi; Anju Dhawan; Neeta Kumar; Deepak, K. K.; Sreenivas, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam) had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and c...

  13. Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Cardiac Autonomic Activity in Healthy Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Ellis; Turin, Tanvir C.; Sola, Darlene Y.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Exner, Derek V.; Mann, Michelle C.; Ahmed, Sofia B.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (≤50nmol/L 25-hydroxy vitamin D) is a cardiovascular (CV) risk factor that affects approximately one billion people worldwide, particularly those affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD). Individuals with CKD demonstrate abnormal cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, which has been linked to the significant rates of CV-related mortality in this population. Whether vitamin D deficiency has a direct association with regulation of cardiac autonomic activity has never be...

  14. Pulmonary function, cholinergic bronchomotor tone, and cardiac autonomic abnormalities in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective study analyzed the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in pulmonary and cardiac function by evaluating cardiovascular reflex and its correlation with pulmonary function abnormalities of type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients (N = 17 and healthy subjects (N = 17 were evaluated by 1 pulmonary function tests including spirometry, He-dilution method, N2 washout test, and specific airway conductance (SGaw determined by plethysmography before and after aerosol administration of atropine sulfate, and 2 autonomic cardiovascular activity by the passive tilting test and the magnitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA. Basal heart rate was higher in the diabetic group (87.8 ± 11.2 bpm; mean ± SD than in the control group (72.9 ± 7.8 bpm, P<0.05. The increase of heart rate at 5 s of tilting was 11.8 ± 6.5 bpm in diabetic patients and 17.6 ± 6.2 bpm in the control group (P<0.05. Systemic arterial pressure and RSA analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups. Diabetes intragroup analysis revealed two behaviors: 10 patients with close to normal findings and 7 with significant abnormalities in terms of RSA, with the latter subgroup presenting one or more abnormalities in other tests and clear evidence of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. End-expiratory flows were significantly lower in diabetic patients than in the control group (P<0.05. Pulmonary function tests before and after atropine administration demonstrated comparable responses by both groups. Type 2 diabetic patients have cardiac autonomic dysfunction that is not associated with bronchomotor tone alterations, probably reflecting a less severe impairment than that of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Yet, a reduction of end-expiratory flow was detected.

  15. Blunted autonomic response in cluster headache patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads; Brinth, Louise; Mehlsen, Jesper;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cluster headache (CH) is a disabling headache disorder with chronobiological features. The posterior hypothalamus is involved in CH pathophysiology and is a hub for autonomic control. We studied autonomic response to the head-up tilt table test (HUT) including heart rate variability...... (HRV) in CH patients and compared results to healthy controls. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-seven episodic and chronic CH patients and an equal number of age-, sex- and BMI-matched controls were included. We analyzed responses to HUT in the time and frequency domain and by non-linear analysis. RESULTS...

  16. Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Early Cardiac Affection in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Othman, Khaled M.; Naglaa Youssef Assaf; Hanan Mohamed Farouk; Iman M. Aly Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To detect the early preclinical alterations in cardiac autonomic control as well as altered cardiac function in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients and their relevance to the clinical features of the disease using noninvasive methods. Methods: 30 SSc patients and 15 healthy controls matched for age and sex underwent clinical examination, serological analysis, and echocardiographic assessment including Doppler flow imaging to evaluate cardiac function, and 24-hour Holter monitoring an...

  17. Glycemic Variability Is Associated With Reduced Cardiac Autonomic Modulation in Women With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Lebech Cichosz, Simon; Hoeyem, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    and 39 women with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and a known duration of diabetes <5 years. All patients were equipped with a continuous glucose monitoring sensor for 3 days, and the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) was calculated to obtain individual glycemic variability. Cardiac......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the sex differences in cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and to determine whether cardiac autonomic modulation is associated with glycemic variability. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated a cohort consisting of 48 men...

  18. Insights into the clinical and functional significance of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease

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    Luiz Fernando Junqueira Junior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Exclusive or associated lesions in various structures of the autonomic nervous system occur in the chronic forms of Chagas disease. In the indeterminate form, the lesions are absent or mild, whereas in the exclusive or combined heart and digestive disease forms, they are often more pronounced. Depending on their severity these lesions can result mainly in cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction but also in sympathetic dysfunction of variable degrees. Despite the key autonomic effect on cardiovascular functioning, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease remains unknown. METHODS: Review of data on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease and their potential consequences, and considerations supporting the possible relationship between this disturbance and general or cardiovascular clinical and functional adverse outcomes. RESULTS: We hypothesise that possible consequences that cardiac dysautonomia might variably occasion or predispose in Chagas disease include: transient or sustained arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, adverse overall and cardiovascular prognosis with enhanced morbidity and mortality, an inability of the cardiovascular system to adjust to functional demands and/or respond to internal or external stimuli by adjusting heart rate and other hemodynamic variables, and immunomodulatory and cognitive disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac autonomic modulation in Chagas disease might not be a mere epiphenomenon without significance. Indirect evidences point for a likely important role of this alteration as a primary predisposing or triggering cause or mediator favouring the development of subtle or evident secondary cardiovascular functional disturbances and clinical consequences, and influencing adverse outcomes.

  19. [Drug with a high metabolic activity, cocarnit, in the treatment of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, S V; Melekhovets', O K; Demikhova, N V; Vynnychenko, L B

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with diabetes is formed in the absence of atherosclerotic changes as a consequence of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in the early stages of diabetes. Progression of autonomic cardiac neuropathy in cardio-vascular type is associated with the violation of energy supply of cells, protein synthesis, electrolyte exchange, the exchange of trace elements, oxidation reduction processes, oxygen-transport function of blood, so that metabolic therapy is carried out to optimize the processes of formation and energy costs. The drug cocarnit activates processes of aerobic oxidation of glucose, as well as providing regulatory influence on the oxidation of fatty acids. Applying of cocarnit in complex therapy in patients with diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy found improvement of left ventricular diastolic function, and positive dynamics in the efferent activity balance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic control of heart rate variability, which provides the regression of clinical symptoms. PMID:23356142

  20. Distinctive cardiac autonomic dysfunction following stress exposure in both sexes in an animal model of PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koresh, Ori; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Matar, Michael A; Geva, Amir B; Cohen, Hagit

    2016-07-15

    It is unclear whether the poor autonomic flexibility or dysregulation observed in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) represents a pre-trauma vulnerability factor or results from exposure to trauma. We used an animal model of PTSD to assess the association between the behavioral response to predator scent stress (PSS) and the cardiac autonomic modulation in male and female rats. The rats were surgically implanted with radiotelemetry devices to measure their electrocardiograms and locomotor activity (LMA). Following baseline telemetric monitoring, the animals were exposed to PSS or sham-PSS. Continuous telemetric monitoring (24h/day sampling) was performed over the course of 7days. The electrocardiographic recordings were analyzed using the time- and frequency-domain indexes of heart rate variability (HRV). The behavioral response patterns were assessed using the elevated plus maze and acoustic startle response paradigms for the retrospective classification of individuals according to the PTSD-related cut-off behavioral criteria. During resting conditions, the male rats had significantly higher heart rates (HR) and lower HRV parameters than the female rats during both the active and inactive phases of the daily cycle. Immediately after PSS exposure, both the female and male rats demonstrated a robust increase in HR and a marked drop in HRV parameters, with a shift of sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic predominance. In both sexes, autonomic system habituation and recovery were selectively inhibited in the rats whose behavior was extremely disrupted after exposure to PSS. However, in the female rats, exposure to the PSS produced fewer EBR rats, with a more rapid recovery curve than that of the male rats. PSS did not induce changes to the circadian rhythm of the LMA. According to our results, PTSD can be conceptualized as a disorder that is related to failure-of-recovery mechanisms that impede the restitution of physiological homeostasis. PMID

  1. Cardiac Autonomic Effects of Acute Exposures to Airborne Particulates in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, M. S.; Schlegel, T. T.; Knapp, C. F.; Patwardhan, A. R.; Jenkins, R. A.; Ilgner, R. H.; Evans, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate cardiac autonomic changes associated with acute exposures to airborne particulates. Methods: High fidelity 12-lead ECG (CardioSoft, Houston, TX) was acquired from 19 (10 male / 9 female) non-smoking volunteers (age 33.6 +/- 6.6 yrs) during 10 minutes pre-exposure, exposure and post-exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), cooking oil fumes, wood smoke and sham (water vapor). To control exposure levels, noise, subject activity, and temperature, all studies were conducted inside an environmental chamber. Results: The short-term fractal scaling exponent (Alpha-1) and the ratio of low frequency to high frequency Heart Rate Variability (HRV) powers (LF/HF, a purported sympathetic index) were both higher in males (pcardiac responses to some acute airborne particulates are gender related.

  2. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka P Jyotsna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04. The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75.Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone.

  3. The assessment of cardiac autonomic functions in adolescents with a family history of premature atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Huseyin; Kilicaslan, Baris; Aydin, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Subclinical atherosclerosis has been recently detected in adolescents with a family history of premature atherosclerosis. However, no studies in the literature have assessed the cardiac autonomic functions of these adolescents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cardiac autonomic functions of adolescents with a family history of premature atherosclerosis compared with those of age- and gender-matched adolescents without a family history of atherosclerosis. METHOD: We evaluated the cardiac autonomic functions of 36 adolescents with a family history of premature atherosclerosis (Group 1) and compared them with those of 31 age- and gender-matched adolescents whose parents did not have premature atherosclerosis (Group 2). Twenty-four-hour time domain (standard deviation of all normal sinus RR intervals [SDNN], standard deviation of the mean of normal RR intervals in each 5-minute segment [SDANN], root-mean-square differences in successive RR intervals) and frequency domain (very low frequency, low frequency, high frequency, low frequency/high frequency) parameters of heart rate variability were used for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic functions. RESULTS: There were no differences in the time and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability between the two groups. Heart rate was negatively correlated with SDNN (r = -0.278, p = 0.035), while age was significantly correlated with root-mean-square differences in successive RR intervals, high frequency, low frequency and low frequency/high frequency (r = -0.264, -0.370, 0.265 and 0.374, respectively; p<0.05 for all). CONCLUSION: We found that the cardiac autonomic functions of adolescents with a family history of premature atherosclerosis were not different compared with those of adolescents without a positive family history of premature atherosclerosis. It appears that subclinical atherosclerosis does not reach a critical value such that it can alter cardiac autonomic functions

  4. Complex Nonlinear Autonomic Nervous System Modulation Link Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy and Peripheral Vascular Disease

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    Kinda eKhalaf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiological interactions are abundant within, and between, body systems. These interactions may evolve into discrete states during pathophysiological processes resulting from common mechanisms. An association between arterial stenosis, identified by low ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI and cardiovascular disease (CVD as been reported. Whether an association between vascular calcification - characterized by high ABPI and a different pathophysiology - is similarly associated with CVD, has not been established. The current study aims to investigate the association between ABPI, and cardiac rhythm, as an indicator of cardiovascular health and functionality, utilising heart rate variability (HRV.Methods and Results: Two hundred and thirty six patients underwent ABPI assessment. Standard time and frequency domain, and non-linear HRV measures were determined from 5-minute electrocardiogram. ABPI data were divided into normal (n=101, low (n=67 and high (n=66 and compared to HRV measures.(DFAα1 and SampEn were significantly different between the low ABPI, high ABPI and control groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: A possible coupling between arterial stenosis and vascular calcification with decreased and increased HRV respectively was observed. Our results suggest a model for interpreting the relationship between vascular pathophysiology and cardiac rhythm. The cardiovascular system may be viewed as a complex system comprising a number of interacting subsystems. These cardiac and vascular subsystems/networks may be coupled and undergo transitions in response to internal or external perturbations. From a clinical perspective, the significantly increased sample entropy compared to the normal ABPI group and the decreased and increased complex correlation properties measured by DFA for the low and high ABPI groups respectively, may be useful indicators that a more holistic treatment approach in line with this more complex clinical picture is required.

  5. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

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    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  6. Aging in autonomic control by multifractal studies of cardiac interbeat intervals in the VLF band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heart rate responds dynamically to various intrinsic and environmental stimuli. The autonomic nervous system is said to play a major role in this response. Multifractal analysis offers a novel method to assess the response of cardiac interbeat intervals. Twenty-four hour ECG recordings of RR interbeat intervals (of 48 elderly volunteers (age 65–94), 40 middle-aged persons (age 45–53) and 36 young adults (age 18–26)) were investigated to study the effect of aging on autonomic regulation during normal activity in healthy adults. Heart RR-interval variability in the very low frequency (VLF) band (32–420 RR intervals) was evaluated by multifractal tools. The nocturnal and diurnal signals of 6 h duration were studied separately. For each signal, the analysis was performed twice: for a given signal and for the integrated signal. A multifractal spectrum was quantified by the hmax value at which a multifractal spectrum attained its maximum, width of a spectrum, Hurst exponent, extreme events hleft and distance between the maxima of a signal and its integrated counterpart. The following seven characteristics are suggested as quantifying the age-related decrease in the autonomic function ('int' refers to the integrated signal): (a) hsleepmax − hmaxwake > 0.05 for a signal; (b) hintmax > 1.15 for wake; (c) hintmax − hmax > 0.85 for sleep; (d) Hurstwake − Hurstsleep < 0.01; (e) widthwake > 0.07; (f) widthint < 0.30 for sleep; (g) hintleft > 0.75. Eighty-one percent of elderly people had at least four of these properties, and ninety-two percent of young people had three or less. This shows that the multifractal approach offers a concise and reliable index of healthy aging for each individual. Additionally, the applied method yielded insights into dynamical changes in the autonomic regulation due to the circadian cycle and aging. Our observations support the hypothesis that imbalance in the autonomic control due to healthy aging could be related to

  7. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

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    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  8. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ineke Nederend; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Blom, Nico A; Arend D. J. ten Harkel

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that...

  9. Evaluation of diabetic autonomic neuropathy by 123I-metaiodobenzyl-guanidine (MIBG) cardiac imaging. Initial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-photon emission computed tomography was performed in 52 diabetics and 10 healthy volunteers using MIBG. The diabetics had no particular findings of electrocardiography, echocardiography, or exercise thallium imaging and no cardiovascular episodes. The healthy volunteers had no abnormal findings on exercise thallium imaging or glucose tolerance test. The average relative regional uptake (RRU) was decreased in the inferoposterior wall compared with the anterior or lateral wall in both the diabetics and volunteers. According to the RRU and visual images, we divided the diabetics into the following four groups: 14 who were normal (group N), 30 with segmental defects (group S), 4 with diffuse defects (group D) and 4 without accumulation (group DH). Diabetic complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) and hypertension were more frequent in group S than group N. However, there were no significant differences in the physiological evidence of autonomic neuropathy (C.V. of the R-R interval on the ECG and blood pressure response to standing or deep breathing) between groups S and N. Vibration sense was significantly more impaired in group S than in group N. These results suggest that cardiac imaging with MIBG might be a useful examination for the early diagnosis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. (author)

  10. Modulation of Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke following Ayurveda (Indian System of Medicine Treatment

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    Sriranjini Sitaram Jaideep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in stroke has implications on morbidity and mortality. Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine describes stroke as pakshaghata. We intended to study the effect of Ayurveda therapies on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Methods. Fifty patients of ischemic stroke (middle cerebral artery territory (mean age 39.26 ± 9.88 years; male 43, female 7 were recruited within one month of ictus. All patients received standard allopathic medications as advised by neurologist. In addition, patients were randomized to receive physiotherapy (Group I or Ayurveda treatment (Group II for 14 days. Continuous electrocardiogram and finger arterial pressure were recorded for 15 min before and after treatments and analyzed offline to obtain heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS. Results were analysed by RMANOVA. Results. Patients in Group II showed statistically significant improvement in cardiac autonomic parameters. The standard deviation of normal to normal intervals,and total and low frequency powers were significantly enhanced (F=8.16, P=0.007, F=9.73, P=0.004, F=13.51, and P=0.001, resp.. The BRS too increased following the treatment period (F=10.129, P=0.004. Conclusions. The current study is the first to report a positive modulation of cardiac autonomic activity after adjuvant Ayurveda treatment in ischemic stroke. Further long term studies are warranted.

  11. Teaching Cardiac Autonomic Function Dynamics Employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated,…

  12. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  13. Screening for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy using a new handheld device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulichsen, Elisabeth; Fleischer, Jesper; Ejskjaer, Niels; Eldrup, Ebbe; Tarnow, Lise

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a serious complication of longstanding diabetes and is associated with an increased morbidity and reduced quality of life in patients with diabetes. The present study evaluated the prevalence of CAN diagnosed by reduced heart rate variability (HRV) using a...... newly developed device in a large, unselected, hospital-based population of patients with diabetes....

  14. Influence of Smoking Consumption and Nicotine Dependence Degree in Cardiac Autonomic Modulation

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    Ana Paula Soares dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Smoking consumption alters cardiac autonomic function. Objective: Assess the influence of the intensity of smoking and the nicotine dependence degree in cardiac autonomic modulation evaluated through index of heart rate variability (HRV. Methods: 83 smokers, of both genders, between 50 and 70 years of age and with normal lung function were divided according to the intensity of smoking consumption (moderate and severe and the nicotine dependency degree (mild, moderate and severe. The indexes of HRV were analyzed in rest condition, in linear methods in the time domain (TD, the frequency domain (FD and through the Poincaré plot. For the comparison of smoking consumption, unpaired t test or Mann-Whitney was employed. For the analysis between the nicotine dependency degrees, we used the One-way ANOVA test, followed by Tukey's post test or Kruskal-Wallis followed by Dunn's test. The significance level was p 0.05. Conclusion: Only the intensity of smoking consumption had an influence over the cardiac autonomic modulation of the assessed tobacco smokers. Tobacco smokers with severe intensity of smoking consumption presented a lower autonomic modulation than those with moderate intensity.

  15. Cardiac Autonomic Drive during Arterial Hypertension and Metabolic Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kseneva, S I; Borodulina, E V; Trifonova, O Yu; Udut, V V

    2016-06-01

    ANS support of the cardiac work was assessed with analysis of heart rate variability in representative samples of patients with arterial hypertension and metabolic disturbances manifested by overweight, classes I-II obesity, compromised glucose tolerance, and type II diabetes. Initially enhanced sympathetic effects on the heart rate demonstrated no further increase during the orthostatic test in contrast to suprasegmentary influences enhanced by this test. The pronouncedness of revealed peculiarities in ANS drive to the heart correlated with metabolic disturbances, and these peculiarities attained maximum in patients with type II diabetes. PMID:27383176

  16. Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Cardiac Autonomic Activity in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ellis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency (≤50nmol/L 25-hydroxy vitamin D is a cardiovascular (CV risk factor that affects approximately one billion people worldwide, particularly those affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD. Individuals with CKD demonstrate abnormal cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, which has been linked to the significant rates of CV-related mortality in this population. Whether vitamin D deficiency has a direct association with regulation of cardiac autonomic activity has never been explored in humans. Methods: Thirty-four (34 healthy, normotensive subjects were studied and categorized based on 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency (deficient vs. non-deficient, n = 7 vs. 27, as well as 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels (above vs. below 25th percentile, n = 8 vs. 26. Power spectral analysis of electrocardiogram recordings provided measures of cardiac autonomic activity across low frequency (LF and high frequency (HF, representative of vagal contribution bands, representative of the sympathetic and vagal limbs of the autonomic nervous system when transformed to normalized units (nu, respectively, as well as overall cardiosympathovagal balance (LF:HF during graded angiotensin II (AngII challenge (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min, 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min. Results: At baseline, significant suppression of sympathovagal balance was observed in the 25-hydroxy vitamin D-deficient participants (LF:HF, p = 0.02 vs. non-deficient, although no other differences were observed throughout AngII challenge. Participants in the lowest 1,25-dihydroxy VD quartile experienced significant withdrawal of inhibitory vagal control, as well as altered overall sympathovagal balance throughout AngII challenge (HF, mean difference = −6.98 ± 3 nu, p = 0.05; LF:HF, mean difference = 0.34 ± 0.1, p = 0.043 vs. above 25th percentile. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with suppression of resting cardiac autonomic activity, while low 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels are

  17. Relationship between duration of illness and cardiac autonomic nervous activity in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Fujita, Masatoshi; Nin, Kazuko; Noma, Shun’ichi; Teramukai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background The mortality rate associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) is high, and death is mainly attributable to cardiac events. A wide range of autonomic nervous system disturbances may be mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular mortality and sudden death of patients with AN. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been proven to be a reliable noninvasive method for quantitative assessment of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of heart rate (HR). The longer the duration of illnes...

  18. Relationship between duration of illness and cardiac autonomic nervous activity in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Fujita, Masatoshi; Nin, Kazuko; Noma, Shun'ichi; Teramukai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mortality rate associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) is high, and death is mainly attributable to cardiac events. A wide range of autonomic nervous system disturbances may be mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular mortality and sudden death of patients with AN. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been proven to be a reliable noninvasive method for quantitative assessment of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of heart rate (HR). The longer the duration of illne...

  19. Mild-to-moderate intensity exercise improves cardiac autonomic drive in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Goit, Rajesh Kumar; Paudel, Bishnu Hari; Khadka, Rita; Roy, Roshan Kumar; Shrewastwa, Mukesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Introduction The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of moderate aerobic exercise on cardiac autonomic function in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods Heart rate variability of 20 patients with type 2 diabetes was assessed. Resting electrocardiogram for the heart rate variability analysis at spontaneous respiration was recorded for 5 min in the supine position before and after 6 months of supervised aerobic training given three times per week. Results In time...

  20. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats

  1. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mostarda, Cristiano [Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão (UFMA), São Luís, MA (Brazil); Figueroa, Diego Mendrot [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelis, Kátia De [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.rodrigues@incor.usp.br [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  2. Cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability and turbulence in pre-hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Alim; Uenishi, Masahiro; Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Matsumoto, Kazuo; Kato, Ritsushi; Hara, Motoki; Yazıcı, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Non-dipping blood pressure pattern was shown to be associated with increased cardiovascular events. In addition, cardiac autonomic dysfunction was found to be associated with non-dipper phenomenon. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the cardiac autonomic functions in dipper and non-dipper pre-hypertensive subjects. A total of 65 pre-hypertensive subjects were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups as non-dippers (40 subjects, 52% female) and dippers (25 subjects, 52.5% female). Cardiac autonomic functions of the two groups were compared with the aid of heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence (HRT), atrial premature contractions (APCs), ventricular premature contractions (VPCs), and mean heart rate (MHR). There was no significant difference between non-dippers and dippers in basal characteristics. The two parameters of HRT, turbulence onset and turbulence slope, were found to be significantly abnormal in non-dippers than in dippers (P < .011 and P < .002, respectively). Heart rate variability parameters, including SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, and pNN50, were found to be similar in dipper and non-dipper pre-hypertensive subjects (P < .998, P < .453, P < .205, and P < .788, respectively). APCs, VPCs, and MHR were compared, and there were statistical differences between the groups (APCs 5.80 ± 4.55, 9.14 ± 7.33, P < .024; VPCs 8.48 ± 8.83, 13.23 ± 9.68, P < .044; and MHR 70.16 ± 11.08, 76.26 ± 11.31, P < .035; respectively). This study demonstrated a possible cardiac autonomic dysfunction in pre-hypertensive subjects with non-dipper pattern. This may be a basis for future studies related to pre-hypertension and non-dipping BP pattern. PMID:22676318

  3. Highly abnormal thermotests in familial dysautonomia suggest increased cardiac autonomic risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hilz, M; Kolodny, E.; Neuner, I; Stemper, B; Axelrod, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Patients with familial dysautonomia have an increased risk of sudden death. In some patients with familial dysautonomia, sympathetic cardiac dysfunction is indicated by prolongation of corrected QT (QTc) interval, especially during stress tests. As many patients do not tolerate physical stress, additional indices are needed to predict autonomic risk. In familial dysautonomia there is a reduction of both sympathetic neurons and peripheral small nerve fibres which...

  4. Signs of cardiac autonomic imbalance and proarrhythmic remodeling in FTO deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Carnevali

    Full Text Available In humans, variants of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene have recently been associated with obesity. However, the physiological function of FTO is not well defined. Previous investigations in mice have linked FTO deficiency to growth retardation, loss of white adipose tissue, increased energy metabolism and enhanced systemic sympathetic activation. In this study we investigated for the first time the effects of global knockout of the mouse FTO gene on cardiac function and its autonomic neural regulation. ECG recordings were acquired via radiotelemetry in homozygous knockout (n = 12 and wild-type (n = 8 mice during resting and stress conditions, and analyzed by means of time- and frequency-domain indexes of heart rate variability. In the same animals, cardiac electrophysiological properties (assessed by epicardial mapping and structural characteristics were investigated. Our data indicate that FTO knockout mice were characterized by (i higher heart rate values during resting and stress conditions, (ii heart rate variability changes (increased LF to HF ratio, (iii larger vulnerability to stress-induced tachyarrhythmias, (iv altered ventricular repolarization, and (v cardiac hypertrophy compared to wild-type counterparts. We conclude that FTO deficiency in mice leads to an imbalance of the autonomic neural modulation of cardiac function in the sympathetic direction and to a potentially proarrhythmic remodeling of electrical and structural properties of the heart.

  5. Response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Schiffer, Angélique A; Widdershoven, Jos W; Meine, Mathias M; Doevendans, Pieter A; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment for a subgroup of patients with advanced congestive heart failure and a prolonged QRS interval. Despite the majority of patients benefiting from CRT, 10-40% of patients do not respond to this treatment and are labeled as nonresponders...

  6. Prospective randomized controlled intervention trial: Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Improves Cardiac autonomic functions and Quality of life in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To assess the effect of Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Program on glycemic control, quality of life, and cardiac autonomic functions in diabetes. Material and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 120 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes (n = 56 and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program (n = 64. Standard therapy included advice on diet, walk, and oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was an interactive session in which Sudarshan kriya yoga, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam was taught under guidance of a certified teacher. Change in fasting, post prandial blood sugars, glycated hemoglobin, and quality of life were assessed. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and six months after intervention. Results: There was significant improvement in psychological (P = 0.006 and social domains (P = 0.04 and total quality of life (P = 0.02 in the group practicing comprehensive yogic breathing program as compared to the group following standard therapy alone. In the group following breathing program, the improvement in sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions was statistically significant (P = 0.01, while the change in the standard group was not significant (P = 0.17. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P = 0.07. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P = 0.76. The parameters of glycemic control were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: There was significant improvement in quality of life and cardiac autonomic functions in the diabetes patients practicing comprehensive yogic breathing

  7. Silent myocardial infarction secondary to cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jacob, Aasems; Anthony Diaz, Mark; Lederman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and hypertension presented to the emergency department with fever and chills of 1 day duration. On examination, temperature was 100.9 F, heart rate 111/min and she had orthostatic hypotension. Laboratory tests showed elevated blood urea nitrogen and white cell count. The patient underwent treatment for symptomatic urinary tract infection and while her fever and leucocytosis resolved, tachycardia persisted. An EKG done showed T inversions in leads II, III, arteriovenous fistula, V2 and V3. Troponin-I was elevated. Nuclear stress test revealed apical wall motion abnormality confirming myocardial infarction. Ewing's tests were carried out at bedside and these diagnosed severe autonomic neuropathy. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause cardiac autonomic neuropathy from chronic inflammation. This case entails the importance of assessing and detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy in chronic inflammatory conditions, and the need to be cautious of acute coronary events in these patients, even for minimal or no symptoms. PMID:27489064

  8. Central nervous system involvement in the autonomic responses to psychological distress

    OpenAIRE

    de Morree, H. M.; Szabó, B. M.; Rutten, G.-J.; Kop, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Psychological distress can trigger acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death in vulnerable patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism that plays a role in stress-induced cardiac events involves the autonomic nervous system, particularly disproportional sympathetic activation and parasympathetic withdrawal. This article describes the relation between psychological distress and autonomic nervous system function, with a focus on subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The rol...

  9. Percutaneous autonomic neural modulation: A novel technique to treat cardiac arrhythmia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablation and anti-arrhythmic medications have shown promise but have been met with varying success and unwanted side effects such as myocardial injury, arrhythmias, and morbidity from invasive surgical intervention. The answer to improving efficacy of ablation may include modulation of the cardiac aspect of the autonomic nervous system. Our lab has developed a novel approach and device to navigate the oblique sinus and to use DC current and saline/alcohol irrigation to selectively stimulate and block the autonomic ganglia found on the epicardial side of the heart. This novel approach minimizes myocardial damage from thermal injury and provides a less invasive and targeted approach. For feasibility, proof-of-concept, and safety monitoring, we carried out canine studies to test this novel application. Our results suggest a safer and less invasive way of modulating arrhythmogenic substrate that may lead to improved treatment of AF in humans

  10. Percutaneous autonomic neural modulation: A novel technique to treat cardiac arrhythmia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Madhavan, Malini [Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Venkatachalam, Kalpathi L. [Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Knudson, Mark B. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); EnteroMedics, EnteroMedics, St. Paul, MN (United States); Asirvatham, Samuel J., E-mail: asirvatham.samuel@mayo.edu [Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Ablation and anti-arrhythmic medications have shown promise but have been met with varying success and unwanted side effects such as myocardial injury, arrhythmias, and morbidity from invasive surgical intervention. The answer to improving efficacy of ablation may include modulation of the cardiac aspect of the autonomic nervous system. Our lab has developed a novel approach and device to navigate the oblique sinus and to use DC current and saline/alcohol irrigation to selectively stimulate and block the autonomic ganglia found on the epicardial side of the heart. This novel approach minimizes myocardial damage from thermal injury and provides a less invasive and targeted approach. For feasibility, proof-of-concept, and safety monitoring, we carried out canine studies to test this novel application. Our results suggest a safer and less invasive way of modulating arrhythmogenic substrate that may lead to improved treatment of AF in humans.

  11. Cardiac autonomic recovery after a single session of resistance exercise with and without vascular occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Nilo M; Pedro, Rafael E; Leicht, Anthony S; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the heart rate variability (HRV) after resistance training with and without vascular occlusion. It was hypothesized that low intensity (LI) with vascular occlusion (LIO) would elicit comparable postexercise HRV responses with that of high intensity (HI) without vascular occlusion. Nine subjects undertook 4 experimental sessions of leg press exercise on different days: (a) 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test, (b) 4 sets of 8 repetitions + 1 set until exhaustion at 80% of 1RM without vascular occlusion (HI), (c) 4 sets of 16 repetitions + 1 set until exhaustion at 40% of 1RM with vascular occlusion (LIO), and (d) 4 sets of 16 repetitions + 1 set with the number of repetitions equal to the last set of LIO but at 40% of 1RM without vascular occlusion (LI). Heart rate variability was analyzed 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 5 hours, and 24 hours after the HI, LIO, and LI sessions. The HI session increased the heart rate (HR) and reduced the root mean square of the successive difference of R-R intervals (RMSSD) and log-transformed high-frequency (lnHF) power during prolonged recovery (HR = 5 hours; RMSSD = 30 minutes; lnHF = 1 hour) at a greater magnitude when compared with LIO and LI. Despite the same intensity of exercise for LIO and LI, the occlusion delayed the recovery of HR and HRV variables. Postexercise blood lactate concentration was moderate to strongly correlated with peak HR (r = 0.87), RMSSD (r = -0.64), and lnHF (r = -0.68). This study has demonstrated that LIO was able to reduce cardiac autonomic stress when compared with HI. PMID:24077384

  12. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with uraemia is not related to pre-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Marie Bayer; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo;

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been proposed that pre-diabetes may cause neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in uraemic patients was related to the presence of pre-diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 66 non-diabetic uraemic patients...... selected from a waiting list for kidney transplantation. They were on average 43 ± 12 years old, with a duration of uraemia of 32 ± 27 months in the pre-dialytic stage, or receiving either haemo-, or peritoneal dialysis. A control group of 14 healthy people matched by sex, age and body mass index were...

  13. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with uraemia is not related to pre-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eming, Marie Bayer; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo Friis;

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been proposed that pre-diabetes may cause neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in uraemic patients was related to the presence of pre-diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 66 non-diabetic uraemic patients...... selected from a waiting list for kidney transplantation. They were on average 43 +/- 12 years old, with a duration of uraemia of 32 +/- 27 months in the pre-dialytic stage, or receiving either haemo-, or peritoneal dialysis. A control group of 14 healthy people matched by sex, age and body mass index were...

  14. Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Early Cardiac Affection in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Othman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the early preclinical alterations in cardiac autonomic control as well as altered cardiac function in systemic sclerosis (SSc patients and their relevance to the clinical features of the disease using noninvasive methods. Methods: 30 SSc patients and 15 healthy controls matched for age and sex underwent clinical examination, serological analysis, and echocardiographic assessment including Doppler flow imaging to evaluate cardiac function, and 24-hour Holter monitoring analyzed for arrhythmia and heart rate variability (HRV in the time and frequency domains. Results: The trans-mitral Doppler of early to atrial wave (E/A ratio was reversed in five patients (16.6% and the tricuspid E/A ratio was reversed in 10 patients (33.3%. Holter analysis for SSc patients revealed an increased prevalence of premature ventricular contractions (PVC $ 10/h (P = 0.02, supra-ventricular tachycardias (SVTs (P = 0.2, and total PVC count (P = 0.0000. Highly significant (P = 0.000 impairment in all HRV parameters was demonstrated in the SSc patients. Total skin thickness score (TSS, Raynaud’s phenomenon and anti-scleroderma 70 (anti-SCL70 showed significant positive correlations with all arrhythmia parameters, while showing a significant negative correlation with the impaired ventricular diastolic function and various HRV parameters. No correlation was found between arrhythmia and HRV parameters and disease duration, disease type, or presence of anti-centromere antibodies. Conclusion: Low heart rate variability, increased TSS and the presence of anti-SCL70 are correlated with preclinical cardiac involvement in SSc patients and may predict the likelihood of malignant arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Therefore, noninvasive HRV evaluation before clinical cardiac involvement in these patients might be beneficial when added to the clinical and laboratory assessments in detecting high-risk patients, and may allow for implementation of preventive

  15. Quantification of cardiac autonomic nervous activities in ambulatory dogs by eliminating cardiac electric activities using cubic smoothing spline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of an implantable radio transmitter system, direct measurement of cardiac autonomic nervous activities (CANAs) became possible for ambulatory animals for a couple of months. However, measured CANAs include not only CANA but also cardiac electric activity (CEA) that can affect the quantification of CANAs. In this study, we propose a novel CEA removal method using moving standard deviation and cubic smoothing spline. This method consisted of two steps of detecting CEA segments and eliminating CEAs in detected segments. Using implanted devices, we recorded stellate ganglion nerve activity (SGNA), vagal nerve activity (VNA) and superior left ganglionated plexi nerve activity (SLGPNA) directly from four ambulatory dogs. The CEA-removal performance of the proposed method was evaluated and compared with commonly used high-pass filtration (HPF) for various heart rates and CANA amplitudes. Results tested with simulated CEA and simulated true CANA revealed stable and excellent performance of the suggested method compared to the HPF method. The averaged relative error percentages of the proposed method were less than 0.67%, 0.65% and 1.76% for SGNA, VNA and SLGPNA, respectively. (paper)

  16. Responsibility for Crashes of Autonomous Vehicles: An Ethical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hevelke, Alexander; Nida-Rümelin, Julian

    2014-01-01

    A number of companies including Google and BMW are currently working on the development of autonomous cars. But if fully autonomous cars are going to drive on our roads, it must be decided who is to be held responsible in case of accidents. This involves not only legal questions, but also moral ones. The first question discussed is whether we should try to design the tort liability for car manufacturers in a way that will help along the development and improvement of autonomous vehicles. In p...

  17. Motor/autonomic stress responses in a competitive piano performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshie, Michiko; Kudo, Kazutoshi; Ohtsuki, Tatsuyuki

    2009-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of psychological stress on performance quality, autonomic responses, and upper extremity muscle activity in skilled pianists through comparisons between stressful (competition) and nonstressful (rehearsal) conditions. We observed increased levels of subjective anxiety, autonomic arousal, and electromyographic activity in the competition condition, which could contribute to the impairment of performance quality. The results provide important practical implications for enhancing performance quality as well as preventing playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians. PMID:19673810

  18. Cardiac autonomic functions and the emergence of violence in a highly realistic model of social conflict in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozsef Haller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the multitude of factors that can transform human social interactions into violent conflicts, biological features received much attention in recent years as correlates of decision making and aggressiveness especially in critical situations. We present here a highly realistic new model of human aggression and violence, where genuine acts of aggression are readily performed and which at the same time allows the parallel recording of biological concomitants. Particularly, we studied police officers trained at the International Training Centre (Budapest, Hungary, who are prepared to perform operations under extreme conditions of stress. We found that aggressive arousal can transform a basically peaceful social encounter into a violent conflict. Autonomic recordings show that this change is accompanied by increased heart rates, which was associated earlier with reduced cognitive complexity of perceptions ("attentional myopia" and promotes a bias towards hostile attributions and aggression. We also observed reduced heart rate variability in violent subjects, which is believed to signal a poor functioning of prefrontal-subcortical inhibitory circuits and reduces self-control. Importantly, these autonomic particularities were observed already at the beginning of social encounters i.e. before aggressive acts were initiated, suggesting that individual characteristics of the stress-response define the way in which social pressure affects social behavior, particularly the way in which this develops into violence. Taken together, these findings suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are valuable external symptoms of internal motivational states and decision making processes, and raise the possibility that behavior under social pressure can be predicted by the individual characteristics of stress responsiveness.

  19. Effects of autonomic balance and fluid and electrolyte changes on cardiac function in infarcted rats: A serial study of sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, N S; Dos-Santos, R C; Silveira, Anderson Luiz Bezerra da; R, Sonoda-Côrtes; Gantus, Michel Alexandre Villani; Fortes, F S; Olivares, Emerson Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Premenopausal women are known to show lower incidence of cardiovascular disease than men. During myocardial infarction (MI), homeostatic responses are activated, including the sympathetic autonomic nervous system and the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is related to the fluid and electrolyte balance, both aiming to maintain cardiac output. This study sought to perform a serial evaluation of sexual dimorphism in cardiac autonomic control and fluid and electrolyte balance during the development of MI-induced heart failure in rats. Experimental MI was induced in male (M) and female (F) adult (7-9 weeks of age) Wistar rats. The animals were placed in metabolic cages to assess fluid intake and urine volume 1 and 4 weeks after inducing MI (male myocardial infarction (MMI) and female myocardial infarction (FMI) groups). They subsequently underwent echocardiographic evaluation and spectral analysis of heart rate variability. After completing each protocol, the animals were killed for postmortem evaluation and histology. The MMI group showed earlier and more intense cardiac morphological and functional changes than the FMI group, although the extent of MI did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). The MMI group showed higher sympathetic modulation and sodium and water retention than the FMI group (P < 0.05), which may partly explain both the echocardiographic and pathological findings. Females subjected to infarction seem to show attenuation of sympathetic modulation, more favourable fluid and electrolyte balances, and better preserved cardiac function compared to males subjected to the same infarction model. PMID:26748814

  20. Role of inflammation in the development of cardiac autonomic disfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Novikova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate role of inflammation in pathogenesis of cardiac autonomic dysfunction assessed by heart rate variability (HRV analyses, in patients (pts with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Material and methods. 75 female pts with SLE aged before 55 years were included. Control group consisted of 32 healthy women of comparable age. Clinical symptoms, activity degree and main cardiovascular risk factors were assessed. Common carotid duplex scanning with measurement of intima-media thickness, echocardiography, 24 h ECG ambulatory recording with determination of time domain parameters, evaluation of serum inflammation markers level (CRP, IL-6, TNFa were performed. Results. HRV time domain parameters adjusted by McanNN - SDNNn%, SDNNin%, rMSSDn%, pNN50% in women with SLE were lower than in healthy control. HRV parameters inversely correlated with inflammation markers in SLE (p<0,05. SLE pts were divided into 4 groups: 1 (n=12 - pts with low HRV parameters and high level of IL-6; 2 (n=13 - low HRV and normal IL-6; 3 (n=6 - normal HRV and high IL-6; 4 (n=44 - normal HRV and IL-6. SLEDA1 2K, left atrium size, levels of markers of inflammation in group 1 were higher, then in group 4 (p<0,05. Hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking and subclinical atherosclerosis of carotid arteries were more frequent in group 2 compared to group 4 (p<0,05. Conclusion. These results suggest important role of autoimmune inflammation in pathogenesis of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in SLE pts with high disease activity and traditional cardiovascular risk factor, atherosclerotic changes - in low SLE activity. HRV, traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers combined measurement can help to identify subjects at risk of cardiovascular mortality among SLE pts.

  1. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M U Sujan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head in migraine patients. Methods: Forty chronic migraine patients fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria were recruited from the neurology outpatient clinic. Patients were randomized to receive either hydrotherapy plus conventional pharmacological care (n = 20 or conventional medication only (n = 20. Hydrotherapy group received treatment with hot arm and foot bath (103°F to 110°F and ice massage to head daily for 20 min for 45 days. Patients were assessed using headache impact test (HIT, visual analog scale for pain and cardiac autonomic function by heart rate variability (HRV before and after intervention period. Results: There was a significant decrease in HIT score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment in both the groups. However, it was more evident in add on hydrotherapy group compared to pharmacological treatment alone group. There was also significant improvement in the HRV parameters. In particular, there was a significant decrease in heart rate (P = 0.017, increase in high frequency (HF (P = 0.014 and decrease in low frequency/HF ratio (P = 0.004 in add on hydrotherapy group. Conclusion: Our study shows that add on hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients.

  2. Framing the ultimatum game: gender differences and autonomic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlo, Michela; Lotto, Lorella; Palomba, Daniela; Scozzari, Simona; Rumiati, Rino

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating whether the way offers are framed in the Ultimatum Game (UG) affects behavioral and autonomic responses in men and women. The "I give you" and "I take" expressions were used as gain and loss frames, respectively. Skin conductance and heart rate were recorded as indices of autonomic activation in response to unfair, mid-value, and fair offers. Acceptance rates were higher in men than in women under the gain frame. Moreover, men showed higher acceptance rates under the gain than under the loss frame with mid-value offers, whereas women's choices were not affected by frame. On the physiological level, men produced differential autonomic response patterns during decision-making when offers were presented under gain and loss framing. The "I take" frame, by acting as a loss frame, elicited in men the characteristic defensive response pattern that is evoked by aversive stimulation, in which increases in skin conductance are coupled with increases in heart rate. On the other hand, the "I give you" frame, by acting as a gain frame, elicited in men increases in skin conductance associated with prevailing heart rate deceleratory responses, reflecting a state of enhanced attention and orienting. In contrast, women's autonomic reactivity was not affected by frame, consistent with behavioral results. Phasic changes in heart rate were crucial in revealing differential functional significance of skin conductance responses under different frames in men, thus questioning the assumption that this autonomic measure can be used as an index of negative emotional arousal in the UG. PMID:22494303

  3. Metabolic and cardiac autonomic effects of high-intensity resistance training protocol in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Deus, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Claudio Ricardo; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Baldissera, Vilmar; da Silva, Carlos Alberto; Rossi, Bruno Rafael Orsini; de Sousa, Hugo Celso Dutra; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of metabolic and autonomic nervous control on high-intensity resistance training (HRT) as determined by pancreatic glucose sensitivity (GS), insulin sensitivity (IS), blood lactate ([La]), and heart rate variability (HRV) in rats. Thirty male, albino Wistar rats (292 ± 20 g) were divided into 3 groups: sedentary control (SC), low-resistance training (LRT), and HRT. The animals in the HRT group were submitted to a high-resistance protocol with a progressively increasing load relative to body weight until exhaustion, whereas the LRT group performed the same exercise regimen with no load progression. The program was conducted 3 times per week for 8 weeks. The [La], parameters related to the functionality of pancreatic tissue, and HRV were measured. There was a significant increase in peak [La] only in the HRT group, but there was a reduction in [La] when corrected to the maximal load in both trained groups (LRT and HRT, p < 0.05). Both trained groups exhibited an increase in IS; however, compared with SC and LRT, HRT demonstrated a significantly higher GS posttraining (p < 0.05). With respect to HRV, the low-frequency (LF) band, in milliseconds squared, reduced in both trained groups, but the high-frequency band, in milliseconds squared and nu, increased, and the LF in nu, decreased only in the HRT group (p < 0.05). The HRT protocol produced significant and beneficial metabolic and cardiac autonomic adaptations. These results provide evidence for the positive benefits of HRT in counteracting metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:22067239

  4. Functional autonomic nervous system profile in children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kushki, Azadeh; Brian, Jessica; Dupuis, Annie; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2014-01-01

    Background Autonomic dysregulation has been recently reported as a feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, the nature of autonomic atypicalities in ASD remain largely unknown. The goal of this study was to characterize the cardiac autonomic profile of children with ASD across four domains affected in ASD (anxiety, attention, response inhibition, and social cognition), and suggested to be affected by autonomic dysregulation. Methods We compared measures of autonomic cardiac regulat...

  5. Responsibility for crashes of autonomous vehicles: an ethical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevelke, Alexander; Nida-Rümelin, Julian

    2015-06-01

    A number of companies including Google and BMW are currently working on the development of autonomous cars. But if fully autonomous cars are going to drive on our roads, it must be decided who is to be held responsible in case of accidents. This involves not only legal questions, but also moral ones. The first question discussed is whether we should try to design the tort liability for car manufacturers in a way that will help along the development and improvement of autonomous vehicles. In particular, Patrick Lin's concern that any security gain derived from the introduction of autonomous cars would constitute a trade-off in human lives will be addressed. The second question is whether it would be morally permissible to impose liability on the user based on a duty to pay attention to the road and traffic and to intervene when necessary to avoid accidents. Doubts about the moral legitimacy of such a scheme are based on the notion that it is a form of defamation if a person is held to blame for causing the death of another by his inattention if he never had a real chance to intervene. Therefore, the legitimacy of such an approach would depend on the user having an actual chance to do so. The last option discussed in this paper is a system in which a person using an autonomous vehicle has no duty (and possibly no way) of interfering, but is still held (financially, not criminally) responsible for possible accidents. Two ways of doing so are discussed, but only one is judged morally feasible. PMID:25027859

  6. Sinoatrial tissue of crucian carp heart has only negative contractile responses to autonomic agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hälinen Mervi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the anoxia-tolerant crucian carp (Carassius carassius cardiac activity varies according to the seasons. To clarify the role of autonomic nervous control in modulation of cardiac activity, responses of atrial contraction and heart rate (HR to carbacholine (CCh and isoprenaline (Iso were determined in fish acclimatized to winter (4°C, cold-acclimated, CA and summer (18°C, warm-acclimated, WA temperatures. Results Inhibitory action of CCh was much stronger on atrial contractility than HR. CCh reduced force of atrial contraction at an order of magnitude lower concentrations (EC50 2.75-3.5·10-8 M in comparison to its depressive effect on HR (EC50 1.23-2.02·10-7 M (P -8 M and 10-7 M CCh, respectively (P + current, IK,CCh, with an EC50 value of 3-4.5·10-7 M and inhibited Ca2+ current (ICa by 28 ± 8% and 51 ± 6% at 10-7 M and 10-6 M, respectively. These currents can explain the shortening of AP. Iso did not elicit any responses in crucian carp sinoatrial preparations nor did it have any effect on atrial ICa, probably due to the saturation of the β-adrenergic cascade in the basal state. Conclusion In the crucian carp, HR and force of atrial contraction show cardio-depressive responses to the cholinergic agonist, but do not have any responses to the β-adrenergic agonist. The scope of inhibitory regulation by CCh is increased by the high basal tone of the adenylate cyclase-cAMP cascade. Higher concentrations of CCh were required to induce IK,CCh and inhibit ICa than was needed for CCh's negative inotropic effect on atrial muscle suggesting that neither IK,CCh nor ICa alone can mediate CCh's actions but they might synergistically reduce AP duration and atrial force production. Autonomic responses were similar in CA winter fish and WA summer fish indicating that cardiac sensitivity to external modulation by the autonomic nervous system is not involved in seasonal acclimatization of the crucian carp heart to cold and anoxic

  7. Sequential modulation of cardiac autonomic control induced by cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflex mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Palazzolo, L.; Rimoldi, A.; Diedrich, A.; Harris, P. A.; Porta, A.; Malliani, A.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonhypotensive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) induces a reflex increase in forearm vascular resistance and muscle sympathetic neural discharge without affecting mean heart rate. We tested the hypothesis that a reflex change of the autonomic modulation of heartbeat might arise during low intensity LBNP without changes of mean heart rate. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten healthy volunteers underwent plasma catecholamine evaluation and a continuous recording of ECG, finger blood pressure, respiratory activity, and central venous pressure (CVP) during increasing levels of LBNP up to -40 mm Hg. Spectrum and cross-spectrum analyses assessed the changes in the spontaneous variability of R-R interval, respiration, systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and CVP and in the gain (alpha(LF)) of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate. Baroreceptor sensitivity was also evaluated by the SAP/R-R spontaneous sequences technique. LBNP began decreasing significantly: CVP at -10, R-R interval at -20, SAP at -40, and the indexes alpha(LF) and baroreceptor sensitivity at -30 and -20 mm Hg, compared with baseline conditions. Plasma norepinephrine increased significantly at -20 mm Hg. The normalized low-frequency component of R-R variability (LF(R-R)) progressively increased and was significantly higher than in the control condition at -15 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhypotensive LBNP elicits a reflex increase of cardiac sympathetic modulation, as evaluated by LF(R-R), which precedes the changes in the hemodynamics and in the indexes of arterial baroreflex control.

  8. Autonomic skin responses in females with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Bach, Flemming W.; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla;

    2009-01-01

    Fabry disease is a genetic lysosomal disorder with dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A causing accumulation of glycolipids in multiple organs including the nervous system and with neuropathy as a prominent manifestation. Neurological symptoms include pain and autonomic...... response to iontophoresis of acetylcholine (p = 0.04) and a smaller capsaicin-induced flare compared to controls. These findings suggest that female patients both have an impaired C-fiber function and local abnormalities in blood vessels and sweat glands....

  9. Comparing the accuracy of ES-BC, EIS-GS, and ES Oxi on body composition, autonomic nervous system activity, and cardiac output to standardized assessments

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    Lewis JE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available John E Lewis1, Stacey L Tannenbaum1, Jinrun Gao3, Angelica B Melillo1, Evan G Long1, Yaima Alonso2, Janet Konefal1, Judi M Woolger2, Susanna Leonard1, Prabjot K Singh1, Lawrence Chen1, Eduard Tiozzo1 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 3State Farm Insurance, Bloomington, IL, USA Background and purpose: The Electro Sensor Complex (ESC is software that combines three devices using bioelectrical impedance, galvanic skin response, and spectrophotometry: (1 ES-BC (Electro Sensor-Body Composition; LD Technology, Miami, FL to assess body composition, (2 EIS-GS (Electro Interstitial Scan-Galvanic Skin; LD Technology to predict autonomic nervous system activity, and (3 ES Oxi (Electro Sensor Oxi; LD Technology to assess cardiac output. The objective of this study was to compare each to a standardized assessment: ES-BC to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, EIS-GS to heart rate variability, and ES Oxi to BioZ Dx Diagnostic System (BioZ Dx; SonoSite Inc, Bothell, WA. Patients and methods: The study was conducted in two waves. Fifty subjects were assessed for body composition and autonomic nervous system activity. Fifty-one subjects were assessed for cardiac output. Results: We found adequate relative and absolute agreement between ES-BC and DXA for fat mass (r = 0.97, P < 0.001 with ES-BC overestimating fat mass by 0.1 kg and for body fat percentage (r = 0.92, P < 0.001 with overestimation of fat percentage by 0.4%. For autonomic nervous system activity, we found marginal relative agreement between EIS-GS and heart rate variability by using EIS-GS as the predictor in a linear regression equation (adjusted R2 = 0.56, P = 0.03. For cardiac output, adequate relative and absolute agreement was found between ES Oxi and BioZ Dx at baseline (r = 0.60, P < 0.001, after the first exercise stage (r = 0.79, P < 0.001, and after the second exercise stage (r = 0.86, P

  10. Acute Auditory Stimulation with Different Styles of Music Influences Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Men

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    Sheila Ap. F. da Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: No clear evidence is available in the literature regarding the acute effect of different styles of music on cardiac autonomic control. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the acute effects of classical baroque and heavy metal musical auditory stimulation on Heart Rate Variability (HRV in healthy men. Patients and Methods: In this study, HRV was analyzed regarding time (SDNN, RMSSD, NN50, and pNN50 and frequency domain (LF, HF, and LF / HF in 12 healthy men. HRV was recorded at seated rest for 10 minutes. Subsequently, the participants were exposed to classical baroque or heavy metal music for five minutes through an earphone at seated rest. After exposure to the first song, they remained at rest for five minutes and they were again exposed to classical baroque or heavy metal music. The music sequence was random for each individual. Standard statistical methods were used for calculation of means and standard deviations. Besides, ANOVA and Friedman test were used for parametric and non-parametric distributions, respectively. Results: While listening to heavy metal music, SDNN was reduced compared to the baseline (P = 0.023. In addition, the LF index (ms2 and nu was reduced during exposure to both heavy metal and classical baroque musical auditory stimulation compared to the control condition (P = 0.010 and P = 0.048, respectively. However, the HF index (ms2 was reduced only during auditory stimulation with music heavy metal (P = 0.01. The LF/HF ratio on the other hand decreased during auditory stimulation with classical baroque music (P = 0.019. Conclusions: Acute auditory stimulation with the selected heavy metal musical auditory stimulation decreased the sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation on the heart, while exposure to a selected classical baroque music reduced sympathetic regulation on the heart.

  11. Cardiac sympathetic modulation in response to apneas/hypopneas through heart rate variability analysis.

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    Florian Chouchou

    Full Text Available Autonomic dysfunction is recognized to contribute to cardiovascular consequences in obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS patients who present predominant cardiovascular sympathetic activity that persists during wakefulness. Here, we examined 1 the factors that influence sympathetic cardiac modulation in response to apneas/hypopneas; and 2 the influence of autonomic activity during apneas/hypopneas on CA. Sixteen OSAHS patients underwent in-hospital polysomnography. RR interval (RR and RR spectral analysis using wavelet transform were used to study parasympathetic (high frequency power: HF(WV and sympathetic (low frequency power: LF(WV and LF(WV/HF(WV ratio activity before and after apnea/hypopnea termination. Autonomic cardiac modulations were compared according to sleep stage, apnea/hypopnea type and duration, arterial oxygen saturation, and presence of CA. At apnea/hypopnea termination, RR decreased (p<0.001 while LF(WV (p = 0.001 and LF(WV/HF(WV ratio (p = 0.001 increased. Only RR and LF(WV/HF(WV ratio changes were higher when apneas/hypopneas produced CA (p = 0.030 and p = 0.035, respectively or deep hypoxia (p = 0.023 and p = 0.046, respectively. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that elevated LF(WV (p = 0.006 and LF(WV/HF(WV ratio (p = 0.029 during apneas/hypopneas were independently related to higher CA occurrence. Both the arousal and hypoxia processes may contribute to sympathetic cardiovascular overactivity by recurrent cardiac sympathetic modulation in response to apneas/hypopneas. Sympathetic overactivity also may play an important role in the acute central response to apneas/hypopneas, and in the sleep fragmentation.

  12. Motor execution detection based on autonomic nervous system responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triggered assistance has been shown to be a successful robotic strategy for provoking motor plasticity, probably because it requires neurologic patients’ active participation to initiate a movement involving their impaired limb. Triggered assistance, however, requires sufficient residual motor control to activate the trigger and, thus, is not applicable to individuals with severe neurologic injuries. In these situations, brain and body–computer interfaces have emerged as promising solutions to control robotic devices. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of a body–machine interface to detect motion execution only monitoring the autonomic nervous system (ANS) response. Four physiological signals were measured (blood pressure, breathing rate, skin conductance response and heart rate) during an isometric pinching task and used to train a classifier based on hidden Markov models. We performed an experiment with six healthy subjects to test the effectiveness of the classifier to detect rest and active pinching periods. The results showed that the movement execution can be accurately classified based only on peripheral autonomic signals, with an accuracy level of 84.5%, sensitivity of 83.8% and specificity of 85.2%. These results are encouraging to perform further research on the use of the ANS response in body–machine interfaces. (paper)

  13. Analysis of cardiorespiratory phase coupling and cardiovascular autonomic responses during food ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niizeki, Kyuichi; Saitoh, Tadashi

    2016-05-15

    The present study analyzed whether the phase coherency (λ) of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is altered by food ingestion in healthy young subjects. After 5min of resting control, 13 healthy volunteers were asked to eat a solid meal with access to water at their own pace, followed by 5min of the postprandial state. The R-R interval (RRI), beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP), and respiratory activity were recorded using electrocardiography, a Finapres device, and inductance plethysmography, respectively. The stroke volume was calculated by the pulse-contour method from continuous BP measurement, and the cardiac output (CO) was obtained by multiplying the stroke volume by the heart rate. From the oscillatory signals of RSA and respiration, λ was computed; additionally, frequency domain indexes of the heart rate variability (HRV) were calculated using a short-time Fourier transform. A steady-state 3-min resting period (R), food ingestion period (FOOD), and the first 2-min and the last 3-min of the post prandial period were analyzed separately. We also compared the responses to gum chewing (GUM) and water intake (WATER) using the same protocol on separate days. A shortening of RRI and increases in BP and CO were observed in FOOD compared to R, suggesting a shift of sympathovagal balance toward sympathetic activation. Similar responses but smaller magnitudes were observed in the GUM condition, whereas only transient shortening of RRI was observed in the WATER condition. The HRV indexes did not show any significant changes in response to GUM and WATER but sympathovagal balance was shifted in favor of sympathetic dominance in FOOD. λ decreased during all of the conditions. There was a significant negative correlation between λ and the indirect measure of sympathovagal balance. These results suggest that ingestion of food induces enhanced cardiac sympathetic activity and that a phase coherence of RSA could provide a sensitive measure for evaluating the cardiac

  14. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years, and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years. We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males, OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males, slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males; for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males; for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males, and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males. Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in

  15. Autonomously-triggered microfluidic cooling using thermo-responsive hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Abhishek K; Dong, Liang; Beebe, David J; Jiang, Hongrui

    2007-03-01

    We present autonomously-triggered on-chip microfluidic cooling devices that utilize thermo-responsive hydrogels to adapt to local environmental temperatures. An external rotating magnetic stirrer couples with an in situ fabricated nickel impeller in these centrifugal-based microfluidic cooling devices to recirculate cooler water. Temperature-responsive hydrogels, which exhibit volumetric expansion and contraction, are integrated at the axle of the impeller. In this design, the hydrogels behave similar to an automotive clutch, to autonomously control the impeller's rotation as a function of the local environmental temperature. Therefore, the hydrogels act as both sensors and actuators and help take away the necessity for additional temperature sensing, feedback, and/or control units here. Cooling devices capable of on-chip thermal management at multiple predetermined onset operation points are realized by changes to the composition of hydrogel to alter its lowest critical solution temperature (LCST). Furthermore, the effect of magnetic stirrer frequency on the fluid cooling and flowrates for different two-blade nickel impeller designs are presented. PMID:17330161

  16. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joanna; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Agellon, Luis B.; Michalak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance. Conclusions We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function. PMID:27441395

  17. Gross anatomical study on the human myocardial bridges with special reference to the spatial relationship among coronary arteries, cardiac veins, and autonomic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kageyama, Ikuo; Aizawa, Yukio; Kumaki, Katsuji; Miki, Akinori; Terashima, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    Coronary arteries are frequently covered by cardiac muscles. This arrangement is termed a myocardial bridge. Previous studies have shown that myocardial bridges can cause myocardial ischemic diseases or cardiac arrhythmia, but the relevant pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. We examined 60 hearts from Japanese cadavers macroscopically to clarify the spatial relationships among coronary arteries, cardiac veins and autonomic nerves. We found 86 myocardial bridges in 47 hearts from the 60 cadavers examined (78.3%). Next, we dissected out nine hearts with myocardial bridges in detail under the operating microscope. We found no additional branches of coronary arteries on the myocardial bridge surfaces. However, the cardiac veins, which usually accompany the coronary arteries, ran independently on the myocardial bridge surfaces in the same region. Cardiac autonomic nerves comprised two rami: one was associated with the coronary artery under the myocardial bridge and the other ran on the surface of the bridge. Such spatial relationships among the coronary arteries, cardiac veins and cardiac autonomic nerves at the myocardial bridges are quite similar to those in mouse embryo hearts. Clin. Anat. 29:333-341, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26506515

  18. Autonomic and cardiovascular responses of preschool children to television programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröer, M; Howell, M

    1990-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the heart rates (HR) and skin temperatures (ST) of 18 preschool children while they viewed two clips of everyday children's television (TV) programming. The measurements were made in a day care setting, in a naturalistic environment designed to mimic the real world of children's TV viewing. The purpose of the study was to determine whether cardiovascular and autonomic arousal to TV programming might occur in some children. Since a large body of psychosocial literature addresses the affects of TV violence on children, HR and ST were examined during exposure to scenes from Mr. Roger's Neighborhood and G.I. Joe cartoons. The Mr. Roger's clip was slow, rhythmic, prosocial, and nonviolent, while the G.I. Joe clip was fast-paced, staccato, colorful, and full of verbal and action violence. The study found a significant effect of exposure to the cartoon violence on HR, with HR increasing. ST decreased, but not significantly, and there was a significant effect of time on the ST, due possibly to habituation. This finding has relevance to nursing assessment, intervention, and education of parents and children, since TV viewing is a pervasive cultural phenomenon. The possibility of excessive or inappropriate autonomic and cardiovascular responsiveness in some children to TV must be considered. PMID:2213521

  19. Blood pressure and cardiac autonomic modulation at rest, during exercise and recovery time in the young overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Alves de Araújo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to assess the blood pressure (BP, cardiac autonomic modulation at rest, in physical exercise and in the recovery in untrained eutrophic (E and overweight (O youth. The body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, systolic BP-SBP (E: 109.80 ± 10.05; O: 121.85 ± 6.98 mmHg and diastolic BP - DBP (E: 65.90 ± 7.28; O: 73.14 ± 12.22 mmHg were higher in overweight and the heart rate recovery (%HRR was lower as compared with E volunteers. The BMI was associated with SBP (r= 0.54, DBP (r= 0.65, load on the heart rate variability threshold - HRVT (r= -0.46, %HRR 2' (r= -0.48 and %HRR 5' (r= -0.48, and WC was associated with SBP (r= 0.54, DBP (r= 0.64 and HRR 2' (r= -0.49. The %HRR was associated to SBP, DBP and HRVT. In summary, the anthropometric variables, BP and cardiac autonomic modulation in the recovery are altered in overweight youth.

  20. Cyclic nucleotide regulation of cardiac sympatho-vagal responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Paterson, David J

    2016-07-15

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are now recognized as important intracellular signalling molecules that modulate cardiac sympatho-vagal balance in the progression of heart disease. Recent studies have identified that a significant component of autonomic dysfunction associated with several cardiovascular pathologies resides at the end organ, and is coupled to impairment of cyclic nucleotide targeted pathways linked to abnormal intracellular calcium handling and cardiac neurotransmission. Emerging evidence also suggests that cyclic nucleotide coupled phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play a key role limiting the hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP in disease, and as a consequence this influences the action of the nucleotide on its downstream biological target. In this review, we illustrate the action of nitric oxide-CAPON signalling and brain natriuretic peptide on cGMP and cAMP regulation of cardiac sympatho-vagal transmission in hypertension and ischaemic heart disease. Moreover, we address how PDE2A is now emerging as a major target that affects the efficacy of soluble/particulate guanylate cyclase coupling to cGMP in cardiac dysautonomia. PMID:26915722

  1. Using the Initial Systolic Time Interval to assess cardiac autonomic function in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H. Meijer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI has been defined as the time difference between the peak electrical and peak mechanical activity of the heart. ISTI is obtained from the electro-cardiogram and the impedance cardiogram. The response of ISTI while breathing at rest and to a deep breathing stimulus was studied in a group of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD and a group of healthy control subjects. ISTI showed substantial variability during these manoeuvres. The tests showed that the variability of RR and ISTI was substantially different between PD patients and controls. It is hypothesized that in PD patients the sympathetic system compensates for the loss of regulatory control function of the blood-pressure by the parasympathetic system. It is concluded that ISTI is a practical, additional and independent parameter that can be used to assist other tests in evaluating autonomic control of the heart in PD patients.doi:10.5617/jeb.216 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 98-101, 2011

  2. Simvastatin-induced cardiac autonomic control improvement in fructose-fed female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Juliana da Silva; Nathalia Bernardes; Janaina de O. Brito; Iris Callado Sanches; Maria Cláudia Irigoyen; Kátia de Angelis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because autonomic dysfunction has been found to lead to cardiometabolic disorders and because studies have reported that simvastatin treatment has neuroprotective effects, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin treatment on cardiovascular and autonomic changes in fructose-fed female rats. METHODS: Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls (n=8), fructose (n=8), and fructose+ simvastatin (n=8). Fructose overload was induced...

  3. Cardiac autonomic activity predicts dominance in verbal over spatial reasoning tasks: results from a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solernó, Juan I; Chada, Daniela Pérez; Guinjoan, Salvador M; Lloret, Santiago Pérez; Hedderwick, Alejandro; Vidal, María Florencia; Cardinali, Daniel P; Vigo, Daniel E

    2012-04-01

    The present study sought to determine whether autonomic activity is associated with dominance in verbal over spatial reasoning tasks. A group of 19 healthy adults who performed a verbal and spatial aptitude test was evaluated. Autonomic function was assessed by means of heart rate variability analysis, before and during the tasks. The results showed that a better relative performance in verbal over spatial reasoning tasks was associated with vagal prevalence in normal subjects. PMID:22118959

  4. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    OpenAIRE

    M U Sujan; M. Raghavendra Rao; Ravikiran Kisan; Hulegar A Abhishekh; Atchayaram Nalini; Trichur R Raju; Sathyaprabha, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head) in migraine pati...

  5. Cardiac autonomic imbalance by social stress in rodents: understanding putative biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Susan K Wood, Phd

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to stress or traumatic events can lead to the development of depression and anxiety disorders. In addition to the debilitating consequences on mental health, patients with psychiatric disorders also suffer from autonomic imbalance, making them susceptible to a variety of medical disorders. Emerging evidence utilizing spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), a reliable non-invasive measure of cardiovascular autonomic regulation, indicates that patients with depression and va...

  6. Multi-layer Attribute Selection and Classification Algorithm for the Diagnosis of Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Based on HRV Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert F. Jelinek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN poses an important clinical problem, which often remains undetected due difficulty of conducting the current tests and their lack of sensitivity. CAN has been associated with growth in the risk of unexpected death in cardiac patients with diabetes mellitus. Heart rate variability (HRV attributes have been actively investigated, since they are important for diagnostics in diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiac and renal disease. Due to the adverse effects of CAN it is important to obtain a robust and highly accurate diagnostic tool for identification of early CAN, when treatment has the best outcome. Use of HRV attributes to enhance the effectiveness of diagnosis of CAN progression may provide such a tool. In the present paper we propose a new machine learning algorithm, the Multi-Layer Attribute Selection and Classification (MLASC, for the diagnosis of CAN progression based on HRV attributes. It incorporates our new automated attribute selection procedure, Double Wrapper Subset Evaluator with Particle Swarm Optimization (DWSE-PSO. We present the results of experiments, which compare MLASC with other simpler versions and counterpart methods. The experiments used our large and well-known diabetes complications database. The results of experiments demonstrate that MLASC has significantly outperformed other simpler techniques.

  7. Impact of traffic-related air pollution on acute changes in cardiac autonomic modulation during rest and physical activity: a cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole-Hunter, Tom; Weichenthal, Scott; Kubesch, Nadine; Foraster, Maria; Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Bouso, Laura; Martínez, David; Westerdahl, Dane; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    People are often exposed to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) during physical activity (PA), but it is not clear if PA modifies the impact of TRAP on cardiac autonomic modulation. We conducted a panel study among 28 healthy adults in Barcelona, Spain to examine how PA may modify the impact of TRAP on cardiac autonomic regulation. Participants completed four 2-h exposure scenarios that included either rest or intermittent exercise in high- and low-traffic environments. Time- and frequency-domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV) were monitored during each exposure period along with continuous measures of TRAP. Linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate the impact of TRAP on HRV as well as potential effect modification by PA. Exposure to TRAP was associated with consistent decreases in HRV; however, exposure-response relationships were not always linear over the broad range of exposures. For example, each 10 μg/m(3) increase in black carbon was associated with a 23% (95% CI: -31, -13) decrease in high frequency power at the low-traffic site, whereas no association was observed at the high-traffic site. PA modified the impact of TRAP on HRV at the high-traffic site and tended to weaken inverse associations with measures reflecting parasympathetic modulation (P ≤ 0.001). Evidence of effect modification at the low-traffic site was less consistent. The strength and direction of the relationship between TRAP and HRV may vary across exposure gradients. PA may modify the impact of TRAP on HRV, particularly at higher concentrations. PMID:26486990

  8. Reliability of Autonomic Responses and Malaise Across Multiple Motion Sickness Stimulation Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Cynthia S.; Toscano, William B.; Cowings, Patricia S.

    1993-01-01

    There is general agreement that a high degree of variability exists between subjects in their autonomic nervous system responses to motion sickness stimulation. Additionally, a paucity of data exists that examines the variability within an individual across repeated motion sickness tests. Investigators have also examined the relationship of autonomic responses to motion sickness development. These investigations have used analyses at discrete points in time to describe this relationship. This approach fails to address the time course of autonomic responses and malaise development throughout the motion sickness test. Our objectives were to examine the reliability of autonomic responses and malaise using the final minute of the motion sickness test across five testing occasions, to examine the reliability of the change in autonomic responses and the change in malaise across five testing occasions, and to examine the relationship between changes in autonomic responses and changes in malaise level across the entire motion sickness test. Our results indicate that, based on the final minute of testing, the autonomic responses of heart rate, blood volume pulse, and respiration rate are moderately stable across multiple tests. Changes in heart rate, blood volume pulse, respiration rate, and malaise throughout the test duration were less stable across the tests. We attribute this instability to variations in individual susceptibility and the error associated with estimating a measure of autonomic gain.

  9. Methods of investigation for cardiac autonomic dysfunction in human research studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, Luciano; Spallone, Vincenza; Stevens, Martin; Hilsted, Jannik; Frontoni, Simona; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Ziegler, Dan; Kempler, Peter; Freeman, Roy; Low, Phillip; Tesfaye, Solomon; Valensi, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This consensus document provides evidence-based guidelines regarding the evaluation of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) for human research studies as a result of the work of the CAN Subcommittee of the Toronto Diabetic Neuropathy Expert Group. The CAN subcommittee critically...

  10. Cardiac autonomic imbalance by social stress in rodents: understanding putative biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Wood, Phd

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to stress or traumatic events can lead to the development of depression and anxiety disorders. In addition to the debilitating consequences on mental health, patients with psychiatric disorders also suffer from autonomic imbalance, making them susceptible to a variety of medical disorders. Emerging evidence utilizing spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV, a reliable noninvasive measure of cardiovascular autonomic regulation, indicates that patients with depression and various anxiety disorders (i.e., panic, social, generalized anxiety disorders, and post traumatic stress disorder are characterized by decreased HRV. Social stressors in rodents are ethologically relevant experimental stressors that recapitulate many of the dysfunctional behavioral and physiological changes that occur in psychological disorders. In this review, evidence from clinical studies and preclinical stress models identify putative biomarkers capable of precipitating the comorbidity between disorders of the mind and autonomic dysfunction. Specifically, the role of corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y and inflammation are investigated. The impetus for this review is to highlight stress-related biomarkers that may prove critical in the development of autonomic imbalance in stress -related psychiatric disorders.

  11. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  12. TRPM8 mechanism of autonomic nerve response to cold in respiratory airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cong-Yi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breathing cold air without proper temperature exchange can induce strong respiratory autonomic responses including cough, airway constriction and mucosal secretion, and can exacerbate existing asthma conditions and even directly trigger an asthma attack. Vagal afferent fiber is thought to be involved in the cold-induced respiratory responses through autonomic nerve reflex. However, molecular mechanisms by which vagal afferent fibers are excited by cold remain unknown. Using retrograde labeling, immunostaining, calcium imaging, and electrophysiological recordings, here we show that a subpopulation of airway vagal afferent nerves express TRPM8 receptors and that activation of TRPM8 receptors by cold excites these airway autonomic nerves. Thus activation of TRPM8 receptors may provoke autonomic nerve reflex to increase airway resistance. This putative autonomic response may be associated with cold-induced exacerbation of asthma and other pulmonary disorders, making TRPM8 receptors a possible target for prevention of cold-associated respiratory disorders.

  13. Autonomic and Emotional Responses of Graduate Student Clinicians in Speech-Language Pathology to Stuttered Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntupalli, Vijaya K.; Nanjundeswaran, Chayadevie; Dayalu, Vikram N.; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fluent speakers and people who stutter manifest alterations in autonomic and emotional responses as they view stuttered relative to fluent speech samples. These reactions are indicative of an aroused autonomic state and are hypothesized to be triggered by the abrupt breakdown in fluency exemplified in stuttered speech. Furthermore,…

  14. University EFL Learners' Perceptions of Their Autonomous Learning Responsibilities and Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razeq, Anwar Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the readiness of university students for autonomous learning of English as a foreign language. Data was collected using questionnaires and interviews. The study assessed learners' readiness for autonomous learning across three dimensions: a) learners' perceptions of their educational responsibilities; b)…

  15. Sensor Webs: Autonomous Rapid Response to Monitor Transient Science Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Dan; Grosvenor, Sandra; Frye, Stu; Sherwood, Robert; Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Cichy, Ben; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix

    2005-01-01

    To better understand how physical phenomena, such as volcanic eruptions, evolve over time, multiple sensor observations over the duration of the event are required. Using sensor web approaches that integrate original detections by in-situ sensors and global-coverage, lower-resolution, on-orbit assets with automated rapid response observations from high resolution sensors, more observations of significant events can be made with increased temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution. This paper describes experiments using Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) along with other space and ground assets to implement progressive mission autonomy to identify, locate and image with high resolution instruments phenomena such as wildfires, volcanoes, floods and ice breakup. The software that plans, schedules and controls the various satellite assets are used to form ad hoc constellations which enable collaborative autonomous image collections triggered by transient phenomena. This software is both flight and ground based and works in concert to run all of the required assets cohesively and includes software that is model-based, artificial intelligence software.

  16. Network representation of cardiac interbeat intervals for monitoring restitution of autonomic control for heart transplant patients

    CERN Document Server

    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Makowiec, Joanna Danuta; Kryszewski, Stanislaw; Graff, Beata; Wdowczyk-Szulc, Joanna; Buchnowiecka, Marta Zarczynska-; Gruchala, Marcin; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The aim is to present the ability of a network of transitions as a nonlinear tool providing a graphical representation of a time series. This representation is used for cardiac RR-intervals in follow-up observation of changes in heart rhythm of patients recovering after heart transplant.

  17. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs by serum response factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jeanne Y

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serum response factor (SRF regulates certain microRNAs that play a role in cardiac and skeletal muscle development. However, the role of SRF in the regulation of microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis in cardiac hypertrophy has not been well established. In this report, we employed two distinct transgenic mouse models to study the impact of SRF on cardiac microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis. Cardiac-specific overexpression of SRF (SRF-Tg led to altered expression of a number of microRNAs. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a and upregulation of miR-21 occurred by 7 days of age in these mice, long before the onset of cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that SRF overexpression impacted the expression of microRNAs which contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. Reducing cardiac SRF level using the antisense-SRF transgenic approach (Anti-SRF-Tg resulted in the expression of miR-1, miR-133a and miR-21 in the opposite direction. Furthermore, we observed that SRF regulates microRNA biogenesis, specifically the transcription of pri-microRNA, thereby affecting the mature microRNA level. The mir-21 promoter sequence is conserved among mouse, rat and human; one SRF binding site was found to be in the mir-21 proximal promoter region of all three species. The mir-21 gene is regulated by SRF and its cofactors, including myocardin and p49/Strap. Our study demonstrates that the downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a, and upregulation of miR-21 can be reversed by one single upstream regulator, SRF. These results may help to develop novel therapeutic interventions targeting microRNA biogenesis.

  18. Cardiac adaptations of bullfrog tadpoles in response to chytrid infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salla, Raquel Fernanda; Gamero, Fernando Urban; Ribeiro, Larissa Rodrigues; Rizzi, Gisele Miglioranza; Medico, Samuel Espinosa Dal; Rissoli, Rafael Zanelli; Vieira, Conrado Augusto; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine Cristina Mathias; Leite, Domingos Silva; Abdalla, Fábio Camargo; Toledo, Luis Felipe; Costa, Monica Jones

    2015-08-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can result in heart failure in Bd-susceptible species. Since Bd infection generally does not cause mortality in North American bullfrogs, the aim of this work was to verify whether this species presents any cardiac adaptation that could improve the tolerance to the fungus. Thus, we analyzed tadpoles' activity level, relative ventricular mass, ventricle morphology, in loco heart frequency, and in vitro cardiac function. The results indicate that infected animals present an increase in both ventricular relative mass and in myofibrils' incidence, which accompanied the increase in myocytes' diameter. Such morphological alterations enabled an increase in the in vitro twitch force that, in vivo, would result in elevation of the cardiac stroke volume. This response requires much less energy expenditure than an elevation in heart frequency, but still enables the heart to pump a higher volume of blood per minute (i.e., an increase in cardiac output). As a consequence, the energy saved in the regulation of the cardiac function of Bd-infected tadpoles can be employed in other homeostatic adjustments to avoid the lethal effect of the fungus. Whether other species present this ability, and to what extent, remains uncertain, but such possible interspecific variability might explain different mortality rates among different species of Bd-infected amphibians. PMID:26055358

  19. TRPM8 mechanism of autonomic nerve response to cold in respiratory airway

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Cong-Yi; Tominaga Makoto; Johnson Richard D; Chen Meng; Ling Jennifer X; Xing Hong; Gu Jianguo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Breathing cold air without proper temperature exchange can induce strong respiratory autonomic responses including cough, airway constriction and mucosal secretion, and can exacerbate existing asthma conditions and even directly trigger an asthma attack. Vagal afferent fiber is thought to be involved in the cold-induced respiratory responses through autonomic nerve reflex. However, molecular mechanisms by which vagal afferent fibers are excited by cold remain unknown. Using retrograd...

  20. Bariatric Surgery Restores Cardiac and Sudomotor Autonomic C-Fiber Dysfunction towards Normal in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, David C.; Wohlgemuth, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim was to evaluate the impact of bariatric surgery on cardiac and sudomotor autonomic C-fiber function in obese subjects with and without Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), using sudorimetry and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Method Patients were evaluated at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after vertical sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. All subjects were assessed using SudoscanTM to measure electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) of hands and feet, time and frequency domain analysis of HRV, Neurologic Impairment Scores of lower legs (NIS-LL), quantitative sensory tests (QST) and sural nerve conduction studies. Results Seventy subjects completed up to 24-weeks of follow-up (24 non-T2DM, 29 pre-DM and 17 T2DM). ESC of feet improved significantly towards normal in T2DM subjects (Baseline = 56.71±3.98 vs 12-weeks = 62.69±3.71 vs 24-weeks = 70.13±2.88, p<0.005). HRV improved significantly in T2DM subjects (Baseline sdNN (sample difference of the beat to beat (NN) variability) = 32.53±4.28 vs 12-weeks = 44.94±4.18 vs 24-weeks = 49.71±5.19, p<0,001 and baseline rmsSD (root mean square of the difference of successive R-R intervals) = 23.88±4.67 vs 12-weeks = 38.06±5.39 vs 24-weeks = 43.0±6.25, p<0.0005). Basal heart rate (HR) improved significantly in all groups, as did weight, body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, waist circumference and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), insulin and HOMA2-IR (homeostatic model assessment) levels improved significantly in pre-DM and T2DM subjects. On multiple linear regression analysis, feet ESC improvement was independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at baseline, and improvement in A1C at 24 weeks, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity. Sudomotor function improvement was not associated with baseline weight, BMI, % body fat or lipid levels. Improvement in basal HR was also independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at

  1. Effect of overreaching on cognitive performance and related cardiac autonomic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, O; Lussier, M; Fraser, S; Bherer, L; Audiffren, M; Bosquet, L

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effect of a 2-week overload period immediately followed by a 1-week taper period on different cognitive processes including executive and nonexecutive functions, and related heart rate variability. Eleven male endurance athletes increased their usual training volume by 100% for 2 weeks, and decreased it by 50% for 1 week. A maximal graded test, a constant speed test at 85% of peak treadmill speed, and a Stroop task with the measurement of heart rate variability were performed at each period. All participants were considered as overreached. We found a moderate increase in the overall reaction time to the three conditions of the Stroop task after the overload period (816 ± 83 vs 892 ± 117 ms, P = 0.03) followed by a return to baseline after the taper period (820 ± 119 ms, P = 0.013). We found no association between cognitive performance and cardiac parasympathetic control at baseline, and no association between changes in these measures. Our findings clearly underscore the relevance of cognitive performance in the monitoring of overreaching in endurance athletes. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we did not find any relationship between executive performance and cardiac parasympathetic control. PMID:22537000

  2. A study on cardiac autonomic modulation during pregnancy by non-invasive heart rate variability measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritesh Hariprasad Gandhi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Remarkable and uncontrollable changes with modification during pregnancy are connected with the autonomic control and consequently with the heart rate variability (HRV. Heart rate variability is a sum of different mechanisms and if pregnancy is a state of change, these modifications could be extracted from HRV analysis. Objective: To assess the effect of pregnancy on heart rate variability among pregnant mothers during first trimester of pregnancy and third trimester of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: HRV was measured for 5 minutes of continuous recording of electrocardiogram (ECG lead II, using windows based HRV analysis system variowin-HR after obtaining permission from the Institutional Review Board of Government Medical College, Bhavnagar and written consent from 30 pregnant subjects and 30 non-pregnant control subjects at autonomic function lab, Dept of Physiology, Bhavnagar. Result: Frequency domain parameters, very low frequency (VLF, low frequency (LF, high frequency (HF and HF normalized unit (nu were significantly decreased and LF (nu and LF/HF significantly increased in pregnant subject in 3 rd trimester as compared to their 1 st trimester of pregnancy. Time Domain parameters like SDNN, RMSSD, SDSD, NN50 count, pNN50, SD1/SD2, triangular HRV index and average R-R interval were significantly decreased during 3 rd trimester of pregnancy. Conclusion: The inhibition of resting parasympathetic activity or vagal blockage and an increment of the sympathetic modulation during the 3 rd third trimester of gestation in pregnancy as compared to their 1 st trimester and healthy non-pregnant subjects. Sympathovagal imbalance and abnormally low HRV may more pronounce during later stage of normal pregnancy.

  3. {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in diabetic patients. Relationship with {sup 201}Tl uptake and cardiac autonomic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Kurose, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Takashi; Flores, L.G. II; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo; Matsukura, Shigeru [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of diabetic myocardial damage (suspected myocardial damage; SMD) diagnosed by {sup 201}Tl-SPECT and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (AN) on myocardial MIBG uptake in patients with NIDDM. Eighty-seven diabetic patients divided into four subgroups: 23 with SMD (+) AN (+); 19 with SMD (+) AN (-); 27 with SMD (-) AN (+); 18 with SMD (-) AN (-), and 10 controls were studied. Both planar and SPECT images were taken at 30 minutes (early) and 3 hours (delayed) after {sup 123}I-MIBG injection. The heart to mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) and washout ratio of {sup 123}I-MIBG (WR) were obtained from both planar images. Similarly, the difference between the {sup 201}Tl image and the {sup 123}I-MIBG image in the total uptake score (TUS) was taken as the difference in the total uptake score ({Delta}TUS) representing cardiac sympathetic denervation without SMD. On both early and delayed planar images, the mean H/M value in the subgroups of diabetic patients was significantly lower in the SMD (+) AN (+) group than in the control group, but among those subgroups, there was statistically significant difference between the SMD (+) AN (+) and SMD (-) AN (-) groups only on the delayed images. Regarding the WR value, there was no statistically significant difference among subjects. On SPECT image analysis, the diabetic subgroup with AN or SMD had statistically significant lower values for TUS than those of the control group. Among diabetics, there was a statistically significant differences between SMD [+] AN [+] and SMD [-] AN [-] on both early and delayed images. Similarly, the SMD [+] AN [-] group also had significantly lower values than those of SMD [-] AN [-] on early images. Regarding {Delta}TUS, there was a statistically significant differences between AN [+] subgroups and controls. Similarly, the mean value for {Delta}TUS was much higher in AN [+] subgroups than in AN [-] subgroups with or without SMD in diabetes

  4. [sup 123]I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in diabetic patients. Relationship with [sup 201]Tl uptake and cardiac autonomic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Kurose, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Takashi; Flores, L.G. II; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo; Matsukura, Shigeru (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan))

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of diabetic myocardial damage (suspected myocardial damage; SMD) diagnosed by [sup 201]Tl-SPECT and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (AN) on myocardial MIBG uptake in patients with NIDDM. Eighty-seven diabetic patients divided into four subgroups: 23 with SMD (+) AN (+); 19 with SMD (+) AN (-); 27 with SMD (-) AN (+); 18 with SMD (-) AN (-), and 10 controls were studied. Both planar and SPECT images were taken at 30 minutes (early) and 3 hours (delayed) after [sup 123]I-MIBG injection. The heart to mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) and washout ratio of [sup 123]I-MIBG (WR) were obtained from both planar images. Similarly, the difference between the [sup 201]Tl image and the [sup 123]I-MIBG image in the total uptake score (TUS) was taken as the difference in the total uptake score ([Delta]TUS) representing cardiac sympathetic denervation without SMD. On both early and delayed planar images, the mean H/M value in the subgroups of diabetic patients was significantly lower in the SMD (+) AN (+) group than in the control group, but among those subgroups, there was statistically significant difference between the SMD (+) AN (+) and SMD (-) AN (-) groups only on the delayed images. Regarding the WR value, there was no statistically significant difference among subjects. On SPECT image analysis, the diabetic subgroup with AN or SMD had statistically significant lower values for TUS than those of the control group. Among diabetics, there was a statistically significant differences between SMD [+] AN [+] and SMD [-] AN [-] on both early and delayed images. Similarly, the SMD [+] AN [-] group also had significantly lower values than those of SMD [-] AN [-] on early images. Regarding [Delta]TUS, there was a statistically significant differences between AN [+] subgroups and controls. Similarly, the mean value for [Delta]TUS was much higher in AN [+] subgroups than in AN [-] subgroups with or without SMD in diabetes

  5. Cardiac Emergency Response Planning for Schools: A Policy Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kathleen; Martin Goble, Monica; Berger, Stuart; Courson, Ron; Fosse, Gwen; Gillary, Randall; Halowich, Joe; Indik, Julia H; Konig, Madeleine; Lopez-Anderson, Martha; Murphy, M Kathleen; Newman, Mary M; Ranous, Jeff; Sasson, Comilla; Taras, Howard; Thompson, Allison

    2016-09-01

    A sudden cardiac arrest in school or at a school event is potentially devastating to families and communities. An appropriate response to such an event-as promoted by developing, implementing, and practicing a cardiac emergency response plan (CERP)-can increase survival rates. Understanding that a trained lay-responder team within the school can make a difference in the crucial minutes between the time when the victim collapses and when emergency medical services arrive empowers school staff and can save lives. In 2015, the American Heart Association convened a group of stakeholders to develop tools to assist schools in developing CERPs. This article reviews the critical components of a CERP and a CERP team, the factors that should be taken into account when implementing the CERP, and recommendations for policy makers to support CERPs in schools. PMID:27486226

  6. Cardiac responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarndt, Rachel; Piloto, Sarah; Powell, Frank L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen

    2015-12-01

    An adequate supply of oxygen is important for the survival of all tissues, but it is especially critical for tissues with high-energy demands, such as the heart. Insufficient tissue oxygenation occurs under a variety of conditions, including high altitude, embryonic and fetal development, inflammation, and thrombotic diseases, often affecting multiple organ systems. Responses and adaptations of the heart to hypoxia are of particular relevance in human cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, in which the effects of hypoxic exposure can range in severity from transient to long-lasting. This study uses the genetic model system Drosophila to investigate cardiac responses to acute (30 min), sustained (18 h), and chronic (3 wk) hypoxia with reoxygenation. Whereas hearts from wild-type flies recovered quickly after acute hypoxia, exposure to sustained or chronic hypoxia significantly compromised heart function upon reoxygenation. Hearts from flies with mutations in sima, the Drosophila homolog of the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-α), exhibited exaggerated reductions in cardiac output in response to hypoxia. Heart function in hypoxia-selected flies, selected over many generations for survival in a low-oxygen environment, revealed reduced cardiac output in terms of decreased heart rate and fractional shortening compared with their normoxia controls. Hypoxia-selected flies also had smaller hearts, myofibrillar disorganization, and increased extracellular collagen deposition, consistent with the observed reductions in contractility. This study indicates that longer-duration hypoxic insults exert deleterious effects on heart function that are mediated, in part, by sima and advances Drosophila models for the genetic analysis of cardiac-specific responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:26377557

  7. Short-term ECG recording for the identification of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in people with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Herbert F.; Pham, Phuong; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Spence, Ian

    2007-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a serious and increasing health problem worldwide. Compared to non-diabetics, patients experience an increased risk of all cardiovascular diseases, including dysfunctional neural control of the heart. Poor diagnoses of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) may result in increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction and ischaemia, which can lead to sudden death. Traditionally the Ewing battery of tests is used to identify CAN. The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of heart rate variability (HRV) analyses of short-term ECG recordings as a method for detecting CAN. HRV may be able to identify asymptomatic individuals, which the Ewing battery is not able to do. Several HRV parameters are assessed, including time and frequency domain, as well as nonlinear parameters. Eighteen out of thirty-eight individuals with diabetes were positive for two or more of the Ewing battery of tests indicating CAN. Approximate Entropy (ApEn), log normalized total power (LnTP) and log normalized high frequency (LnHF) power demonstrate a significant difference at p ECG recordings. Our study paves the way to assess the utility of nonlinear parameters in identifying asymptomatic CAN.

  8. A STUDY OF CARDIAC AUTONOMIC CONTROL AND PULMONARY FUNCTIONS IN DIFFERENT PHASES OF MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishrutha KV

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Menstrual cycle is a physiological cyclical occurrence in women. This is associated with variationsin metabolism and associated endocrine fluctuations. Among other things, the cardio respiratory changes too havebeen observed. In the present study, we investigated the autonomic control of heart, and concurrent changes in therespiratory system. Material and methods:Forty seven normally menstruating women were recruited from a groupof 80 subjects reported for this study voluntarily. ECG was recorded from limb lead II time domain and frequencydomain analysis of Heart rate Variability (HRV was done. Their respiratory parameters namely PEFR, FEV1weredetermined. Results:The results of this study were analysed by applying Wilcoxon’s signed rank sum test. In Timedomain analysis RMSSD (36.91±2.73, p<0.05 showed significant decrease during ovulation, while otherparameters did not show significant variation among the three phases. Frequency domain analysis yielded results tosuggest that there is increased variability during Ovulatory and Luteal phase (p<0.05. PEFR and FEV1increased inluteal phase (p<0.05.Conclusions:The results of our study reiterated the findings of reports of previous studies onthe heart rate variability suggesting that the HRV was more during ovulatory and luteal phase. This is suggestive ofthe role of Progesterone on the HRV. Similarly the respiratory parameters too showed an increased PEFR and FEV1suggesting a decreased airway resistance, while other parameters remained unchanged.

  9. Exercise and autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, R L; Bloomfield, D M; Rosenwinkel, E T

    2000-03-01

    The complex interplay between the dichotomous subdivisions of the autonomic nervous system establishes and maintains a delicately tuned homeostasis in spite of an ever-changing environment. Aerobic exercise training can increase activity of the parasympathetic nervous system and decrease sympathetic activity. Conversely, it is well-documented that cardiac disease is often characterized by attenuated parasympathetic activity and heightened sympathetic tone. A correlation between autonomic disequilibrium and disease has led to the hypothesis that exercise training, as a therapy that restores the autonomic nervous system towards normal function, may be associated with, and possibly responsible for, outcome improvements in various populations. This is merely one of the many benefits that is conferred by chronic exercise training and reviewed in this issue. PMID:10758814

  10. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C-11 hydroxy ephedrine, introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue, studies employing normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders was found to valuable as a nonadreneric tracer. Simultaneously, animal studies been used to assess its use following ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threohydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, we are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve our ability to identify abnormalides. We are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. We are developing radiopharmaceuticals, for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in our institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by, preliminary PET data

  11. Physical therapy for airway clearance improves cardiac autonomic modulation in children with acute bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia P. Jacinto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effects of physical therapy on heart rate variability (HRV, especially in children, are still inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effects of conventional physical therapy (CPT for airway clearance and nasotracheal suction on the HRV of pediatric patients with acute bronchiolitis. METHOD: 24 children were divided into two groups: control group (CG, n=12 without respiratory diseases and acute bronchiolitis group (BG, n=12. The heart rate was recorded in the BG at four different moments: basal recording (30 minutes, 5 minutes after the CPT (10 minutes, 5 minutes after nasotracheal suction (10 minutes, and 40 minutes after nasotracheal suction (30 minutes. The CG was subjected to the same protocol, except for nasotracheal suction. To assess the HRV, we used spectrum analysis, which decomposes the heart rate oscillations into frequency bands: low frequency (LF=0.04-0.15Hz, which corresponds mainly to sympathetic modulation; and high frequency (HF=0.15-1.2Hz, corresponding to vagal modulation. RESULTS: Under baseline conditions, the BG showed higher values in LF oscillations, lower values in HF oscillations, and increased LF/HF ratio when compared to the CG. After CPT, the values for HRV in the BG were similar to those observed in the CG during basal recording. Five minutes after nasotracheal suction, the BG showed a decrease in LF and HF oscillations; however, after 40 minutes, the values were similar to those observed after application of CPT. CONCLUSIONS: The CPT and nasotracheal suction, both used for airway clearance, promote improvement in autonomic modulation of HRV in children with acute bronchiolitis.

  12. 123I-MIBG lung uptake in patients with diabetes mellitus. Correlation with cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between 123I-MIBG lung uptake and autonomic neuropathy (AN) in patients with diabetes mellitus. For the quantitative analysis, lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) were obtained from chest planar image. In addition, both lung washout ratio (%WR-L) and heart washout ratio (%WR-H) were calculated from early and delayed images. Similarly, exercised myocardial scintigraphy using 201Tl-chloride was done to rule out ischemia and lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M-Tl) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M-Tl) were obtained from chest planar image. Each indexes were compared in both diabetic group and control group. Both mean value of H/M and %WR-H in AN (+) group were significantly higher than those of control group. Mean value of L/M in each diabetic group was significantly higher than that of control group. Particularly, L/M of AN (+) group is higher than that of AN (-) group on early study. Mean value of %WR-L in AN (+) group was also significantly higher than that of control group. Regarding the 201Tl-uptake index, there was no statistical significance among in each group. The current study showed that abnormal pulmonary 123I-MIBG uptake in the lung existed in patients with diabetes mellitus. The phenomenon might be related with sympathetic dysfunction or severity of diabetes mellitus. (author)

  13. How to Calculate Renyi Entropy from Heart Rate Variability, and Why it Matters for Detecting Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eCornforth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN is a disease that involves nerve damage leading to an abnormal control of heart rate. An open question is to what extent this condition is detectable from Heart Rate Variability (HRV, which provides information only on successive intervals between heart beats, yet is non-invasive and easy to obtain from a 3-lead ECG recording. A variety of measures may be extracted from HRV, including time domain, frequency domain and more complex non-linear measures. Among the latter, Renyi Entropy has been proposed as a suitable measure that can be used to discriminate CAN from controls. However, all entropy methods require estimation of probabilities, and there are a number of ways in which this estimation can be made. In this work, we calculate Renyi entropy using several variations of the histogram method, and a density method based on sequences of RR intervals. In all, we calculate Renyi entropy using nine methods, and compare their effectiveness in separating the different classes of participants. We find that the histogram method using single RR intervals yields an entropy measure that is either incapable of discriminating CAN from controls, or that it provides little information that could not be gained from the standard deviation of the RR intervals. In contrast, probabilities calculated using a density method, based on sequences of RR intervals, yield an entropy measure that provides good separation between groups of participants, and provides information not available from the standard deviation. The main contribution of this work is that different approaches to calculating probability may affect the success of detecting disease. Our results bring new clarity to the methods used to calculate the Renyi entropy in general, and in particular, to the successful detection of CAN.

  14. Predictive value of cardiac autonomic indexes and MIBG washout in ICD recipients with mild to moderate heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed at evaluating the combined use of heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging in the risk stratification for sudden cardiac death (SCD) of patients with mild to moderate heart failure. Twenty-five patients (17 male and 8 female, mean age 63±5 years, mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 36±3%) with a recently implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and mild (NYHA I-II) heart failure due to either ischemic (n=15) or dilated (n=10) cardiomyopathy were studied. One week after ICD implantation they underwent baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) evaluation to bolus phenylephrine by the Oxford method, 24-h heart rate variability (HRV) assessment, and MIBG imaging. The mean patient follow-up was 32±10 months. Simple correlation and stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate if the number of sustained ventricular tachycardia (cycle length <330 ms) or fibrillation episodes per month is related to one or more of MIBG, BRS, and HRV indexes and if MIBG % washout is related to HRV and/or BRS. The frequency of fast ventricular arrhythmic episodes (FVAE) demonstrated an inverse relation to BRS (p<0.0001), rMSSD (p=0.001), and pNN50 (p=0.0034), while it was positively related to low frequency (LF) (p<0.0001) and MIBG % washout (p=0.001). BRS, LF, rMSSD, and MIBG washout were also independent predictors of FVAE. MIBG washout was related to only one HRV marker (SDNN-I, p<0.0001), while no correlation was observed with BRS. In ICD recipients with well-compensated heart failure, autonomic markers derived from BRS, HRV, and MIBG studies are related to FVAE. These markers have limited inter-dependency and constitute useful means for SCD risk stratification in this subgroup of patients. (author)

  15. Pediatric defibrillation after cardiac arrest: initial response and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Cristina; Domínguez, Pedro; Carrillo, Angel; Bellón, Jose María

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shockable rhythms are rare in pediatric cardiac arrest and the results of defibrillation are uncertain. The objective of this study was to analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included defibrillation in children. Methods Forty-four out of 241 children (18.2%) who were resuscitated from inhospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had been treated with manual defibrillation. Data were recorded according to the Utstein style. Outcome variables were a sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and one-year survival. Characteristics of patients and of resuscitation were evaluated. Results Cardiac disease was the major cause of arrest in this group. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (PVT) was the first documented electrocardiogram rhythm in 19 patients (43.2%). A shockable rhythm developed during resuscitation in 25 patients (56.8%). The first shock (dose, 2 J/kg) terminated VF or PVT in eight patients (18.1%). Seventeen children (38.6%) needed more than three shocks to solve VF or PVT. ROSC was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%) and it was sustained in 19 patients (43.2%). Only three patients (6.8%), however, survived at 1-year follow-up. Children with VF or PVT as the first documented rhythm had better ROSC, better initial survival and better final survival than children with subsequent VF or PVT. Children who survived were older than the finally dead patients. No significant differences in response rate were observed when first and second shocks were compared. The survival rate was higher in patients treated with a second shock dose of 2 J/kg than in those who received higher doses. Outcome was not related to the cause or the location of arrest. The survival rate was inversely related to the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion Defibrillation is necessary in 18% of children who suffer cardiac arrest. Termination of VF or PVT after the first defibrillation dose is achieved in a low

  16. Cardiac coherence, self-regulation, autonomic stability, and psychosocial well-being

    OpenAIRE

    McCraty, Rollin; Zayas, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to alter one’s emotional responses is central to overall well-being and to effectively meeting the demands of life. One of the chief symptoms of events such as trauma, that overwhelm our capacities to successfully handle and adapt to them, is a shift in our internal baseline reference such that there ensues a repetitive activation of the traumatic event. This can result in high vigilance and over-sensitivity to environmental signals which are reflected in inappropriate emotional r...

  17. Multifractal and nonlinear assessment of autonomous nervous system response during transient myocardial ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assess autonomic nervous system response during prolonged percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) using heart rate variability analysis with multifractal indices. These indices are used to evaluate the effects of the PTCA procedures at different arteries and locations. A total of 55 patients from the Staff3 database, with no prior history of myocardial infarction, were included in the study. The indices increased significantly during the transient ischaemia and reperfusion periods, indicating an increase in nonlinear multifractal characteristics and a change in temporal correlations in heartbeat fluctuations. This indicates that significant multifractal and nonlinear complex reactions in the autonomic control of the heart rate occurred during coronary artery occlusions and suggests that the multifractal indices may be a promising nonlinear technique for evaluating autonomic nervous system response in the presence of transient myocardial ischaemia

  18. Elevated HbA1c Levels Are Associated with the Blunted Autonomic Response Assessed by Heart Rate Variability during Blood Volume Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Miho; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2016-01-01

    A high glycemic status increases the risk for autonomic dysfunction and cardiovascular failure. The aim of this study was to investigate time-dependent changes in the autonomic response and cardiovascular dynamics and the association between the level of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and autonomic response during blood volume reduction. The study population consisted of 26 preoperative participants who were scheduled for autologous blood donation (200-400 mL of whole blood) for intraoperative or postoperative use. These participants without circulatory, respiratory, or brain disease and diabetes mellitus were grouped according to their HbA1c levels: rate variability (HRV) to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation throughout blood donation. During blood volume reduction, which was about 10% of the circulating blood volume, the BP and heart rate varied within normal ranges in both groups. The high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, significantly decreased and increased with the progression of blood volume reduction, respectively, in the HbA1c < 6.5% group. In contrast, in the HbA1c ≥ 6.5% group, the HF component did not significantly change, and the increase in the LF/HF ratio was delayed. Time-dependent changes in HRV were related to blood volume reduction only in the HbA1c < 6.5% group. Thus, elevated HbA1c levels are associated with the decrease in the autonomic response induced by blood volume reduction. PMID:27615262

  19. Hemodynamic and autonomic nervous system responses to mixed meal ingestion in healthy young and old subjects and dysautonomic patients with postprandial hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Ryan, S. M.; Parker, J. A.; Freeman, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although postprandial hypotension is a common cause of falls and syncope in elderly persons and in patients with autonomic insufficiency, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS. We examined the hemodynamic, splanchnic blood pool, plasma norepinephrine (NE), and heart rate (HR) power spectra responses to a standardized 400-kcal mixed meal in 11 healthy young (age, 26 +/- 5 years) and nine healthy elderly (age, 80 +/- 5 years) subjects and 10 dysautonomic patients with symptomatic postprandial hypotension (age, 65 +/- 16 years). Cardiac and splanchnic blood pools were determined noninvasively by radionuclide scans, and forearm vascular resistance was determined using venous occlusion plethysmography. In healthy young and old subjects, splanchnic blood volume increased, but supine blood pressure remained unchanged after the meal. In both groups, HR increased and systemic vascular resistance remained stable. Forearm vascular resistance and cardiac index increased after the meal in elderly subjects, whereas these responses were highly variable and of smaller magnitude in the young. Young subjects demonstrated postprandial increases in low-frequency HR spectral power, representing cardiac sympatho-excitation, but plasma NE remained unchanged. In elderly subjects, plasma NE increased after the meal but without changes in the HR power spectrum. Patients with dysautonomia had a large postprandial decline in blood pressure associated with no change in forearm vascular resistance, a fall in systemic vascular resistance, and reduction in left ventricular end diastolic volume index. HR increased in these patients but without changes in plasma NE or the HR power spectrum. CONCLUSIONS. 1) In healthy elderly subjects, the maintenance of blood pressure homeostasis after food ingestion is associated with an increase in HR, forearm vascular resistance, cardiac index, and plasma NE. In both young and old, systemic vascular resistance is

  20. Autonomic responses to cold face stimulation in sickle cell disease: a time-varying model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalacheva, Patjanaporn; Kato, Roberta M; Sangkatumvong, Suvimol; Detterich, Jon; Bush, Adam; Wood, John C; Meiselman, Herbert; Coates, Thomas D; Khoo, Michael C K

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by sudden onset of painful vaso-occlusive crises (VOC), which occur on top of the underlying chronic blood disorder. The mechanisms that trigger VOC remain elusive, but recent work suggests that autonomic dysfunction may be an important predisposing factor. Heart-rate variability has been employed in previous studies, but the derived indices have provided only limited univariate information about autonomic cardiovascular control in SCD. To circumvent this limitation, a time-varying modeling approach was applied to investigate the functional mechanisms relating blood pressure (BP) and respiration to heart rate and peripheral vascular resistance in healthy controls, untreated SCD subjects and SCD subjects undergoing chronic transfusion therapy. Measurements of respiration, heart rate, continuous noninvasive BP and peripheral vascular resistance were made before, during and after the application of cold face stimulation (CFS), which perturbs both the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems. Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity estimated from the model was found to be impaired in nontransfused SCD subjects, but partially restored in SCD subjects undergoing transfusion therapy. Respiratory-cardiac coupling gain was decreased in SCD and remained unchanged by chronic transfusion. These results are consistent with autonomic dysfunction in the form of impaired parasympathetic control and sympathetic overactivity. As well, CFS led to a significant reduction in vascular resistance baroreflex sensitivity in the nontransfused SCD subjects but not in the other groups. This blunting of the baroreflex control of peripheral vascular resistance during elevated sympathetic drive could be a potential factor contributing to the triggering of VOC in SCD. PMID:26177958

  1. Modulation by Central MAPKs/PI3K/sGc of the TNF-α/iNOS-dependent Hypotension and Compromised Cardiac Autonomic Control in Endotoxic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Marwa Y; El-Gowilly, Sahar M; Abdel-Galil, Abdel-Galil A; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2016-08-01

    Reduced blood pressure (BP) and cardiac autonomic activity are early manifestations of endotoxemia. We investigated whether these effects are modulated by central mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and related phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) signaling in conscious rats. The effect of pharmacologic inhibition of these molecular substrates on BP, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) responses evoked by intravascular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 mg/kg) were assessed. LPS (1) lowered BP (2) increased HR, (3) reduced time [SD of beat-to-beat intervals (SDNN), and root mean square of successive differences in R-R intervals (rMSSD)], and frequency domain indices of HRV (total power and spectral bands of low and high-frequency), and (4) elevated serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. The inhibition of TNF-α (pentoxifylline) or inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, aminoguanidine) abolished hemodynamic, HRV, and inflammatory actions of LPS. Intracisternal (i.c.) injection of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor), and SP600125 (MAPKJNK inhibitor) mitigated the hypotensive and tachycardic actions of LPS but failed to affect associated decreases in HRV. MAPKp38 inhibition by i.c. SB203580 produced exactly opposite effects. None of the LPS effects was altered after i.c. PD98059 (MAPKERK1/2 inhibitor). Overall, central MAPKs/PI3K/sGC pathways variably contribute to the TNF-α/iNOS-dependent reductions in BP and HRV seen during endotoxic shock. PMID:27110744

  2. Proteomic responses of skeletal and cardiac muscle to exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regular exercise is effective in the prevention of chronic diseases and confers a lower risk of death in individuals displaying risk factors such as hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Thus, knowledge of the molecular responses to exercise provides a valuable contrast for interpreting investigations of disease and can highlight novel therapeutic targets. While exercise is an everyday experience and can be conceptualized in simple terms, exercise is a complex physiological phenomena and investigation of exercise responses requires sophisticated analytical techniques and careful standardization of the exercise stimulus. Proteomic investigation of exercise is in its infancy but the ability to link changes in function with comprehensive changes in protein expression and post-translational modification holds great promise for advancing physiology. This review highlights recent pioneering work investigating the effects of exercise in skeletal and cardiac muscle that has uncovered novel mechanisms underling the benefits of physical activity. PMID:21679117

  3. Blunted autonomic response to volume expansion in formerly preeclamptic women with low plasma volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam, I.; Courtar, D.A.; Janssen, B.J.; Aardenburg, R.; Peeters, L.L.; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesize that low plasma volume in normotensive formerly preeclamptic women reflects reduced venous storage capacity. To test this hypothesis, we compared circulatory and autonomic responses to acute volume loading between women with low and those with normal plasma volume. METHODS:

  4. Cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses to graded exercise in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Galbo, H; Christensen, N J

    1980-01-01

    Thirteen juvenile diabetics were studied in order to determine if decreased beat-to-beat variation during deep respiration, indicating abnormal autonomic nerve function, imply that cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses are impaired. Patients with decreased beat-to-beat variation had to...

  5. IS CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGE RESPONSIBLE FOR CONGENITAL CARDIAC AND EXTRA-CARDIAC ANOMALIES?

    OpenAIRE

    Nutan Nalini; Sudha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This article is about the stillbirth in which we found significant numbers of cardiac as well as extracardiac defects, in combination or separately. In this article, we would like to emphasize the anomalies found in consanguineous marriages. AIM To correlate the prevalence of cardiac as well as extracardiac anomalies in consanguineous marriages. Especially, here we would like to focus on the cardiac lesions. MATERIAL AND METHOD The study was ca...

  6. The autonomic and rate pressure product responses of Tai Chi practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Figueroa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spectral analysis of autonomic nervous system activity can provide insight into cardiovascular function. Rate pressure product is the parameter often targeted pharmacologically to decrease the incidence of myocardial events. Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not Tai Chi Chuan practitioners would demonstrate autonomic responses that would be more cardioprotective when compared to non-trained controls. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that measured the autonomic responses and rate pressure product of 2 groups of subjects; a Tai Chi Chuan trained (n = 13 and non-trained sedentary controls (n = 13 at rest and during 2 stressor phases that simulated functional activities of daily living. Results: The Tai Chi group maintained a greater parasympathetic outflow at rest and during the isometric grip stressor phase (P<0.05. Sympathetic outflow, systolic blood pressure and rate pressure product were significantly lower in the Tai Chi group at rest, during the isometric grip and standing stressor phases (P<0.05. Conclusion: Although a cause-and-effect relationship cannot be concluded in this study, the Tai Chi group was able to demonstrate efficiency of the myocardium with suppressed rate pressure product values and autonomic responses that favored parasympathetic outflow. This type of training may complement non-pharmacological anti-hypertensive therapy.

  7. Investigation research on autonomous responsive materials; Jiritsu oto zairyo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    A survey was made on autonomous responsive materials as a new material which reversibly change molecular structures and the aggregation state according to external stimuli. Autonomous responsive materials imitate environmental responsibility in the living organism system and have sensing, control and active functions for external stimuli. The materials are highly efficient and environmentally friendly. In biomimetic materials for soft actuators, drastic changes by temperature of elastic modulus of water-swollen hydrogel are used to the motion. In order to molecularly design stimulus-responsible polymer gel, studied are the relation between the micro structure and stimulus responsibility, dynamic correlation between the micro structure and the macro structure, etc. In the biomedical field, new cure and diagnosis using innovative materials are expected, and the application of autonomous responsive materials to the field is studied. For example, using hydrogel responding the temperature and the surface and controlling by temperature the interaction with components of the organism such as protein and cells, drug delivery in the organism is optimized. Also studied is the application of hydrophilic/hydrophobic changes by temperature to the chromatography. 215 refs., 47 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Scintigraphic differentiation between two forms of primary dysautonomia early after onset of autonomic dysfunction: value of cardiac and pulmonary iodine-123 MIBG uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system can be observed in patients with Parkinson's disease and those with multiple system atrophy. However, the fate of the two diseases differs considerably and leads to different strategies for patient management. Differentiation of the two diseases currently requires a combination of several clinical and electrophysiological tests. First studies of myocardial innervation using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) indicated a possible role of scintigraphy for this purpose. An increase in the pulmonary uptake of 123I-MIBG has been reported in secondary dysautonomias. Whether sympathetic innervation of the lung is affected in primary dysautonomias is currently unknown. Therefore, cardiac and pulmonary uptake of 123I-MIBG was studied in 21 patients with Parkinson's disease, 7 patients with multiple system atrophy and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. Thoracic images were obtained in the anterior view 4 h after intravenous injection of 185 MBq 123I-MIBG, at which time the maximum neuronal uptake is reached. All patients with Parkinson's disease had significantly lower cardiac uptake of 123I-MIBG than patients with multiple system atrophy and controls. Sympathetic innervation of the lung was not affected in either disease. It is concluded that scintigraphy with 123I-MIBG appears to be a useful tool for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy early after onset of autonomic dysfunction. (orig.)

  9. Scintigraphic differentiation between two forms of primary dysautonomia early after onset of autonomic dysfunction: value of cardiac and pulmonary iodine-123 MIBG uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, M.J.; Juengling, F.D.; Krause, T.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg University Hospital (Germany); Braune, S. [Dept. of Neurology, Freiburg University Hospital (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Primary dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system can be observed in patients with Parkinson's disease and those with multiple system atrophy. However, the fate of the two diseases differs considerably and leads to different strategies for patient management. Differentiation of the two diseases currently requires a combination of several clinical and electrophysiological tests. First studies of myocardial innervation using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) indicated a possible role of scintigraphy for this purpose. An increase in the pulmonary uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG has been reported in secondary dysautonomias. Whether sympathetic innervation of the lung is affected in primary dysautonomias is currently unknown. Therefore, cardiac and pulmonary uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG was studied in 21 patients with Parkinson's disease, 7 patients with multiple system atrophy and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. Thoracic images were obtained in the anterior view 4 h after intravenous injection of 185 MBq {sup 123}I-MIBG, at which time the maximum neuronal uptake is reached. All patients with Parkinson's disease had significantly lower cardiac uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG than patients with multiple system atrophy and controls. Sympathetic innervation of the lung was not affected in either disease. It is concluded that scintigraphy with {sup 123}I-MIBG appears to be a useful tool for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy early after onset of autonomic dysfunction. (orig.)

  10. Autonomic response to approachability characteristics, approach behavior, and social functioning in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Anna; Ng, Rowena; Bellugi, Ursula

    2015-11-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic disorder that is saliently characterized by a unique social phenotype, most notably associated with a dramatically increased affinity and approachability toward unfamiliar people. Despite a recent proliferation of studies into the social profile of WS, the underpinnings of the pro-social predisposition are poorly understood. To this end, the present study was aimed at elucidating approach behavior of individuals with WS contrasted with typical development (TD) by employing a multidimensional design combining measures of autonomic arousal, social functioning, and two levels of approach evaluations. Given previous evidence suggesting that approach behaviors of individuals with WS are driven by a desire for social closeness, approachability tendencies were probed across two levels of social interaction: talking versus befriending. The main results indicated that while overall level of approachability did not differ between groups, an important qualitative between-group difference emerged across the two social interaction contexts: whereas individuals with WS demonstrated a similar willingness to approach strangers across both experimental conditions, TD individuals were significantly more willing to talk to than to befriend strangers. In WS, high approachability to positive faces across both social interaction levels was further associated with more normal social functioning. A novel finding linked autonomic responses with willingness to befriend negative faces in the WS group: elevated autonomic responsivity was associated with increased affiliation to negative face stimuli, which may represent an autonomic correlate of approach behavior in WS. Implications for underlying organization of the social brain are discussed. PMID:26459097

  11. Reduced autonomic responses to faces in Capgras delusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, H D; A. W. Young; Quayle, A H; de Pauw, K W

    1997-01-01

    People experiencing the Capgras delusion claim that others, usually those quite close emotionally, have been replaced by near-identical impostors. Ellis & Young suggested in 1990 that the Capgras delusion results from damage to a neurological system involved in orienting responses to seen faces based on their personal significance. This hypothesis predicts that people suffering the Capgras delusion will be hyporesponsive to familiar faces. We tested this prediction in five people with Capgras...

  12. Mind-body relationships in elite apnea divers during breath holding: a study of autonomic responses to acute hypoxemia

    OpenAIRE

    Laurino, Marco; Menicucci, Danilo; Mastorci, Francesca; Allegrini, Paolo; Piarulli, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo P.; Bedini, Remo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Passera, Mirko; L'Abbate, Antonio; Gemignani, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The mental control of ventilation with all associated phenomena, from relaxation to modulation of emotions, from cardiovascular to metabolic adaptations, constitutes a psychophysiological condition characterizing voluntary breath-holding (BH). BH induces several autonomic responses, involving both autonomic cardiovascular and cutaneous pathways, whose characterization is the main aim of this study. Electrocardiogram and skin conductance (SC) recordings were collected from 14 elite divers duri...

  13. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin–angiotensin system

    OpenAIRE

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, MarkW.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin–angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice defi...

  14. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation improves hemodynamic responses after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ghashghaei, Fatemeh Esteki; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Marandi, Seyed Mohammad; Ghashghaei, Samira Esteki

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disorders are an important public health problem worldwide. They are also the leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Therefore, American Heart Association proposed cardiac rehabilitation program as an essential part of care for cardiac patients to improve functional capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation program on functional status and some hemodynamic responses in patients after coronary artery bypass graft (...

  15. Analysis of cerebral and autonomic response to respiratory events in patients with Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Milioli, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The arousal scoring in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is important to clarify the impact of the disease on sleep but the currently applied American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) definition may underestimate the subtle alterations of sleep. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the impact of respiratory events on cortical and autonomic arousal response and to quantify the additional value of cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) and pulse wave amplitude (PWA) for a more ac...

  16. Eye contact with neutral and smiling faces: effects on autonomic responses and frontal EEG asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Maria Pönkänen

    2012-01-01

    In our previous studies we have shown that seeing another person “live” with a direct vs. averted gaze results in greater relative left-sided frontal asymmetry in the electroencephalography (EEG), associated with approach motivation, and in enhanced skin conductance responses indicating autonomic arousal. In our studies, however, the stimulus persons had a neutral expression. In real-life social interaction, eye contact is often associated with a smile, which is another signal of the sender’s...

  17. Modeling cooperative and autonomous adaptive cruise control dynamic responses using experimental data

    OpenAIRE

    Milanés, Vicente; Shladover, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle longitudinal control systems such as (commercially available) autonomous Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) and its more sophisticated variant Cooperative ACC (CACC) could potentially have significant impacts on traffic flow. Accurate models of the dynamic responses of both of these systems are needed to produce realistic predictions of their effects on highway capacity and traffic flow dynamics. This paper describes the develop-ment of models of both ACC and CACC control systems that are ...

  18. Impact of aging on cardiac function in a female rat model of menopause: role of autonomic control, inflammation, and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machi JF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Freire Machi,1,2 Danielle da Silva Dias,3 Sarah Cristina Freitas,3 Oscar Albuquerque de Moraes,1 Maikon Barbosa da Silva,1 Paula Lázara Cruz,1 Cristiano Mostarda,4 Vera M C Salemi,1 Mariana Morris,2 Kátia De Angelis,3 Maria-Cláudia Irigoyen1 1Hypertension Unit, Heart Institute (InCor, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Institute of Neuro-Immune Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA; 3Laboratory of Translational Physiology, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, 4Health Adult and Child, Federal University of Maranhao (UFMA, São Luiz, Maranhão, Brazil Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aging on metabolic, cardiovascular, autonomic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress parameters after ovarian hormone deprivation (OVX. Methods: Female Wistar rats (3 or 22 months old were divided into: young controls, young ovariectomized, old controls, and old ovariectomized (bilateral ovaries removal. After a 9-week follow-up, physical capacity, metabolic parameters, and morphometric and cardiac functions were assessed. Subsequently, arterial pressure was recorded and cardiac autonomic control was evaluated. Oxidative stress was measured on the cardiac tissue, while inflammatory profile was assessed in the plasma. Results: Aging or OVX caused an increase in body and fat weight and triglyceride concentration and a decrease in both insulin sensitivity and aerobic exercise capacity. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and increased cardiac overload (myocardial performance index were reported in old groups when compared with young groups. Aging and OVX led to an increased sympathetic tonus, and vagal tonus was lower only for the old groups. Tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 were increased in old groups when compared with young groups. Glutathione redox balance (GSH/GSSG was reduced in young ovariectomized, old controls, and old ovariectomized

  19. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    involving brain stem areas, which is consistent with the Braak hypothesis. In the narcolepsy patients, it was shown that a reduced HRR to arousals was primarily predicted by hypocretin deficiency in both rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep, independent of cataplexy and other factors. The results......, which includes the cardiac centre and controls autonomic functions, and therefore autonomic dysfunction may be experienced early in the disease course. Sleep disturbances are also common non-motor complications of PD, and therefore PD patients undergo polysomnography at the Danish Center for Sleep...... narcolepsy patients on autonomic function and on the sleep transition rate. The results showed an attenuated heart rate response (HRR) in PD patients compared to controls and early PD (iRBD patients). Also iRBD patients had an attenuated HRR compared to control subjects, and the method to measure the HRR may...

  20. How Can Music Influence the Autonomic Nervous System Response in Patients with Severe Disorder of Consciousness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riganello, Francesco; Cortese, Maria D.; Arcuri, Francesco; Quintieri, Maria; Dolce, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Activations to pleasant and unpleasant musical stimuli were observed within an extensive neuronal network and different brain structures, as well as in the processing of the syntactic and semantic aspects of the music. Previous studies evidenced a correlation between autonomic activity and emotion evoked by music listening in patients with Disorders of Consciousness (DoC). In this study, we analyzed retrospectively the autonomic response to musical stimuli by mean of normalized units of Low Frequency (nuLF) and Sample Entropy (SampEn) of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) parameters, and their possible correlation to the different complexity of four musical samples (i.e., Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Grieg, and Boccherini) in Healthy subjects and Vegetative State/Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (VS/UWS) patients. The complexity of musical sample was based on Formal Complexity and General Dynamics parameters defined by Imberty's semiology studies. The results showed a significant difference between the two groups for SampEn during the listening of Mussorgsky's music and for nuLF during the listening of Boccherini and Mussorgsky's music. Moreover, the VS/UWS group showed a reduction of nuLF as well as SampEn comparing music of increasing Formal Complexity and General Dynamics. These results put in evidence how the internal structure of the music can change the autonomic response in patients with DoC. Further investigations are required to better comprehend how musical stimulation can modify the autonomic response in DoC patients, in order to administer the stimuli in a more effective way. PMID:26696818

  1. How can music influence the Autonomic Nervous System response in patients with severe Disorder of Consciousness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eRiganello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Activations to pleasant and unpleasant musical stimuli were observed within an extensive neuronal network and different brain structures, as well as in the processing of the syntactic and semantic aspects of the music. Previous studies evidenced a correlation between autonomic activity and emotion evoked by music listening in patients with Disorders of Consciousness (DoC. In this study, we analyzed retrospectively the autonomic response to musical stimuli by mean of normalized units of Low Frequency (nuLF and Sample Entropy (SampEn of Heart Rate Variability (HRV parameters, and their possible correlation to the different complexity of four musical samples (i.e. Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Grieg and Boccherini in Healthy subjects and Vegetative State/Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (VS/UWS patients.The complexity of musical sample was based on Formal Complexity and General Dynamics parameters defined by Imberty’s semiology studies.The results showed a significant difference between the two groups for SampEn during the listening of Mussorgsky’s music and for nuLF during the listening of Boccherini and Mussorgsky’s music.Moreover, the VS/UWS group showed a reduction of nuLF as well as SampEn comparing music of increasing Formal Complexity and General Dynamics.These results put in evidence how the internal structure of the music can change the autonomic response in patients with DoC. Further investigations are required to better comprehend how musical stimulation can modify the autonomic response in DoC patients, in order to administer the stimuli in a more effective way.

  2. Measures of endothelial dysfunction predict response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, David R; Lawford, Patricia; Sheridan, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) improves morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF). Impaired endothelial function, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in HF and may help to differentiate responders from non-responders. Methods 19 patients were recruited, comprising 94% men, mean age 69±8 years, New York Heart Association functional classes II–IV, QRSd 161±21 ms and mean left ventricular ejection fraction 26±8%. Markers of response and FMD were measured at baseline, 6 and 12 months following CRT. Results 14 patients were responders to CRT. Responders had significant improvements in VO2 (12.6±1.7 to 14.7±1.5 mL/kg/min, pFMD in responders was 2.9±1.9% and 7.4±3.73% in non-responders (pFMD. This study confirms that FMD identifies responders to CRT, due to endothelium-dependent mechanisms alone. PMID:27335654

  3. Variable linesource response in attenuation corrected cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Varying line source response can result in errors due to the reference scan being inappropriate. The incidence of this problem and its effect on cardiac perfusion SPECT was investigated. Acquisitions of transmission data without the bed or a patient were used to determine the variation in global sensitivity and uniformity of the transmission with respect to camera position over a period of 4 months. The average variations for various parameters were: Influence of variations in regional sensitivity on the reconstructed attenuation map and ultimately the patient study was investigated. Counts in selected sections of patient transmission images were reduced by 5 to 30 percent and then reconstructed in the patient study with iterative reconstruction for 30 iterations (Butterworth 0.66 nyquist frequency order 10). The reconstructed scans were compared to the original study which had minimal linesource misalignment and the percentage differences were calculated to determine the effect of regional sensitivity differences with angle. At the level of variation of regional sensitivity (5-10%) it was found data varied by up to 20% in portions of the patient myocardium compared to the original data. Additional line source quality control is essential and variation in transmission counts with rotation minimised. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  4. Presence of human friends and pet dogs as moderators of autonomic responses to stress in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, K M; Blascovich, J; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M

    1991-10-01

    Autonomic responses were measured while 45 adult women performed a standard experimental stress task in the laboratory with only the experimenter present and 2 weeks later at home in the presence of a female friend, pet dog, or neither. Results demonstrated that autonomic reactivity was moderated by the presence of a companion, the nature of whom was critical to the size and direction of the effect. Ss in the friend condition exhibited higher physiological reactivity and poorer performance than subjects in the control and pet conditions. Ss in the pet condition showed less physiological reactivity during stressful tasks than Ss in the other conditions. The results are interpreted in terms of the degree to which friends and pets are perceived as evaluative during stressful task performance. Physiological reactivity was consistent across the laboratory and field settings. PMID:1960650

  5. Facial feedback and autonomic responsiveness reflect impaired emotional processing in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Pala, Francesca; Manenti, Rosa; Brambilla, Michela; Cobelli, Chiara; Rosini, Sandra; Benussi, Alberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara; Cotelli, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Emotional deficits are part of the non-motor features of Parkinson's disease but few attention has been paid to specific aspects such as subjective emotional experience and autonomic responses. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of emotional recognition in Parkinson's Disease (PD) using the following levels: explicit evaluation of emotions (Self-Assessment Manikin) and implicit reactivity (Skin Conductance Response; electromyographic measure of facial feedback of the zygomaticus and corrugator muscles). 20 PD Patients and 34 healthy controls were required to observe and evaluate affective pictures during physiological parameters recording. In PD, the appraisal process on both valence and arousal features of emotional cues were preserved, but we found significant impairment in autonomic responses. Specifically, in comparison to healthy controls, PD patients revealed lower Skin Conductance Response values to negative and high arousing emotional stimuli. In addition, the electromyographic measures showed defective responses exclusively limited to negative and high arousing emotional category: PD did not show increasing of corrugator activity in response to negative emotions as happened in heathy controls. PD subjects inadequately respond to the emotional categories which were considered more "salient": they had preserved appraisal process, but impaired automatic ability to distinguish between different emotional contexts. PMID:27509848

  6. Facial feedback and autonomic responsiveness reflect impaired emotional processing in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Pala, Francesca; Manenti, Rosa; Brambilla, Michela; Cobelli, Chiara; Rosini, Sandra; Benussi, Alberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara; Cotelli, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Emotional deficits are part of the non-motor features of Parkinson’s disease but few attention has been paid to specific aspects such as subjective emotional experience and autonomic responses. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of emotional recognition in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) using the following levels: explicit evaluation of emotions (Self-Assessment Manikin) and implicit reactivity (Skin Conductance Response; electromyographic measure of facial feedback of the zygomaticus and corrugator muscles). 20 PD Patients and 34 healthy controls were required to observe and evaluate affective pictures during physiological parameters recording. In PD, the appraisal process on both valence and arousal features of emotional cues were preserved, but we found significant impairment in autonomic responses. Specifically, in comparison to healthy controls, PD patients revealed lower Skin Conductance Response values to negative and high arousing emotional stimuli. In addition, the electromyographic measures showed defective responses exclusively limited to negative and high arousing emotional category: PD did not show increasing of corrugator activity in response to negative emotions as happened in heathy controls. PD subjects inadequately respond to the emotional categories which were considered more “salient”: they had preserved appraisal process, but impaired automatic ability to distinguish between different emotional contexts. PMID:27509848

  7. Transcranial Doppler and cardiovascular responses during cardiovascular autonomic tests in migraineurs during and outside attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Boesen, F; Olesen, J

    The transcranial Doppler (TCD) and cardiovascular responses to established tests of autonomic function were studied in 50 migraineurs (23 of whom experienced aura and 27 who did not) and 30 healthy control subjects. In addition to the measurements outside attacks, 10 migraineurs were also tested...... to a head-up tilt test, a cold-pressor test and a Valsalva manoeuvre. The cardiovascular reflexes in response to the Valsalva manoeuvre suggested a mild parasympathetic hypofunction in migraineurs, both those with and those without aura. On the basis of the present results and previous findings by...

  8. Effect of Low Amphetamine Doses on Cardiac Responses to Emotional Stress in Aged Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakas, Csaba; Buwalda, Bauke; Luiten, Paul G.M.; Bohus, Bela

    1992-01-01

    In young Wistar rats conditioned emotional stress can be characterized by a learned bradycardiac response to an inescapable footshock. In aged rats this bradycardiac response is attenuated and accompanied by suppressed behavioral arousal in response to novelty. In the present study, cardiac response

  9. Trials and intensity effects in single-trial ERP components and autonomic responses in a dishabituation paradigm with very long ISIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Brett; Barry, Robert J; Bonfield, Rebecca C

    2015-12-01

    The phasic orienting reflex (OR) was investigated using single-trial data collected concurrently from 4 autonomic measures and event-related potentials (ERPs). In an auditory dishabituation paradigm, twelve indifferent tones of two intensities (60 or 80 dB, intensity change on trial 11, counterbalanced between subjects) were presented at very long interstimulus intervals (ISIs). Novelty and intensity based stimulus-response patterns were examined seeking ERP analogues of autonomic measures representing pre-OR and OR processing. Skin conductance response (SCR) represented the phasic OR index. EOG-corrected ERP data for 16 subjects were decomposed by a temporal Principal Components Analysis (PCA). SCR diminished over 10 standard trials, recovered on change trial 11, dishabituated to the re-presentation of the standard tone on trial 12, and showed intensity effects at the change - formal requirements for an OR index. The evoked cardiac response (HR) showed no trial or intensity effects. Respiratory pause (RP) decreased linearly over trials and showed recovery but no dishabituation or intensity effect. Peripheral vasoconstriction (PVC) failed to decrement but exhibited an intensity effect. Ten identifiable ERP components were extracted: Na, P1, N1-1, PN, P2, P3a, P3b, a novelty-sensitive HabP3, an intensity-sensitive IntP3, and the Slow Wave (SW). Pattern 1 showed no trial or intensity effects (HR, P1, PN, P2); Pattern 2 showed no trial effect but an intensity effect (PVC, Na, N1-1, P3a); and Pattern 3 demonstrated habituation and an intensity effect (SCR, RP, P3b, HabP3, IntP3, SW). The observed fractionation of autonomic and central measures is consistent with Preliminary Process Theory (PPT) rather than the notion of a unitary OR. PMID:26255255

  10. Cardiac sympathetic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. Relationship between results of 123I-MIBG scintigraphy and autonomic nervous function evaluated by the Valsalva maneuver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined whether the results of 123I-MIBG scintigraphy reflect cardiac sympathetic nerve function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The subjects were 62 patients with PD (age, 65.4±6.3 years) and 53 controls (65.2±7.1 years). All subjects underwent 123I-MIBG scintigraphy and QTc interval measurement on electrocardiogram (ECG). Hemodynamic autonomic function was estimated by the Valsalva maneuver in 37 subjects (63.9±5.2 years) randomly selected from the patients with PD. As control, the Valsalva maneuver was also done in 20 randomly selected controls (64.1±5.0 years), and 123I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 21 controls (67.7±5.3 years old). The subjects rested in a supine position for 20 min and were given an intravenous injection of 111 MBq 123I-MIBG. Relative organ uptake was determined by the region of interest (ROI) in the anterior view and the ratio of average pixel count in the heart (H) to that in the mediastinum (M) was calculated (H/M ratio) for early (after 15 min) and delayed (after 3 hrs) periods. The Valsalva maneuver was done by having the subjects exhale into a mouthpiece at an expiratory pressure of 40 mmHg for 15 seconds. Blood pressure and RR intervals were measured during the Valsalva maneuver by tonometry, using a noninvasive blood pressure monitoring system (ANS 508, Nihon Colin Co., Ltd.). Baroreceptor reflex sensitivities (BRS) of the second phase (BRS II) and fourth phase (BRS IV) of the Valsalva maneuver were calculated, and blood pressure elevations during the late second phase (IIp) and fourth phase (IVp) were measured. QTc was greater in the patients with PD (417 ms) than in the control subjects (409 ms). The H/M ratios of the early and delayed images in the patients with PD (1.76, 1.61) were significantly lower than those in the control subjects (2.56, 2.45). The early and delayed H/M ratios significantly correlated with the severity of disease according to Hoehn-Yahr stage. QTc interval and IVp significantly

  11. Relationship Between Cardiac Autonomic Function of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Glucose Metabolism%2型糖尿病患者心脏植物神经功能改变与血糖代谢的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成功

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究2型糖尿病患者心脏植物神经功能改变与血糖代谢之间的关系。方法选取我院60例2型糖尿病患者,分别检测患者心脏植物神经功能和糖化血红蛋白水平,研究分析患者心脏植物神经功能改变与血糖代谢的关系。结果60例患者中心脏植物神经功能正常者糖化血红蛋白浓度为(6.2±1.2)%,异常者糖化血红蛋白浓度为(8.4±2.3)%,心脏植物神经功能异常者糖化血红蛋白浓度高于正常者(P<0.05),数据比较存在统计学差异。心脏植物神经功能严重病变患者糖化血红蛋白浓度均高于早期病变者和典型病变者(P<0.05),数据比较差异均存在统计学意义。结论2型糖尿病患者的心脏植物神经功能改变与其糖化血红蛋白浓度之间关系密切,及时、有效控制患者血糖,降低患者糖化血红蛋白浓度,对改善2型糖尿病患者心脏植物神经功能,减轻其心脏植物神经病变程度具有重要作用。%ObjectiveTo explore the relationship between type 2 cardiac autonomic function changes and glucose metabolism in diabetic patients.Methods 60 cases in our hospital patients with type 2 diabetes were detected in patients with cardiac autonomic function and glycated hemoglobin levels, the researchers analyzed the relationship between cardiac autonomic function changes with glucose metabolism.Results60 patients with normal cardiac autonomic function glycated hemoglobin concentration(6.2 ± 1.2)%,abnormal glycated hemoglobin concentration(8.4 ± 2.3)%,cardiac autonomic dysfunction glycated hemoglobin concentration was significantly higher than normal(P<0.05),there was significant difference data comparison. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with severe disease glycated hemoglobin concentration were higher than early lesions and typical lesions(P<0.05),the data were statistically significant differences. Conclusion The close relationship between

  12. Evaluating Autonomic Parameters: The Role of Sleep ‎Duration in Emotional Responses to Music ‎

    OpenAIRE

    Atefeh Goshvarpour; Ataollah Abbasi; Ateke Goshvarpour

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It has been recognized that sleep has an important effect on emotion processing. The aim ‎of this study was to investigate the effect of previous night sleep duration on autonomicresponses to musical stimuli in different emotional contexts.‎Method: A frequency based measure of GSR, PR and ECG signals were examined in 35 healthy ‎students in three groups of oversleeping, lack of sleep and normal sleep. ‎Results: The results of this study revealed that regardless of the emotional c...

  13. Prediction of nuclear submariner adaptability from autonomic indices and Rorschach Inkblot responses. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weybrew, B.B.; Molish, H.B.

    1986-09-09

    To identify the most valid predictors of submariner adaptability, the authors derived 23 indices from the responses of 170 nuclear submariners to the Rorschach Inkblot Test, 11 measures of Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) reactivity to contrived stress, and five adjustment criteria. Factor analysis of this 39x39 correlation matrix yielded two Rorschach Factors, one of which correlated with three criterion dimensions. Two unique factors were also discovered, one, a structured ANS factor, and the other, a complex criterion scale. Selected Rorschach scores and, to a lesser extent, certain ANS indices emanating from this study, may be usefully-valid predictors of the adaptability of nuclear submariners during long patrols.

  14. On-line identification of the speed, steering and diving response parameters of an autonomous underwater vehicle from experimental data

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrke, Fredric G.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The experimental response data from autonomous maneuvering using the NPS AUV II vehicle has been analyzed with a view to defining Kalman filters to provide on-line estimates of system parameters and their variability. Kalman filters, designed for parameter estimation are expected to be the first step in the development of autonomous fault detection systems for underwater vehicles. Secondly, extraction of vehicle hydrodynamic coefficie...

  15. Autonomic Cardiovascular Responses in Acclimatized Lowlanders on Prolonged Stay at High Altitude: A Longitudinal Follow Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Priyanka; Sharma, Vijay K.; Hota, Kalpana B.; Das, Saroj K; Hota, Sunil K.; Srivastava, Ravi B.; Singh, Shashi B

    2014-01-01

    Acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude is reported to cause sympathetic dominance that may contribute to the pathophysiology of high altitude illnesses. The effect of prolonged stay at high altitude on autonomic functions, however, remains to be explored. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating the effect of high altitude on autonomic neural control of cardiovascular responses by monitoring heart rate variability (HRV) during chronic hypobaric hypoxia. Baseline electrocar...

  16. Discrimination of the Healthy and Sick Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System by a New Wavelet Analysis of Heartbeat Intervals

    OpenAIRE

    Ashkenazy, Y.; Lewkowicz, M.; Levitan, J.; Moelgaard, H.; Thomsen, P. E. Bloch; Saermark, K.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to distinguish with a complete certainty between healthy subjects and patients with various dysfunctions of the cardiac nervous system by way of multiresolutional wavelet transform of RR intervals. We repeated the study of Thurner et al on different ensemble of subjects. We show that reconstructed series using a filter which discards wavelet coefficients related with higher scales enables one to classify individuals for which the method otherwise is inconclu...

  17. Trichinella spiralis infection changes immune response in mice performed abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplantation and prolongs cardiac allograft survival time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gengguo; Deng, Ronghai; Yao, Jianping; Liao, Bing; Chen, Yinghua; Wu, Zhongdao; Hu, Hongxing; Zhou, Xingwang; Ma, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Allograft rejection has been an obstacle for long-term survival of patients for many years. Current strategies for transplant rejection are not as optimal as we expected, especially for long-term treatments. Trichinella spiralis, a nematode parasitized in mammalian muscle and as an invader, maintains harmonious with host in the long term by evading host immune attack. To determine whether T. spiralis infection impacts on allograft rejection, we performed mice cardiac allograft transplantation model by using BALB/c (H-2(b)) mice as donors and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice orally infected with 300 muscle larvae for 28 days as recipients. Graft survival was monitored by daily palpation of the abdomen; histologic change was observed by H&E stain; and CD4(+), CD8(+), CD4(+)IFN-γ(+), and CD4(+)IL-17(+) T cells and regulatory T cells were examined with the use of flow cytometry. Serum cytokine levels were measured by Luminex. Finally, we found that mean survival time of cardiac allografts in T. spiralis group was 23.40 ± 1.99 days, while the vehicle control group was 10.60 ± 0.75 days. Furthermore, we observed alleviated histological changes in the heart allograft, decreased corresponding CD8(+) T cells, suppressed Th1 and Th17 responses, and increased regulatory T cell frequency in a murine cardiac transplantation model at day 7 post-transplantation in experimental group. These data suggest that T. spiralis infection resulted in prolonged allograft survival following murine cardiac transplantation, with suppressed Th1/Th17 responses and augmented regulatory T cells. PMID:26481486

  18. Autonomic hyper-vigilance in post-infective fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yumiko; Cooper, Gavin; Burton, Alexander R; Lemon, Jim; Schall, Ulrich; Lloyd, Andrew; Vollmer-Conna, Ute

    2010-09-01

    This study examined whether post-infective fatigue syndrome (PIFS) is associated with a disturbance in bidirectional autonomic signalling resulting in heightened perception of symptoms and sensations from the body in conjunction with autonomic hyper-reactivity to perceived challenges. We studied 23 patients with PIFS and 25 healthy matched control subjects. A heartbeat discrimination task and a pressure pain threshold test were used to assess interoceptive sensitivity. Cardiac response was assessed over a 4-min Stroop task. PIFS was associated with higher accuracy in heartbeat discrimination and a lower pressure pain threshold. Increased interoceptive sensitivity correlated strongly with current symptoms and potentiated differences in the cardiac response to the Stroop task, which in PIFS was characterized by insensitivity to task difficulty and lack of habituation. Our results provide the first evidence of heightened interoceptive sensitivity in PIFS. Together with the distinct pattern in cardiac responsivity these findings present a picture of physiological hyper-vigilance and response inflexibility. PMID:20678991

  19. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J;

    2016-01-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important...

  20. Sensitivity of the resting-state haemodynamic response function estimation to autonomic nervous system fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo-Rong; Marinazzo, Daniele

    2016-05-13

    The haemodynamic response function (HRF) is a key component of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal, providing the mapping between neural activity and the signal measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Most of the time the HRF is associated with task-based fMRI protocols, in which its onset is explicitly included in the design matrix. On the other hand, the HRF also mediates the relationship between spontaneous neural activity and the BOLD signal in resting-state protocols, in which no explicit stimulus is taken into account. It has been shown that resting-state brain dynamics can be characterized by looking at sparse BOLD 'events', which can be retrieved by point process analysis. These events can be then used to retrieve the HRF at rest. Crucially, cardiac activity can also induce changes in the BOLD signal, thus affecting both the number of these events and the estimation of the haemodynamic response. In this study, we compare the resting-state haemodynamic response retrieved by means of a point process analysis, taking the cardiac fluctuations into account. We find that the resting-state HRF estimation is significantly modulated in the brainstem and surrounding cortical areas. From the analysis of two high-quality datasets with different temporal and spatial resolution, and through the investigation of intersubject correlation, we suggest that spontaneous point process response durations are associated with the mean interbeat interval and low-frequency power of heart rate variability in the brainstem. PMID:27044997

  1. Cardiovascular responses from immersion at recovery phase of the cardiac rehabilitation protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Framartinho Carlos Silva Araújo; Heleno Carneiro Rolim de Moraes; Jaqueline Vieira Sales

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe the cardiovascular responses from immersion at recovery phase of the cardiac rehabilitation protocol. Methods: This was an interventional, descriptive and prospective study with quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 20 patients with diagnoses of heart disease and hypertension with Functional Classification of Heart Failure from the New York Heart Association (NYHA), which have remained clinically stable and participating in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program of...

  2. Role for the Unfolded Protein Response in Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Man Liu; Dudley, Samuel C

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has been extensively investigated in neurological diseases and diabetes, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. Activated UPR participates in multiple cardiac conditions and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, the UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure by affecting cardiac ion channels expression, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rat...

  3. High Altitude Hearts: Genetic Basis of Cardiac Responses to Long-term Hypoxia Exposures in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Zarndt, Rachel Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a feature of many hypoxia-induced diseases, and affects millions of people worldwide suffering conditions including pulmonary disease, inflammation, and high altitude. Interestingly, highlanders with beneficial genetic adaptations to high altitude have remarkably low incidence of cardiomyopathies. In contrast, pathological cardiac hypertrophy is the hallmark feature of disease in other, poorly adapted highland populations. Detailed mechanisms of these cardiac responses remain...

  4. Eye contact with neutral and smiling faces: effects on frontal EEG asymmetry and autonomic responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Maria Pönkänen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In our previous studies we have shown that seeing another person “live” with a direct vs. averted gaze results in greater relative left-sided frontal asymmetry in the electroencephalography (EEG, associated with approach motivation, and in enhanced skin conductance responses indicating autonomic arousal. In our studies, however, the stimulus persons had a neutral expression. In real-life social interaction, eye contact is often associated with a smile, which is another signal of the sender’s approach-related motivation. A smile could therefore enhance the affective-motivational responses to eye contact. In the present study, we investigated whether the facial expression (neutral vs. smile would modulate the frontal EEG asymmetry and autonomic arousal to seeing a direct vs. an averted gaze in faces presented “live” through a liquid crystal shutter. The results showed that the skin conductance responses were greater for the direct than the averted gaze and that the effect of gaze direction was more pronounced for a smiling than a neutral face. However, the frontal EEG asymmetry results revealed a more complex pattern. Participants whose responses to seeing the other person were overall indicative of leftward frontal activity (indicative of approach showed greater relative left-sided asymmetry for the direct vs. averted gaze, whereas participants whose responses were overall indicative of rightward frontal activity (indicative of avoidance showed greater relative right-sided asymmetry to direct vs. averted gaze. The other person’s facial expression did not have an effect on the frontal EEG asymmetry. These findings may reflect that another’s direct gaze, as compared to their smile, has a more dominant role in regulating perceivers’ approach motivation.

  5. Discrimination of the Healthy and Sick Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System by a New Wavelet Analysis of Heartbeat Intervals

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yu; Levitan, J; Moelgaard, H; Bloch-Thomsen, P E; Saermark, K

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to distinguish with a complete certainty between healthy subjects and patients with various dysfunctions of the cardiac nervous system by way of multiresolutional wavelet transform of RR intervals. We repeated the study of Thurner et al on different ensemble of subjects. We show that reconstructed series using a filter which discards wavelet coefficients related with higher scales enables one to classify individuals for which the method otherwise is inconclusive. We suggest a delimiting diagnostic value of the standard deviation of the filtered, reconstructed RR interval time series in the range of $\\sim 0.035$ (for the above mentioned filter), below which individuals are at risk.

  6. Effects of repeated Valsalva maneuver straining on cardiac and vasoconstrictive baroreflex responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Ratliff, Duane A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Ludwig, David A.; Muniz, Gary W.; Benedetti, Erik; Chavarria, Jose; Koreen, Susan; Nguyen, Claude; Wang, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We hypothesized that repeated respiratory straining maneuvers (repeated SM) designed to elevate arterial BPs (arterial baroreceptor loading) would acutely increase baroreflex responses. METHODS: We tested this hypothesis by measuring cardiac baroreflex responses to carotid baroreceptor stimulation (neck pressures), and changes in heart rate and diastolic BP after reductions in BP induced by a 15-s Valsalva maneuver in 10 female and 10 male subjects at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after performing repeated SM. Baroreflex responses were also measured in each subject at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h at the same time on a separate day without repeated SM (control) in a randomized, counter-balanced cross-over experimental design. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in carotid-cardiac and peripheral vascular baroreflex responses measured across time following repeated SM compared with the control condition. Integrated cardiac baroreflex response (deltaHR/ deltaSBP) measured during performance of a Valsalva maneuver was increased by approximately 50% to 1.1 +/- 0.2 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 1 h and 1.0 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 3 h following repeated SM compared with the control condition (0.7 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at both 1 and 3 h, respectively). However, integrated cardiac baroreflex response after repeated SM returned to control levels at 6 and 24 h after training. These responses did not differ between men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that arterial baroreceptor loading induced by repeated SM increased aortic, but not carotid, cardiac baroreflex responses for as long as 3 h after repeated SM. We conclude that repeated SM increases cardiac baroreflex responsiveness which may provide patients, astronauts, and high-performance aircraft pilots with protection from development of orthostatic hypotension.

  7. Anticipatory autonomic response to a public speaking task in women: the role of trait anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bono, Esperanza; Moya-Albiol, Luis; Salvador, Alicia; Carrillo, Eduvigis; Ricarte, Jorge; Gomez-Amor, Jesus

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study anticipatory autonomic responses their relationship to trait anxiety. Twenty-three women prepared an evaluated speech (S-condition) and 22 women an evaluated essay (W-condition). Heart rate (HR), finger pulse volume (FPV) and skin conductance were recorded before, during and after preparation of the task and during task performance; state-anxiety was evaluated before and after the task. In the total sample, state-anxiety was higher in the S- than in W-condition and this anxiety increase was accompanied by FPV reductions. However, when the sample was split according to trait anxiety scores, HR during preparation and increases of state-anxiety were greater in S- than W-condition in only in high-anxious women. Results suggest that specificity of anticipatory HR response to a public speaking task in women is moderated by cognitive anxiety. PMID:12100844

  8. Modifications of Control Loop to Improve the Depth Response of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Ping Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During a constant depth maneuver of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV, its pitch attitude and stern plane deflections create forces and moments to achieve equilibrium in the vertical plane. If an AUV has a proportional controller only in its depth control loop, then different weights or centers of gravity will cause different steady-state depth errors at trimmed conditions. In general, a steady-state depth error can be eliminated by adding an integral controller in the depth control loop. However, an improper integrator may lead to a bad transient response, even though the steady-state depth error can finally be eliminated. To remove the steady-state depth error, this study proposes methods that adjust the depth command and add a switching integral controller in the depth control loop. Simulation results demonstrate that the steady-state depth error can be eliminated and the transient response can be improved.

  9. Chemosensory perception, symptoms and autonomic responses during chemical exposure in multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna Sara; Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a prevalent medically unexplained symptom characterized by symptom reactions to everyday chemical exposure below hygienic thresholds. The aim of this study was to investigate the expressions of hyper-reactivity in MCS during whole-body exposure to l...... found for breathing rate or tonic electrodermal activity responses. Conclusions: We conclude that MCS sufferers differ from healthy controls in terms of autonomic responses, symptoms and chemosensory perception during chemical exposure......./m3. Results: MCS participants, compared with controls, reported greater perceived odor intensities, more unpleasantness to the exposure and increasing symptoms over time. MCS participants also expressed higher pulse rate and lower pulse rate variability than controls did. No group differences were...

  10. Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR: a flow-like mental state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Barratt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR is a previously unstudied sensory phenomenon, in which individuals experience a tingling, static-like sensation across the scalp, back of the neck and at times further areas in response to specific triggering audio and visual stimuli. This sensation is widely reported to be accompanied by feelings of relaxation and well-being. The current study identifies several common triggers used to achieve ASMR, including whispering, personal attention, crisp sounds and slow movements. Data obtained also illustrates temporary improvements in symptoms of depression and chronic pain in those who engage in ASMR. A high prevalence of synaesthesia (5.9% within the sample suggests a possible link between ASMR and synaesthesia, similar to that of misophonia. Links between number of effective triggers and heightened flow state suggest that flow may be necessary to achieve sensations associated with ASMR.

  11. Emotional Responses to Odors in Children with High-Functioning Autism: Autonomic Arousal, Facial Behavior and Self-Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legisa, Jasna; Messinger, Daniel S.; Kermol, Enzo; Marlier, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Although emotional functioning is impaired in children with autism, it is unclear if this impairment is due to difficulties with facial expression, autonomic responsiveness, or the verbal description of emotional states. To shed light on this issue, we examined responses to pleasant and unpleasant odors in eight children (8-14 years) with…

  12. Short-duration spaceflight impairs human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Janice M.; Charles, John B.; Bennett, Barbara S.; Jones, Michele M.; Eckberg, Dwain L.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a spaceflight on the vagally mediated baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses of humans were investigated by measuring the responses (provoked by neck pressure changes) in supine position and the heart rate and blood pressure in the supine and standing positions in 16 astronauts before and after 4- to 5-day long Space Shuttle missions. The results showed that exposures to spaceflight resulted in reduced baseline levels of the vagal-cardiac outflow and the vagally mediated responses to changes of the arterial baroreceptor input and that these changes contribute to postflight reductions of astronauts' ability to maintain standing arterial pressures.

  13. Measurement of the effect of Isha Yoga on cardiac autonomic nervous system using short-term heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Muralikrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beneficial effects of Yoga have been postulated to be due to modulation of the autonomic nervous system. Objective: To assess the effect of Isha Yoga practices on cardiovascular autonomic nervous system through short-term heart rate variability (HRV. Design of the Study: Short-term HRV of long-term regular healthy 14 (12 males and 2 females Isha Yoga practitioners was compared with that of age- and gender-matched 14 (12 males and 2 females non-Yoga practitioners. Methods and Materials: ECG Lead II and respiratory movements were recorded in both groups using Polyrite during supine rest for 5 min and controlled deep breathing for 1 minute. Frequency domain analysis [RR interval is the mean of distance between subsequent R wave peaks in ECG], low frequency (LF power, high frequency (HF power, LF normalized units (nu, HF nu, LF/HF ratio] and time domain analysis [Standard Deviation of normal to normal interval (SDNN, square of mean squared difference of successive normal to normal intervals (RMSSD, normal to normal intervals which are differing by 50 ms (NN50, and percentage of NN50 (pNN50] of HRV variables were analyzed for supine rest. Time domain analysis was recorded for deep breathing. Results: Results showed statistically significant differences between Isha Yoga practitioners and controls in both frequency and time domain analyses of HRV indices, with no difference in resting heart rate between the groups. Conclusions: Practitioners of Isha Yoga showed well-balanced beneficial activity of vagal efferents, an overall increased HRV, and sympathovagal balance, compared to non-Yoga practitioners during supine rest and deep breathing.

  14. Neuroendocrine Responses to Transvascular Autonomic Modulation: A Modified Balloon Angioplasty in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, M; Sternberg, Z

    2016-02-01

    Balloon angioplasty (BA) is a treatment modality to correct vascular lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, who present with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI). We hypothesized that BA clinical benefits stems in part from improvement in cardiovascular autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. We adopted the Transvascular Autonomic Modulation (TVAM), as a modified BA technique, with the objective of further enhancing ANS functional activities. TVAM involved dilation of multiple vascular beds, including IJVs, azygos and renal veins, and application of manual compression. Since the ANS regulates the function of the hypothalamus pituitary (HPA) axis, we examined TVAM effects on HPA axis in MS patients, and determined the relationship between ANS function and HPA activity. The adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol serum levels, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were measured before and 24 h after TVAM procedure in 72 MS patients. Baseline ACTH and cortisol serum levels were lower than normal ranges in 18% and 25% MS patients respectively. The intervention resulted in significant reductions in both ACTH and cortisol (pcounter to the stress-mediated increases in serum levels of these hormones, which are expected following an invasive procedure. The clinical implications of this unexpected response warrant further investigations. PMID:25789986

  15. Physiological correlates of the big 5: autonomic responses to video presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, Claudia Chloe; Kothuri, Ravi; Marci, Carl; Siefert, Caleb; Pfaff, Donald D

    2013-12-01

    Personality's link to emotional experience has been demonstrated, but specific biological responses to emotion as a function of personality have not been well-established. Here, the association between personality and physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance, and respiration) to emotional videos was assessed. One-hundred sixty-nine participants self-reported on their Big 5 personality traits and underwent ambulatory monitoring as they watched four brief video clips from primetime television content showing scenes containing violence, fear, sadness, and tension. Generally, the negatively-toned emotional scenes provoked increases in skin conductance response and declines in heart rate. We found that physiological outcomes depended on the particular emotional scene and on personality, most notably Extraversion and Neuroticism. Extraversion, and to a lesser degree, Neuroticism, were associated with increases in autonomic arousal responses to the scenes. Gender also interacted with personality to predict responses, such that women who scored higher on measures of Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Conscientious tended to show more physiological arousal than men. Overall, the emotional scenes evoked increases in arousal and more controlled attention. The findings are discussed in context of the limited capacity model and shed light on how personality and gender affect physiological reactions to emotional experiences in everyday life. PMID:24129901

  16. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes and no symptoms of coronary artery disease: comparison of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy and heart rate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholte, Arthur J.H.A.; Schuijf, Joanne D.; Delgado, Victoria; Kok, Jurriaan A.; Bus, Mieke T.J.; Maan, Arie C.; Wall, Ernst E. van der; Bax, Jeroen J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Stokkel, Marcel P.; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra [Leiden University Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine, Leiden (Netherlands); Kharagitsingh, Antje V. [Medisch Centrum Haaglanden, Department of Internal Medicine, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes, truly asymptomatic for coronary artery disease (CAD), using heart rate variability (HRV) and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-mIBG) myocardial scintigraphy. The study group comprised 88 patients with type 2 diabetes prospectively recruited from an outpatient diabetes clinic. In all patients myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, CAN by HRV and {sup 123}I-mIBG myocardial scintigraphy were performed. Two or more abnormal tests were defined as CAN-positive (ECG-based CAN) and one or fewer as CAN-negative. CAN assessed by {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy was defined as abnormal if the heart-to-mediastinum ratio was <1.8, the washout rate was >25%, or the total defect score was >13. The prevalence of CAN in patients asymptomatic for CAD with type 2 diabetes and normal myocardial perfusion assessed by HRV and {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy was respectively, 27% and 58%. Furthermore, in almost half of patients with normal HRV, {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy showed CAN. The current study revealed a high prevalence of CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes. Secondly, disagreement between HRV and {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy for the assessment of CAN was observed. (orig.)

  17. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes and no symptoms of coronary artery disease: comparison of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy and heart rate variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes, truly asymptomatic for coronary artery disease (CAD), using heart rate variability (HRV) and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-mIBG) myocardial scintigraphy. The study group comprised 88 patients with type 2 diabetes prospectively recruited from an outpatient diabetes clinic. In all patients myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, CAN by HRV and 123I-mIBG myocardial scintigraphy were performed. Two or more abnormal tests were defined as CAN-positive (ECG-based CAN) and one or fewer as CAN-negative. CAN assessed by 123I-mIBG scintigraphy was defined as abnormal if the heart-to-mediastinum ratio was 25%, or the total defect score was >13. The prevalence of CAN in patients asymptomatic for CAD with type 2 diabetes and normal myocardial perfusion assessed by HRV and 123I-mIBG scintigraphy was respectively, 27% and 58%. Furthermore, in almost half of patients with normal HRV, 123I-mIBG scintigraphy showed CAN. The current study revealed a high prevalence of CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes. Secondly, disagreement between HRV and 123I-mIBG scintigraphy for the assessment of CAN was observed. (orig.)

  18. Considerations on command and response language features for a network of heterogeneous autonomous computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberg, N.; Shaw, C., III

    1984-01-01

    The design of a uniform command language to be used in a local area network of heterogeneous, autonomous nodes is considered. After examining the major characteristics of such a network, and after considering the profile of a scientist using the computers on the net as an investigative aid, a set of reasonable requirements for the command language are derived. Taking into account the possible inefficiencies in implementing a guest-layered network operating system and command language on a heterogeneous net, the authors examine command language naming, process/procedure invocation, parameter acquisition, help and response facilities, and other features found in single-node command languages, and conclude that some features may extend simply to the network case, others extend after some restrictions are imposed, and still others require modifications. In addition, it is noted that some requirements considered reasonable (user accounting reports, for example) demand further study before they can be efficiently implemented on a network of the sort described.

  19. {sup 123}I-MIBG lung uptake in patients with diabetes mellitus. Correlation with cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Flores, L.G. II; Ohnishi, Takashi; Tamura, Shozo; Watanabe, Katsushi; Kurose, Takeshi; Matsukura, Sigeru [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between {sup 123}I-MIBG lung uptake and autonomic neuropathy (AN) in patients with diabetes mellitus. For the quantitative analysis, lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) were obtained from chest planar image. In addition, both lung washout ratio (%WR-L) and heart washout ratio (%WR-H) were calculated from early and delayed images. Similarly, exercised myocardial scintigraphy using {sup 201}Tl-chloride was done to rule out ischemia and lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M-Tl) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M-Tl) were obtained from chest planar image. Each indexes were compared in both diabetic group and control group. Both mean value of H/M and %WR-H in AN (+) group were significantly higher than those of control group. Mean value of L/M in each diabetic group was significantly higher than that of control group. Particularly, L/M of AN (+) group is higher than that of AN (-) group on early study. Mean value of %WR-L in AN (+) group was also significantly higher than that of control group. Regarding the {sup 201}Tl-uptake index, there was no statistical significance among in each group. The current study showed that abnormal pulmonary {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake in the lung existed in patients with diabetes mellitus. The phenomenon might be related with sympathetic dysfunction or severity of diabetes mellitus. (author)

  20. Cardiovascular responses from immersion at recovery phase of the cardiac rehabilitation protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Framartinho Carlos Silva Araújo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the cardiovascular responses from immersion at recovery phase of the cardiac rehabilitation protocol. Methods: This was an interventional, descriptive and prospective study with quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 20 patients with diagnoses of heart disease and hypertension with Functional Classification of Heart Failure from the New York Heart Association (NYHA, which have remained clinically stable and participating in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program of Fortaleza University. The variables heart rate, blood pressure, saturation and dyspnea were investigated, being verified at rest, post-exercise and post-immersion. Data collection occurred over three sessions, withone week interval. Results: There was a significant response in heart rate and dyspnea, after application of immersion in the recovery phase (p 0.05. Conclusion: There were no clinical consequences resulting from themethod used, showing significant improvements in symptoms, with adherence to the cardiac rehabilitation program after inclusion of immersion as a therapeutic complement.

  1. Cardiovascular, metabolic, and hormonal responses to noradrenaline in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Andersen, P; Hvidberg, A;

    1996-01-01

    resistance, glucose kinetics, metabolites (beta-hydroxybuturate, glycerol, and lactate), and glucoregulatory hormones (noradrenaline, adrenaline, growth hormone, pancreatic polypeptide, cortisol, and insulin). Systolic and mean blood pressure increased in all groups but diabetic patients with autonomic......Denervation hypersensitivity is a well-known phenomenon in patients with autonomic failure. In diabetic autonomic neuropathy hypersensitivity to beta-adrenergic stimulation has been demonstrated. We infused noradrenaline, mainly an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, in three escalating doses (0.5, 2...

  2. The Autonomous Development Strategies of Micro and Small Entrepreneurs Through Coorporate Social Responsibility in Bogor District of West Java

    OpenAIRE

    Faizal Maad; Sumardjo Sumardjo; Amiruddin Saleh; Pudji Muljono

    2014-01-01

    The objective  of this  reseach were to: (1) analyze the level of autonomous of mikro and small entreprise (SMEs) entrepreneurs are empowered through Coorporate Social Responsibility (CSR); (2) analyze the dominant factors that influence autonomous of MSEs entrepreneurs  are empowered through CSR;  and (3) formulate an appropriate  a strategy  in developing autonomy of MSEs entrepreneurs through CSR. The reseach  was conduct  in the village built two companies running CSR in Bogor district in...

  3. Cognitive modulation of psychophysical, respiratory and autonomic responses to cold pressor test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica L Santarcangelo

    Full Text Available In healthy subjects with high hypnotisability (highs under hypnosis, subjectively effective suggestions for analgesia abolish the increases in blood pressure associated with cold pressor test (cpt by reducing the peripheral vascular resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the suggestions of analgesia on the responses to cpt in healthy highs (n = 22 and in low hypnotisable participants (lows, n = 22 out of hypnosis. Cpt was administered without (CPT and with suggestions for analgesia (CPT+AN. Psychophysical (pain intensity, pain threshold, cpt duration (time of immersion and pain tolerance, defined as the difference between cpt duration and pain threshold, respiratory (amplitude and frequency and autonomic variables (tonic skin conductance, mean RR interval (RR = 1/heart rate, blood pressure, skin blood flow were studied. The suggestions for analgesia increased cpt duration and RR in both groups, but decreased pain intensity and enhanced pain threshold only in highs; in both groups they did not modulate systolic blood pressure, tonic skin conductance and skin blood flow; thus, increased parasympathetic activity appears responsible for the heart rate reduction induced by suggestions in both groups. In conclusion, our findings show that suggestions modulate pain experience differentially in highs and lows, and are partially effective also in lows. We hypothesize that the mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of suggestions in healthy lows may be involved also in their efficacy in chronic pain patients with low hypnotisability.

  4. Cardiac Responses during Picture Viewing in Young Male Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roelie J. Hempel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research investigating the emotion recognition ability in patients with schizophrenia has mainly focused on the recognition of facial expressions. To broaden our understanding of emotional processes in patients with schizophrenia, this study aimed to investigate whether these patients experience and process other emotionally evocative stimuli differently from healthy participants. To investigate this, we measured the cardiac and subjective responses of 33 male patients (9 with and 24 without antipsychotic medication and 40 male control subjects to emotion-eliciting pictures. Cardiac responses were chosen as an outcome measure because previous research has indicated that these are linked with attentional and emotional processes and provide a more objective measure than self-report measures alone. The differences in cardiac responses between patients and controls were limited to medicated patients: only the medicated patients showed significantly decreased cardiac orienting responses compared with control subjects, regardless of picture contents. These results indicate that medicated patients directed less attention towards emotion-eliciting pictures than controls. Decreased attentional resources while processing emotional evocative stimuli could lead to incorrect appraisals of the environment and may have detrimental emotional and social consequences, contributing to chronic stress levels and an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

  5. Human responses to upright tilt: a window on central autonomic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, W. H.; Hoag, J. B.; Crossman, A. A.; Kuusela, T. A.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    1. We examined interactions between haemodynamic and autonomic neural oscillations during passive upright tilt, to gain better insight into human autonomic regulatory mechanisms. 2. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, respiration and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity in nine healthy young adults. Subjects breathed in time with a metronome at 12 breaths min-1 (0.2 Hz) for 5 min each, in supine, and 20, 40, 60, 70 and 80 deg head-up positions. We performed fast Fourier transform (and autoregressive) power spectral analyses and integrated low-frequency (0.05-0.15 Hz) and respiratory-frequency (0. 15-0.5 Hz) spectral powers. 3. Integrated areas of muscle sympathetic bursts and their low- and respiratory-frequency spectral powers increased directly and significantly with the tilt angle. The centre frequency of low-frequency sympathetic oscillations was constant before and during tilt. Sympathetic bursts occurred more commonly during expiration than inspiration at low tilt angles, but occurred equally in expiration and inspiration at high tilt angles. 4. Systolic and diastolic pressures and their low- and respiratory-frequency spectral powers increased, and R-R intervals and their respiratory-frequency spectral power decreased progressively with the tilt angle. Low-frequency R-R interval spectral power did not change. 5. The cross-spectral phase angle between systolic pressures and R-R intervals remained constant and consistently negative at the low frequency, but shifted progressively from positive to negative at the respiratory frequency during tilt. The arterial baroreflex modulus, calculated from low-frequency cross-spectra, decreased at high tilt angles. 6. Our results document changes of baroreflex responses during upright tilt, which may reflect leftward movement of subjects on their arterial pressure sympathetic and vagal response relations. The intensity, but not the centre frequency of low

  6. Cardiac molecular-acclimation mechanisms in response to swimming-induced exercise in Atlantic salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castro

    Full Text Available Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control, 0.65 (medium intensity and 1.31 (high intensity body lengths s(-1. Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first

  7. Inflammatory Response to Cardiac Surgery and Strategies to Overcome it.

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor Mukul; Ramachandran T

    2004-01-01

    A general activation of the immune system is observed during any operative procedure as a physiological response to the surgical trauma. Cardiopulmonary bypass may directly activate the inflammatory response by three distinct mechanisms: direct ′contact activation′ of the immune system following exposure of blood to the foreign surfaces, ischaemia-reperfusion injury to vital organs and systemic endotoxaemia resulting from gut translocation of endotoxin. The inflammatory response...

  8. Responses of the autonomic nervous system in altitude adapted and high altitude pulmonary oedema subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Radhakrishnan, U.; Sen Gupta, J.; Nayar, H. S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies were carried out to ascertain the role of sympatho-parasympathetic responses in the process of adaptation to altitude. The assessment of status of autonomic balance was carried out in a group of 20 young male subjects by recording their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, extremity temperatures, pupillary diameter, cold pressor response, oxygen consumption, cardioacceleration during orthostasis and urinary excretion of catecholamines; in a thermoneutral laboratory. The same parameters were repeated on day 3 and at weekly intervals for a period of 3 weeks, after exposing them to 3,500 m; and also after return to sea level. At altitude, similar studies were carried out in a group of 10 acclimatized lowlanders, 10 high altitude natives and 6 patients who had recently recovered from high altitude pulmonary oedema. In another phase, similar studies were done in two groups of subjects, one representing 15 subjects who had stayed at altitude (3,500 4,000 m) without any ill effects and the other comprising of 10 subjects who had either suffered from high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) or acute mountain sickness (AMS). The results revealed sympathetic overactivity on acute induction to altitude which showed gradual recovery on prolonged stay, the high altitude natives had preponderance to parasympathetic system. Sympathetic preponderance may not be an essential etiological factor for the causation of maladaptation syndromes.

  9. Intrinsic Cardiac Autonomic Ganglionated Plexi within Epicardial Fats Modulate the Atrial Substrate Remodeling: Experiences with Atrial Fibrillation Patients Receiving Catheter Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Rahul; Lo, Li-Wei; Lin, Yenn-Jiang Lin; Chang, Shih-Lin; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chung, Fa-Po; Chiou, Cheun-Wang; Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background A recent study reported the close relationship between high dominant frequent (DF) sites [atrial fibrillation (AF) nest] and the intrinsic cardiac autonomic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the regional distribution of epicardial fat and the properties of the biatrial substrates in AF patients. Methods We studied 32 patients with paroxysmal (n = 23) and persistent (n = 9) AF. The epicardial fat volume around the left atrium (LA) was evaluated using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography and the topographic distribution of the fat volume was assessed. The biatrial DFs, voltages, and total activation times (TATs) were obtained during sinus rhythm. Results Out of the 8 divided LA regions, a significant linear correlation existed between the LA fat and mean DF values in the right upper anterior LA, left upper anterior LA, right lower anterior LA, right upper posterior LA, left upper posterior LA, and left lower posterior LA. There was no significant correlation between the regional LA fat distribution and regional LA peak-to-peak bipolar voltage and TAT. During a mean follow-up of 17 ± 8 months, 22 of the 32 (69%) patients were free of AF. In the multivariate analysis, only the mean LA DF was found to be a significant predictor of recurrence. Conclusions There was a close association between the regional distribution of the LA epicardial fat and the atrial substrate manifesting high frequency during sinus rhythm (AF nest). Those nests were related to ablation outcome. Hence, epicardial fat may play a significant role in atrial substrate remodeling and thereby in the pathogenesis and maintenance of AF. PMID:27122948

  10. Vasopressin responses to unloading arterial baroreceptors during cardiac nerve blockade in conscious dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the relative contributions of afferent input from the heart and from arterial baroreceptors in the stimulation of arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion in response to hypotension caused by thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC). Afferent input from cardiac receptors was reversibly blocked by infusing 2% procaine into the pericardial space to anesthetize the cardiac nerves. Acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) alone caused a rise in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 24 +/- 3 mmHg but no change in plasma AVP. If the rise in MAP was prevented by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 39 +/- 15 pg/ml, and if MAP was allowed to increase and then was forced back to control by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 34 +/- 15 pg/ml. Thus the rise in MAP during CNB stimulated arterial baroreceptors, which in turn compensated for the loss of inhibitory input from cardiac receptors on AVP secretion. These results indicate that the maximum secretory response resulting from complete unloading of cardiac receptors at a normal MAP results in a mean increase in plasma AVP of 39 pg/ml in this group of dogs. When MAP was reduced 25% below control levels (from 95 +/- 5 to 69 +/- 3 mmHg) by TIVCC during pericardial saline infusion, plasma AVP increased by 79 +/- 42 pg/ml. However, the same degree of hypotension during CNB (MAP was reduced from 120 +/- 5 to 71 +/- 3 mmHg) led to a greater (P less than 0.05) increase in plasma AVP of 130 +/- 33 pg/ml. Because completely unloading cardiac receptors can account for an increase of only 39 pg/ml on average in this group of dogs, the remainder of the increase in plasma AVP must be due to other sources of stimulation. We suggest that the principal stimulus to AVP secretion after acute CNB in these studies arises from unloading the arterial baroreceptors.

  11. Evaluating Autonomic Parameters: The Role of Sleep ‎Duration in Emotional Responses to Music ‎

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshvarpour‎, Atefeh; Abbasi, Ataollah; Goshvarpour‎, Ateke

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It has been recognized that sleep has an important effect on emotion processing. The aim ‎of this study was to investigate the effect of previous night sleep duration on autonomicresponses to musical stimuli in different emotional contexts.‎ Method: A frequency based measure of GSR, PR and ECG signals were examined in 35 healthy ‎students in three groups of oversleeping, lack of sleep and normal sleep. ‎ Results: The results of this study revealed that regardless of the emotional context of the musical ‎stimuli (happy, relax, fear, and sadness), there was an increase in the maximum power of ‎GSR, ECG and PR during the music time compared to the rest time in all the three ‎groups. In addition, the higher value of these measures was achieved while the ‎participants listened to relaxing music. Statistical analysis of the extracted features ‎between each pair of emotional states revealed that the most significant differences ‎were attained for ECG signals. These differences were more obvious in the participants ‎with normal sleeping (p<10-18). The higher value of the indices has been shown, ‎comparing long sleep duration with the normal one.‎ Conclusion: There was a strong relation between emotion and sleep duration, and this association can ‎be observed by means of the ECG signals.‎ PMID:27252770

  12. Autonomic nervous system:its response and adaptation to exercises%自主神经系统对运动反应、适应的研究与进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵连杰

    2015-01-01

    背景:心血管系统满足运动过程中不同组织和器官的需求,一次性运动和长时间运动会引起不同的心脏自主神经系统的反应和变化。通过分析心率变异指标提取人体变化的信息,用于运动效果和个体方案的制定成为一个重要的研究领域。目的:从传统的心率变异指标在运动中的应用入手,并结合最新的研究动态,为进一步的心脏自主神经对运动反应和适应研究提供理论支撑。方法:通过计算机检索学术谷歌和PubMed数据库相关文献。检索时间范围为1997年1月至2015年3月。英文检索词为“autonomic nervous system,heart rate variability,HRV,exercise intervention,exercise training”。结果与结论:共检索到405篇相关文献,根据纳入标准保留79篇文献。根据一次性运动心脏自主神经的变化,可以评定有氧工作能力和制定个体干预方案。心脏自主神经对运动干预的反应和适应取决于强度和持续时间,存在较大的个体差异。交感神经和迷走神经长时间兴奋或抑制可能预示过度训练发生。%BACKGROUND:The cardiovascular system meets the demand of different tissues and organs in the motor process. One-time exercise and long-time exercise wil cause different responses and changes of the cardiac autonomic nervous system. Information about changes of the human body can be extractedvia indicators of heart rate variability, which wil be used for formulation of exercise effect and individualized program. It wil be an important field in the future. OBJECTIVE:To study the conventional indicators of heart rate variability used in exercise in combination with the latest research trends, and to provide theoretical support for studying the response and adaptation of cardiac autonomic nervous system to exercises. METHODS: A computer-based search of Google Scholar and PubMed database was performed for relevant articles published from January

  13. Hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Recent antecedent hypoglycemia reduces autonomic responses to, symptoms of, and defense against subsequent hypoglycemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Dagogo-Jack, S E; Craft, S; Cryer, P E

    1993-01-01

    We hypothesize that in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), recent antecedent iatrogenic hypoglycemia is a major cause of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, a disorder distinct from classical diabetic autonomic neuropathy (CDAN), and that hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, by reducing both symptoms of and defense against developing hypoglycemia, results in recurrent iatrogenic hypoglycemia, thus creating a vicious cycle. We used the hyperinsulinemic (12.0 ...

  14. Role of Autonomic Reflex Arcs in Cardiovascular Responses to Air Pollution Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Christina M.; Hazari, Mehdi S.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2015-01-01

    The body responds to environmental stressors by triggering autonomic reflexes in the pulmonary receptors, baroreceptors, and chemoreceptors to maintain homeostasis. Numerous studies have shown that exposure to various gases and airborne particles can alter the functional outcome of these reflexes, particularly with respect to the cardiovascular system. Modulation of autonomic neural input to the heart and vasculature following direct activation of sensory nerves in the respiratory system, eli...

  15. Autonomic responses to cold face stimulation in sickle cell disease: a time-varying model analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chalacheva, Patjanaporn; Kato, Roberta M.; Sangkatumvong, Suvimol; Detterich, Jon; Bush, Adam; Wood, John C.; Meiselman, Herbert; Coates, Thomas D; Khoo, Michael C.K.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by sudden onset of painful vaso-occlusive crises (VOC), which occur on top of the underlying chronic blood disorder. The mechanisms that trigger VOC remain elusive, but recent work suggests that autonomic dysfunction may be an important predisposing factor. Heart-rate variability has been employed in previous studies, but the derived indices have provided only limited univariate information about autonomic cardiovascular control in SCD. To circumvent...

  16. The Autonomous Development Strategies of Micro and Small Entrepreneurs Through Coorporate Social Responsibility in Bogor District of West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizal Maad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective  of this  reseach were to: (1 analyze the level of autonomous of mikro and small entreprise (SMEs entrepreneurs are empowered through Coorporate Social Responsibility (CSR; (2 analyze the dominant factors that influence autonomous of MSEs entrepreneurs  are empowered through CSR;  and (3 formulate an appropriate  a strategy  in developing autonomy of MSEs entrepreneurs through CSR. The reseach  was conduct  in the village built two companies running CSR in Bogor district involved 212  (SMEs entrepreneurs which determined from population (450 SMEs entrepreneurs by Solvin formula with level of error 5 % and drawn by cluster random sampling. Data collection was conducted from July to November 2013, and consisted  the primary and secondary data. Data analysis was simulated by using structural equation model (SEM . The results showed that the degree  of autonomous MSEs entrepreneurs is low, its core was 36.89 out of 100.00. There are three strategies that must be done to develop of  autonomous MSEs entrepreneurs through  CSR, such as; (a an increase the empowerment sustainable of MSEs entrepereneurs (b improve the quality of  the environment  supporting MSEs and (c an increase in intensity of  empowerment for MSEs entrepreneurs.

  17. Attention to eye contact in the West and East: autonomic responses and evaluative ratings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Akechi

    Full Text Available Eye contact has a fundamental role in human social interaction. The special appearance of the human eye (i.e., white sclera contrasted with a coloured iris implies the importance of detecting another person's face through eye contact. Empirical studies have demonstrated that faces making eye contact are detected quickly and processed preferentially (i.e., the eye contact effect. Such sensitivity to eye contact seems to be innate and universal among humans; however, several studies suggest that cultural norms affect eye contact behaviours. For example, Japanese individuals exhibit less eye contact than do individuals from Western European or North American cultures. However, how culture modulates eye contact behaviour is unclear. The present study investigated cultural differences in autonomic correlates of attentional orienting (i.e., heart rate and looking time. Additionally, we examined evaluative ratings of eye contact with another real person, displaying an emotionally neutral expression, between participants from Western European (Finnish and East Asian (Japanese cultures. Our results showed that eye contact elicited stronger heart rate deceleration responses (i.e., attentional orienting, shorter looking times, and higher ratings of subjective feelings of arousal as compared to averted gaze in both cultures. Instead, cultural differences in the eye contact effect were observed in various evaluative responses regarding the stimulus faces (e.g., facial emotion, approachability etc.. The rating results suggest that individuals from an East Asian culture perceive another's face as being angrier, unapproachable, and unpleasant when making eye contact as compared to individuals from a Western European culture. The rating results also revealed that gaze direction (direct vs. averted could influence perceptions about another person's facial affect and disposition. These results suggest that cultural differences in eye contact behaviour emerge from

  18. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Alexander R.; Godwin, James W.; Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regenerati...

  19. Cognitive load and autonomic response patterns under negative priming demand in depersonalization-derealization disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemche, Erwin; Sierra-Siegert, Mauricio; David, Anthony S; Phillips, Mary L; Gasston, David; Williams, Steven C R; Giampietro, Vincent P

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have yielded evidence for cognitive processing abnormalities and alterations of autonomic functioning in depersonalization-derealization disorder (DPRD). However, multimodal neuroimaging and psychophysiology studies have not yet been conducted to test for functional and effective connectivity under cognitive stress in patients with DPRD. DPRD and non-referred control subjects underwent a combined Stroop/negative priming task, and the neural correlates of Stroop interference effect, negative priming effect, error rates, cognitive load span and average amplitude of skin conductance responses were ascertained for both groups. Evoked haemodynamic responses for basic Stroop/negative priming activations were compared. For basic Stroop to neutral contrast, patients with DPRD differed in the location (inferior vs. superior lobule) of the parietal region involved, but showed similar activations in the left frontal region. In addition, patients with DPRD also co-activated the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (BA9) and posterior cingulate cortex (BA31), which were also found to be the main between-group difference regions. These regions furthermore showed connectivity with frequency of depersonalization states. Evoked haemodynamic responses drawn from regions of interest indicated significant between-group differences in 30-40% of time points. Brain-behaviour correlations differed mainly in laterality, yet only slightly in regions. A reversal of autonomic patterning became evident in patients with DPRD for cognitive load spans, indicating less effective arousal suppression under cognitive stress - patients with DPRD showed positive associations of cognitive load with autonomic responses, whereas controls exhibit respective inverse association. Overall, the results of the present study show only minor executive cognitive peculiarities, but further support the notion of abnormalities in autonomic functioning in patients with DPRD. PMID:26791018

  20. Dorsal and ventral hippocampus modulate autonomic responses but not behavioral consequences associated to acute restraint stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopinho, América A; Lisboa, Sabrina F S; Guimarães, Francisco S; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the dorsal (DH) and the ventral (VH) poles of the hippocampus are structurally, molecularly and functionally different regions. While the DH is preferentially involved in the modulation of spatial learning and memory, the VH modulates defensive behaviors related to anxiety. Acute restraint is an unavoidable stress situation that evokes marked and sustained autonomic changes, which are characterized by elevated blood pressure (BP), intense heart rate (HR) increases, skeletal muscle vasodilatation and cutaneous vasoconstriction, which are accompanied by a rapid skin temperature drop followed by body temperature increases. In addition to those autonomic responses, animals submitted to restraint also present behavioral changes, such as reduced exploration of the open arms of an elevated plus-maze (EPM), an anxiogenic-like effect. In the present work, we report a comparison between the effects of pharmacological inhibition of DH and VH neurotransmission on autonomic and behavioral responses evoked by acute restraint stress in rats. Bilateral microinjection of the unspecific synaptic blocker cobalt chloride (CoCl2, 1mM) into the DH or VH attenuated BP and HR responses, as well as the decrease in the skin temperature, elicited by restraint stress exposure. Moreover, DH or VH inhibition before restraint did not change the delayed increased anxiety behavior observed 24 h later in the EPM. The present results demonstrate for the first time that both DH and VH mediate stress-induced autonomic responses to restraint but they are not involved in the modulation of the delayed emotional consequences elicited by such stress. PMID:24147071

  1. Recurrent painful interoceptive sensations of the digestive tract increase general autonomic defensive response activation regardless of picture induced valence

    OpenAIRE

    Ceunen, Erik; Herssens, Natacha; Van Oudenhove*, Lukas; Bogaerts, Katleen; Ly, Huynh Giao; Coen, Steven; Tack, Jan; Vlaeyen, Johan; Van Diest, Ilse

    2012-01-01

    You can view the poster by scrolling down and clicking on "View/Open" at the bottom right of this page. Cite as: Ceunen, E., Herssens, N., Van Oudenhove, L., Bogaerts, K., Ly, H., Coen, S., Tack, J., Vlaeyen, J., Van Diest, I. (2012). Recurrent painful interoceptive sensations of the digestive tract increase general autonomic defensive response activation regardless of picture induced valence. Psychophysiology: vol. 49 (S1), S93.

  2. Memory association machine: an account of the realization and interpretation of an autonomous responsive site-specific artwork.

    OpenAIRE

    Bogart, Benjamin David Robert

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is an account of the realization and interpretation of the autonomous responsive electronic media artwork "Memory Association Machine" (MAM). Realization and interpretation are components of the creative process that braids conceptual, site-specific, electronic media art and artificial intelligence practises. The meaning of MAM is dependent on its unique location in space and time. MAM relates itself to its context using three primary processes: perception, the integration of sens...

  3. Fetal and maternal cardiac responses to physical activity and exercise during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Linda E; Allen, John J B; Gustafson, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    Since the 1970s, researchers have studied the influence of exercise during pregnancy on offspring heart development. With the knowledge and current evidence of fetal programming effects, research has demonstrated that exercise is safe and beneficial for mother, fetus, and neonate. Predominantly, research has focused on maternal and fetal cardiac adaptations related to aerobic exercise during pregnancy; less is known regarding the effects of resistance or combination (aerobic and resistance) training during pregnancy. Ongoing research is focusing on fetal responses to different intensity, duration and modes of maternal exercise throughout pregnancy. This article will summarize our current state of knowledge regarding the influence of exercise intensity, duration, and modes during pregnancy on maternal and fetal cardiac responses. PMID:26805461

  4. Global brain blood-oxygen level responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by brain injury, perhaps resulting from apnea-related hypoxia or periods of impaired cerebral perfusion. Perfusion changes can be determined indirectly by evaluation of cerebral blood volume and oxygenation alterations, which can be measured rapidly and non-invasively with the global blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal, a magnetic resonance imaging procedure. We assessed acute BOLD responses in OSA subjects to pressor challenges that elicit cerebral blood flow changes, using a two-group comparative design with healthy subjects as a reference. We separately assessed female and male patterns, since OSA characteristics and brain injury differ between sexes. We studied 94 subjects, 37 with newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA (6 female (age mean ± std: 52.1±8.1 yrs; apnea/hypopnea index [AHI]: 27.7±15.6 events/hr and 31 male 54.3±8.4 yrs; AHI: 37.4±19.6 events/hr, and 20 female (age 50.5±8.1 yrs and 37 male (age 45.6±9.2 yrs healthy control subjects. We measured brain BOLD responses every 2 s while subjects underwent cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. The global BOLD signal rapidly changed after the first 2 s of each challenge, and differed in magnitude between groups to two challenges (cold pressor, hand grip, but not to the Valsalva maneuver (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. OSA females showed greater differences from males in response magnitude and pattern, relative to healthy counterparts. Cold pressor BOLD signal increases (mean ± adjusted standard error at the 8 s peak were: OSA 0.14±0.08% vs. Control 0.31±0.06%, and hand grip at 6 s were: OSA 0.08±0.03% vs. Control at 0.30±0.02%. These findings, indicative of reduced cerebral blood flow changes to autonomic challenges in OSA, complement earlier reports of altered resting blood flow and reduced cerebral artery responsiveness. Females are more affected than males, an outcome which may contribute to the sex

  5. MIBG scintigraphic assessment of cardiac adrenergic activity in response to altitude hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High altitude hypoxia induces a decrease in the cardiac chronotropic function at maximal exercise or in response to isoproterenol infusion, suggesting an alteration in the cardiac sympathetic activation. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine [(123I]MIBG) was used to map scintigraphically the cardiac sympathetic neuronal function in six male subjects (aged 32 ± 7 yr) after an exposure to high altitude that created hypoxic conditions. Results obtained just after return to sea level (RSL) were compared with the normal values obtained after 2 or 3 mo of normoxia (N). A static image was created as the sum of the 16-EKG gated images recorded for 10 min in the anterior view of the chest at 20, 60, 120, and 240 min after injection. Regions of interest were located over the heart (H), lungs (L), and mediastinum (M) regions. There was a significant decrease in the H/M and the L/M ratios in RSL compared to N condition. Plasma norepinephrine concentration was elevated during the stay at altitude but not significantly different in RSL compared to N. In conclusion, cardiac [123I]MIBG uptake is reduced after an exposure to altitude hypoxia, supporting the hypothesis of an hypoxia-induced reduction of adrenergic neurotransmitter reserve in the myocardium. Furthermore, the observed significant decrease in pulmonary MIBG uptake suggests an alteration of endothelial cell function after exposure to chronic hypoxia

  6. Hemodynamic and ADH responses to central blood volume shifts in cardiac-denervated humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Thompson, C. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Savin, W. M.; Gordon, E. P.; Haskell, W. L.; Schroeder, J. S.; Sandler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes designed to induce blood volume shifts in ten cardiac transplant recipients to assess the contribution of cardiac and vascular volume receptors in the control of ADH secretion. Each subject underwent 15 min of a control period in the seated posture, then assumed a lying posture for 30 min at 6 deg head down tilt (HDT) followed by 20 min of seated recovery. Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions (echocardiography) were taken at 0 and 15 min before HDT, 5, 15, and 30 min of HDT, and 5, 15, and 30 min of seated recovery. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Resting plasma volume (PV) was measured by Evans blue dye and percent changes in PV during posture changes were calculated from changes in hematocrit. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded every 2 min. Results indicate that cardiac volume receptors are not the only mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute blood volume shifts in man.

  7. Elevated Cardiac Troponins in Setting of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Sepsis, and Septic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Elevation of cardiac troponins and creatinine kinase is frequently observed in setting of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, or septic shock. Underlying pathophysiologic mechanism for such troponin leak, its clinical significance, and what different could be done in such settings remain elusive. In this paper we have briefly overviewed the proposed pathogenic mechanisms for SIRS, sepsis, or septic shock-related troponin elevation (SRTE) and have provided brief overview on...

  8. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation (HTx is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response.

  9. Mind-body relationships in elite apnea divers during breath holding: a study of autonomic responses to acute hypoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eLaurino

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The mental control of ventilation with all associated phenomena,from relaxation to modulation of emotions, from cardiovascular tometabolic adaptations, constitutes a psychophysiological conditioncharacterizing voluntary breath holding (BH. BH induces severalautonomic responses, involving both autonomic cardiovascular andcutaneous pathways, whose characterization is the main aim ofthis study. Electrocardiogram and skin conductance (SC recordingswere collected from 14 elite divers during three conditions: freebreathing (FB, normoxic phase of BH (NPBH and hypoxic phaseof BH (HPBH. Thus, we compared a set of features describing signaldynamics between the three experimental conditions: from heart ratevariability features (in time and frequency domains and by usingnonlinear methods to rate and shape of spontaneous SC responses.The main result of the study rises by applying a Factor Analysis tothe subset of features significantly changed in the two BH phases.Indeed, the Factor Analysis allowed to uncover the structure of latentfactors which modeled the autonomic response: a factor describingthe autonomic balance, one the information increase rate, and alatter the central nervous system driver. The BH did not disrupt theFB factorial structure, and only few features moved among factors.Factor Analysis indicates that during BH i only the SC described theemotional output, ii the sympathetic tone on heart did not change, iiithe dynamics of interbeats intervals showed an increase of long rangecorrelation that anticipates the HPBH, followed by a drop to a randombehavior. In conclusion, data show that the autonomic control onheart rate and skin conductance are differentially modulated duringBH, which could be related to a more pronounced effect on emotionalcontrol induced by the mental training to BH.

  10. Muscle cells challenged with saturated fatty acids mount an autonomous inflammatory response that activates macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillon Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Within adipose tissue of mice fed a high fat diet, resident and infiltrating macrophages assume a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by the production of cytokines which in turn impact on the surrounding tissue. However, inflammation is not restricted to adipose tissue and high fat-feeding is responsible for a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in muscle. Although skeletal muscle is the major disposer of dietary glucose and a major determinant of glycemia, the origin and consequence of muscle inflammation in the development of insulin resistance are poorly understood. We used a cell culture approach to investigate the vectorial crosstalk between muscle cells and macrophages upon exposure to physiological, low levels of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Inflammatory pathway activation and cytokine expression were analyzed in L6 muscle cells expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (L6GLUT4myc exposed to 0.2 mM palmitate or palmitoleate. Conditioned media thereof, free of fatty acids, were then tested for their ability to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Palmitate -but not palmitoleate- induced IL-6, TNFα and CCL2 expression in muscle cells, through activation of the NF-κB pathway. Palmitate (0.2 mM alone did not induce insulin resistance in muscle cells, yet conditioned media from palmitate-challenged muscle cells selectively activated macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of palmitate activate autonomous inflammation in muscle cells to release factors that turn macrophages pro-inflammatory. We hypothesize that saturated fat-induced, low-grade muscle cell inflammation may trigger resident skeletal muscle macrophage polarization, possibly contributing to insulin resistance in vivo.

  11. Head Exposure to Cold during Whole-Body Cryostimulation: Influence on Thermal Response and Autonomic Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Julien; Schaal, Karine; Bieuzen, François; Le Meur, Yann; Filliard, Jean-Robert; Volondat, Marielle; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on whole-body cryotherapy has hypothesized a major responsibility of head cooling in the physiological changes classically reported after a cryostimulation session. The aim of this experiment was to verify this hypothesis by studying the influence of exposing the head to cold during whole-body cryostimulation sessions, on the thermal response and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Over five consecutive days, two groups of 10 participants performed one whole-body cryostimulation session daily, in one of two different systems; one exposing the whole-body to cold (whole-body cryostimulation, WBC), and the other exposing the whole-body except the head (partial-body cryostimulation, PBC).10 participants constituted a control group (CON) not receiving any cryostimulation. In order to isolate the head-cooling effect on recorded variables, it was ensured that the WBC and PBC systems induced the same decrease in skin temperature for all body regions (mean decrease over the 5 exposures: -8.6°C±1.3°C and -8.3±0.7°C for WBC and PBC, respectively), which persisted up to 20-min after the sessions (P20). The WBC sessions caused an almost certain decrease in tympanic temperature from Pre to P20 (-0.28 ±0.11°C), while it only decreased at P20 (-0.14±0.05°C) after PBC sessions. Heart rate almost certainly decreased after PBC (-8.6%) and WBC (-12.3%) sessions. Resting vagal-related heart rate variability indices (the root-mean square difference of successive normal R-R intervals, RMSSD, and high frequency band, HF) were very likely to almost certainly increased after PBC (RMSSD:+49.1%, HF: +123.3%) and WBC (RMSSD: +38.8%, HF:+70.3%). Plasma norepinephrine concentration was likely increased in similar proportions after PBC and WBC, but only after the first session. Both cryostimulation techniques stimulated the ANS with a predominance of parasympathetic tone activation from the first to the fifth session and in slightly greater proportion with WBC than PBC

  12. Effects of autonomous motivational priming on motivation and affective responses towards high-intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Denver M Y; Teseo, Amanda J; Bray, Steven R

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the effect of autonomous motivational priming on motivation, attitudes and intentions towards high-intensity interval training (HIT). Participants (N = 42) performed a graded exercise test to determine their peak aerobic power (WPEAK). At a subsequent testing session, participants were randomised to complete either an autonomous or neutral motivational priming task followed by a 10 × 1 HIT exercise protocol, alternating 1-min bouts of hard (70% WPEAK) and light (12.5% WPEAK) exercises for 20 min. Participants primed with autonomous motivation reported greater enjoyment, P = .009, ηp(2) = .16, and perceived competence, P = .005, ηp(2) = .18, post-exercise compared to those in the neutral priming condition. Participants in the autonomous motivational priming condition also reported more positive attitudes, P = .014, ηp(2) = .14, towards HIT; however, there was no difference between the conditions for task motivation during HIT or intentions, P = .53, ηp(2) = .01, to engage in HIT. These findings highlight autonomous motivational priming as a method of enhancing affective and motivational experiences regarding HIT. PMID:26634389

  13. Regulating Response Time in an Autonomic Computing System: A Comparison of Proportional Control and Fuzzy Control Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish S. Venkatarama

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecommerce is an area where an Autonomic Computing system could be very effectively deployed.Ecommerce has created demand for high quality information technology services and businesses areseeking quality of service guarantees from their service providers. These guarantees are expressed aspart of service level agreements. Properly adjusting tuning parameters for enforcement of the servicelevel agreement is time-consuming and skills-intensive. Moreover, in case of changes to the workload, thesetting of the parameters may no longer be optimum. In an ecommerce system, where the workloadchanges frequently, there is a need to update the parameters at regular intervals. This paper describestwo approaches, one, using a proportional controller and two, using a fuzzy controller, to automate thetuning of MaxClients parameter of Apache web server based on the required response time and thecurrent workload. This is an illustration of the self-optimizing characteristic of an autonomic computingsystem.

  14. Regulating Response Time in an Autonomic Computing System: A Comparison of Proportional Control and Fuzzy Control Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish S. Venkatarama

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecommerce is an area where an Autonomic Computing system could be very effectively deployed. Ecommerce has created demand for high quality information technology services and businesses are seeking quality of service guarantees from their service providers. These guarantees are expressed as part of service level agreements. Properly adjusting tuning parameters for enforcement of the service level agreement is time-consuming and skills-intensive. Moreover, in case of changes to the workload, the setting of the parameters may no longer be optimum. In an ecommerce system, where the workload changes frequently, there is a need to update the parameters at regular intervals. This paper describes two approaches, one, using a proportional controller and two, using a fuzzy controller, to automate the tuning of MaxClients parameter of Apache web server based on the required response time and the current workload. This is an illustration of the self-optimizing characteristic of an autonomic computing system.

  15. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  16. Effect of extracellular calcium on the additive effect of theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamkuwar Prashant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available At different extracellular calcium concentrations, the positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol and isoproterenol in combination with theophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor have been evaluated in the isolated frog heart and the isolated guinea pig left atria to investigate whether extracellular calcium produces any effect on the additive effect of the theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine. Cumulative dose response study of isoproterenol and isoproterenol in presence of theophylline at different extracellular calcium concentration was performed. The study revealed an increase in additive effect of theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine with increase in extracellular calcium concentration, but increase in extracellular calcium concentration decreased the myocardial responsiveness to additive effect of theophylline and isoproterenol combination. The mechanism of positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol and in combination with theophylline involves increase in intracellular cAMP by different pathways and extracellular calcium produces positive inotropic effect by initiating the interaction between the contractile proteins actin and myosin. The study revealed that an increase in the concentration of extracellular calcium increased the additive effect of theophylline and isoproterenol combination, but a decrease in the myocardial responsiveness was observed.

  17. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback on cardiovascular responses and autonomic sympathovagal modulation following stressor tasks in prehypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Sun, P; Wang, S; Lin, G; Wang, T

    2016-02-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is implicated in prehypertension, and previous studies have suggested that therapies that improve modulation of sympathovagal balance, such as biofeedback and slow abdominal breathing, are effective in patients with prehypertension at rest. However, considering that psychophysiological stressors may be associated with greater cardiovascular risk in prehypertensives, it is important to investigate whether heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) results in equivalent effects on autonomic cardiovascular responses control during stressful conditions in prehypertensives. A total of 32 college students with prehypertension were enrolled and randomly assigned to HRV-BF (n=12), slow abdominal breathing (SAB, n=10) or no treatment (control, n=10) groups. Then, a training experiment consisting of 15 sessions was employed to compare the effect of each intervention on the following cardiovascular response indicators before and after intervention: heart rate (HR); heart rate variability (HRV) components; blood volume pulse amplitude (BVPamp); galvanic skin response; respiration rate (RSP); and blood pressure. In addition, the cold pressor test and the mental arithmetic challenge test were also performed over two successive days before and after the invention as well as after 3 months of follow-up. A significant decrease in HR and RSP and a significant increase in BVPamp were observed after the HRV-BF intervention (P<0.001). For the HRV analysis, HRV-BF significantly reduced the ratio of low-frequency power to high-frequency power (the LF/HF ratio, P<0.001) and increased the normalized high-frequency power (HFnm) (P<0.001) during the stress tests, and an added benefit over SAB by improving HRV was also observed. In the 3-month follow-up study, similar effects on RSP, BVPamp, LF/HF and HFnm were observed in the HRV-BF group compared with the SAB group. HRV-BF training contributes to the beneficial effect of reducing the stress-related cardiovascular

  18. Evaluation of cardiac modulation in children in response to apnea/hypopnea using the Phone Oximeter(™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkordi, Parastoo; Garde, Ainara; Karlen, Walter; Petersen, Christian L; Wensley, David; Dumont, Guy A; Mark Ansermino, J

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) can experience changes in automatic cardiac regulation as a result of frequent sleep fragmentation and disturbance in normal respiration and oxygenation that accompany most apnea/hypopnea events. In adults, these changes are reflected in enhanced sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic activity. In this study, we examined the autonomic cardiac regulation in children with and without SDB, through spectral and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of pulse rate variability (PRV). PRV was measured from pulse-to-pulse intervals (PPIs) of the photoplethysmogram (PPG) recorded from 160 children using the Phone Oximeter(™) in the standard setting of overnight polysomnography. Spectral analysis of PRV showed the cardiac parasympathetic index (high frequency, HF) was lower (p < 0.01) and cardiac sympathetic indices (low frequency, LF and LF/HF ratio) were higher (p < 0.01) during apnea/hypopnea events for more than 95% of children with SDB. DFA showed the short- and long-range fluctuations of heart rate were more strongly correlated in children with SDB compared to children without SDB. These findings confirm that the analysis of the PPG recorded using the Phone Oximeter(™) could be the basis for a new screening tool for assessing PRV in non-clinical environment. PMID:26732019

  19. American Heart Association Response to the 2015 Institute of Medicine Report on Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumar, Robert W; Eigel, Brian; Callaway, Clifton W; Estes, N A Mark; Jollis, James G; Kleinman, Monica E; Morrison, Laurie J; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Rea, Thomas D; Sendelbach, Sue

    2015-09-15

    The American Heart Association (AHA) commends the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act (2015). The AHA recognizes the unique opportunity created by the report to meaningfully advance the objectives of improving outcomes for sudden cardiac arrest. For decades, the AHA has focused on the goal of reducing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease though robust support of basic, translational, clinical, and population research. The AHA also has developed a rigorous process using the best available evidence to develop scientific, advisory, and guideline documents. These core activities of development and dissemination of scientific evidence have served as the foundation for a broad range of advocacy initiatives and programs that serve as a foundation for advancing the AHA and IOM goal of improving cardiac arrest outcomes. In response to the call to action in the IOM report, the AHA is announcing 4 new commitments to increase cardiac arrest survival: (1) The AHA will provide up to $5 million in funding over 5 years to incentivize resuscitation data interoperability; (2) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support for local and regional implementation opportunities to increase cardiac arrest survival by improving out-of-hospital and in-hospital systems of care; (3) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support to launch an AHA resuscitation research network; and (4) the AHA will cosponsor a National Cardiac Arrest Summit to facilitate the creation of a national cardiac arrest collaborative that will unify the field and identify common goals to improve survival. In addition to the AHA's historic and ongoing commitment to improving cardiac arrest care and outcomes, these new initiatives are responsive to each of the IOM recommendations and demonstrate the AHA's leadership in the field. However, successful implementation of the IOM recommendations will require a timely

  20. Cardiac and blood pressure responses to mental stress in reactive hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannarale, G; Isea, J E; Coats, A J; Conway, J; Sleight, P

    1991-01-01

    To study the haemodynamic response to a standardized mental stress, we measured ascending aorta velocity using Doppler ultrasonography in 20 reactive ("white-coat") hypertensives and 20 age and sex matched normal controls (NC) familiar with the hospital setting. Reactive hypertensives (RH) had 3 office diastolic BP recordings between 90-110 mmHg and ambulatory BP less than 140/90 mmHg. The cardiac response to mental arithmetic was greater in RH than NC (minute distance, RH: +36.7 +/- 40.2% vs NC: +10.3 +/- 19%, p less than 0.05; peak velocity, RH: +8.4 +/- 16.5% vs NC: -1.4 +/- 11.9%, p less than 0.05), and there was a different peripheral resistance response (RH: -12.2 +/- 24.2% vs NC: +6.5 +/- 22%, p less than 0.05). We suggest that subjects with reactive hypertension have a strong cardiac response to mental stress and this could be a characteristic of this condition. PMID:2022068

  1. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    2016-01-01

    brain regions mediating postural and motoric actions, including respiration and cardiac output. The study of pathological processes associated with autonomic disruption shows susceptibilities of different brain structures to altered timing of neural function, notably in sleep disordered breathing, such as obstructive sleep apnea and congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. The cerebellum, in particular, serves coordination roles for vestibular stimuli and blood pressure changes, and shows both injury and substantially altered timing of responses to pressor challenges in sleep-disordered breathing conditions. The insights into central autonomic processing provided by

  2. Cardiovascular responses from immersion at recovery phase of the cardiac rehabilitation protocol - doi:10.5020/18061230.2011.p123

    OpenAIRE

    Jaqueline Vieira Sales; Heleno Carneiro Rolim de Moraes; Framartinho Carlos Silva Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the cardiovascular responses from immersion at recovery phase of the cardiac rehabilitation protocol. Methods: This was an interventional, descriptive and prospective study with quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 20 patients with diagnoses of heart disease and hypertension with Functional Classification of Heart Failure from the New York Heart Association (NYHA), which have remained clinically stable and participating in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Prog...

  3. Procalcitonin for the differential diagnosis of infectious and non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome after cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Dong; Zhou, Jianxin; Haraguchi, Go; Arai, Hirokuni; Mitaka, Chieko

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was performed to assess the value of procalcitonin (PCT) for the differential diagnosis between infectious and non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after cardiac surgery. Methods Patients diagnosed with SIRS after cardiac surgery between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2013 were retrospectively studied. A total of 142 patients with SIRS, infectious (n = 47) or non-infectious (n = 95), were included. The patients with infectious SIRS included 11 with ...

  4. Plasma tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1): an independent predictor of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tolosana, Jose María; Mont, Lluís; Sitges, Marta; Berruezo, Antonio; Delgado, Victoria; Vidal, Bàrbara; Tamborero, David; Morales, Manel; Batlle, Montserrat; Roig, Eulalia; Castel, M. Angeles; Pérez-Villa, Félix; Godoy, Miguel; Brugada, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Aims Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) play a role in left ventricular structural remodelling. The aim of our study was to analyse MMP-2 and TIMP-1 levels as predictors of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods and results A cohort of 42 CRT patients from our centre was prospectively evaluated at baseline and after 12-month follow-up. MMP-2 and TIMP-1 assays were performed prior to CRT implant. Cardiac resynchronization therapy res...

  5. Particles Alter Diesel Exhaust Gases-Induced Hypotension, Cardiac Arrhythmia,Conduction Disturbance, and Autonomic Imbalance in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that acute exposures to vehicular traffic and particulate matter (PM) air pollution are key causes of fatal cardiac arrhythmia, especially in those with preexisting cardiovascular disease. Researchers point to electrophysiologic dysfunction and auto...

  6. Study on the correlation of the autonomic nervous system responses to a stressor of high discomfort with personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, J; Ducharme, M B; Thompson, M

    2004-09-30

    The present study investigated Eysenck's predictions concerning the correlation of personality to arousal at higher levels of stress. Twenty young adults were exposed to a physical stress causing great discomfort, specifically a cold wind (4 degrees C at 60 km/h) exposure to the face for 3 min. Autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses were measured by continuous heart rate and plasma catecholamine determinations before, during and after the test. At the end of the test, the participants gave a rating of discomfort on a 0 to 10 scale. The personality traits were assessed with the Big-Five Inventory test (BFI). Results indicated that higher levels of trait extraversion were positively correlated with discomfort ratings and with the increased heart rate and the noradrenaline responses. Neuroticism was negatively correlated to discomfort and the autonomic responses. These findings tend to support Eysenck's theory on the role of personality on arousal at higher levels of stress. It is also proposed that the better tolerance to this severe stress observed with neuroticism is correlated to a certain habituation process caused by light to moderate arousal frequently experienced by participants with this personality trait during their daily activities. PMID:15327912

  7. Primary Sjögrens syndrome is associated with impaired autonomic response to orthostasis and sympathetic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, W.-F.; Stangroom, A.J.; Davidson, A.; Wilton, K.; Mitchell, S.; Newton, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Symptoms in keeping with autonomic dysfunction are commonly described by primary Sjögrens syndrome patients (pSS); whether objective abnormalities of autonomic function occur is unclear. This study set out to explore dynamic cardiovascular autonomic responses in pSS and their relationship with symptoms and quality of life. Methods: Twenty-one people from the UK pSS registry, 21 community controls and 21 patients with the autoimmune liver disease primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) (matched case-wise for age and sex) attended for assessment of autonomic responses to orthostasis and Valsalva manoeuvre (VM). pSS patients also completed EULAR Sjögrens Syndrome patient-reported index (ESSPRI), EULAR Sjögren’s syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI), fatigue impact scale and EURO-QOL 5-dimension (EQ-5D). Results: Compared with controls, pSS patients had significantly lower baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) (114 ± 13 vs. 127 ± 20; P = 0.02), which dropped to a significantly lower value (98 ± 22 vs. 119 ± 24, P = 0.009). When area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for when the SBP was below baseline this was significantly greater in pSS compared to both control groups (pSS vs. control vs. PBC: 153 ± 236 vs. 92 ± 85 vs. 1.2 ± 0.3, P = 0.005). Peak phase IV SBP during the VM was significantly lower in pSS (P = 0.007) indicating early sympathetic failure. Increased heart rate associated with fatigue (P = 0.02; r2 = 0.2) and EQ-5D. A shift in sympathetic-vagal balance associated with overall symptom burden (ESSPRI) (P = 0.04, r2 = 0.3) and EULAR sicca score (P = 0.016; r2 = 0.3), the latter also correlated with baroreceptor effectiveness (P = 0.03; r2 = 0.2) and diastolic blood pressure variability (P = 0.003; r2 = 0.4). Conclusion: pSS patients have impaired blood pressure response to standing. Dysautonomia correlates with PSS-associated symptoms and quality of life. PMID:22976617

  8. Perinatal taurine exposure programs patterns of autonomic nerve activity responses to tooth pulp stimulation in adult male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimsuksri, Sawita; Wyss, J. Michael; Thaeomor, Atcharaporn; Paphangkorakit, Jarin; Jirakulsomchok, Dusit; Roysommuti, Sanya

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal taurine excess or deficit influences adult health and disease, especially relative to the autonomic nervous system. This study tests the hypothesis that perinatal taurine exposure influences adult autonomic nervous system control of arterial pressure in response to acute electrical tooth pulp stimulation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed normal rat chow with 3% β-alanine (taurine depletion, TD), 3% taurine (taurine supplementation, TS) or water alone (control, C) from conception to weaning. Their male offspring were fed normal rat chow and tap water throughout the experiment. At 8–10 weeks of age, blood chemistry, arterial pressure, heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity were measured in anesthetized rats. Age, body weight, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, plasma electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine and plasma cortisol were not significantly different among the three groups. Before tooth pulp stimulation, low (0.3–0.5 Hz) and high frequency (0.5–4.0 Hz) power spectral densities of arterial pressure were not significantly different among groups, while the power spectral densities of renal sympathetic nerve activity were significantly decreased in TD compared to control rats. Tooth pulp stimulation did not change arterial pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve and arterial pressure power spectral densities in the 0.3–4.0 Hz spectrum or renal sympathetic nerve firing rate in any group. In contrast, perinatal taurine imbalance disturbed very low frequency power spectral densities of both arterial pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity (below 0.1 Hz), both before and after the tooth pulp stimulation. The power densities of TS were most sensitive to ganglionic blockade and central adrenergic inhibition, while those of TD were sensitive to both central and peripheral adrenergic inhibition. The present data indicate that perinatal taurine imbalance can lead to aberrant autonomic nervous system responses in

  9. Cardiac and Vascular Responses to Thigh Cuffs and Respiratory Maneuvers on Crewmembers of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen; Ebert, Douglas; Whitson, Peggy A.; Feiveson, Alan; Alferova, Irina V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, and a decrease in leg diameter. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (ECHO) in a baseline steady state and during preload reduction introduced with thigh occlusion cuffs used as a counter-measure device (Braslet cuffs) measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations. Methods: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 +/- 46.days after launch (mean +/- SD; 33 - 185). Twenty Seven cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained with/without respiratory maneuvers before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs. Results: Non-physicians performed diagnostic-quality cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations using remote guidance. Three of 27 combinations of maneuvers and Braslet or Braslet alone were identified as being significant changed when compared to baseline. Eleven of 81 differences between combinations of Mueller, Valsalva or baseline were significant and related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in lower extremity venous volume. Conclusions: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts commensurate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques to measure the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an invaluable tool in determining the volume status of the cardiac patient at the 'microgravity bedside'.

  10. Mom feels what her child feels: thermal signatures of vicarious autonomic response while watching children in a stressful situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eManini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Maternal attunement with an infant's emotional states is thought to represent a distinctive feature of the human primary bond. It implies the mother’s ability of empathizing with her child in order to fulfil the child’s needs in an immediate and appropriate manner. Thus, it is particularly involved in stressful situations. By assuming that maternal attunement embodies a direct sharing of physiological responses with the child, we compared the autonomic response of mothers observing their own distressed child with those of other women observing an unknown child involved in an ecological distressful condition (mishap paradigm. The hypothesis was that the adult’s response was more attuned with the child’s response in the former group than in the latter group. The autonomic response was non-invasively evaluated through the recording of the thermal facial imprints by means of thermal infrared (IR imaging. Nine mother-child dyads and nine woman-unknown child dyads were studied. We found marked similarities between the facial temperature dynamics of women and children along the experimental procedure, thus providing evidence for a direct emotional sharing within the adult-child dyad. The evidence for common dynamics in the time course of the temperatures was assessed through correlation analysis and, nevertheless, resulted stronger in the mother-child dyads than in the other women–child dyads. In addition, temporal analysis showed a faster response in mothers than in other women, thus confirming our study hypothesis. Besides confirming the extraordinary capability of thermal infrared imaging to preserve ecological context in the study of social or non-verbal interactions, these results suggest that maternity appears to potentiate the emotional attunement with the child. Although based on preliminary results, this study opens new perspectives in the study of the factors modulating vicarious socio-emotional processes.

  11. Impact of early detection and treatment of diabetes on the 6-year prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in people with screen-detected diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, Morten; Fleischer, J; Witte, Daniel Rinse;

    2013-01-01

    ADDITION Danmark undersøgte vi effekten af tidlig opsporing og efterfølgende intensive behandling af type 2 diabetes i almen praksis på hyppigheden af kardiel autonom neuropati 6 år efter diagnose. Resultater: Prævalensen af tidlig KAN var 15,1% i rutine behandlingsgruppen (RG) og 15.5% i intensive...

  12. BRN 3.1 Knockouts Affect the Vestibular, Autonomic, and Circadian Rhythm Responses to 2G Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, D. M.; Erkman, L.; Rosenfeld, M. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that 2G exposure via centrifugation significantly attenuated the daily mean and circadian rhythm amplitude of rat body temperature (Tb), heart rate, and activity (Act). In addition, 2G exposure activates neural responses in several vestibular, autonomic, and circadian nuclei. Although we have characterized the effect of 2G on an animal's physiological, neuronal, and behavioral responses, it will be important to understand the underlying neural and physiological mechanisms that mediate those responses. For example, the vestibular responses, proprioceptive feedback, or fluid shifts may be the critical factors that mediate the responses to 2G. As a first step to understand the relative importance of these different response pathways to altered gravitational fields, this study examined the contribution of the vestibular system by utilizing an animal model from molecular biology. Brain 3.1 (Bm 3.1) is a POU domain homeobox gene involved in the normal development of the vestibular and auditory system. Brn 3.1 deletion results in a loss of hair cells in the otoliths, semicircular canals, and cochlea. As a result mice with a Brn 3.1 deletion do not have a functioning vestibular or auditory system. The BRN 3.1 knockout mouse could be a very useful animal model for isolating the role of the vestibular system in mediating the physiological responses to 2G exposure. Therefore, this study compared the effect of 2G exposure via centrifugation between Brn 3.1 knockout (KO) versus Wildtype (W) mice.

  13. Vasopressin, renin, and cortisol responses to hemorrhage during acute blockade of cardiac nerves in conscious dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) on the increases in plasma renin activity (PRA), arginine vasopressin (AVP), and cortisol in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage was determined in conscious dogs (n = 9). Procaine was infused into the pericardial space to produce acute reversible CNB, or saline was infused in the control hemorrhage. Blood was removed from the inferior vena cava at a rate of 1 ml.kg-1.min-1. In the control hemorrhage, plasma AVP increased from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 219 +/- 66 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.63 +/- 0.20 to 3.08 +/- 0.91 ng angiotensin I (ANG I).ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.4 +/- 0.2 to 4.0 +/- 0.7 micrograms/dl. When the hemorrhage was repeated during acute CNB, plasma AVP increased from 2.8 +/- 1.6 to 185 +/- 59 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.44 +/- 0.14 to 2.24 +/- 0.27 ng ANG I.ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 5.4 +/- 0.6 micrograms/dl, and none of the increases differed significantly from the responses during the control hemorrhage. Left atrial pressure fell significantly after removal of 6 ml/kg of blood, but mean arterial pressure was maintained at control levels until blood loss reached 20 ml/kg during pericardial infusion of either saline or procaine. The declines in MAP at the 30 ml/kg level of hemorrhage in both treatments were similar. These results demonstrate that acutely blocking input from cardiac receptors does not reduce the increases in plasma AVP, cortisol, and PRA in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that input from cardiac receptors is required for a normal AVP response to hemorrhage and suggest that other receptors, presumably arterial baroreceptors, can stimulate AVP and cortisol secretion in the absence of signals from the heart.

  14. Agent, autonomous

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Annie

    2007-01-01

    The expression autonomous agents, widely used in virtual reality, computer graphics, artificial intelligence and artificial life, corresponds to the simulation of autonomous creatures, virtual (i.e. totally computed by a program), or embodied in a physical envelope, as done in autonomous robots.

  15. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren;

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  16. The Impact of Autonomic Dysreflexia on Blood Flow and Skin Response in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Ramella-Roman

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic dysreflexia (AD is an inappropriate response of the sympathetic nervous system that commonly occurs when individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI, at or above the sixth thoracic (T6 vertebra, are subjected to a noxious stimulus below the level of injury. An AD event can be put into motion by something as simple as an ingrown toenail or a full bladder, with symptoms ranging from headache, high blood pressure, and even stroke. We have characterized the onset of AD and resulting autonomic events in an individual with SCI using a fiberoptic-based probe. Two probes were located above and below the injury level, on the subjects forearm and thigh, respectively, and were connected to a dual channel spectrophotometer. Oxygen saturation was calculated using the reflectance spectra and an algorithm based on melanin and hemoglobin absorption. We noticed that during an AD event the amount of oxygen in the skin below the injury level dropped by as much as 40%, while above the injury level, skin oxygenation remained constant. In addition, we found that the level of skin perspiration below the level of injury increased significantly. We hypothesize that the combination of AD-related ischemia with pressure-related ischemia and increased perspiration places individuals with spinal cord injury level at T6 or above at an elevated risk for developing a pressure sore below the injury site.

  17. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response: An analysis of the classic papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J; Brignole, Michele; Nielsen, Henning B; Stewart, Julian; Sutton, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important to understand that when blood pressure (BP) is falling, SVR and CO do not change reciprocally as they do in the steady state. In 1932, Lewis, assuming that decreased SVR alone accounted for hypotension, defined "the vasovagal response" along pathophysiologic lines to denote the association of vasodilation with vagal-induced bradycardia in simple faint. Studies performed by Barcroft and Sharpey-Schafer between 1940 and 1950 used volume-based plethysmography to demonstrate major forearm vasodilation during extreme hypotension and concluded that the main mechanism for hypotension was vasodilation. Plethysmographic measurements were intermittent and not frequent enough to capture rapid changes in blood flow during progressive hypotension. However, later investigations by Weissler, Murray, and Stevens performed between 1950 and 1970 used invasive beat-to-beat BP measurements and more frequent measurements of CO using the Fick principle. They demonstrated that CO significantly fell before syncope, and little vasodilation occurred until very late in the vasovagal reaction Thus, since the 1970s, decreasing cardiac output rather than vasodilation has been regarded as the principal mechanism for the hypotension of vasovagal syncope. PMID:26598322

  18. Sex-related differences in the normal cardiac response to upright exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous studies from this laboratory, it was found that approximately 30% of women with chest pain and normal coronary arteries demonstrated either a decrease in or a failure to increase radionuclide ejection fraction during exercise. To examine the hypothesis that this apparent abnormality in left ventricular function represents a physiologic difference between men and women, a prospective study was made of central and peripheral cardiovascular responses to exercise in 31 age-matched healthy volunteers (16 women and 15 men). A combination of quantitative radionuclide (technetium) angiography and expired-gas analysis was used to measure ejection fraction and relative changes in end-diastolic counts, stroke counts, count output, and arteriovenous oxygen difference during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. Normal male and female volunteers demonstrated comparable baseline left ventricular function and similar aerobic capacity, as determined by weight-adjusted peak oxygen consumption. However, their cardiac responses to exercise were significantly different. The ejection fraction increased by 5 points or more in 14 of 15 men, but in only seven of the 16 women. End-diastolic counts increased by 30% in women, but was unchanged in men. Because decreases in ejection fraction were matched by increases in end-diastolic counts, relative increases in stroke counts and count output were the same for men and women. These data demonstrate a basic difference between men and women with respect to the mechanism by which they achieve a normal response of stroke volume to exercise; these differences must be taken into account when measurements of cardiac function during exercise stress are used for diagnostic purposes

  19. SIRT Is Required for EDP-Mediated Protective Responses toward Hypoxia–Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L.; Fedotov, Ilia; Endo, Tomoko; Seubert, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia–reoxygenation (H/R) injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex, and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s) protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways. PMID:27242531

  20. EEG and autonomic responses during performance of matching and non-matching to sample working memory tasks with emotional content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Garcia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Working memory (WM is a neural system responsible for the temporary storage of information and its utilization in problem solving. The central executive is theorized as the controller of storage functions that support WM. Neurophysiological data suggest that EEG theta and alpha oscillations in frontal and midline regions are involved in neural communication between the central executive and storage functions during WM performance. Emotion is known to modulate several memory systems, including WM, through central and peripheral pathways. However, the physiological correlations (electroencephalographic – EEG; autonomic nervous activity of the effect of emotion over WM are not well described. In this study we aimed to identify physiological responses related to emotional WM performance. EEG (21 channels, heart rate (HR and galvanic skin response (GSR recordings were obtained from 54 volunteers while performing delayed matching and non-matching to sample tasks (DMTS/DNMTS. Emotional and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System and geometric figures were used as stimuli. As expected, WM performance was accompanied by presence of theta (frontal and midline electrodes and Alpha power (parietal electrodes. Beta and gamma oscillations were concentrated in frontopolar and left temporal regions. DNMTS task was accompanied by increases in Beta power, HR and GSR compared to DMTS task. Correlation analysis showed a positive tendency for gamma in Fp2 site, ratio of LF/HF (HR low and high frequency and skin conductance in both tasks. The HR results indicate an inverse reaction related to parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system during the performance of the tasks. Taken together, our results contribute to elucidate the complex interactions between central and autonomic nervous systems in the modulation of emotional WM tasks.

  1. Cardiovascular responses from immersion at recovery phase of the cardiac rehabilitation protocol - doi:10.5020/18061230.2011.p123

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Vieira Sales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the cardiovascular responses from immersion at recovery phase of the cardiac rehabilitation protocol. Methods: This was an interventional, descriptive and prospective study with quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 20 patients with diagnoses of heart disease and hypertension with Functional Classification of Heart Failure from the New York Heart Association (NYHA, which have remained clinically stable and participating in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program of Fortaleza University. The variables heart rate, blood pressure, saturation and dyspnea were investigated, being verified at rest, post-exercise and post-immersion. Data collection occurred over three sessions, with one week interval. Results: There was a significant response in heart rate and dyspnea, after application of immersion in the recovery phase (p 0.05. Conclusion: There were no clinical consequences resulting from the method used, showing significant improvements in symptoms, with adherence to the cardiac rehabilitation program after inclusion of immersion as a therapeutic complement.

  2. Standardization of a computerized method for calculating autonomic function test responses in healthy subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neumann

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were 1 to compare results obtained by the traditional manual method of measuring heart rate (HR and heart rate response (HRR to the Valsalva maneuver, standing and deep breathing, with those obtained using a computerized data analysis system attached to a standard electrocardiograph machine; 2 to standardize the responses of healthy subjects to cardiovascular tests, and 3 to evaluate the response to these tests in a group of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. In all subjects (97 healthy and 143 with DM we evaluated HRR to deep breathing, HRR to standing, HRR to the Valsalva maneuver, and blood pressure response (BPR to standing up and to a sustained handgrip. Since there was a strong positive correlation between the results obtained with the computerized method and the traditional method, we conclude that the new method can replace the traditional manual method for evaluating cardiovascular responses with the advantages of speed and objectivity. HRR and BPR of men and women did not differ. A correlation between age and HRR was observed for standing (r = -0.48, P<0.001 and deep breathing (r = -0.41, P<0.002. Abnormal BPR to standing was usually observed only in diabetic patients with definite and severe degrees of autonomic neuropathy.

  3. Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following exercise: implications for training prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jamie; Peake, Jonathan M; Buchheit, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The objective of exercise training is to initiate desirable physiological adaptations that ultimately enhance physical work capacity. Optimal training prescription requires an individualized approach, with an appropriate balance of training stimulus and recovery and optimal periodization. Recovery from exercise involves integrated physiological responses. The cardiovascular system plays a fundamental role in facilitating many of these responses, including thermoregulation and delivery/removal of nutrients and waste products. As a marker of cardiovascular recovery, cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following a training session is highly individualized. It appears to parallel the acute/intermediate recovery of the thermoregulatory and vascular systems, as described by the supercompensation theory. The physiological mechanisms underlying cardiac parasympathetic reactivation are not completely understood. However, changes in cardiac autonomic activity may provide a proxy measure of the changes in autonomic input into organs and (by default) the blood flow requirements to restore homeostasis. Metaboreflex stimulation (e.g. muscle and blood acidosis) is likely a key determinant of parasympathetic reactivation in the short term (0-90 min post-exercise), whereas baroreflex stimulation (e.g. exercise-induced changes in plasma volume) probably mediates parasympathetic reactivation in the intermediate term (1-48 h post-exercise). Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation does not appear to coincide with the recovery of all physiological systems (e.g. energy stores or the neuromuscular system). However, this may reflect the limited data currently available on parasympathetic reactivation following strength/resistance-based exercise of variable intensity. In this review, we quantitatively analyse post-exercise cardiac parasympathetic reactivation in athletes and healthy individuals following aerobic exercise, with respect to exercise intensity and duration, and fitness

  4. A Comparative Study of Gender Differences in Age Associated Changes in Autonomic Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran D Thorat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is much clinical evidence to suggest that cardiovascular functions vary both in males and females and the activity of autonomic nervous system varies with age and gender. The cardiovascular responses of blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate and other variables to change in posture differ between the sexes. This study evaluated the gender differences in age-associated changes in cardiac sympathetic activity. This was a prospective study with the Primary Data which was collected from Pravara Rural Hospital Loni, Maharashtra, India. Total 80 completely healthy male and female subjects were selected for the study and divided into three groups according to their age. All the subjects were evaluated using CANWIN cardiac autonomic neuropathy analyzer; a windows based cardiac autonomic neuropathy analysis system with interpretation.Descriptive statistics was done using “unpaired t” test and one way ANOVA results were used to compare between the three study groups. Comparison of outcome parameters was calculated with significance test. This study suggests that gender differences exist in age-related changes in cardiac sympathetic activity. There is marked influence of age on sympathetic nervous system activation due to impaired sensitivity of baroreceptors in women than in men of the same age group

  5. An integrated stochastic multi-regional long-term energy planning model incorporating autonomous power systems and demand response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power sector faces a rapid transformation worldwide from a dominant fossil-fueled towards a low carbon electricity generation mix. Renewable energy technologies (RES) are steadily becoming a greater part of the global energy mix, in particular in regions that have put in place policies and measures to promote their utilization. This paper presents an optimization-based approach to address the generation expansion planning (GEP) problem of a large-scale, central power system in a highly uncertain and volatile electricity industry environment. A multi-regional, multi-period linear mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model is presented, combining optimization techniques with a Monte Carlo (MCA) method and demand response concepts. The optimization goal concerns the minimization of the total discounted cost by determining optimal power capacity additions per time interval and region, and the power generation mix per technology and time period. The model is evaluated on the Greek power system (GPS), taking also into consideration the scheduled interconnection of the mainland power system with those of selected autonomous islands (Cyclades and Crete), and aims at providing full insight into the composition of the long-term energy roadmap at a national level. - Highlights: • A spatial, multi-period, long-term generation expansion planning model is presented. • A Monte-Carlo method along with a demand response mechanism are incorporated. • Autonomous power systems interconnection is considered. • Electricity and CO2 emission trade are taken into account. • Lignite, natural gas and wind power comprise the dominant power technologies

  6. CARDIAC AND BEHAVIORAL-RESPONSES OF LONG-TERM OBESE AND LEAN ZUCKER RATS TO EMOTIONAL-STRESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NYAKAS, C; BALKAN, B; STEFFENS, AB; BOHUS, B

    1995-01-01

    Obesity is known as a risk factor in stress-related cardiovascular pathology in man. The length of obesity can be an important interacting variable. Therefore, cardiac and behavioral responses to emotional stress were studied in 1-year-old, genetically obese (fa/fa) and lean (Fa/-) male Zucker rats,

  7. Association between brain natriuretic peptide, markers of inflammation and the objective and subjective response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Versteeg, Henneke; Meine, Mathias;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can induce a decrease in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and systemic inflammation, which may be associated with CRT-response. However, the evidence is inconclusive. We examined levels of BNP and inflammatory markers from ...

  8. Autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using “PNEUMOCARD”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Funtova, I. I.; Diedrich, A.; Chernikova, A. G.; Drescher, J.; Baranov, V. M.; Tank, J.

    2009-10-01

    Investigations of blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during long term space flights on board the "ISS" have shown characteristic changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Therefore, alterations of the autonomic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for in- and post-flight disturbances. The device "Pneumocard" was developed to further investigate autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory function aboard the ISS. The hard-software diagnostic complex "Pneumocard" was used during in-flight experiment aboard ISS for autonomic function testing. ECG, photoplethysmography, respiration, transthoracic bioimpedance and seismocardiography were assessed in one male cosmonaut (flight lengths six month). Recordings were made prior to the flight, late during flight, and post-flight during spontaneous respiration and controlled respiration at different rates. HR remained stable during flight. The values were comparable to supine measurements on earth. Respiratory frequency and blood pressure decreased during flight. Post flight HR and BP values increased compared to in-flight data exceeding pre-flight values. Cardiac time intervals did not change dramatically during flight. Pulse wave transit time decreased during flight. The maximum of the first time derivative of the impedance cardiogram, which is highly correlated with stroke volume was not reduced in-flight. Our results demonstrate that autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using "Pneumocard" is feasible and generates data of good quality. Despite the decrease in BP, pulse wave transit time was found reduced in space as shown earlier. However, cardiac output did not decrease profoundly in the investigated cosmonaut. Autonomic testing during space flight detects individual changes in cardiovascular control and may add important information to standard medical control. The recent plans to support a flight to Mars, makes these kinds of observations all the more relevant

  9. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors......In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity of...

  10. Heart rate variability as important approach for assessment autonomic modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Maycon Jr Ferreira; Angelina Zanesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alterations in the heart rate recovery and heart rate variability have been associated with greater risk of mortality and early prognosis of cardiac diseases. Thus, strategies for assessing autonomic nervous system and its modulation to the heart are crucial for preventing cardiovascular events in healthy subjects as well as in cardiac patients. In this review, an update of studies examining heart rate variability (HRV) and its use as indicator of cardiac autonomic modulation will be...

  11. Differential response of rat cardiac and skeletal muscle glycogen to glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, J L; Poland, J W; Honey, R N

    1982-05-01

    Though glucocorticoids were previously implicated in the support of myocardial glycogen supercompensation after exercise, it was unclear why skeletal muscle glycogen did not simultaneously supercompensate since it was also exposed to the exercise-induced glucocorticoid increases. The current study shows that glucocorticoids differentially affect cardiac and skeletal muscle glycogen. Following dexamethasone administration (400 micrograms i.p.) myocardial glycogen peaked at 6 h while glycogen in the soleus, red vastus lateralis, and white vastus lateralis increased more slowly and reached the highest values 17 h postinjection. Concurrently, blood glucose, insulin, and glucagon remained at control levels. Liver glycogen increased within 2 h and continued to rise with a peak value at 17 h. Plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels increased and remained high throughout the 26-h experimental period. High FFA levels inhibit glycogenolysis and thus could be partially responsible for glucocorticoid-induced glycogen increases. It is postulated that glycogen supercompensation does not readily occur in skeletal muscles after exercise because of the brevity of the corticosterone and FFA increases and the slowness of the skeletal muscle glycogen response to glucocorticoids. PMID:7104851

  12. Multi-Source Autonomous Response for Targeting and Monitoring of Volcanic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley G.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Tran, Daniel Q.

    2014-01-01

    ' inputs. The software framework uses multiple source languages and is a general framework for combining inputs and incrementally submitting observation requests/reconfigurations, accounting for prior requests. The autonomous aspect of operations is unique, especially in the context of the wide range of inputs that includes manually inputted electronic reports (such as the Air Force Weather Advisories), automated satellite-based detection methods (such as MODVOLC and GOESVOLC), and in situ sensor networks.

  13. Motivational processes and autonomic responsivity in Asperger's disorder: evidence from the Iowa Gambling Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shannon A; Yechiam, Eldad; Murphy, Robin R; Queller, Sarah; Stout, Julie C

    2006-09-01

    Asperger's disorder (ASP), like other autism spectrum disorders, is associated with altered responsiveness to social stimuli. This study investigated learning and responsiveness to nonsocial, but motivational, stimuli in ASP. We examined choice behavior and galvanic skin conductance responses (SCRs) during the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT; Bechara et al., 1994) in 15 adolescents and young adults with ASP and 14 comparison subjects. We examined aspects of learning, attention to wins and losses, and response style with a formal cognitive model, the Expectancy-Valence Learning model (Busemeyer & Stout, 2002). The ASP group did not differ from the comparison group in proportions of selections from advantageous decks. However, ASP participants showed a distinct pattern of selection characterized by frequent shifts between the four IGT decks, whereas comparison participants developed clear deck preferences. SCR results showed some evidence of reduced responsiveness in the ASP group during the IGT. Results from the cognitive model indicated that, in contrast to the comparison group, the ASP group's selections were less consistent with the motivational significance they assigned to decks. Findings are discussed in the context of the neurobiological substrates associated with IGT performance. PMID:16961948

  14. Sympathetic skin response: simple test for evaluation of autonomic function in patients with diabetes mellitus?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Srinivasa Jayachandra; Maxim Pinto; Urban J. A. D'Souza

    2005-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: We read with interest the excellent article by Huang YN et al.1 This important and carefully conducted study illustrates the sympathetic skin response (SSR) test can detect early dysfunction of the small sympathetic fibers in people affected by diabetes mellitus.

  15. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve integrity with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffel, David M. E-mail: raffel@umich.edu; Wieland, Donald M

    2001-07-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of cardiac function. Abnormalities of cardiac innervation have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many heart diseases, including sudden cardiac death and congestive heart failure. In an effort to provide clinicians with the ability to regionally map cardiac innervation, several radiotracers for imaging cardiac sympathetic neurons have been developed. This paper reviews the development of neuronal imaging agents and discusses their emerging role in the noninvasive assessment of cardiac sympathetic innervation.

  16. Obesity alters molecular and functional cardiac responses to ischemia/reperfusion and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Daniel J; Goodwill, Adam G; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Herring, B Paul; McClintick, Jeanette N; Tune, Johnathan D; Mather, Kieren J

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that obesity alters the cardiac response to ischemia/reperfusion and/or glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation, and that these differences are associated with alterations in the obese cardiac proteome and microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome. Ossabaw swine were fed normal chow or obesogenic diet for 6 months. Cardiac function was assessed at baseline, during a 30-minutes coronary occlusion, and during 2 hours of reperfusion in anesthetized swine treated with saline or exendin-4 for 24 hours. Cardiac biopsies were obtained from normal and ischemia/reperfusion territories. Fat-fed animals were heavier, and exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Plasma troponin-I concentration (index of myocardial injury) was increased following ischemia/reperfusion and decreased by exendin-4 treatment in both groups. Ischemia/reperfusion produced reductions in systolic pressure and stroke volume in lean swine. These indices were higher in obese hearts at baseline and relatively maintained throughout ischemia/reperfusion. Exendin-4 administration increased systolic pressure in lean swine but did not affect the blood pressure in obese swine. End-diastolic volume was reduced by exendin-4 following ischemia/reperfusion in obese swine. These divergent physiologic responses were associated with obesity-related differences in proteins related to myocardial structure/function (e.g. titin) and calcium handling (e.g. SERCA2a, histidine-rich Ca(2+) binding protein). Alterations in expression of cardiac miRs in obese hearts included miR-15, miR-27, miR-130, miR-181, and let-7. Taken together, these observations validate this discovery approach and reveal novel associations that suggest previously undiscovered mechanisms contributing to the effects of obesity on the heart and contributing to the actions of GLP-1 following ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:27234258

  17. Pupillary Light Reflexes are Associated with Autonomic Dysfunction in Bolivian Diabetics But Not Chagas Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Anthony; Pajuelo, Monica; Tornheim, Jeffrey A; Vu, Nancy; Carnero, Andrés M; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Camacho, Marilyn; Justiniano, Juan; Colanzi, Rony; Bowman, Natalie M; Morris, Tiffany; MacDougall, Hamish; Bern, Caryn; Moore, Steven T; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is common in Chagas disease and diabetes. Patients with either condition complicated by cardiac autonomic dysfunction face increased mortality, but no clinical predictors of autonomic dysfunction exist. Pupillary light reflexes (PLRs) may identify such patients early, allowing for intensified treatment. To evaluate the significance of PLRs, adults were recruited from the outpatient endocrine, cardiology, and surgical clinics at a Bolivian teaching hospital. After testing for Chagas disease and diabetes, participants completed conventional autonomic testing (CAT) evaluating their cardiovascular responses to Valsalva, deep breathing, and orthostatic changes. PLRs were measured using specially designed goggles, then CAT and PLRs were compared as measures of autonomic dysfunction. This study analyzed 163 adults, including 96 with Chagas disease, 35 patients with diabetes, and 32 controls. PLRs were not significantly different between Chagas disease patients and controls. Patients with diabetes had longer latency to onset of pupil constriction, slower maximum constriction velocities, and smaller orthostatic ratios than nonpatients with diabetes. PLRs correlated poorly with CAT results. A PLR-based clinical risk score demonstrated a 2.27-fold increased likelihood of diabetes complicated by autonomic dysfunction compared with the combination of blood tests, CAT, and PLRs (sensitivity 87.9%, specificity 61.3%). PLRs represent a promising tool for evaluating subclinical neuropathy in patients with diabetes without symptomatic autonomic dysfunction. Pupillometry does not have a role in the evaluation of Chagas disease patients. PMID:27044564

  18. Dorsomedial hypothalamus mediates autonomic, neuroendocrine, and locomotor responses evoked from the medial preoptic area

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Joseph L.; Zaretsky, Dmitry V.; Sarkar, Sumit; DiMicco, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that sympathetic responses evoked from the preoptic area in anesthetized rats require activation of neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus. Disinhibition of neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus in conscious rats produces physiological and behavioral changes resembling those evoked by microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist and neuronal inhibitor, into the medial preoptic area. We tested the hypothesis that all of these effects evoked from the medial p...

  19. The Brain Mechanisms Underlying the Perception of Pungent Taste of Capsaicin and the Subsequent Autonomic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Kawakami, Shinpei; Sato, Hajime; Akihiro T Sasaki; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Yoshida, Yumiko; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Sadato, Norihiro; Kang, Youngnam

    2016-01-01

    In a human fMRI study, it has been demonstrated that tasting and ingesting capsaicin activate the ventral part of the middle and posterior short gyri (M/PSG) of the insula which is known as the primary gustatory area, suggesting that capsaicin is recognized as a taste. Tasting and digesting spicy foods containing capsaicin induce various physiological responses such as perspiration from face, salivation, and facilitation of cardiovascular activity, which are thought to be caused through visce...

  20. Behavioural, brain and cardiac responses to hypobaric hypoxia in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica E; Christensen, Karen; Vizzier-Thaxton, Yvonne; Mitchell, Malcolm A; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2016-09-01

    around 60s into LAPS when heart rate levelled off. There was a good correlation between behavioural, EEG and cardiac measures in relation to loss of consciousness which collectively provide a loss of consciousness estimate of around 60s. There were some effects of temperature adjusted pressure curves on behavioural latencies and ECG responses, but in general responses were consistent and very similar to those reported in previous research on controlled atmosphere stunning with inert gases. The results suggest that the process is humane (slaughter without avoidable fear, anxiety, pain, suffering and distress). In particular, the maintenance of slow wave EEG patterns in the early part of LAPS (while birds are still conscious) is strongly suggestive that LAPS is non-aversive, since we would expect this to be interrupted by pain or discomfort. PMID:27117817

  1. Ensuring 3es and Responsiveness in the Delivery of Educational Services in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapia Moalam Abdulrachman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM is a public organization in the Philippines located in between the national government and the local governments. It performs unique functions quite distinct from other public organizations in the coun-try, as it performs both political and administrative functions. Using unobtrusive research design, as it relies on mostly secondary data, this paper analyzes the educational system in the region and proposes strategies in attaining administrative efficiency, economy, effectiveness and responsiveness. The paper starts with the introduction which consist of the background and statement of the problem. It is followed by a review of theoretical perspective and then by the research methodology. The fourth part portrays the findings of the study which include: DepEd ARMM resources; the management of DepEd ARMM, and the management outputs such as: net enrollment ratio, achievement rate and literacy rate. The fifth part of the paper deals with the analyses and conclusion. The paper concludes that in addition to certain structural innovation, inculcation of appropriate work ethics in accordance with the Ethi-cal Standards Act, the Anti-Corruption Law, the Civil Service Rules and Regulations as well as the Islamic Practices on Employment must be enshrined in the reform agenda. Finally, among other things that could facilitate the attainment of 3Es and R in the delivery of educational services is a strategy that requires the joint collaboration and teamwork between the civil society, non-government organizations and government organizations in the region.

  2. Evaluating Autonomic Parameters: The Role of ‎Sleep ‎Duration in Emotional Responses to Music ‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Goshvarpour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It has been recognized that sleep has an important effect on emotion processing. The aim ‎of this study was to investigate the effect of previous night sleep duration on autonomicresponses to musical stimuli in different emotional contexts.‎Method: A frequency based measure of GSR, PR and ECG signals were examined in 35 healthy ‎students in three groups of oversleeping, lack of sleep and normal sleep. ‎Results: The results of this study revealed that regardless of the emotional context of the musical ‎stimuli (happy, relax, fear, and sadness, there was an increase in the maximum power of ‎GSR, ECG and PR during the music time compared to the rest time in all the three ‎groups. In addition, the higher value of these measures was achieved while the ‎participants listened to relaxing music. Statistical analysis of the extracted features ‎between each pair of emotional states revealed that the most significant differences ‎were attained for ECG signals. These differences were more obvious in the participants ‎with normal sleeping (p<10-18. The higher value of the indices has been shown, ‎comparing long sleep duration with the normal one.‎Conclusion: There was a strong relation between emotion and sleep duration, and this association can ‎be observed by means of the ECG signals.‎ 

  3. Subarachnoid clonidine and trauma response in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gissi da Rocha Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The intense trauma response triggered by cardiopulmonary bypass can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The present study evaluated whether clonidine, a drug of the class of α-2 agonists, administered by spinal route, without association with local anesthetics or opioids, reduces this response in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Method: A total of 27 patients between 18 and 75 years old, divided by non-blinded fashion into a control group (15 and a clonidine group (12, were studied. All patients underwent identical technique of general anesthesia. Then, only the clonidine group received 1 μg kg−1 clonidine by spinal route. Levels of blood glucose, lactate and cortisol were measured at three consecutive times: T1, at the time of installation of invasive arterial pressure; T2, 10 min after the first dose for cardioplegia; and T3, at the time of skin suture; and troponin I values at T1 and T3. The variation of results between T2-T1, T3-T2, and T3-T1 was also evaluated. Results: There was a statistically significant difference only with respect to the variation in blood glucose in the clonidine group: T3-T2, p = 0.027 and T3-T1, p = 0.047. Conclusions: Spinal clonidine at a dose of 1 μg kg−1 did not decrease blood measurements of troponin, cortisol, or lactate. Blood glucose suffered a more moderate variation during the procedure in the clonidine group. This fact, already reported in the literature, requires further investigation to be clarified.

  4. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa Toshio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (2 and very high-density (≥10,000/km2 areas, the mean call-response intervals were 9.3 and 6.2 minutes, 1-month survival rates were 5.4% and 9.1%, and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rates were 2.7% and 4.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, cause of arrest, first aid by bystander and the proportion of neighborhood elderly people ≥65 yrs, patients in very high-density areas had a significantly higher survival rate (odds ratio (OR, 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.44 - 1.87; p Conclusion Living in a low-density area was associated with an independent risk of delay in ambulance response, and a low survival rate in cases of OHCA. Distribution of EMS centers according to population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas.

  5. Multiparameter Predictor of Fluid Responsiveness in Cardiac Surgical Patients Receiving Tidal Volumes Less Than 10 mL/kg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Keita; Smith, Gregory; Renehan, John; Isbell, James; McMurry, Timothy; Rosner, Mitchell; Thiele, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Introduction We hypothesize that respiratory variation in the pulmonary artery tracing predicts fluid responsiveness (primary hypothesis) and that inclusion of multiple physiologic waveforms as well as ventilator settings in a predictive model of fluid responsiveness would lead to improvements in the clinical utility of this class of metrics (secondary hypothesis). Methods Blood pressure tracings were prospectively recorded in 35 patients immediately following cardiac surgery. Fluid bolus administration data, ventilator settings, and cardiac output were recorded prospectively before and after fluid boluses given at the discretion of the treating physician. Results We observed statistically significant but limited relationships between pulmonic (r(2) = .26, P = .0052) and systemic (r(2) = .13, P = .011) pulse pressure variation and changes in cardiac index. A multiparameter estimate of fluid responsiveness, which included respiratory variation in central venous pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, indexed tidal volumes, positive end-expiratory pressure, and mean airway pressure, was also correlated with change in cardiac index (r(2) = .42, P = .0056). Using the area under the curve (AUC) technique to compare specificity and sensitivity, dynamic indicators (AUC = 0.74, 0.67, and 0.81 for systemic arterial respiratory [pulse pressure] variation, pulmonic arterial respiratory [pulse pressure] variation, and the multiparameter estimate, respectively) outperformed static estimates (0.49 and 0.48 for central venous pressure and pulmonary artery diastolic pressure, respectively). Conclusion While integration of multiple physiologic waveforms as well as ventilator parameters improves the predictability of fluid responsive metrics in the setting of lung-protective ventilation, the composite index may still be of limited predictive value. PMID:27317553

  6. Hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation performed with video and direct laryngoscopy in patients scheduled for major cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkılar, Gamze; Sargın, Mehmet; Sarıtaş, Tuba Berra; Borazan, Hale; Gök, Funda; Kılıçaslan, Alper; Otelcioğlu, Şeref

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to compare the hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation performed with direct and video laryngoscope in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery and to assess the airway and laryngoscopic characteristics. One hundred ten patients were equally allocated to either direct Macintosh laryngoscope (n = 55) or indirect Macintosh C-MAC video laryngoscope (n = 55). Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded prior to induction anesthesia, and imm...

  7. Prevention by NMDA receptor antagonists of the centrally-evoked increases of cardiac inotropic responses in rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Monassier, L.; Tibiriça, E.; Roegel, J. C.; Mettauer, B.; Feldman, J.; Bousquet, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate further the role of the excitatory amino acid (EAA) system of neurotransmission, particularly of the NMDA receptor, in the central regulation of cardiac function. 2. Electrical stimulation of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in pentobarbitone anaesthetized rabbits induced a cardiovascular response mainly characterized by a positive inotropic effect, hypertension and a marked increase in the myocardial oxygen demand index. 3....

  8. Illusory ownership of an invisible body reduces autonomic and subjective social anxiety responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterstam, Arvid; Abdulkarim, Zakaryah; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2015-01-01

    What is it like to be invisible? This question has long fascinated man and has been the central theme of many classic literary works. Recent advances in materials science suggest that invisibility cloaking of the human body may be possible in the not-so-distant future. However, it remains unknown how invisibility affects body perception and embodied cognition. To address these questions, we developed a perceptual illusion of having an entire invisible body. Through a series of experiments, we characterized the multisensory rules that govern the elicitation of the illusion and show that the experience of having an invisible body reduces the social anxiety response to standing in front of an audience. This study provides an experimental model of what it is like to be invisible and shows that this experience affects bodily self-perception and social cognition. PMID:25906330

  9. ErbB4 localization to cardiac myocyte nuclei, and its role in myocyte DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icli, Basak [Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Bharti, Ajit [Center of Molecular Stress Response Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute, Department of Medicine, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Pentassuglia, Laura; Peng, Xuyang [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Sawyer, Douglas B., E-mail: douglas.b.sawyer@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ErbB4 localizes to cardiac myocyte nuclei as a full-length receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myocytes express predominantly JM-a/CYT-1 ErbB4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocyte p53 activation in response to doxorubicin requires ErbB4 activity. -- Abstract: The intracellular domain of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase is known to translocate to the nucleus of cells where it can regulate p53 transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ErbB4 can localize to the nucleus of adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM), and regulate p53 in these cells. We demonstrate that ErbB4 does locate to the nucleus of cardiac myocytes as a full-length protein, although nuclear location occurs as a full-length protein that does not require Protein Kinase C or {gamma}-secretase activity. Consistent with this we found that only the non-cleavable JM-b isoform of ErbB4 is expressed in ARVM. Doxorubicin was used to examine ErbB4 role in regulation of a DNA damage response in ARVM. Doxorubicin induced p53 and p21 was suppressed by treatment with AG1478, an EGFR and ErbB4 kinase inhibitor, or suppression of ErbB4 expression with small interfering RNA. Thus ErbB4 localizes to the nucleus as a full-length protein, and plays a role in the DNA damage response induced by doxorubicin in cardiac myocytes.

  10. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  11. Successful reduction of intraventricular asynchrony is associated with superior response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreger Henryk

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is generally associated with a low to moderate increase of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. In some patients, however, LVEF improves remarkably and reaches near-normal values. The aim of the present study was to further characterize these so called 'super-responders' with a special focus on the extent of intra- and interventricular asynchrony before and after device implantation compared to average responders. Methods 37 consecutive patients who underwent CRT device implantation according to current guidelines were included in the study. Patients were examined by echocardiography before, one day after and six months after device implantation. Pre-defined criterion for superior response to CRT was an LVEF increase > 15% after six months. Results At follow-up, eight patients (21.6% were identified as super-responders. There were no significant differences regarding age, gender, prevalence of ischemic heart disease and LVEF between average and super-responders at baseline. After six months, LVEF had significantly increased from 26.7% ± 5.7% to 33.1% ± 7.9% (p p p = 0.713. CRT significantly reduced the IVMD to 20.3 ± 15.7 (p p = 0.013 in super-responders with no difference between both groups (p = 0.858. As a marker for intraventricular asynchrony, we assessed the longest intraventricular delay between six basal LV segments. At baseline, there was no difference between average (86.2 ± 30.5 ms and super-responders (78.8 ± 23.6 ms, p = 0.528. CRT significantly reduced the longest intraventricular delay in both groups - with a significant difference between average (66.2 ± 36.2 ms and super-responders (32.5 ± 18.3 ms, p = 0.022. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the longest intraventricular delay one day after device implantation as an independent predictor of superior response to CRT (p = 0.038. Conclusions A significant reduction of the longest

  12. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  13. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S., E-mail: knordgre@d.umn.edu; Wallace, Kendall B., E-mail: kwallace@d.umn.edu

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  14. Stress effects on mood, HPA axis, and autonomic response: comparison of three psychosocial stress paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E Giles

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental psychology research has attempted to parse the complex relationship between psychosocial stress, mood, cognitive performance, and physiological changes. To do so, it is necessary to have effective, validated methods to experimentally induce psychosocial stress. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST is the most commonly used method of experimentally inducing psychosocial stress, but it is resource intensive. Less resource intense psychosocial stress tasks include the Socially Evaluative Cold Pressor Task (SECPT and a computerized mental arithmetic task (MAT. These tasks effectively produce a physiological and psychological stress response and have the benefits of requiring fewer experimenters and affording data collection from multiple participants simultaneously. The objective of this study was to compare the magnitude and duration of these three experimental psychosocial stress induction paradigms. On each of four separate days, participants completed either a control non-stressful task or one of the three experimental stressors: the TSST, SECPT, or MAT. We measured mood, working memory performance, salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase (AA, and heart rate. The TSST and SECPT exerted the most robust effects on mood and physiological measures. TSST effects were generally evident immediately post-stress as well as 10- and 20-minutes after stress cessation, whereas SECPT effects were generally limited to the duration of the stressor. The stress duration is a key determinant when planning a study that utilizes an experimental stressor, as researchers may be interested in collecting dependent measures prior to stress cessation. In this way, the TSST would allow the investigator a longer window to administer tasks of interest.

  15. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  16. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  17. Correlation between arterial wall stiffness, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Aleksandrovna Serhiyenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess arterial wall stiffness, plasma levels of of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as well as functional state and structure of the myocardium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN.Materials and Methods. The study involved a total of 65 patients with T2DM. 12 had no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD or CAN, 14 were diagnosed with subclinical stage of CAN, 18 – with functional stage, and 21 – with organic stage. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic augmentation index (AIx, brachial artery AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and plasma levels of NT-proBNP. Clinical examination included ECG, Holter monitoring, ambulatory BP measurement and echocardiography.Results. Patients with isolated T2DM showed a trend for increased vascular wall stiffness. PWV was increased in patients with subclinical stage of CAN. Aortic and brachial AIx, PWV and AASI were elevated in patients with functional stage of CAN, PWV being significantly higher vs. subclinical CAN subgroup. Organic stage was characterized by pathologically increased values of all primary parameters; PWV and AASI were significantly higher compared with other groups. Development and progression of CAN was accompanied by an increase in NT-proBNP plasma levels. Concentration of NT-proBNP was in direct correlation with left ventricular mass (LVM and PWV. PWV and LVM values also directly correlated between themselves.Conclusion. Development and progression of CAN in patients with T2DM is accompanied by an increase in vascular wall stiffness. The elevation of plasma NT-proBNP in patients with T2DM correlates with the development of CAN and is significantly and independently associated with an increase in LVM and PWV. Our data suggests the pathophysiological interconnection between metabolic, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with T2DM and CAN.

  18. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a "priming" dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a "challenge" dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results: Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions: This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions.

  19. The role of autonomic cardiovascular neuropathy in pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović-Pejičić Snježana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes is strongly associated with macrovascular complications, among which ischemic heart disease is the major cause of mortality. Autonomic neuropathy increases the risk of complications, which calls for an early diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine both presence and extent of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, in regard to the type of diabetes mellitus, as well as its correlation with coronary disease and major cardiovascular risk factors. Material and methods. We have examined 90 subjects, classified into three groups, with 30 patients each: those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and control group of healthy subjects. All patients underwent cardiovascular tests (Valsalva maneuver, deep breathing test, response to standing, blood pressure response to standing sustained, handgrip test, electrocardiogram, treadmill exercise test and filled out a questionnaire referring to major cardiovascular risk factors: smoking, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Results. Our results showed that cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was more frequent in type 2 diabetes, manifesting as autonomic neuropathy. In patients with autonomic neuropathy, regardless of the type of diabetes, the treadmill test was positive, i.e. strongly correlating with coronary disease. In regard to coronary disease risk factors, the most frequent correlation was found for obesity and hypertension. Discussion Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is considered to be the principal cause of arteriosclerosis and coronary disease. Our results showed that the occurrence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy increases the risk of coronary disease due to dysfunction of autonomic nervous system. Conclusions. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that significantly correlates with coronary disease. Early diagnosis of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy points to increased cardiovascular risk, providing a basis for preventive

  20. Ex-vivo response to blood products and haemostatic agents after paediatric cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Andreasen, Jo B; Christiansen, Kirsten; Ravn, Hanne B

    2013-01-01

    . The aims of the present study were to investigate changes in coagulation profiles after paediatric cardiac surgery and the effect after ex-vivo addition of blood products and haemostatic agents. Coagulation profiles were evaluated by thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in 54 children before and immediately...

  1. Two large preoperative doses of erythropoietin do not reduce the systemic inflammatory response to cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Troels Dirch; Andersen, Lars Willy; Steinbrüchel, Daniel;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induce an inflammatory reaction that may lead to tissue injury. Experimental studies suggest that recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) independent of its erythropoietic effect may be used clinically as an anti-inflammatory drug. This...

  2. Phlebotomy eliminates the maximal cardiac output response to six weeks of exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian; Doucende, Gregory; Flück, Daniela;

    2014-01-01

    With this study we tested the hypothesis that six weeks of endurance training increases maximal cardiac output (Qmax) relatively more by elevating blood volume (BV) than by inducing structural and functional changes within the heart. Nine healthy but untrained volunteers (VO2max 47 ± 5 ml.min(-1)...

  3. Monitoring Cognitive and Emotional Processes Through Pupil and Cardiac Response During Dynamic Versus Logical Task

    OpenAIRE

    Causse, Mickael; Senard, Jean-Michel; Démonet, Jean François; Pastor, Josette

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the links between physiological measurements and cognitive and emotional functioning. As long as the operator is a key agent in charge of complex systems, the definition of metrics able to predict his performance is a great challenge. The measurement of the physiological state is a very promising way but a very acute comprehension is required; in particular few studies compare autonomous nervous system reactivity according to specific cognitive processes during task perfo...

  4. Acute Physiological Responses to Short- and Long-Stage High-Intensity Interval Exercise in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Tschakert, Julia M. Kroepfl, Alexander Mueller, Hanns Harpf, Leonhard Harpf, Heimo Traninger, Sandra Wallner-Liebmann, Tatjana Stojakovic, Hubert Scharnagl, Andreas Meinitzer, Patriz Pichlhoefer, Peter Hofmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite described benefits of aerobic high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE, the acute responses during different HIIE modes and associated health risks have only been sparsely discovered in heart disease patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the acute responses for physiological parameters, cardiovascular and inflammatory biomarkers, and catecholamines yielded by two different aerobic HIIE protocols compared to continuous exercise (CE in phase III cardiac rehabilitation. Eight cardiac patients (7 with coronary heart disease, 1 with myocarditis; 7 males, 1 female; age: 63.0 ± 9.4 years; height: 1.74 ± 0.05 m; weight: 83.6 ± 8.7 kg, all but one treated with ß-blocking agents, performed a maximal symptom-limited incremental exercise test (IET and three different exercise tests matched for mean load (Pmean and total duration: 1 short HIIE with a peak workload duration (tpeak of 20 s and a peak workload (Ppeak equal to the maximum power output (Pmax from IET; 2 long HIIE with a tpeak of 4 min, Ppeak was corresponding to the power output at 85 % of maximal heart rate (HRmax from IET; 3 CE with a target workload equal to Pmean of both HIIE modes. Acute metabolic and peak cardiorespiratory responses were significantly higher during long HIIE compared to short HIIE and CE (p 0.05. All health-related variables remained in a normal range in any test except NT-proBNP, which was already elevated at baseline. Despite a high Ppeak particularly in short HIIE, both HIIE modes were as safe and as well tolerated as moderate CE in cardiac patients by using our methodological approach.

  5. Pulmonary artery pressure responses to increased cardiac output in chickens with raised metabolic rate

    OpenAIRE

    West, John B.; Fu, Zhenxing; Gu, Yusu; Wagner, Harrieth E.; Carr, J. Austin; Peterson, Kirk L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has shown remarkable differences in the pressure-flow relations of the pulmonary circulation between birds and mammals. For example several studies suggest that the avian pulmonary blood vessels behave like rigid tubes, very different from the situation in mammalian lung. We therefore speculated that birds would develop high pulmonary artery pressures when the cardiac output was substantially increased during heavy exercise, for example during flight. However because of the tech...

  6. Downregulation of adenine nucleotide translocator 1 exacerbates tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated cardiac inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Shi; Wang, Nadan; Bisetto, Sara; Yi, Bing; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation contributes significantly to cardiac dysfunction. Although the initial phase of inflammation is essential for repair and healing, excessive proinflammatory cytokines are detrimental to the heart. We found that adenine nucleotide translocator isoform-1 (ANT1) protein levels were significantly decreased in the inflamed heart of C57BL/6 mice following cecal ligation and puncture. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we performed small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown o...

  7. Impact of Ejection Fraction on the Clinical Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Mild Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Cecilia; Daubert, Claude; Abraham, William T;

    2013-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in mild heart failure (HF) patients with QRS prolongation and ejection fraction (EF) ≤30%. To assess the effect of CRT in less severe systolic dysfunction, outcomes in the REsynchronization reVErses Remodeling in Systolic left v......Entricular dysfunction (REVERSE) study were evaluated in which patients with left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (LVEF) >30% were included....

  8. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Ghio, Stefano; St John Sutton, Martin;

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) as a predictor of left ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling and clinical benefit of cardiac synchronization therapy (CRT) and to evaluate the effect of CRT on TAPSE in patients with mildly symptomatic systolic...... heart failure as a substudy of the REsyncronization reVErses Remodeling in Systolic left vEntricular dysfunction (REVERSE) trial....

  9. Dispersant use as a response to oil spills: toxicological effects on fish cardiac performance

    OpenAIRE

    Milinkovitch, Thomas; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène; Lefrançois, Christel; Imbert, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Dispersant use is a controversial technique used to respond to oil spills in nearshore areas. In order to assess the toxicity of this technique, this study evaluated the cardiac toxicological effects on juvenile golden grey mullets Liza aurata exposed for 48 h to either dispersant alone, chemically dispersed oil, mechanically dispersed oil, the water soluble fraction of oil or to a control condition. Following exposure, the positive inotropic effects of adrenaline were assessed in order to ev...

  10. Chronic CaMKII inhibition blunts the cardiac contractile response to exercise training

    OpenAIRE

    Kaurstad, Guri; Alves, Marcia N.; Kemi, Ole J.; Rolim, Natale; Høydal, Morten A.; Wisløff, Helene; Stølen, Tomas O.; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a critical role modulating cardiac function in both health and disease. Here, we determined the effect of chronic CaMKII inhibition during an exercise training program in healthy mice. CaMKII was inhibited by KN-93 injections. Mice were randomized to the following groups: sham sedentary, sham exercise, KN-93 sedentary, and KN-93 exercise. Cardiorespiratory function was evaluated by ergospirometry duri...

  11. Cardiac response during various activities in patients with ischemic heart disease evaluated by an ambulatory ventricular monitor (VEST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the cardiac response to various exercises in ischemic heart disease (IHD), left ventricular function was continuously measured with an ambulatory ventricular monitor (VEST) in 3 normal subjects and 15 IHD patients. Treadmill exercise (early stage (El), end stage (E2) and recovery standing state (RE), walking (WK) and climbing stairs (CS), was used for exercise. 15 IHD patients were divided into 4 groups by the LVEF response to treadmill exercise. In group I (G1), LVEF increased gradually at stage l and became plateau from stage 2 (G2), LVEF increased at stage l and became plateau from stage 2 but decreased from maximal EF more than 5% at end stage. In group 3 (G3), LVEF increased only at stage l and decreased immediately after stage l to end stage. The decrease of LVEF at end stage from standing was more than 5%. In group 4 (G4), LVEF decreased at stage l and became minimium at end stage. This grouping was well related to thallium redistribution (Tl RD) score and coronary arteriography (CAG) score. We could predict the severity of coronary artery disease from this grouping because all group 3 or 4 patients had severe coronary artery disease. VEST was useful for the evaluation for the tolerance to daily activities while group 4 could not always. The degree of the increase in cardiac output during ischemia evaluated by VEST may be one of the useful index of the tolerance to exercise. In conclusion, VEST was very useful for evaluating cardiac capacity of ischemic heart disease patients during various exercises. (author)

  12. Exercise Reveals the Interrelation of Physical Fitness, Inflammatory Response, Psychopathology, and Autonomic Function in Patients With Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ostermann, Stefanie; Herbsleb, Marco; Schulz, Steffen; Donath, Lars; Berger, Sandy; Eisenträger, Daniela; Siebert, Tobias; Müller, Hans-Josef; Puta, Christian; Voss, Andreas; Gabriel, Holger W.; Koch, Kathrin; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining and improving fitness are associated with a lower risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease. Patients with schizophrenia are known to exercise less and have poorer health behaviors than average. Physical fitness and physiological regulation during exercise tasks have not been investigated to date among patients with schizophrenia. We studied autonomic modulation in a stepwise exhaustion protocol in 23 patients with schizophrenia and in matched controls, using spirometry ...

  13. Autonomic response to an experimental psychological stressor in healthy subjects: measurement of sympathetic, parasympathetic, and pituitary-adrenal parameters: test-retest reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U; Ostgaard, S; Christensen, N J; Fenger, M; Flachs, H

    1990-01-01

    A mental arithmetic test (the stressor; 15 min) significantly increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate and plasma adrenaline by 11%, 12%, 28% and 152% respectively, with a prompt return to resting values after the test. Plasma noradrenaline and serum cortisol did not increase....... The increments in systolic blood pressure and heart rate were significantly lower at retest. MSSD at stress, but not at rest, was significantly lower at retest. The mental arithmetic stress test as described here produces a sufficient autonomic response to make it viable for laboratory stress research...

  14. Adaptations to iron deficiency: cardiac functional responsiveness to norepinephrine, arterial remodeling, and the effect of beta-blockade on cardiac hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker LeeAnn

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency (ID results in ventricular hypertrophy, believed to involve sympathetic stimulation. We hypothesized that with ID 1 intravenous norepinephrine would alter heart rate (HR and contractility, 2 abdominal aorta would be larger and more distensible, and 3 the beta-blocker propanolol would reduce hypertrophy. Methods 1 30 CD rats were fed an ID or replete diet for 1 week or 1 month. Norepinephrine was infused via jugular vein; pressure was monitored at carotid artery. Saline infusions were used as a control. The pressure trace was analyzed for HR, contractility, systolic and diastolic pressures. 2 Abdominal aorta catheters inflated the aorta, while digital microscopic images were recorded at stepwise pressures to measure arterial diameter and distensibility. 3 An additional 10 rats (5 ID, 5 control were given a daily injection of propanolol or saline. After 1 month, the hearts were excised and weighed. Results Enhanced contractility, but not HR, was associated with ID hypertrophic hearts. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were consistent with an increase in arterial diameter associated with ID. Aortic diameter at 100 mmHg and distensibility were increased with ID. Propanolol was associated with an increase in heart to body mass ratio. Conclusions ID cardiac hypertrophy results in an increased inotropic, but not chronotropic response to the sympathetic neurotransmitter, norepinephrine. Increased aortic diameter is consistent with a flow-dependent vascular remodeling; increased distensibility may reflect decreased vascular collagen content. The failure of propanolol to prevent hypertrophy suggests that ID hypertrophy is not mediated via beta-adrenergic neurotransmission.

  15. Induction of chronic non-inflammatory widespread pain increases cardiac sympathetic modulation in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Larissa Resende; de Melo, Vitor Ulisses; Macedo, Fabricio Nunes; Barreto, Andre Sales; Badaue-Passos, Daniel; Viana dos Santos, Marcio Roberto; Dias, Daniel Penteado Martins; Sluka, Kathleen A.; DeSantana, Josimari M.; Valter J. Santana-Filho

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by chronic non-inflammatory widespread pain (CWP) and changes in sympathetic function. In attempt to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of FM we used a well-established CWP animal model. We aimed to evaluate changes in cardiac autonomic balance and baroreflex function in response to CWP induction in rats. CWP was induced by two injections of acidic saline (pH 4.0, n=8) five days apart into the left gastrocnemius muscle. Control animals were injected...

  16. The role of the immuno-inflammatory response in patients after cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Samborska-Sablik, Anna; Sablik, Zbigniew; Gaszynski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the research was to assess whether concentrations of inflammatory markers in blood of patients after cardiac arrest (CA) are related to their clinical state and survival. Material and methods Forty-six patients, aged 63 ±12 years, 21 of them after out-of-hospital CA and 25 after in-hospital CA, were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five patients survived and were discharged from hospital (CA-S); 21 died during hospitalization (CA-D). The clinical state of the patients was...

  17. Dealing with global safety issues : was the response to QT-liability of non-cardiac drugs well coordinated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, Norman; Morganroth, Joel; Shah, Rashmi R; Garnett, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Drug-induced torsade de pointes (TdP) is a potentially fatal iatrogenic entity. Its reporting rate in association with non-cardiac drugs increased exponentially from the early 1990s and was associated with an increasing number of new non-cardiac drugs whose proarrhythmic liability was not appreciated pre-marketing. This epidemic provoked a comprehensive global response from drug regulators, drug developers and academia, which resulted in stabilization of the reporting rate of TdP. This commentary reviews the chronology and nature of, and the reasons for, this response, examines its adequacy, and proposes future strategies for dealing with such iatrogenic epidemics more effectively. It is concluded that the response was piecemeal and lacked direction. No one entity was responsible, with the result that important contributions from regulators, industry and academia lacked coordination. While the process of dealing with QT crisis seemed to have worked reasonably well in this instance, it does not seem wise to expect the next crisis in drug development to be managed as well. Future crises will need better management and the challenge is to implement a system set up to respond globally and efficiently to a perceived drug-related hazard. In this regard, we discuss the roles of new tools the legislation has provided to the regulators and the value of an integrated expert assessment of all pre-approval data that may signal a potential safety issue in the postmarketing period. We also discuss the roles of other bodies such as the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring, CIOMS and the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). PMID:23417505

  18. Plasma tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1): an independent predictor of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosana, Jose María; Mont, Lluís; Sitges, Marta; Berruezo, Antonio; Delgado, Victoria; Vidal, Bàrbara; Tamborero, David; Morales, Manel; Batlle, Montserrat; Roig, Eulalia; Castel, M. Angeles; Pérez-Villa, Félix; Godoy, Miguel; Brugada, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Aims Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) play a role in left ventricular structural remodelling. The aim of our study was to analyse MMP-2 and TIMP-1 levels as predictors of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods and results A cohort of 42 CRT patients from our centre was prospectively evaluated at baseline and after 12-month follow-up. MMP-2 and TIMP-1 assays were performed prior to CRT implant. Cardiac resynchronization therapy responders were defined as patients who survived, were not transplanted, and increased their basal 6 min walking distance test (6MWDT) by ≥10% or improved their NYHA functional class. Overall, 25 patients (60%) were classed as responders. At 12-month follow-up, six patients (14.2%) had died and one (2.4%) patient had been transplanted. Compared with responders, non-responders had higher levels of TIMP-1 (277 ± 59 vs. 216 ± 46 ng/mL, P = 0.001), MMP-2 (325 ± 115 vs. 258 ± 56 ng/mL, P = 0.02), and creatinine (1.76 ± 0.8 vs. 1.25 ± 0.3 mg/dL, P = 0.01). In a multivariate analysis, TIMP-1 was the only independent predictor of non-response to CRT [OR 0.97, 95% (CI 0.96–0.99) P = 0.005]. TIMP-1≥248 ng/mL predicted non-response with 71% sensitivity and 72% specificity. Conclusion TIMP-1 is an independent predictor of non-response in patients treated with CRT. PMID:20360066

  19. [Sudden cardiac death in diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, C W; Lee-Barkey, Y H

    2016-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) represents one of the most frequent causes of death in patients with diabetes. In contrast to patients without diabetes it has not been significantly reduced despite improvements in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and long-term treatment of cardiovascular diseases as well as diabetes mellitus. Several mechanisms can be responsible for the high incidence of SCD in diabetics: 1. arrhythmogenic effects mediated via cardiac autonomic neuropathy, repolarization disturbances or sympathetic tone activation (hypoglycemia), 2. myocardial ischemia due to atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, platelet aggregation or thrombophilic effects, 3. myocardial disease due to inflammation, fibrosis, associated hypertension or uremia and 4. potassium imbalance due to diabetic nephropathy or hypoglycemia. This review introduces concepts of mechanisms that are responsible for SCD in patients with diabetes. Treatment of patients with diabetes should primarily consider a systematic assessment of any deterioration of this chronic disease and of complications at an early stage. Cardiovascular drug treatment corresponds to that of non-diabetics. In antidiabetic treatment drugs with a low risk of hypoglycemia should be preferred. Treatment with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) also combined with cardiac resynchronization therapy () demonstrated a high life-saving potential particularly in patients with diabetes. PMID:27071967

  20. Involvement of the autonomic nervous system in Chagas heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Reis Lopes

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system and especially the intracardiac autonomic nervous system is involved in Chagas' disease. Ganglionitis and periganglionitis were noted in three groups ofpatients dying with Chagas'disease: 1 Those in heart failure; 2 Those dying a sudden, non violent death and; 3 Those dying as a consequence ofaccidents or homicide. Hearts in the threegroups also revealed myocarditis and scattered involvement of intramyocardial ganglion cells as well as lesions of myelinic and unmyelinic fibers ascribable to Chagas'disease. In mice with experimentally induced Chagas' disease weobserved more intensive neuronal lesions of the cardiac ganglia in the acute phase of infection. Perhaps neuronal loss has a role in the pathogenesis of Chagas cardiomyopathy. However based on our own experience and on other data from the literature we conclude that the loss of neurones is not the main factor responsible for the manifestations exhibited by chronic chagasic patients. On the other hand the neuronal lesions may have played a role in the sudden death ofone group of patients with Chagas'disease but is difficult to explain the group of patients who did not die sudderly but instead progressed to cardiac failure.

  1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, M; Goadsby, P J

    2016-01-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders characterised by lateralized symptoms: prominent headache and ipsilateral cranial autonomic features, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation and rhinorrhea. The TACs are: cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT)/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features (SUNA) and hemicrania continua (HC). Their diagnostic criteria are outlined in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition-beta (ICHD-IIIb). These conditions are distinguished by their attack duration and frequency, as well as response to treatment. HC is continuous and by definition responsive to indomethacin. The main differential when considering this headache is chronic migraine. Other TACs are remarkable for their short duration and must be distinguished from other short-lasting painful conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia and primary stabbing headache. Cluster headache is characterised by exquisitely painful attacks that occur in discrete episodes lasting 15-180 min a few times a day. In comparison, PH occurs more frequently and is of shorter duration, and like HC is responsive to indomethacin. SUNCT/SUNA is the shortest duration and highest frequency TAC; attacks can occur over a hundred times every day. PMID:24888770

  2. Autonomous Search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Decades of innovations in combinatorial problem solving have produced better and more complex algorithms. These new methods are better since they can solve larger problems and address new application domains. They are also more complex which means that they are hard to reproduce and often harder to fine-tune to the peculiarities of a given problem. This last point has created a paradox where efficient tools are out of reach of practitioners. Autonomous search (AS) represents a new research field defined to precisely address the above challenge. Its major strength and originality consist in the

  3. Cardiac output response to changes of the atrioventricular delay in different body positions and during exercise in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Marcus; Damgaard, Morten; Norsk, Peter; Gabrielsen, Anders; Sahlén, Anders; Linde, Cecilia; Braunschweig, Frieder

    2009-01-01

    prolonged by 40 ms in 27 CRT patients and 9 controls without heart failure. Cardiac output (CO) was measured by inert gas rebreathing (Innocor) as the average over different body positions (left-lateral, supine, sitting, standing, and exercise). In eight CRT patients with an implantable haemodynamic monitor...

  4. Surgical implantation and functional assessment of an invasive telemetric system to measure autonomic responses in domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, A; Zebunke, M; Bellmann, O; Mohr, E; Langbein, J; Puppe, B

    2016-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to establish a surgical procedure to implant a new telemetric device for the continuous recording of electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood pressure (BP) in freely moving pigs. A second aim was the functional assessment of cardiovascular parameters, including heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), so that these data could be used as the basis for the objective evaluation of autonomic activity and balance in different behavioural contexts. Eleven domestic pigs (German Landrace) underwent surgery for the placement of a telemetric device. At day 15 after surgery, 512 consecutive inter-beat intervals and pressure waves were analysed using different detection methods (automatic and manually corrected) while the animals were resting or feeding, respectively. HRV and BPV were calculated. Incomplete datasets were found in four pigs due to missing ECG or BP signals. Technical and surgical issues concerning catheterisation and detachment of the negative ECG lead were continuously improved. In the remaining pigs, excellent signal quality (manually corrected data of 1%) was obtained during resting and acceptable signal quality (ECG recordings. Sympathetic arousal with accompanying vagal withdrawal during feeding was documented. The established surgical implantation and functional assessment of the telemetric system with the reliable registration of cardiovascular parameters in freely moving pigs could serve as a basis for future studies of autonomic regulation in context of stress and animal welfare. PMID:26626089

  5. Influência da vitamina C na modulação autonômica cardíaca no repouso e durante o exercício isométrico em crianças obesas The influence of vitamin C on cardiac autonomic modulation at rest and during isometric exercise in obese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Alexandre dos Santos Lira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: comparar, entre obesos e eutróficos, os parâmetros de modulação autonômica cardíaca e analisar o efeito da suplementação da vitamina C na modulação autonômica cardíaca em crianças obesas, no repouso e durante o exercício isométrico respectivamente. MÉTODOS: participaram oito crianças eutróficas (IMC = 18 ± 1Kg/cm² e 21 obesas (IMC = 29 ± 1Kg/cm², com idade entre 8 e 11 anos, ambos os gêneros, distribuídas em dois grupos: suplementadas com 500 mg de vitamina C (n=11, e placebo (n=10, durante 45 dias. Modulação autonômica cardíaca foi avaliada por análise espectral da variabilidade da frequência cardíaca em repouso e durante o exercício isométrico. RESULTADOS: crianças obesas, no repouso e durante o exercício isométrico, apresentaram uma maior ativação simpática cardíaca e uma menor atividade vagal. Quando se comparou os componentes espectrais de baixa e alta frequência entre os grupos avaliados, observaram-se diferenças significativas. Após suplementação com vitamina C, os componentes espectrais foram similares àqueles observados nas crianças eutróficas, tanto no repouso como durante o exercício isométrico. CONCLUSÕES: crianças obesas apresentam uma maior atividade simpática e menor atividade vagal no repouso e durante o exercício isométrico quando comparada as crianças eutróficas. Como também, a suplementação oral com vitamina C, em altas doses, pode restaurar a disfunção autonômica cardíaca em crianças obesas.OBJECTIVES: to draw a comparison between obese and eutrophic children regarding cardiac autonomic modulation and to investigate the effect of vitamin C supplements on cardiac autonomic modulation in obese children, at rest and during isometric exercise. METHODS: the study covered eight eutrophic (IMC= 18 ± 1Kg/cm² and 21 obese (IMC = 29 ± 1Kg/cm² children aged between 8 and 11 years of both sexes, distributed into two groups: one receiving a 500 mg vitamin C

  6. Pure Autonomic Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs GARD Information Navigator FAQs About Rare Diseases Pure autonomic failure Title Other Names: Bradbury Eggleston syndrome; ... Categories: Nervous System Diseases ; RDCRN Summary Summary Listen Pure autonomic failure is characterized by generalized autonomic failure ...

  7. The sensory channel of presentation alters subjective ratings and autonomic responses towards disgusting stimuli -Blood pressure, heart rate and skin conductance in response to visual, auditory, haptic and olfactory presented disgusting stimuli-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona eCroy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Disgust causes specific reaction patterns, observable in mimic responses and body reactions. Most research on disgust deals with visual stimuli. However, pictures may cause another disgust experience than sounds, odors or tactile stimuli. Therefore disgust experience evoked by four different sensory channels was compared.A total of 119 participants received 3 different disgusting and one control stimulus, each presented through the visual, auditory, tactile and olfactory channel. Ratings of evoked disgust as well as responses of the autonomic nervous system (heart rate, skin conductance level, systolic blood pressure were recorded and the effect of stimulus labeling and of repeated presentation was analyzed. Ratings suggested that disgust could be evoked through all senses; they were highest for visual stimuli. However, autonomic reaction towards disgusting stimuli differed according to the channel of presentation. In contrast to the other, olfactory disgust stimuli provoked a strong decrease of systolic blood pressure. Additionally, labeling enhanced disgust ratings and autonomic reaction for olfactory and tactile, but not for visual and auditory stimuli. Repeated presentation indicated that participant’s disgust rating diminishes to all but olfactory disgust stimuli. Taken together we argue that the sensory channel through which a disgust reaction is evoked matters.

  8. Myocardial Galectin-3 Expression Is Associated with Remodeling of the Pressure-Overloaded Heart and May Delay the Hypertrophic Response without Affecting Survival, Dysfunction, and Cardiac Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frunza, Olga; Russo, Ilaria; Saxena, Amit; Shinde, Arti V; Humeres, Claudio; Hanif, Waqas; Rai, Vikrant; Su, Ya; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2016-05-01

    The β-galactoside-binding animal lectin galectin-3 is predominantly expressed by activated macrophages and is a promising biomarker for patients with heart failure. Galectin-3 regulates inflammatory and fibrotic responses; however, its role in cardiac remodeling remains unclear. We hypothesized that galectin-3 may be up-regulated in the pressure-overloaded myocardium and regulate hypertrophy and fibrosis. In normal mouse myocardium, galectin-3 was constitutively expressed in macrophages and was localized in atrial but not ventricular cardiomyocytes. In a mouse model of transverse aortic constriction, galectin-3 expression was markedly up-regulated in the pressure-overloaded myocardium. Early up-regulation of galectin-3 was localized in subpopulations of macrophages and myofibroblasts; however, after 7 to 28 days of transverse aortic constriction, a subset of cardiomyocytes in fibrotic areas contained large amounts of galectin-3. In vitro, cytokine stimulation suppressed galectin-3 synthesis by macrophages and cardiac fibroblasts. Correlation studies revealed that cardiomyocyte- but not macrophage-specific galectin-3 localization was associated with adverse remodeling and dysfunction. Galectin-3 knockout mice exhibited accelerated cardiac hypertrophy after 7 days of pressure overload, whereas female galectin-3 knockouts had delayed dilation after 28 days of transverse aortic constriction. However, galectin-3 loss did not affect survival, systolic and diastolic dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in the pressure-overloaded heart. Despite its potential role as a prognostic biomarker, galectin-3 is not a critical modulator of cardiac fibrosis but may delay the hypertrophic response. PMID:26948424

  9. Cardiac response to various activities in ischaemic heart disease patients evaluated by an ambulatory ventricular monitor (VEST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the cardiac response to various forms of exercise in ischaemic heart disease (IHD), left ventricular function was continuously measured with an ambulatory ventricular monitor (VEST) in three normal subjects and 15 IHD patients. Treadmill exercise (early stage (E1), end stage (E2) and recovering standing state (RE)), walking (WK), climbing stairs (CS), and eating (ET) were used for exercise. Fifteen IHD patients were divided into four groups according to their response to treadmill exercise. In group 1 (G1), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) increased gradually at stage 1 and reached a plateau from stage 2 to the end stage, as with a normal group. In group 2 (G2), LVEF increased at stage 1 and reached a plateau from stage 2 but decreased more than 5% from maximal EF at the end stage. In group 3 (G3), LVEF increased only at stage 1 and decreased immediately after stage 1 up to the end stage. The decrease of LVEF at the end stage from standing was more than 5%. In group 4 (G4), LVEF decreased at stage 1 and became minimum at the end stage. This grouping was well related to thallium redistribution (T1 RD) score and coronary arteriography (CAG) score. By this simple device and using inexpensive radiopharmaceuticals we could predict the severity of coronary artery disease from this grouping because all group 3 or 4 patients had severe coronary artery disease. VEST was useful for the evaluation for the tolerance to daily activities. Groups 1, 2 and 3 tolerated daily activities while group 4 could not always. The degree of the increase in cardiac output during ischaemia evaluated by VEST may be a useful index of the tolerance to exercise. An advantage of this method is the low investment needed to cope with increasing heart disease both in developed and developing countries. (author). 7 refs, 5 figs

  10. Cardiac and Respiratory Responses During Visual Search in Nonretarded Children and Retarded Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porges, Stephen W.; Humphrey, Mary M.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between physiological response patterns and mental competence was investigated by evaluating heart rate and respiratory responses during a sustained visual-search task in 29 nonretarded grade school children and 16 retarded adolescents. (Author)

  11. Monitoring cognitive and emotional processes through pupil and cardiac response during dynamic versus logical task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causse, Mickaël; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Démonet, Jean François; Pastor, Josette

    2010-06-01

    The paper deals with the links between physiological measurements and cognitive and emotional functioning. As long as the operator is a key agent in charge of complex systems, the definition of metrics able to predict his performance is a great challenge. The measurement of the physiological state is a very promising way but a very acute comprehension is required; in particular few studies compare autonomous nervous system reactivity according to specific cognitive processes during task performance and task related psychological stress is often ignored. We compared physiological parameters recorded on 24 healthy subjects facing two neuropsychological tasks: a dynamic task that require problem solving in a world that continually evolves over time and a logical task representative of cognitive processes performed by operators facing everyday problem solving. Results showed that the mean pupil diameter change was higher during the dynamic task; conversely, the heart rate was more elevated during the logical task. Finally, the systolic blood pressure seemed to be strongly sensitive to psychological stress. A better taking into account of the precise influence of a given cognitive activity and both workload and related task-induced psychological stress during task performance is a promising way to better monitor operators in complex working situations to detect mental overload or pejorative stress factor of error. PMID:19816770

  12. An Integrated Approach for the Monitoring of Brain and Autonomic Response of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders during Treatment by Wearable Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeci, Lucia; Tonacci, Alessandro; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Narzisi, Antonio; Di Palma, Simone; Corda, Daniele; Baldus, Giovanni; Cruciani, Federico; Anzalone, Salvatore M.; Calderoni, Sara; Pioggia, Giovanni; Muratori, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are associated with physiological abnormalities, which are likely to contribute to the core symptoms of the condition. Wearable technologies can provide data in a semi-naturalistic setting, overcoming the limitations given by the constrained situations in which physiological signals are usually acquired. In this study an integrated system based on wearable technologies for the acquisition and analysis of neurophysiological and autonomic parameters during treatment is proposed and an application on five children with ASD is presented. Signals were acquired during a therapeutic session based on an imitation protocol in ASD children. Data were analyzed with the aim of extracting quantitative EEG (QEEG) features from EEG signals as well as heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) from ECG. The system allowed evidencing changes in neurophysiological and autonomic response from the state of disengagement to the state of engagement of the children, evidencing a cognitive involvement in the children in the tasks proposed. The high grade of acceptability of the monitoring platform is promising for further development and implementation of the tool. In particular if the results of this feasibility study would be confirmed in a larger sample of subjects, the system proposed could be adopted in more naturalistic paradigms that allow real world stimuli to be incorporated into EEG/psychophysiological studies for the monitoring of the effect of the treatment and for the implementation of more individualized therapeutic programs. PMID:27445652

  13. Effects of lidocaine constant rate infusion on sevoflurane requirement, autonomic responses, and postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing ovariectomy under opioid-based balanced anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbano, Nicolò; Secci, Fabio; Careddu, Giovanni M; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Rossi, Gabriele; Driessen, Bernd

    2012-08-01

    The effects of constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine on sevoflurane (SEVO) requirements, autonomic responses to noxious stimulation, and postoperative pain relief were evaluated in dogs undergoing opioid-based balanced anesthesia. Twenty-four dogs scheduled for elective ovariectomy were randomly assigned to one of four groups: BC, receiving buprenorphine without lidocaine; FC, receiving fentanyl without lidocaine; BL, receiving buprenorphine and lidocaine; FL, receiving fentanyl and lidocaine. Dogs were anesthetized with intravenous (IV) diazepam and ketamine and anesthesia maintained with SEVO in oxygen/air. Lidocaine (2mg/kg plus 50 μg/kg/min) or saline were infused in groups BL/FL and BC/FC, respectively. After initiation of lidocaine or saline CRI IV buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) or fentanyl (4 μg/kg plus 8 μg/kg/h CRI) were administered IV in BC/BL and FC/FL, respectively. Respiratory and hemodynamic variables, drug plasma concentrations, and end-tidal SEVO concentrations (E'SEVO) were measured. Behaviors and pain scores were subjectively assessed 1 and 2h post-extubation. Lidocaine CRI produced median drug plasma concentrations <0.4 μg/mL during peak surgical stimulation. Lidocaine produced a 14% decrease in E'SEVO in the BL (P<0.01) but none in the FL group and no change in cardio-pulmonary responses to surgery or postoperative behaviors and pain scores in any group. Thus, depending on the opioid used, supplementing opioid-based balanced anesthesia with lidocaine (50 μg/kg/min) may not have any or only a minor impact on anesthetic outcome in terms of total anesthetic dose, autonomic responses to visceral nociception, and postoperative analgesia. PMID:22261004

  14. Isolating the segment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain responsible for mitochondrial damage during cardiac ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ischemia damages the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), mediated in part by damage generated by the mitochondria themselves. Mitochondrial damage resulting from ischemia, in turn, leads to cardiac injury during reperfusion. The goal of the present study was to localize the segment of the ETC that produces the ischemic mitochondrial damage. We tested if blockade of the proximal ETC at complex I differed from blockade distal in the chain at cytochrome oxidase. Isolated rabbit hearts were perfused for 15 min followed by 30 min stop-flow ischemia at 37 oC. Amobarbital (2.5 mM) or azide (5 mM) was used to block proximal (complex I) or distal (cytochrome oxidase) sites in the ETC. Time control hearts were buffer-perfused for 45 min. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) were isolated. Ischemia decreased cytochrome c content in SSM but not in IFM compared to time control. Blockade of electron transport at complex I preserved the cytochrome c content in SSM. In contrast, blockade of electron transport at cytochrome oxidase with azide did not retain cytochrome c in SSM during ischemia. Since blockade of electron transport at complex III also prevented cytochrome c loss during ischemia, the specific site that elicits mitochondrial damage during ischemia is likely located in the segment between complex III and cytochrome oxidase.

  15. Cardiac response to exercise in mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-Yan Wang; Qiu-Fen Xu; Yao Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Objective Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increases the risk of cardiovascular problem.The symptom of dyspnea on exertion may be associated with pulmonary dysfunction or heart failure, or both. The study objective was to determine whether cardiac dysfunction adds to the mechanism of dyspnea caused mainly by impaired lung function in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD. Methods Patients with COPD and healthy controls performed incremental and constant work rate exercise testing. Venous blood samples were collected in 19 COPD patients and 10 controls before and during constant work exercise for analysis of N-terminal-pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP). Results Peak oxygen uptake and constant work exercise time (CWET) were significantly lower in COPD group than in control group (15.81±3.65 vs 19.19a±6.16 ml/min kg, P=0.035 and 7.78±6.53 rain vs 14.77±7.33 min, P=0.015, respectively). Anaerobic threshold, oxygen pulse and heart rate reserve were not statistically significant between COPD group and control group. The NT-pro-BNP levels both at rest and during constant work exercise were higher in COPD group compared to control group, but without statistical significance. The correlations between CWET and NT-proBNP at rest or during exercise in patients with COPD were not statistically significant. Conclusions Heart failure does not contribute to exercise intolerance in mild-to-moderate COPD.

  16. Male and female hypertrophic rat cardiac myocyte functional responses to ischemic stress and β-adrenergic challenge are different

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, James R.; Curl, Claire L.; Harding, Tristan W.; Vila Petroff, Martin; Harrap, Stephen B.; Delbridge, Lea M D

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy is the most potent cardiovascular risk factor after age, and relative mortality risk linked with cardiac hypertrophy is greater in women. Ischemic heart disease is the most common form of cardiovascular pathology for both men and women, yet significant differences in incidence and outcomes exist between the sexes. Cardiac hypertrophy and ischemia are frequently occurring dual pathologies. Whether the cellular (cardiomyocyte) mechanisms underlying myocardial dama...

  17. Real-time Needle Steering in Response to Rolling Vein Deformation by a 9-DOF Image-Guided Autonomous Venipuncture Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alvin I.; Balter, Max L.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Venipuncture is the most common invasive medical procedure performed in the United States and the number one cause of hospital injury. Failure rates are particularly high in pediatric and elderly patients, whose veins tend to deform, move, or roll as the needle is introduced. To improve venipuncture accuracy in challenging patient populations, we have developed a portable device that autonomously servos a needle into a suitable vein under image guidance. The device operates in real time, combining near-infrared and ultrasound imaging, computer vision software, and a 9 degrees-of-freedom robot that servos the needle. In this paper, we present the kinematic and mechanical design of the latest generation robot. We then investigate in silico and in vitro the mechanics of vessel rolling and deformation in response to needle insertions performed by the robot. Finally, we demonstrate how the robot can make real-time adjustments under ultrasound image guidance to compensate for subtle vessel motions during venipuncture. PMID:26779381

  18. Cardiac responses to induced lactate oxidation: NMR analysis of metabolic equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, E D; Damico, L A; White, L T; Yu, X

    1995-07-01

    The role of lactate as a source of pyruvate oxidation in supporting cardiac work, energetics, and formation of oxidative metabolites was examined in normal myocardium. 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were acquired from isolated rabbit hearts supplied 2.5 mM [3-13C]lactate or [3-13C]pyruvate with or without stimulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) by dichloroacetate (DCA). Similar workloads determined by rate-pressure products were noted with pyruvate (21,700 +/- 2,400; mean +/- SE) and lactate (18,970 +/- 1,510). Oxygen consumption was similar in all four groups with means between 19.0 and 22.2 mumol.min-1.g dry weight-1 (SE = 1.6-2.0) as was the ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP with means between 1.8 and 2.1 (SE = 0.1-0.6). Intracellular pH, determined from 31P-NMR spectra, was essentially the same with pyruvate (7.06 +/- 0.02) and lactate (7.05 +/- 0.04). 13C enrichment of glutamate was higher with lactate (92%) than with pyruvate (70%). Pyruvate plus DCA induced no change in glutamate content at 9-10 mumol/g, but 13C enrichment increased to 83%, while lactate plus DCA maintained enrichment at 90%. Levels of alpha-ketoglutarate were lower with lactate (1.81 mumol/g) than with pyruvate (2.36 mumol/g). Lactate plus DCA elevated glutamate by 60% with a proportional increase in alpha-ketoglutarate. Thus the balance between glutamate and alpha-ketoglutarate was affected by substrate supply only and not by PDH activation. The results suggest that the equilibrium between alpha-ketoglutarate and glutamate is sensitive to cytosolic redox state, an important consideration for 13C-NMR analyses that rely on glutamate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7631845

  19. Cardiac perioperative complications in noncardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Radovanović Dragana; Kolak Radmila; Stokić Aleksandar; Radovanović Zoran; Jovanović Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are confronted with an increasing population of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for cardiac complications in the perioperative period. Perioperative cardiac complications are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of perioperative (operative and postoperative) cardiac complications and correlations between the incidence of perioperative cardiac complications and type of surgical ...

  20. Effects of vocalization on cardiovascular and electrodermal responses during mental arithmetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaka, J; Blascovich, J; Swart, L

    1994-10-01

    This study assessed the contribution of vocalization to autonomic responses during mental arithmetic. Specifically this study compared the autonomic responses of subjects during aloud and silent phases of repeated mental arithmetic tasks. The results were consistent for both tasks. As expected, heart rate and skin conductance responses were elevated during the aloud phases. Preejection period and cardiac output reactions, however, were greater during the silent phases. Furthermore, stroke volume declined during the aloud phases, but was maintained near resting levels during the silent phases. There were no phase effects for systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, or total peripheral resistance. The pattern of autonomic responses between aloud and silent phases of mental arithmetic suggest that the relationship between vocalization and autonomic response is not unidirectional but varies depending on the physiological parameter under investigation. PMID:7876036

  1. Pre-implant right ventricular function might be an important predictor of the response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ring Margareta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Cardiac resynchronization therapy is proven efficacious in patients with heart failure (HF. Presence of biventricular HF is associated with a worse prognosis than having only left ventricular (LV HF and pacing might deteriorate heart function. The aim of the study was to assess a possible significance of right ventricular (RV pre-implant systolic function to predict response to CRT. Design We studied 22 HF-patients aged 72 ± 11 years, QRS-duration 155 ± 20 ms and with an LV ejection fraction (EF of 26 ± 6% before and four weeks after receiving a CRT-device. Results There were no changes in LV diameters or end systolic volume (ESV during the study. However, end diastolic volume (EDV decreased from 226 ± 71 to 211 ± 64 ml (p = 0.02 and systolic maximal velocities (SMV increased from 2.2 ± 0.4 to 2.6 ± 0.9 cm/s (p = 0.04. Pre-implant RV-SMV (6.2 ± 2.6 cm/s predicted postoperative increase in LV contractility, p = 0.032. Conclusions Pre-implant decreased RV systolic function might be an important way to predict a poor response to CRT implicating that other treatments should be considered. Furthermore we found that 3D- echocardiography and Tissue Doppler Imaging were feasible to detect short-term changes in LV function.

  2. Gender-Specific Effects on Immune Response and Cardiac Function after Trauma Hemorrhage and Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Albertsmeier, Markus; Pratschke, Sebastian; Chaudry, Irshad; Angele, Martin K

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Studies in human as well as animal models indicate a gender-specific responsiveness of the immune and organ systems with regard to shock, trauma, and sepsis. Methods A literature review was performed. Results Cell-mediated immune responses and cardiovascular functions are suppressed in males following trauma hemorrhage, whereas they are maintained or even enhanced in females in the proestrus state of the estrus cycle. Experimental studies have demonstrated that divergent im...

  3. Pinpointing brainstem mechanisms responsible for autonomic dysfunction in Rett syndrome: therapeutic perspectives for 5-HT1A agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Ana P; Bissonnette, John M; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by loss of function of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Reduced function of this ubiquitous transcriptional regulator has a devastating effect on the central nervous system. One of the most severe and life-threatening presentations of this syndrome is brainstem dysfunction, which results in autonomic disturbances such as breathing deficits, typified by episodes of breathing cessation intercalated with episodes of hyperventilation or irregular breathing. Defects in numerous neurotransmitter systems have been observed in Rett syndrome both in animal models and patients. Here we dedicate special attention to serotonin due to its role in promoting regular breathing, increasing vagal tone, regulating mood, alleviating Parkinsonian-like symptoms and potential for therapeutic translation. A promising new symptomatic strategy currently focuses on regulation of serotonergic function using highly selective serotonin type 1A (5-HT1A) "biased agonists." We address this newly emerging therapy for respiratory brainstem dysfunction and challenges for translation with a holistic perspective of Rett syndrome, considering potential mood and motor effects. PMID:24910619

  4. Impaired Neural Structure and Function Contributing to Autonomic Symptoms in Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M Harper

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS patients show major autonomic alterations in addition to their better-known breathing deficiencies. The processes underlying CCHS, mutations in the PHOX2B gene, target autonomic neuronal development, with frame shift extent contributing to symptom severity. Many autonomic characteristics, such as impaired pupillary constriction and poor temperature regulation, reflect parasympathetic alterations, and can include disturbed alimentary processes, with malabsorption and intestinal motility dyscontrol. The sympathetic nervous system changes can exert life-threatening outcomes, with dysregulation of sympathetic outflow leading to high blood pressure, time-altered and dampened heart rate and breathing responses to challenges, cardiac arrhythmia, profuse sweating, and poor fluid regulation. The central mechanisms contributing to failed autonomic processes are readily apparent from structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, which reveal substantial cortical thinning, tissue injury, and disrupted functional responses in hypothalamic, hippocampal, posterior thalamic, and basal ganglia sites and their descending projections, as well as insular, cingulate, and medial frontal cortices, which influence subcortical autonomic structures. Midbrain structures are also compromised, including the raphe system and its projections to cerebellar and medullary sites, the locus coeruleus, and medullary reflex integrating sites, including the dorsal and ventrolateral medullary nuclei. The damage to rostral autonomic sites overlaps metabolic, affective and cognitive regulatory regions, leading to hormonal disruption, anxiety, depression, behavioral control, and sudden death concerns. The injuries suggest that interventions for mitigating hypoxic exposure and nutrient loss may provide cellular protection, in the same fashion as interventions in other conditions with similar malabsorption, fluid turnover

  5. Strain dyssynchrony index determined by three-dimensional speckle area tracking can predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onishi Tetsuari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported strain dyssynchrony index assessed by two-dimensional speckle tracking strain, and a marker of both dyssynchrony and residual myocardial contractility, can predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT. A newly developed three-dimensional (3-D speckle tracking system can quantify endocardial area change ratio (area strain, which coupled with the factors of both longitudinal and circumferential strain, from all 16 standard left ventricular (LV segments using complete 3-D pyramidal datasets. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that strain dyssynchrony index using area tracking (ASDI can quantify dyssynchrony and predict response to CRT. Methods We studied 14 heart failure patients with ejection fraction of 27 ± 7% (all≤35% and QRS duration of 172 ± 30 ms (all≥120 ms who underwent CRT. Echocardiography was performed before and 6-month after CRT. ASDI was calculated as the average difference between peak and end-systolic area strain of LV endocardium obtained from 3-D speckle tracking imaging using 16 segments. Conventional dyssynchrony measures were assessed by interventricular mechanical delay, Yu Index, and two-dimensional radial dyssynchrony by speckle-tracking strain. Response was defined as a ≥15% decrease in LV end-systolic volume 6-month after CRT. Results ASDI ≥ 3.8% was the best predictor of response to CRT with a sensitivity of 78%, specificity of 100% and area under the curve (AUC of 0.93 (p Conclusions ASDI can predict responders and LV reverse remodeling following CRT. This novel index using the 3-D speckle tracking system, which shows circumferential and longitudinal LV dyssynchrony and residual endocardial contractility, may thus have clinical significance for CRT patients.

  6. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  7. The Effect of Noseband Tightening on Horses' Behavior, Eye Temperature, and Cardiac Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Fenner

    Full Text Available Restrictive nosebands are common in equestrian sport. This is concerning, as recent evidence suggests that very tight nosebands can cause a physiological stress response, and may compromise welfare. The objective of the current study was to investigate relationships that noseband tightness has with oral behavior and with physiological changes that indicate a stress response, such as increases in eye temperature (measured with infrared thermography and heart rate and decreases in heart rate variability (HRV. Horses (n = 12 wearing a double bridle and crank noseband, as is common in dressage at elite levels, were randomly assigned to four treatments: unfastened noseband (UN, conventional area under noseband (CAUN with two fingers of space available under the noseband, half conventional area under noseband (HCAUN with one finger of space under the noseband, and no area under the noseband (NAUN. During the tightest treatment (NAUN, horse heart rate increased (P = 0.003, HRV decreased (P < 0.001, and eye temperature increased (P = 0.011 compared with baseline readings, indicating a physiological stress response. The behavioral results suggest some effects from bits alone but the chief findings are the physiological readings that reflect responses to the nosebands at their tightest. Chewing decreased during the HCAUN (P < 0.001 and NAUN (P < 0.001 treatments. Yawning rates were negligible in all treatments. Similarly, licking was eliminated by the NAUN treatment. Following the removal of the noseband and double bridle during the recovery session, yawning (P = 0.015, swallowing (P = 0.003, and licking (P < 0.001 significantly increased compared with baseline, indicating a post-inhibitory rebound response. This suggests a rise in motivation to perform these behaviors and implies that their inhibition may place horses in a state of deprivation. It is evident that a very tight noseband can cause physiological stress responses and inhibit the expression of

  8. The Effect of Noseband Tightening on Horses’ Behavior, Eye Temperature, and Cardiac Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Samuel; McGreevy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Restrictive nosebands are common in equestrian sport. This is concerning, as recent evidence suggests that very tight nosebands can cause a physiological stress response, and may compromise welfare. The objective of the current study was to investigate relationships that noseband tightness has with oral behavior and with physiological changes that indicate a stress response, such as increases in eye temperature (measured with infrared thermography) and heart rate and decreases in heart rate variability (HRV). Horses (n = 12) wearing a double bridle and crank noseband, as is common in dressage at elite levels, were randomly assigned to four treatments: unfastened noseband (UN), conventional area under noseband (CAUN) with two fingers of space available under the noseband, half conventional area under noseband (HCAUN) with one finger of space under the noseband, and no area under the noseband (NAUN). During the tightest treatment (NAUN), horse heart rate increased (P = 0.003), HRV decreased (P < 0.001), and eye temperature increased (P = 0.011) compared with baseline readings, indicating a physiological stress response. The behavioral results suggest some effects from bits alone but the chief findings are the physiological readings that reflect responses to the nosebands at their tightest. Chewing decreased during the HCAUN (P < 0.001) and NAUN (P < 0.001) treatments. Yawning rates were negligible in all treatments. Similarly, licking was eliminated by the NAUN treatment. Following the removal of the noseband and double bridle during the recovery session, yawning (P = 0.015), swallowing (P = 0.003), and licking (P < 0.001) significantly increased compared with baseline, indicating a post-inhibitory rebound response. This suggests a rise in motivation to perform these behaviors and implies that their inhibition may place horses in a state of deprivation. It is evident that a very tight noseband can cause physiological stress responses and inhibit the expression of

  9. The Effect of Noseband Tightening on Horses' Behavior, Eye Temperature, and Cardiac Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Kate; Yoon, Samuel; White, Peter; Starling, Melissa; McGreevy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Restrictive nosebands are common in equestrian sport. This is concerning, as recent evidence suggests that very tight nosebands can cause a physiological stress response, and may compromise welfare. The objective of the current study was to investigate relationships that noseband tightness has with oral behavior and with physiological changes that indicate a stress response, such as increases in eye temperature (measured with infrared thermography) and heart rate and decreases in heart rate variability (HRV). Horses (n = 12) wearing a double bridle and crank noseband, as is common in dressage at elite levels, were randomly assigned to four treatments: unfastened noseband (UN), conventional area under noseband (CAUN) with two fingers of space available under the noseband, half conventional area under noseband (HCAUN) with one finger of space under the noseband, and no area under the noseband (NAUN). During the tightest treatment (NAUN), horse heart rate increased (P = 0.003), HRV decreased (P < 0.001), and eye temperature increased (P = 0.011) compared with baseline readings, indicating a physiological stress response. The behavioral results suggest some effects from bits alone but the chief findings are the physiological readings that reflect responses to the nosebands at their tightest. Chewing decreased during the HCAUN (P < 0.001) and NAUN (P < 0.001) treatments. Yawning rates were negligible in all treatments. Similarly, licking was eliminated by the NAUN treatment. Following the removal of the noseband and double bridle during the recovery session, yawning (P = 0.015), swallowing (P = 0.003), and licking (P < 0.001) significantly increased compared with baseline, indicating a post-inhibitory rebound response. This suggests a rise in motivation to perform these behaviors and implies that their inhibition may place horses in a state of deprivation. It is evident that a very tight noseband can cause physiological stress responses and inhibit the expression of

  10. Left ventricular dysfunction in normotensive Type 1 diabetic patients: the impact of autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskiran, M; Rasmussen, Verner; Rasmussen, Bo Valdemar; Fritz-Hansen, T; Larsson, H. B. W.; Jensen, G. B.; Hilsted, J

    Aims The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for increased cardiovascular mortality in diabetic autonomic neuropathy (AN) are largely unknown. The aim was to determine the relative role of AN in the pathogenesis of cardiac diastolic dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy in Type 1...... diabetes. Methods Ten Type 1 diabetic patients with AN, defined by cardiovascular tests (AN+) and 10 age- and sex-matched patients without neuropathy (AN-) as well as 10 healthy subjects (C) participated in the study. Left ventricular diastolic function was assessed by Doppler echocardiography, whilst...... showed a significantly greater left ventricular mass index in AN+ compared with C [103 +/- 4 g/m(2) (AN+) vs. 98 +/- 7 (AN-) and 92 +/- 4 g/m(2) (C), P < 0.05]. Conclusion Autonomic neuropathy is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction in Type 1 diabetic patients...

  11. p21(CIP1/WAF1)-dependent inhibition of cardiac hypertrophy in response to Angiotensin II involves Akt/Myc and pRb signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Ludger; Grothe, Daniela; Billia, Filio

    2016-09-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1) (p21) is highly expressed in the adult heart. However, in response to stress, its expression is downregulated. Therefore, we investigated the role of p21 in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophic growth. At 2 months of age, p21 knockout mice (p21KO) lack an overt cardiac phenotype. In contrast, by 10 months of age, p21KO developed age-dependent cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. After 3 weeks of trans-aortic banding (TAB), the heart/body weight ratio in 11 week old p21KO mice increased by 57%, as compared to 42% in wild type mice indicating that p21KO have a higher susceptibility to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We then chronically infused 8 week old wild type mice with Angiotensin II (2.0mg/kg/min) or saline subcutaneously by osmotic pumps for 14 days. Recombinant TAT conjugated p21 protein variants (10mg/kg body weight) or saline were intraperitoneally injected once daily for 14 days into Angiotensin II and saline-infused animals. Angiotensin II treated mice developed pathological cardiac hypertrophy with an average increase of 38% in heart/body weight ratios, as compared to saline-treated controls. Reconstitution of p21 function by TAT.p21 protein transduction prevented Angiotensin II-dependent development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Taken together, our genetic and biochemical data show an important function of p21 in the regulation of growth-related processes in the heart. PMID:27486069

  12. The Insular Cortex and the Regulation of Cardiac Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Stephen; Cechetto, David

    2016-04-01

    Cortical representation of the heart challenges the orthodox view that cardiac regulation is confined to stereotyped, preprogrammed and rigid responses to exteroceptive or interoceptive environmental stimuli. The insula has been the region most studied in this regard; the results of clinical, experimental, and functional radiological studies show a complex interweave of activity with patterns dynamically varying regarding lateralization and antero-posterior distribution of responsive insular regions. Either acting alone or together with other cortical areas including the anterior cingulate, medial prefrontal, and orbito-frontal cortices as part of a concerted network, the insula can imbue perceptions with autonomic color providing emotional salience, and aiding in learning and behavioral decision choice. In these functions, cardiovascular input and the right anterior insula appear to play an important, if not pivotal role. At a more basic level, the insula gauges cardiovascular responses to exteroceptive and interoceptive stimuli, taking into account memory, cognitive, and reflexive constructs thereby ensuring appropriate survival responses and maintaining emotional and physiological homeostasis. When acquired derangements to the insula occur after stroke, during a seizure or from abnormal central processing of interoceptive or exteroceptive environmental cues as in psychiatric disorders, serious consequences can arise including cardiac electrophysiological, structural and contractile dysfunction and sudden cardiac death. PMID:27065176

  13. A non-cardiomyocyte autonomous mechanism of cardioprotection involving the SLO1 BK channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Wojtovich

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Opening of BK-type Ca2+ activated K+ channels protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. However, the location of BK channels responsible for cardioprotection is debated. Herein we confirmed that openers of the SLO1 BK channel, NS1619 and NS11021, were protective in a mouse perfused heart model of IR injury. As anticipated, deletion of the Slo1 gene blocked this protection. However, in an isolated cardiomyocyte model of IR injury, protection by NS1619 and NS11021 was insensitive to Slo1 deletion. These data suggest that protection in intact hearts occurs by a non-cardiomyocyte autonomous, SLO1-dependent, mechanism. In this regard, an in-situ assay of intrinsic cardiac neuronal function (tachycardic response to nicotine revealed that NS1619 preserved cardiac neurons following IR injury. Furthermore, blockade of synaptic transmission by hexamethonium suppressed cardioprotection by NS1619 in intact hearts. These results suggest that opening SLO1 protects the heart during IR injury, via a mechanism that involves intrinsic cardiac neurons. Cardiac neuronal ion channels may be useful therapeutic targets for eliciting cardioprotection.

  14. Cardiovascular and autonomic modulation by the central nervous system after aerobic exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Martins-Pinge

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in maintaining homeostasis under normal and pathological conditions. The sympathetic tone, particularly for the cardiovascular system, is generated by sympathetic discharges originating in specific areas of the brainstem. Aerobic exercise training promotes several cardiovascular adjustments that are influenced by the central areas involved in the output of the autonomic nervous system. In this review, we emphasize the studies that investigate aerobic exercise training protocols to identify the cardiovascular adaptations that may be the result of central nervous system plasticity due to chronic exercise. The focus of our study is on some groups of neurons involved in sympathetic regulation. They include the nucleus tractus solitarii, caudal ventrolateral medulla and the rostral ventrolateral medulla that maintain and regulate the cardiac and vascular autonomic tonus. We also discuss studies that demonstrate the involvement of supramedullary areas in exercise training modulation, with emphasis on the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, an important area of integration for autonomic and neuroendocrine responses. The results of these studies suggest that the beneficial effects of physical activity may be due, at least in part, to reductions in sympathetic nervous system activity. Conversely, with the recent association of physical inactivity with chronic disease, these data may also suggest that increases in sympathetic nervous system activity contribute to the increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

  15. Autonomic and endocrine control of cardiovascular function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard; Gordan; Judith; K; Gwathmey; Lai-Hua; Xie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the heart is to contract and pump oxygenated blood to the body and deoxygenated blood to the lungs.To achieve this goal,a normal human heart must beat regularly and continuously for one’s entire life.Heartbeats originate from the rhythmic pacing discharge from the sinoatrial(SA) node within the heart itself.In the absence of extrinsic neural or hormonal influences,the SA node pacing rate would be about 100 beats per minute.Heart rate and cardiac output,however,must vary in response to the needs of the body’s cells for oxygen and nutrients under varying conditions.In order to respond rapidly to the changing requirements of the body’s tissues,the heart rate and contractility are regulated by the nervous system,hormones,and other factors.Here we review how the cardiovascular system is controlled and influenced by not only a unique intrinsic system,but is also heavily influenced by the autonomic nervous system as well as the endocrine system.

  16. Ryanodine modification of cardiac muscle responses to potassium-free solutions. Evidence for inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    To test whether ryanodine blocks the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle, we examined its effects on the aftercontractions and transient depolarizations or transient inward currents developed by guinea pig papillary muscles and voltage-clamped calf cardiac Purkinje fibers in potassium-free solutions. Ryanodine (0.1-1.0 microM) abolished or prevented aftercontractions and transient depolarizations by the papillary muscles without affecting any of the other sequ...

  17. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  18. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed 9/2/2015. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy Summary. Dysautonomia International . http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID= ... page Basic Information In Depth Information Basic Information Dysautonomia International offers an information page on Autoimmune autonomic ...

  19. EFFECTS OF MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE (UMAMI TASTE) WITH AND WITHOUT GUANOSINE 5'-MONOPHOSPHATE ON RAT AUTONOMIC RESPONSES TO MEALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEFFENS, AB; LEUVENINK, H; SCHEURINK, AJW

    1994-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as a food additive to improve the taste of food. The effect of MSG on sweet taste is enhanced by guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP). Because increased palatability is known to increase the vagally mediated preabsorptive insulin response (PIR), we hypothesized that MS

  20. A Simple Autonomous Current-Sharing Control Strategy for Fast Dynamic Response of Parallel Inverters in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Yajuan; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel control strategy based on a virtual resistance and a phase locked loop for parallel three-phase inverters. The proposed controller can overcome the drawbacks of the conventional droop control such as slow transient response, complex design, and limited stability margins...

  1. Cardiac atrial circadian rhythms in PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE and per1:luc mice: amplitude and phase responses to glucocorticoid signaling and medium treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daan R van der Veen

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in cardiac function are apparent in e.g., blood pressure, heart rate, and acute adverse cardiac events. A circadian clock in heart tissue has been identified, but entrainment pathways of this clock are still unclear. We cultured tissues of mice carrying bioluminescence reporters of the core clock genes, period 1 or 2 (per1(luc or PER2(LUC and compared in vitro responses of atrium to treatment with medium and a synthetic glucocorticoid (dexamethasone [DEX] to that of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and liver. We observed that PER2(LUC, but not per1(luc is rhythmic in atrial tissue, while both per1(luc and PER2(LUC exhibit rhythmicity in other cultured tissues. In contrast to the SCN and liver, both per1(luc and PER2(LUC bioluminescence amplitudes were increased in response to DEX treatment, and the PER2(LUC amplitude response was dependent on the time of treatment. Large phase-shift responses to both medium and DEX treatments were observed in the atrium, and phase responses to medium treatment were not attributed to serum content but the treatment procedure itself. The phase-response curves of atrium to both DEX and medium treatments were found to be different to the liver. Moreover, the time of day of the culturing procedure itself influenced the phase of the circadian clock in each of the cultured tissues, but the magnitude of this response was uniquely large in atrial tissue. The current data describe novel entrainment signals for the atrial circadian clock and specifically highlight entrainment by mechanical treatment, an intriguing observation considering the mechanical nature of cardiac tissue.

  2. Cardiac Atrial Circadian Rhythms in PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE and per1:luc Mice: Amplitude and Phase Responses to Glucocorticoid Signaling and Medium Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yang; Li, Lei; Duffield, Giles E.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in cardiac function are apparent in e.g., blood pressure, heart rate, and acute adverse cardiac events. A circadian clock in heart tissue has been identified, but entrainment pathways of this clock are still unclear. We cultured tissues of mice carrying bioluminescence reporters of the core clock genes, period 1 or 2 (per1luc or PER2LUC) and compared in vitro responses of atrium to treatment with medium and a synthetic glucocorticoid (dexamethasone [DEX]) to that of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and liver. We observed that PER2LUC, but not per1luc is rhythmic in atrial tissue, while both per1luc and PER2LUC exhibit rhythmicity in other cultured tissues. In contrast to the SCN and liver, both per1luc and PER2LUC bioluminescence amplitudes were increased in response to DEX treatment, and the PER2LUC amplitude response was dependent on the time of treatment. Large phase-shift responses to both medium and DEX treatments were observed in the atrium, and phase responses to medium treatment were not attributed to serum content but the treatment procedure itself. The phase-response curves of atrium to both DEX and medium treatments were found to be different to the liver. Moreover, the time of day of the culturing procedure itself influenced the phase of the circadian clock in each of the cultured tissues, but the magnitude of this response was uniquely large in atrial tissue. The current data describe novel entrainment signals for the atrial circadian clock and specifically highlight entrainment by mechanical treatment, an intriguing observation considering the mechanical nature of cardiac tissue. PMID:23110090

  3. Salmeterol enhances the cardiac response to gene therapy in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Oh; Li, Songtao; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human (rh) acid α-glucosidase (GAA) has prolonged the survival of patients. However, the paucity of cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) in skeletal muscle, where it is needed to take up rhGAA, correlated with a poor response to ERT by muscle in Pompe disease. Clenbuterol, a selective β2 receptor agonist, enhanced the CI-MPR expression in striated muscle through Igf-1 mediated muscle hypertrophy, which correlated with increased CI-MPR (also the Igf-2 receptor) expression. In this study we have evaluated 4 new drugs in GAA knockout (KO) mice in combination with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding human GAA, 3 alternative β2 agonists and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Mice were injected with AAV2/9-CBhGAA (1E+11 vector particles) at a dose that was not effective at clearing glycogen storage from the heart. Heart GAA activity was significantly increased by either salmeterol (pclenbuterol (p<0.01) in combination with the AAV vector, in comparison with untreated GAA-KO mice. Wirehang testing revealed that salmeterol and the AAV vector significantly increased performance, in comparison with the AAV vector alone (p<0.001). Similarly, salmeterol with the vector increased performance significantly more than any of the other drugs. The most effective individual drugs had no significant effect in absence of vector, in comparison with untreated mice. Thus, salmeterol should be further developed as adjunctive therapy in combination with either ERT or gene therapy for Pompe disease. PMID:27017193

  4. Effect of Sustained Human Centrifugation on Autonomic Cardiovascular and Vestibular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Wood, Scott J.; Brown, Troy E.; Benavides, Edgar W.; Harm, Deborah L.; Rupert, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    Repeated exposure to +Gz enhances human baroreflex responsiveness and improves tolerance to cardiovascular stress. However, both sustained exposure to +Gx and changes in otolith function resulting from the gravitational changes of space flight and parabolic flight may adversely affect autonomic cardiovascular function and orthostatic tolerance. HYPOTHESES: Baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance are acutely improved by a single sustained (30 min) exposure to +3Gz but not +3Gx. Moreover, after 30 min of +3Gx, any changes that occur in autonomic cardiovascular function will relate commensurately to changes in otolith function. METHODS: Twenty-two healthy human subjects were first exposed to 5 min of +3 Gz centrifugation and then subsequently up to a total of30 min of either +3Gz (n = 15) or +3Gx (n = 7) centrifugation. Tests of autonomic cardiovascular function both before and after both types of centrifugation included: (a) power spectral determinations of beat-to-beat R-R intervals and arterial pressures; (b) carotid-cardiac baroreflex tests; ( c) Valsalva tests; and (d) 30-min head-up tilt (HUT) tests. Otolith function was assessed during centrifugation by the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex and both before and after centrifugation by measurements of ocular counter-rolling and dynamic posturography. RESULTS: All four +3Gz subjects who were intolerant to HUT before centrifugation became tolerant to HUT after centrifugation. The operational point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex and the Valsalva-related baroreflex were also enhanced in the +3Gz group but not in the +3Gx group. No significant vestibular-autonomic relationships were detected, other than a significant vestibular-cerebrovascular interaction reported previously. CONCLUSIONS: A single, sustained exposure to +3 Gz centrifugation acutely improves baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance whereas a similar exposure to +3 Gx centrifugation appears to have less effect.

  5. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Niño Mantilla

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is a serious problem in diabetic patients. The cardiovacular autonomic neuropathy is the most important autonomic dysfuntion for it´s implication in the increasesof the mortality rate in diabetis patients. tis ethiopatogenesis is the result of a multifactorial process caused by chronic hyperglycemia, ending up in damage of the autonomic fibers thet innervate the heart and blood vessels, leading to dysfuntional hearth rate control and abnormal vascular dynamics. the associated clinical manifestations include orthotatic hypotension, excecise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular liability and silent myocardial ischemia. Being important its recognition, quantitative test to evaluate the cardiovascular funtion, to value its evolution and the effects of the treatment ahould be done, being the most used, the hearth rate response to standing test, and teh valsalva maneuver. the handling of this entity is done improving control of glucose blood levels its the most effective way to prevent the cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

  6. Autonomous Mission Operations Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    As light time delays increase, the number of such situations in which crew autonomy is the best way to conduct the mission is expected to increase. However, there are significant open questions regarding which functions to allocate to ground and crew as the time delays increase. In situations where the ideal solution is to allocate responsibility to the crew and the vehicle, a second question arises: should the activity be the responsibility of the crew or an automated vehicle function? More specifically, we must answer the following questions: What aspects of mission operation responsibilities (Plan, Train, Fly) should be allocated to ground based or vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control in the presence of significant light-time delay between the vehicle and the Earth?How should the allocated ground based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed across the flight control team and ground system automation? How should the allocated vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed between the flight crew and onboard system automation?When during the mission should responsibility shift from flight control team to crew or from crew to vehicle, and what should the process of shifting responsibility be as the mission progresses? NASA is developing a roadmap of capabilities for Autonomous Mission Operations for human spaceflight. This presentation will describe the current state of development of this roadmap, with specific attention to in-space inspection tasks that crews might perform with minimum assistance from the ground.

  7. Bioimpedance-Based Wearable Measurement Instrumentation for Studying the Autonomic Nerve System Response to Stressful Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of mental stress on workers under hard and stressful conditions is critical to identify which workers are not ready to undertake a mission that might put in risk their own life and the life of others. The ATREC project aims to enable Real Time Assessment of Mental Stress of the Spanish Armed Forces during military activities. Integrating sensors with garments and using wearable measurement devices, the following physiological measurements were recorded: heart and respiration rate, skin galvanic response as well as peripheral temperature. The measuring garments are the following: a sensorized glove, an upper-arm strap and a repositionable textrode chest strap system with 6 textrodes. The implemented textile-enabled instrumentation contains: one skin galvanometer, two temperature sensors, for skin and environmental, and an Impedance Cardiographer/Pneumographer containing a 1 channel ECG amplifier to record cardiogenic biopotentials. The implemented wearable systems operated accordingly to the specifications and are ready to be used for the mental stress experiments that will be executed in the coming phases of the project in healthy volunteers.

  8. Bioimpedance-Based Wearable Measurement Instrumentation for Studying the Autonomic Nerve System Response to Stressful Working Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J.; Álvarez, L.; Buendía, R.; Ayllón, D.; Llerena, C.; Gil-Pita, R.; Seoane, F.

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of mental stress on workers under hard and stressful conditions is critical to identify which workers are not ready to undertake a mission that might put in risk their own life and the life of others. The ATREC project aims to enable Real Time Assessment of Mental Stress of the Spanish Armed Forces during military activities. Integrating sensors with garments and using wearable measurement devices, the following physiological measurements were recorded: heart and respiration rate, skin galvanic response as well as peripheral temperature. The measuring garments are the following: a sensorized glove, an upper-arm strap and a repositionable textrode chest strap system with 6 textrodes. The implemented textile-enabled instrumentation contains: one skin galvanometer, two temperature sensors, for skin and environmental, and an Impedance Cardiographer/Pneumographer containing a 1 channel ECG amplifier to record cardiogenic biopotentials. The implemented wearable systems operated accordingly to the specifications and are ready to be used for the mental stress experiments that will be executed in the coming phases of the project in healthy volunteers.

  9. Respective roles of scatter, attenuation, depth-dependent collimator response and finite spatial resolution in cardiac single-photon emission tomography quantitation: a Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Fakhri, G.N.; Buvat, I.; Pelegrini, M.; Benali, H.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Paola, R. di [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital Necker, 75 - Paris (France); Almeida, P.; Bendriem, B. [SHFJ, Groupe Instrumentation PET/SPET, Orsay (France)

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative influence of scatter, attenuation, depth-dependent collimator response and finite spatial resolution upon the image characteristics in cardiac single-photon emission tomography (SPET). An acquisition of an anthropomorphic cardiac phantom was performed together with corresponding SPET Monte Carlo simulations. The cardiac phantom and the Monte Carlo simulations were designed so that the effect of scatter, attenuation, depth-dependent collimator response and finite spatial resolution could be studied individually and in combination. The impact of each physical effect and of combinations of effects was studied in terms of absolute and relative quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the resulting images. No corrections for these effects were assessed. Results obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and real acquisitions were in excellent agreement. Attenuation introduced about 90% activity underestimation in a 10-mm-thick left ventricle wall while finite spatial resolution alone introduced about 30% activity underestimation. Scatter had a negligible impact on quantitative accuracy in the recontructed slices when attenuation was present. Neither bull`s eye map homogeneity nor contrast between a hot and a cold region were affected by depth-dependent collimator response or finite spatial resolution. Bull`s eye map homogeneity was severely affected by attenuation but not by scatter. Attenuation and scatter reduced contrast by about 20% each. Both attenuation and scatter increased the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) characterizing the spatial resolution of the imaging system by {approx}1 mm each but the main effect responsible for the observed 11-mm FWHM spatial resolution was the depth-dependent collimator response. SNR was reduced by a factor of {approx}2.5 because of attenuation, while scattered counts increased SNR by {approx}10%. In conclusion, the quantification of the

  10. Female Listeners' Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners' respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners' respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners' heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions. PMID:26925009

  11. Female Listeners’ Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners’ respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners’ respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners’ heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions. PMID:26925009

  12. Female listeners’ autonomic responses to dramatic shifts between loud and soft music/sound passages: a study of heavy metal songs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Han eCheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners’ respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners’ respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listener’s heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research of the temporal dynamics of musical emotions.

  13. Autonomic Nervous System Responses During Perception of Masked Speech may Reflect Constructs other than Subjective Listening Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Alexander L; MacPherson, Megan K; Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Alvar, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Typically, understanding speech seems effortless and automatic. However, a variety of factors may, independently or interactively, make listening more effortful. Physiological measures may help to distinguish between the application of different cognitive mechanisms whose operation is perceived as effortful. In the present study, physiological and behavioral measures associated with task demand were collected along with behavioral measures of performance while participants listened to and repeated sentences. The goal was to measure psychophysiological reactivity associated with three degraded listening conditions, each of which differed in terms of the source of the difficulty (distortion, energetic masking, and informational masking), and therefore were expected to engage different cognitive mechanisms. These conditions were chosen to be matched for overall performance (keywords correct), and were compared to listening to unmasked speech produced by a natural voice. The three degraded conditions were: (1) Unmasked speech produced by a computer speech synthesizer, (2) Speech produced by a natural voice and masked byspeech-shaped noise and (3) Speech produced by a natural voice and masked by two-talker babble. Masked conditions were both presented at a -8 dB signal to noise ratio (SNR), a level shown in previous research to result in comparable levels of performance for these stimuli and maskers. Performance was measured in terms of proportion of key words identified correctly, and task demand or effort was quantified subjectively by self-report. Measures of psychophysiological reactivity included electrodermal (skin conductance) response frequency and amplitude, blood pulse amplitude and pulse rate. Results suggest that the two masked conditions evoked stronger psychophysiological reactivity than did the two unmasked conditions even when behavioral measures of listening performance and listeners' subjective perception of task demand were comparable across the three

  14. Chronic stress induces a hyporeactivity of the autonomic nervous system in response to acute mental stressor and impairs cognitive performance in business executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Renata Roland; Díaz, Miguel Mauricio; Santos, Tatiane Vanessa da Silva; Bernardes, Jean Tofoles Martins; Peixoto, Leonardo Gomes; Bocanegra, Olga Lucia; Neto, Morun Bernardino; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the incidence of chronic stress in business executives (109 subjects: 75 male and 34 female) and its relationship with cortisol levels, cognitive performance, and autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity after an acute mental stressor. Blood samples were collected from the subjects to measure cortisol concentration. After the sample collection, the subjects completed the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults and the Stroop Color-Word Test to evaluate stress and cognitive performance levels, respectively. Saliva samples were collected prior to, immediately after, and five minutes after the test. The results revealed that 90.1% of the stressed subjects experienced stress phases that are considered chronic stress. At rest, the subjects with chronic stress showed higher cortisol levels, and no gender differences were observed. No differences were found between the stressed and non-stressed subjects regarding salivary amylase activity prior to test. Chronic stress also impaired performance on the Stroop test, which revealed higher rates of error and longer reaction times in the incongruent stimulus task independently of gender. For the congruent stimulus task of the Stroop test, the stressed males presented a higher rate of errors than the non-stressed males and a longer reaction time than the stressed females. After the acute mental stressor, the non-stressed male group showed an increase in salivary alpha-amylase activity, which returned to the initial values five minutes after the test; this ANS reactivity was not observed in the chronically stressed male subjects. The ANS responses of the non-stressed vs stressed female groups were not different prior to or after the Stroop test. This study is the first to demonstrate a blunted reactivity of the ANS when male subjects with chronic psychological stress were subjected to an acute mental stressor, and this change could contribute to impairments in cognitive performance. PMID:25807003

  15. Chronic stress induces a hyporeactivity of the autonomic nervous system in response to acute mental stressor and impairs cognitive performance in business executives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Roland Teixeira

    Full Text Available The present study examined the incidence of chronic stress in business executives (109 subjects: 75 male and 34 female and its relationship with cortisol levels, cognitive performance, and autonomic nervous system (ANS reactivity after an acute mental stressor. Blood samples were collected from the subjects to measure cortisol concentration. After the sample collection, the subjects completed the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults and the Stroop Color-Word Test to evaluate stress and cognitive performance levels, respectively. Saliva samples were collected prior to, immediately after, and five minutes after the test. The results revealed that 90.1% of the stressed subjects experienced stress phases that are considered chronic stress. At rest, the subjects with chronic stress showed higher cortisol levels, and no gender differences were observed. No differences were found between the stressed and non-stressed subjects regarding salivary amylase activity prior to test. Chronic stress also impaired performance on the Stroop test, which revealed higher rates of error and longer reaction times in the incongruent stimulus task independently of gender. For the congruent stimulus task of the Stroop test, the stressed males presented a higher rate of errors than the non-stressed males and a longer reaction time than the stressed females. After the acute mental stressor, the non-stressed male group showed an increase in salivary alpha-amylase activity, which returned to the initial values five minutes after the test; this ANS reactivity was not observed in the chronically stressed male subjects. The ANS responses of the non-stressed vs stressed female groups were not different prior to or after the Stroop test. This study is the first to demonstrate a blunted reactivity of the ANS when male subjects with chronic psychological stress were subjected to an acute mental stressor, and this change could contribute to impairments in cognitive

  16. Sensorized Garments and Textrode-Enabled Measurement Instrumentation for Ambulatory Assessment of the Autonomic Nervous System Response in the ATREC Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosme Llerena

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in textile materials, technology and miniaturization of electronics for measurement instrumentation has boosted the development of wearable measurement systems. In several projects sensorized garments and non-invasive instrumentation have been integrated to assess on emotional, cognitive responses as well as physical arousal and status of mental stress through the study of the autonomous nervous system. Assessing the mental state of workers under stressful conditions is critical to identify which workers are in the proper state of mind and which are not ready to undertake a mission, which might consequently risk their own life and the lives of others. The project Assessment in Real Time of the Stress in Combatants (ATREC aims to enable real time assessment of mental stress of the Spanish Armed Forces during military activities using a wearable measurement system containing sensorized garments and textile-enabled non-invasive instrumentation. This work describes the multiparametric sensorized garments and measurement instrumentation implemented in the first phase of the project required to evaluate physiological indicators and recording candidates that can be useful for detection of mental stress. For such purpose different sensorized garments have been constructed: a textrode chest-strap system with six repositionable textrodes, a sensorized glove and an upper-arm strap. The implemented textile-enabled instrumentation contains one skin galvanometer, two temperature sensors for skin and environmental temperature and an impedance pneumographer containing a 1-channel ECG amplifier to record cardiogenic biopotentials. With such combinations of garments and non-invasive measurement devices, a multiparametric wearable measurement system has been implemented able to record the following physiological parameters: heart and respiration rate, skin galvanic response, environmental and peripheral temperature. To ensure the proper functioning of the

  17. Sensorized garments and textrode-enabled measurement instrumentation for ambulatory assessment of the autonomic nervous system response in the ATREC project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Fernando; Ferreira, Javier; Alvarez, Lorena; Buendia, Ruben; Ayllón, David; Llerena, Cosme; Gil-Pita, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Advances in textile materials, technology and miniaturization of electronics for measurement instrumentation has boosted the development of wearable measurement systems. In several projects sensorized garments and non-invasive instrumentation have been integrated to assess on emotional, cognitive responses as well as physical arousal and status of mental stress through the study of the autonomous nervous system. Assessing the mental state of workers under stressful conditions is critical to identify which workers are in the proper state of mind and which are not ready to undertake a mission, which might consequently risk their own life and the lives of others. The project Assessment in Real Time of the Stress in Combatants (ATREC) aims to enable real time assessment of mental stress of the Spanish Armed Forces during military activities using a wearable measurement system containing sensorized garments and textile-enabled non-invasive instrumentation. This work describes the multiparametric sensorized garments and measurement instrumentation implemented in the first phase of the project required to evaluate physiological indicators and recording candidates that can be useful for detection of mental stress. For such purpose different sensorized garments have been constructed: a textrode chest-strap system with six repositionable textrodes, a sensorized glove and an upper-arm strap. The implemented textile-enabled instrumentation contains one skin galvanometer, two temperature sensors for skin and environmental temperature and an impedance pneumographer containing a 1-channel ECG amplifier to record cardiogenic biopotentials. With such combinations of garments and non-invasive measurement devices, a multiparametric wearable measurement system has been implemented able to record the following physiological parameters: heart and respiration rate, skin galvanic response, environmental and peripheral temperature. To ensure the proper functioning of the implemented

  18. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, c

  19. Pregnancy as a cardiac stress model

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eunhee; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy occurs during pregnancy as a consequence of both volume overload and hormonal changes. Both pregnancy- and exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy are generally thought to be similar and physiological. Despite the fact that there are shared transcriptional responses in both forms of cardiac adaptation, pregnancy results in a distinct signature of gene expression in the heart. In some cases, however, pregnancy can induce adverse cardiac events in previously healthy women witho...

  20. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    OpenAIRE

    Kuster, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, cardiac hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure and is therefore called pathological hypertrophy. That hypertrophy is not bad per se, is illustrated by the hyp...

  1. The impact of lifestyle-related risk factors on cardiac response to ischemia and possibilities to restore impaired ischemic tolerance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ravingerová, T.; Čarnická, S.; Nemčeková, M.; Ledvényiová, V.; Adameová, A.; Khandelwal, V. K. M.; Zálešák, M.; Kolář, František

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, Suppl.2 (2012), S1-S10. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB12SK164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : lifestyle risk factors * myocardial ischemia * gender -related differences * cardiac adaptation * pleiotropic effects Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  2. Baseline Systolic Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Test Can Predict Exercise Indices following Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    OpenAIRE

    Akram Sardari; Mostafa Nejatian; Mehrdad Sheikhvatan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Systolic blood pressure recovery (rSBP) is of prognostic value for predicting the survival and co-morbidity rate in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This study investigated the association between rSBP and exercise indices after complete cardiac rehabilitation program (CR) in a population-based sample of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).Methods: The sample population consisted of 352 patients who underwent pure CABG. The patients underwent sta...

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  4. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  5. Autonomic nervous dysfunction in hamsters infected with West Nile virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    Full Text Available Clinical studies and case reports clearly document that West Nile virus (WNV can cause respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI complications. Other functions controlled by the autonomic nervous system may also be directly affected by WNV, such as bladder and cardiac functions. To investigate how WNV can cause autonomic dysfunctions, we focused on the cardiac and GI dysfunctions of rodents infected with WNV. Infected hamsters had distension of the stomach and intestines at day 9 after viral challenge. GI motility was detected by a dye retention assay; phenol red dye was retained more in the stomachs of infected hamsters as compared to sham-infected hamsters. The amplitudes of electromygraphs (EMGs of intestinal muscles were significantly reduced. Myenteric neurons that innervate the intestines, in addition to neurons in the brain stem, were identified to be infected with WNV. These data suggest that infected neurons controlling autonomic function were the cause of GI dysfunction in WNV-infected hamsters. Using radiotelemetry to record electrocardiograms and to measure heart rate variability (HRV, a well-accepted readout for autonomic function, we determined that HRV and autonomic function were suppressed in WNV-infected hamsters. Cardiac histopathology was observed at day 9 only in the right atrium, which was coincident with WNV staining. A subset of WNV infected cells was identified among cells with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel 4 (HCN4 as a marker for cells in the sinoatrial (SA and atrioventricular (AV nodes. The unique contribution of this study is the discovery that WNV infection of hamsters can lead to autonomic dysfunction as determined by reduced HRV and reduced EMG amplitudes of the GI tract. These data may model autonomic dysfunction of the human West Nile neurological disease.

  6. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Costello BT; Nadel J.; Taylor AJ

    2016-01-01

    Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting syst...

  7. Funções autonômica cardíaca e mecânica ventricular na cardiopatia chagásica crônica assintomática Cardiac autonomic and ventricular mechanical functions in asymptomatic chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel França Vasconcelos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A associação das funções autonômica cardíaca e ventricular sisto-diastólica variavelmente alteradas ainda é controversa e pouco explorada na cardiopatia chagásica crônica. OBJETIVO: Avaliar em que extensão as funções autonômica cardíaca e mecânica ventricular estão alteradas e se ambas estão relacionadas na cardiopatia chagásica assintomática. MÉTODOS: EM 13 cardiopatas chagásicos assintomáticos e 15 indivíduos normais (grupo controle, foram avaliadas e correlacionadas a modulação autonômica da variabilidade da frequência cardíaca durante cinco minutos, nos domínios temporal e espectral, nas posições supina e ortostática, e a função ventricular com base em variáveis morfofuncionais Doppler ecocardiográficas. A análise estatística empregou o teste de Mann-Whitney e a correlação de Spearman. RESULTADOS: Em ambas as posições, os índices temporais (p = 0,0004-0,01 e as áreas espectrais total (p = 0,0007-0,005 e absoluta, de baixa e alta frequências (p = 0,0001-0,002, mostraram-se menores no grupo chagásico. O balanço vagossimpático mostrou-se semelhante em ambas as posturas (p = 0,43-0,89. As variáveis ecocardiográficas não diferiram entre os grupos (p = 0,13-0,82, exceto o diâmetro sistólico final do ventrículo esquerdo que se mostrou maior (p = 0,04, correlacionando-se diretamente com os reduzidos índices da modulação autonômica global (p = 0,01-0,04 e parassimpática (p = 0,002-0,01, nos pacientes chagásicos, em posição ortostática. CONCLUSÃO: AS DEpressões simpática e parassimpática com balanço preservado associaram-se apenas a um indicador de disfunção ventricular. Isso sugere que a disfunção autonômica cardíaca pode preceder e ser independentemente mais severa que a disfunção ventricular, não havendo associação causal entre ambos os distúrbios na cardiopatia chagásica crônica.BACKGROUND: The association of variably altered cardiac autonomic and

  8. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control: effects of posture and autonomic blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, T. J.; Appel, M. L.; Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We applied system identification to the analysis of fluctuations in heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize quantitatively the physiological mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these variables. We characterized two autonomically mediated coupling mechanisms [the heart rate baroreflex (HR baroreflex) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (ILV-HR)] and two mechanically mediated coupling mechanisms [the blood pressure wavelet generated with each cardiac contraction (circulatory mechanics) and the direct mechanical effects of respiration on blood pressure (ILV-->ABP)]. We evaluated the method in humans studied in the supine and standing postures under control conditions and under conditions of beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic pharmacological blockades. Combined beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade abolished the autonomically mediated couplings while preserving the mechanically mediated coupling. Selective autonomic blockade and postural changes also altered the couplings in a manner consistent with known physiological mechanisms. System identification is an "inverse-modeling" technique that provides a means for creating a closed-loop model of cardiovascular regulation for an individual subject without altering the underlying physiological control mechanisms.

  9. Short-Term Effects of Isotonic Handgrip Exercise on Cardiovascular Autonomic Reactivity in Healthy Young Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nileshkumar H Patel, Hasmukh D Shah, Wasim A Shaikh, Sushil K Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Background: Exercise is a potent stimulus for sympathetic nervous system activation. But the compliance of people for routine form of exercise for BP control has not been very encouraging. Objective of the study was to determine the short-term effects of isotonic handgrip exercise on cardiovascular autonomic reactivity in healthy adolescents and to find a user friendly exercise which help in reducing blood pressure. Method and Materials: Present study was conducted on 50 young healthy adolescents in the age group of 17–19 years. Isotonic handgrip exercise was performed for 20 minutes at the rate 12 contractions per minute (2 sec contraction/3 sec relaxation at an intensity of 30%MVC using Ball-Squeeze Dynamometer. Vascular sympathetic reactivity and cardiac parasympathetic reactivity were tested at baseline and during recovery period (Immediate- post-exercise and 1 hour–post-exercise. Result: There were no changes in the parameters (Expiration: Inspiration ratio and Valsalva Ratio measuring parasympathetic reactivity. Sympathetic reactivity as evaluated by diastolic blood pressure responses to isometric handgrip test (HGT and cold pressor test (CPT showed no significant decreases. No significant difference was observed in cardiovascular autonomic reactivity during immediate and 1 hr post-exercise recovery in both boys and girls. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the exercise regime under consideration could not produce any short-term beneficial effects with respect to cardiovascular autonomic reactivity."

  10. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias

    OpenAIRE

    Benoliel, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs) are headaches/facial pains classified together based on:a suspected common pathophysiology involving the trigeminovascular system, the trigeminoparasympathetic reflex and centres controlling circadian rhythms;a similar clinical presentation of trigeminal pain, and autonomic activation.

  11. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    disease, and may be nonspecific. A number of recently developed quantifiable and reproducible autonomic nerve function tests are reviewed, with emphasis on the physiological basis of the tests and on practical applicability. Finally, diagnostic criteria, based on autonomic nerve function tests, are...

  12. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke. PMID:26802767

  13. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ming; Yu; Yong; Xu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this minireview, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs.

  14. From neurovascular coupling to neurovascular cascade: a study on neural, autonomic and vascular transients in attention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mental processes bring about neural, vascular and autonomic changes in the brain cortex. Due to the different nature of these modifications, their onsets show no synchrony and time dynamics is often strongly dissimilar. After acquiring data from a group of 16 subjects, we estimated temporal correlation between task and signals in order to assess possible influences induced by an attentive task on electroencephalographic (EEG), heart rate variability (HRV), oxy- and deoxy-haemoglobin concentration signals. We also investigated correlations and time delays between couples of different biological signals. This allowed for the isolation of a subgroup of subjects showing similar tracks. Cardiac frequency and deoxy-haemoglobin signals displayed a strong positive correlation with the task design, while EEG alpha rhythm and oxygenation showed a negative correlation. Neural electrical response was nearly instantaneous with respect to the task progression, and autonomic response showed a mean delay of about 15 s and a slower hemodynamic response (mean delay above 20 s) was finally induced. Globally, the task elicited a cascade of responses, in which delays can be quantified. (paper)

  15. Effect of 30-min +3 Gz centrifugation on vestibular and autonomic cardiovascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Wood, Scott J.; Brown, Troy E.; Harm, Deborah L.; Rupert, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Repeated exposure to increased +Gz enhances human baroreflex responsiveness and improves tolerance to cardiovascular stress. However, it is not known whether such enhancements might also result from a single, more prolonged exposure to increased +Gz. Our study was designed to investigate whether baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance are acutely improved by a single prolonged exposure to +3 Gz, and moreover, whether changes in autonomic cardiovascular function resulting from exposure to increased +Gz are correlated with changes in otolith function. METHODS: We exposed 15 healthy human subjects to +3 Gz centrifugation for up to 30 min or until symptoms of incipient G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) ensued. Tests of autonomic cardiovascular function both before and after centrifugation included: 1) power spectral determinations of beat-to-beat R-R intervals and arterial pressures; 2) carotid-cardiac baroreflex tests; 3) Valsalva tests; and 4) 30-min head-up tilt tests. Otolith function was assessed during centrifugation by the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex and both before and after centrifugation by measurements of ocular counter-rolling and dynamic posturography. RESULTS: Of the 15 subjects who underwent prolonged +3 Gz, 4 were intolerant to 30 min of head-up tilt before centrifugation but became tolerant to such tilt after centrifugation. The Valsalva-related baroreflex as well as a measure of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex were also enhanced after centrifugation. No significant vestibular-autonomic relationships were detected beyond a vestibular-cerebrovascular interaction reported earlier in a subset of seven participants. CONCLUSIONS: A single prolonged exposure to +3 Gz centrifugation acutely improves baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance.

  16. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) insufficiency protects against the development of systemic inflammatory response after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pągowska-Klimek, Izabela; Świerzko, Anna S; Michalski, Mateusz; Moll, Maciej; Szala-Poździej, Agnieszka; Sokołowska, Anna; Krajewski, Wojciech R; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    We investigated MBL2 and MASP2 genotypes, serum MBL (mannose-binding lectin) levels and activities of its complexes with associated serine proteases (MASP-1, MASP -2), in relation to complications following cardiac surgery in 195 children. The incidence of SIRS was lower in patients carrying MBL2 A/O and O/O genotypes (p=0.024). Children with MBL levels 30) (p=0.021). Thus, low MBL concentrations and associated genotypes may protect patients from systemic inflammation while high MBL serum levels and corresponding genotypes are risk factors of postoperative complications. PMID:26382056

  17. Impaired cardiac adrenergic innervation assessed by MIBG imaging as a predictor of treatment response in childhood dilated cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Acar, P; Merlet, P.; Iserin, L; Bonnet, D.; Sidi, D; Syrota, A; Kachaner, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the prognostic value of metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging in childhood cardiomyopathy.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre.
PATIENTS—40 children (21 boys, 19 girls; mean (SD) age, 7.0 (5.6) years) with heart failure resulting from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 23) or various other disorders (n = 17).
METHODS—At the initial examination, cardiac 123I-MIBG uptake and release, circulating noradrenaline (norepinephrine) concentratio...

  18. Evaluation of autonomic functions in subclinical hypothyroid and hypothyroid patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Aarti S.; Ram Lal; Dhanwal, Dinesh K.; Jain, Ajay K.; Veena Chowdhury

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autonomic dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular morbidity in subclinical hypothyroid patients. It is controversial whether the abnormality exists in sympathetic or the parasympathetic function. It is also not known whether the severity of autonomic dysfunction is related to the degree of thyroid deficiency. Design of Study: Prospective case control. Materials and Methods: Autonomic functions based on heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to various maneuvers wer...

  19. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  20. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  1. A comparison of genetic findings in sudden cardiac death victims and cardiac patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Christin L; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Frank-Hansen, Rune;

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is responsible for a large proportion of non-traumatic, sudden and unexpected deaths in young individuals. Sudden cardiac death is a known manifestation of several inherited cardiac diseases. In post-mortem examinations, about two-thirds of the SCD cases show structural...

  2. Autonomous linear lossless systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Shodhan; Rapisarda, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    We define a lossless autonomous system as one having a quadratic differential form associated with it called an energy function, which is positive and which is conserved. We define an oscillatory system as one which has all its trajectories bounded on the entire time axis. In this paper, we show that an autonomous system is lossless if and only if it is oscillatory. Next we discuss a few properties of energy functions of autonomous lossless systems and a suitable way of splitting a given ener...

  3. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. PMID:25744760

  4. Accelerated cardiac remodeling in desmoplakin transgenic mice in response to endurance exercise is associated with perturbed Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martherus, Ruben; Jain, Rahul; Takagi, Ken; Mendsaikhan, Uzmee; Turdi, Subat; Osinska, Hanna; James, Jeanne F; Kramer, Kristen; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Towbin, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-15

    Arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AVC) is a frequent underlying cause for arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death especially during intense exercise. The mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate how chronic endurance exercise contributes to desmoplakin (DSP) mutation-induced AVC pathogenesis. Transgenic mice with overexpression of desmoplakin, wild-type (Tg-DSP(WT)), or the R2834H mutant (Tg-DSP(R2834H)) along with control nontransgenic (NTg) littermates were kept sedentary or exposed to a daily running regimen for 12 wk. Cardiac function and morphology were analyzed using echocardiography, electrocardiography, histology, immunohistochemistry, RNA, and protein analysis. At baseline, 4-wk-old mice from all groups displayed normal cardiac function. When subjected to exercise, all mice retained normal cardiac function and left ventricular morphology; however, Tg-DSP(R2834H) mutants displayed right ventricular (RV) dilation and wall thinning, unlike NTg and Tg-DSP(WT). The Tg-DSP(R2834H) hearts demonstrated focal fat infiltrations in RV and cytoplasmic aggregations consisting of desmoplakin, plakoglobin, and connexin 43. These aggregates coincided with disruption of the intercalated disks, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Although Tg-DSP(R2834H) mice already displayed high levels of p-GSK3-β(Ser9) and p-AKT1(Ser473) under sedentary conditions, decrease of nuclear GSK3-β and AKT1 levels with reduced p-GSK3-β(Ser9), p-AKT1(Ser473), and p-AKT1(Ser308) and loss of nuclear junctional plakoglobin was apparent after exercise. In contrast, Tg-DSP(WT) showed upregulation of p-AKT1(Ser473), p-AKT1(Ser308), and p-GSK3-β(Ser9) in response to exercise. Our data suggest that endurance exercise accelerates AVC pathogenesis in Tg-DSP(R2834H) mice and this event is associated with perturbed AKT1 and GSK3-β signaling. Our study suggests a potential mechanism-based approach to exercise management in patients with AVC

  5. Responses of Six-Weeks Aquatic Exercise on the Autonomic Nervous System, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow and Lung Functions in Young Adults with Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Taweesak Janyacharoen; Narupon Kunbootsri; Preeda Arayawichanon; Seksun Chainansamit; Kittisak Sawanyawisuth

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a chronic respiratory disease. Sympathetic hypofunction is identified in all of the allergic rhinitis patients. Moreover, allergic rhinitis is associated with decreased peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) and impaired lung functions. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of six-week of aquatic exercise on the autonomic nervous system function, PNIF and lung functions in allergic rhinitis patients.Twenty-six allergic rhinitis patients, 12 males and 14 females wer...

  6. RESPIRATORY, AUTONOMIC, AND EXPERIENTIAL RESPONSES TO REPEATED INHALATIONS OF 20% CO2 ENRICHED AIR IN PANIC DISORDER, SOCIAL PHOBIA, AND HEALTHY CONTROLS

    OpenAIRE

    Blechert, Jens; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Wilhelm, Eva M.; Roth, Walton T.

    2010-01-01

    Inhalation of carbon-dioxide (CO2) enriched air triggers anxiety in panic disorder (PD) patients, which is often interpreted as a sign of biological vulnerability. However, most studies have not measured respiration in these tasks. We compared patients with PD (N=20) and social phobia (SP, N=19) to healthy controls (N=18) during eight inhalations of 20% CO2, preceded and followed by two inhalations of room air, while continuously measuring subjective anxiety and dyspnea as well as autonomic a...

  7. Dissociated Emergent-Response System and Fine-Processing System in Human Neural Network and a Heuristic Neural Architecture for Autonomous Humanoid Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaodan Yan

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the functional connectivity of the primary sensory system with resting state fMRI and applied such knowledge into the design of the neural architecture of autonomous humanoid robots. Correlation and Granger causality analyses were utilized to reveal the functional connectivity patterns. Dissociation was within the primary sensory system, in that the olfactory cortex and the somatosensory cortex were strongly connected to the amygdala whereas the visual cortex an...

  8. Heart rate variability as a biomarker for autonomic nervous system response differences between children with chronic pain and healthy control children

    OpenAIRE

    Evans S; Seidman LC; Tsao JCI; Lung KC; Zeltzer LK; Naliboff BD

    2013-01-01

    Subhadra Evans,1 Laura C Seidman,1 Jennie CI Tsao,1 Kirsten C Lung,1 Lonnie K Zeltzer,1 Bruce D Naliboff21Pediatric Pain Program, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Studies in adults have demonstrated a relationship between lowered heart rate variability (HRV) and poor health. However, less is known about the role of autonomic arousal in children's well-being. The aim...

  9. A comparison between heart rate and heart rate variability as indicators of cardiac health and fitness

    OpenAIRE

    CatharinaCorneliaGrant; LizelleFletcher

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of cardiac autonomic activity and control via heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) is known to provide prognostic information in clinical populations. Issues with regard to standardisation and interpretation of HRV data make the use of the more easily accessible HR on its own as an indicator of autonomic cardiac control very appealing. The aim of this study was to investigate the strength of associations between an important cardio vascular health metric such as VO2...

  10. A comparison between heart rate and heart rate variability as indicators of cardiac health and fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Catharina C.; Murray, Carien; Janse van Rensburg, Dina C.; Fletcher, Lizelle

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of cardiac autonomic activity and control via heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) is known to provide prognostic information in clinical populations. Issues with regard to standardization and interpretation of HRV data make the use of the more easily accessible HR on its own as an indicator of autonomic cardiac control very appealing. The aim of this study was to investigate the strength of associations between an important cardio vascular health metric such as VO2...

  11. AUTONOMOUS DRIVEN CAR

    OpenAIRE

    Meeshika Arora

    2013-01-01

    In order to achieve autonomous operation of a vehiclein urban situations with unpredictable traffic, several real timesystems must interoperate, including environment perceptionplanning and control. In addition a robust vehicle platform withappropriate sensors, computational hardware, networking andsoftware infrastructure is essential.

  12. Highly Autonomous Systems Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, R.; Rasmussen, R.; Man, G.; Patel, K.

    1998-01-01

    It is our aim by launching a series of workshops on the topic of highly autonomous systems to reach out to the larger community interested in technology development for remotely deployed systems, particularly those for exploration.

  13. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  14. Novel control of cardiac myofilament response to calcium by S-glutahionylation at specific sites of myosin binding protein C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.JohnSolaro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies demonstrated a relation between glutathionylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C and diastolic dysfunction in a hypertensive mouse model stressed by treatment with salt, deoxycorticosterone acetate, and unilateral nephrectomy. Although these results strongly indicated an important role for S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C as a modifier of myofilament function, indirect effects of other post-translational modifications may have occurred. Moreover, we did not determine the sites of thiol modification by glutathionylation. To address these issues, we developed an in vitro method to mimic the in situ S-glutathionylation of myofilament proteins and determined direct functional effects and sites of oxidative modification employing Western blotting and mass spectrometry. We induced glutathionylation in vitro by treatment of isolated myofibrils and detergent extracted fiber bundles (skinned fibers with oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Immuno-blotting results revealed increased glutathionylation with GSSG treatment of a protein band around 140 kDa. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the 140 kDa band as cardiac myosin binding protein C and determined the sites of glutathionylation to be at cysteines 655, 479, and 627. Determination of the relation between Ca2+-activation of myofibrillar acto-myosin ATPase rate demonstrated an increased Ca2+-sensitivity induced by the S-glutathionylation. Force generating skinned fiber bundles also showed an increase in Ca-sensitivity when treated with oxidized glutathione, which was reversed with the reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Our data demonstrate that a specific and direct effect of S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C is a significant increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity. Our data also provide new insights into the functional significance of oxidative modification of myosin binding protein C and the potential role of domains not previously considered to

  15. Engineering Autonomous Driving Software

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Christian; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A larger number of people with heterogeneous knowledge and skills running a project together needs an adaptable, target, and skill-specific engineering process. This especially holds for a project to develop a highly innovative, autonomously driving vehicle to participate in the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge. In this contribution, we present essential elements of a software and systems engineering process to develop a so-called artificial intelligence capable of driving autonomously in complex u...

  16. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  17. Acute Response of Right Ventricular Function to Iloprost Inhalations in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Preliminary Evaluation 
with Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing LU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally elevated blood pressure of the pulmonary circulation. Without treatment, PAH progresses rapidly to right ventricular (RV failure and even death. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI has been an accurate and reproducible tool to assessment of RV morphology and function, which are important factors in the prognosis of patients with PAH. The aim of this study is to investigate acute RV response to inhalation of aerosolized iloprost in patients with PAH using CMRI. Method From March 2012 to March 2014, 48 patients with PAH underwent CMRI before and immediately after inhalation of iloprost with a single dose of 20 μg over 15 min-20 min. RV function parameters derived from CMRI images were analyzed before and after iloprost inhalation, including end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-diastolic area (EDA, end-systolic volume (ESV, end-systolic area (ESA, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF and cardiac output (CO. Percentage of RV area change was also calculated [%RVAC=(EDA-ESA/EDA×100%]. Wilcoxon's Sign Rank Test or Paired Samples t-Test was used to compare the differences of RV function parameters before and after inhalation. Results After iloprost inhalation, all patients showed significant decrease in RV EDV and RV ESV (P=0.007, P<0.001 respectively. Whereas, there were significant increase in RV SV (P=0.014, RV EF (P=0.009 and %RVAC (P=0.006. RV CO had no significant difference before and after inhalation (P=0.851. Conclusions Inhalation of iloprost can immediately improve RV function in patients with PAH, and noninvasive evaluation of the acute response with CMRI is feasibility.

  18. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  19. Contingency Software in Autonomous Systems: Technical Level Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Robyn R.; Patterson-Hines, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Contingency management is essential to the robust operation of complex systems such as spacecraft and Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Automatic contingency handling allows a faster response to unsafe scenarios with reduced human intervention on low-cost and extended missions. Results, applied to the Autonomous Rotorcraft Project and Mars Science Lab, pave the way to more resilient autonomous systems.

  20. Depression and Cardiac Disease: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Huffman, Jeff C.; Christopher M Celano; Beach, Scott R.; Shweta R. Motiwala; Januzzi, James L.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression is common, persistent, and associated with worse health-related quality of life, recurrent cardiac events, and mortality. Both physiological and behavioral factors—including endothelial dysfunction, platelet abnormalities, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and reduced engagement in health-promoting activities—may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Because of the potential impact of depression on quality of...

  1. FGF21 and cardiac physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ePlanavila

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21 production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPARα and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease.

  2. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27262674

  3. Effects of silica exposure on the cardiac and renal inflammatory and fibrotic response and the antagonistic role of interleukin-1 beta in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiali; Shi, Tingming; Cui, Xiuqing; Rong, Yi; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Yuewei; Shen, Yan; Chen, Weihong

    2016-02-01

    Current epidemiological studies suggest that crystalline silica exposure is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and renal disease; however, the potential pathological damage of the heart and kidney and its underlying mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. This study tried to investigate the silica-induced inflammatory and fibrotic changes in the heart and kidney and evaluate the role of interleukin (IL)-1 beta (β) in silica-induced cardiac and renal damage. In this study, a silica-exposed model was generated by intratracheally instilling silica dust in mice. The anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used to neutralise IL-1β in the pulmonary alveolus and serum. The real-time PCR studies showed that (1) inhalational silica induced inflammatory responses in the heart and kidney by elevated mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1; (2) early fibrotic responses in the heart were observed as elevated mRNA levels of collagen I and fibronectin. What is more, fibrosis of the kidney was demonstrated by pathological results and significantly increased mRNA levels of TGF-β, collagen I, collagen III and fibronectin. Further studies showed that usage of anti-IL-1β mAb decreased the inflammatory response of the heart and kidney induced by inhalational silica and also attenuated fibrosis in the mouse kidney. In conclusion, this study found that inhaled silica induced inflammatory and early fibrotic responses in the mouse heart and inflammatory response and fibrosis in the mouse kidney. Neutralisation of IL-1β attenuated the silica-induced inflammatory response of the heart and kidney and decreased fibrosis in the mouse kidney. PMID:25388157

  4. Baseline Systolic Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Test Can Predict Exercise Indices following Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Sardari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systolic blood pressure recovery (rSBP is of prognostic value for predicting the survival and co-morbidity rate in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. This study investigated the association between rSBP and exercise indices after complete cardiac rehabilitation program (CR in a population-based sample of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG.Methods: The sample population consisted of 352 patients who underwent pure CABG. The patients underwent standard symptom-limited exercise testing immediately before and also after the completion of the CR sessions. rSBP was defined as the ratio of the systolic blood pressure at 3 minutes in recovery to the systolic blood pressure at peak exercise.Results: An abnormal baseline rSBP after exercise was a strong predictor of exercise parameters in the last session, including metabolic equivalents (β = -0.617, SE = 0.127, p value < 0.001 and peak O2 consumption (β = -1.950, SE = 0.363, p value < 0.001 measured in the last session adjusted for baseline exercise characteristics, demographics, function class, and left ventricular ejection fraction.Conclusion: The current study strongly emphasizes the predictive role of baseline rSBP after exercise in evaluating exercise parameters following CR. This baseline index can predict abnormal METs value, peak O2 consumption, post-exercise heart rate, and heart rate recovery after a 24-session CR program.

  5. Exercise and autonomic function in health and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwinkel, E T; Bloomfield, D M; Arwady, M A; Goldsmith, R L

    2001-08-01

    Autonomic nervous system activity contributes to the regulation of cardiac output during rest, exercise, and cardiovascular disease. Measurement of HRV has been particularly useful in assessing parasympathetic activity, while its utility for assessing sympathetic function and overall sympathovagal balance remains controversial. Studies have revealed that parasympathetic tone dominates the resting state, while exercise is associated with prompt withdrawal of vagal tone and subsequent sympathetic activation. Conversely, recovery is characterized by parasympathetic activation followed by sympathetic withdrawal, although clarification of the normal trajectory and autonomic basis of heart rate decay following exercise is needed. Abnormalities in autonomic physiology--especially increased sympathetic activity, attenuated vagal tone, and delayed heart rate recovery--have been associated with increased mortality. Exercise training is associated with a relative enhancement of vagal tone, improved heart rate recovery after exercise, and reduced morbidity in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, whether exercise training leads to reduced mortality in this population because of its ability to specifically modulate autonomic function is unknown at the present time. Although the results of a recent randomized study in patients with CHF and a meta-analysis in the setting of a recent myocardial infarction determined that exercise training leads to improved outcomes in these populations, neither study measured autonomic function. Improved autonomic function due to exercise training is a promising rationale for explaining improvements in outcome, although more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:11570111

  6. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  7. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  8. Cognitive Biases and Autonomic Responding in Anxiety and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Santucci, Aimee Kristin

    2001-01-01

    The present study addressed cognitive biases in anxiety and depression using the emotional Stroop task, and explored both the affective space and autonomic underpinnings of these disorders. In previous studies, anxiety has been associated with both an attentional bias toward threat information and low cardiac vagal control, as reflected in heart rate variability (HRV) indices. Depression has been linked to a memory bias for negative information; however, findings of low HRV for depression are...

  9. Autonomous Language Learning: The Teachers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a large-scale study on learner autonomy in language learning carried out with students and English teachers at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Examines the teachers' views of their roles and responsibilities, their assessment of their students'decision-making abilities and the autonomous language learning activities that they have…

  10. Short-Term Autonomic Denervation of the Atria Using Botulinum Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Seil; Choi, Eue-Keun; Choi, Yun-Shik

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Major epicardial fat pads contain cardiac ganglionated plexi (GP) of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic denervation may improve the success rate of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. This study was designed to elucidate the acute effects of blocking the right atrium-pulmonary vein (RA-PV) and left atrium-inferior vena cava (LA-IVC) fat pads on the electrophysiologic characteristics of the atrium and AF inducibility with a botulinum toxin injection. Materials and...

  11. Not left ventricular lead position, but the extent of immediate asynchrony reduction predicts long-term response to cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poller, Wolfram C; Dreger, Henryk; Schwerg, Marius; Bondke, Hansjürgen; Melzer, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for a large subgroup of chronic heart failure patients. Various attempts to improve the high non-responder rate of 30 % by preoperative asynchrony assessment have failed. We hypothesized that superior response to CRT is correlated with greater acute reduction of asynchrony and that a concordant left ventricular (LV) lead is beneficial compared to a discordant lead. Hundred and eight consecutive CRT patients from our center were prospectively included. Clinical status and asynchrony parameters were assessed before, 1 day and 6 months after CRT implantation. Super-response was defined as an increase of the LV ejection fraction by ≥15 % and a decrease in LV end systolic volume (LVESV) by ≥30 %. When the criteria for super-response were not met, average response was given with a decrease of baseline LVESV ≥15 %. Sixty eight patients were classified as responders (63 %). Comparing super- (n = 19) and average (n = 49) responders, we found that greater acute reduction of LV asynchrony (change of asynchronous segments under CRT: -1.3 vs. -0.4, p < 0.05; decrease of LV intraventricular delay: -34 ms vs. -16 ms, p < 0.05) is associated with superior reverse remodeling after 6 months. Importantly, asynchrony parameters of super-, average and non-responders were almost identical at baseline. A concordant LV lead (n = 63) was not associated with improved LV reverse remodeling compared to a discordant lead (n = 28): LVEF: +8.6 % vs. +7.8 %, p = 0.91; LVESV: -30.5 ml vs. -23.8 mL, p = 0.84. A greater immediate reduction of LV asynchrony predicts superior response. Preoperative asynchrony parameters do not correlate with outcome. A concordant LV lead is not superior to a discordant lead. PMID:24468897

  12. Architecture of autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  13. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  14. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Tio, Rene A. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Thorax Center Cardiology; Schwaiger, Markus (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2015-03-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  15. Cerebral Hemispheric Lateralization Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis May Affect Interictal Cardiovascular Autonomic Functions in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokia Ghchime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is linked to the autonomic nervous system dysfunctions. Seizures alter the function of different systems such as the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and urogenital systems. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible factors which may be involved in interictal cardiovascular autonomic function in temporal lobe epilepsy with complex partial seizures, and with particular attention to hippocampal sclerosis. The study was conducted in 30 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (19 with left hippocampal sclerosis, 11 with right hippocampal sclerosis. All subjects underwent four tests of cardiac autonomic function: heart rate changes in response to deep breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure variations throughout resting activity and during hand grip, mental stress, and orthostatic tests. Our results show that the right cerebral hemisphere predominantly modulates sympathetic activity, while the left cerebral hemisphere mainly modulates parasympathetic activity, which mediated tachycardia and excessive bradycardia counterregulation, both of which might be involved as a mechanism of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients (SUDEP.

  16. Cardiac and thermoregulatory responses to inhaled pollutants in healthy and compromised rodents: modulation via interaction with environmental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodents often demonstrate a profound depression in physiological function following acute exposure to toxic xenobiotic agents. This effect, termed the hypothermic response, is primarily characterized by significant decreases in ore temperature and heart rate and is generally accompanied by similar deficits in other important functional parameters. This response appears to be remarkably consistent across a wide variety of toxic agents and exposure regimens; however, the magnitude and duration of the induced effects may be modulated by changes in dose, animal mass, and environmental conditions. while the initiating stimulus and underlying mechanism(s) remains elusive, this response may represent an inherent reflexive pattern that is unique to the rodent and serves to attenuate the induced toxicity. Given that rodents re the primary animal species used in toxicological studies, it is important to consider this hypothermic response and its modulatory factors when interpreting the results of such studies and extrapolating those results to an

  17. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  18. Usefulness of hemodynamic sensors for physiologic cardiac pacing in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhetta, Eraldo; Bortnik, Miriam; Marino, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The rate adaptive sensors applied to cardiac pacing should respond as promptly as the normal sinus node with an highly specific and sensitive detection of the need of increasing heart rate. Sensors operating alone may not provide optimal heart responsiveness: central venous pH sensing, variations in the oxygen content of mixed venous blood, QT interval, breathing rate and pulmonary minute ventilation monitored by thoracic impedance variations, activity sensors. Using sensors that have different attributes but that work in a complementary manners offers distinct advantages. However, complicated sensors interactions may occur. Hemodynamic sensors detect changes in the hemodynamic performances of the heart, which partially depends on the autonomic nervous system-induced inotropic regulation of myocardial fibers. Specific hemodynamic sensors have been designed to measure different expression of the cardiac contraction strength: Peak Endocardial Acceleration (PEA), Closed Loop Stimulation (CLS) and TransValvular Impedance (TVI), guided by intraventricular impedance variations. Rate-responsive pacing is just one of the potential applications of hemodynamic sensors in implantable pacemakers. Other issues discussed in the paper include: hemodynamic monitoring for the optimal programmation and follow up of patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy; hemodynamic deterioration impact of tachyarrhythmias; hemodynamic upper rate limit control; monitoring and prevention of vasovagal malignant syncopes. PMID:21461359

  19. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  20. Effect of maturation on hemodynamic and autonomic control recovery following maximal running exercise in highly-trained young soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBuchheit

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of maturation on post-exercise hemodynamic and autonomic responses. Fifty-five highly-trained young male soccer players (12-18 yr classified as pre-, circum- or post-peak height velocity (PHV performed a graded running test to exhaustion on a treadmill. Before (Pre and after (5th-10th min, Post exercise, heart rate (HR, stroke volume (SV, cardiac ouput (CO, arterial pressure (AP and total peripheral resistance (TPR were monitored. Parasympathetic (high-frequency [HFRR] of HR variability (HRV and baroreflex sensitivity [Ln BRS] and sympathetic activity (low-frequency [LFSAP] of systolic AP variability were estimated. Post-exercise blood lactate [La]b, the HR recovery (HRR time constant and parasympathetic reactivation (time varying HRV analysis were assessed. In all three groups, exercise resulted in increased HR, CO, AP and LFSAP (P<0.001, decreased SV, HFRR and Ln BRS (all P<0.001, and no change in TPRI (P=0.98. There was no ‘maturation x time’ interaction for any of the hemodynamic or autonomic variables (all P>0.22. After exercise, pre-PHV players displayed lower SV, CO and [La]b, faster HRR and greater parasympathetic reactivation compared with circum- and post-PHV players. Multiple regression analysis showed that lean muscle mass, [La]b and Pre parasympathetic activity were the strongest predictors of HRR (r2=0.62, P<0.001. While pre-PHV players displayed a faster HRR and greater post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, maturation had little influence on the hemodynamic and autonomic responses following maximal running exercise. HRR relates to lean muscle mass, blood acidosis and intrinsic parasympathetic function, with less evident impact of post-exercise autonomic function.

  1. Experimental Autonomous Vehicle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the requirements for and a prototype configuration of a software architecture for control of an experimental autonomous vehicle. The test bed nature of the system is emphasised in the choice of architecture making re-configurability, data logging and extendability simple. The...

  2. ADAM: ADaptive Autonomous Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, van Daan C.; Nijenhuis, Lucas F.J.; Bakkers, André W.P.; Vervoort, Wiek A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a part of the development of an adaptive autonomous machine that is able to move in an unknown world extract knowledge out of the perceived data, has the possibility to reason, and finally has the capability to exchange experiences and knowledge with other agents. The agent is n

  3. Autonomous Security Patrol System

    OpenAIRE

    Erramouspe, Jake

    2010-01-01

    This project provides an efficient and cost-effective solution to building security and active monitoring. The security is monitored and controlled by autonomous patrol robots. Any indication of a security breach will result in an immediate alarm and activation of the robot group to subdue and tranquilize the intruder.

  4. Software Architecture for Autonomous Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jimmy S.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis objective is to design an autonomous spacecraft architecture to perform both deliberative and reactive behaviors. The Autonomous Small Planet In-Situ Reaction to Events (ASPIRE) project uses the architecture to integrate several autonomous technologies for a comet orbiter mission.

  5. Efeito agudo da intensidade do exercício de força na modulação autonômica cardíaca pós-exercício Efecto agudo de intensidad del ejercicio de fuerza en la modulación autónoma del corazón post-ejercicio Acute effect of resistance exercise intensity in cardiac autonomic modulation after exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluísio Henrique Rodrigues de Andrade Lima

    2011-06-01

    midió para un análisis espectral posterior de su variabilidad. RESULTADOS: En comparación con los valores anteriores de la intervención, el intervalo RR y la banda de alta frecuencia (AF se incrementó (cambios importantes: + 112 ± 83 ms; +10 ± 11 un, respectivamente, p 0,05. En comparación a los valores pre ejercicio, el intervalo RR y la banda AF disminuyeron (cambios importantes: -69 ± 105 ms; -13 ± 14 un, respectivamente, p BACKGROUND: Cardiac sympathovagal balance is altered after resistance exercise. However, the impact of the characteristics of resistance training in this response remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: Analyze the acute effect of resistance exercise intensity for trunk and upper limbs in cardiac autonomic modulation after exercise. METHODS: Fifteen young men performed three experimental sessions in random order: control (C, resistance exercise with 50% of 1-RM (E50% and resistance exercise with 70% of 1-RM (E70%. The sessions included 05 exercises for the trunk and upper limbs performed in three sets of 12, 9 and 6 repetitions, respectively. Before and at 20 and 50 minutes after the interventions, the heart rate was measured for spectral analysis of variability. RESULTS: In comparison to the values before the intervention, the RR interval and the band of high frequency (HF increased (major changes: + 112 ± 83 ms; +10 ± 11 un, respectively, p 0.05. Compared to pre-exercise values, the RR interval and the HF band decreased (major changes: -69 ± 105 ms; -13 ± 14 un, respectively, p <0.01, while the LF band and the LF/HF ratio increased (major changes: -13 ± 14 un, 13 ± 3 14 ± 3 and un, respectively, p <0.01 after E70%. CONCLUSION: The higher intensity of resistance exercise for trunk and upper limbs promoted, in an acute manner, greater increase in cardiac sympathovagal balance after exercise.

  6. Autonomic Modulation by Electrical Stimulation of the Parasympathetic Nervous System: An Emerging Intervention for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Lu, Zhibing; He, Wenbo; Huang, Bing; Jiang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac autonomic nervous system has been known to play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, which increases the parasympathetic activity and suppresses the sympathetic activity, is emerging as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we review the recent literature on autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, including vagus nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagal stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and ganglionated plexi stimulation, in the treatment of heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26914959

  7. Cardiovascular autonomic function in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallo, F; Maffei, P; Dalla Pozza, A; Carli, M; Della Mea, P; Lupia, M; Rabbia, F; Sonino, N

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic dysfunction is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. No data on sympathovagal balance are available in patients with Cushing's syndrome, in whom cardiovascular risk is high. We studied 10 patients with newly diagnosed Cushing's syndrome (1 male/9 females; age mean+/-SD, 47+/-10 yr) and 10 control subjects matched for age, sex, body mass index, and cardiovascular risk factors. In both groups there were 7 patients with arterial hypertension, 3 with diabetes mellitus, and 2 with obesity. Cardiac autonomic function was evaluated by analysis of short time heart rate variability (HRV) measures in frequency domain over 24-h, daytime, and nighttime. The 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and echocardiography were also performed. In comparison with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower 24-h (1.3+/-0.6 vs 3.7+/-1.5, mean+/-SD, p<0.01), daytime (2.0+/-1.4 vs 4.5+/-1.6, p<0.01), and night-time (1.0+/-0.4 vs 3.5+/-2.3, p<0.01) low-frequency/ high frequency (LF/HF) power ratio. In the presence of similar LF power, the difference was due to elevation in HF power in Cushing's syndrome compared to controls: 24-h, 12.7+/-6.7 vs 5.8+/-2.8, p<0.01; daytime, 10.2+/-7.3 vs 4.5+/-2.1, p<0.05; nighttime, 14.2+/-7.0 vs 7.8+/-4.7, p<0.05. Eight Cushing patients vs 4 controls had a non-dipping blood pressure profile. At echocardiography, Cushing patients had a greater left ventricular mass index and/or relative wall thickness, and impaired diastolic function, compared with controls. Compared to controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome showed a sympathovagal imbalance, characterized by a relatively increased parasympathetic activity. Whether this autonomic alteration is meant to counterbalance cortisol-induced effects on blood pressure and cardiac structure/function or has a different pathophysiological significance is still unknown. PMID:19337014

  8. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the

  9. Cardiac tissue engineering in magnetically actuated scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers new possibilities for the functional and structural restoration of damaged or lost heart tissue by applying cardiac patches created in vitro. Engineering such functional cardiac patches is a complex mission, involving material design on the nano- and microscale as well as the application of biological cues and stimulation patterns to promote cell survival and organization into a functional cardiac tissue. Herein, we present a novel strategy for creating a functional cardiac patch by combining the use of a macroporous alginate scaffold impregnated with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) and the application of external magnetic stimulation. Neonatal rat cardiac cells seeded within the magnetically responsive scaffolds and stimulated by an alternating magnetic field of 5 Hz developed into matured myocardial tissue characterized by anisotropically organized striated cardiac fibers, which preserved its features for longer times than non-stimulated constructs. A greater activation of AKT phosphorylation in cardiac cell constructs after applying a short-term (20 min) external magnetic field indicated the efficacy of magnetic stimulation to actuate at a distance and provided a possible mechanism for its action. Our results point to a synergistic effect of magnetic field stimulation together with nanoparticulate features of the scaffold surface as providing the regenerating environment for cardiac cells driving their organization into functionally mature tissue. (paper)

  10. Role of Biological Sex in Normal Cardiac Function and in its Disease Outcome – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhavathi, K.; Selvi, K.Tamarai; Poornima, K.N.; Sarvanan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Biological sex plays an important role in normal cardiac physiology as well as in the heart‘s response to cardiac disease. Women generally have better cardiac function and survival than do men in the face of cardiac disease; however, this is progressively lost when comparing postmenopausal women with age matched men. Animal model of cardiac disease mirror what is seen in humans. Sex hormones contribute significantly to sex based difference in cardiac functioning and in its disease outcome. Es...

  11. Responses of Six-Weeks Aquatic Exercise on the Autonomic Nervous System, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow and Lung Functions in Young Adults with Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweesak Janyacharoen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis is a chronic respiratory disease. Sympathetic hypofunction is identified in all of the allergic rhinitis patients. Moreover, allergic rhinitis is associated with decreased peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF and impaired lung functions. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of six-week of aquatic exercise on the autonomic nervous system function, PNIF and lung functions in allergic rhinitis patients.Twenty-six allergic rhinitis patients, 12 males and 14 females were recruited in this study. Subjects were diagnosed by a physician based on history, physical examination, and positive reaction to a skin prick test. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups. The control allergic rhinitis group received education and maintained normal life. The aquatic group performed aquatic exercise for 30 minutes a day, three days a week for six weeks. Heart rate variability, PNIF and lung functions were measured at the beginning, after three weeks and six weeks.There were statistically significant increased low frequency normal units (LF n.u., PNIF and showed decreased high frequency normal units (HF n.u. at six weeks after aquatic exercise compared with the control group.Six weeks of aquatic exercise could increase sympathetic activity and PNIF in allergicrhinitis patients.

  12. Vestibular influences on autonomic cardiovascular control in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaggioni, I.; Costa, F.; Kaufmann, H.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that anatomical connections exist between vestibular and autonomic nuclei. Animal studies have shown functional interactions between the vestibular and autonomic systems. The nature of these interactions, however, is complex and has not been fully defined. Vestibular stimulation has been consistently found to reduce blood pressure in animals. Given the potential interaction between vestibular and autonomic pathways this finding could be explained by a reduction in sympathetic activity. However, rather than sympathetic inhibition, vestibular stimulation has consistently been shown to increase sympathetic outflow in cardiac and splanchnic vascular beds in most experimental models. Several clinical observations suggest that a link between vestibular and autonomic systems may also exist in humans. However, direct evidence for vestibular/autonomic interactions in humans is sparse. Motion sickness has been found to induce forearm vasodilation and reduce baroreflex gain, and head down neck flexion induces transient forearm and calf vasoconstriction. On the other hand, studies using optokinetic stimulation have found either very small, variable, or inconsistent changes in heart rate and blood pressure, despite substantial symptoms of motion sickness. Furthermore, caloric stimulation severe enough to produce nystagmus, dizziness, and nausea had no effect on sympathetic nerve activity measured directly with microneurography. No effect was observed on heart rate, blood pressure, or plasma norepinephrine. Several factors may explain the apparent discordance of these results, but more research is needed before we can define the potential importance of vestibular input to cardiovascular regulation and orthostatic tolerance in humans.

  13. Effect of Sleep/Wake Cycle on Autonomic Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the association between irregular sleep/wake cycle in shift workers and autonomic regulation. Study Design: Cross-sectional, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Dow University Hospital, Karachi, from August to November 2013. Methodology: All health care providers working in rotating shifts making a total (n=104) were included. Instrument was an integrated questionnaire applied to assess autonomic regulation, taken from Kroz et al. on scoring criteria, ranging from 18 - 54, where higher rating signifies strong autonomic regulation, indicating a stable Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) and vice versa. Participants were interviewed and their response was recorded by the investigator. Influence of sleep misalignment was measured quantitatively to extract index of autonomic activity. Results: There was a reduced trend in autonomic strength amongst shift workers. The mean score obtained on the Autonomic Scale was 37.8 ± 5.9. Conclusion: Circadian misalignment has an injurious influence on ANS which might be valuable in controlling autonomic dysfunction that leads to fatal triggers in rotating shift workers. (author)

  14. Exploring the autonomic correlates of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Daniel; Mulgrew, Joseph; Hautus, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between personality and resting heart rate variability (HRV) indices. Healthy volunteers (n=106) completed a 240-item Big Five personality inventory, the state/Trait Anxiety inventory, and a ten minute electrocardiographic recording. Time and frequency domain estimates of HRV were derived from the cardiac time series and related to the Big Five dimensions of personality, to personality types extracted from a cluster analysis, and to Trait Anxiety. Frequency domain measures of HRV (HRV-HF, LF/HF) were associated with specific dimensions of personality, but significance was not noted for the time domain measure (STD-RR). Furthermore, distressed personality types exhibited significantly greater autonomic imbalance (LF/HF) than other personality types. However, significance was not noted for the time domain measure (STD-RR). These results can be explained with reference to a contemporary model of neurovisceral integration. PMID:26026396

  15. Research on the features of cardiac autonomic nervous activity of divers under simulated stressors with computer games%电脑游戏模拟应激条件下潜水员心脏自主神经活动特点的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马海鹰; 经冥; 邓光辉; 江楠楠; 解汝庆

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过电脑游戏模拟应激条件下27名潜水员和30名普通岸勤人员心率及心率变异性的分析,探讨潜水员心脏自主神经活动的特点.方法 实验采用电脑游戏作为应激诱发材料,在被试操作的同时记录心率和心率变异性指标.结果 (1)模拟应激条件潜水员的恐惧、厌恶和紧张体验与普通岸勤人员比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01).(2)2组被试者在3个阶段的平均心率(heart rate variability,HRP)主效应显著[(F(2,110)=67.700,P<0.01)],低频功率(LF)主效应显著[(F(2,110) =20.774,P<0.01)],高频功率(HF)主效应显著[(F(2,110) =5.647,P<0.05)],LF/HF 主效应显著[(F(2,110) =6.101,P<0.05)],低频校正值(LFnu)主效应显著[(F(2,110) =6.184,P<0.05)],高频校正值(HFnu)主效应显著[(F(2,110) =6.735,P<0.05)].(3)组间比较差异无统计学意义.组别与阶段之间在LF/HF[(F(2,110) =4.285,P<0.05)]有显著交互作用.结论 (1)模拟应激条件下潜水员心脏自主神经活动的特点是预期阶段交感神经张力的上升,副交感神经张力下降.应对阶段交感神经张力和副交感神经张力同时下降,但副交感神经张力下降的幅度较小.(2)潜水员迷走神经的功能相对较强,可下调负性情绪体验的强度,同时迷走神经功能不协调也影响负性情绪体验的敏感性.%Objective To explore the features of cardiac autonomic nervous activity of divers by analyzing the heart rate and heart rate variability of 27 divers and 30 ordinary naval personnel ashore.Methods Subjects'heart rate and heart rate variability were recorded under stressors of computer games.Results (1) Under stressful conditions,divers experienced significantly less terror and strain than ordinary naval personnel ashore.(2) Main effects on heart rate variability (HRP) at the 3 stages could be significantly seen in the subjects of the 2 groups [F(2,110) =67.700,P < 0.01)],and the main effect on LF was obviously

  16. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  17. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  18. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury. PMID:25480318

  19. Autonomous single camera exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal-Calleja, Teresa A.; Sanfeliu, Alberto; Andrade-Cetto, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present an active exploration strategy for a mobile robot navigating in 3D. The aim is to control a moving robot that autonomously builds a visual feature map while at the same time optimises its localisation in this map. The technique chooses the most appropriate commands maximising the information gain between prior states and measurements, while performing 6DOF bearing only SLAM at video rate. Maximising the mutual information helps the vehicle avoid ill-conditioned measur...

  20. Autonomous Underwater Vehicle control

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal Morató, Jordi; Gomáriz Castro, Spartacus; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the system control design stages for an autonomous underwater vehicle are presented. The vehicle must be able to sail on sea surface, following a path without losing its route and once a position is reached, a dive following a perpendicular path to the surface is carried out. A two level system control are proposed. The primary level will control the navigation of the vehicle where a linear controllers are proposed. Whereas in secondary level guidance system, collision system, s...

  1. The autonomous acoustic buoy

    OpenAIRE

    Pellicer, Francisco; Reitsma, Robert; Agüera, Joaquín; Marinas, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The Acoustic Buoy is a project between the Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics (LAB) and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). In areas that the human activities produce high noise levels, such as oil exploration or construction, there is a need to monitor the environment for the presence of cetaceans. Another need is for fishing, to prevent endangered species from being killed. This can be done with an Autonomous Acoustic Buoy (AAB). Mooring or anchoring at to the seaflo...

  2. Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jitendra R. Raol; Ajith Gopal

    2010-01-01

    Mobile intelligent autonomous systems (MIAS) is a fast emerging research area. Although it can be regarded as a general R&D area, it is mainly directed towards robotics. Several important subtopics within MIAS research are:(i) perception and reasoning, (ii) mobility and navigation,(iii) haptics and teleoperation, (iv) image fusion/computervision, (v) modelling of manipulators, (vi) hardware/software architectures for planning and behaviour learning leadingto robotic architecture, (vii) ve...

  3. Cardiac electrical stunning is a common feature of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangping; Liu, Tong; Liu, Enzhao

    2006-01-01

    There are many published papers focused on the topic of atrial electrical remodeling, which defined as the shortening and dispersion of effective refractory period (ERP) in patients with paroxysmal or persistent tachyarrhythmias or in animals with long-term rapid atrial pacing. Heart failure could produce the electrical remodeling of sinus node, manifesting the prolongation of corrected sinus node recovery time and sinus cycle length. It might be attributed to decreased hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide expression of sinus node. Rapid atrial pacing for only 10-15 min, simulating transient atrial tachyarrhythmias, alters sinus node function in human. Termination of atrial flutter by ablation induces reversible changes in sinus node function. After atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, there was a significant improvement of sinus node function, with an increase in the mean heart rate, maximal heart rate and heart rate range significantly. Reverse electrical remodeling of the ERP occurs at different rates in different regions of the atrium. Previous experiments showed that electrical remodeling of atrial myocardium could be induced by autonomic nervous transmitters and suggested that autonomic nerve activity was an important factor to promote AF episodes. We postulated that electrical remodeling and reverse electrical remodeling are common features of the heart, including atrium, ventricle, sinus node, and conductive system. Inappropriate very rapid or slow electrical depolarization may cause electrical remodeling of the heart, but appropriate rates of electrical depolarization and cessation of rapid stimulation may contribute to the reverse electrical remodeling. So, we forward that a concept defined as cardiac electrical stunning, including electrical remodeling and reverse electrical remodeling, should be a common characteristic and mechanism of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:16759818

  4. The Link Between Stress Disorders and Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Rasna eSabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this p...

  5. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of autonomic function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J

    2016-07-15

    This review focuses on how to assess autonomic function in humans including various ways to measure heart rate, catecholamines, and sympathetic neural activity. The need to assess autonomic function is paramount in many experimental paradigms because of the following. (1) Autonomic dysfunction is present in common diseases like hypertension, diabetes and heart failure, and the magnitude of this dysfunction is broadly related to morbidity and mortality in these disorders. (2) The relationship between autonomic dysfunction and morbidity and mortality can be causal. (3) Interventions that modulate or reverse autonomic dysfunction can improve outcomes in the affected patients. The techniques discussed are also frequently used to understand the autonomic response to sympathoexcitatory manoeuvres like exercise, the cold pressor test or mental stress. Because these manoeuvres can engage a variety of sensory and efferent pathways, under some circumstances the physiological responses measured by many of the techniques are directionally similar, in others they are divergent. Thus any investigator seeking to study the autonomic nervous system or its contribution to either normal physiology or pathophysiological conditions must carefully balance a number of considerations to ensure that the right technique is used to address the question of interest. PMID:27098282

  6. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  7. Autonomic Findings in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Martinez, Jose; Katz, Stuart D; Tully, Lisa; Reynolds, Harmony R

    2016-01-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often occurs after emotional or physical stress. Norepinephrine levels are unusually high in the acute phase, suggesting a hyperadrenergic mechanism. Comparatively little is known about parasympathetic function in patients with TC. We sought to characterize autonomic function at rest and in response to physical and emotional stimuli in 10 women with a confirmed history of TC and 10 age-matched healthy women. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity was assessed at rest and during baroreflex stimulation (Valsalva maneuver and tilt testing), cognitive stimulation (Stroop test), and emotional stimulation (event recall, patients). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation were also performed. TC women (tested an average of 37 months after the event) had excessive pressor responses to cognitive stress (Stroop test: p emotional arousal (recall of TC event: p = 0.03 vs baseline). Pressor responses to hemodynamic stimuli were also amplified (Valsalva overshoot: p <0.05) and prolonged (duration: p <0.01) in the TC women compared with controls. Plasma catecholamine levels did not differ between TC women and controls. Indexes of parasympathetic (vagal) modulation of heart rate induced by respiration and cardiovagal baroreflex gain were significantly decreased in the TC women versus controls. In conclusion, even long after the initial episode, women with previous episode of TC have excessive sympathetic responsiveness and reduced parasympathetic modulation of heart rate. Impaired baroreflex control may therefore play a role in TC. PMID:26743349

  8. 心脏再同步化治疗无应答的一些新认识%New Opinions on Non-response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy ( CRT ) plays an import role in the therapy for terminal heart failure. In the latest European guidelines for heart failure therapy, the use of CRT implantation has gradually increased. However, 20%~30% of patients with CRT show no obvious effects after CRT; this is called non-response. In order to improve patient response to CRT, more methods need to be found that can forecast the efficacy of CRT for individual patients. The current optimal method for predicting which patients will respond to CRT is the duration of the QRS wave in heart failure. However, more options are needed in order to further improve patient response rate to CRT.%心脏再同步化治疗在终末期心力衰竭治疗中的地位日益重要.新近的欧洲指南中心脏再同步化治疗植入的适应证不断扩大.但有20%~30%的患者在安装了心脏再同步化治疗之后,效果不明显,称为心脏再同步化治疗无应答.合理地定义心脏再同步化治疗的应答,应该更注重患者症状和改善,而不片面追求临床指标的改善.关注新的预测心脏再同步化治疗有应答的方法,选择最优的预测方法,如QRS波时限等预测方法,预测心脏再同步化治疗植入效果,将加深对心脏再同步化治疗无应答的认识,降低心脏再同步化治疗无应答率,使更多的心力衰竭患者受益.

  9. Diabetic gastroparesis in association with autonomic neuropathy and microvasculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koçkar MC

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastroparesis is a frequent and sometimes life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Autonomic neuropathy seems to be one of the most important mechanisms underlying this entity, together with the other probable pathologies. The present study was performed in order to identify an alternative to gastric scintigraphy as a screening test. The gastric emptying times of 60 subjects (Group 1: 20 insulin-dependent patients, Group 2: 20 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients, and Group 3: 20 healthy volunteers were monitored by gastric scintigraphy. Perception thresholds for cold, heat, and vibration were tested by a quantitative sensory test, and QTc dispersions were calculated from standard electrocardiography recordings. In addition, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c and urine beta2-microglobulin and microalbumin concentrations were determined for the patient groups. Funduscopic examination was performed by an independent ophthalmologist. Gastroparesis was determined in both patient groups, regardless of fasting blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c concentrations. A strong correlation was observed between nephropathy, retinopathy, and cardiac autonomic denervation (QTc and gastroparesis. In conclusion, retinal and renal microvasculopathy parameters and cardiac autonomic function tests may be useful for screening diabetic patients for gastroparesis.

  10. Jam avoidance with autonomous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tordeux, Antoine; Lassarre, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Many car-following models are developed for jam avoidance in highways. Two mechanisms are used to improve the stability: feedback control with autonomous models and increasing of the interaction within cooperative ones. In this paper, we compare the linear autonomous and collective optimal velocity (OV) models. We observe that the stability is significantly increased by adding predecessors in interaction with collective models. Yet autonomous and collective approaches are close when the speed...

  11. Chemical Specification of Autonomic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Banâtre, Jean-Pierre; Fradet, Pascal; Radenac, Yann

    2004-01-01

    Autonomic computing provides a vision of information systems allowing self-management of many predefined properties. Such systems take care of their own behavior and of their interactions with other components without any external intervention. One of the major challenges concerns the expression of properties and constraints of autonomic systems. We believe that the {\\em chemical programming paradigm} (represented here by the Gamma formalism) is well-suited to the specification of autonomic s...

  12. Implementation of seven echocardiographic parameters of myocardial asynchrony to improve the long-term response rate of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Gert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac resynchronization Therapy (CRT is an effective therapy for chronic heart failure with beneficial hemodynamic effects leading to a reduction of morbidity and mortality. The responder rates, however, are low. There are various and contentious echocardiographic parameters of myocardial asynchrony. Patient selection by echocardiographic assessment of asynchrony is thought to improve responder rates. Methods In this small single-center pilot-study, seven established parameters of myocardial asynchrony were used to select patients for CRT: (1 interventricular electromechanical delay (IMD, cut-off ≥ 40 ms, (2 Septal-to-posterior wall motion delay (SPWMD, ≥ 130 ms, (3 maximal difference in time-to-peak velocities between any two of twelve LV segments (Ts-12 ≥ 104 ms, (4 standard deviation of time to peak myocardial velocities (Ts-12-SD, ≥ 34.4 ms, (5 difference between the septal and basal time-to-peak velocity (TDId, ≥ 60 ms, (6 left ventricular electromechanical delay (LVEMD, > 140 ms and (7 delayed longitudinal contraction (DLC, > 2 segments. 16 chronic heart failure patients (NYHA III–IV, LVEF Results Based on reverse remodeling (relative reduction of LVESV > 15%, relative increase of LVEF > 25%, the responder rate to CRT was 81.2% in patients selected for CRT according to our protocol as compared to 47.4% in the control group (p = 0.04. At baseline, there were on average 4.1 ± 1.6 positive parameters of asynchrony (follow-up: 3.7 [± 1.6] parameters positive, p = 0.52. Only the LVEMD decreased significantly after CRT (p = 0.027. The remaining parameters showed a non-significant trend towards reduction of myocardial asynchrony. Conclusion The implementation of different markers of asynchrony in the selection process for CRT improves the hemodynamic response rate to CRT.

  13. Central gene expression changes associated with enhanced neuroendocrine and autonomic response habituation to repeated noise stress after voluntary wheel running in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah K eSasse; Tara J eNyhuis; Cher V eMasini; Heidi E W eDay; Serge eCampeau

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that regular physical exercise benefits health in part by counteracting some of the negative physiological impacts of stress. While some studies identified reductions in some measures of acute stress responses with prior exercise, limited data were available concerning effects on cardiovascular function, and reported effects on HPA axis responses were largely inconsistent. Given that exposure to repeated or prolonged stress is strongly implicated in the preci...

  14. Complex Nonlinear Autonomic Nervous System Modulation Link Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy and Peripheral Vascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kinda eKhalaf; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Caroline eRobinson; Cornforth, David J.; Tarvainen, Mika P.; Hayder eAl-Aubaidy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physiological interactions are abundant within, and between, body systems. These interactions may evolve into discrete states during pathophysiological processes resulting from common mechanisms. An association between arterial stenosis, identified by low ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) as been reported. Whether an association between vascular calcification - characterized by high ABPI and a different pathophysiology - is similarly associated ...

  15. Acute leukaemoid reaction following cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb Stephen T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia is an atypical myeloproliferative disorder with a natural history of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia, a complex and poorly understood response by the bone marrow to stress. Cardiac surgery activates many inflammatory cascades and may precipitate a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. We present a case of undiagnosed chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia who developed rapidly fatal multi-organ dysfunction following cardiac surgery due to an acute leukaemoid reaction.

  16. Mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) frequently is the unfavorable outcome of pathological heart hypertrophy. In contrast to physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which occurs in response to exercise and leads to full adaptation of contractility to the increased wall stress, pathological hypertrophy occurs in response to volume or pressure overload, ultimately leading to contractile dysfunction and HF. Because cardiac hypertrophy impairs the relationship between ATP demand and production, mitochondrial bioenerget...

  17. Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment for developing and evaluating intelligent software for both actual and simulated autonomous vehicles. Laboratory computers provide...

  18. Jam avoidance with autonomous systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tordeux, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Many car-following models are developed for jam avoidance in highways. Two mechanisms are used to improve the stability: feedback control with autonomous models and increasing of the interaction within cooperative ones. In this paper, we compare the linear autonomous and collective optimal velocity (OV) models. We observe that the stability is significantly increased by adding predecessors in interaction with collective models. Yet autonomous and collective approaches are close when the speed difference term is taking into account. Within the linear OV models tested, the autonomous models including speed difference are sufficient to maximise the stability.

  19. DISORDERS OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE: FOCUS ON THE ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Akhmedova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV in patients with ischemic heart disease, a life-threatening heart rhythm disorders, as well as diabetes mellitus (DM is considered. A significant association between the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system and death from cardiovascular causes is identified. The reactions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS can serve as a precipitating factor of arrhythmias in patients with heart disorders. Analysis of HRV at rest is the main and informative method for determination of the ANS disorders. HRV decreases greatly in patients with acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmia, and DM, predicting a high risk of death. The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is cardiac autonomic neuropathy, with the development of "silent" ischemia and painless myocardial infarction. Autonomic regulation of the heart rate should be assessed for early diagnosis and prevention of complications in the form of sudden death.

  20. Collaborating with Autonomous Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Cross, Charles D.; Fan, Henry; Hempley, Lucas E.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc D.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    With the anticipated increase of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) entering into the National Airspace System, it is highly likely that vehicle operators will be teaming with fleets of small autonomous vehicles. The small vehicles may consist of sUAS, which are 55 pounds or less that typically will y at altitudes 400 feet and below, and small ground vehicles typically operating in buildings or defined small campuses. Typically, the vehicle operators are not concerned with manual control of the vehicle; instead they are concerned with the overall mission. In order for this vision of high-level mission operators working with fleets of vehicles to come to fruition, many human factors related challenges must be investigated and solved. First, the interface between the human operator and the autonomous agent must be at a level that the operator needs and the agents can understand. This paper details the natural language human factors e orts that NASA Langley's Autonomy Incubator is focusing on. In particular these e orts focus on allowing the operator to interact with the system using speech and gestures rather than a mouse and keyboard. With this ability of the system to understand both speech and gestures, operators not familiar with the vehicle dynamics will be able to easily plan, initiate, and change missions using a language familiar to them rather than having to learn and converse in the vehicle's language. This will foster better teaming between the operator and the autonomous agent which will help lower workload, increase situation awareness, and improve performance of the system as a whole.

  1. Role of mobile passenger lymphocytes in the rejection of renal and cardiac allografts in the rat. A passenger lymphocyte-mediated graft-versus-host reaction amplifies the host response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that passenger lymphocytes migrate out of rat renal allografts into host spleens in a radioresistant fashion. These mobile passenger lymphocytes within BN kidney and heart transplants are immunocompetent, since they elicit a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction in the spleens of (LEW x BN)F2 hybrid hosts. The greater GVH reaction in (LEW x BN)F1 recipients of BN kidneys reflects the greater number of mobile passenger lymphocytes in the kidney when compared to the heart. The mobile passenger lymphocytes within BN renal allografts also cause a proliferative response in the spleens of the LEW hosts as well as an accelerated rejection of BN renal allografts when compared to BN cardiac allografts, for the differences between BN kidney and heart, both in terms of splenomegaly elicited in LEW as well as tempo of rejection, are abolished by total body x-irradiation of the donor with 900 rad. Results indicate that a mobile passenger lymphocyte mediated GVH reaction in the central lymphoid organs of the host augments the host response to allogenic kidneys and contributes materially to first-set renal allograft rejection; this GVH reaction on the other hand is not conspicuously present in LEW recipients of BN cardiac allografts and has therefore little effect on first-set cardiac allograft rejection

  2. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  3. Central gene expression changes associated with enhanced neuroendocrine and autonomic response habituation to repeated noise stress after voluntary wheel running in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah KSasse

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that regular physical exercise benefits health in part by counteracting some of the negative physiological impacts of stress. While some studies identified reductions in some measures of acute stress responses with prior exercise, limited data were available concerning effects on cardiovascular function, and reported effects on HPA axis responses were largely inconsistent. Given that exposure to repeated or prolonged stress is strongly implicated in the precipitation and exacerbation of illness, we proposed the novel hypothesis that physical exercise might facilitate adaptation to repeated stress, and subsequently demonstrated significant enhancement of both HPA axis (glucocorticoid and cardiovascular (tachycardia response habituation to repeated noise stress in rats with long-term access to running wheels compared to sedentary controls. Stress habituation has been attributed to modifications of brain circuits, but the specific sites of adaptation and the molecular changes driving its expression remain unclear. Here, in situ hybridization histochemistry was used to examine regulation of select stress-associated signaling systems in brain regions representing likely candidates to underlie exercise-enhanced stress habituation. Analyzed brains were collected from active (6 weeks of wheel running and sedentary rats following control, acute, or repeated noise exposures that induced a significantly faster rate of glucocorticoid response habituation in active animals but preserved acute noise responsiveness. Nearly identical experimental manipulations also induce a faster rate of cardiovascular response habituation in exercised, repeatedly stressed rats. The observed regulation of the corticotropin-releasing factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor systems across several brain regions suggests widespread effects of voluntary exercise on central functions and related adaptations to stress across multiple response

  4. Autonomous packaging robot

    OpenAIRE

    Vo, Van Thanh

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the autonomous packaging robot application is to replace manual product packaging in food industry with a fully automatic robot. The objective is achieved by using the combination of machine vision, central computer, sensors, microcontroller and a typical ABB robot. The method is to equip the robot with different sensors: camera as “eyes” of robot, distance sensor and microcontroller as “sense of touch” of the robot, central computer as “brain” of the robot. Because the ro...

  5. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...... management and efficient system operation. Due to the expected large number of user-deployed cells, centralized network planning becomes unpractical and new scalable alternatives must be sought. In this article, we propose a fully distributed and scalable solution to the interference management problem...

  6. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  7. Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motoneurons labeled after voluntary diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Michael ePanneton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dramatic bradycardia is induced by underwater submersion in vertebrates. The location of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons driving this aspect of the diving response was investigated using cFos immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde transport of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB to double-label neurons. After pericardial injections of CTB, trained rats voluntarily dove underwater, and their heart rates dropped immediately to 95±2bpm, an 80% reduction. After immunohistochemical processing, the vast majority of CTB labeled neurons were located in the reticular formation from the rostral cervical spinal cord to the facial motor nucleus, confirming previous studies. Labeled neurons caudal to the rostral ventrolateral medulla were usually spindle-shaped aligned along an oblique line running from the dorsal vagal nucleus to the ventrolateral reticular formation, while those more rostrally were multipolar with extended dendrites. Nine percent of retrogradely-labeled neurons were positive for both cFos and CTB after diving and 74% of these were found rostral to the obex. CTB also was transported transganglionically in primary afferent fibers, resulting in large granular deposits in dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and commissural subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii and finer deposits in lamina I and IV-V of the trigeminocervical complex. The overlap of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons activated by diving with those activated by baro- and chemoreceptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla is discussed. Thus the profound bradycardia seen with underwater submersion reinforces the notion that the mammalian diving response is the most powerful autonomic reflex known.

  8. Role of autogenic relaxation in management of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type II diabetes mellitus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manish K. Verma; Biswas, D A; Shambhavi Tripathi; N. S. Verma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a very common complication of Type II diabetes mellitus patients. Early detection and treatment of CAN is necessary for reduction of mortality and morbidity in type II diabetes patients. Methods: The study included 120 diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with autonomic neuropathy both male and female, with more than 5 years duration of disease. Age group of the study subjects was between 30 and ndash; 70 years. All the 120 diabet...

  9. Verbal, Facial and Autonomic Responses to Empathy-Eliciting Film Clips by Disruptive Male Adolescents with High versus Low Callous-Unemotional Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wied, Minet; van Boxtel, Anton; Matthys, Walter; Meeus, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This study examined empathy-related responding in male adolescents with disruptive behavior disorder (DBD), high or low on callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Facial electromyographic (EMG) and heart rate (HR) responses were monitored during exposure to empathy-inducing film clips portraying sadness, anger or happiness. Self-reports were assessed…

  10. Towards autonomous vehicular clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Olariu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the 21st century has seen a growing interest in vehicular networking and its myriad potential applications. The initial view of practitioners and researchers was that radio-equipped vehicles could keep the drivers informed about potential safety risks and increase their awareness of road conditions. The view then expanded to include access to the Internet and associated services. This position paper proposes and promotes a novel and more comprehensive vision namely, that advances in vehicular networks, embedded devices and cloud computing will enable the formation of autonomous clouds of vehicular computing, communication, sensing, power and physical resources. Hence, we coin the term, autonomous vehicular clouds (AVCs. A key feature distinguishing AVCs from conventional cloud computing is that mobile AVC resources can be pooled dynamically to serve authorized users and to enable autonomy in real-time service sharing and management on terrestrial, aerial, or aquatic pathways or theaters of operations. In addition to general-purpose AVCs, we also envision the emergence of specialized AVCs such as mobile analytics laboratories. Furthermore, we envision that the integration of AVCs with ubiquitous smart infrastructures including intelligent transportation systems, smart cities and smart electric power grids will have an enormous societal impact enabling ubiquitous utility cyber-physical services at the right place, right time and with right-sized resources.

  11. Nemesis Autonomous Test System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Lee, Cin-Young; Horvath, Gregory A,; Clement, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized framework has been developed for systems validation that can be applied to both traditional and autonomous systems. The framework consists of an automated test case generation and execution system called Nemesis that rapidly and thoroughly identifies flaws or vulnerabilities within a system. By applying genetic optimization and goal-seeking algorithms on the test equipment side, a "war game" is conducted between a system and its complementary nemesis. The end result of the war games is a collection of scenarios that reveals any undesirable behaviors of the system under test. The software provides a reusable framework to evolve test scenarios using genetic algorithms using an operation model of the system under test. It can automatically generate and execute test cases that reveal flaws in behaviorally complex systems. Genetic algorithms focus the exploration of tests on the set of test cases that most effectively reveals the flaws and vulnerabilities of the system under test. It leverages advances in state- and model-based engineering, which are essential in defining the behavior of autonomous systems. It also uses goal networks to describe test scenarios.

  12. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  13. Autonomic nervous system response patterns in freshmen with different resilience in a military university%某军校不同心理弹性水平的大一新生自主神经反应特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张佳佳; 彭李; 李敏

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究不同心理弹性水平军校大学生自主神经反应特点.方法 采用成人心理弹性量表(resilience scale for adults,RSA)对重庆某军校大一新生进行心理测评,筛选出心理弹性高分组和低分组被试共144名,再从中选取愿意参加本实验的心理弹性高分组和低分组被试各27名,其进行自主神经反应(心率、皮电、皮温、指端血容振幅)特点的实验研究.结果 ①静息状态下,心理弹性高分组和低分组被试的自主神经反应没有统计学差异(P>0.05).②悲伤情绪诱导下,心理弹性高分组在皮电上低于心理弹性低分组(t=-2.077,P=0.043).③悲伤情绪诱导后,心理弹性高分组和心理弹性低分组的各个指标的恢复时间上均无统计学差异(P>0.05).结论 心理弹性水平不同的大学生的自主神经活动模式可能存在一定程度的差异.%Objective To investigate the autonomic nervous system response pattern in military college students with different levels of resilience. Methods Resilience Scale for Adults (R.SA) was applied to test 144 college students, and based on the RSA score 54 freshmen who accepted to join the test were selected and were divided into a high resilience group and a low resilience group. Each 27 freshmen of the two groups were tested for autonomic nervous system response pattern. Results ① At resting state, students of the high resilience group and low resilience group did not show significant differences in heart rate ( HR) , skin conductance (SC), skin temperature (ST) and blood volume pulse (BVP) (P>0. 05). ② Compared with those indices obtained at resting state, students of the high resilience group scored lower in HR, SC and ST under sad mood induction, but higher in BVP; students of the low resilience group scored higher in HR and SC under sad mood induction, but lower in ST and BVP. Sad mood induction showed that SC of the high resilience group was significantly lower than that of the

  14. 心脏自主神经节消融治疗睡眠呼吸暂停并发心房颤动的实验研究%Effects of cardiac autonomic ganglia ablation on atrial fibrillation associated with sleep apnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余小梅; 鲁志兵; 何文博; 何勃; 黄兵; 赵劲波; 江洪

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of cardiac autonomic ganglionated plexus (GP)ablation on atrial fibrillation(AF) associated with sleep apnea(SA).Methods Thirteen dogs were randomly divided into two groups.GP ablation was performed after SA in the first group(n=7) and before SA in the second group (n =6).Surface electrocardiograms and blood were collected.Effective refractory period (ERP) and window of vulnerability(WOV) of the atrium,pulmonary veins and superior vena cava were measured in the baseline state,at the end of SA which was lasted for 1 hour and after GP ablation,respectively.Changes of heart rate,blood pressure,arterial blood gas analysis,heart rate viability (HRV),ERP and WOV were compared between the two groups before and after GP ablation.Results In the first group,during the process of SA,the heart rate and blood pressure increased and then decreased.At the end of 1 h SA,the HRV analysis revealed that the ratio of low frequency/high frequency(LF/HF) reduced compare to the level of baseline state [(0.6±0.2)vs.(O.8± 0.2),P<0.05] ; ERP was significantly shortened,and ∑WOV was significantly increased(P<0.05).After GP ablation,LF/HF was significantly increased[(1.1±0.3)vs(0.8±0.2),P<0.05],ERP was significantly prolonged,and ∑WOV was decreased (P<0.05).In the second group,during SA process following GP ablation,the heart rate and blood pressure were increased and then decreased.ERP was shortened at several sites.However,there were no significant changes of LF/HF and ∑WOV.In both groups,hypoxemia,hypercapnia and acidosis were observed after 1 h SA.Conclusion The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the occurrence of AF associated with SA.GP ablation may reverse and prevent AF caused by SA.%目的 研究心脏自主神经节(GP)消融对睡眠呼吸暂停(SA)并发心房颤动(房颤)的影响.方法 成年杂种犬13只,采用随机数字法分为2组.第1组先制作SA模型再行GP消融(n=7),

  15. [Rhythm disorders and cardiac crypto-malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J M; Raczka, F; Cung, T T; Combes, N; Bortone, A; Gaty, D

    2005-12-01

    Faced with a cardiac arrhythmia occuring in an apparently healthy heart, it is necessary to perform an anatomical investigation to detect any unsuspected anomalies. Congenital cardiopathy must certainly be excluded, as this is often responsible for rhythm disorders and/or cardiac conduction defects. Similarly, any acquired conditions, cardiomyopathy, or cardiac tumour must be sought. However, the possibility should always be considered of a minimal congenital malformation, which could be repsonsible for: any type of cardiac arrhythmia: rhythm disorder or conduction defect at the atrial, junctional or ventricular level, with a benign or serious prognosis. Unexpected therapeutic difficulties during radiofrequency ablation procedures or at implantation of pacemakers or defibrillators. Together with rhythm studies, the investigation of choice is high quality imaging, either the classic left or right angiography or the more modern cardiac CT or intracardiac mapping. PMID:16433240

  16. Causes of sudden cardiac death in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dejana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Sudden cardiac death in athletes is a growing problem, despite the huge existing knowledge in medicine and sports. Effects of vigorous physical activity In response to vigorous physical activity, the body undergoes profound morphologic and functional changes. These changes are usually healthy, but sometimes may gravitate to some cardiac diseases. But still, most sudden cardiac deaths are due to previous unknown diseases. Causes of sudden cardiac death The most common cause of sudden cardiac death in athletes is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other reasons are congenital coronary artery anomalies, myocarditis, dilatative cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy of the right ventricle, sarcoidosis, mitral valve prolapse, aortic valve stenosis, atherosclerosis, long QT syndrome, and blunt impact to the chest. Conclusion Bearing in mind the above mentioned, more frequent physical examinations of athletes are recommended.

  17. Autonomous immunity in mucosal epithelial cells: fortifying the barrier against infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells express an autonomous innate immune response that controls the overgrowth of invaded bacteria, mitigates the harmful effects of the bacteria carried within, and does not rely on other external arms of the immune response. Epithelial cell autonomous innate immunity "respects" the social biology of invading bacteria to achieve symbiosis, and is the primary protective mechanism against pathogens. PMID:27005450

  18. Cardiac Repolarization Analysis: Immediate Response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel; Tobaldini, E.; Montano, N.; Leinveber, P.

    Zaragoza: Computing in Cardiology , 2013, s. 871-874. ISSN 2325-8861. [The 40th conference on Computing in Cardiology . Zaragoza (ES), 22.09.2013-25.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2034 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ventricular repolarization * QT memory * QT restitution * QT dynamic parameters * tilt test Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  19. Expanded Perspectives on Autonomous Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores two general perspectives on autonomous learners: psychological and sociocultural. These perspectives introduce a range of theoretically grounded facets of autonomous learners, facets such as the self-regulated learner, the emotionally intelligent learner, the self-determined learner, the mediated learner, the socioculturally…

  20. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...