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Sample records for cardiac autonomic neuropathy

  1. [Autonomic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, T; Penzlin, A I; Illigens, B M W

    2013-07-01

    Autonomic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that involve damage of small peripheral autonomic Aδ- and C-fibers. Causes of autonomic nerve fiber damage are disorders such as diabetes mellitus and HIV-infection. Predominant symptoms of autonomic neuropathy are orthostatic hypotension, gastro-intestinal problems, urogenital dysfunction, and cardiac arrhythmia, which can severely impair the quality of life in affected patients. Furthermore, autonomic neuropathies can be induced by autoimmune diseases such as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, hereditary disorders such as the lysosomal storage disorder Fabry disease and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, as well as certain toxins and drugs.

  2. [Autonomic dysfunction syndrome and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in children with diabetes mellitus type I. The correction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukian, V Iu; Bolotova, N V; Aver'ianov, A P; Filina, N Iu; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the state of the autonomic nervous system in 90 children with diabetes mellitus type I. The autonomic dysfunction syndrome was found in 58,9% and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in 28,9% of patients. We revealed the high risk of the development of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in children with diabetes mellitus type I in the presence of the autonomic dysfunction syndrome. It has been shown that the early treatment of functional disturbances of the autonomic nervous system using transcranial magnetic stimulation is necessary to prevent the manifestation of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  3. Autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1980-01-01

    In order to elucidate the physiological significance of autonomic neuropathy in juvenile diabetics, cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic functions have been investigated in three groups of juvenile diabetics: One group had no signs of neuropathy, one group had presumably slight autonomic...... neuropathy (reduced beat-to-beat variation in heart rate during hyperventilation) and one group had clinically severe autonomic neuropathy, defined by presence of orthostatic hypotension. In all three experimental situations we found sympathetic dysfunction causing cardiovascular and/or hormonal...... maladjustments in patients with autonomic neuropathy. Regarding metabolic functions we found normal responses to graded exercise and insulin-induced hypoglycemia in patients with autonomic neuropathy in spite of blunted catecholamine responses, suggesting increased sensitivity of glycogen stores and adipose...

  4. Diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy: insights from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stables, Catherine L; Glasser, Rebecca L; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a relatively common and often devastating complication of diabetes. The major clinical signs are tachycardia, exercise intolerance, and orthostatic hypotension, but the most severe aspects of this complication are high rates of cardiac events and mortality. One of the earliest manifestations of CAN is reduced heart rate variability, and detection of this, along with abnormal results in postural blood pressure testing and/or the Valsalva maneuver, are central to diagnosis of the disease. The treatment options for CAN, beyond glycemic control, are extremely limited and lack evidence of efficacy. The underlying molecular mechanisms are also poorly understood. Thus, CAN is associated with a poor prognosis and there is a compelling need for research to understand, prevent, and reverse CAN. In this review of the literature we examine the use and usefulness of animal models of CAN in diabetes. Compared to other diabetic complications, the number of animal studies of CAN is very low. The published studies range across a variety of species, methods of inducing diabetes, and timescales examined, leading to high variability in study outcomes. The lack of well-characterized animal models makes it difficult to judge the relevance of these models to the human disease. One major advantage of animal studies is the ability to probe underlying molecular mechanisms, and the limited numbers of mechanistic studies conducted to date are outlined. Thus, while animal models of CAN in diabetes are crucial to better understanding and development of therapies, they are currently under-used. PMID:23562143

  5. Autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy is often difficult to establish, since clinical symptoms generally appear late in the course of the disease, and may be non-specific. A number of recently developed quantifiable and reproducible autonomic nerve function tests are reviewed, with emphasis on th...

  6. [Drug with a high metabolic activity, cocarnit, in the treatment of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, S V; Melekhovets', O K; Demikhova, N V; Vynnychenko, L B

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with diabetes is formed in the absence of atherosclerotic changes as a consequence of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in the early stages of diabetes. Progression of autonomic cardiac neuropathy in cardio-vascular type is associated with the violation of energy supply of cells, protein synthesis, electrolyte exchange, the exchange of trace elements, oxidation reduction processes, oxygen-transport function of blood, so that metabolic therapy is carried out to optimize the processes of formation and energy costs. The drug cocarnit activates processes of aerobic oxidation of glucose, as well as providing regulatory influence on the oxidation of fatty acids. Applying of cocarnit in complex therapy in patients with diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy found improvement of left ventricular diastolic function, and positive dynamics in the efferent activity balance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic control of heart rate variability, which provides the regression of clinical symptoms. PMID:23356142

  7. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  8. Screening for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy using a new handheld device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulichsen, Elisabeth; Fleischer, Jesper; Ejskjaer, Niels;

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a serious complication of longstanding diabetes and is associated with an increased morbidity and reduced quality of life in patients with diabetes. The present study evaluated the prevalence of CAN diagnosed by reduced heart rate variability (HRV) using...... a newly developed device in a large, unselected, hospital-based population of patients with diabetes....

  9. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Anne Sofie; Tarnow, Lise; Rossing, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) has been associated with a poor prognosis in patients with diabetes. Because CAN is common in patients with diabetic nephropathy, we evaluated the predictive value of CAN in type 1 diabetic patients with and without diabetic nephropathy....

  10. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  11. Silent myocardial infarction secondary to cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jacob, Aasems; Anthony Diaz, Mark; Lederman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and hypertension presented to the emergency department with fever and chills of 1 day duration. On examination, temperature was 100.9 F, heart rate 111/min and she had orthostatic hypotension. Laboratory tests showed elevated blood urea nitrogen and white cell count. The patient underwent treatment for symptomatic urinary tract infection and while her fever and leucocytosis resolved, tachycardia persisted. An EKG done showed T inversions in leads II, III, arteriovenous fistula, V2 and V3. Troponin-I was elevated. Nuclear stress test revealed apical wall motion abnormality confirming myocardial infarction. Ewing's tests were carried out at bedside and these diagnosed severe autonomic neuropathy. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause cardiac autonomic neuropathy from chronic inflammation. This case entails the importance of assessing and detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy in chronic inflammatory conditions, and the need to be cautious of acute coronary events in these patients, even for minimal or no symptoms. PMID:27489064

  12. Prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in Asian Indian patients with fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Nanaiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It was formerly believed that since fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD is a secondary form of diabetes, specific diabetic complications were uncommon. This is no longer considered to be true. Our objective was to study the prevalence and pattern of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN in patients with FCPD. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study on consecutive male patients with FCPD was performed. Using an automated CAN System Analyzer, heart rate response to deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, standing and blood pressure response to standing were measured. The standard Ewing′s criteria were used to define normal, borderline, and abnormal values. Prevalence rates were calculated and the patients were defined to have normal autonomic function, parasympathetic, sympathetic, and combined dysfunction. Results: The prevalence of CAN in this study population was 63.3%. Isolated parasympathetic dysfunction (42.3% was the most common abnormality. Combined sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction was noted in 13.3% of patients. Isolated borderline dysfunction was noted among 13.3% of patients. CAN was detected in six patients with a duration of diabetes of less than 1 year after diagnosis. Patients with autonomic dysfunction were found to have a lower body mass index (BMI and low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol when compared to those with normal autonomic functions, which was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The prevalence of abnormal cardiac autonomic function is as high as 63.3% in the present study population which warrants regular screening of patients with FCPD for autonomic dysfunction. Patients with FCPD and autonomic dysfunction were found to have a lower BMI and lower LDL-cholesterol, which may be indicators of malnutrition in the group with autonomic dysfunction. Whether this malnutrition contributes to autonomic dysfunction needs further exploration.

  13. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with uraemia is not related to pre-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Marie Bayer; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo;

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been proposed that pre-diabetes may cause neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in uraemic patients was related to the presence of pre-diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 66 non-diabetic uraemic patients...... enrolled. Beat-to-beat variability was determined from the echocardiographic recording during deep inspiration and expiration. CAN was defined as a beat-to-beat value below 10 beats/min. Pre-diabetes was defined as presence of impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance measured by oral...... glucose tolerance test (WHO/American Diabetes Association criteria 2007). RESULTS: The prevalence of CAN was 38% in uraemic patients compared with 8% in the controls (p diabetic, while the remaining 39 had a normal glucose tolerance...

  14. Evaluation of diabetic autonomic neuropathy by 123I-metaiodobenzyl-guanidine (MIBG) cardiac imaging. Initial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-photon emission computed tomography was performed in 52 diabetics and 10 healthy volunteers using MIBG. The diabetics had no particular findings of electrocardiography, echocardiography, or exercise thallium imaging and no cardiovascular episodes. The healthy volunteers had no abnormal findings on exercise thallium imaging or glucose tolerance test. The average relative regional uptake (RRU) was decreased in the inferoposterior wall compared with the anterior or lateral wall in both the diabetics and volunteers. According to the RRU and visual images, we divided the diabetics into the following four groups: 14 who were normal (group N), 30 with segmental defects (group S), 4 with diffuse defects (group D) and 4 without accumulation (group DH). Diabetic complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) and hypertension were more frequent in group S than group N. However, there were no significant differences in the physiological evidence of autonomic neuropathy (C.V. of the R-R interval on the ECG and blood pressure response to standing or deep breathing) between groups S and N. Vibration sense was significantly more impaired in group S than in group N. These results suggest that cardiac imaging with MIBG might be a useful examination for the early diagnosis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. (author)

  15. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course...

  16. Enhancing Predictive Accuracy of Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Using Blood Biochemistry Features and Iterative Multitier Ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abawajy, Jemal; Kelarev, Andrei; Chowdhury, Morshed U; Jelinek, Herbert F

    2016-01-01

    Blood biochemistry attributes form an important class of tests, routinely collected several times per year for many patients with diabetes. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of blood biochemistry for improving the predictive accuracy of the diagnosis of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) progression. Blood biochemistry contributes to CAN, and so it is a causative factor that can provide additional power for the diagnosis of CAN especially in the absence of a complete set of Ewing tests. We introduce automated iterative multitier ensembles (AIME) and investigate their performance in comparison to base classifiers and standard ensemble classifiers for blood biochemistry attributes. AIME incorporate diverse ensembles into several tiers simultaneously and combine them into one automatically generated integrated system so that one ensemble acts as an integral part of another ensemble. We carried out extensive experimental analysis using large datasets from the diabetes screening research initiative (DiScRi) project. The results of our experiments show that several blood biochemistry attributes can be used to supplement the Ewing battery for the detection of CAN in situations where one or more of the Ewing tests cannot be completed because of the individual difficulties faced by each patient in performing the tests. The results show that AIME provide higher accuracy as a multitier CAN classification paradigm. The best predictive accuracy of 99.57% has been obtained by the AIME combining decorate on top tier with bagging on middle tier based on random forest. Practitioners can use these findings to increase the accuracy of CAN diagnosis.

  17. Complex Nonlinear Autonomic Nervous System Modulation Link Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy and Peripheral Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinda eKhalaf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiological interactions are abundant within, and between, body systems. These interactions may evolve into discrete states during pathophysiological processes resulting from common mechanisms. An association between arterial stenosis, identified by low ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI and cardiovascular disease (CVD as been reported. Whether an association between vascular calcification - characterized by high ABPI and a different pathophysiology - is similarly associated with CVD, has not been established. The current study aims to investigate the association between ABPI, and cardiac rhythm, as an indicator of cardiovascular health and functionality, utilising heart rate variability (HRV.Methods and Results: Two hundred and thirty six patients underwent ABPI assessment. Standard time and frequency domain, and non-linear HRV measures were determined from 5-minute electrocardiogram. ABPI data were divided into normal (n=101, low (n=67 and high (n=66 and compared to HRV measures.(DFAα1 and SampEn were significantly different between the low ABPI, high ABPI and control groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: A possible coupling between arterial stenosis and vascular calcification with decreased and increased HRV respectively was observed. Our results suggest a model for interpreting the relationship between vascular pathophysiology and cardiac rhythm. The cardiovascular system may be viewed as a complex system comprising a number of interacting subsystems. These cardiac and vascular subsystems/networks may be coupled and undergo transitions in response to internal or external perturbations. From a clinical perspective, the significantly increased sample entropy compared to the normal ABPI group and the decreased and increased complex correlation properties measured by DFA for the low and high ABPI groups respectively, may be useful indicators that a more holistic treatment approach in line with this more complex clinical picture is required.

  18. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity...... of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors......) are not altered in circulating blood cells in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Thus, a generalized up-regulation of adrenoceptors does not occur in diabetic autonomic neuropathy....

  19. Evaluation of diabetic autonomic neuropathy by [sup 123]I-metaiodobenzyl-guanidine (MIBG) cardiac imaging. Initial report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osonoi, Takeshi; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Saitou, Miyoko; Kuroda, Yasuhisa; Uchimi, Nobuo; Ishioka, Kuniharu (Mitokyoudou General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan)); Onuma, Tomio; Suga, Shigeki; Takebe, Kazuo

    1994-11-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography was performed in 52 diabetics and 10 healthy volunteers using MIBG. The diabetics had no particular findings of electrocardiography, echocardiography, or exercise thallium imaging and no cardiovascular episodes. The healthy volunteers had no abnormal findings on exercise thallium imaging or glucose tolerance test. The average relative regional uptake (RRU) was decreased in the inferoposterior wall compared with the anterior or lateral wall in both the diabetics and volunteers. According to the RRU and visual images, we divided the diabetics into the following four groups: 14 who were normal (group N), 30 with segmental defects (group S), 4 with diffuse defects (group D) and 4 without accumulation (group DH). Diabetic complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) and hypertension were more frequent in group S than group N. However, there were no significant differences in the physiological evidence of autonomic neuropathy (C.V. of the R-R interval on the ECG and blood pressure response to standing or deep breathing) between groups S and N. Vibration sense was significantly more impaired in group S than in group N. These results suggest that cardiac imaging with MIBG might be a useful examination for the early diagnosis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. (author).

  20. Multi-layer Attribute Selection and Classification Algorithm for the Diagnosis of Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Based on HRV Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert F. Jelinek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN poses an important clinical problem, which often remains undetected due difficulty of conducting the current tests and their lack of sensitivity. CAN has been associated with growth in the risk of unexpected death in cardiac patients with diabetes mellitus. Heart rate variability (HRV attributes have been actively investigated, since they are important for diagnostics in diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiac and renal disease. Due to the adverse effects of CAN it is important to obtain a robust and highly accurate diagnostic tool for identification of early CAN, when treatment has the best outcome. Use of HRV attributes to enhance the effectiveness of diagnosis of CAN progression may provide such a tool. In the present paper we propose a new machine learning algorithm, the Multi-Layer Attribute Selection and Classification (MLASC, for the diagnosis of CAN progression based on HRV attributes. It incorporates our new automated attribute selection procedure, Double Wrapper Subset Evaluator with Particle Swarm Optimization (DWSE-PSO. We present the results of experiments, which compare MLASC with other simpler versions and counterpart methods. The experiments used our large and well-known diabetes complications database. The results of experiments demonstrate that MLASC has significantly outperformed other simpler techniques.

  1. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... experimental situations insufficient contraction of resistance vessels has been demonstrated. The vasoconstrictor defects demonstrated are of a magnitude sufficient to account for the prevailing hypotension. Furthermore, during exercise cardiac output is low in patients with autonomic neuropathy, a finding...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...

  2. 123I-MIBG lung uptake in patients with diabetes mellitus. Correlation with cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between 123I-MIBG lung uptake and autonomic neuropathy (AN) in patients with diabetes mellitus. For the quantitative analysis, lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) were obtained from chest planar image. In addition, both lung washout ratio (%WR-L) and heart washout ratio (%WR-H) were calculated from early and delayed images. Similarly, exercised myocardial scintigraphy using 201Tl-chloride was done to rule out ischemia and lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M-Tl) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M-Tl) were obtained from chest planar image. Each indexes were compared in both diabetic group and control group. Both mean value of H/M and %WR-H in AN (+) group were significantly higher than those of control group. Mean value of L/M in each diabetic group was significantly higher than that of control group. Particularly, L/M of AN (+) group is higher than that of AN (-) group on early study. Mean value of %WR-L in AN (+) group was also significantly higher than that of control group. Regarding the 201Tl-uptake index, there was no statistical significance among in each group. The current study showed that abnormal pulmonary 123I-MIBG uptake in the lung existed in patients with diabetes mellitus. The phenomenon might be related with sympathetic dysfunction or severity of diabetes mellitus. (author)

  3. Short-term ECG recording for the identification of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in people with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Herbert F.; Pham, Phuong; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Spence, Ian

    2007-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a serious and increasing health problem worldwide. Compared to non-diabetics, patients experience an increased risk of all cardiovascular diseases, including dysfunctional neural control of the heart. Poor diagnoses of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) may result in increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction and ischaemia, which can lead to sudden death. Traditionally the Ewing battery of tests is used to identify CAN. The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of heart rate variability (HRV) analyses of short-term ECG recordings as a method for detecting CAN. HRV may be able to identify asymptomatic individuals, which the Ewing battery is not able to do. Several HRV parameters are assessed, including time and frequency domain, as well as nonlinear parameters. Eighteen out of thirty-eight individuals with diabetes were positive for two or more of the Ewing battery of tests indicating CAN. Approximate Entropy (ApEn), log normalized total power (LnTP) and log normalized high frequency (LnHF) power demonstrate a significant difference at p ECG recordings. Our study paves the way to assess the utility of nonlinear parameters in identifying asymptomatic CAN.

  4. How to Calculate Renyi Entropy from Heart Rate Variability, and Why it Matters for Detecting Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eCornforth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN is a disease that involves nerve damage leading to an abnormal control of heart rate. An open question is to what extent this condition is detectable from Heart Rate Variability (HRV, which provides information only on successive intervals between heart beats, yet is non-invasive and easy to obtain from a 3-lead ECG recording. A variety of measures may be extracted from HRV, including time domain, frequency domain and more complex non-linear measures. Among the latter, Renyi Entropy has been proposed as a suitable measure that can be used to discriminate CAN from controls. However, all entropy methods require estimation of probabilities, and there are a number of ways in which this estimation can be made. In this work, we calculate Renyi entropy using several variations of the histogram method, and a density method based on sequences of RR intervals. In all, we calculate Renyi entropy using nine methods, and compare their effectiveness in separating the different classes of participants. We find that the histogram method using single RR intervals yields an entropy measure that is either incapable of discriminating CAN from controls, or that it provides little information that could not be gained from the standard deviation of the RR intervals. In contrast, probabilities calculated using a density method, based on sequences of RR intervals, yield an entropy measure that provides good separation between groups of participants, and provides information not available from the standard deviation. The main contribution of this work is that different approaches to calculating probability may affect the success of detecting disease. Our results bring new clarity to the methods used to calculate the Renyi entropy in general, and in particular, to the successful detection of CAN.

  5. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy;

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control...... in the setting of diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The prevalence of confirmed CAN is around 20%, and increases up to 65% with age and diabetes duration. Established risk factors for CAN are glycaemic control in type 1 and a combination of hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and glycaemic control...... in type 2 diabetes. CAN is a risk marker of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, and possibly a progression promoter of diabetic nephropathy. Criteria for CAN diagnosis and staging are: 1. one abnormal cardio-vagal test identifies possible or early CAN; 2. at least two abnormal cardio-vagal tests...

  6. Treatment of gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnblom, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The symptoms caused by gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus is important to highlight since it affects a large proportion of people with diabetes, regardless of whether this is type 1 or type 2. Gastroparesis and general signs of bowel dysfunction, such as constipation, diarrhoea and abdominal pain are most often encountered and involve both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options. This mini-review summarises a presentation given at the 'Diagnosis and treatment of autonomic diabetic neuropathy in the gut' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by another mini-review on a topic from this symposium (by Azpiroz and Malagelada, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3831-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Péter Kempler (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3826-y ). PMID:26634570

  7. Study of the association between left ventricular diastolic impairment and cardiac autonomic neuropathy in diabetic patients using [{sup 123}I] metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy

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    Suzuki, Rokuro; Tanaka, Shiro; Tojo, Osamu; Ishii, Tomofusa; Sato, Toshihiko; Fujii, Satoru [Osaka City General Hospital (Japan); Tumura, Kei

    1994-12-01

    The association between left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction and myocardial MIBG accumulation was investigated. The subjects were 14 Type II diabetic patients who had no evidence of ischemic heat disease, LV hypertrophy or dilated cardiomyopathy as determined by exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy and echocardiography. In 14 diabetic patients, isovolumic relaxation time (IRT) was measured by M-mode echocardiography, and the subjects were subdivided into two groups: Group1, 8 patients with impaired left ventricular diastolic function (IRT{>=}80 msec), and Group 2, 6 patients with normal left ventricular diastolic function (IRT<80 msec). {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was performed, and the myocardial accumulation of {sup 123}I-MIBG was investigated. The ratio of myocardial to mediastinal MIBG uptake was significantly (p<0.01) lower in Group 1 than in Group 2. And scintigraphic defects were significantly (p<0.05) more numerous in Group 1 than in Group 2. Patients in Group 1 had a greater frequency of cardiac autonomic neuropathy evaluated by QTc interval and coefficient of variation of R-R interval, when compared with Group 2. These data suggest that, in diabetic patients with no evidence of ischemic heart disease, LV hypertrophy or dilated cardiomyopathy, impairment of left ventricular diastolic function is associated with cardiac autonomic neuropathy. (author).

  8. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future.

  9. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  10. {sup 123}I-MIBG lung uptake in patients with diabetes mellitus. Correlation with cardiac autonomic neuropathy

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    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Flores, L.G. II; Ohnishi, Takashi; Tamura, Shozo; Watanabe, Katsushi; Kurose, Takeshi; Matsukura, Sigeru [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between {sup 123}I-MIBG lung uptake and autonomic neuropathy (AN) in patients with diabetes mellitus. For the quantitative analysis, lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) were obtained from chest planar image. In addition, both lung washout ratio (%WR-L) and heart washout ratio (%WR-H) were calculated from early and delayed images. Similarly, exercised myocardial scintigraphy using {sup 201}Tl-chloride was done to rule out ischemia and lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M-Tl) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M-Tl) were obtained from chest planar image. Each indexes were compared in both diabetic group and control group. Both mean value of H/M and %WR-H in AN (+) group were significantly higher than those of control group. Mean value of L/M in each diabetic group was significantly higher than that of control group. Particularly, L/M of AN (+) group is higher than that of AN (-) group on early study. Mean value of %WR-L in AN (+) group was also significantly higher than that of control group. Regarding the {sup 201}Tl-uptake index, there was no statistical significance among in each group. The current study showed that abnormal pulmonary {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake in the lung existed in patients with diabetes mellitus. The phenomenon might be related with sympathetic dysfunction or severity of diabetes mellitus. (author)

  11. Cardiac autonomic nervous test value to the diagnosis of plant diabetic neuropathy%心脏自主神经试验对糖尿病合并植物神经病变的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何煜暐

    2015-01-01

    目的:对46例糖尿病患者心脏自主神经试验进行分析,探讨心脏自主神经试验对糖尿病合并植物神经病变的诊断价值。方法:根据临床表现把糖尿病患者分为糖尿病合并植物神经病变组和糖尿病不合并植物神经病变组。行心脏自主神经试验,并对两组数据进行比较。结果:糖尿病合并植物神经病变组呼吸差,乏氏指数、30/15比值均低于不合并植物神经病变组。结论:心脏自主神经试验方法简单方便,容易掌握,重复性好,可作为评估糖尿病合并植物神经病变的敏感指标。%Objective46 cases of diabetic cardiac autonomic nervous test were analyzed, and discuss the heart autonomic nervous test value to the diagnosis of plant diabetic neuropathy.MethodsThe diabetes patients according to clinical manifestations of divided into diabetic neuropathy group and diabetes do not merge plants group of neuropathy. Heart the heart nerve test, and carries on the comparison to 2 sets of data.ResultsPlant diabetic neuropathy group of poor breathing, lack of index, the ratio of 30/15 were less merger plant neuropathy group.Conclusions Cardiac autonomic nervous test method is simple and convenient, easy to learn, good repeatability, can be used as evaluation of sensitive indicator of plant diabetic neuropathy.

  12. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes and no symptoms of coronary artery disease: comparison of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy and heart rate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholte, Arthur J.H.A.; Schuijf, Joanne D.; Delgado, Victoria; Kok, Jurriaan A.; Bus, Mieke T.J.; Maan, Arie C.; Wall, Ernst E. van der; Bax, Jeroen J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Stokkel, Marcel P.; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra [Leiden University Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine, Leiden (Netherlands); Kharagitsingh, Antje V. [Medisch Centrum Haaglanden, Department of Internal Medicine, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes, truly asymptomatic for coronary artery disease (CAD), using heart rate variability (HRV) and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-mIBG) myocardial scintigraphy. The study group comprised 88 patients with type 2 diabetes prospectively recruited from an outpatient diabetes clinic. In all patients myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, CAN by HRV and {sup 123}I-mIBG myocardial scintigraphy were performed. Two or more abnormal tests were defined as CAN-positive (ECG-based CAN) and one or fewer as CAN-negative. CAN assessed by {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy was defined as abnormal if the heart-to-mediastinum ratio was <1.8, the washout rate was >25%, or the total defect score was >13. The prevalence of CAN in patients asymptomatic for CAD with type 2 diabetes and normal myocardial perfusion assessed by HRV and {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy was respectively, 27% and 58%. Furthermore, in almost half of patients with normal HRV, {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy showed CAN. The current study revealed a high prevalence of CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes. Secondly, disagreement between HRV and {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy for the assessment of CAN was observed. (orig.)

  13. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Niño Mantilla

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is a serious problem in diabetic patients. The cardiovacular autonomic neuropathy is the most important autonomic dysfuntion for it´s implication in the increasesof the mortality rate in diabetis patients. tis ethiopatogenesis is the result of a multifactorial process caused by chronic hyperglycemia, ending up in damage of the autonomic fibers thet innervate the heart and blood vessels, leading to dysfuntional hearth rate control and abnormal vascular dynamics. the associated clinical manifestations include orthotatic hypotension, excecise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular liability and silent myocardial ischemia. Being important its recognition, quantitative test to evaluate the cardiovascular funtion, to value its evolution and the effects of the treatment ahould be done, being the most used, the hearth rate response to standing test, and teh valsalva maneuver. the handling of this entity is done improving control of glucose blood levels its the most effective way to prevent the cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

  14. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  15. [sup 123]I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in diabetic patients. Association with autonomic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Ohnishi, Takashi; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Futami, Shigemi; Watanabe, Katsushi; Nakatsuru, Kuninobu; Toshimori, Toshitaka; Matsukura, Shigeru (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    [sup 123]I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 20 diabetic patients (NIDDM) and 8 control subjects to investigate the association between clinical autonomic nerve dysfunction and myocardial accumulation of MIBG. We used coefficient variance of R-R interval (CV[sub R-R]) as a index of the autonomic neuropathy and categorized diabetes into two groups (CV[sub R-R][>=]2.0: non-autonomic neuropathy. CV[sub R-R]<2.0: autonomic neuropathy). In planar imaging studies, heart to mediastinum MIBG uptake ratio (H/M) was calculated on both early and delayed images. The washout ratio of [sup 123]I-MIBG in the heart (%WR) was also obtained using myocardial tracer activity on the both images. Mean value of these indices in diabetic group did not reveal any significant difference with the value in the control group. On the SPECT images, low uptake was observed in the posterior-inferior wall with normal uptake of [sup 201]Tl in diabetic patients with non-autonomic neuropathy. These areas extended in patients with autonomic neuropathy. The mean value of count ratio of posterior-interior to anterior wall (posterior-inferior/anterior ratio: PI/A) in the diabetic autonomic neuropathy group was significantly higher than in the control group on the both early and delayed images. And the mean value of regional %WR in the posterior-inferior wall calculated by the both MIBG SPECT images was significantly higher in the non-autonomic neuropathy group than in the control group. In the diabetic patients, retention mechanism of [sup 123]I-MIBG was considered to be involved at an early stage without autonomic nerve dysfunction clinically. As autonomic neuropathy progressed severely, uptake mechanism was also supposed to be involved. Therefore, [sup 123]I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was useful for early detection of cardiac sympathetic nervous dysfunction in diabetic patients. (author).

  16. Plasma dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) as an index of diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N J; Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J

    1988-01-01

    Forearm venous plasma noradrenalin and dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) concentrations were measured in eight diabetic patients with and eight diabetic patients without neuropathy. Plasma noradrenalin was on average the same in patients with and without neuropathy and correlated to serum creatinine....... Plasma DHPG concentrations were significantly reduced in patients with autonomic neuropathy as compared to patients without neuropathy (P less than 0.05). A low plasma DHPG/noradrenalin ratio in forearm venous blood identified all patients with autonomic neuropathy except one (P less than 0...

  17. Decreased myocardial perfusion reserve in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskiran, Mustafa; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Verner;

    2002-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for increased cardiovascular mortality in diabetic autonomic neuropathy are unknown. To investigate the effect of autonomic neuropathy on myocardial function, we performed dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance perfusion imaging during baseline...... conditions and after Dipyridamole-induced vasodilatation in nine type 1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy (AN+), defined by cardiovascular tests, as well as in 10 type 1 diabetic patients without autonomic neuropathy (AN-) and 10 healthy control subjects. Baseline myocardial perfusion index (K...... blood pressure response to Dipyridamole and myocardial perfusion reserve index. We conclude that type 1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy have a decreased myocardial perfusion reserve capacity when challenged with a vasodilatator, a finding that may in part be the pathophysiological substrate...

  18. [Clinical practice of hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, the main category becomes Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), and hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN). At least 80 genes have been associated with CMT, HMN or HSAN, a precise molecular diagnosis is often needed to make a clinical diagnosis accurately, enable genetic counseling of the patient and understanding of their molecular mechanisms. To identify the mutation in each patient, using a high-throughput NGS, we established a diagnostic procedure involving screening of disease causing genes in CMT, HMN or HSAN.

  19. Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy and anaesthesia - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Dave

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are a rare group of disorders characterized by progressive loss of function that predominantly affects the peripheral sensory nerves. Autonomic dysfunction is present to a variable degree and can have several implications for anaesthesia. We report the case of a patient with Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy who was posted for a below knee amputation and discuss the anaesthesia management.

  20. Diabetic gastroparesis in association with autonomic neuropathy and microvasculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koçkar MC

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastroparesis is a frequent and sometimes life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Autonomic neuropathy seems to be one of the most important mechanisms underlying this entity, together with the other probable pathologies. The present study was performed in order to identify an alternative to gastric scintigraphy as a screening test. The gastric emptying times of 60 subjects (Group 1: 20 insulin-dependent patients, Group 2: 20 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients, and Group 3: 20 healthy volunteers were monitored by gastric scintigraphy. Perception thresholds for cold, heat, and vibration were tested by a quantitative sensory test, and QTc dispersions were calculated from standard electrocardiography recordings. In addition, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c and urine beta2-microglobulin and microalbumin concentrations were determined for the patient groups. Funduscopic examination was performed by an independent ophthalmologist. Gastroparesis was determined in both patient groups, regardless of fasting blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c concentrations. A strong correlation was observed between nephropathy, retinopathy, and cardiac autonomic denervation (QTc and gastroparesis. In conclusion, retinal and renal microvasculopathy parameters and cardiac autonomic function tests may be useful for screening diabetic patients for gastroparesis.

  1. Metabolic and cardiovascular responses to epinephrine in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Richter, E; Madsbad, S;

    1987-01-01

    Norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction, which is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, is accentuated in patients with autonomic neuropathy. In contrast, responses mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, including vasodilatation and metabolic changes, have not been evaluated in these patients. ...

  2. The role of autonomic cardiovascular neuropathy in pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović-Pejičić Snježana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes is strongly associated with macrovascular complications, among which ischemic heart disease is the major cause of mortality. Autonomic neuropathy increases the risk of complications, which calls for an early diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine both presence and extent of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, in regard to the type of diabetes mellitus, as well as its correlation with coronary disease and major cardiovascular risk factors. Material and methods. We have examined 90 subjects, classified into three groups, with 30 patients each: those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and control group of healthy subjects. All patients underwent cardiovascular tests (Valsalva maneuver, deep breathing test, response to standing, blood pressure response to standing sustained, handgrip test, electrocardiogram, treadmill exercise test and filled out a questionnaire referring to major cardiovascular risk factors: smoking, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Results. Our results showed that cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was more frequent in type 2 diabetes, manifesting as autonomic neuropathy. In patients with autonomic neuropathy, regardless of the type of diabetes, the treadmill test was positive, i.e. strongly correlating with coronary disease. In regard to coronary disease risk factors, the most frequent correlation was found for obesity and hypertension. Discussion Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is considered to be the principal cause of arteriosclerosis and coronary disease. Our results showed that the occurrence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy increases the risk of coronary disease due to dysfunction of autonomic nervous system. Conclusions. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that significantly correlates with coronary disease. Early diagnosis of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy points to increased cardiovascular risk, providing a basis for preventive

  3. Cardiovascular, metabolic, and hormonal responses to noradrenaline in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Andersen, P; Hvidberg, A;

    1996-01-01

    Denervation hypersensitivity is a well-known phenomenon in patients with autonomic failure. In diabetic autonomic neuropathy hypersensitivity to beta-adrenergic stimulation has been demonstrated. We infused noradrenaline, mainly an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, in three escalating doses (0.5, 2.......5, and 5 micrograms min-1) in three age and sex matched groups of eight subjects: healthy volunteers, diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy. During steady state in each infusion period we measured heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, hepato-splanchnic blood flow, vascular...... resistance, glucose kinetics, metabolites (beta-hydroxybuturate, glycerol, and lactate), and glucoregulatory hormones (noradrenaline, adrenaline, growth hormone, pancreatic polypeptide, cortisol, and insulin). Systolic and mean blood pressure increased in all groups but diabetic patients with autonomic...

  4. Alternative Quantitative Tools in the Assessment of Diabetic Peripheral and Autonomic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, A I; Casellini, C; Névoret, M-L

    2016-01-01

    Here we review some seldom-discussed presentations of diabetic neuropathy, including large fiber dysfunction and peripheral autonomic dysfunction, emphasizing the impact of sympathetic/parasympathetic imbalance. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes and contributes additional risks in the aging adult. Loss of sensory perception, loss of muscle strength, and ataxia or incoordination lead to a risk of falling that is 17-fold greater in the older diabetic compared to their young nondiabetic counterparts. A fall is accompanied by lacerations, tears, fractures, and worst of all, traumatic brain injury, from which more than 60% do not recover. Autonomic neuropathy has been hailed as the "Prophet of Doom" for good reason. It is conducive to increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden death. An imbalance in the autonomic nervous system occurs early in the evolution of diabetes, at a stage when active intervention can abrogate the otherwise relentless progression. In addition to hypotension, many newly recognized syndromes can be attributed to cardiac autonomic neuropathy such as orthostatic tachycardia and bradycardia. Ultimately, this constellation of features of neuropathy conspire to impede activities of daily living, especially in the patient with pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. The resulting reduction in quality of life may worsen prognosis and should be routinely evaluated and addressed. Early neuropathy detection can only be achieved by assessment of both large and small- nerve fibers. New noninvasive sudomotor function technologies may play an increasing role in identifying early peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, allowing rapid intervention and potentially reversal of small-fiber loss.

  5. Prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy measured by simple bedside tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, Torben Bech; Benn, Jette; Christiansen, J S;

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, five simple bedside tests, beat-to-beat variation during quiet respiration, beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration, heart rate and blood pressure response to standing, heart rate response to exercise, and heart rate response....... The prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy in the whole diabetic population indicated by abnormal response in beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration was 27%. Diabetic autonimic neuropathy increased in frequency with duration of disease. Patients with nephropathy or proliferative retinopathy had...... a significantly higher prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy as indicated by abnormal beat-to-beat variation during forced respirations (p less than 0.01) than patients without these complications....

  6. Cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Liu; Dongmei Chen; Yonggang Wang; Xin Zhao; Yang Zheng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the distribution characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves and to explore the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia.DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed for papers examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerves, using "heart, autonomic nerve, sympathetic nerve, vagus nerve, nerve distribution, rhythm and atrial fibrillation" as the key words.SELECTION CRITERIA: A total of 165 studies examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerve were screened, and 46 of them were eventually included.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The distribution and characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves were observed, and immunohistochemical staining was applied to determine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase (main markers of cardiac autonomic nerve distribution). In addition, the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and cardiac arrhythmia was investigated.RESULTS: Cardiac autonomic nerves were reported to exhibit a disordered distribution in different sites, mainly at the surface of the cardiac atrium and pulmonary vein, forming a ganglia plexus. The distribution of the pulmonary vein autonomic nerve was prominent at the proximal end rather than the distal end, at the upper left rather than the lower right, at the epicardial membrane rather than the endocardial membrane, at the left atrium rather than the right atrium, and at the posterior wall rather than the anterior wall. The main markers used for cardiac autonomic nerves were tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase. Protein gene product 9.5 was used to label the immunoreactive nerve distribution, and the distribution density of autonomic nerves was determined using a computer-aided morphometric analysis system.CONCLUSION: The uneven distribution of the cardiac autonomic nerves is the leading cause of the occurrence of arrhythmia, and the cardiac autonomic nerves play an important role in the

  7. Impact of early detection and treatment of diabetes on the 6-year prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in people with screen-detected diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, Morten; Fleischer, J; Witte, Daniel Rinse;

    2013-01-01

    Baggrund: Der er begrænset viden om hvordan tidlig multifaktoriel behandling forbedrer konsekvenser af diabetes. Kardiel autonom neuropati (KAN) hos personer med diabetes indikerer omfattende skade på det autonome nervesystem og er relateret til mortalitet og livskvalitet. I dette studie fra...... ADDITION Danmark undersøgte vi effekten af tidlig opsporing og efterfølgende intensive behandling af type 2 diabetes i almen praksis på hyppigheden af kardiel autonom neuropati 6 år efter diagnose. Resultater: Prævalensen af tidlig KAN var 15,1% i rutine behandlingsgruppen (RG) og 15.5% i intensive...... kardiovaskulære risikofaktorer er således ikke nok til at forebygge at mange diabetes patienter udvikler KAN....

  8. Disease mechanisms in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoorten, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2006-02-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are common monogenically inherited diseases of the peripheral nervous system. In the most common variant, i.e., the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, both motor and sensory nerves are affected. In contrast, sensory abnormalities predominate or are exclusively present in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN). HSAN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and are subdivided according to mode of inheritance, age of onset and clinical evolution. In recent years, 6 disease-causing genes have been identified for autosomal dominant and recessive HSAN. However, vesicular transport and axonal trafficking seem important common pathways leading to degeneration of sensory and autonomic neurons. This review discusses the HSAN-related genes and their biological role in the disease mechanisms leading to HSAN.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... article on PubMed Central Huang CL, Kuo E. Mechanisms of disease: WNK-ing at the mechanism of salt-sensitive hypertension. Nat Clin Pract Nephrol. ... Verpoorten N, De Jonghe P, Timmerman V. Disease mechanisms in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. Neurobiol Dis. ...

  10. Correlation between arterial wall stiffness, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Aleksandrovna Serhiyenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess arterial wall stiffness, plasma levels of of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as well as functional state and structure of the myocardium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN.Materials and Methods. The study involved a total of 65 patients with T2DM. 12 had no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD or CAN, 14 were diagnosed with subclinical stage of CAN, 18 – with functional stage, and 21 – with organic stage. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic augmentation index (AIx, brachial artery AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and plasma levels of NT-proBNP. Clinical examination included ECG, Holter monitoring, ambulatory BP measurement and echocardiography.Results. Patients with isolated T2DM showed a trend for increased vascular wall stiffness. PWV was increased in patients with subclinical stage of CAN. Aortic and brachial AIx, PWV and AASI were elevated in patients with functional stage of CAN, PWV being significantly higher vs. subclinical CAN subgroup. Organic stage was characterized by pathologically increased values of all primary parameters; PWV and AASI were significantly higher compared with other groups. Development and progression of CAN was accompanied by an increase in NT-proBNP plasma levels. Concentration of NT-proBNP was in direct correlation with left ventricular mass (LVM and PWV. PWV and LVM values also directly correlated between themselves.Conclusion. Development and progression of CAN in patients with T2DM is accompanied by an increase in vascular wall stiffness. The elevation of plasma NT-proBNP in patients with T2DM correlates with the development of CAN and is significantly and independently associated with an increase in LVM and PWV. Our data suggests the pathophysiological interconnection between metabolic, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with T2DM and CAN.

  11. Diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Clinicalmanifestations, cardiovascular consequences, diagnosisand treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akif Serhat Balcloglu; Haldun Müderrisoglu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a frequentchronic complication of diabetes mellitus with potentiallylife-threatening outcomes. CAN is caused by theimpairment of the autonomic nerve fibers regulatingheart rate, cardiac output, myocardial contractility, cardiacelectrophysiology and blood vessel constriction anddilatation. It causes a wide range of cardiac disorders,including resting tachycardia, arrhythmias, intraoperativecardiovascular instability, asymptomatic myocardialischemia and infarction and increased rate of mortalityafter myocardial infarction. Etiological factors associatedwith autonomic neuropathy include insufficient glycemiccontrol, a longer period since the onset of diabetes,increased age, female sex and greater body mass index.The most commonly used methods for the diagnosisof CAN are based upon the assessment of heart ratevariability (the physiological variation in the time intervalbetween heartbeats), as it is one of the first findings inboth clinically asymptomatic and symptomatic patients.Clinical symptoms associated with CAN generally occurlate in the disease process and include early fatigue andexhaustion during exercise, orthostatic hypotension,dizziness, presyncope and syncope. Treatment is basedon early diagnosis, life style changes, optimization ofglycemic control and management of cardiovascular riskfactors. Medical therapies, including aldose reductaseinhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors,prostoglandin analogs and alpha-lipoic acid, have beenfound to be effective in randomized controlled trials.The following article includes the epidemiology, clinicalfindings and cardiovascular consequences, diagnosis,and approaches to prevention and treatment of CAN.

  12. The role of serum methylglyoxal on diabetic peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. S.; Jensen, T.M.; Jensen, J S;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are common diabetic complications and independent predictors of cardiovascular disease. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal has been suggested to play a causal role in the pathogeneses of diabetic peripheral neuropathy...... and possibly diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional association between serum methylglyoxal and diabetic peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in a subset of patients in the ADDITION-Denmark study with short-term screen......-detected Type 2 diabetes (duration ~ 5.8 years). METHODS: The patients were well controlled with regard to HbA(1c), lipids and blood pressure. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed by measures of resting heart rate variability and cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy...

  13. Genes for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies : a genotype-phenotype correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven g

  14. A case of hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G P Prashanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN -IV, also known as congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis, is a very rare condition that presents in infancy with anhidrosis, absence of pain sensation and self -mutilation. Developmental delay and mental retardation are usually present. Ultrastructural study of the peripheral nerves demonstrates loss of the unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers. We here report a 8 year -old boy with HSAN IV with typical clinical features where the diagnosis was supported by nerve biopsy findings. However, our case was unusual since mental development was normal.

  15. No response of pancreatic hormones to hypoglycemia in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T;

    1982-01-01

    The responses of pancreatic hormones (i.e. glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin) to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were investigated in 18 insulin-dependent diabetics without residual beta-cell function and in 6 normal subjects. Nine of the diabetics had autonomic neuropathy, and 9 had...... no neuropathy. After hypoglycemia, no significant increase in any of the 3 pancreatic hormones was found in the diabetics with autonomic neuropathy, whereas significant increments were found in the diabetics without neuropathy and in the normal subjects. These results suggest that autonomic nervous activity...

  16. Gallbladder ejection fraction using {sup 99m}Tc-DISIDA scan in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki; An, Jun Hyup [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seok Dong [Dongkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the changes of gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF) in diabetic patients with or without autonomic neuropathy. This study included 37 diabetic patients (25 women, 12 men, mean age 51 years) and 24 normal controls (10 women, 14 men, mean age 38 years). After intravenous injection of 185 MBq of {sup 99m}T{sub c}-DISIDA, serial anterior abdominal images were acquired before and after fatty meal. Regions of interest were applied on gallbladder and right hepatic lobe on 60 and 90 minute images to calculate GBEF. GBEF was significantly reduced in diabetes with autonomic neuropathy (43{+-}12.3%) and without autonomic neuropathy (57.5{+-}13.2%) compared with normal controls (68{+-}11.6%, p<0.05). And also, GBEF was significantly reduced in diabetes with autonomic neuropathy compared with diabetes without autonomic neuropathy (p<0.05). Fasting blood glucose level, age, sex, hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, serum lipid level were not different in these two diabetic patient groups (p>0.05). When 50.2% of GBEF was used as the criteria for diabetic autonomic neuropathy, the sensitivity and specificity were 80%, 76.5%, respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.846. GBEF of diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy was significantly reduced than that of diabetic patients without autonomic neuropathy.

  17. Mechanisms of disease in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; Timmerman, Vincent; Janssens, Katrien

    2012-01-24

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of the PNS. Progressive degeneration, predominantly of sensory and autonomic neurons, is the main pathological feature in patients with HSAN, and causes prominent sensory loss and ulcerative mutilations in combination with variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Advances in molecular genetics have enabled identification of disease-causing mutations in 12 genes, and studies on the functional effects of these mutations are underway. Although some of the affected proteins--such as nerve growth factor and its receptor--have obvious nerve-specific roles, others are ubiquitously expressed proteins that are involved in sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, transcription regulation and structural integrity. An important challenge in the future will be to understand the common molecular pathways that result in HSANs. Unraveling the mechanisms that underlie sensory and autonomic neurodegeneration could assist in identifying targets for future therapeutic strategies in patients with HSAN. This Review highlights key advances in the understanding of HSANs, including insights into the molecular mechanisms of disease, derived from genetic studies of patients with these disorders.

  18. Frequency of autonomic neuropathy in patients with erectile dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Among diabetic patients autonomic neuropathy (AN) is one of the most frequent complications. This affects peripheral nervous system and thus results into erectile dysfunction (ED). The main objectives of the study were to determine the frequency of autonomic neuropathy (AN) in diabetic patients with ED and to find out the associated risk factors. Method: In this descriptive case series, a total 200 consecutive patients of Diabetes Mellitus with erectile dysfunction attended the Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DEM), Services Hospital Lahore during three months (from June to August 2013), were included. For assessing erectile dysfunction (ED) and autonomic neuropathy (AN) International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Composite Autonomic Scoring System (CASS) were used respectively. Other factors impacting the autonomic functions in diabetes like duration of diabetes, age of patient, body mass index (BMI), and glycaemic control (HbAlc), hypertension and smoking status were recorded. Results: Average age of the patients was 57.58±9.53 years (95 percentage C.I. 55.54-59.63). Frequency of autonomic neuropathy (AN) in ED patients was 86 (43 percentage). Duration of diabetes Mellitus and BMI were statistically significantly different among patients with severe, moderate and mild autonomic neuropathy. Conclusions: Autonomic neuropathy was very frequent in diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction. The associated risk factors are duration of disease and body mass index. (author)

  19. Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy Affects Symptom Generation and Brain-Gut Axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Christina; Søfteland, Eirik; Gunterberg, Veronica;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVELong-term diabetes leads to severe peripheral, autonomous, and central neuropathy in combination with clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. The brain-gut axis thus expresses a neurophysiological profile, and heart rate variability (HRV) can be correlated with clinical gastrointestinal...... symptoms.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSFifteen healthy volunteers and 15 diabetic patients (12 with type 1 diabetes) with severe gastrointestinal symptoms and clinical suspicion of autonomic neuropathy were included. Psychophysics and evoked brain potentials were assessed after painful rectosigmoid...... autonomic neuropathy and peripheral nervous degeneration, as well as changes in dipole sources in diabetic patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. The findings may lead to improved treatment modalities targeting pharmacological neuroprotection or neuromodulation....

  20. Small Fiber Neuropathy Associated with Hyperlipidemia: Utility of Cutaneous Silent Periods and Autonomic Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Morkavuk, G.; Leventoglu, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Established electrophysiological methods have limited clinical utility in the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy. The cutaneous silent period (CSP) may be useful as a method for the evaluation of smaller and unmyelinated fiber dysfunctions. Hyperlipidemia is a very rare cause of small fiber neuropathy. In this study, hyperlipidemia and small fiber neuropathy in symptomatic patients with normal nerve conduction studies were evaluated with autonomic tests and cutaneous silent perio...

  1. Noradrenaline and isoproterenol kinetics in diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J

    1986-01-01

    Noradrenaline and isoproterenol kinetics using intravenous infusion of L-3H-NA and of 3H-isoproterenol were investigated in eight Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients without neuropathy and in eight Type 1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy matched for age, sex and duration of di...

  2. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2007-10-03

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception) and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating). Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III), which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  3. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelrod Felicia B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating. Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III, which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  4. Medial arterial calcification, calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification in a diabetic patient with severe autonomic neuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Medial arterial calcification (Monckeberg\\'s arteriosclerosis) is well described in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. There is also a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. We describe a diabetic patient with autonomic neuropathy and extensive medial arterial calcification who also had calcification of the aortic valve and of the mitral valve annulus. We propose that autonomic neuropathy may play a role in calcification of these structures at the base of the heart.

  5. Plasma adrenaline kinetics in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, A; Hilsted, J; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl;

    1989-01-01

    labelled adrenaline had been stopped was significantly prolonged in Type 1 diabetic patients with neuropathy compared to those without (after 20 min infusion 2.7 vs 2.2 min, p less than 0.02, after 75 min infusion 3.7 vs 2.9 min, p less than 0.05). The corresponding values for the mean sojourn time...... volume in Type 1 diabetic patients with neuropathy as compared to patients without neuropathy (estimated space of distribution 29 vs 20 l). Our results suggest that patients with diabetic neuropathy do not adjust the plasma adrenaline concentration to changes in adrenaline infusion rate as rapidly...... as those without neuropathy, i.e. the effect of an elevated adrenaline secretion rate may be prolonged in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy....

  6. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  7. A 41-year-old man with polyarthritis and severe autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Bourcier

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Matthew E Bourcier, Aaron I VinikEastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USAAbstract: Orthostasis due to autonomic neuropathy can cause severe debilitation and prove refractory to treatment. This report describes a case of severe sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic dysfunction as a consequence of acetylcholine receptor antibodies and Sjogren’s syndrome. Symptomatic management, plasma fluid expanders, and IVIG therapy failed to offer a salutary response to the condition. Etanercept therapy provided improvement of the orthostasis and autonomic function measured as high and low frequency respiratory effects on heart rate variability as well as enhancement of skin blood flow using Laser Doppler. It would be of considerable interest to determine the effectiveness of etanercept in other autoimmune neuropathies.Keywords: autonomic neuropathy, etanercept, IntraEpidermal Nerve Fibers (IENF, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, laser doppler skin blood flow, orthostasis

  8. Auditory stimulation and cardiac autonomic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor E. Valenti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have already demonstrated that auditory stimulation with music influences the cardiovascular system. In this study, we described the relationship between musical auditory stimulation and heart rate variability. Searches were performed with the Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: "auditory stimulation", "autonomic nervous system", "music" and "heart rate variability". The selected studies indicated that there is a strong correlation between noise intensity and vagal-sympathetic balance. Additionally, it was reported that music therapy improved heart rate variability in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that dopamine release in the striatal system induced by pleasurable songs is involved in cardiac autonomic regulation. Musical auditory stimulation influences heart rate variability through a neural mechanism that is not well understood. Further studies are necessary to develop new therapies to treat cardiovascular disorders.

  9. Early onset hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type I and not leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pande Sushil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathies (HSAN are rare forms of chronic neuropathies in children, which lead to severe complications like foot ulcers, mutilations, fractures and deformities. We report an eight years old female who presented with nonhealing perforating ulcer over anterior sole, resorption of terminal portion of right middle finger and hyperhidrosis over back since two years of age. Deep tendon reflexes were absent in lower legs but were preserved in upper limbs. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of HSAN, Type I. Early diagnosis of hereditary sensory neuropathy led to significant reduction in morbidity and hence improvement in the quality of life in our patient.

  10. Diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Do we have anytreatment perspectives?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria A Serhiyenko; Alexandr A Serhiyenko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a serious andcommon complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). Despiteits relationship to an increased risk of cardiovascularmortality and its association with multiple symptoms andimpairments, the significance of CAN has not been fullyappreciated. CAN among DM patients is characterizedreview the latest evidence and own data regarding thetreatment and the treatment perspectives for diabeticCAN. Lifestyle modification, intensive glycemic controlmight prevent development or progression of CAN.Pathogenetic treatment of CAN includes balanceddiet and physical activity; optimization of glycemiccontrol; treatment of dyslipoproteinemia; correctionof metabolic abnormalities in myocardium; preventionand treatment of thrombosis; use of aldose reductaseinhibitors; dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA), acetyl-Lcarnitine,antioxidants, first of all α-lipoic acid (α-LA),use of long-chain ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fattyacids (ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs), vasodilators, fat-solublevitamin B1, aminoguanidine; substitutive therapy ofgrowth factors, in severe cases-treatment of orthostatichypotension. The promising methods include researchand use of tools that increase blood flow throughthe vasa vasorum, including prostacyclin analogues,thromboxane A2 blockers and drugs that contribute intostrengthening and/or normalization of Na+, K+-ATPase(phosphodiesterase inhibitor), α-LA, DGLA, ω-3 PUFAs,and the simultaneous prescription of α-LA, ω-3 PUFAand DGLA.

  11. Upper extremity subclinical autonomic and peripheral neuropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud M Fathalla; Mohja A El-Badawy

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune, multiorgan disease that affects connective tissues of many organs or systems, including the nervous system, where it affects the autonomic, the peripheral, and the central nervous system. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association of subclinical autonomic and peripheral neuropathy with SLE and to correlate neurophysiological parameters with clinical and laboratory data. Patients and methods ...

  12. [Hereditary sensory and motor neuropathy and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: recent advances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2011-12-01

    This review summarizes the recent genetic advances in hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy also called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. The different new genes discovered in 2010 and their underlying phenotypes will be presented.

  13. TO FIND THE PREVALENCE OF AUTONOMIC NEUROPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH NON ALCOHOLIC HEPATIC CIRRHOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTARCT: Autonomic neuropathy has been reported in patients wit h alcoholic liver disease but information on its occurrence in patients with n on-alcoholic liver disease is contradictory. To make the things more clear the present study was conducted to assess autonomic functions in patients with non-alcoholic liver disease and its relationships with the severity of liver damage. Autonomic function using five standard test s was examined in 50 cirrhotics. The extent of autonomic dysfunction was determined in the patie nts and a comparison between the characteristics of patients with and without autonom ic neuropathy was made. Out of 50 patients 35 (70% were found to have autonomic neuro pathy The alteration of the parasympathetic function [20 out of 35(57%] was sign ificantly more frequent than that of sympathetic function [15(43%]. The prevalence of aut onomic neuropathy was more (80% in patients with Child-Pugh grade C cirrhosis as compare d to those having Child-Pugh grade B cirrhosis (54%. The results were clinically signif icant but statistically insignificant (p>0.05. It was seen that out of total 50 cases of non alcoholi c cirrhosis, the majority (68% were due to hepatitis C infection. A high prevalence of abnormali ties in both sympathetic and parasympathetic function tests, and a poor relationshi p with liver function parameters, has been found in patients with non-alcoholic chronic l iver disease.

  14. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Is Associated With Macrovascular Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Yderstraede, Knud; Gulichsen, Elisabeth;

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to identify the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in a cohort of individuals with diabetes in outpatient clinics from 4 different parts of Denmark and to explore the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes in relation to CAN. The DAN-Study is a Danish...... multicenter study focusing on diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Over a period of 12 months, 382 type 1 and 271 type 2 individuals with diabetes were tested for CAN. Patients were randomly recruited and tested during normal visits to outpatient clinics at 4 Danish hospitals. The presence of CAN was quantified...... neuropathy (P = .041). Among type 2 diabetes patients CAN was independently associated with high pulse pressure (P

  15. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and subclinical cardiovascular disease in normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulrik Madvig; Jensen, Tonny; Køber, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is associated with increased mortality in diabetes. Since CAN often develops in parallel with diabetic nephropathy as a confounder, we aimed to investigate the isolated impact of CAN on cardiovascular disease in normoalbuminuric patients. Fifty-six normoa...

  16. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  17. Abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation in mice lacking ASIC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Terry B J; Chen, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3(-/-) mice. Asic3(-/-) mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3(-/-) mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3(-/-) mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24804235

  18. Abnormal Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Mice Lacking ASIC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Feng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3−/− mice. Asic3−/− mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3−/− mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3−/− mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Cardiac Autonomic Control in Individuals With Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulopoulou, Styliani; Baynard, Tracy; Collier, Scott; Giannopoulou, Ifigenia; Figueroa, Arturo; Beets, Michael; Pitetti, Kenneth; Fernhall, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to compare cardiac autonomic control at rest between 50 individuals with Down syndrome and 24 control participants without disabilities. Resting autonomic function was assessed using analysis of heart rate variability. Participants with Down syndrome had reduced total heart rate variability, which indicates possible…

  20. [Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II A: early neurological and skeletal findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmer, C; Díaz Zambrano, S; Santos Díaz, M A; González Huerta, L M; Cuevas Covarrubias, S A; Bravo Oro, A

    2014-04-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are genetic disorders characterized by the loss of sensation including pain, tactile and temperature. Its clinical and molecular features vary widely; the symptoms may begin from birth or be noticed in the first or second decade, with different types of complications of trauma to the extremities such as ulcers, mutilations and acral amputations. They are classified into six groups from I to VI, determined by the abnormality in eleven genes leading to phenotypic variations in the age of onset and the presence or absence of dysautonomia signs. With the exception of type I, all are autosomal recessive. The type II of these neuropathies is characterized by insensitivity to pain, heat and proprioception. We describe three members of a Mexican family with WNK1 gene mutation that caused hereditary neuropathy IIA.

  1. Three cousins with chronic foot ulcers from late-onset hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies type 2 (HSAN2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Shahin; Pakmanesh, Kambiz

    2006-02-28

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are a group of rare disorders characterized by prominent sensory and autonomic neuropathy without motor involvement. We report three male cousins with chronic foot ulcers, all were affected with late-onset HSAN type 2 (HSAN2). In view of the history of consanguinity and male sex, X-linked recessive transmission was likely in our patients. According to the authors' knowledge this is the first report of HSAN2 from Iran.

  2. Treatment of autonomic neuropathy, postural tachycardia and orthostatic syncope with octreotide LAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeldtke, Robert D; Bryner, Kimberly D; Hoeldtke, Martin E; Hobbs, Gerald

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether autonomic neuropathy and the postural tachycardia syndrome can be treated with octreotide LAR (Long Acting Release). This was an open-label pilot project. Protocol 1 Patients with autonomic neuropathy (n = 4) were given increasing doses of octreotide LAR once a month for three months. Blood pressure was measured in the sitting posture every two weeks. Pretreatment mean blood pressure averaged 83.8 +/- 7.1 mm Hg. After four, six and eight weeks of therapy the blood pressures averaged 96.3 +/- 6.4, 98.2 +/- 6.1 (p orthostatic intolerance were given 10, 20, or 30 mg of octreotide LAR over three months. Seven patients entered and five completed the study. After two months treatment, standing time increased from 36.0 +/- 9.2 to 59.2 +/- .8 minutes (p Orthostatic dizziness and chronic fatigue improved. We conclude that octreotide LAR can be used to treat autonomic neuropathy but there is a risk of an excessive pressor response. Octreotide LAR improved standing time and suppressed tachycardia in patients with orthostatic intolerance.

  3. Analysis of cardiac autonomic modulation in obese and eutrophic children

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; Júnior, Ismael Forte Freitas; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity causes alterations in cardiac autonomic function. However, there are scarce and conflicting data on this function with regard to heart rate variability in obese children. OBJECTIVE: To compare the autonomic function of obese and eutrophic children by analyzing heart rate variability. METHODS: One hundred twenty-one children (57 male and 64 female) aged 8 to 12 years were distributed into two groups based on nutritional status [obese (n  =  56) and eutrophic (ideal weight...

  4. Analysis of cardiac autonomic modulation in obese and eutrophic children

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Carlos Marques Vanderlei; Carlos Marcelo Pastre; Ismael Forte Freitas Júnior; Moacir Fernandes de Godoy

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity causes alterations in cardiac autonomic function. However, there are scarce and conflicting data on this function with regard to heart rate variability in obese children. OBJECTIVE: To compare the autonomic function of obese and eutrophic children by analyzing heart rate variability. METHODS: One hundred twenty-one children (57 male and 64 female) aged 8 to 12 years were distributed into two groups based on nutritional status [obese (n = 56) and eutrophic (ideal weight r...

  5. [Autonomic neuropathy: a high risk complication for type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Marques Junior, Wilson; Foss, Milton Cesar

    2008-03-01

    The pathological alteration of the nervous system in diabetic patients is extensive and frequently severe. The prevalence of the diabetic neuropathy reach high levels with the evolution of the diabetes, often showing frequencies higher than 50% in several groups of patients. The neurological lesion in this pathological situation is extensive in the diabetic patient, including widely the peripheral nervous system with its components sensory, motor and autonomic: with typical symptoms and in accordance with the pathogenesis of metabolic origin and/or microvascular disease. The autonomic nervous system is a main regulator of many systems in the human body. Then its lesion can promote significant alterations in the function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital system, that can be related to increased motality. This review anlyses the abnormalities related to lesion of the autonomic nervous system, particularly in type 1 diabetic patients, trying to characterize the risk of morbidity and mortality.

  6. Gastric emptying time and the effect of cisapride in cirrhotic patients with autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumurdulu, Yuksel; Yapar, Zeynep; Canataroglu, Abdullah; Serin, Ender; Gumurdulu, Derya; Kibar, Mustafa; Colakoglu, Salih

    2003-02-01

    GOALS To investigate the relationships between gastric emptying and autonomic dysfunction in hepatic cirrhosis and to assess the effects of cisapride on gastric emptying in cirrhotic patients. STUDY Twenty-four cirrhotic patients (8 patients in each Child-Pugh classification) and 25 healthy controls were enrolled. All the patients had viral (B or C) hepatitis. Patients with DM, alcoholic cirrhosis, active peptic ulcer, gastric malignancy and pyloric obstruction were excluded by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Parasympathetic and sympathetic functions were assessed by the criteria set forth by Ewing and Clark. Drugs affecting GI motility and smoking were discontinued 48 hours and 12 hours prior to the study respectively. A solid-phase of gastric emptying study was conducted by scintigraphic method for the calculation of gastric half-emptying time (GET1/2). RESULTS The study revealed that 9 patients with Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis had autonomic neuropathy and none of Child-Pugh A cirrhosis had autonomic neuropathy. Prolonged GET1/2 was noted in cirrhotics compared with the control group (p hepatitis may cause prolonged gastric emptying. Cisapride can shorten gastric emptying time in such patients. PMID:12544204

  7. Auditory stimulation and cardiac autonomic regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor E Valenti; Guida, Heraldo L.; Frizzo, Ana C F; Cardoso, Ana C. V.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Luiz Carlos de Abreu

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have already demonstrated that auditory stimulation with music influences the cardiovascular system. In this study, we described the relationship between musical auditory stimulation and heart rate variability. Searches were performed with the Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: "auditory stimulation", "autonomic nervous system", "music" and "heart rate variability". The selected studies indicated that there is a strong correlation bet...

  8. Recurrent gastric dilatation and intestinal dysmotility possibly resulting from autonomic neuropathy in a Great Dane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoo, Joseph W; Shelton, G Diane

    2014-01-01

    A 5 yr old female spayed Great Dane was presented for recurrent episodes of gastric dilatation, intestinal dysmotility, and one episode of gastric rupture. Numerous hematologic, radiographic, and endocrine diagnostic tests were performed with no identifiable underlying cause. Many risk factors have been identified for gastric dilatation and most were present in this Great Dane. A number of symptomatic treatments, aimed primarily at altering the gastrointestinal tract flora and motility were tried, but failed to influence the clinical course of the disease. The dog continued to worsen, experienced more frequent episodes of gastric dilatation, and developed generalized muscle atrophy. Biopsies were collected from the biceps femoris and triceps brachii muscles. A pattern of denervation atrophy was evident in both muscles, consistent with polyneuropathy. The owners elected humane euthanasia and a necropsy was performed. A striking finding at necropsy was severe loss of myelinated fibers with extensive endoneurial fibrosis in the vagus nerve, consistent with an autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy is a previously unexplored cause of gastric dilatation and intestinal dysmotility in dogs. These findings should open new directions for exploring pathogenic mechanisms for gastric dilatation in this species.

  9. Circadian profile of cardiac autonomic nervous modulation in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Richardt, Gert; Potratz, Jürgen;

    2003-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Circadian Profile of Heart Rate Variability. INTRODUCTION: Although heart rate variability (HRV) has been established as a tool to study cardiac autonomic activity, almost no data are available on the circadian patterns of HRV in healthy subjects aged 20 to 70 years. METHODS AND RESULTS......: We investigated 166 healthy volunteers (81 women and 85 men; age 42 +/- 15 years, range 20-70) without evidence of cardiac disease. Time-domain HRV parameters were determined from 24-hour Holter monitoring and calculated as hourly mean values and mean 24-hour values. All volunteers were fully mobile...

  10. Assessment of Diabetic Polyneuropathy and Autonomic Neuropathy Using Current Perception Threshold in Korean Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Kyung Koo; Jung Hun Ohn; Soo-Heon Kwak; Min Kyong Moon

    2014-01-01

    Background The current perception threshold (CPT) could be quantified by stimulating Aβ and C fibers at 2,000 and 5 Hz, respectively. C fibers play a role in the autonomic nervous system and are involved in temperature and pain sensation. We evaluated the usefulness of CPT for diagnosing distal polyneuropathy (DPN) and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in diabetic patients. Methods The CPT was measured in the index finger (C7 level) and in the third toe (L5 level) in diabetic patients...

  11. Subacute autonomic and sensory neuropathy closely related to cytomegalovirus infection preceded by frequent syncopal attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Koichi; Namekawa, Michito; Kondo, Soichi; Ono, Sayaka; Nakano, Imaharu

    2016-08-31

    A 73-year-old woman who had hypertension developed a slight fever and general malaise with laboratory-proven hepatic dysfunction as well as frequent syncopal attacks 3 months before admission to our hospital. One month later, she developed urinary retention and distal limb numbness. Upon admission, her neurological examination showed reduced limb tendon reflexes, glove and stocking-type numbness, and diminished senses of touch, temperature, pain, and distal leg vibration and position. Serum cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgM antibody and CMV IgG antibody were elevated on admission, and both decreased thereafter, confirming CMV infection. No serum anti-ganglioside antibody was detected. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed a mild pleocytosis and elevated proteins. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes of the tibial and peroneal nerve were slightly reduced. Sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitudes of the median and ulnar nerves were reduced, and sural SNAP was not evoked. Systolic blood pressure dropped 48 mmHg when the patient assumed a standing position from a supine one, demonstrating orthostatic hypotension, and a cold pressor test was abnormal, both indicating an obvious hypofunction of the sympathetic nerve. The postganglionic autonomic nerve appeared to be damaged because the accumulation of [(123)I] meta-iodobenzylguanidine was reduced on myocardial scintigraphy. These findings combined together led us to make a diagnosis of subacute autonomic and sensory neuropathy associated with CMV infection in this case. Following an eventless administration of oral fludrocortisones, intravenous immuno-globulin (IVIg) was given after one month of the hospitalization with a remarkable reduction of the syncope. This case is instructive in two points. One is that there may be a couple of months with syncope alone before the sensory disturbance appearance, and the other is that IVIg may be considerably effective for the patient-annoying syncopes. To our knowledge, this

  12. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V: Report of a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kalaskar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN type V is a rare inherited disease caused by a mutation in the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 1 gene located on chromosome 1 (1q21-q22. It is characterized by pain insensitivity, partial anhydrosis without mental retardation and unimpaired touch and pressure sensitivity. Self-mutilation injury involving the teeth, lips, tongue, ears, eyes, nose, and fingers are invariable feature of this disorder. The purpose of this paper was to discuss the diagnosis and oral management of 18-month-old girl with HSAN type V, having typical oral manifestation of bitten tongue and auto-extraction of primary teeth. Modified bite guard was given to the patient to prevent further self-mutilating injuries to the tongue.

  13. Gastroparesis is associated with oxytocin deficiency, oesophageal dysmotility with hyperCCKemia, and autonomic neuropathy with hypergastrinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Julia; Melander, Olle; Johansson, Linda;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility and autonomic neuropathy are common problems among diabetics with largely unknown aetiology. Many peptides are involved in the autonomic nervous system regulating the GI tract. The aim of this study was to examine if concentrations of oxytocin...... was increased in patients with oesophageal dysmotility, and gastrin secretion was increased in patients with autonomic neuropathy. The findings suggest that disturbed peptide secretion may be part of the pathophysiology of digestive complications in diabetics......., cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin and vasopressin in plasma differ between diabetics with normal function and dysfunction in GI motility. METHODS: Nineteen patients with symptoms from the GI tract who had been examined with gastric emptying scintigraphy, oesophageal manometry, and deep-breathing test were included...

  14. Autonomic neuropathy in nondiabetic offspring of type 2 diabetic subjects is associated with urinary albumin excretion rate and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure: the Fredericia Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Anne-Catherine; Vestbo, Else; Frøland, Anders;

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of parental type 2 diabetes on the autonomic nervous system and to determine whether autonomic neuropathy is present and associated with changes in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) in nondiabetic subjects......, Redmond, WA), and UAER was determined through three overnight urine samples. The subjects with parental type 2 diabetes had significantly lower heart rate variation in all three bedside tests (P diabetes. The prevalence of autonomic neuropathy in the nondiabetic...... offspring with parental type 2 diabetes (6.7%) was significantly (P neuropathy was associated with a higher fasting insulin level (P

  15. Nocturnal antihypertensive treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes with autonomic neuropathy and non-dipping of blood pressure during night time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkær, Henrik; Jensen, Tonny; Kofoed, Klaus;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and elevated nocturnal blood pressure are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Previously, associations between CAN, non-dipping of nocturnal blood pressure and coronary artery calcification have been...... demonstrated. The present protocol describes a trial to test the efficacy of bedtime dosing of the ACE inhibitor enalapril on night time blood pressure and left ventricular mass in patients with type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a randomised, double-blind, two-way cross-over study, 24 normoalbuminuric...... patients with type 1 diabetes with CAN will be treated for 12 weeks with either morning or bedtime dosing of 20 mg enalapril, followed by 12 weeks of switched treatment regimen. During each treatment period, two 24 h ambulatory blood pressure measurements will be performed and after each treatment period...

  16. Influence of Visceral Adiposity on Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hee Jang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate the influences of visceral adiposity on cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.MethodsTwo hundred eleven patients with type 2 diabetes participated in this study. Anthropometric and metabolic parameters were measured, and the visceral fat area was assessed using computed tomography. CAN was diagnosed using a cardiovascular reflex test. We analyzed the correlation between the visceral fat area and each parameter in this test.ResultsThe mean age, body mass index (BMI, and duration of diabetes of the study population were 60±14 years (mean±standard deviation, 25.1±4.2 kg/m2, and 12.3±8.9 years, respectively. The visceral fat area showed positive correlations with age, BMI, waist circumference, and subcutaneous fat area. There was no statistically significant difference in the cardiovascular reflex test outcome between genders. Univariate linear regression analysis showed that an increased visceral fat area diminished good heart rate response to a Valsalva maneuver (R2=4.9%, P=0.013 in an unadjusted model, but only in women. This statistical association was preserved after adjusting for age and BMI (R2=9.8%, P=0.0072.ConclusionThe results of this study suggest that visceral adiposity contributes to an autonomic imbalance to some degree, as demonstrated by the impaired cardiovascular reflex test among women with type 2 diabetes.

  17. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12. PMID:11429613

  18. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12.

  19. Evaluation and Prevention of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajouhi M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic neuropathy is an incapacitating disease that afflicts almost 50 percent of patients with diabetes. A late finding in type 1 diabetes, diabetic neuropathy can be an early finding in non insulin-dependent diabetes. Diabetic neuropathies are divided primarily into two groups, sensorimotor and autonomic. Patients may acquire only one type of diabetic neuropathy or may present with combinations of neuropathies, such as autonomic neuropathy or distal symmetric polyneuropathy, the latter of which the most common form. Motor deficits, orthostatic hypotension, silent cardiac ischemia, hyperhidrosis, vasomotor instability, gastroparesis, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction can also result from diabetic neuropathy. Strict control of blood sugar, combined with proper daily foot care, is essential to avoid the complications of this disorder. With the potential to afflict any part of the nervous system, diabetic neuropathy should be suspected in all patients with type 2 diabetes as well as patients who have had type 1 diabetes for over five years. Although some patients with diabetic neuropathy notice few symptoms, upon physical examination mild to moderately severe sensory loss may be noted by the physician. Idiopathic neuropathy has been known to precede the onset of type 2 diabetes.

  20. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davidson, G L

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  1. Misclassification and linkage of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, J.M.; Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Recently Kwon et al. published in the Journal their work describing linkage of a single large family with an inherited axonal neuropathy to chromosome 3, which they suggest is a second locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 2 and subsequently named {open_quotes}CMT2B.{close_quotes} We think that the diagnostic classification of this family as CMT2 is incorrect, since the subjects have a severe sensory neuropathy that fits within the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type 1 classification of Dyck (1993). Abnormal sensory findings in CMT2 separate it from distal spinal muscular atrophy but are a minor component of clinical symptoms in most CMT patients, as CMT is primarily a motor neuropathy. When Kwon et al. state that {open_quotes}all [patients] had characteristic findings in their physical examinations, including... evidence of foot sores that were slow to heal, or amputated limbs related to the poorly healing foot ulcers,{close_quotes} it suggests that a different diagnosis is more appropriate. In our experience collecting data on >950 individuals in >60 CMT1, CMT2, CMTX and CMT4 families, we have not seen foot ulcers, osteomyelitis, or amputations. Ulcerations leading to osteomyelitis and amputations are usually associated with severe sensory neuropathies. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Burnout versus work engagement in their effects on 24-hour ambulatory monitored cardiac autonomic function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.P. van Doornen (Lorenz); J.H. Houtveen (Jan); S. Langelaan (Saar); A.B. Bakker (Arnold); W. van Rhenen (Willem); W.B. Schaufeli (Wilmar)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBurnout has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This relationship may be mediated by a stress-related disruption in cardiac autonomic activity. The aim of the present study was to assess cardiac autonomic activity (sympathetic and parasympathetic) during a work

  3. Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Predicts Recurrent Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seon-Ah; Yun, Jae-Seung; Lim, Tae-Seok; Min, Kyoungil; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Park, Yong-Moon; Ahn, Yu-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study evaluated the relationship between CAN and recurrent CVD in type 2 diabetes. A total of 206 patients with type 2 diabetes who had a history of CVD within 3 years of enrollment were consecutively recruited from January 2001 to December 2009 and followed-up until December 2015. Cardiovascular autonomic function tests were performed using the following heart rate variability parameters: expiration-to-inspiration ratio, response to Valsalva maneuver and standing. We estimated the recurrence of CVD events during the follow-up period. A total of 159 (77.2%) of the 206 patients enrolled completed the follow up, and 78 (49.1%) patients had recurrent episodes of CVD, with an incidence rate of 75.6 per 1,000 patient-years. The mean age and diabetes duration were 62.5 ± 8.7 and 9.2 ± 6.9 years, respectively. Patients who developed recurrent CVD also exhibited hypertension (P = 0.004), diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.012), higher mean systolic blood pressure (P = 0.006), urinary albumin excretion (P = 0.015), and mean triglyceride level (P = 0.035) than did patients without recurrent CVD. Multivariable Cox hazard regression analysis revealed that definite CAN was significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrent CVD (hazard ratio [HR] 3.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39−6.60; P = 0.005). Definite CAN was an independent predictor for recurrent CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes who had a known prior CVD event. PMID:27741306

  4. Male accessory gland inflammation prevalence in type 2 diabetic patients with symptoms possibly reflecting autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita A Condorelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Male accessory gland inflammation or infection (MAGI is a potentially underdiagnosed complication of type 2 diabetes (DM2; specifically, we reported in a recent study that the frequency of MAGI was 43% among DM2 patients. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is associated with a peculiar ultrasound characterization of the seminal vesicles (SVs in DM2 patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of MAGI in two different categories of DM2 patients (i.e. patients with and without symptoms that possibly reflect DAN and the respective ultrasound characterizations. Sixty DM2 patients with a mean (± s.e.m. age of 42.0 ± 6.0 years (range: 34-47 years were classified according to the presence or the absence of symptoms that could possibly reflect DAN (group A: DM2 with symptoms possibly reflecting DAN, n = 28 patients and group B: DM2 without symptoms possibly reflecting DAN, n = 32 patients. The patients in Group A exhibited a significantly higher frequency of MAGI compared with those in group B patients (P < 0.05; moreover, the Group A patients exhibited a significantly higher frequency of ultrasound signs suggestive of vesiculitis (P < 0.05. Finally, the concentrations of lymphocytes but not the concentrations of the leukocytes in the semen were significantly higher (P < 0.05 in group A compared with group B.

  5. Regular Football Practice Improves Autonomic Cardiac Function in Male Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS in the cardiovascular regulation is of primal importance. Since it has been associated with adverse conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, sleep disorders, hypertension and obesity. Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the impact of recreational football practice on the autonomic cardiac function of male children, as measured by heart rate variability. Patients and Methods Forty-seven male children aged 9 - 12 years were selected according to their engagement with football oriented practice outside school context. The children were divided into a football group (FG; n = 22 and a control group (CG; n = 25. The FG had regular football practices, with 2 weekly training sessions and occasional weekend matches. The CG was not engaged with any physical activity other than complementary school-based physical education classes. Data from physical activity, physical fitness, and heart rate variability measured in time and frequency domains were obtained. Results The anthropometric and body composition characteristics were similar in both groups (P > 0.05. The groups were also similar in time spent daily on moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (FG vs. CG: 114 ± 64 vs. 87 ± 55 minutes; P > 0.05. However, the FG performed better (P < 0.05 in Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (1394 ± 558 vs. 778 ± 408 m and 15-m sprint test (3.06 ± 0.17 vs. 3.20 ± 0.23 s. Also, the FG presented enhanced autonomic function. Significant differences were detected (P < 0.05 between groups for low frequency normalized units (38.0 ± 15.2 vs. 47.3 ± 14.2 n.u (normalized units, high frequency normalized units (62.1 ± 15.2 vs. 52.8 ± 14.2 n.u., and LF:HF ratio (0.7 ± 0.4 vs. 1.1 ± 0.6 ms2. Conclusions Children engaged with regular football practice presented enhanced physical fitness and autonomic function, by increasing vagal tone at rest.

  6. 2型糖尿病外周感觉神经病变和心自主神经病变关系的研究%Relationship between peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛奔; 苏恒; 李超; 张云; 薛元明

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨T2DM外周感觉神经病变和心自主神经病变之间的关系. 方法 选取T2DM患者148例,采集临床资料,测定FPG、HbA1c及LDL-C等生化指标;进行定量感觉神经检查(以色列TSA-Ⅱ定量感觉神经测定仪),结合临床症状评价糖尿病外周感觉神经病变;进行心血管反射试验检查,结合临床症状评价糖尿病心自主神经病变. 结果 外周感觉神经病变的患病率为28%,心自主神经病变的患病率为10%;无外周感觉神经病变的患者中心自主神经病变的患病率为6%,存在外周感觉神经病变的患者中心自主神经病变的患病率为21%;与对照组相比,外周感觉神经病变组和心自主神经病变组的病程较长,FPG、HbA1 c及LDL-C水平较高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 糖尿病心自主神经病变可发生于无外周感觉神经病变的患者;病程、FPG、HbA1c及LDL-C可能为糖尿病外周感觉神经病变和心自主神经病变的危险因素.%Objective To investigate the relationship between diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. Methods The clinical data of 148 T2DM patients was collected and the biochemical indices, including FPG, HbA1c, and LDL-C of these patients, were determined. The diabetic peripheral neuropathy was diagnosed according to the quantitative sensory test (Neurosensory Analyzer Model TSA-Ⅱ) and clinical symptoms. The diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was estimated with cardiovascular reflex test and clinical symptoms. Results The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy was 28% and that of the cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was 10% . In the patients without diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was 6%, while in those with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was 21%. Compared with the control group, the disease

  7. Cardiac autonomic control in adolescents with primary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havlíceková Z

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairment in cardiovascular autonomic regulation participates in the onset and maintenance of primary hypertension. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control using long-term heart rate variability (HRV analysis in adolescents with primary hypertension. Subjects and methods Twenty two adolescent patients with primary hypertension (5 girls/17 boys aged 14-19 years and 22 healthy subjects matched for age and gender were enrolled. Two periods from 24-hour ECG recording were evaluated by HRV analysis: awake state and sleep. HRV analysis included spectral power in low frequency band (LF, in high frequency band (HF, and LF/HF ratio. Results In awake state, adolescents with primary hypertension had lower HF and higher LF and LF/HF ratio. During sleep, HF was lower and LF/HF ratio was higher in patients with primary hypertension. Conclusions A combination of sympathetic predominance and reduced vagal activity might represent a potential link between psychosocial factors and primary hypertension, associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity.

  8. Cardiac autonomic control in the obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouha Gammoudi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sympathetic activation is considered to be the main mechanism involved in the development of cardiovascular diseases in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. The heart rate variability (HRV analysis represents a non-invasive tool allowing the study of the autonomic nervous system. The impairment of HRV parameters in OSA has been documented. However, only a few studies tackled the dynamics of the autonomic nervous system during sleep in patients having OSA. Aims: To analyze the HRV over sleep stages and across sleep periods in order to clarify the impact of OSA on cardiac autonomic modulation. The second objective is to examine the nocturnal HRV of OSA patients to find out which HRV parameter is the best to reflect the symptoms severity. Methods: The study was retrospective. We have included 30 patients undergoing overnight polysomnography. Subjects were categorized into two groups according to apnea–hypopnea index (AHI: mild-to-moderate OSAS group (AHI: 5–30 and severe OSAS group (AHI>30. The HRV measures for participants with low apnea–hypopnea indices were compared to those of patients with high rates of apnea–hypopnea across the sleep period and sleep stages. Results: HRV measures during sleep stages for the group with low rates of apnea–hypopnea have indicated a parasympathetic activation during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. However, no significant difference has been observed in the high AHI group except for the mean of RR intervals (mean RR. The parasympathetic activity tended to increase across the night but without a statistical difference. After control of age and body mass index, the most significant correlation found was for the mean RR (p=0.0001, r=−0.248. Conclusion: OSA affects sympathovagal modulation during sleep, and this impact has been correlated to the severity of the disease. The mean RR seemed to be a better index allowing the sympathovagal balance appreciation during the night in OSA.

  9. Complex Nonlinear Autonomic Nervous System Modulation Link Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy and Peripheral Vascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kinda eKhalaf; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Caroline eRobinson; Cornforth, David J.; Tarvainen, Mika P.; Hayder eAl-Aubaidy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physiological interactions are abundant within, and between, body systems. These interactions may evolve into discrete states during pathophysiological processes resulting from common mechanisms. An association between arterial stenosis, identified by low ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) as been reported. Whether an association between vascular calcification - characterized by high ABPI and a different pathophysiology - is similarly associated ...

  10. Male accessory gland inlfammation prevalence in type2 diabetic patients with symptoms possibly relfecting autonomic neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rosita A Condorelli; Enzo Vicari; Aldo E Calogero; Sandro La Vignera

    2014-01-01

    Male accessory gland inlfammation or infection(MAGI) is a potentially underdiagnosed complication of type2 diabetes(DM2);speciifcally, we reported in a recent study that the frequency of MAGI was 43% among DM2patients. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that diabetic autonomic neuropathy(DAN) is associated with a peculiar ultrasound characterization of the seminal vesicles(SVs) in DM2patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of MAGI in two different categories of DM2patients(i.e.patients with and without symptoms that possibly relfect DAN) and the respective ultrasound characterizations. Sixty DM2patients with a mean(± s.e.m.) age of 42.0±6.0years(range: 34–47years) were classiifed according to the presence or the absence of symptoms that could possibly relfect DAN(groupA: DM2 with symptoms possibly relfecting DAN,n=28patients and groupB: DM2 without symptoms possibly relfecting DAN,n=32patients). The patients in GroupA exhibited a signiifcantly higher frequency of MAGI compared with those in groupB patients(P<0.05); moreover, the GroupA patients exhibited a signiifcantly higher frequency of ultrasound signs suggestive of vesiculitis(P<0.05). Finally, the concentrations of lymphocytes but not the concentrations of the leukocytes in the semen were signiifcantly higher(P<0.05) in groupA compared with groupB.

  11. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna, Viveka P.; Smita Ambekar; Rajiv Singla; Ansumali Joshi; Anju Dhawan; Neeta Kumar; Deepak, K. K.; Sreenivas, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam) had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and c...

  12. Part and Parcel of the Cardiac Autonomic Nerve System: Unravelling Its Cellular Building Blocks during Development

    OpenAIRE

    Végh, Anna M D; Duim, Sjoerd N; Smits, Anke M; Robert E Poelmann; Arend D. J. ten Harkel; DeRuiter, Marco C; Marie José Goumans; Monique R M Jongbloed

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (cANS) is essential for proper heart function, and complications such as heart failure, arrhythmias and even sudden cardiac death are associated with an altered cANS function. A changed innervation state may underlie (part of) the atrial and ventricular arrhythmias observed after myocardial infarction. In other cardiac diseases, such as congenital heart disease, autonomic dysfunction may be related to disease outcome. This is also the case after heart transplantat...

  13. Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Cardiac Autonomic Activity in Healthy Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Ellis; Turin, Tanvir C.; Sola, Darlene Y.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Exner, Derek V.; Mann, Michelle C.; Ahmed, Sofia B.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (≤50nmol/L 25-hydroxy vitamin D) is a cardiovascular (CV) risk factor that affects approximately one billion people worldwide, particularly those affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD). Individuals with CKD demonstrate abnormal cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, which has been linked to the significant rates of CV-related mortality in this population. Whether vitamin D deficiency has a direct association with regulation of cardiac autonomic activity has never be...

  14. Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Early Cardiac Affection in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Othman, Khaled M.; Naglaa Youssef Assaf; Hanan Mohamed Farouk; Iman M. Aly Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To detect the early preclinical alterations in cardiac autonomic control as well as altered cardiac function in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients and their relevance to the clinical features of the disease using noninvasive methods. Methods: 30 SSc patients and 15 healthy controls matched for age and sex underwent clinical examination, serological analysis, and echocardiographic assessment including Doppler flow imaging to evaluate cardiac function, and 24-hour Holter monitoring an...

  15. Insights into the clinical and functional significance of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Junqueira Junior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Exclusive or associated lesions in various structures of the autonomic nervous system occur in the chronic forms of Chagas disease. In the indeterminate form, the lesions are absent or mild, whereas in the exclusive or combined heart and digestive disease forms, they are often more pronounced. Depending on their severity these lesions can result mainly in cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction but also in sympathetic dysfunction of variable degrees. Despite the key autonomic effect on cardiovascular functioning, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease remains unknown. METHODS: Review of data on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease and their potential consequences, and considerations supporting the possible relationship between this disturbance and general or cardiovascular clinical and functional adverse outcomes. RESULTS: We hypothesise that possible consequences that cardiac dysautonomia might variably occasion or predispose in Chagas disease include: transient or sustained arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, adverse overall and cardiovascular prognosis with enhanced morbidity and mortality, an inability of the cardiovascular system to adjust to functional demands and/or respond to internal or external stimuli by adjusting heart rate and other hemodynamic variables, and immunomodulatory and cognitive disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac autonomic modulation in Chagas disease might not be a mere epiphenomenon without significance. Indirect evidences point for a likely important role of this alteration as a primary predisposing or triggering cause or mediator favouring the development of subtle or evident secondary cardiovascular functional disturbances and clinical consequences, and influencing adverse outcomes.

  16. TIME AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY SIGNAL IN PROGNOSIS OF TYPE 2 DIABETIC AUTONOMIC NEUROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARIKA TALE,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease occurs eventually in majority of patients with diabetes mellitus and to be the outstanding factor in over all diabetes morbidity and mortality rates. Thus the timely detection of diabetic autonomic neuropathy and the use of effective means to improve autonomic nervous system function become of almost significance. In this work Electrocardiogram (ECG data of 20 Diabetes Mellitus (DM and 20 normal control volunteers were recorded and autonomic nervous system activities are quantified by means of frequency and time domainanalysis. Time domain measure ,Standard deviation of successive NN intervals (SDNN,NN intervals differing more than 50 msec.( NN50 count,Percentage value of NN50 count( pNN50 count, HRV triangular index, show a lower variation in the DM patient group compared to normal subjects and p value <0.01. The frequency domain measures indicate significant differences in very low frequency (VLF, low frequency (LF power and high frequency (HF power. Value generated from the ratio of low frequency to high frequency, (LF/HF ispretty high, with not much significance between both groups.

  17. Part and Parcel of the Cardiac Autonomic Nerve System: Unravelling Its Cellular Building Blocks during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. D. Végh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system (cANS is essential for proper heart function, and complications such as heart failure, arrhythmias and even sudden cardiac death are associated with an altered cANS function. A changed innervation state may underlie (part of the atrial and ventricular arrhythmias observed after myocardial infarction. In other cardiac diseases, such as congenital heart disease, autonomic dysfunction may be related to disease outcome. This is also the case after heart transplantation, when the heart is denervated. Interest in the origin of the autonomic nerve system has renewed since the role of autonomic function in disease progression was recognized, and some plasticity in autonomic regeneration is evident. As with many pathological processes, autonomic dysfunction based on pathological innervation may be a partial recapitulation of the early development of innervation. As such, insight into the development of cardiac innervation and an understanding of the cellular background contributing to cardiac innervation during different phases of development is required. This review describes the development of the cANS and focuses on the cellular contributions, either directly by delivering cells or indirectly by secretion of necessary factors or cell-derivatives.

  18. Treatment of Posttraumatic Abdominal Autonomic Neuropathy Manifesting as Functional Dyspepsia and Chronic Constipation: An Integrative East-West Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubov, Andrew; Taw, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    A 52-year-old male with a history of spinal cord injury and cauda equina syndrome resulting in neurogenic bladder presented with chronic constipation and functional dyspepsia that was refractory to medical management. He was treated with an integrative East-West approach including acupuncture, trigger point injections, and Tui Na massage. Both his pain and constipation improved after a series of treatments, and this improvement was largely sustained at 2-year follow-up. This patient's symptoms are consistent with damage to the visceral parasympathetic nervous system. Interestingly, many studies evaluating the mechanisms of acupuncture point to restoration of parasympathetic tone as a mechanism of action. In this article, we describe a case of complex functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with posttraumatic autonomic neuropathy that was refractory to pharmacotherapy and was successfully treated with an integrative East-West approach. PMID:26331105

  19. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AND PROSTHETIC REHABILITATION IN HEREDITARY SENSORY AND AUTONOMIC NEUROPATHY (HSANTYPE IV:A CASE REPORT*

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    Duygu OFLUOĞLU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN are rare genetic syndromes of unknown etiology. They are seen in early childhood and are categorized into six different types by their symptoms. HSAN type 4 demonstrates autosomal recessive transmission pattern, with such major characteristics as loss of sense of pain, self-mutilation, anhydrosis and mental retardation. Sympathetic innervations are deficient despite the existence of sweat glands. Sufferers are hypotonic without any tendon reflexes, and neuro-motor development is retarded. In some cases tactile sensation and vibration may be intact. Biting injuries due to lack of pain sensation cause laceration, ulceration and scarring of the tongue, lips and other parts of oral mucosa. Tooth luxation and severe dental attrition have been observed. This case report presents oral and dental findings, surgical treatments and prosthetic rehabilitation of an 11- year-old boy with HSAN type 4.

  20. Assessment of Diabetic Polyneuropathy and Autonomic Neuropathy Using Current Perception Threshold in Korean Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

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    Bo Kyung Koo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe current perception threshold (CPT could be quantified by stimulating Aβ and C fibers at 2,000 and 5 Hz, respectively. C fibers play a role in the autonomic nervous system and are involved in temperature and pain sensation. We evaluated the usefulness of CPT for diagnosing distal polyneuropathy (DPN and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN in diabetic patients.MethodsThe CPT was measured in the index finger (C7 level and in the third toe (L5 level in diabetic patients aged 30 to 69 years. We assessed DPN according to the neuropathy total symptom score-6 (NTSS-6 and 10-g monofilament pressure sensation. Subjects with a NTSS-6 >6 or with abnormal 10-g monofilament sensation were defined to have DPN. CAN was evaluated by spectral analysis of heart rate variability and by Ewing's traditional tests.ResultsThe subjects with DPN had significantly higher CPT at all of the frequencies than the subjects without DPN (P6 could be most precisely predicted by CPT at 2,000 and 5 Hz, respectively. However, only 6.5% and 19.6% of subjects with DPN had an abnormal CPT at 2,000 Hz at the C7 and L5 levels. Although CPT at 5 Hz showed a negative correlation with the power of low and high frequency in the spectral analysis (P<0.05, only 16.7% of subjects with CAN exhibited an abnormal CPT at the same frequency.ConclusionAlthough the CPT is significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms or signs corresponding to the nerve fiber stimulated, it provides little additional information compared with conventional evaluations.

  1. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

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    Viveka P Jyotsna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04. The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75.Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone.

  2. Plasma adrenaline kinetics in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J; Henriksen, J H;

    1989-01-01

    Plasma adrenaline kinetics (clearance, extraction across the forearm, initial plasma disappearance rate, mean sojourn time, volume of distribution) were studied in sixteen Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients during constant i.v. infusion of tritium labelled adrenaline. In patients with (n...... = 8) and without (n = 8) neuropathy forearm venous plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations as well as plasma clearance of adrenaline based on arterial sampling (1.7 vs 2.1 l/min) were not significantly different. The initial disappearance time (T 1/2) after the infusion of the tritium...... labelled adrenaline had been stopped was significantly prolonged in Type 1 diabetic patients with neuropathy compared to those without (after 20 min infusion 2.7 vs 2.2 min, p less than 0.02, after 75 min infusion 3.7 vs 2.9 min, p less than 0.05). The corresponding values for the mean sojourn time...

  3. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

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    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  4. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  5. Teaching Cardiac Autonomic Function Dynamics Employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated,…

  6. Effect of Yoga on migraine: A comprehensive study using clinical profile and cardiac autonomic functions

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    Ravikiran Kisan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Intervention showed significant clinical improvement in both groups. Headache frequency and intensity were reduced more in Yoga with conventional care than the conventional care group alone. Furthermore, Yoga therapy enhanced the vagal tone and decreased the sympathetic drive, hence improving the cardiac autonomic balance. Thus, Yoga therapy can be effectively incorporated as an adjuvant therapy in migraine patients.

  7. Modulation of Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke following Ayurveda (Indian System of Medicine Treatment

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    Sriranjini Sitaram Jaideep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in stroke has implications on morbidity and mortality. Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine describes stroke as pakshaghata. We intended to study the effect of Ayurveda therapies on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Methods. Fifty patients of ischemic stroke (middle cerebral artery territory (mean age 39.26 ± 9.88 years; male 43, female 7 were recruited within one month of ictus. All patients received standard allopathic medications as advised by neurologist. In addition, patients were randomized to receive physiotherapy (Group I or Ayurveda treatment (Group II for 14 days. Continuous electrocardiogram and finger arterial pressure were recorded for 15 min before and after treatments and analyzed offline to obtain heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS. Results were analysed by RMANOVA. Results. Patients in Group II showed statistically significant improvement in cardiac autonomic parameters. The standard deviation of normal to normal intervals,and total and low frequency powers were significantly enhanced (F=8.16, P=0.007, F=9.73, P=0.004, F=13.51, and P=0.001, resp.. The BRS too increased following the treatment period (F=10.129, P=0.004. Conclusions. The current study is the first to report a positive modulation of cardiac autonomic activity after adjuvant Ayurveda treatment in ischemic stroke. Further long term studies are warranted.

  8. No effect of Pindolol on postural hypotension in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. A randomised double-blind controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgård, A; Hilsted, J

    1988-01-01

    of this therapy we performed a double-blind placebo controlled cross-over study with Pindolol (15 mg/day). Eight Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy and signs and symptoms of orthostatic hypotension (systolic blood pressure decrease greater than 30 mm Hg when standing......) participated in the study. Patients were treated for 10 weeks. Clinical examinations were performed every fortnight and patients registered postural symptoms twice daily on a visual analog scale. No significant changes were seen in blood pressure recordings, heart-rate or visual analog scale registration...... during treatment with Pindolol compared to placebo. Our study does not support the suggestion that Pindolol is a valuable drug for treatment of diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy and postural giddiness....

  9. Cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses to graded exercise in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Galbo, H; Christensen, N J

    1980-01-01

    Thirteen juvenile diabetics were studied in order to determine if decreased beat-to-beat variation during deep respiration, indicating abnormal autonomic nerve function, imply that cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses are impaired. Patients with decreased beat-to-beat variation had to...

  10. Glycemic Variability Is Associated With Reduced Cardiac Autonomic Modulation in Women With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Lebech Cichosz, Simon; Hoeyem, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    and 39 women with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and a known duration of diabetes sensor for 3 days, and the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) was calculated to obtain individual glycemic variability. Cardiac......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the sex differences in cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and to determine whether cardiac autonomic modulation is associated with glycemic variability. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated a cohort consisting of 48 men...... variability as assessed by MAGE. This was not the case in men. The association in women persisted in a multivariate regression analysis controlling for weight, mean heart rate, blood pressure (systolic), and triglycerides. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with newly diagnosed and well-controlled type 2 diabetes...

  11. [sup 123]I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in diabetic patients. Relationship with [sup 201]Tl uptake and cardiac autonomic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Kurose, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Takashi; Flores, L.G. II; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo; Matsukura, Shigeru (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan))

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of diabetic myocardial damage (suspected myocardial damage; SMD) diagnosed by [sup 201]Tl-SPECT and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (AN) on myocardial MIBG uptake in patients with NIDDM. Eighty-seven diabetic patients divided into four subgroups: 23 with SMD (+) AN (+); 19 with SMD (+) AN (-); 27 with SMD (-) AN (+); 18 with SMD (-) AN (-), and 10 controls were studied. Both planar and SPECT images were taken at 30 minutes (early) and 3 hours (delayed) after [sup 123]I-MIBG injection. The heart to mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) and washout ratio of [sup 123]I-MIBG (WR) were obtained from both planar images. Similarly, the difference between the [sup 201]Tl image and the [sup 123]I-MIBG image in the total uptake score (TUS) was taken as the difference in the total uptake score ([Delta]TUS) representing cardiac sympathetic denervation without SMD. On both early and delayed planar images, the mean H/M value in the subgroups of diabetic patients was significantly lower in the SMD (+) AN (+) group than in the control group, but among those subgroups, there was statistically significant difference between the SMD (+) AN (+) and SMD (-) AN (-) groups only on the delayed images. Regarding the WR value, there was no statistically significant difference among subjects. On SPECT image analysis, the diabetic subgroup with AN or SMD had statistically significant lower values for TUS than those of the control group. Among diabetics, there was a statistically significant differences between SMD [+] AN [+] and SMD [-] AN [-] on both early and delayed images. Similarly, the SMD [+] AN [-] group also had significantly lower values than those of SMD [-] AN [-] on early images. Regarding [Delta]TUS, there was a statistically significant differences between AN [+] subgroups and controls. Similarly, the mean value for [Delta]TUS was much higher in AN [+] subgroups than in AN [-] subgroups with or without SMD in diabetes

  12. {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in diabetic patients. Relationship with {sup 201}Tl uptake and cardiac autonomic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Kurose, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Takashi; Flores, L.G. II; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo; Matsukura, Shigeru [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of diabetic myocardial damage (suspected myocardial damage; SMD) diagnosed by {sup 201}Tl-SPECT and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (AN) on myocardial MIBG uptake in patients with NIDDM. Eighty-seven diabetic patients divided into four subgroups: 23 with SMD (+) AN (+); 19 with SMD (+) AN (-); 27 with SMD (-) AN (+); 18 with SMD (-) AN (-), and 10 controls were studied. Both planar and SPECT images were taken at 30 minutes (early) and 3 hours (delayed) after {sup 123}I-MIBG injection. The heart to mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) and washout ratio of {sup 123}I-MIBG (WR) were obtained from both planar images. Similarly, the difference between the {sup 201}Tl image and the {sup 123}I-MIBG image in the total uptake score (TUS) was taken as the difference in the total uptake score ({Delta}TUS) representing cardiac sympathetic denervation without SMD. On both early and delayed planar images, the mean H/M value in the subgroups of diabetic patients was significantly lower in the SMD (+) AN (+) group than in the control group, but among those subgroups, there was statistically significant difference between the SMD (+) AN (+) and SMD (-) AN (-) groups only on the delayed images. Regarding the WR value, there was no statistically significant difference among subjects. On SPECT image analysis, the diabetic subgroup with AN or SMD had statistically significant lower values for TUS than those of the control group. Among diabetics, there was a statistically significant differences between SMD [+] AN [+] and SMD [-] AN [-] on both early and delayed images. Similarly, the SMD [+] AN [-] group also had significantly lower values than those of SMD [-] AN [-] on early images. Regarding {Delta}TUS, there was a statistically significant differences between AN [+] subgroups and controls. Similarly, the mean value for {Delta}TUS was much higher in AN [+] subgroups than in AN [-] subgroups with or without SMD in diabetes

  13. Influence of Smoking Consumption and Nicotine Dependence Degree in Cardiac Autonomic Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Ana Paula Soares; Ramos, Dionei; de Oliveira, Gabriela Martins; dos Santos, Ana Alice Soares; Freire, Ana Paula Coelho Figueira; It, Juliana Tiyaki; Fernandes, Renato Peretti Prieto; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo

    2016-01-01

    Background Smoking consumption alters cardiac autonomic function. Objective Assess the influence of the intensity of smoking and the nicotine dependence degree in cardiac autonomic modulation evaluated through index of heart rate variability (HRV). Methods 83 smokers, of both genders, between 50 and 70 years of age and with normal lung function were divided according to the intensity of smoking consumption (moderate and severe) and the nicotine dependency degree (mild, moderate and severe). The indexes of HRV were analyzed in rest condition, in linear methods in the time domain (TD), the frequency domain (FD) and through the Poincaré plot. For the comparison of smoking consumption, unpaired t test or Mann-Whitney was employed. For the analysis between the nicotine dependency degrees, we used the One-way ANOVA test, followed by Tukey's post test or Kruskal-Wallis followed by Dunn's test. The significance level was p 0.05). Conclusion Only the intensity of smoking consumption had an influence over the cardiac autonomic modulation of the assessed tobacco smokers. Tobacco smokers with severe intensity of smoking consumption presented a lower autonomic modulation than those with moderate intensity. PMID:27142649

  14. Influence of Smoking Consumption and Nicotine Dependence Degree in Cardiac Autonomic Modulation

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    Ana Paula Soares dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Smoking consumption alters cardiac autonomic function. Objective: Assess the influence of the intensity of smoking and the nicotine dependence degree in cardiac autonomic modulation evaluated through index of heart rate variability (HRV. Methods: 83 smokers, of both genders, between 50 and 70 years of age and with normal lung function were divided according to the intensity of smoking consumption (moderate and severe and the nicotine dependency degree (mild, moderate and severe. The indexes of HRV were analyzed in rest condition, in linear methods in the time domain (TD, the frequency domain (FD and through the Poincaré plot. For the comparison of smoking consumption, unpaired t test or Mann-Whitney was employed. For the analysis between the nicotine dependency degrees, we used the One-way ANOVA test, followed by Tukey's post test or Kruskal-Wallis followed by Dunn's test. The significance level was p 0.05. Conclusion: Only the intensity of smoking consumption had an influence over the cardiac autonomic modulation of the assessed tobacco smokers. Tobacco smokers with severe intensity of smoking consumption presented a lower autonomic modulation than those with moderate intensity.

  15. Cardiac Autonomic Adjustments During Baroreflex Test in Obese and Non-Obese Preadolescents

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    Mário Augusto Paschoal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Recent studies have shown changes in cardiac autonomic control of obese preadolescents. Objective: To assess the heart rate responses and cardiac autonomic modulation of obese preadolescents during constant expiratory effort. Methods: This study assessed 10 obese and 10 non-obese preadolescents aged 9 to 12 years. The body mass index of the obese group was between the 95th and 97th percentiles of the CDC National Center for Health Statistics growth charts, while that of the non-obese group, between the 5th and 85th percentiles. Initially, they underwent anthropometric and clinical assessment, and their maximum expiratory pressures were obtained. Then, the preadolescents underwent a constant expiratory effort of 70% of their maximum expiratory pressure for 20 seconds, with heart rate measurement 5 minutes before, during and 5 minutes after it. Heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate values were analyzed by use of a software. Results: The HRV did not differ when compared before and after the constant expiratory effort intra- and intergroup. The heart rate values differed (p < 0.05 during the effort, being the total variation in non-obese preadolescents of 18.5 ± 1.5 bpm, and in obese, of 12.2 ± 1.3 bpm. Conclusion: The cardiac autonomic modulation did not differ between the groups when comparing before and after the constant expiratory effort. However, the obese group showed lower cardiovascular response to baroreceptor stimuli during the effort, suggesting lower autonomic baroreflex sensitivity.

  16. Docetaxel does not impair cardiac autonomic function in breast cancer patients previously treated with anthracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Eeva; Rantanen, Virpi; Syvänen, Kari; Jalonen, Jarmo; Antila, Kari; Salminen, Eeva

    2002-04-01

    The effects of docetaxel treatment on autonomic cardiac function was studied with 24-h ECG recordings in breast cancer patients pretreated with anthracyclines. Twenty-four women were evaluated before docetaxel treatment and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel 100 mg/m(2). The heart rate, cardiac extrasystoles and heart rate variability (HRV) in both the time and frequency domain were assessed from 24-h ECG recordings. The acute effects of docetaxel were calculated from 1-h recordings immediately prior to, during and after infusion. Long-term effects were evaluated from 24-h recordings performed before treatment and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel. There was no increase in the number of cardiac extrasystoles during docetaxel infusion. The number of ventricular extrasystoles decreased from 14 (23) to 7 (14) during and 5 (10) after the first infusion (p=0.02). The heart rate, HRV and extrasystoles were similar before and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel. The treatment did not abolish circadian variability of the heart rate. Docetaxel did not deteriorate autonomic cardiac function. In conclusion, our findings suggest that docetaxel does not have harmful cumulative effects on autonomic control of the heart and is therefore unlikely to be cardiotoxic.

  17. Graded vascular autonomic control versus discontinuous cardiac control during gradual upright tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahjaoui-Bouhaddi, M; Cappelle, S; Henriet, M T; Dumoulin, G; Wolf, J P; Regnard, J

    2000-03-15

    Indexes of heart rate variability (HRV) and the slope of cardiac baroreflex are extensively used for non invasive assessment of circulatory autonomic control in pathophysiology. We performed this study (1) to assess the sensitivity of these indexes towards small graded postural stimulations and (2) to delineate the informations provided about the settings of both vascular tone and cardiac activity. Twenty healthy subjects were randomly tilted for eight minutes at each of the six angles: -10 degrees, 0 degrees (supine), 10 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees. Instant RR-interval and finger blood pressure (BP) were continuously recorded, and venous blood was collected at the end of each 8 min position for catecholamines determination. Group average heart rate, noradrenaline and diastolic BP (DBP) increased linearly with head-up tilt angle from 10 degrees. Systolic BP (SBB) ranked only two distinct series -10 degrees, 0 degrees, 10 degrees versus 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, as did the number of spontaneous baroreflex (SBR) sequences. The spectral power of the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) of RR variability and the ratio LF/HF changed rather abruptly from either 30 degrees or 45 degrees, depending on each individual. Both HF/tot i.e. the ratio of HF to total spectral RR variability and the slope of SBR decreased markedly from 10 degrees to 30 degrees and less but more gradually from 30 degrees to 60 degrees. Thus, our observations argue for gradual adjustments of vascular tone as reflected by highly consistent changes in plasma noradrenaline and diastolic arterial pressure, contrasting with a main discontinuous autonomic setting of cardiac activity as reflected by changes in the harmonic components of spectral RR variability and in the slope of cardiac baroreflex. The pattern of changes in systolic arterial pressure attested the discontinuous cardiac autonomic control rather than the gradual setting of arterial tone. We submit that

  18. The Role of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus in Cardiac Autonomic Control during Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joustra, S. D.; Reijntjes, R. H.; Pereira, A. M.; Lammers, G. J.; Biermasz, N. R.; Thijs, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may play an important role in central autonomic control, since its projections connect to (para)sympathetic relay stations in the brainstem and spinal cord. The cardiac autonomic modifications during nighttime may therefore not only result from direct effects of the sleep-related changes in the central autonomic network, but also from endogenous circadian factors as directed by the SCN. To explore the influence of the SCN on autonomic fluctuations during nighttime, we studied heart rate and its variability (HRV) in a clinical model of SCN damage. Methods Fifteen patients in follow-up after surgical treatment for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFMA) compressing the optic chiasm (8 females, 26–65 years old) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls (5 females, 30–63 years) underwent overnight ambulatory polysomnography. Eleven patients had hypopituitarism and received adequate replacement therapy. HRV was calculated for each 30-second epoch and corrected for sleep stage, arousals, and gender using mixed effect regression models. Results Compared to controls, patients spent more time awake after sleep onset and in NREM1-sleep, and less in REM-sleep. Heart rate, low (LF) and high frequency (HF) power components and the LF/HF ratio across sleep stages were not significantly different between groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that the SCN does not play a dominant role in cardiac autonomic control during sleep. PMID:27010631

  19. Effects of emotion regulation difficulties on the tonic and phasic cardiac autonomic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Berna

    Full Text Available Emotion regulation theory aims to explain the interactions between individuals and the environment. In this context, Emotion Regulation Difficulties (ERD disrupt the physiological component of emotions through the autonomic nervous system and are involved in several psychopathological states.We were interested in comparing the influence of a film-elicited emotion procedure on the autonomic nervous system activity of two groups with different levels of emotion regulation difficulties.A total of 63 women (undergraduate students ranging from 18 to 27 (20.7 ± 1.99 years old were included. Using the upper and lower quartile of a questionnaire assessing the daily difficulties in regulating emotions, two groups, one with low (LERD and one with high (HERD levels of emotion regulation difficulties, were constituted and studied during a film-elicited emotion procedure. Cardiac vagal activity (HF-HRV was analyzed during three periods: baseline, film-elicited emotion, and recovery.The cardiovascular results showed a decrease in HF-HRV from baseline to elicitation for both groups. Then, from elicitation to recovery, HF-HRV increased for the LERD group, whereas a low HF-HRV level persisted for the HERD group.The HERD group exhibited inappropriate cardiac vagal recovery after a negative emotion elicitation had ended. Cardiac vagal tone took longer to return to its initial state in the HERD group than in the LERD group. Prolonged cardiac vagal suppression might constitute an early marker of emotion regulation difficulties leading to lower cardiac vagal tone.

  20. Cardiac Autonomic Drive during Arterial Hypertension and Metabolic Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kseneva, S I; Borodulina, E V; Trifonova, O Yu; Udut, V V

    2016-06-01

    ANS support of the cardiac work was assessed with analysis of heart rate variability in representative samples of patients with arterial hypertension and metabolic disturbances manifested by overweight, classes I-II obesity, compromised glucose tolerance, and type II diabetes. Initially enhanced sympathetic effects on the heart rate demonstrated no further increase during the orthostatic test in contrast to suprasegmentary influences enhanced by this test. The pronouncedness of revealed peculiarities in ANS drive to the heart correlated with metabolic disturbances, and these peculiarities attained maximum in patients with type II diabetes. PMID:27383176

  1. Reduced sinus arrhythmia in diabetic autonomic neuropathy: diagnostic value of an age-related normal range.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S A

    1982-01-01

    A study was carried out to establish a normal range for use in a deep breathing test of cardiac vagal integrity in diabetes mellitus. The change in heart rate resulting from taking a deep breath was recorded in 174 healthy subjects aged 16-89 years. Results were expressed as the ratio of the longest R-R interval during expiration to the shortest R-R interval during inspiration. This ratio declined appreciably with age (p less than 0.001) but was not significantly related to resting heart rate...

  2. Cardiac autonomic responses induced by mental tasks and the influence of musical auditory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Juliana Cristina; Guida, Heraldo L; Fontes, Anne M G; Antonio, Ana M S; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Barnabé, Viviani; Marcomini, Renata S; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; da Silva, Meire L; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the acute effects of musical auditory stimulation on cardiac autonomic responses to a mental task in 28 healthy men (18-22 years old). In the control protocol (no music), the volunteers remained at seated rest for 10 min and the test was applied for five minutes. After the end of test the subjects remained seated for five more minutes. In the music protocol, the volunteers remained at seated rest for 10 min, then were exposed to music for 10 min; the test was then applied over five minutes, and the subjects remained seated for five more minutes after the test. In the control and music protocols the time domain and frequency domain indices of heart rate variability remained unchanged before, during and after the test. We found that musical auditory stimulation with baroque music did not influence cardiac autonomic responses to the mental task. PMID:25129880

  3. Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Cardiac Autonomic Activity in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ellis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency (≤50nmol/L 25-hydroxy vitamin D is a cardiovascular (CV risk factor that affects approximately one billion people worldwide, particularly those affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD. Individuals with CKD demonstrate abnormal cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, which has been linked to the significant rates of CV-related mortality in this population. Whether vitamin D deficiency has a direct association with regulation of cardiac autonomic activity has never been explored in humans. Methods: Thirty-four (34 healthy, normotensive subjects were studied and categorized based on 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency (deficient vs. non-deficient, n = 7 vs. 27, as well as 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels (above vs. below 25th percentile, n = 8 vs. 26. Power spectral analysis of electrocardiogram recordings provided measures of cardiac autonomic activity across low frequency (LF and high frequency (HF, representative of vagal contribution bands, representative of the sympathetic and vagal limbs of the autonomic nervous system when transformed to normalized units (nu, respectively, as well as overall cardiosympathovagal balance (LF:HF during graded angiotensin II (AngII challenge (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min, 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min. Results: At baseline, significant suppression of sympathovagal balance was observed in the 25-hydroxy vitamin D-deficient participants (LF:HF, p = 0.02 vs. non-deficient, although no other differences were observed throughout AngII challenge. Participants in the lowest 1,25-dihydroxy VD quartile experienced significant withdrawal of inhibitory vagal control, as well as altered overall sympathovagal balance throughout AngII challenge (HF, mean difference = −6.98 ± 3 nu, p = 0.05; LF:HF, mean difference = 0.34 ± 0.1, p = 0.043 vs. above 25th percentile. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with suppression of resting cardiac autonomic activity, while low 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels are

  4. Relationship between duration of illness and cardiac autonomic nervous activity in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Fujita, Masatoshi; Nin, Kazuko; Noma, Shun’ichi; Teramukai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background The mortality rate associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) is high, and death is mainly attributable to cardiac events. A wide range of autonomic nervous system disturbances may be mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular mortality and sudden death of patients with AN. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been proven to be a reliable noninvasive method for quantitative assessment of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of heart rate (HR). The longer the duration of illnes...

  5. Relationship between duration of illness and cardiac autonomic nervous activity in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Fujita, Masatoshi; Nin, Kazuko; Noma, Shun'ichi; Teramukai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mortality rate associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) is high, and death is mainly attributable to cardiac events. A wide range of autonomic nervous system disturbances may be mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular mortality and sudden death of patients with AN. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been proven to be a reliable noninvasive method for quantitative assessment of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of heart rate (HR). The longer the duration of illne...

  6. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mostarda, Cristiano [Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão (UFMA), São Luís, MA (Brazil); Figueroa, Diego Mendrot [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelis, Kátia De [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.rodrigues@incor.usp.br [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  7. Highly abnormal thermotests in familial dysautonomia suggest increased cardiac autonomic risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hilz, M; Kolodny, E.; Neuner, I; Stemper, B; Axelrod, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Patients with familial dysautonomia have an increased risk of sudden death. In some patients with familial dysautonomia, sympathetic cardiac dysfunction is indicated by prolongation of corrected QT (QTc) interval, especially during stress tests. As many patients do not tolerate physical stress, additional indices are needed to predict autonomic risk. In familial dysautonomia there is a reduction of both sympathetic neurons and peripheral small nerve fibres which...

  8. Cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability and turbulence in pre-hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Alim; Uenishi, Masahiro; Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Matsumoto, Kazuo; Kato, Ritsushi; Hara, Motoki; Yazıcı, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Non-dipping blood pressure pattern was shown to be associated with increased cardiovascular events. In addition, cardiac autonomic dysfunction was found to be associated with non-dipper phenomenon. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the cardiac autonomic functions in dipper and non-dipper pre-hypertensive subjects. A total of 65 pre-hypertensive subjects were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups as non-dippers (40 subjects, 52% female) and dippers (25 subjects, 52.5% female). Cardiac autonomic functions of the two groups were compared with the aid of heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence (HRT), atrial premature contractions (APCs), ventricular premature contractions (VPCs), and mean heart rate (MHR). There was no significant difference between non-dippers and dippers in basal characteristics. The two parameters of HRT, turbulence onset and turbulence slope, were found to be significantly abnormal in non-dippers than in dippers (P < .011 and P < .002, respectively). Heart rate variability parameters, including SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, and pNN50, were found to be similar in dipper and non-dipper pre-hypertensive subjects (P < .998, P < .453, P < .205, and P < .788, respectively). APCs, VPCs, and MHR were compared, and there were statistical differences between the groups (APCs 5.80 ± 4.55, 9.14 ± 7.33, P < .024; VPCs 8.48 ± 8.83, 13.23 ± 9.68, P < .044; and MHR 70.16 ± 11.08, 76.26 ± 11.31, P < .035; respectively). This study demonstrated a possible cardiac autonomic dysfunction in pre-hypertensive subjects with non-dipper pattern. This may be a basis for future studies related to pre-hypertension and non-dipping BP pattern. PMID:22676318

  9. Signs of cardiac autonomic imbalance and proarrhythmic remodeling in FTO deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Carnevali

    Full Text Available In humans, variants of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene have recently been associated with obesity. However, the physiological function of FTO is not well defined. Previous investigations in mice have linked FTO deficiency to growth retardation, loss of white adipose tissue, increased energy metabolism and enhanced systemic sympathetic activation. In this study we investigated for the first time the effects of global knockout of the mouse FTO gene on cardiac function and its autonomic neural regulation. ECG recordings were acquired via radiotelemetry in homozygous knockout (n = 12 and wild-type (n = 8 mice during resting and stress conditions, and analyzed by means of time- and frequency-domain indexes of heart rate variability. In the same animals, cardiac electrophysiological properties (assessed by epicardial mapping and structural characteristics were investigated. Our data indicate that FTO knockout mice were characterized by (i higher heart rate values during resting and stress conditions, (ii heart rate variability changes (increased LF to HF ratio, (iii larger vulnerability to stress-induced tachyarrhythmias, (iv altered ventricular repolarization, and (v cardiac hypertrophy compared to wild-type counterparts. We conclude that FTO deficiency in mice leads to an imbalance of the autonomic neural modulation of cardiac function in the sympathetic direction and to a potentially proarrhythmic remodeling of electrical and structural properties of the heart.

  10. Screening and assessment of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in long-standing type 2 diabetic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Refaie

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Middle-aged women with long-standing diabetes are vulnerable to CAN with postural hypotension and prolonged QTc intervals, QTd, and increased left ventricular mass index. Identification of CAN is crucial to prevent the hazards of cardiovascular insults during stressful situations, and cases with severe CAN may require coronary artery disease screening preoperatively.

  11. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with uraemia is not related to pre-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eming, Marie Bayer; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo Friis;

    2011-01-01

    enrolled. Beat-to-beat variability was determined from the echocardiographic (ECG) recording during deep inspiration and expiration. CAN was defined as a beat-to-beat value below 10 beats/min. Pre-diabetes was defined as presence of impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance measured...

  12. Effect of exercise on cardiac autonomic function in females with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, Dina C; Ker, James A; Grant, Catharina C; Fletcher, Lizelle

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of exercise on cardiac autonomic function as measured by short-term heart rate variability (HRV) in females suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Females with confirmed RA were randomly assigned to an exercise group (RAE) and a sedentary group (RAC). RAE was required to train under supervision two to three times per week, for 3 months. Three techniques (time domain, frequency domain and Poincaré plot analyses) were used to measure HRV at baseline and study completion. At baseline, RAC (n = 18) had a significantly higher variability compared to RAE (n = 19) for most HRV indicators. At study completion, the variables showing significant changes (p = 0.01 to 0.05) favoured RAE in all instances. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to assess changes within groups from start to end. RAE showed significant improvement for most of the standing variables, including measurements of combined autonomic influence, e.g. SDRR (p = 0.002) and variables indicating only vagal influence, e.g. pNN50 (p = 0.014). RAC mostly deteriorated with emphasis on variables measuring vagal influence (RMSSD, pNN50, SD1 and HF (ms(2)). Study results indicated that 12 weeks of exercise intervention had a positive effect on cardiac autonomic function as measured by short-term HRV, in females with RA. Several of the standing variables indicated improved vagal influence on the heart rate. Exercise can thus potentially be used as an instrument to improve cardiac health in a patient group known for increased cardiac morbidity.

  13. Prospective randomized controlled intervention trial: Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Improves Cardiac autonomic functions and Quality of life in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To assess the effect of Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Program on glycemic control, quality of life, and cardiac autonomic functions in diabetes. Material and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 120 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes (n = 56 and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program (n = 64. Standard therapy included advice on diet, walk, and oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was an interactive session in which Sudarshan kriya yoga, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam was taught under guidance of a certified teacher. Change in fasting, post prandial blood sugars, glycated hemoglobin, and quality of life were assessed. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and six months after intervention. Results: There was significant improvement in psychological (P = 0.006 and social domains (P = 0.04 and total quality of life (P = 0.02 in the group practicing comprehensive yogic breathing program as compared to the group following standard therapy alone. In the group following breathing program, the improvement in sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions was statistically significant (P = 0.01, while the change in the standard group was not significant (P = 0.17. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P = 0.07. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P = 0.76. The parameters of glycemic control were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: There was significant improvement in quality of life and cardiac autonomic functions in the diabetes patients practicing comprehensive yogic breathing

  14. (Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.

  15. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia and their healthy relatives – a small review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Juergen Bär

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The majority of excess mortality among people with schizophrenia seems to be caused by cardiovascular complications, and in particular, coronary heart disease. In addition, the prevalence of heart failure and arrhythmias is increased in this population. Reduced efferent vagal activity, which has been consistently described in these patients and their healthy first-degree relatives, might be one important mechanism contributing to their increased cardiac mortality. A decrease in heart rate variability (HRV and complexity was often shown in unmedicated patients when compared to healthy controls. In addition, faster breathing rates, accompanied by shallow breathing, seem to influence autonomic cardiac functioning in acute unmedicated patients substantially. Moreover, low physical fitness is a further and independent cardiac risk factor present in this patient population. Interestingly, new studies describe chronotropic incompetence during physical exercise as an important additional risk factor in patients with schizophrenia. Some studies report a correlation of the autonomic imbalance with the degree of positive symptoms (i.e. delusions and some with the duration of disease. The main body of psychiatric research is focused on mental aspects of the disease, thereby neglecting obvious physical health needs of these patients. Here, a joint effort is needed to design interventional strategies in everyday clinical settings to improve physical health and quality of life.

  16. An Autonomic Link Between Inhaled Diesel Exhaust and Impaired Cardiac Performance: Insight From Treadmill and Doubutamine Challenges in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Short-term exposure to vehicular emissions is associated with adverse cardiac events. Diesel exhaust (DE) is an ubiquitous air pollutant believed to provoke cardiac events partly through imbalance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervo...

  17. Diphtheritic neuropathy, an analysis based on muscle and nerve biopsy and repeated neurophysiological and autonomic function tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Solders, G; Nennesmo, I; Persson, A.

    1989-01-01

    A patient with diphtheritic neuropathy was investigated with repeated tests of parasympathetic and sympathetic vasomotor and sudomotor functions for one year after the onset of symptoms. Somatic nerve function was tested with nerve conduction studies and an index based on ten variables was used to follow the course of the neuropathy. Sural nerve and anterior tibial muscle biopsies were performed. A severe but shortlasting impairment of the parasympathetic vagal reflex arc was found. The recov...

  18. Percutaneous autonomic neural modulation: A novel technique to treat cardiac arrhythmia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablation and anti-arrhythmic medications have shown promise but have been met with varying success and unwanted side effects such as myocardial injury, arrhythmias, and morbidity from invasive surgical intervention. The answer to improving efficacy of ablation may include modulation of the cardiac aspect of the autonomic nervous system. Our lab has developed a novel approach and device to navigate the oblique sinus and to use DC current and saline/alcohol irrigation to selectively stimulate and block the autonomic ganglia found on the epicardial side of the heart. This novel approach minimizes myocardial damage from thermal injury and provides a less invasive and targeted approach. For feasibility, proof-of-concept, and safety monitoring, we carried out canine studies to test this novel application. Our results suggest a safer and less invasive way of modulating arrhythmogenic substrate that may lead to improved treatment of AF in humans

  19. Percutaneous autonomic neural modulation: A novel technique to treat cardiac arrhythmia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Madhavan, Malini [Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Venkatachalam, Kalpathi L. [Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Knudson, Mark B. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); EnteroMedics, EnteroMedics, St. Paul, MN (United States); Asirvatham, Samuel J., E-mail: asirvatham.samuel@mayo.edu [Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Ablation and anti-arrhythmic medications have shown promise but have been met with varying success and unwanted side effects such as myocardial injury, arrhythmias, and morbidity from invasive surgical intervention. The answer to improving efficacy of ablation may include modulation of the cardiac aspect of the autonomic nervous system. Our lab has developed a novel approach and device to navigate the oblique sinus and to use DC current and saline/alcohol irrigation to selectively stimulate and block the autonomic ganglia found on the epicardial side of the heart. This novel approach minimizes myocardial damage from thermal injury and provides a less invasive and targeted approach. For feasibility, proof-of-concept, and safety monitoring, we carried out canine studies to test this novel application. Our results suggest a safer and less invasive way of modulating arrhythmogenic substrate that may lead to improved treatment of AF in humans.

  20. OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF CARDIAC AUTONOMIC ACTIVITY IN DIFFERENT PHASES OF MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srujana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide spectrum of biological function is regulated by the cyclic changes in estrogen and progesterone levels during regular menstrual cycle. However limited literature is available concerning the relationship of these hormones and cardiac autonomic activity. In the present study, we hypothesize that there would be heart rate variability during different phases of menstrual cycle, which can be attributed to the effect of ovarian steroids on cardiovascular function in women. The aim of the study is to compare the c ardiac autonomic activity in the different phases of menstrual cycle ( M enstrual, follicular and luteal phases using heart rate variability. The objective is to establish a physiological correlation between the cardiac autonomic activity and different phas es of menstrual cycle. The study was conducted in 48 regularly menstruating young female, of age group 18 - 30yrs, in the Upgraded Department of Physiology, Osmania medical college, from December 2011 to August 2013, using LABCHART software provided by ADLAB S. The power spectral analysis of HRV was used to calculate low frequency(LF , high frequency (HF component and their ratio (LF/HF during menstrual (2±1 days, follicular(11±1 day and luteal phases (20±1day from the first day of bleeding. Results showe d a significant increase was noted in low frequency component in luteal phase compared to follicular phase (p=0.000, whereas, a tendency for increase in high frequency component was observed in follicular phase (p=0.004. Furthermore, LF/HF was significan tly higher in luteal phase than in the follicular phase (p=0.000 indicating an increased sympathetic activity. The conclusion is regulation of autonomic tone is modified during menstrual cycle. The alteration in the balance of ovarian hormones might be re sponsible for these changes.

  1. Pulmonary function, cholinergic bronchomotor tone, and cardiac autonomic abnormalities in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective study analyzed the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in pulmonary and cardiac function by evaluating cardiovascular reflex and its correlation with pulmonary function abnormalities of type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients (N = 17 and healthy subjects (N = 17 were evaluated by 1 pulmonary function tests including spirometry, He-dilution method, N2 washout test, and specific airway conductance (SGaw determined by plethysmography before and after aerosol administration of atropine sulfate, and 2 autonomic cardiovascular activity by the passive tilting test and the magnitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA. Basal heart rate was higher in the diabetic group (87.8 ± 11.2 bpm; mean ± SD than in the control group (72.9 ± 7.8 bpm, P<0.05. The increase of heart rate at 5 s of tilting was 11.8 ± 6.5 bpm in diabetic patients and 17.6 ± 6.2 bpm in the control group (P<0.05. Systemic arterial pressure and RSA analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups. Diabetes intragroup analysis revealed two behaviors: 10 patients with close to normal findings and 7 with significant abnormalities in terms of RSA, with the latter subgroup presenting one or more abnormalities in other tests and clear evidence of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. End-expiratory flows were significantly lower in diabetic patients than in the control group (P<0.05. Pulmonary function tests before and after atropine administration demonstrated comparable responses by both groups. Type 2 diabetic patients have cardiac autonomic dysfunction that is not associated with bronchomotor tone alterations, probably reflecting a less severe impairment than that of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Yet, a reduction of end-expiratory flow was detected.

  2. Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Early Cardiac Affection in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Othman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the early preclinical alterations in cardiac autonomic control as well as altered cardiac function in systemic sclerosis (SSc patients and their relevance to the clinical features of the disease using noninvasive methods. Methods: 30 SSc patients and 15 healthy controls matched for age and sex underwent clinical examination, serological analysis, and echocardiographic assessment including Doppler flow imaging to evaluate cardiac function, and 24-hour Holter monitoring analyzed for arrhythmia and heart rate variability (HRV in the time and frequency domains. Results: The trans-mitral Doppler of early to atrial wave (E/A ratio was reversed in five patients (16.6% and the tricuspid E/A ratio was reversed in 10 patients (33.3%. Holter analysis for SSc patients revealed an increased prevalence of premature ventricular contractions (PVC $ 10/h (P = 0.02, supra-ventricular tachycardias (SVTs (P = 0.2, and total PVC count (P = 0.0000. Highly significant (P = 0.000 impairment in all HRV parameters was demonstrated in the SSc patients. Total skin thickness score (TSS, Raynaud’s phenomenon and anti-scleroderma 70 (anti-SCL70 showed significant positive correlations with all arrhythmia parameters, while showing a significant negative correlation with the impaired ventricular diastolic function and various HRV parameters. No correlation was found between arrhythmia and HRV parameters and disease duration, disease type, or presence of anti-centromere antibodies. Conclusion: Low heart rate variability, increased TSS and the presence of anti-SCL70 are correlated with preclinical cardiac involvement in SSc patients and may predict the likelihood of malignant arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Therefore, noninvasive HRV evaluation before clinical cardiac involvement in these patients might be beneficial when added to the clinical and laboratory assessments in detecting high-risk patients, and may allow for implementation of preventive

  3. Quantification of cardiac autonomic nervous activities in ambulatory dogs by eliminating cardiac electric activities using cubic smoothing spline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of an implantable radio transmitter system, direct measurement of cardiac autonomic nervous activities (CANAs) became possible for ambulatory animals for a couple of months. However, measured CANAs include not only CANA but also cardiac electric activity (CEA) that can affect the quantification of CANAs. In this study, we propose a novel CEA removal method using moving standard deviation and cubic smoothing spline. This method consisted of two steps of detecting CEA segments and eliminating CEAs in detected segments. Using implanted devices, we recorded stellate ganglion nerve activity (SGNA), vagal nerve activity (VNA) and superior left ganglionated plexi nerve activity (SLGPNA) directly from four ambulatory dogs. The CEA-removal performance of the proposed method was evaluated and compared with commonly used high-pass filtration (HPF) for various heart rates and CANA amplitudes. Results tested with simulated CEA and simulated true CANA revealed stable and excellent performance of the suggested method compared to the HPF method. The averaged relative error percentages of the proposed method were less than 0.67%, 0.65% and 1.76% for SGNA, VNA and SLGPNA, respectively. (paper)

  4. [Genetics of neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gess, B; Schirmacher, A; Young, P

    2013-02-01

    Hereditary neuropathies belong to the most common neurogenetic disorders. They appear mostly as sensory and motor neuropathies but there are also pure sensory, pure motor as well as sensory and autonomic hereditary neuropathies. In clinical practice, knowledge of hereditary neuropathies is important in order to recognize them among polyneuropathies and achieve a successful genetic diagnosis. The molecular genetics of hereditary neuropathies are very heterogeneous with currently more than 40 known disease-causing genes. The 4 most common genes account for almost 90% of the genetically diagnosed hereditary neuropathies. In this review article we provide an overview of the currently known genes and propose a rational genetic work-up protocol of the most common genes.

  5. The Effect of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Lipids Concentration in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhiyenko Victoria

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is one of the independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of long-chain w-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (w-3 PUFA on the levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and on some lipid profile parameters in patients with T2DM and CAN. Material and Methods: 36 patients with T2DM and verified CAN were divided into 2 groups. The first group received traditional hypoglycemic therapy (n = 15, control for three months; patients in group 2 (n = 21 received in addition 1 g/day of the long-chain w-3 PUFA for three months. Results: Prescription of the w-3 PUFA to the patients with T2DM and СAN was accompanied by a statistically significant decrease of NT-proBNP level and led to significantly positive changes in the high density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels in the blood. Conclusions: Obtained results suggest that the efficacy of w-3 PUFA is the result of a direct effect of the pharmacological agent on the investigated indexes

  6. Imaging of the autonomic nervous system: focus on cardiac sympathetic innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David S

    2003-12-01

    Symptoms or signs of abnormal autonomic nervous system function occur commonly in several neurological disorders. Clinical evaluations have depended on physiological, pharmacological, and neurochemical approaches. Recently, imaging of sympathetic noradrenergic innervation has been introduced and applied especially in the heart. Most studies have used the radiolabeled sympathomimetic amine, (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine. Decreased uptake or increased "washout" of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine-derived radioactivity is associated with worse prognosis or more severe disease in hypertension, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and diabetes mellitus. This pattern may reflect a high rate of postganglionic sympathetic nerve traffic to the heart. Many recent studies have agreed on the remarkable finding that all patients with Parkinson's disease and orthostatic hypotension have a loss of cardiac sympathetic innervation, whereas all patients with multiple system atrophy, often difficult to distinguish clinically from Parkinson's disease, have intact cardiac sympathetic innervation. Because Parkinson's disease entails a postganglionic sympathetic noradrenergic lesion, the disease appears to be not only a movement disorder, with dopamine loss in the nigrostriatal system of the brain, but also a dysautonomia, with noradrenaline loss in the sympathetic nervous system of the heart. As new ligands are developed, one may predict further discoveries of involvement of components of the autonomic nervous system in neurological diseases.

  7. 糖尿病自主神经病变是脑血管病变的危险因素探讨%Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy is to Investigate the Risk Factors for Cere-brovascular Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高颖

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors of diabetic autonomic neuropathy whether or cerebrovascular disease, study the relationship between autonomic neuropathy and cerebral vascular disease. Methods Hospital Year 2010 - 2015 180 cases of type 2 diabetes, including 90 cases of diabetic autonomic neuropathy and 90 patients with non-diabetic autonomic neuropathy. 180 patients were divided into two groups, diabetic autonomic neuropathy becomes the experimental group, the non-diabetic auto-nomic neuropathy becomes the control group. Two patients underwent transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Results The results of pa-tients with transcranial Doppler ultrasound, the experimental group of patients to detect significant abnormalities, cerebral vascular compliance, cerebral vascular stenosis. Conclusion After two groups of patients with transcranial Doppler ultrasound, consider dia-betic autonomic neuropathy may be diabetic cerebrovascular disease risk factors.%目的:探讨糖尿病自主神经病变是否为脑血管病变的危险因素,研究自主神经病变与脑血管病变的关系。方法选取该院2010-2015年180例2型糖尿病患者,其中有90例为糖尿病自主神经病变,90例非糖尿病自主神经病变。将180例患者分为两组,糖尿病自主神经病变为实验组,非糖尿病自主神经病变为对照组。两组患者都进行了经颅多普勒超声检查。结果两组患者经颅多普勒超声检查的结果比较,实验组患者的检测有明显的异常,出现脑血管顺应性下降,脑血管狭窄。结论经过对两组患者进行经颅多普勒超声检查后,考虑糖尿病自主神经病变有可能是糖尿病脑血管病变的危险因素。

  8. Observations on the Curative Effect of Acupuncture on Cardiac Vegetative Neuropathy of Diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Lei

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-six patients with type Ⅱ diabetes were divided into medicine group treated with oral hypoglycemic agents and acupuncture group treated with needling. The patients had abnormity on blood glucose, glycosylatedhemoglobin (HbA1), and the function of cardiac vegetative nerve before treatment. After one month' s treatment, there were marked decrease on blood glucose and HbA1 in medicine group, but no change in acupuncture group. Patients of acupuncture group had an exact improving effect on Wassermann index, difference in heart rate between standing and lying position,30/15R-R interval ratio and other function of cardiac vegetative nerve. It indicated acupuncture could improve the abnormal function of cardiac vegetative nerve.%将36例糖尿病Ⅱ型患者分为西药组和针刺组,分别予降糖药物和针刺治疗.治疗前患者血糖、HbA1,各项心脏植物神经功能试验均异常.治疗1个月西药组血糖及HbA1显著下降,而其余各项指标均无显著变化.针刺组血糖HbA1无显著变化,但乏氏指数、立卧位心率差、30/15R-R期间比值、异常项目数均显著改善.说明针刺可以改善心脏植物神经功能.

  9. Cardiac autonomic reactivity and salivary cortisol in men and women exposed to social stressors : relationship with individual ethological profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sgoifo, A; Braglia, F; Costoli, T; Musso, E; Meerlo, P; Ceresini, G; Troisi, A

    2003-01-01

    The degree of cardiovascular stress responsivity and its possible implications for the onset and progression of cardiovascular pathologies seem to be linked to the individual strategy of behavioral coping with stressors. This study was designed to investigate the relationship among cardiac autonomic

  10. Relationship between inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers and cardiac autonomic function in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Lari C; Roediger, Mollie P; Grandits, Greg;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the relationship between inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers and cardiac autonomic function (CAF) as measured by heart rate variability in persons with HIV. MATERIALS & METHODS: This analysis included 4073 HIV-infected persons from the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral...... Therapy study. We examined the association between IL-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and D-dimer with heart rate variability measures (SDNN and rMSSD), both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. RESULTS: Cross-sectional analysis revealed significant inverse associations between IL-6, hs......CRP and d-dimer with SDNN and rMSSD (p longitudinal analysis failed to show a significant association between baseline IL-6, hsCRP and d-dimer with change in CAF over time. CONCLUSION: Cross-sectionally, higher levels of inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers were...

  11. Dysfunction of pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous system in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junlong; Tu, Weifeng; Dai, Jianqiang; Lv, Qing; Yang, Xiaoqi

    2011-01-01

    The pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous functions were compared in elderly, non-cardiac surgery patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and without diabetes mellitus (NDM). A group of 30 unpremedicated elderly patients scheduled to undergo elective non-cardiac surgery were studied, including 15 DM patients and 15 NDM patients. Each component of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in the frequency domain was monitored with Holter during the nights of the day before and on 1st and 2nd day after operation. After surgery, total power (TP), high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) significantly decreased as compared to the baseline values before operation in both groups (p<0.05). The LF/HF ratio was significantly changed in DM group but did not change in NDM group. On the 2nd postoperative day, TP, HF, LF and VLF in DM group were further decreased as compared to those on the 1st postoperative day and were significantly lower than those in NDM group (p<0.01 or 0.05), but these indices in NDM group did not show significant decreases. Surgery induced the cardiac autonomic nervous dysfunction in elderly patients not only with DM but also without diabetes. On the 2nd postoperative day, the disturbances of cardiac autonomic nervous activity were more sever in DM patients, compared to the 1st postoperative day, but was not significantly more sever than in the NDM patients.

  12. Role of inflammation in the development of cardiac autonomic disfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Novikova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate role of inflammation in pathogenesis of cardiac autonomic dysfunction assessed by heart rate variability (HRV analyses, in patients (pts with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Material and methods. 75 female pts with SLE aged before 55 years were included. Control group consisted of 32 healthy women of comparable age. Clinical symptoms, activity degree and main cardiovascular risk factors were assessed. Common carotid duplex scanning with measurement of intima-media thickness, echocardiography, 24 h ECG ambulatory recording with determination of time domain parameters, evaluation of serum inflammation markers level (CRP, IL-6, TNFa were performed. Results. HRV time domain parameters adjusted by McanNN - SDNNn%, SDNNin%, rMSSDn%, pNN50% in women with SLE were lower than in healthy control. HRV parameters inversely correlated with inflammation markers in SLE (p<0,05. SLE pts were divided into 4 groups: 1 (n=12 - pts with low HRV parameters and high level of IL-6; 2 (n=13 - low HRV and normal IL-6; 3 (n=6 - normal HRV and high IL-6; 4 (n=44 - normal HRV and IL-6. SLEDA1 2K, left atrium size, levels of markers of inflammation in group 1 were higher, then in group 4 (p<0,05. Hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking and subclinical atherosclerosis of carotid arteries were more frequent in group 2 compared to group 4 (p<0,05. Conclusion. These results suggest important role of autoimmune inflammation in pathogenesis of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in SLE pts with high disease activity and traditional cardiovascular risk factor, atherosclerotic changes - in low SLE activity. HRV, traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers combined measurement can help to identify subjects at risk of cardiovascular mortality among SLE pts.

  13. Aging in autonomic control by multifractal studies of cardiac interbeat intervals in the VLF band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heart rate responds dynamically to various intrinsic and environmental stimuli. The autonomic nervous system is said to play a major role in this response. Multifractal analysis offers a novel method to assess the response of cardiac interbeat intervals. Twenty-four hour ECG recordings of RR interbeat intervals (of 48 elderly volunteers (age 65–94), 40 middle-aged persons (age 45–53) and 36 young adults (age 18–26)) were investigated to study the effect of aging on autonomic regulation during normal activity in healthy adults. Heart RR-interval variability in the very low frequency (VLF) band (32–420 RR intervals) was evaluated by multifractal tools. The nocturnal and diurnal signals of 6 h duration were studied separately. For each signal, the analysis was performed twice: for a given signal and for the integrated signal. A multifractal spectrum was quantified by the hmax value at which a multifractal spectrum attained its maximum, width of a spectrum, Hurst exponent, extreme events hleft and distance between the maxima of a signal and its integrated counterpart. The following seven characteristics are suggested as quantifying the age-related decrease in the autonomic function ('int' refers to the integrated signal): (a) hsleepmax − hmaxwake > 0.05 for a signal; (b) hintmax > 1.15 for wake; (c) hintmax − hmax > 0.85 for sleep; (d) Hurstwake − Hurstsleep < 0.01; (e) widthwake > 0.07; (f) widthint < 0.30 for sleep; (g) hintleft > 0.75. Eighty-one percent of elderly people had at least four of these properties, and ninety-two percent of young people had three or less. This shows that the multifractal approach offers a concise and reliable index of healthy aging for each individual. Additionally, the applied method yielded insights into dynamical changes in the autonomic regulation due to the circadian cycle and aging. Our observations support the hypothesis that imbalance in the autonomic control due to healthy aging could be related to

  14. Effortful control and resiliency exhibit different patterns of cardiac autonomic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Derek P; Friedman, Bruce H

    2015-05-01

    Effortful control (EC) and ego-resiliency (often shortened to resiliency) may similarly encode adaptability to stress. Differentiation of these traits in terms of autonomic control may highlight each construct's relative mechanisms in stress regulation. In the current study, 84 subjects self-reported levels of EC and resiliency and then were exposed to 3 mental stressors (mental arithmetic, speech preparation, verbal fluency), during which heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed to index cardiac vagal influences. Interbeat intervals (IBIs) were also collected, while pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET) were assessed as sympathetic indices. Multiple regression was used to explore the extent to which autonomic control was moderated by each EC and resiliency. Results indicate that EC was related to concordance between IBI and HRV, along with negative emotion. Resiliency was more associated with coherence between IBI and PEP, and with positive emotion. Findings suggest that regulatory processes play a role in EC's adaptability to stress, while resiliency may involve approach motivation in stress control. PMID:25758131

  15. Distinctive cardiac autonomic dysfunction following stress exposure in both sexes in an animal model of PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koresh, Ori; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Matar, Michael A; Geva, Amir B; Cohen, Hagit

    2016-07-15

    It is unclear whether the poor autonomic flexibility or dysregulation observed in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) represents a pre-trauma vulnerability factor or results from exposure to trauma. We used an animal model of PTSD to assess the association between the behavioral response to predator scent stress (PSS) and the cardiac autonomic modulation in male and female rats. The rats were surgically implanted with radiotelemetry devices to measure their electrocardiograms and locomotor activity (LMA). Following baseline telemetric monitoring, the animals were exposed to PSS or sham-PSS. Continuous telemetric monitoring (24h/day sampling) was performed over the course of 7days. The electrocardiographic recordings were analyzed using the time- and frequency-domain indexes of heart rate variability (HRV). The behavioral response patterns were assessed using the elevated plus maze and acoustic startle response paradigms for the retrospective classification of individuals according to the PTSD-related cut-off behavioral criteria. During resting conditions, the male rats had significantly higher heart rates (HR) and lower HRV parameters than the female rats during both the active and inactive phases of the daily cycle. Immediately after PSS exposure, both the female and male rats demonstrated a robust increase in HR and a marked drop in HRV parameters, with a shift of sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic predominance. In both sexes, autonomic system habituation and recovery were selectively inhibited in the rats whose behavior was extremely disrupted after exposure to PSS. However, in the female rats, exposure to the PSS produced fewer EBR rats, with a more rapid recovery curve than that of the male rats. PSS did not induce changes to the circadian rhythm of the LMA. According to our results, PTSD can be conceptualized as a disorder that is related to failure-of-recovery mechanisms that impede the restitution of physiological homeostasis. PMID

  16. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-05-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS.The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G).Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0-0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters.AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients.

  17. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M U Sujan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head in migraine patients. Methods: Forty chronic migraine patients fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria were recruited from the neurology outpatient clinic. Patients were randomized to receive either hydrotherapy plus conventional pharmacological care (n = 20 or conventional medication only (n = 20. Hydrotherapy group received treatment with hot arm and foot bath (103°F to 110°F and ice massage to head daily for 20 min for 45 days. Patients were assessed using headache impact test (HIT, visual analog scale for pain and cardiac autonomic function by heart rate variability (HRV before and after intervention period. Results: There was a significant decrease in HIT score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment in both the groups. However, it was more evident in add on hydrotherapy group compared to pharmacological treatment alone group. There was also significant improvement in the HRV parameters. In particular, there was a significant decrease in heart rate (P = 0.017, increase in high frequency (HF (P = 0.014 and decrease in low frequency/HF ratio (P = 0.004 in add on hydrotherapy group. Conclusion: Our study shows that add on hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients.

  18. Evaluation of cardiac sympathetic neuronal integrity in diabetic patients using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Jung [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 134 Shincheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Doo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 134 Shincheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Young Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 134 Shincheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Pyoung [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 134 Shincheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Yong Woon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 134 Shincheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hyung Sik [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 134 Shincheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Yun [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 134 Shincheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Seung Gil [Department of Endocrinology, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 134 Shincheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-04-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is associated with increased mortality in diabetic patients. To evaluate the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in these patients, a prospective study was undertaken using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The study groups consisted of ten diabetic patients with cardiac autonomic neuropathy (group I) and six without autonomic neuropathy (group II). Autonomic nervous function tests, thallium scan, radionuclide ventriculographic data including ejection fraction and wall motion study, and 24-h urine catecholamine levels were evaluated. {sup 123}I-MIBG SPET was performed at 30 min and 4 h following injection of 3 mCi of {sup 123}I-MIBG in groups I and II and in normal subjects (n=4). On planar images, the heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio was measured. Defect pattern and severity of MIBG uptake were qualitatively analysed on SPET. Compared with control subjects, diabetic patients had a reduced H/M ratio regardless of the presence of clinical autonomic neuropathy. There was no difference in H/M ratio between groups I and II. On SPET images, focal or diffuse defects were demonstrated in all patients in group I, and in five of the six patients in group II. The extent of defects tended to be more pronounced in group I than in group II. In conclusion, {sup 123}I-MIBG scan was found to be a more sensitive method than clinical autonomic nervous function tests for the detection of autonomic neuropathy in diabetes. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. [Developments in hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, O

    2012-12-01

    Hereditary sensorimotor neuropathies, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprise a group of diseases with heterogeneous clinical, electrophysiological and genetic expression. They are classified by the mode of inheritance (autosomal dominant, X-linked dominant, autosomal recessive) and their electrophysiological characteristics taking into account the speed of motor conduction of the median nerve (demyelinating, intermediary and axonal forms). Certain purely motor forms are called spinal CMT or hereditary distal motor neuropathy, or distal spinal amyotrophy. CMT involving an important sensorial component, trophic disorders, or signs of dysautonomia are included in the classification of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

  20. Coefficient of variation of R-R intervals in electrocardiogram is a sensitive marker of anemia induced by autonomic neuropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Nishimura, Rimei; Kageyama, Shigeru; Tajima, Naoko

    2007-10-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between hemoglobin (Hb) levels and autonomic failure using a sensitive marker, coefficient of variation of R-R intervals in electrocardiogram (CVR-R) in order to clarify a cause of normocytic normochromic anemia in type 1 diabetic patients without overt nephropathy. We recruited 46 patients with type 1 diabetes and measured creatinine clearance (Ccr), HbA1c, albuminuria, Hb levels and CVR-R of all patients. In addition, the status of diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy were also evaluated. Serum erythropoietin (EPO), Fe, total iron binding capacity, lactate dehydrogenase, total bilirubin levels and number of reticulocytes and mean corpuscular volume were also measured to distinguish types of anemia. To survey the statistical correlation existing between Hb and body mass index (BMI), Ccr, HbA1c, albuminuria or retinopathy, multiple regression analysis was performed. Serum EPO, Fe, TIBC, LDH and TB levels and number of reticulocytes and MCV were within normal limits. Multiple regression analysis disclosed that HbA1c, nephropathy evaluated by albuminuria and Ccr, and retinopathy has no concern with Hb level. There is only significant relationship between Hb levels and CVR-R. Similar results were obtained even if we analyzed a group of male and female separately. We conclude that CVR-R has the strong relationship on anemia without overt nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, indicating that autonomic failure contributes on the progression of anemia via a poor response of EPO to anemia.

  1. Neuropatia autonômica cardiovascular diabética: fatores de risco, impacto clínico e diagnóstico precoce Diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy: risk factors, clinical impact and early diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Clemente de Souza Pereira Rolim

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A neuropatia autonômica cardiovascular (NAC constitui uma das complicações de maior repercussão clínica do diabete melito (DM e, ao mesmo tempo, está entre as menos diagnosticadas. Nesta revisão, são discutidos os principais fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento e a progressão da NAC nos pacientes com DM, a história natural da neuropatia autonômica e seu impacto na doença cardiovascular do DM, bem como os testes para o diagnóstico precoce e o estadiamento da NAC na prática clínica. A pesquisa bibliográfica teve como base dois bancos de dados: Medline e Tripdatabase, com os seguintes descritores: diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy e cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetes. Os artigos de 1998 a 2007 em inglês e alemão foram selecionados. A NAC em estágios iniciais (precoce e intermediária pode ser diagnosticada e revertida, porém, nos casos avançados (estágio grave, resta apenas o tratamento sintomático. A NAC está associada a um maior índice de morbidade e mortalidade cardiovasculares e pior qualidade de vida nos indivíduos diabéticosCardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN is one of the most clinically significant complications of diabetes mellitus (DM, but one of the least frequently diagnosed. In this review, we discuss the major risk factors for the development and progression of CAN in patients with DM, the natural history of autonomic neuropathy and its impact on cardiovascular disease in DM, as well as the tests for the early diagnosis and staging of CAN in the clinical practice. The bibliographic research was based on two databases: Medline and Tripdatabase, with the following descriptors: diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetes. We selected English and German articles, written between 1998 and 2007. In its initial stages (early and intermediate, CAN may be diagnosed and reversed. However, in advanced cases (severe stage, the only

  2. Neuropatia vegetativa em pacientes com tolerância diminuída à glicose Autonomic neuropathy in patients with impaired glucose tolerance test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Freire Rezende

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinar se tolerância diminuída à glicose (TDG está associada a neuropatia vegetativa realizamos estudo transversal de que participaram 44 pacientes com intolerância a glicose (Grupo 1 os quais foram comparados com 43 indivíduos controles apresentando teste de tolerância à glicose normal (Grupo 2. Os pacientes de ambos os grupos, após aceitarem participar da pesquisa, eram submetidos a anamnese, exames clínico e laboratoriais e estudo da função vegetativa (intervalo QT, prova da arritmia sinusal, manobra de Valsalva e teste postural. Os pacientes com TDG apresentaram mais hipertensão arterial sistêmica, obesidade centrípeta, hiperglicemas de jejum e pós-prandiais e dislipidemias que os controles. O teste de arritmia sinusal estava alterado em 54,5% dos grupo 1 e em 32,5% do grupo 2. A manobra de Valsalva foi anormal em 34,1% no grupo 1 e em 7% dos controles (p=0,004. A prova postural não foi diferente nos dois grupos. O comprometimento do sistema neurovegetativo foi mais freqüente nos pacientes com TDG que nos controles. A maior freqüência de fatores de risco para doença aterosclerótica cardiovascular e o concomitante comprometimento do sistema nervoso vegetativo nos pacientes com TDG podem ser os responsáveis pelas elevadas taxas de letalidade devida a vasculopatias observadas nessa população.Impaired glucose tolerance (1GT is a clinical situation characterized by mild hyperglicemia, which is estimated to afflict 7.8% of the Brazilian population. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common: complication in diabetes mellitus and it is related to morbidity and lethality in this disease. The associatior between IGT and peripheral neuropathy is still a matter of great concern. PURPOSE AND METHOD: In order to determine if IGT is associated with autonomic neuropathy a cross-sectional study in 44 patients with impaired glucose tolerance test (Group 1 was performed. The patients were compared to 43 control

  3. Simvastatin-induced cardiac autonomic control improvement in fructose-fed female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Juliana da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Because autonomic dysfunction has been found to lead to cardiometabolic disorders and because studies have reported that simvastatin treatment has neuroprotective effects, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin treatment on cardiovascular and autonomic changes in fructose-fed female rats. METHODS: Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls (n=8, fructose (n=8, and fructose+ simvastatin (n=8. Fructose overload was induced by supplementing the drinking water with fructose (100 mg/L, 18 wks. Simvastatin treatment (5 mg/kg/day for 2 wks was performed by gavage. The arterial pressure was recorded using a data acquisition system. Autonomic control was evaluated by pharmacological blockade. RESULTS: Fructose overload induced an increase in the fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels and insulin resistance. The constant rate of glucose disappearance during the insulin intolerance test was reduced in the fructose group (3.4+ 0.32%/min relative to that in the control group (4.4+ 0.29%/min. Fructose+simvastatin rats exhibited increased insulin sensitivity (5.4+0.66%/min. The fructose and fructose+simvastatin groups demonstrated an increase in the mean arterial pressure compared with controls rats (fructose: 124+2 mmHg and fructose+simvastatin: 126 + 3 mmHg vs. controls: 112 + 2 mmHg. The sympathetic effect was enhanced in the fructose group (73 + 7 bpm compared with that in the control (48 + 7 bpm and fructose+simvastatin groups (31+8 bpm. The vagal effect was increased in fructose+simvastatin animals (84 + 7 bpm compared with that in control (49 + 9 bpm and fructose animals (46+5 bpm. CONCLUSION: Simvastatin treatment improved insulin sensitivity and cardiac autonomic control in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome in female rats. These effects were independent of the improvements in the classical plasma lipid profile and of reductions in arterial pressure. These results

  4. Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder ...

  5. Metabolic and cardiac autonomic effects of high-intensity resistance training protocol in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Deus, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Claudio Ricardo; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Baldissera, Vilmar; da Silva, Carlos Alberto; Rossi, Bruno Rafael Orsini; de Sousa, Hugo Celso Dutra; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of metabolic and autonomic nervous control on high-intensity resistance training (HRT) as determined by pancreatic glucose sensitivity (GS), insulin sensitivity (IS), blood lactate ([La]), and heart rate variability (HRV) in rats. Thirty male, albino Wistar rats (292 ± 20 g) were divided into 3 groups: sedentary control (SC), low-resistance training (LRT), and HRT. The animals in the HRT group were submitted to a high-resistance protocol with a progressively increasing load relative to body weight until exhaustion, whereas the LRT group performed the same exercise regimen with no load progression. The program was conducted 3 times per week for 8 weeks. The [La], parameters related to the functionality of pancreatic tissue, and HRV were measured. There was a significant increase in peak [La] only in the HRT group, but there was a reduction in [La] when corrected to the maximal load in both trained groups (LRT and HRT, p < 0.05). Both trained groups exhibited an increase in IS; however, compared with SC and LRT, HRT demonstrated a significantly higher GS posttraining (p < 0.05). With respect to HRV, the low-frequency (LF) band, in milliseconds squared, reduced in both trained groups, but the high-frequency band, in milliseconds squared and nu, increased, and the LF in nu, decreased only in the HRT group (p < 0.05). The HRT protocol produced significant and beneficial metabolic and cardiac autonomic adaptations. These results provide evidence for the positive benefits of HRT in counteracting metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:22067239

  6. Cardiac Organ Damage and Arterial Stiffness in Autonomic Failure: Comparison With Essential Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Valeria; Maule, Simona; Di Stefano, Cristina; Tosello, Francesco; Totaro, Silvia; Veglio, Franco; Milan, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic failure (AF) is characterized by orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, and increased blood pressure (BP) variability. AF patients develop cardiac organ damage, similarly to essential hypertension (EH), and have higher arterial stiffness than healthy controls. Determinants of cardiovascular organ damage in AF are not well known: both BP variability and mean BP values may be involved. The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac organ damage, arterial stiffness, and central hemodynamics in AF, compared with EH subjects with similar 24-hour BP and a group of healthy controls, and to evaluate determinants of target organ damage in patients with AF. Twenty-seven patients with primary AF were studied (mean age, 65.7±11.2 years) using transthoracic echocardiography, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, central hemodynamics, and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. They were compared with 27 EH subjects matched for age, sex, and 24-hour mean BP and with 27 healthy controls. AF and EH had similar left ventricular mass (101.6±33.3 versus 97.7±28.1 g/m(2), P=0.59) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (9.3±1.8 versus 9.2±3.0 m/s, P=0.93); both parameters were significantly lower in healthy controls (Phypertensive heart disease and increased arterial stiffness, similar to EH with comparable mean BP values. Twenty-four-hour and nighttime systolic BP were determinants of cardiovascular damage, independent of BP variability.

  7. Evaluation of the autonomic neuropathy function immediately after a change to upright posture using the impulse response function; Impulse oto kansu wo mochiita shisei henkan katoki ni okeru jiritsu shinkei kino hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, K. [Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Moyoshi, M.; Takata, K. [Daido Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Watanabe, Y. [Toyota College of Technology, Aichi (Japan)

    1997-05-20

    Autonomic neuropathy function immediately after a change to upright posture has been evaluated by applying transient response function of the system to the blood regulation system. The impulse response function was determined from the change in heart rate before postural change to the upright posture, and was compared with the transient change immediately after a change to the upright posture. The time series of R-R interval of electrocardiogram was used as the time series of the change in heart rate. To determine the impulse response function, an autoregressive model was applied to the R-R interval time series. The impulse response function at the steady state is a transient reaction at the impulse stimulation added to the blood regulation system. The R-R interval decreases rapidly by the autonomic neuropathy reaction in which the blood is rapidly transferred into the legs immediately after a change to upright posture. There is a close correlation between the initial temporary decrease in R-R interval and the impulse response function derived from the change in heart rate immediately after a change to the upright posture. Accordingly, the blood regulation and autonomic neuropathy functions can be evaluated by the impulse response function without actual standing test and load of tested persons. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Alteration of cardiac autonomic function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goit, Rajesh K; Jha, Santosh K; Pant, Bhawana N

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if heart rate variability (HRV) showed any changes in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy in comparison with controls. Sixty-five patients with epilepsy (38 males and 27 females), aged 30-50 years, who had never previously received treatment with antiepileptic drugs were eligible for inclusion in this study. Resting electrocardiogram (ECG) at spontaneous respiration was recorded for 5 min in supine position. Time-domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, and Poincare plot of HRV were recorded from ECG In time-domain measures, the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals (RMSSD) and percentage of consecutive RR intervals that differ by more than 50 msec (pNN50) were significantly less in patients with epilepsy. In frequency-domain measures, high frequency [(HF) msec(2)], HF (nu), and low frequency [LF (msec(2))] were significantly less in patients with epilepsy while LF (nu) and LF/HF were significantly high in patients with epilepsy. In Poincare plot, standard deviation perpendicular to line of Poincare plot (SD1) and standard deviation along the line of entity in Poincare plot (SD2) were significantly less in patients with epilepsy. Our results suggest that epileptic patients have an impact on the cardiac autonomic function as measured by HRV.

  9. Exercise training improves cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in type 1 diabetic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ki Ok; Moritani, Toshio; Woo, Jinhee; Jang, Ki Soeng; Bae, Ju Yong; Yoo, Jaeho; Kang, Sunghwun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect exercise training has on cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) and cardiovascular risk profiles in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). [Subjects] Fifteen type 1 DM children (all boys; 13.0±1.0 years of age) were enrolled in the study. [Methods] The subjects received exercise training three times a week in a 12-week program. Each child was asked to walk on a treadmill to achieve an exercise intensity of VO2max 60%. ANS activity was measured by power spectral analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Blood samples were obtained for serum lipid profiles. To evaluate Doppler-shifted Fourier pulsatility index (PI) analysis, a 5-MHz continuous wave Doppler (VASCULAB D10) set was used to measure forward blood flow velocity (FLOW) in the radial artery. [Results] Total and low-frequency (LF) power of heart rate variability increased significantly after exercise intervention. Total cholesterol (TC) levels were significant lower after exercise intervention. Total and high-frequency (HF) power were significantly correlated with higher TC levels, but diastolic blood pressure and HF was significantly correlated with lower TC levels. [Conclusion] Regular exercise intervention should be prescribed for children with type 1 DM.

  10. Frontal midline theta rhythm is correlated with cardiac autonomic activities during the performance of an attention demanding meditation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Y; Sato, W; Toichi, M; Murai, T; Okada, T; Hayashi, A; Sengoku, A

    2001-04-01

    Frontal midline theta rhythm (Fm theta), recognized as distinct theta activity on EEG in the frontal midline area, reflects mental concentration as well as meditative state or relief from anxiety. Attentional network in anterior frontal lobes including anterior cingulate cortex is suspected to be the generator of this activity, and the regulative function of the frontal neural network over autonomic nervous system (ANS) during cognitive process is suggested. However no studies have examined peripheral autonomic activities during Fm theta induction, and interaction of central and peripheral mechanism associated with Fm theta remains unclear. In the present study, a standard procedure of Zen meditation requiring sustained attention and breath control was employed as the task to provoke Fm theta, and simultaneous EEG and ECG recordings were performed. For the subjects in which Fm theta activities were provoked (six men, six women, 48% of the total subjects), peripheral autonomic activities were evaluated during the appearance of Fm theta as well as during control periods. Successive inter-beat intervals were measured from the ECG, and a recently developed method of analysis by Toichi et al. (J. Auton. Nerv. Syst. 62 (1997) 79-84) based on heart rate variability was used to assess cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic functions separately. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic indices were increased during the appearance of Fm theta compared with control periods. Theta band activities in the frontal area were correlated negatively with sympathetic activation. The results suggest a close relationship between cardiac autonomic function and activity of medial frontal neural circuitry.

  11. Leprosy neuropathy: clinical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2013-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious peripheral neuropathy caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The different clinical presentations of the disease are determined by the quality of the host immune response. Early detection of leprosy and treatment by multidrug therapy are the most important steps in preventing deformity and disability. Thus the early recognition of the clinical leprosy presentation is essential. Mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex (MM), polyneuritis (MM summation) are the most frequent. The frequent anesthetic skin lesions are absent in the pure neuritic leprosy presentation form. Isolated peripheral nerve involvement is common, including the cranial ones. Arthritic presentation is occasionally seen, usually misdiagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis. Attention should be given to autonomic dysfunctions in leprosy. There are clinical presentations with severe neuropathic pain - painful small-fiber neuropathy. Leprous late-onset neuropathy (LLON) clinical presentation should be considered facing a patient who develop an inflammatory neuropathy many years after a previous skin leprosy treatment. PMID:24141500

  12. Systematic morphology and evolutionary anatomy of the autonomic cardiac nervous system in the lesser apes, gibbons (hylobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Thorington, Richard W; Kunimatsu, Yutaka; Whatton, James F

    2008-08-01

    We examined the morphology of the autonomic cardiac nervous system (ACNS) on 20 sides of 10 gibbons (Hylobatidae) of three genera, and we have inferred the evolution of the anatomy of the primate ACNS. We report the following. (1) Several trivial intraspecific and interspecific variations are present in gibbons, but the general arrangement of the ACNS in gibbons is consistent. (2) Although the parasympathetic vagal cardiac nervous system is extremely consistent, the sympathetic cardiac nervous system, such as the composition of the sympathetic ganglia and the range of origin of the sympathetic cardiac nerves, exhibit topographical differences among primates. (3) The vertebral ganglion, seldom observed in the Old World monkeys (Cercopithecidae), was consistently present in gibbons as well as in humans. (4) There are fewer thoracic ganglia contributing to the cervicothoracic ganglion in humans than in gibbons and in gibbons than in Old World monkeys. (5) The superior cardiac nerve originating from the superior cervical ganglion, rarely observed in Old World monkeys but commonly observed in humans, was present in 13 of 20 sides (65%), mostly on the left. Accordingly, the ACNS morphology exhibits evolutionary changes within the primate lineage. These evolutionary differences between Old World monkeys, gibbons, and humans are most parsimoniously interpreted as resulting from regular changes in the lineages leading from their common ancestor to the extant species that we dissected. They include the reduction in the number of thoracic ganglia contributing to the cervicothoracic ganglion and the expansion of the range of the cardiac nervous origin.

  13. Transthyretin Val30Met Mutation in an African American with Cardiac Amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze, P. Christian; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old African American individual who presented with recurrent diarrhea and progressive exercise intolerance. Gastroenterologic studies demonstrated delayed intestinal transit and neurologic testing showed peripheral sensory and autonomic neuropathy. Cardiovascular assessment revealed concentric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and preserved LV function. Renal function was impaired in the absence of anemia. Cardiac...

  14. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: prevalence and estimated risk of coronary heart disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, O; Arildsen, H; Damsgaard, E M;

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in Type 1 diabetes mellitus in the general population and to assess the relationship between CAN and risk of future coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: The Type 1 diabetes mellitus...... population in the municipality of Horsens, Denmark, was delineated by the prescription method and a random sample of 120 diabetics aged 40-75 years was recruited. Type 1 diabetes mellitus was registered if fasting C-peptide was below 0.30 nmol L(-1). The E/I ratio was calculated as the mean of the longest R......, was computed. Additionally, the 10-year risk of CHD was calculated using the Framingham model. RESULTS: A total of 84 people responded, of whom 71 had Type 1 diabetes mellitus. The E/I ratio was measured in 69 people. The prevalence of CAN expressed as an E/I ratio below the normal 5th percentile was 38...

  15. A new method of assessing cardiac autonomic function and its comparison with spectral analysis and coefficient of variation of R-R interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toichi, M; Sugiura, T; Murai, T; Sengoku, A

    1997-01-12

    A new non-linear method of assessing cardiac autonomic function was examined in a pharmacological experiment in ten healthy volunteers. The R-R interval data obtained under a control condition and in autonomic blockade by atropine and by propranolol were analyzed by each of the new methods employing Lorenz plot, spectral analysis and the coefficient of variation. With our method we derived two measures, the cardiac vagal index and the cardiac sympathetic index, which indicate vagal and sympathetic function separately. These two indices were found to be more reliable than those obtained by the other two methods. We anticipate that the non-invasive assessment of short-term cardiac autonomic function will come to be performed more reliably and conveniently by this method.

  16. The effects of different styles of musical auditory stimulation on cardiac autonomic regulation in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Adriano L; Valenti, Vitor E; Guida, Heraldo L; Campos, Mônica F; Knap, André; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Ferreira, Celso; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The literature investigated the effects of chronic baroque music auditory stimulation on the cardiovascular system. However, it lacks in the literature the acute effects of different styles of music on cardiac autonomic regulation. To evaluate the acute effects of baroque and heavy metal music on heart rate variability (HRV) in women. The study was performed in 21 healthy women between 18 and 30 years old. We excluded persons with previous experience with music instrument and those who had affinity with the song styles. All procedures were performed in the same sound-proof room. We analyzed HRV in the time (standard deviation of normal-to-normal respiratory rate (RR) intervals, root-mean square of differences between adjacent normal RR intervals in a time interval, and the percentage of adjacent RR intervals with a difference of duration greater than 50 ms) and frequency (low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF], and LF/HF ratio) domains. HRV was recorded at rest for 10 min. Subsequently they were exposed to baroque or heavy metal music for 5 min through an earphone. After the first music exposure they remained at rest for more 5 min and them they were exposed again to baroque or heavy metal music. The sequence of songs was randomized for each individual. The power analysis provided a minimal number of 18 subjects. Shapiro-Wilk to verify normality of data and analysis of variance for repeated measures followed by the Bonferroni test for parametric variables and Friedman's followed by the Dunn's post-test for non-parametric distributions. During the analysis of the time-domain indices were not changed. In the frequency-domain analysis, the LF in absolute units was reduced during the heavy metal music stimulation compared to control. Acute exposure to heavy metal music affected the sympathetic activity in healthy women. PMID:23771427

  17. Acute Auditory Stimulation with Different Styles of Music Influences Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Ap. F. da Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: No clear evidence is available in the literature regarding the acute effect of different styles of music on cardiac autonomic control. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the acute effects of classical baroque and heavy metal musical auditory stimulation on Heart Rate Variability (HRV in healthy men. Patients and Methods: In this study, HRV was analyzed regarding time (SDNN, RMSSD, NN50, and pNN50 and frequency domain (LF, HF, and LF / HF in 12 healthy men. HRV was recorded at seated rest for 10 minutes. Subsequently, the participants were exposed to classical baroque or heavy metal music for five minutes through an earphone at seated rest. After exposure to the first song, they remained at rest for five minutes and they were again exposed to classical baroque or heavy metal music. The music sequence was random for each individual. Standard statistical methods were used for calculation of means and standard deviations. Besides, ANOVA and Friedman test were used for parametric and non-parametric distributions, respectively. Results: While listening to heavy metal music, SDNN was reduced compared to the baseline (P = 0.023. In addition, the LF index (ms2 and nu was reduced during exposure to both heavy metal and classical baroque musical auditory stimulation compared to the control condition (P = 0.010 and P = 0.048, respectively. However, the HF index (ms2 was reduced only during auditory stimulation with music heavy metal (P = 0.01. The LF/HF ratio on the other hand decreased during auditory stimulation with classical baroque music (P = 0.019. Conclusions: Acute auditory stimulation with the selected heavy metal musical auditory stimulation decreased the sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation on the heart, while exposure to a selected classical baroque music reduced sympathetic regulation on the heart.

  18. Cardiac autonomic recovery after a single session of resistance exercise with and without vascular occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Nilo M; Pedro, Rafael E; Leicht, Anthony S; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the heart rate variability (HRV) after resistance training with and without vascular occlusion. It was hypothesized that low intensity (LI) with vascular occlusion (LIO) would elicit comparable postexercise HRV responses with that of high intensity (HI) without vascular occlusion. Nine subjects undertook 4 experimental sessions of leg press exercise on different days: (a) 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test, (b) 4 sets of 8 repetitions + 1 set until exhaustion at 80% of 1RM without vascular occlusion (HI), (c) 4 sets of 16 repetitions + 1 set until exhaustion at 40% of 1RM with vascular occlusion (LIO), and (d) 4 sets of 16 repetitions + 1 set with the number of repetitions equal to the last set of LIO but at 40% of 1RM without vascular occlusion (LI). Heart rate variability was analyzed 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 5 hours, and 24 hours after the HI, LIO, and LI sessions. The HI session increased the heart rate (HR) and reduced the root mean square of the successive difference of R-R intervals (RMSSD) and log-transformed high-frequency (lnHF) power during prolonged recovery (HR = 5 hours; RMSSD = 30 minutes; lnHF = 1 hour) at a greater magnitude when compared with LIO and LI. Despite the same intensity of exercise for LIO and LI, the occlusion delayed the recovery of HR and HRV variables. Postexercise blood lactate concentration was moderate to strongly correlated with peak HR (r = 0.87), RMSSD (r = -0.64), and lnHF (r = -0.68). This study has demonstrated that LIO was able to reduce cardiac autonomic stress when compared with HI. PMID:24077384

  19. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET]. Progress report, September 1991--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.

  20. Examining the role of TRPA1 in air pollution-induced cardiac arrhythmias and autonomic imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we describe how air pollution causes cardiac arrhythmogenesis through sensory irritation in the airways. Time-series studies show the risk of adverse cardiac events increases significantly in the hours to days after expos...

  1. Toxic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic neuropathies generally result in length dependent axonal neuropathy with the exception of diphtheria and a few toxic neuropathies. In spite of occurrence of diphtheria in India there is paucity of published reports on diphtheritic neuropathy. Arsenic neuropathy commonly occurs in Bengal and Bangladesh because of ground water contamination whereas in Punjab it is due to contamination of opium. Lead neuropathy is rare and has been reported in battery workers and silver refining workers. It produces motor neuropathy resulting in foot drop and wrist drop. Organophosphates are used as pesticides, industrial chemicals and food adulterant. Certain organophosphates such as triorthocresyl phosphate used for or oil adulteration inhibit neurotoxic esterase and result in a delayed type of axonal neuropathy. Alcohol related neuropathy is a controversial issue whether it is due to alcohol related toxicity or due to nutritional deficiencies. Indian studies have revealed that neuropathy occurs both in alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Hexane neuropathy is reported in screen printers and these cases highlight the need for better preventive and occupational measures. Iatrogenic toxic neuropathies have been reported with cisplatin and vincristine. Because of geographical, occupational and health related conditions toxic neuropathies are likely to be more common than reported and greater awareness is needed.

  2. Itopride hydrochloride efficacy in the management of delayed gastric emptying in type 1 diabetis mellitus patients in the presence of autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Yur’evna Budennaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AimEvaluation of the itopride (Ganaton®, Abbot therapy efficacy in the management of gastrointestinal (GI symptoms and gastric motor function (GMF in type 1 diabetis mellitus (T1DM patients (pts in the presence of GMF dysfunction and other forms of diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN.Materials and MethodsThe total of 34 patients with T1DM, GMF dysfunction and DAN were selected for randomized, prospective, open-label, comparative study. The duration of the study was 6 weeks. The study group (17 pts received itopride 150 mg total daily. The control group (17 pts did not receive any treatment for GMF. А questionnaire was used for the assessment of gastrointestinal (GI symptoms. Gastric emptying velocity was evaluated with 13C-octanoate breath test.ResultsAs a result of itopride therapy there was a statistically significant decrease in the amount of time (T1/2 needed for the gastric emptying. The median amount of time decreased from 89.0 [82.3; 101.0] min to 53.0 [82.3; 101.0] min (p<0.001; decrease of the incidents of gastroesophageal reflux (p=0.013 and symptoms of intestinal dyspepsia (p=0.005. In control group there was no change in parameters. There was no positive dynamics of glycaemic control parameters (fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, fructosamine, and no reduction in the frequency of hypoglycaemic episodes during the test in any of the groups.ConclusionsItopride therapy in T1DM patients with GMF dysfunction and DAN in the total daily dose of 150 mg improves gastric emptying velocity. This therapy also improves symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and intestinal dyspepsia. Improvement GMF doesn’t lead to positive dynamics of glycaemic control parameters.

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  4. 糖尿病自主神经病变的非线性预测分析%Nonlinear predictability analysis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王清; 李永勤; 邓亲恺

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Researches on the diagnosis and detection methods of diabetic autonomic neuropathy(DAN) is very weak at present.OBJECTIVE: To get the data about the degree of autonomic neuropathy by using the nonlinear heart rate variability(HRV) so as to provide clinical evidence for the early diagnosis of DAN.DESIGN: A single sample study.SETTINGS: Computer department in a university; Staff room of medical physics of department of biomedical engineering in a university.PARTICIPANTS: The experiment was completed in the Staff Room of Medical Physics, Department of Biomedical Engineering in the First Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from March to May 2002. Thirty-four diabetic patients, including 22 with DAN complications, were selected from the inpatients of Department of Endocrinology in the Affiliated Nanfang Hospital of the First Military Medical University of PLA, and other 40 normal subjects, who were from the faculty in the First Military Medical University of Chinese PLA and students in the Department of Physical Education, Chinese PLA Institute of Physical Education, were taken as the controls. The R wave to R wave intervals(RRI) time series is sampled and corrected to 512 points for analysis.INTERVENTIONS: Based on the virtual instrumental workbench-LabVIEW, 74 standard adjacent RRI signals were selected from 34 diabetic patients and 40 normal cases, and then analyzed with the method of nonlinear predictability.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Collective and analytical results of the 74 standard adjacent RRI signals.RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the diabetic patients without DAN and the controls by the analysis with normalized mean square error(NMSE) NMSE ( P = 0. 075 ), but the significant difference between the DAN patients and the controls( P = 0. 001) . While significant analysis between the diabetic patients without DAN complications and the controls was significant by the analysis of mean absolute error(MAE) (P = 0. 007 and P = 0

  5. Effects of psychological stress test on the cardiac response of public safety workers: alternative parameters to autonomic balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that public safety workers (PSW) face many stressful situations that yield them as high-risk population for suffering chronic stress diseases. In this multidisciplinary research the cardiac response to induced psychological stress by a short duration Stroop test was evaluated in 20 female and 19 male PSW, in order to compare traditionally used cardiac response parameters with alternative ones. Electrocardiograms have been recorded using the Eindhoven electrodes configuration for 1 min before, 3 min during and 1 min after the test. Signals analysis has been performed for the heart rate and the power spectra of its variability and of the variability of the amplitude of the R-wave, i.e. the highest peak of the electrocardiographic signal periodic sequence. The results demonstrated that the traditional autonomic balance index shows no significant differences between stages. In contrast, the median of the area of the power spectrum of the R-wave amplitude variability in the frequency region dominated by the autonomous nervous system (0.04-to-0.4 Hz) is the more sensitive parameter. Moreover, this parameter allows to identify gender differences consistent with those encountered in other studies

  6. Blood pressure and cardiac autonomic modulation at rest, during exercise and recovery time in the young overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Alves de Araújo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to assess the blood pressure (BP, cardiac autonomic modulation at rest, in physical exercise and in the recovery in untrained eutrophic (E and overweight (O youth. The body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, systolic BP-SBP (E: 109.80 ± 10.05; O: 121.85 ± 6.98 mmHg and diastolic BP - DBP (E: 65.90 ± 7.28; O: 73.14 ± 12.22 mmHg were higher in overweight and the heart rate recovery (%HRR was lower as compared with E volunteers. The BMI was associated with SBP (r= 0.54, DBP (r= 0.65, load on the heart rate variability threshold - HRVT (r= -0.46, %HRR 2' (r= -0.48 and %HRR 5' (r= -0.48, and WC was associated with SBP (r= 0.54, DBP (r= 0.64 and HRR 2' (r= -0.49. The %HRR was associated to SBP, DBP and HRVT. In summary, the anthropometric variables, BP and cardiac autonomic modulation in the recovery are altered in overweight youth.

  7. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery, heart rate variability and QT dynamicity parameters in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dural, Muhammet; Kabakcı, Giray; Cınar, Neşe; Erbaş, Tomris; Canpolat, Uğur; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Aytemir, Kudret

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. However, there is little data regarding cardiac autonomic functions in these patients. Herein, we aimed to investigate several parameters of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with acromegaly compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 20 newly diagnosed acromegalic patients (55% female, age:45.7 ± 12.6 years) and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent 24 h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting 1st, 2nd and 3rd minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV) and QT dynamicity analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar except diabetes mellitus and hypertension among groups. Mean HRR1 (29.2 ± 12.3 vs 42.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.001), HRR2 (43.5 ± 15.6 vs 61.1 ± 10.8, p = 0.001) and HRR3 (46.4 ± 16.2 vs 65.8 ± 9.8, p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. HRV parameters as, SDNN [standard deviation of all NN intervals] (p = 0.001), SDANN [SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals] (p = 0.001), RMSSD [root square of successive differences in RR interval] (p = 0.001), PNN50 [proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms] (p = 0.001) and high-frequency [HF] (p = 0.001) were significantly decreased in patients with acromegaly; but low frequency [LF] (p = 0.046) and LF/HF (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in acromegaly patients. QTec (p = 0.009), QTac/RR slope (p = 0.017) and QTec/RR slope (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly. Additionally, there were significant negative correlation of disease duration with HRR2, HRR3, SDNN, PNN50, RMSSD, variability index. Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in patients with acromegaly. Further large scale studies are needed to exhibit the prognostic significance of impaired autonomic functions in patients with

  8. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG. EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG. Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them.

  9. Simvastatin-induced cardiac autonomic control improvement in fructose-fed female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Juliana da Silva; Nathalia Bernardes; Janaina de O. Brito; Iris Callado Sanches; Maria Cláudia Irigoyen; Kátia de Angelis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because autonomic dysfunction has been found to lead to cardiometabolic disorders and because studies have reported that simvastatin treatment has neuroprotective effects, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin treatment on cardiovascular and autonomic changes in fructose-fed female rats. METHODS: Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls (n=8), fructose (n=8), and fructose+ simvastatin (n=8). Fructose overload was induced...

  10. Cardiac autonomic imbalance by social stress in rodents: understanding putative biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Susan K Wood, Phd

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to stress or traumatic events can lead to the development of depression and anxiety disorders. In addition to the debilitating consequences on mental health, patients with psychiatric disorders also suffer from autonomic imbalance, making them susceptible to a variety of medical disorders. Emerging evidence utilizing spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), a reliable non-invasive measure of cardiovascular autonomic regulation, indicates that patients with depression and va...

  11. Painful peripheral neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bo; Xu-sheng HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy (PPN) is characterized by neuropathic pain (NP), which is accompanied by dysfunction of motor, sensory and autonomic nervous system. It always involves small nerve fibers, including A δ and C fibers. PPN can be classified into two types according to etiology: hereditary and acquired. Pain of PPN can manifest as spontaneous pain and stimulus-evoked pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia and hyperpathia). The manifestation of typical cases is length-dependent, which firstly...

  12. Neuropatia sensitiva e autonômica herditátia tipo II: a propósito de dois casos Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2: two cases report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Luiz Sanvito

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Dois casos de neuropatia sensitiva e autonômica hereditária do tipo 2 são descritos. Este tipo de neuropatia faz parte de um grupo constituído por cinco entidades diferentes. A sistematização destas neuropatias depende de múltiplos critérios como idade de início, aspectos genéticos, manifestações clínicas, aspectos eletroneuromiográficos e patológicos. Neste relato descrevemos dois irmãos com 27 e 35 anos de idade que foram acompanhados em nosso Serviço, com quadro de insensibilidade à dor e conseqüentes deformidades de membros e distúrbios sensitivo-tróficos. Para estes pacientes foi definido o diagnóstico de neuropatia sensitiva e autonômica hereditária do tipo 2, com modalidade de transmissão hereditária autossômica recessiva. A idade de início do quadro, os aspectos hereditários, as manifestações clínicas e os aspectos eletroneuromiográficos são analisados. O diagnóstico diferencial com outras neuropatias sensitivas hereditárias e adquiridas é considerado.Two cases of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 are reported. This type of neuropathy is included in a group that consists of five different entities. The systematization of that neuropathies depends on multiple criteria such as age of beginning, genetic aspects, clinical manifestations, eletroneuromyographic and pathologic features. In this report we describe the cases in a family, two brothers, 27 and 35 years old that were observed in our department with pain insensibility and consequent sensitive-trophic disturbs and deformity of members. The diagnoses was defined as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 and an inherited pattern recessive autossomic transmission was considered. The age of beginning, the hereditary aspects, the clinical manifestations and the eletroneuromyographic features are analysed. The differential diagnoses with other sensory hereditary and acquired neuropathies is emphasized.

  13. Taking pain out of NGF: a "painless" NGF mutant, linked to hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type V, with full neurotrophic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Capsoni

    Full Text Available During adulthood, the neurotrophin Nerve Growth Factor (NGF sensitizes nociceptors, thereby increasing the response to noxious stimuli. The relationship between NGF and pain is supported by genetic evidence: mutations in the NGF TrkA receptor in patients affected by an hereditary rare disease (Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathy type IV, HSAN IV determine a congenital form of severe pain insensitivity, with mental retardation, while a mutation in NGFB gene, leading to the aminoacid substitution R100W in mature NGF, determines a similar loss of pain perception, without overt cognitive neurological defects (HSAN V. The R100W mutation provokes a reduced processing of proNGF to mature NGF in cultured cells and a higher percentage of neurotrophin secreted is in the proNGF form. Moreover, using Surface Plasmon Resonance we showed that the R100W mutation does not affect NGF binding to TrkA, while it abolishes NGF binding to p75NTR receptors. However, it remains to be clarified whether the major impact of the mutation is on the biological function of proNGF or of mature NGF and to what extent the effects of the R100W mutation on the HSAN V clinical phenotype are developmental, or whether they reflect an impaired effectiveness of NGF to regulate and mediate nociceptive transmission in adult sensory neurons. Here we show that the R100 mutation selectively alters some of the signaling pathways activated downstream of TrkA NGF receptors. NGFR100 mutants maintain identical neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties in a variety of cell assays, while displaying a significantly reduced pain-inducing activity in vivo (n = 8-10 mice/group. We also show that proNGF has a significantly reduced nociceptive activity, with respect to NGF. Both sets of results jointly contribute to elucidating the mechanisms underlying the clinical HSAN V manifestations, and to clarifying which receptors and intracellular signaling cascades participate in the pain

  14. Cardiac autonomic imbalance by social stress in rodents: understanding putative biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Wood, Phd

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to stress or traumatic events can lead to the development of depression and anxiety disorders. In addition to the debilitating consequences on mental health, patients with psychiatric disorders also suffer from autonomic imbalance, making them susceptible to a variety of medical disorders. Emerging evidence utilizing spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV, a reliable noninvasive measure of cardiovascular autonomic regulation, indicates that patients with depression and various anxiety disorders (i.e., panic, social, generalized anxiety disorders, and post traumatic stress disorder are characterized by decreased HRV. Social stressors in rodents are ethologically relevant experimental stressors that recapitulate many of the dysfunctional behavioral and physiological changes that occur in psychological disorders. In this review, evidence from clinical studies and preclinical stress models identify putative biomarkers capable of precipitating the comorbidity between disorders of the mind and autonomic dysfunction. Specifically, the role of corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y and inflammation are investigated. The impetus for this review is to highlight stress-related biomarkers that may prove critical in the development of autonomic imbalance in stress -related psychiatric disorders.

  15. Methods of investigation for cardiac autonomic dysfunction in human research studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, Luciano; Spallone, Vincenza; Stevens, Martin;

    2011-01-01

    reviewed the limitations and strengths of the available diagnostic approaches for CAN and the need for developing new tests for autonomic function. It was concluded that the most sensitive and specific approaches currently available to evaluate CAN in clinical research are: 1) heart rate variability, 2...

  16. Method to measure autonomic control of cardiac function using time interval parameters from impedance cardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.H.; Boesveldt, S.; Elbertse, E.; Berendse, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    The time difference between the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram can be considered as a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activities of the heart. This time interval, characterized by the pre-ejection period (PEP), is related to the sympathetic autonomous ner

  17. Diabetic neuropathy part 1: overview and symmetric phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Kluding, Patricia; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy in United States and neuropathies are the most common complication of diabetes mellitus, affecting up to 50% of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Symptoms usually include numbness, tingling, pain, and weakness. Dizziness with postural changes can be seen with autonomic neuropathy. Metabolic, vascular, and immune theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Axonal damage and segmental demyelination can be seen with diabetic neuropathies. Management of diabetic neuropathy should begin at the initial diagnosis of diabetes and mainly requires tight and stable glycemic control.

  18. Cardiac autonomic functions and the emergence of violence in a highly realistic model of social conflict in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozsef eHaller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the multitude of factors that can transform human social interactions into violent conflicts, biological features received much attention in recent years as correlates of decision making and aggressiveness especially in critical situations. We present here a highly realistic new model of human aggression and violence, where genuine acts of aggression are readily performed and which at the same time allows the parallel recording of biological concomitants. Particularly, we studied police officers trained at the International Training Centre (Budapest, Hungary, who are prepared to perform operations under extreme conditions of stress. We found that aggressive arousal can transform a basically peaceful social encounter into a violent conflict. Autonomic recordings show that this change is accompanied by increased heart rates, which was associated earlier with reduced cognitive complexity of perceptions (attentional myopia and promotes a bias towards hostile attributions and aggression. We also observed reduced heart rate variability in violent subjects, which is believed to signal a poor functioning of prefrontal-subcortical inhibitory circuits and reduces self-control. Importantly, these autonomic particularities were observed already at the beginning of social encounters i.e. before aggressive acts were initiated, suggesting that individual characteristics of the stress-response define the way in which social pressure affects social behavior, particularly the way in which this develops into violence. Taken together, these findings suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are valuable external symptoms of internal motivational states and decision making processes, and raise the possibility that behavior under social pressure can be predicted by the individual characteristics of stress responsiveness.

  19. Network representation of cardiac interbeat intervals for monitoring restitution of autonomic control for heart transplant patients

    CERN Document Server

    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Makowiec, Joanna Danuta; Kryszewski, Stanislaw; Graff, Beata; Wdowczyk-Szulc, Joanna; Buchnowiecka, Marta Zarczynska-; Gruchala, Marcin; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The aim is to present the ability of a network of transitions as a nonlinear tool providing a graphical representation of a time series. This representation is used for cardiac RR-intervals in follow-up observation of changes in heart rhythm of patients recovering after heart transplant.

  20. The effects of chewing versus caffeine on alertness, cognitive performance and cardiac autonomic activity during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Mark; Pavy, Alan; van den Heuvel, Cameron

    2006-12-01

    Chewing has been shown to alleviate feelings of sleepiness and improve cognitive performance during the day. This study investigated the effect of chewing on alertness and cognitive performance across one night without sleep as well as the possible mediating role of cardiac autonomic activity. Fourteen adults participated in a randomized, counterbalanced protocol employing a chewing, placebo and caffeine condition. Participants completed tasks assessing psychomotor vigilance, tracking, grammatical reasoning, alertness and sleepiness each hour across the night. All participants received either placebo or caffeine (200 mg), while the chewing condition also chewed on a tasteless and odorless substance for 15 min each hour. Heart rate (HR), root mean square of the successive differences in R-R intervals on the ECG (RMSSD), and preejection period (PEP) were simultaneously recorded. Alertness and cognitive performance amongst the chewing condition did not differ or were in fact worse when compared with placebo. Similarly, measures of HR and RMSSD remained the same between these two conditions; however, PEP was reduced in the later part of the night in the chewing condition compared with a relative increase for placebo. Caffeine led to improved speed and accuracy on cognitive tasks and increased alertness when compared with chewing. Relative increases in RMSSD and reductions in HR were demonstrated following caffeine; however, no change in PEP was seen. Strong associations between cardiac parasympathetic activity and complex cognitive tasks, as well as between subjective alertness and simpler cognitive tasks, suggest a differential process mediating complex versus simple cognitive performance during sleep deprivation.

  1. [Hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Calvo, Judith; Ghorab, Karima; Tazir, Meriem

    2008-11-15

    Although there are many human hereditary neuropathies, most of them with the exception of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy, are rare. Irrespective of their type, the mode of transmission may be autosomal dominant or recessive, or X-linked. The most difficult to diagnose, however, are the sporadic forms. It is customary to distinguish the cases in which the neuropathy is the sole clinical expression from multisystemic diseases where neuropathy is one component of multi-organ involvement. The complexity and the multiplicity of genes involved and the lack of understanding of their exact functions hinder logical presentation of these hereditary neuropathies. For understandable technical reasons, the stage of specific treatment, namely the repair of the mutated gene, has yet to be attained.

  2. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and cardiac autonomic responses to transrectal examination differ with behavioral reactivity in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L; Kézér, F L; Kulcsár-Huszenicza, M; Ruff, F; Szenci, O; Jurkovich, V

    2016-09-01

    Behavior, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity were evaluated in response to transrectal examination in nonlactating Holstein-Friesian cows with different behavioral reactivity. According to behavioral reactions shown to the procedure of fixing the heart rate (HR) monitors, the 20 cows with the highest and the 20 cows with the lowest behavioral reactivity were involved in the study (high responder, n=20; and low responder, n=20, respectively). Activity of the ANS was assessed by HR and HR variability parameters. Blood and saliva were collected at 5 min before (baseline) and 0, 5 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 60, and 120 min after the examination to determine cortisol concentrations. The examination lasted for 5 min. Cardiac parameters included HR, the root mean square of successive differences between the consecutive interbeat intervals, the high frequency (HF) component of heart rate variability, and the ratio between the low frequency (LF) and HF parameter (LF/HF). Following the examination, peak plasma and saliva cortisol levels and the amplitude of the plasma and saliva cortisol response were higher in high responder cows than in low responders. Areas under the plasma and saliva cortisol response curves were greater in high responder cows. Plasma and salivary cortisol levels correlated significantly at baseline (r=0.91), right after examination (r=0.98), and at peak levels (r=0.96). Area under the HR response curve was higher in low responder cows; however, maximum HR and the amplitude of the HR response showed no differences between groups. Minimum values of both parameters calculated for the examination were higher in high responders. Following the examination, response parameters of root mean square of successive differences and HF did not differ between groups. The maximum and the amplitude of LF/HF response and area under the LF/HF response curve were lower in low responder cows, suggesting a lower sympathetic

  3. Clinical diagnosis of diabetic polyneuropathy with the diabetic neuropathy symptom and diabetic neuropathy examination scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Lefrandt, J.D.; Links, T.P.; Smit, J.A.; Stewart, R.E.; van der Hoeven, J.H.; Hoogenberg, K.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the discriminative power of the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS) and Diabetic Neuropathy Examination (DNE) scores for diagnosing diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP), as well as their relation with cardiovascular autonomic function testing (cAFT) and electro-diagnostic studies (EDS

  4. Reduced cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing: A heritable vulnerability trait in patients with schizophrenia and their healthy first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Yeh, Chin-Bin; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-09-30

    Reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV) has been observed in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives, suggesting genetic predispositions. However, findings have not been consistent. We assessed cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing in first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia (n=45; 26 female; aged 39.69±14.82 years). Data were compared to healthy controls (n=45; 26 female; aged 38.27±9.79 years) matched for age, gender, body mass index and physical activity as well as to unmedicated patients with acute schizophrenia (n=45; 25 female; aged 37.31±12.65 years). Electrocardiograms were recorded under supine resting and deep-breathing conditions (10-12breaths/min). We measured HRV components including variance, low-frequency (LF) power, which may reflect baroreflex function, high-frequency (HF) power, which reflects cardiac parasympathetic activity, and LF/HF ratio, which may reflect sympatho-vagal balance. Patients rather than relatives exhibited lower resting-state HRV (variance, LF, and HF) than controls. As expected, deep breathing induced an increase in variance and HF-HRV in controls. However, such a response was significantly reduced in both patients and their relatives. In conclusion, the diminished cardiac autonomic reactivity to deep breathing seen in patients and their unaffected relatives indicates that this pattern of cardiac autonomic dysregulation may be regarded as a genetic trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:27442977

  5. Focal and multifocal diabetic neuropathies Neuropatia diabética focal e multifocal

    OpenAIRE

    Gérard Said

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common neuropathy in industrialized countries, with a remarkable range of clinical manifestations. The vast majority of the patients with clinical diabetic neuropathy have a distal symmetrical form that progress following a fiber-length dependent pattern, with predominant sensory and autonomic manifestations. This pattern of neuropathy is associated with a progressive distal axonopathy. Patients are exposed to trophic changes in the feet, pains and autonomic di...

  6. Transthyretin V122I amyloidosis with clinical and histological evidence of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, A S; Pelayo-Negro, A L; Jaunmuktane, Z; Scalco, R S; Hutt, D; Evans, M R B; Heally, E; Brandner, S; Holton, J; Blake, J; Whelan, C J; Wechalekar, A D; Gillmore, J D; Hawkins, P N; Reilly, M M

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease manifesting with predominant peripheral and autonomic neuropathy; cardiomyopathy, or both. ATTR V122I is the most common variant associated with non-neuropathic familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. We present an unusual case of V122I amyloidosis with features of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy, supported by histological confirmation in both sites and diffuse tracer uptake on (99m)Tc-3,3-Diphosphono-1,2-Propanodicarboxylic acid (DPD) scintigraphy throughout skeletal and cardiac muscle. A 64 year old Jamaican man presented with cardiac failure. Cardiac MR revealed infiltrative cardiomyopathy; abdominal fat aspirate confirmed the presence of amyloid, and he was homozygous for the V122I variant of transthyretin. He also described general weakness and EMG demonstrated myopathic features. Sural nerve and vastus lateralis biopsy showed TTR amyloid. The patient is being treated with diflunisal, an oral TTR stabilising agent. Symptomatic myopathy and neuropathy with confirmation of tissue amyloid deposition has not previously been described. Extracardiac amyloidosis has implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25819286

  7. [Hereditary peripheral neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Tazir, Mériem; Calvo, Judith; Funalot, Benoît

    2009-09-01

    Currently more than 30 genes are known to be responsible for genetically determined neuropathies. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most frequent of these hereditary neuropathies, with a prevalence of 4.7 to 36 per 100 000. In its demyelinating forms (CMT1), approximately 70% of cases are associated with a duplication of the PMP22gene. In its axonal forms (CMT2), 10-20% of the cases may be associated with a mutation of the MFN2gene. For North African patients with recessive transmission, a mutation of the LMNA gene must be sought. It is essential to stress the great variability of the phenotype--clinical, electrophysiological, and histologic--between and within families. A detailed analysis of these criteria, together with consideration of ethnic origin, may guide the search for the causal mutation. Whether the case involves certainly hereditary transmission or a sporadic form, it is desirable to be able to examine the maximum number of the patient's kin, both clinically and electrophysiologically. The forms with recessive transmission usually have a very early onset and are more serious than the dominant forms. The early- and very early-onset forms of CMT are increasingly better distinguished: congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (mutations of PMP22, MPZ or EGR2), or more axonal forms, including SMARD1 (Spinal muscle atrophy with respiratory distress; mutations of IGHMBP2) and EOHMSN (Early-onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy; mutations of MFN2). The prevention of cutaneous (ulcerations), bone, and amputation complications is very important in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, because of the severity of the sensory disorders.

  8. Auditory Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... field differ in their opinions about the potential benefits of hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other technologies for people with auditory neuropathy. Some professionals report that hearing aids and personal listening devices such as frequency modulation (FM) systems are ...

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injury (trauma) to a nerve, tumors, toxins, autoimmune responses, nutritional deficiencies, alcoholism, medical procedures, and vascular and metabolic disorders. Acquired peripheral neuropathies are caused by systemic disease, trauma from external agents, or infections or autoimmune disorders ...

  10. Heart rate variability and the anxious client: cardiac autonomic and behavioral associations with therapeutic alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Trisha; Meara, Alan; Psychotherapy, M Gestalt; Lal, Sara

    2014-08-01

    This exploratory study was designed to investigate the link between a client's heart rate variability (HRV) and the forming of a therapeutic alliance (TA) during psychotherapy. Change in HRV is associated with many psychological and physiological situations, including cardiac mortality. Cardiac effects were evaluated during therapy in 30 symptomatically anxious clients using HRV during six weekly 1-hour therapy sessions (S1-S6). Therapeutic index (TI), a measure of TA, was evaluated using skin conductance resonance between client and therapist. The Working Alliance Inventory provides a subjective measure of TA. State and trait anxiety and mood states were also assessed. Most HRV parameters were highest during S4. The sympathovagal balance was highest in S1 but stabilized after S2. In S4, TI was linked to high HRV parameters. Overall higher anxiety levels seem to be associated to lower HRV parameters. Conversely, in S4, high HRV parameters were linked to higher mood scores. This study found that a subjective measure of TA contradicted the physiological outcome. Results suggest that physiological data collected during therapy are a more accurate barometer of TA forming. These research findings suggest a need for further research identifying physiological markers in clients with a variety of mental health disorders over long-term therapy. PMID:25010104

  11. A study on cardiac autonomic modulation during pregnancy by non-invasive heart rate variability measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritesh Hariprasad Gandhi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Remarkable and uncontrollable changes with modification during pregnancy are connected with the autonomic control and consequently with the heart rate variability (HRV. Heart rate variability is a sum of different mechanisms and if pregnancy is a state of change, these modifications could be extracted from HRV analysis. Objective: To assess the effect of pregnancy on heart rate variability among pregnant mothers during first trimester of pregnancy and third trimester of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: HRV was measured for 5 minutes of continuous recording of electrocardiogram (ECG lead II, using windows based HRV analysis system variowin-HR after obtaining permission from the Institutional Review Board of Government Medical College, Bhavnagar and written consent from 30 pregnant subjects and 30 non-pregnant control subjects at autonomic function lab, Dept of Physiology, Bhavnagar. Result: Frequency domain parameters, very low frequency (VLF, low frequency (LF, high frequency (HF and HF normalized unit (nu were significantly decreased and LF (nu and LF/HF significantly increased in pregnant subject in 3 rd trimester as compared to their 1 st trimester of pregnancy. Time Domain parameters like SDNN, RMSSD, SDSD, NN50 count, pNN50, SD1/SD2, triangular HRV index and average R-R interval were significantly decreased during 3 rd trimester of pregnancy. Conclusion: The inhibition of resting parasympathetic activity or vagal blockage and an increment of the sympathetic modulation during the 3 rd third trimester of gestation in pregnancy as compared to their 1 st trimester and healthy non-pregnant subjects. Sympathovagal imbalance and abnormally low HRV may more pronounce during later stage of normal pregnancy.

  12. Evaluation of cardiac autonomic nerves by iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and ambulatory electrocardiography in patients after arterial switch operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Hajime; Maeda, Masanobu; Miyahara, Ken [Shakaihoken Chukyo Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [and others

    2000-05-01

    The autonomic cardiac nerves reach the heart after passing through the vicinity of the aortic root and the pulmonary trunk. The arterial switch operation (ASO) completely transects the ascending aorta and the pulmonary trunk. Therefore, this surgical procedure virtually denerves the heart. Cardiac sympathetic denervation and reinnervation were evaluated in patients after ASO using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy and parasympathetic denervation and reinnervation using ambulatory electrocardiography [Holter electrocardiogram (ECG)]. MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 14 patients who underwent ASO (ASO group) and 3 patients who underwent other open heart surgery (control group). All patients in the ASO group underwent the operation in the neonatal or infantile period. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of the myocardium were obtained. Defect score was determined by the SPECT images as a semi-quantitative index. The mean interval between ASO and MIBG scintigraphy was 25.6{+-}14.6 months. Holter ECG was also performed in 14 patients in the ASO group and 19 age-matched normal children. The Holter ECGs were plotted on a Lorenz plot. The H index, which is related to vagal tone for the cardiovascular system, was calculated from the R-R intervals. The mean interval between the ASO and Holter ECG was 8.3{+-}9.7 months. MIBG scintigraphy in the control group demonstrated an almost normal homogeneous tracer uptake, but showed extremely reduced tracer uptake and significantly higher defect score in the ASO group. The extent and degree of the reduction of MIBG uptake improved with time after the ASO. The heart-to-mediastinum MIBG count ratio tended to increase with time. The H index of the ASO group was lower than that of normal children (<12 months: Control group 0.0280{+-}0.0068 vs ASO group 0.0219{+-}0.0083), and gradually increased with time (1-3 years: 0.0470{+-}0.0157 vs 0.0314{+-}0.0124). (author)

  13. DISORDERS OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE: FOCUS ON THE ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Akhmedova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV in patients with ischemic heart disease, a life-threatening heart rhythm disorders, as well as diabetes mellitus (DM is considered. A significant association between the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system and death from cardiovascular causes is identified. The reactions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS can serve as a precipitating factor of arrhythmias in patients with heart disorders. Analysis of HRV at rest is the main and informative method for determination of the ANS disorders. HRV decreases greatly in patients with acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmia, and DM, predicting a high risk of death. The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is cardiac autonomic neuropathy, with the development of "silent" ischemia and painless myocardial infarction. Autonomic regulation of the heart rate should be assessed for early diagnosis and prevention of complications in the form of sudden death.

  14. DISORDERS OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE: FOCUS ON THE ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Akhmedova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV in patients with ischemic heart disease, a life-threatening heart rhythm disorders, as well as diabetes mellitus (DM is considered. A significant association between the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system and death from cardiovascular causes is identified. The reactions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS can serve as a precipitating factor of arrhythmias in patients with heart disorders. Analysis of HRV at rest is the main and informative method for determination of the ANS disorders. HRV decreases greatly in patients with acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmia, and DM, predicting a high risk of death. The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is cardiac autonomic neuropathy, with the development of "silent" ischemia and painless myocardial infarction. Autonomic regulation of the heart rate should be assessed for early diagnosis and prevention of complications in the form of sudden death.

  15. Early atherosclerosis and cardiac autonomic responses to mental stress: a population-based study of the moderating influence of impaired endothelial function

    OpenAIRE

    Juonala Markus; Ravaja Niklas; Hintsa Taina; Hintsanen Mirka; Chumaeva Nadja; Raitakari Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute mental stress may contribute to the cardiovascular disease progression via autonomic nervous system controlled negative effects on the endothelium. The joint effects of stress-induced sympathetic or parasympathetic activity and endothelial function on atherosclerosis development have not been investigated. The present study aims to examine the interactive effect of acute mental stress-induced cardiac reactivity/recovery and endothelial function on the prevalence of c...

  16. Discrimination between Healthy and Sick Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System by Detrended Heart Rate Variability Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yu; Levitan, J; Havlin, S; Saermark, K; Moelgaard, H; Bloch-Thomsen, P E

    1998-01-01

    Multiresolution Wavelet Transform and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis have been recently proven as excellent methods in the analysis of Heart Rate Variability, and in distinguishing between healthy subjects and patients with various dysfunctions of the cardiac nervous system. We argue that it is possible to obtain a distinction between healthy subjects/patients of at least similar quality by, first, detrending the time-series of RR-intervals by subtracting a running average based on a local window with a length of around 32 data points, and then, calculating the standard deviation of the detrended time-series. The results presented here indicate that the analysis can be based on very short time-series of RR-data (7-8 minutes), which is a considerable improvement relative to 24-hours Holter recordings.

  17. MOMORDICA CHARANTIA PROTECTS AGAINST CARDIAC DAMAGE IN STREPTOZOTOCIN-INDUCED DIABETIC WISTAR RATS

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Komolafe; D. A. Ofusori; O. S Adewole; A. O Ayoka; Abiodun, A A

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important world health problems, especially in developing countries where prevalence and incidence rates are highest. Diabetic patients are particularly prone to cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetic cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. The present study investigated the effects of Momordica charantia (M. charantia) on histological changes of the left ventricle of the heart in strept...

  18. Using the Initial Systolic Time Interval to assess cardiac autonomic function in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H. Meijer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI has been defined as the time difference between the peak electrical and peak mechanical activity of the heart. ISTI is obtained from the electro-cardiogram and the impedance cardiogram. The response of ISTI while breathing at rest and to a deep breathing stimulus was studied in a group of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD and a group of healthy control subjects. ISTI showed substantial variability during these manoeuvres. The tests showed that the variability of RR and ISTI was substantially different between PD patients and controls. It is hypothesized that in PD patients the sympathetic system compensates for the loss of regulatory control function of the blood-pressure by the parasympathetic system. It is concluded that ISTI is a practical, additional and independent parameter that can be used to assist other tests in evaluating autonomic control of the heart in PD patients.doi:10.5617/jeb.216 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 98-101, 2011

  19. Timing of obstetrical assistance affects peripartal cardiac autonomic function and early maternal behavior of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Levente; Kézér, Fruzsina Luca; Ruff, Ferenc; Szenci, Ottó

    2016-10-15

    Peripartal autonomic nervous system function and early maternal behavior were investigated in 79 multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows. Animals were allocated into four groups based on the technology of calving management: 1) unassisted calving in a group pen (UCG; N=19), 2) unassisted calving in an individual pen (UCI; N=21), 3) assisted calving with appropriately timed obstetrical assistance (ACA; N=20), and 4) assisted calving with premature obstetrical assistance (ACP; N=19). Heart rate, the high frequency (HF) component of heart rate variability (HRV) as a measure of vagal activity and the ratio between the low frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF ratio) as a parameter of sympathetic nervous system activity were calculated. Heart rate and HRV parameters were presented as areas under the curves (AUC) for the following periods: 1) prepartum period (between 96h before the onset of calving restlessness and the onset of restlessness), 2) parturition (between the onset calving restlessness and delivery), and 3) postpartum period (during a 48-h period after delivery). Pain-related behaviors were recorded during parturition (i.e., the occurrence of vocalization and stretching the neck towards the abdomen) and during a 2-h observation period after calving (i.e., the occurrence of vocalization, stretching the neck towards the abdomen and the duration of standing with an arched back). Early maternal behavior was observed during the first 2h following calving as follows: 1) latency and duration of sniffing calf's head/body, and 2) latency and duration of licking calf's head/body. No difference was found across groups in autonomic function before the onset of calving restlessness. Area under the heart rate curve was higher in ACP cows during parturition (39.6±2.5beats/min×h) compared to UCG, UCI and ACA animals (AUC=13.1±0.9beats/min×h, AUC=22.3±1.4beats/min×h and AUC=25.0±2.1beats/min×h, respectively). Area under the heart rate curve did not differ across the UCG

  20. Effects of autonomic balance and fluid and electrolyte changes on cardiac function in infarcted rats: A serial study of sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, N S; Dos-Santos, R C; Silveira, Anderson Luiz Bezerra da; R, Sonoda-Côrtes; Gantus, Michel Alexandre Villani; Fortes, F S; Olivares, Emerson Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Premenopausal women are known to show lower incidence of cardiovascular disease than men. During myocardial infarction (MI), homeostatic responses are activated, including the sympathetic autonomic nervous system and the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is related to the fluid and electrolyte balance, both aiming to maintain cardiac output. This study sought to perform a serial evaluation of sexual dimorphism in cardiac autonomic control and fluid and electrolyte balance during the development of MI-induced heart failure in rats. Experimental MI was induced in male (M) and female (F) adult (7-9 weeks of age) Wistar rats. The animals were placed in metabolic cages to assess fluid intake and urine volume 1 and 4 weeks after inducing MI (male myocardial infarction (MMI) and female myocardial infarction (FMI) groups). They subsequently underwent echocardiographic evaluation and spectral analysis of heart rate variability. After completing each protocol, the animals were killed for postmortem evaluation and histology. The MMI group showed earlier and more intense cardiac morphological and functional changes than the FMI group, although the extent of MI did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). The MMI group showed higher sympathetic modulation and sodium and water retention than the FMI group (P < 0.05), which may partly explain both the echocardiographic and pathological findings. Females subjected to infarction seem to show attenuation of sympathetic modulation, more favourable fluid and electrolyte balances, and better preserved cardiac function compared to males subjected to the same infarction model. PMID:26748814

  1. Effects of pentoxifylline and pentosan polysulphate combination therapy on diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laczy, Boglárka; Cseh, Judit; Mohás, Márton; Markó, Lajos; Tamaskó, Mónika; Koszegi, Tamás; Molnár, Gergo A; Wagner, Zoltán; Wagner, László; Wittmann, István

    2009-06-01

    Vascular dysfunction, including impaired perfusion has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications in diabetes mellitus. Both pentoxifylline (PF) and pentosan polysulphate (PPS) are known to improve microcirculation. Antioxidant and antiproteinuric effects of PF are also known. In a placebo-controlled study, we determined the possible efficacy of PF-PPS combination therapy on diabetic neuropathy and nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Patients in Verum group (n = 77) received PF-PPS infusions (100-100 mg/day) for 5 days. Control diabetics (Placebo group; n = 12) were given only saline infusions. Specialized cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests, vibration threshold values and urinary albumin excretion were assessed before and after therapy. In Verum group, autonomic score, indicating the severity of cardiac autonomic dysfunction, decreased after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Of the reflexes, deep breath and handgrip tests also improved after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Vibration threshold values, an indicator of the loss of sensory nerve function, were increased after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Results of cardiac autonomic tests and vibration threshold values remained unaltered in Placebo group. Majority of patients had normalbuminuria, which was not affected by PF-PPS. In conclusion, short-term PF-PPS therapy was effective on cardiovascular autonomic function and vibration perception, whereas it failed to reduce albuminuria within normal range in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:18839054

  2. Effects of pentoxifylline and pentosan polysulphate combination therapy on diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laczy, Boglárka; Cseh, Judit; Mohás, Márton; Markó, Lajos; Tamaskó, Mónika; Koszegi, Tamás; Molnár, Gergo A; Wagner, Zoltán; Wagner, László; Wittmann, István

    2009-06-01

    Vascular dysfunction, including impaired perfusion has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications in diabetes mellitus. Both pentoxifylline (PF) and pentosan polysulphate (PPS) are known to improve microcirculation. Antioxidant and antiproteinuric effects of PF are also known. In a placebo-controlled study, we determined the possible efficacy of PF-PPS combination therapy on diabetic neuropathy and nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Patients in Verum group (n = 77) received PF-PPS infusions (100-100 mg/day) for 5 days. Control diabetics (Placebo group; n = 12) were given only saline infusions. Specialized cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests, vibration threshold values and urinary albumin excretion were assessed before and after therapy. In Verum group, autonomic score, indicating the severity of cardiac autonomic dysfunction, decreased after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Of the reflexes, deep breath and handgrip tests also improved after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Vibration threshold values, an indicator of the loss of sensory nerve function, were increased after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Results of cardiac autonomic tests and vibration threshold values remained unaltered in Placebo group. Majority of patients had normalbuminuria, which was not affected by PF-PPS. In conclusion, short-term PF-PPS therapy was effective on cardiovascular autonomic function and vibration perception, whereas it failed to reduce albuminuria within normal range in type 2 diabetic patients.

  3. Painful peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Bo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Painful peripheral neuropathy (PPN is characterized by neuropathic pain (NP, which is accompanied by dysfunction of motor, sensory and autonomic nervous system. It always involves small nerve fibers, including A δ and C fibers. PPN can be classified into two types according to etiology: hereditary and acquired. Pain of PPN can manifest as spontaneous pain and stimulus-evoked pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia and hyperpathia. The manifestation of typical cases is length-dependent, which firstly involves the feet, and then progresses proximally and to the hands, presenting a glove-stock pattern. PPN can be either an isolated disease entity or part of other diseases. The former indicates idiopathic small fiber neuropathy (SFN, while the latter contains various diseases involving peripheral nerve fibers, including systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with other causes. The accessory examinations of PPN include quantitative sensory testing (QST, intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD, sympathetic skin response (SSR, etc. Among them, IENFD is the "golden standard" for SFN. The major therapeutic methods are to control primary diseases and relieve pain. Medications alleviating neuropathic pain consist of carbamazepine, pregabalin, gabapentin and amitriptyline, etc.

  4. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    C-11 hydroxy ephedrine, introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue, studies employing normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders was found to valuable as a nonadreneric tracer. Simultaneously, animal studies been used to assess its use following ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threohydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, we are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve our ability to identify abnormalides. We are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. We are developing radiopharmaceuticals, for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in our institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by, preliminary PET data.

  5. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    C-11 hydroxy ephedrine, introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue, studies employing normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders was found to valuable as a nonadreneric tracer. Simultaneously, animal studies been used to assess its use following ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threohydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, we are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve our ability to identify abnormalides. We are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. We are developing radiopharmaceuticals, for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in our institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by, preliminary PET data.

  6. Cardiac Coherence, Self-Regulation, Autonomic Stability and Psychosocial Well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollin eMcCraty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to alter one’s emotional responses is central to overall well-being and to effectively meeting the demands of life. One of the chief symptoms of events such as trauma, that overwhelm our capacities to successfully handle and adapt to them, is a shift in our internal baseline reference such that there ensues a repetitive activation of the traumatic event. This can result in high vigilance and over-sensitivity to environmental signals which are reflected in inappropriate emotional responses and autonomic nervous system dynamics. In this article we discuss the perspective that one’s ability to self-regulate the quality of feeling and emotion of one’s moment-to-moment experience is intimately tied to our physiology, and the reciprocal interactions among physiological, cognitive and emotional systems. These interactions form the basis of information processing networks in which communication between systems occurs through the generation and transmission of rhythms and patterns of activity. Our discussion emphasizes the communication pathways between the heart and brain, as well as how these are related to cognitive and emotional function and self-regulatory capacity. We discuss the hypothesis that self-induced positive emotions increase the coherence in bodily processes, which is reflected in the pattern of the heart’s rhythm. This shift in the heart rhythm in turn plays an important role in facilitating higher cognitive functions, creating emotional stability and facilitating states of calm. Over time, this establishes a new inner-baseline reference, a type of implicit memory that organizes perception, feelings and behavior. Without establishing a new baseline reference, people are at risk of getting stuck in familiar, yet unhealthy emotional and behavioral patterns and living their lives through the automatic filters of past familiar or traumatic experience.

  7. Physical therapy for airway clearance improves cardiac autonomic modulation in children with acute bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia P. Jacinto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effects of physical therapy on heart rate variability (HRV, especially in children, are still inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effects of conventional physical therapy (CPT for airway clearance and nasotracheal suction on the HRV of pediatric patients with acute bronchiolitis. METHOD: 24 children were divided into two groups: control group (CG, n=12 without respiratory diseases and acute bronchiolitis group (BG, n=12. The heart rate was recorded in the BG at four different moments: basal recording (30 minutes, 5 minutes after the CPT (10 minutes, 5 minutes after nasotracheal suction (10 minutes, and 40 minutes after nasotracheal suction (30 minutes. The CG was subjected to the same protocol, except for nasotracheal suction. To assess the HRV, we used spectrum analysis, which decomposes the heart rate oscillations into frequency bands: low frequency (LF=0.04-0.15Hz, which corresponds mainly to sympathetic modulation; and high frequency (HF=0.15-1.2Hz, corresponding to vagal modulation. RESULTS: Under baseline conditions, the BG showed higher values in LF oscillations, lower values in HF oscillations, and increased LF/HF ratio when compared to the CG. After CPT, the values for HRV in the BG were similar to those observed in the CG during basal recording. Five minutes after nasotracheal suction, the BG showed a decrease in LF and HF oscillations; however, after 40 minutes, the values were similar to those observed after application of CPT. CONCLUSIONS: The CPT and nasotracheal suction, both used for airway clearance, promote improvement in autonomic modulation of HRV in children with acute bronchiolitis.

  8. Timing of obstetrical assistance affects peripartal cardiac autonomic function and early maternal behavior of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Levente; Kézér, Fruzsina Luca; Ruff, Ferenc; Szenci, Ottó

    2016-10-15

    Peripartal autonomic nervous system function and early maternal behavior were investigated in 79 multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows. Animals were allocated into four groups based on the technology of calving management: 1) unassisted calving in a group pen (UCG; N=19), 2) unassisted calving in an individual pen (UCI; N=21), 3) assisted calving with appropriately timed obstetrical assistance (ACA; N=20), and 4) assisted calving with premature obstetrical assistance (ACP; N=19). Heart rate, the high frequency (HF) component of heart rate variability (HRV) as a measure of vagal activity and the ratio between the low frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF ratio) as a parameter of sympathetic nervous system activity were calculated. Heart rate and HRV parameters were presented as areas under the curves (AUC) for the following periods: 1) prepartum period (between 96h before the onset of calving restlessness and the onset of restlessness), 2) parturition (between the onset calving restlessness and delivery), and 3) postpartum period (during a 48-h period after delivery). Pain-related behaviors were recorded during parturition (i.e., the occurrence of vocalization and stretching the neck towards the abdomen) and during a 2-h observation period after calving (i.e., the occurrence of vocalization, stretching the neck towards the abdomen and the duration of standing with an arched back). Early maternal behavior was observed during the first 2h following calving as follows: 1) latency and duration of sniffing calf's head/body, and 2) latency and duration of licking calf's head/body. No difference was found across groups in autonomic function before the onset of calving restlessness. Area under the heart rate curve was higher in ACP cows during parturition (39.6±2.5beats/min×h) compared to UCG, UCI and ACA animals (AUC=13.1±0.9beats/min×h, AUC=22.3±1.4beats/min×h and AUC=25.0±2.1beats/min×h, respectively). Area under the heart rate curve did not differ across the UCG

  9. Autonomic cardiac regulation and morpho-physiological responses to eight week training preparation in junior soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Botek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training preparation in soccer is thought to improve body composition and performance level, especially the maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max. However, an enhancement in performance may be attenuated by the increase of fatigue. Heart rate variability (HRV as a non-invasive index of autonomic nervous system (ANS activity has been considered to be a sensitive tool in fatigue assessment. Objective: This study was focused to evaluate the response of ANS activity and morpho-physiological parameters to eight week training preparation. Methods: Study included 12 trained soccer players aged 17.2 ± 1.2 years. Athletes underwent pre- and post-preparation testing that included the ANS activity assessment by spectral analysis of HRV in supine and upright position. Further, body composition was analyzed via electrical bio-impedance method and physiological parameters were assessed during maximal stress tests. ANS activity and subjective feeling of fatigue was assessed continuously within subsequent weeks of preparation. Results: No significant differences in all HRV variables within weeks were found. Pre vs. post analyses revealed a significant (p < .05 increase in body weight, fat free mass, body mass index, and peak power. A significant decline in mean maximal heart rate (HR and resting HR at standing was identified at the end of preparation. Since no significant changes between pre- post-preparation in the mean VO2max occurred, the positive correlation between the individual change in VO2max and the vagally related HRV [supine LnHF (r = .78, Ln rMSSD (r = .63, and the standing LnHF (r = .73, p < .05] was found. Conclusions: This study showed that an 8 week training program modified particularly fat free mass and short-term endurance, whereas both the autonomic cardiac regulation and the feeling of fatigue remained almost unaffected. Standing position seems to be more sensitive in terms of the HR response in relation to fatigue

  10. Diagnosis and new treatments in genetic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, M M; Shy, M E

    2009-12-01

    The genetic neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases of which the most common types are Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies and the distal hereditary motor neuropathies. More than 30 causative genes have been described, making an accurate genetic diagnosis increasingly possible. Although no specific therapies are yet available, research into their pathogenesis has revolutionised our understanding of the peripheral nervous system and allowed the development of rational approaches to therapy. The first therapeutic trials in CMT are currently underway. This review will suggest an approach to the diagnosis of these disorders and provide an update on new therapies.

  11. Exposure to medium and high ambient levels of ozone causes adverse systemic inflammatory and cardiac autonomic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjomandi, Mehrdad; Wong, Hofer; Donde, Aneesh; Frelinger, Jessica; Dalton, Sarah; Ching, Wendy; Power, Karron; Balmes, John R

    2015-06-15

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to ozone increases cardiovascular morbidity. However, the specific biological mechanisms mediating ozone-associated cardiovascular effects are unknown. To determine whether short-term exposure to ambient levels of ozone causes changes in biomarkers of cardiovascular disease including heart rate variability (HRV), systemic inflammation, and coagulability, 26 subjects were exposed to 0, 100, and 200 ppb ozone in random order for 4 h with intermittent exercise. HRV was measured and blood samples were obtained immediately before (0 h), immediately after (4 h), and 20 h after (24 h) each exposure. Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 20 h after exposure. Regression modeling was used to examine dose-response trends between the endpoints and ozone exposure. Inhalation of ozone induced dose-dependent adverse changes in the frequency domains of HRV across exposures consistent with increased sympathetic tone [increase of (parameter estimate ± SE) 0.4 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.1 in low- to high-frequency domain HRV ratio per 100 ppb increase in ozone at 4 h and 24 h, respectively (P = 0.02 and P = 0.01)] and a dose-dependent increase in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) across exposures at 24 h [increase of 0.61 ± 0.24 mg/l in CRP per 100 ppb increase in ozone (P = 0.01)]. Changes in HRV and CRP did not correlate with ozone-induced local lung inflammatory responses (BAL granulocytes, IL-6, or IL-8), but changes in HRV and CRP were associated with each other after adjustment for age and ozone level. Inhalation of ozone causes adverse systemic inflammatory and cardiac autonomic effects that may contribute to the cardiovascular mortality associated with short-term exposure.

  12. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  13. Near-normoglycaemia and development of neuropathy: a 24-year prospective study from diagnosis of type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Dan; Behler, Margarete; Schroers-Teuber, Maria; Roden, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complete prevention of diabetic neuropathies has not been previously demonstrated. We sought to determine whether long-term near-normoglycaemia maintained from the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes is associated with polyneuropathy and cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Design Prospective observational study over 24 years. Setting Ambulatory care. Participants 32 newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes aged 20.3±1.0 years, duration of diabetes 2.7±0.3 weeks. Intervention Insulin therap...

  14. Comparing the accuracy of ES-BC, EIS-GS, and ES Oxi on body composition, autonomic nervous system activity, and cardiac output to standardized assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis JE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available John E Lewis1, Stacey L Tannenbaum1, Jinrun Gao3, Angelica B Melillo1, Evan G Long1, Yaima Alonso2, Janet Konefal1, Judi M Woolger2, Susanna Leonard1, Prabjot K Singh1, Lawrence Chen1, Eduard Tiozzo1 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 3State Farm Insurance, Bloomington, IL, USA Background and purpose: The Electro Sensor Complex (ESC is software that combines three devices using bioelectrical impedance, galvanic skin response, and spectrophotometry: (1 ES-BC (Electro Sensor-Body Composition; LD Technology, Miami, FL to assess body composition, (2 EIS-GS (Electro Interstitial Scan-Galvanic Skin; LD Technology to predict autonomic nervous system activity, and (3 ES Oxi (Electro Sensor Oxi; LD Technology to assess cardiac output. The objective of this study was to compare each to a standardized assessment: ES-BC to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, EIS-GS to heart rate variability, and ES Oxi to BioZ Dx Diagnostic System (BioZ Dx; SonoSite Inc, Bothell, WA. Patients and methods: The study was conducted in two waves. Fifty subjects were assessed for body composition and autonomic nervous system activity. Fifty-one subjects were assessed for cardiac output. Results: We found adequate relative and absolute agreement between ES-BC and DXA for fat mass (r = 0.97, P < 0.001 with ES-BC overestimating fat mass by 0.1 kg and for body fat percentage (r = 0.92, P < 0.001 with overestimation of fat percentage by 0.4%. For autonomic nervous system activity, we found marginal relative agreement between EIS-GS and heart rate variability by using EIS-GS as the predictor in a linear regression equation (adjusted R2 = 0.56, P = 0.03. For cardiac output, adequate relative and absolute agreement was found between ES Oxi and BioZ Dx at baseline (r = 0.60, P < 0.001, after the first exercise stage (r = 0.79, P < 0.001, and after the second exercise stage (r = 0.86, P

  15. Diabetic neuropathies: update on definitions, diagnostic criteria, estimation of severity, and treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Boulton, Andrew J M; Dyck, Peter J;

    2010-01-01

    Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13-18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates...... on classification, definitions, diagnostic criteria, and treatments of diabetic peripheral neuropathies (DPNs), autonomic neuropathy, painful DPNs, and structural alterations in DPNs....

  16. Scintigraphic differentiation between two forms of primary dysautonomia early after onset of autonomic dysfunction: value of cardiac and pulmonary iodine-123 MIBG uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system can be observed in patients with Parkinson's disease and those with multiple system atrophy. However, the fate of the two diseases differs considerably and leads to different strategies for patient management. Differentiation of the two diseases currently requires a combination of several clinical and electrophysiological tests. First studies of myocardial innervation using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) indicated a possible role of scintigraphy for this purpose. An increase in the pulmonary uptake of 123I-MIBG has been reported in secondary dysautonomias. Whether sympathetic innervation of the lung is affected in primary dysautonomias is currently unknown. Therefore, cardiac and pulmonary uptake of 123I-MIBG was studied in 21 patients with Parkinson's disease, 7 patients with multiple system atrophy and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. Thoracic images were obtained in the anterior view 4 h after intravenous injection of 185 MBq 123I-MIBG, at which time the maximum neuronal uptake is reached. All patients with Parkinson's disease had significantly lower cardiac uptake of 123I-MIBG than patients with multiple system atrophy and controls. Sympathetic innervation of the lung was not affected in either disease. It is concluded that scintigraphy with 123I-MIBG appears to be a useful tool for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy early after onset of autonomic dysfunction. (orig.)

  17. Scintigraphic differentiation between two forms of primary dysautonomia early after onset of autonomic dysfunction: value of cardiac and pulmonary iodine-123 MIBG uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, M.J.; Juengling, F.D.; Krause, T.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg University Hospital (Germany); Braune, S. [Dept. of Neurology, Freiburg University Hospital (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Primary dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system can be observed in patients with Parkinson's disease and those with multiple system atrophy. However, the fate of the two diseases differs considerably and leads to different strategies for patient management. Differentiation of the two diseases currently requires a combination of several clinical and electrophysiological tests. First studies of myocardial innervation using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) indicated a possible role of scintigraphy for this purpose. An increase in the pulmonary uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG has been reported in secondary dysautonomias. Whether sympathetic innervation of the lung is affected in primary dysautonomias is currently unknown. Therefore, cardiac and pulmonary uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG was studied in 21 patients with Parkinson's disease, 7 patients with multiple system atrophy and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. Thoracic images were obtained in the anterior view 4 h after intravenous injection of 185 MBq {sup 123}I-MIBG, at which time the maximum neuronal uptake is reached. All patients with Parkinson's disease had significantly lower cardiac uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG than patients with multiple system atrophy and controls. Sympathetic innervation of the lung was not affected in either disease. It is concluded that scintigraphy with {sup 123}I-MIBG appears to be a useful tool for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy early after onset of autonomic dysfunction. (orig.)

  18. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin–angiotensin system

    OpenAIRE

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, MarkW.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin–angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice defi...

  19. Critical illness neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuromuscular syndrome of acute limb and respiratory weakness that commonly accompanies patients with multi-organ failure and sepsis constitutes critical illness polyneuropathy. It is a major cause of difficulty in weaning off the patient from the ventilator after respiratory and cardiac causes have been excluded. It is usually an axonal motor-sensory polyneuropathy, and is usually associated with or accompanied with a coma producing septic encephalopathy. The neuropathy is usually not apparent until the patient′s encephalopathy has peaked, and may be noted only when the brain dysfunction is resolving. Patients usually have a protracted hospital course complicated by multi-organ failure and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Elevated serum glucose levels and reduced albumin are risk factors for nerve dysfunction, as is prolonged intensive care unit stay. Polyneuropathy may develop after only one week of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, but the frequency tends to correlate with the duration of the severe illness.

  20. Axonopathy in peripheral neuropathies: Mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landowski, Lila M; Dyck, P James B; Engelstad, JaNean; Taylor, Bruce V

    2016-10-01

    Peripheral neuropathies (PNs) are injuries or diseases of the nerves which arise from varied aetiology, including metabolic disease, trauma and drug toxicity. The clinical presentation depends on the type of neuropathy, and may include the loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions, or development of debilitating neuropathic pain distal to the injury site. It can be challenging to identify the aetiology of PNs, as the clinical syndromes are often indistinct. However, the mechanisms that underlie pathological changes in peripheral neuropathy are fundamentally different, depending on the trigger. This review focuses on the axonopathy observed in two frequently encountered forms of peripheral neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A key manifestation of axonopathy in PN is the degeneration of terminal arbors of peripheral nerves, resulting in a loss of epidermal nerve fibres and inappropriate termination of nerve endings. Many symptoms of PN arise from aberrant termination of nerve endings, and the underlying axonopathy may be non-reversible, as nerve regeneration after injury and disease is often poor, absent, or aberrant. Directed guidance of terminal arbors back into the epidermis is therefore a suggested approach to treat peripheral neuropathy. This review will outline potential strategies to enhance and guide axonal regeneration and reinnervation in the skin. Using diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy as specific examples, this review examines the setbacks encountered with the translation of growth factors into therapeutics for human neuropathy, and suggests a number of approaches for topical drug delivery.

  1. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H;

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal...

  2. Cardiac sympathetic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. Relationship between results of 123I-MIBG scintigraphy and autonomic nervous function evaluated by the Valsalva maneuver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined whether the results of 123I-MIBG scintigraphy reflect cardiac sympathetic nerve function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The subjects were 62 patients with PD (age, 65.4±6.3 years) and 53 controls (65.2±7.1 years). All subjects underwent 123I-MIBG scintigraphy and QTc interval measurement on electrocardiogram (ECG). Hemodynamic autonomic function was estimated by the Valsalva maneuver in 37 subjects (63.9±5.2 years) randomly selected from the patients with PD. As control, the Valsalva maneuver was also done in 20 randomly selected controls (64.1±5.0 years), and 123I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 21 controls (67.7±5.3 years old). The subjects rested in a supine position for 20 min and were given an intravenous injection of 111 MBq 123I-MIBG. Relative organ uptake was determined by the region of interest (ROI) in the anterior view and the ratio of average pixel count in the heart (H) to that in the mediastinum (M) was calculated (H/M ratio) for early (after 15 min) and delayed (after 3 hrs) periods. The Valsalva maneuver was done by having the subjects exhale into a mouthpiece at an expiratory pressure of 40 mmHg for 15 seconds. Blood pressure and RR intervals were measured during the Valsalva maneuver by tonometry, using a noninvasive blood pressure monitoring system (ANS 508, Nihon Colin Co., Ltd.). Baroreceptor reflex sensitivities (BRS) of the second phase (BRS II) and fourth phase (BRS IV) of the Valsalva maneuver were calculated, and blood pressure elevations during the late second phase (IIp) and fourth phase (IVp) were measured. QTc was greater in the patients with PD (417 ms) than in the control subjects (409 ms). The H/M ratios of the early and delayed images in the patients with PD (1.76, 1.61) were significantly lower than those in the control subjects (2.56, 2.45). The early and delayed H/M ratios significantly correlated with the severity of disease according to Hoehn-Yahr stage. QTc interval and IVp significantly

  3. Relationship Between Cardiac Autonomic Function of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Glucose Metabolism%2型糖尿病患者心脏植物神经功能改变与血糖代谢的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成功

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究2型糖尿病患者心脏植物神经功能改变与血糖代谢之间的关系。方法选取我院60例2型糖尿病患者,分别检测患者心脏植物神经功能和糖化血红蛋白水平,研究分析患者心脏植物神经功能改变与血糖代谢的关系。结果60例患者中心脏植物神经功能正常者糖化血红蛋白浓度为(6.2±1.2)%,异常者糖化血红蛋白浓度为(8.4±2.3)%,心脏植物神经功能异常者糖化血红蛋白浓度高于正常者(P<0.05),数据比较存在统计学差异。心脏植物神经功能严重病变患者糖化血红蛋白浓度均高于早期病变者和典型病变者(P<0.05),数据比较差异均存在统计学意义。结论2型糖尿病患者的心脏植物神经功能改变与其糖化血红蛋白浓度之间关系密切,及时、有效控制患者血糖,降低患者糖化血红蛋白浓度,对改善2型糖尿病患者心脏植物神经功能,减轻其心脏植物神经病变程度具有重要作用。%ObjectiveTo explore the relationship between type 2 cardiac autonomic function changes and glucose metabolism in diabetic patients.Methods 60 cases in our hospital patients with type 2 diabetes were detected in patients with cardiac autonomic function and glycated hemoglobin levels, the researchers analyzed the relationship between cardiac autonomic function changes with glucose metabolism.Results60 patients with normal cardiac autonomic function glycated hemoglobin concentration(6.2 ± 1.2)%,abnormal glycated hemoglobin concentration(8.4 ± 2.3)%,cardiac autonomic dysfunction glycated hemoglobin concentration was significantly higher than normal(P<0.05),there was significant difference data comparison. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with severe disease glycated hemoglobin concentration were higher than early lesions and typical lesions(P<0.05),the data were statistically significant differences. Conclusion The close relationship between

  4. Discrimination of the Healthy and Sick Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System by a New Wavelet Analysis of Heartbeat Intervals

    OpenAIRE

    Ashkenazy, Y.; Lewkowicz, M.; Levitan, J.; Moelgaard, H.; Thomsen, P. E. Bloch; Saermark, K.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to distinguish with a complete certainty between healthy subjects and patients with various dysfunctions of the cardiac nervous system by way of multiresolutional wavelet transform of RR intervals. We repeated the study of Thurner et al on different ensemble of subjects. We show that reconstructed series using a filter which discards wavelet coefficients related with higher scales enables one to classify individuals for which the method otherwise is inconclu...

  5. Discrimination of the Healthy and Sick Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System by a New Wavelet Analysis of Heartbeat Intervals

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yu; Levitan, J; Moelgaard, H; Bloch-Thomsen, P E; Saermark, K

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to distinguish with a complete certainty between healthy subjects and patients with various dysfunctions of the cardiac nervous system by way of multiresolutional wavelet transform of RR intervals. We repeated the study of Thurner et al on different ensemble of subjects. We show that reconstructed series using a filter which discards wavelet coefficients related with higher scales enables one to classify individuals for which the method otherwise is inconclusive. We suggest a delimiting diagnostic value of the standard deviation of the filtered, reconstructed RR interval time series in the range of $\\sim 0.035$ (for the above mentioned filter), below which individuals are at risk.

  6. Entrapment neuropathies III: lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Luis S; Bencardino, Jenny; Ghazikhanian, Varand; Beltran, Javier

    2010-11-01

    Clinicians frequently encounter compressive neuropathies of the lower extremity. The clinical history and physical examination, along with electrodiagnostic testing and imaging studies, lead to the correct diagnosis. The imaging characteristics of the compression neuropathies can include acute and chronic changes in the nerves and the muscles they innervate. We provide a detailed review of compression neuropathies of the lower extremity with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics. We discuss the clinical presentation, etiology, anatomical location, and MR imaging appearance of these neuropathies, including the piriformis syndrome, iliacus syndrome, saphenous neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meralgia paresthetica), proximal tibial neuropathy, common peroneal neuropathy, deep peroneal neuropathy, superficial peroneal neuropathy, tarsal tunnel syndrome, Baxter's neuropathy, jogger's foot, sural neuropathy, and Morton's neuroma. PMID:21072728

  7. Diabetic cardiomyopathy: from the pathophysiology of the cardiac myocytes to current diagnosis and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Voulgari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina Voulgari, Dimitrios Papadogiannis, Nicholas TentolourisFirst Department of Propaedeutic and Internal Medicine, Athens University Medical School, Laiko General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM, although a distinct clinical entity, is also a part of the diabetic atherosclerosis process. It may be independent of the coexistence of ischemic heart disease, hypertension, or other macrovascular complications. Its pathological substrate is characterized by the presence of myocardial damage, reactive hypertrophy, and intermediary fibrosis, structural and functional changes of the small coronary vessels, disturbance of the management of the metabolic cardiovascular load, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These alterations make the diabetic heart susceptible to ischemia and less able to recover from an ischemic attack. Arterial hypertension frequently coexists with and exacerbates cardiac functioning, leading to the premature appearance of heart failure. Classical and newer echocardiographic methods are available for early diagnosis. Currently, there is no specific treatment for DCM; targeting its pathophysiological substrate by effective risk management protects the myocardium from further damage and has a recognized primary role in its prevention. Its pathophysiological substrate is also the objective for the new therapies and alternative remedies.Keywords: cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, cardiac autonomic neuropathy, echocardiography, treatment strategies

  8. Measurement of the effect of Isha Yoga on cardiac autonomic nervous system using short-term heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Muralikrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beneficial effects of Yoga have been postulated to be due to modulation of the autonomic nervous system. Objective: To assess the effect of Isha Yoga practices on cardiovascular autonomic nervous system through short-term heart rate variability (HRV. Design of the Study: Short-term HRV of long-term regular healthy 14 (12 males and 2 females Isha Yoga practitioners was compared with that of age- and gender-matched 14 (12 males and 2 females non-Yoga practitioners. Methods and Materials: ECG Lead II and respiratory movements were recorded in both groups using Polyrite during supine rest for 5 min and controlled deep breathing for 1 minute. Frequency domain analysis [RR interval is the mean of distance between subsequent R wave peaks in ECG], low frequency (LF power, high frequency (HF power, LF normalized units (nu, HF nu, LF/HF ratio] and time domain analysis [Standard Deviation of normal to normal interval (SDNN, square of mean squared difference of successive normal to normal intervals (RMSSD, normal to normal intervals which are differing by 50 ms (NN50, and percentage of NN50 (pNN50] of HRV variables were analyzed for supine rest. Time domain analysis was recorded for deep breathing. Results: Results showed statistically significant differences between Isha Yoga practitioners and controls in both frequency and time domain analyses of HRV indices, with no difference in resting heart rate between the groups. Conclusions: Practitioners of Isha Yoga showed well-balanced beneficial activity of vagal efferents, an overall increased HRV, and sympathovagal balance, compared to non-Yoga practitioners during supine rest and deep breathing.

  9. Noninvasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system. Final progress report, December 24, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-31

    During the first year of funding, C-11 hydroxyephedrine has been introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue. Studies in normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders indicated the feasibility of this tracer for further evaluation. Simultaneously, animal studies have been used to assess the use of these radiopharmaceuticals in ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threo-hydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, the authors are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve their ability to identify abnormalities. They are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. In addition, they are participating in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in their institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by preliminary PET data. A compilation of all publications funded by this grant is presented in this report.

  10. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Van Boekel

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug.

  11. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions.

  12. Genetically determined optic neuropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal;

    2010-01-01

    The present review focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of hereditary optic neuropathies resulting from retinal ganglion cell degeneration, mostly due to mitochondrial dysfunctions.......The present review focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of hereditary optic neuropathies resulting from retinal ganglion cell degeneration, mostly due to mitochondrial dysfunctions....

  13. Axon Transport and Neuropathy: Relevant Perspectives on the Etiopathogenesis of Familial Dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are highly prevalent and are most often associated with chronic disease, side effects from chemotherapy, or toxic-metabolic abnormalities. Neuropathies are less commonly caused by genetic mutations, but studies of the normal function of mutated proteins have identified particular vulnerabilities that often implicate mitochondrial dynamics and axon transport mechanisms. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are a group of phenotypically related diseases caused by monogenic mutations that primarily affect sympathetic and sensory neurons. Here, I review evidence to indicate that many genetic neuropathies are caused by abnormalities in axon transport. Moreover, in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. There may be specific convergence on gene mutations that disrupt nerve growth factor signaling, upon which sympathetic and sensory neurons critically depend. PMID:26724390

  14. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits. PMID:27474733

  15. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: current perspective and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Kishore, Lalit; Kaur, Navpreet

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders with extremely complex pathophysiology and affects both somatic and autonomic components of the nervous system. Neuropathy is the most common chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. Metabolic disruptions in the peripheral nervous system, including altered protein kinase C activity, and increased polyol pathway activity in neurons and Schwann cells resulting from hyperglycemia plays a key role in the development of diabetic neuropathy. These pathways are related to the metabolic and/or redox state of the cell and are the major source of damage. Activation of these metabolic pathways leads to oxidative stress, which is a mediator of hyperglycemia induced cell injury and a unifying theme for all mechanisms of diabetic neuropathy. The therapeutic intervention of these metabolic pathways is capable of ameliorating diabetic neuropathy but therapeutics which target one particular mechanism may have a limited success. Available therapeutic approaches are based upon the agents that modulate pathogenetic mechanisms (glycemic control) and relieve the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. This review emphasizes the pathogenesis, presently available therapeutic approaches and future directions for the management of diabetic neuropathy.

  16. Modulation by Central MAPKs/PI3K/sGc of the TNF-α/iNOS-dependent Hypotension and Compromised Cardiac Autonomic Control in Endotoxic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Marwa Y; El-Gowilly, Sahar M; Abdel-Galil, Abdel-Galil A; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2016-08-01

    Reduced blood pressure (BP) and cardiac autonomic activity are early manifestations of endotoxemia. We investigated whether these effects are modulated by central mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and related phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) signaling in conscious rats. The effect of pharmacologic inhibition of these molecular substrates on BP, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) responses evoked by intravascular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 mg/kg) were assessed. LPS (1) lowered BP (2) increased HR, (3) reduced time [SD of beat-to-beat intervals (SDNN), and root mean square of successive differences in R-R intervals (rMSSD)], and frequency domain indices of HRV (total power and spectral bands of low and high-frequency), and (4) elevated serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. The inhibition of TNF-α (pentoxifylline) or inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, aminoguanidine) abolished hemodynamic, HRV, and inflammatory actions of LPS. Intracisternal (i.c.) injection of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor), and SP600125 (MAPKJNK inhibitor) mitigated the hypotensive and tachycardic actions of LPS but failed to affect associated decreases in HRV. MAPKp38 inhibition by i.c. SB203580 produced exactly opposite effects. None of the LPS effects was altered after i.c. PD98059 (MAPKERK1/2 inhibitor). Overall, central MAPKs/PI3K/sGC pathways variably contribute to the TNF-α/iNOS-dependent reductions in BP and HRV seen during endotoxic shock. PMID:27110744

  17. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized.

  18. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes.

  19. Electrodiagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    Electrodiagnostic studies are an important component of the evaluation of patients with suspected peripheral nerve disorders. The pattern of findings and the features that are seen on the motor and sensory nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography can help to identify the type of neuropathy, define the underlying pathophysiology (axonal or demyelinating), and ultimately help to narrow the list of possible causes. This article reviews the electrodiagnostic approach to and interpretation of findings in patients with peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Diabetic neuropathy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes and its complications in children continues to increase due to the rise in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although overt diabetic neuropathy is rarely present in children and adolescents with diabetes, subclinical diabetic neuropathy has been estimated to occur in approximately half of all children with type 1 diabetes with a duration of 5 years or longer and up to 25% of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed diabetes have abnormal findings on nerve conduction studies. The present review on the state of pediatric diabetic neuropathy covers the definition, prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk factors, and possible treatment approaches specific to children and adolescents with diabetes. It also highlights the many unknowns in this field. Nonetheless, new emerging interventions that can either prevent or delay the progression of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications may become available in the near future. Until specific interventions for diabetic neuropathy are available for use in children, it will be hard to justify screening for neuropathy other than through clinical assessment. Meanwhile, the search for quicker, easily administered, and quantifiable tests for diabetic neuropathy and efforts to establish valid pediatric norms for well-established measures used in adults will need to continue.

  1. Autonomic testing: common techniques and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Louis H

    2010-07-01

    Laboratories able to test autonomic function are increasingly available and rely on batteries of well-accepted, noninvasive tests. Tests of parasympathetic cardiovagal, sympathetic vasoconstriction, and sudomotor (sweating) function are most commonly employed. Common examples include heart rate variability to various challenges, Valsalva maneuver, standing and tilt-table studies, and various sudomotor methods. New techniques and technical refinements continue to be described. Most studies rely on perturbations of complex systems and not direct assessment. Testing has helped to improve disease recognition and prompted advances in classification, pathophysiology, and treatment. Major areas impacted include hereditary and immune-mediated autonomic neuropathy, diabetic autonomic neuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, Parkinson disease and other autonomic failure syndromes, orthostatic intolerance, and unexplained syncope. PMID:20592565

  2. Autonomic dysfunction in diabetes : a consequence of cardiovascular damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J; Zeebregts, C J; Gans, R O B; Hoogenberg, K H

    2010-01-01

    In 1976, D.J. Ewing showed a clear survival disadvantage for diabetic patients that had 'diabetic autonomic neuropathy', as assessed by heart rate and blood pressure variations during a battery of bedside tests. However, these variations do not solely depend on autonomic nervous system function, but

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset peripheral neuropathy is related to their exposure to Agent Orange or other herbicides during service when the disease ...

  4. Megaoesophagus due to acrylamide neuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Satchell, P M; McLeod, J G

    1981-01-01

    Greyhound dogs exposed to oral acrylamide for a period of eight weeks developed a sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy that had many features in common with acrylamide neuropathy seen in other species. Most of the animals also developed the clinical and radiological features of megaoesophagus. The association of neuropathy and megaoesophagus suggests that an axonopathy of the vagus may be an aetiological factor in this disorder.

  5. Bilateral optic neuropathy in a patient with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Jensen, Peter Koch; Fledelius, Hans Callø

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidogenic transthyretin (ATTR)-related familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal-dominant hereditary disease characterised by slowly progressive peripheral sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy and tissue involvement of the heart, kidneys and central nervous system. Secondary...... ATTR Val30Met mutation. After 11 years of ophthalmic follow-up best-corrected visual acuity was 20/100 in his seeing eye, which further had visual field findings suggestive of optic neuropathy. This was also the diagnosis underlying the preceding insidious full loss of vision in the fellow eye......, with colour Doppler imaging to support an ischaemic aetiology. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ischaemic optic neuropathy in this familial amyloid disorder....

  6. A study of autonomic function tests in obese people

    OpenAIRE

    Rinku Garg, Varun Malhotra, Neera Goel, Usha Dhar, Yogesh Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity is one of the common significant health hazards and is associated with autonomic dysfunction. Aims and objectives: The present study was designed to assess the underlying autonomic neuropathy in obese subjects and to compare it with age-matched controls. Material and Methods: Thirty obese subjects in the age group of 21-40 years were recruited for the study. Six non-invasive autonomic function tests were performed out of which four were based mainly on parasympathetic cont...

  7. PET and SPET tracers for mapping the cardiac nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human cardiac nervous system consists of a sympathetic and a parasympathetic branch with (-)-norepinephrine and acetylcholine as the respective endogenous neurotransmitters. Dysfunction of the cardiac nervous system is implicated in various types of cardiac disease, such as heart failure, myocardial infarction and diabetic autonomic neuropathy. In vivo assessment of the distribution and function of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic neurones with positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) can be achieved by means of a number of carbon-11-, fluorine-18-, bromine-76- and iodine-123-labelled tracer molecules. Available tracers for mapping sympathetic neurones can be divided into radiolabelled catecholamines, such as 6-[18F]fluorodopamine, (-)-6-[18F]fluoronorepinephrine and (-)-[11C]epinephrine, and radiolabelled catecholamine analogues, such as [123I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine, [11C]meta-hydroxyephedrine, [18F]fluorometaraminol, [11C]phenylephrine and meta-[76Br]bromobenzylguanidine. Resistance to metabolism by monoamine oxidase and catechol-O-methyl transferase simplifies the myocardial kinetics of the second group. Both groups of compounds are excellent agents for an overall assessment of sympathetic innervation. Biomathematical modelling of tracer kinetics is complicated by the complexity of the steps governing neuronal uptake, retention and release of these agents as well as by their high neuronal affinity, which leads to partial flow dependence of uptake. Mapping of cardiac parasympathetic neurones is limited by a low density and focal distribution pattern of these neurones in myocardium. Available tracers are derivatives of vesamicol, a molecule that binds to a receptor associated with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. Compounds like (-)-[18F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol display a high degree of non-specific binding in myocardium which restricts their utility for cardiac neuronal imaging. (orig.)

  8. PET and SPET tracers for mapping the cardiac nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, Oliver; Halldin, Christer [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, 17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-03-01

    The human cardiac nervous system consists of a sympathetic and a parasympathetic branch with (-)-norepinephrine and acetylcholine as the respective endogenous neurotransmitters. Dysfunction of the cardiac nervous system is implicated in various types of cardiac disease, such as heart failure, myocardial infarction and diabetic autonomic neuropathy. In vivo assessment of the distribution and function of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic neurones with positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) can be achieved by means of a number of carbon-11-, fluorine-18-, bromine-76- and iodine-123-labelled tracer molecules. Available tracers for mapping sympathetic neurones can be divided into radiolabelled catecholamines, such as 6-[{sup 18}F]fluorodopamine, (-)-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine and (-)-[{sup 11}C]epinephrine, and radiolabelled catecholamine analogues, such as [{sup 123}I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine, [{sup 11}C]meta-hydroxyephedrine, [{sup 18}F]fluorometaraminol, [{sup 11}C]phenylephrine and meta-[{sup 76}Br]bromobenzylguanidine. Resistance to metabolism by monoamine oxidase and catechol-O-methyl transferase simplifies the myocardial kinetics of the second group. Both groups of compounds are excellent agents for an overall assessment of sympathetic innervation. Biomathematical modelling of tracer kinetics is complicated by the complexity of the steps governing neuronal uptake, retention and release of these agents as well as by their high neuronal affinity, which leads to partial flow dependence of uptake. Mapping of cardiac parasympathetic neurones is limited by a low density and focal distribution pattern of these neurones in myocardium. Available tracers are derivatives of vesamicol, a molecule that binds to a receptor associated with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. Compounds like (-)-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol display a high degree of non-specific binding in myocardium which restricts their utility

  9. Asociación de la neuropatía autonómica cardiovascular y el intervalo QT prolongado con la morbimortalidad cardiovascular en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Association of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and prolonged QT interval with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Ticse Aguirre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de evaluar la relación entre la neuropatía autonómica cardiovascular (NACV y el intervalo QT corregido (QTc con la morbimortalidad cardiovascular en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2, se realizó el seguimiento a 5 años de 67 pacientes que acudieron a consulta externa del Servicio de Endocrinología. Se presentaron eventos cardiovasculares en 16 pacientes; el 82% completó el seguimiento y se encontró que el intervalo QTc prolongado fue la única variable que se asoció de forma significativa a morbimortalidad cardiovascular en el análisis de regresión logística múltiple (RR: 13,56; IC 95%: 2,01-91,36 (p=0,0074.In order to evaluate the relationship between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and corrected QT interval (QTc with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, we followed up for 5 years 67 patients attending the outpatient Endocrinology Service. 82% completed follow-up and cardiovascular events occurred in 16 patients. We found that long QTc interval was the only variable significantly associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the multiple logistic regression analysis (RR: 13.56, 95% CI: 2.01-91.36 (p = 0.0074.

  10. Particles Alter Diesel Exhaust Gases-Induced Hypotension, Cardiac Arrhythmia,Conduction Disturbance, and Autonomic Imbalance in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that acute exposures to vehicular traffic and particulate matter (PM) air pollution are key causes of fatal cardiac arrhythmia, especially in those with preexisting cardiovascular disease. Researchers point to electrophysiologic dysfunction and auto...

  11. "Congenital Sensory Neuropathy as a Differential Diagnosis for Phagocytic Immunodeficiency "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharagozlou

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available There are few reports about congenital indifference to pain or Hereditary and Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy (HSAN. Several investigations for pathophysiology of this syndrome have been performed and different classifications about it. In this report we present a case of HSAN type II with general absence of pain and self amputations and leprosy–like damage of extremities which was suspected to be phagocytic immunodeficiency due to past history of repeated ulcer and abscess formation.

  12. Exercise and autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, R L; Bloomfield, D M; Rosenwinkel, E T

    2000-03-01

    The complex interplay between the dichotomous subdivisions of the autonomic nervous system establishes and maintains a delicately tuned homeostasis in spite of an ever-changing environment. Aerobic exercise training can increase activity of the parasympathetic nervous system and decrease sympathetic activity. Conversely, it is well-documented that cardiac disease is often characterized by attenuated parasympathetic activity and heightened sympathetic tone. A correlation between autonomic disequilibrium and disease has led to the hypothesis that exercise training, as a therapy that restores the autonomic nervous system towards normal function, may be associated with, and possibly responsible for, outcome improvements in various populations. This is merely one of the many benefits that is conferred by chronic exercise training and reviewed in this issue. PMID:10758814

  13. 老年2型糖尿病患者睡眠质量与糖尿病自主神经病变的关系%The relationship between sleep quality and diabetic autonomic neuropathy in elder patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洁; 张丽娜; 郭立新

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the sleep quality and diabetic autonomic neuropathy of elder patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods A total of 90 elder patients with diabetes in Beijing Hospital was enrolled in this study.Questionnaires of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were completed to evaluate the quality of sleep and Holter was applied to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV).Other related clinical data such as,catecholamine [epinephrine (E);norepinephrine (NE);dopamine (DA)] and diabetes complications were also collected after admission to the hospital.Patients were divided into three groups:the poor-sleeper group,the common-sleeper group and the goodsleeper group according to PSQI score.HRV and the level of catecholamine were compared among three groups.Results The level of HRV including meanNN [(743 ±58) ms vs(824 ±99)ms and (837 ± 104) ms],ASDNN [(30 ± 10) ms vs (39 ± 14) ms and (41 ± 14) ms],very low frequency(VLF) [(15.33 ± 6.10) ms2 vs (22.11 ± 7.94) ms2 and (22.66 ± 7.87) ms2],low frequency (LF) [(8.30 ± 3.95) ms2 vs (12.58±6.11)ms2 and(12.81 ±6.96)ms2] and LF/high frequency(HF) [(1.23 ±0.32) vs (1.56 ± 0.46) and (1.47 ± 0.42)] in the poor-sleeper group were lower than in both the common-sleeper group and good-sleeper group (all P < 0.05).The level of catecholamine in poor-sleeper group [E:(108.91 ± 4.19) ng/L;NE:(1458.0 ± 50.35) ng/L] were lower than both the common-sleeper group [E:(120.23 ± 4.37) ng/L;NE:(1901.09 ± 131.36)ng/L] and the good-sleeper group [E:(118.23 ± 19.9) ng/L;NE:(1771.87 ± 116.73) ng/L] (all P < O.05),suggesting a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system in subject in the poor-sleeper group.Conclusion Sleep quality is associated with the severity of diabetic autonomic neuropathy and might be one of clinical features for diabetic autonomic neuropathy.%目的 探讨老年2型糖尿病患者睡眠质量与糖尿病自主神经病变的关系.方法 入选住院老年2

  14. Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes Page Content ... treated? Points to Remember Clinical Trials What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve ...

  15. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  16. Multifocal motor neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Thy P Nguyen; Vinay Chaudhry

    2011-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) is a unique disorder characterized by slowly progressive, asymmetric, distal and upper limb predominant weakness without significant sensory abnormalities. Electrophysiology is crucial to the diagnosis, revealing the hallmark partial conduction block. MMN is considered immune mediated due to the association with anti-GM1 antibodies and the response to immunomodulatory treatment. It is paramount to recognize MMN from other motor neuronopathies or peripheral ne...

  17. Agent, autonomous

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Annie

    2007-01-01

    The expression autonomous agents, widely used in virtual reality, computer graphics, artificial intelligence and artificial life, corresponds to the simulation of autonomous creatures, virtual (i.e. totally computed by a program), or embodied in a physical envelope, as done in autonomous robots.

  18. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed;

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical...... substance used in the treatment, cure, prevention or diagnosis of a disease. Optic neuropathy is included in this definition. A distinction between DIPN and other aetiologies of peripheral neuropathy is often quite difficult and thus, the aim of this MiniReview is to discuss the major agents associated...

  19. Functional autonomic nervous system profile in children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kushki, Azadeh; Brian, Jessica; Dupuis, Annie; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2014-01-01

    Background Autonomic dysregulation has been recently reported as a feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, the nature of autonomic atypicalities in ASD remain largely unknown. The goal of this study was to characterize the cardiac autonomic profile of children with ASD across four domains affected in ASD (anxiety, attention, response inhibition, and social cognition), and suggested to be affected by autonomic dysregulation. Methods We compared measures of autonomic cardiac regulat...

  20. A case of late-onset allgrove syndrome presenting with predominant autonomic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debmalya Sanyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Allgrove Syndrome or triple A syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder characterized by achalasia, alacrima and adrenal insufficiency. The objective was to describe a case of 4A syndrome where autonomic dysfunction was the presenting feature. A 22-year-old male presented with erectile dysfunction and loss of spontaneous morning erections for six months. He was having nocturnal diarrhea and recurrent postural dizziness for three months. He was found to have hyperpigmentation at pressure points, postural hypotension and other features of autonomic dysfunction. Laboratory investigations and imaging studies revealed hypoadrenalism, achalasia, alacrima and peripheral neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy-related features persisted even after correction of hypoadrenalism. Based on clinical features and investigation he was diagnosed as a case of 4A syndrome presenting with autonomic dysfunction. Allgrove or 4A syndrome should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis of someone presenting with features of autonomic neuropathy.

  1. The Relationship between Vascular Function and the Autonomic Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiya, Eisuke; Watanabe, Masafumi; Komuro, Issei

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and autonomic nervous system dysfunction are both risk factors for atherosclerosis. There is evidence demonstrating that there is a close interrelationship between these two systems. In hypertension, endothelial dysfunction affects the pathologic process through autonomic nervous pathways, and the pathophysiological process of autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus is closely related with vascular function. However, detailed mechanisms of this interrelationship have not been clearly explained. In this review, we summarize findings concerning the interrelationship between vascular function and the autonomic nervous system from both experimental and clinical studies. The clarification of this interrelationship may provide more comprehensive risk stratification and a new effective therapeutic strategy against atherosclerosis.

  2. Sympathetic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus patients does not elicit Charcot osteoarthropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tomas M; Simonsen, Lene; Holstein, Per E;

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to determine the degree of neuropathy (autonomic and somatic) in patients with diabetes mellitus with or without Charcot osteoarthropathy (CA). METHODS: Forty-nine patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2 were investigated. The patient population of interest...

  3. Small-Fiber Neuropathy: A Diabetic Microvascular Complication of Special Clinical, Diagnostic, and Prognostic Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körei, A E; Istenes, I; Papanas, N; Kempler, P

    2016-01-01

    Damage of small nerve fibers may lead to a large variety of clinical symptoms. Small-fiber neuropathy underlies the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy, which may decrease quality of life. It also contributes to the poor prognosis of diabetic neuropathy because it plays a key role in the pathogenesis of foot ulceration and autonomic neuropathy. Impairment of small nerve fibers is considered the earliest alteration in the course of diabetic neuropathy. Therefore, assessment of functional and morphological abnormalities of small nerve fibers may enable timely diagnosis. The definition, symptoms, and clinical significance of small-fiber neuropathy are considered in the present review. An apparently more complex interaction between small-fiber impairment and microcirculation is extensively discussed. Diagnostic modalities include morphometric and functional methods. Corneal confocal microscopy and punch skin biopsy are considered gold standards, but noninvasive functional tests are also diagnostically useful. However, in routine clinical practice, small-fiber neuropathy is diagnosed by its typical clinical presentation. Finally, prompt treatment should be initiated following diagnosis.

  4. Experimental therapeutics in hereditary neuropathies: the past, the present, and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, David N

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary neuropathies represent approximately 40% of undiagnosed neuropathies in a tertiary clinic setting. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies (CMT) are the most common. Mutations in more than 40 genes have been identified to date in CMT. Approximately 50% of CMT cases are accounted for by CMT type 1A, due to a duplication within the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22). Mutations in the gap junction beta 1 gene (GJB1), the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ), and the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) account for a substantial proportion of other genetically definable CMT. Some 15% of demyelinating CMT and 70% of axonal CMT await genetic clarification. Other hereditary neuropathies include the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, the familial amyloid polyneuropathies, and multisystem disorders (e.g., lipid storage diseases and inherited ataxias) that have peripheral neuropathy as a major or minor component. This review surveys the challenges of developing effective therapies for hereditary neuropathies in terms of past, present, and future experimental therapeutics in CMT.

  5. Recent advances in exploring the genetic susceptibility to diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Cristina; Ciccacci, Cinzia; D'Amato, Cinzia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola; Spallone, Vincenza

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy are common and disabling complications of diabetes. Although glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors are major contributory elements in its development, diabetic neuropathy recognizes a multifactorial influence and a multiplicity of pathogenetic mechanisms. Thus genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its susceptibility, each with a modest contribution, by targeting various metabolic and microvascular pathways whose alterations intervene in diabetic neuropathy pathogenesis. This review is aimed at describing major data from the available literature regarding genetic susceptibility to diabetic neuropathies. It provides an overview of the genes reported as associated with the development or progression of these complications, i.e. ACE, MTHFR, GST, GLO1, APOE, TCF7L2, VEGF, IL-4, GPX1, eNOS, ADRA2B, GFRA2, MIR146A, MIR128A. The identification of genetic susceptibility can help in both expanding the comprehension of the pathogenetic mechanisms of diabetic nerve damage and identifying biomarkers of risk prediction and response to therapeutic intervention.

  6. Heart rate variability as important approach for assessment autonomic modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Maycon Jr Ferreira; Angelina Zanesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alterations in the heart rate recovery and heart rate variability have been associated with greater risk of mortality and early prognosis of cardiac diseases. Thus, strategies for assessing autonomic nervous system and its modulation to the heart are crucial for preventing cardiovascular events in healthy subjects as well as in cardiac patients. In this review, an update of studies examining heart rate variability (HRV) and its use as indicator of cardiac autonomic modulation will be...

  7. Asymptomatic ST-depression during exercise testing in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and autonomic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Nikitich Laptev

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate cardiac autonomic function as assessed by ST dynamics during and post-exercise in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.Materials and methods. The study included 71 young patients with T1DM. The patients were aged 9–18 years and had no history of macrovascular disease or renal disease, including microalbuminuria. Cardiac autonomic function was assessed using cardiovascular tests and 24-h ECG monitoring with automatic calculation of QT interval and heart rate variability parameters. Each patient underwent the physical working capacity 170 test.Results. The prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN was 30.9%. The frequency of asymptomatic ST-segment depression increased during exercise in 10 (45.5% patients with CAN (CAN+ compared with 9 (18.4% patients without CAN (CAN-; p=0.042. During the recovery period, asymptomatic ST-segment depression was present in the first minute in 8 (36.4% CAN+ patients compared with 1 (2% CAN- patient (p=0.0003 and in the second minute in 5 (22.7% CAN+ patients compared with 1 (2% CAN- patient (p=0.0095.Conclusion. Children and adolescents with T1DM and impaired autonomic function have increased prevalence of asymptomatic ST-segment depression during and post-exercise. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents with T1DM and CAN may contribute to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality during adulthood in patients with T1DM.

  8. Clinical application of l-123 MlBG cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young [College of Medicine, Donga Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-10-01

    Cardiac neurotransmission imaging allows in vivo assessment of presynaptic reuptake, neurotransmitter storage and postsynaptic receptors. Among the various neurotransmitter, I-123 MlBG is most available and relatively well-established. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an analogue of the false neurotransmitter guanethidine. It is taken up to adrenergic neurons by uptake-1 mechanism as same as norepinephrine. As tagged with I-123, it can be used to image sympathetic function in various organs including heart with planar or SPECT techniques. I-123 MIBG imaging has a unique advantage to evaluate myocardial neuronal activity in which the heart has no significant structural abnormality or even no functional derangement measured with other conventional examination. In patients with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, this imaging has most sensitive technique to predict prognosis and treatment response of betablocker or ACE inhibitor. In diabetic patients, it allow very early detection of autonomic neuropathy. In patients with dangerous arrhythmia such as ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, MIBG imaging may be only an abnormal result among various exams. In patients with ischemic heart disease, sympathetic derangement may be used as the method of risk stratification. In heart transplanted patients, sympathetic reinnervation is well evaluated. Adriamycin-induced cardiotoxicity is detected earlier than ventricular dysfunction with sympathetic dysfunction. Neurodegenerative disorder such as Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies has also cardiac sympathetic dysfunction. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity with l-123 MlBG imaging may be improve understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiac disease and make a contribution to predict survival and therapy efficacy.

  9. Treatment of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Nancy J

    2012-10-01

    The hereditary optic neuropathies are inherited disorders in which optic nerve dysfunction is a prominent feature in the phenotypic expression of disease. Optic neuropathy may be primarily an isolated finding, such as in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy, or part of a multisystem disorder. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the hereditary optic neuropathies involve mitochondrial dysfunction owing to mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that encodes proteins essential to mitochondrial function. Effective treatments are limited, and current management includes therapies directed at enhancing mitochondrial function and preventing oxidative damage, as well as genetic counselling, and supportive and symptomatic measures. New therapies, including gene therapy, are emerging via animal models and human clinical trials. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, in particular, provides a unique model for testing promising treatments owing to its characteristic sequential bilateral involvement and the accessibility of target tissue within the eye. Lessons learned from treatment of the hereditary optic neuropathies may have therapeutic implications for other disorders of presumed mitochondrial dysfunction. In this Review, the natural history of the common inherited optic neuropathies, the presumed pathogenesis of several of these disorders, and the literature to date regarding potential therapies are summarized.

  10. Hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Recent antecedent hypoglycemia reduces autonomic responses to, symptoms of, and defense against subsequent hypoglycemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Dagogo-Jack, S E; Craft, S; Cryer, P E

    1993-01-01

    We hypothesize that in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), recent antecedent iatrogenic hypoglycemia is a major cause of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, a disorder distinct from classical diabetic autonomic neuropathy (CDAN), and that hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, by reducing both symptoms of and defense against developing hypoglycemia, results in recurrent iatrogenic hypoglycemia, thus creating a vicious cycle. We used the hyperinsulinemic (12.0 ...

  11. The frequency of peripheral neuropathy in a group of HIV positive patients in Brazil Freqüência da neuropatia periférica no Brasil em um grupo de pacientes HIV positivo

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Zanetti; Gilberto M. Manzano; Alberto A. Gabbai

    2004-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological complication occurring in asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of HIV infection. The most common syndromes are distal symmetric polyneuropathy, inflammatory demielinating polyneuropathy, poliradiculopathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex and autonomic neuropathy. PURPOSE: To evaluate the frequency of peripheral neuropathy in a group of HIV seropositive outpatients in São Paulo, Brazil. METHOD: Over a period of 17 months, 49 HIV+ patients ...

  12. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    TALEBIAN, Ahmad; Razeieh GOUDARZI; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Mirzadeh, Azadeh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Talebian A, Goudarzi RM, Mohammadzadeh M , Mirzadeh AS. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1):66-68. AbstractVincristine (VCR) is a vinca alkaloid that is used for treatment of many malignancies.The vinca alkaloids are neurotoxic, usually causing a peripheral neuropathy, but cranial neuropathies are rare as side effects. Described here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy, a known case of Wilms’ tumor, treated by vincristine (0/0...

  13. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are highly debilitating and often lead to severe morbidity and even death. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease. According to the Braak staging study, the progressionof PD starts in the medulla oblongata......, which includes the cardiac centre and controls autonomic functions, and therefore autonomic dysfunction may be experienced early in the disease course. Sleep disturbances are also common non-motor complications of PD, and therefore PD patients undergo polysomnography at the Danish Center for Sleep...... Medicine to assess the sleep disturbances. The aim of this PhD dissertation was to: 1) Develop a method to investigate autonomic changes during sleep in neurodegenerative diseases, and apply this method on PD, iRBD and narcolepsy patients to evaluate the autonomic function in these diseases. 2) Validate...

  14. Drug-Free Correction of the Tone of the Autonomic Nervous System in the Management of Cardiac Arrhythmia in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Popov, PhD, ScD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of our study was to examine the possibility of ventricular extrasystole (VES management in CAD (coronary artery disease patients by attenuating the sympathetic activity with a course of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve. Methods: A decrease in sympathetic tone was achieved via vagus nerve electrical stimulation (VNES. VNES was performed in 48 male CAD patients, mean age 53.5±4.1 years. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy was canceled prior to VNES therapy. The effect of VNES on heart rate variability (HRV and VES were carefully studied. All the patients received a 24-hour ECG monitoring. HRV was calculated for high frequency (HF and low frequency (LF bands and the LF/HF index was determined. Results: Immediately following VNES therapy, 30 patients (group 1 reported alleviation of angina signs and the LF/HF index was significantly decreased (p=0.001. Eighteen patients (group 2 showed no change either in health or the LF/HF index. According to ECG and echocardiography, the VES number did not significantly change immediately after VNES therapy. One month after the VNES course, group 1 reported further improvement in health; the LF/HF index approached normal values. In group 2, the LF/HF significantly decreased (p=0.043. However, in the entire study sample, the VES number significantly decreased overall (p=0.025. Conclusion: VNES attenuated the cardiac effects of hypersympathicotonia decreased the ischemic impact on the myocardium, alleviated the cardiac angina signs, and beneficially influenced the VES number in CAD patients.

  15. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve integrity with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffel, David M. E-mail: raffel@umich.edu; Wieland, Donald M

    2001-07-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of cardiac function. Abnormalities of cardiac innervation have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many heart diseases, including sudden cardiac death and congestive heart failure. In an effort to provide clinicians with the ability to regionally map cardiac innervation, several radiotracers for imaging cardiac sympathetic neurons have been developed. This paper reviews the development of neuronal imaging agents and discusses their emerging role in the noninvasive assessment of cardiac sympathetic innervation.

  16. 射频消融改良心脏自主神经治疗缓慢型心律失常%Radiofrequency Ablation of Bradyarrhythmia by Modification of Cardiac Autonomic Innervation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方芳

    2012-01-01

    心脏神经消融是治疗迷走神经介导的缓慢型心律失常的新方法.射频消融可选择性地造成迷走神经的损伤,改良窦房结和房室结的神经支配.对于部分间歇性高度房室传导阻滞、功能性窦房结功能障碍、神经心源性晕厥等患者,有可能作为起搏器和药物治疗的替代治疗手段.%Radiofrequency catheter ablation is a new technique for management of patients with dominantly adverse parasympathetic autonomic influence. Catheter ablation may inflict the vagal innervation of the sinus and atrioventricular nodes selectively. Cardiac vagal den-ervation may prevent pacemaker implantation in some patients with functional atrioventricular block, sinus dysfunction, and neurocardiogenic syncope.

  17. Auditory Neuropathy - A Case of Auditory Neuropathy after Hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Mazaher Yazdi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Auditory neuropathy is an hearing disorder in which peripheral hearing is normal, but the eighth nerve and brainstem are abnormal. By clinical definition, patient with this disorder have normal OAE, but exhibit an absent or severely abnormal ABR. Auditory neuropathy was first reported in the late 1970s as different methods could identify discrepancy between absent ABR and present hearing threshold. Speech understanding difficulties are worse than can be predicted from other tests of hearing function. Auditory neuropathy may also affect vestibular function. Case Report: This article presents electrophysiological and behavioral data from a case of auditory neuropathy in a child with normal hearing after bilirubinemia in a 5 years follow-up. Audiological findings demonstrate remarkable changes after multidisciplinary rehabilitation. Conclusion: auditory neuropathy may involve damage to the inner hair cells-specialized sensory cells in the inner ear that transmit information about sound through the nervous system to the brain. Other causes may include faulty connections between the inner hair cells and the nerve leading from the inner ear to the brain or damage to the nerve itself. People with auditory neuropathy have OAEs response but absent ABR and hearing loss threshold that can be permanent, get worse or get better.

  18. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopishinskaya S.V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leber optic neuropathy is mitochondrial neurodegenerative disease manifested by progressive visual deterioration due to optic nerve atrophy. It is most frequently manifested in young people aged from 18 to 30, male patients prevailing. The disease is characterized by maternal inheritance, and the inheritance of a feature discontinues in men. In 95% cases Leber hereditary optic neuropathology is due to one of three known mitochondrial DNA mutations, its type being important in relation to the disease prognosis. The disease course has a number of succeeding stages: preclinical, acute and chronic (atrophic. The disease diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical presentation of sequential impairment of both eyes forming central scotoma, the analysis of family history and detection of specific mutations. The present clinical observation illustrates the difficulties in Leber disease diagnosis.

  19. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo-Kottler, B; Wissinger, B

    2011-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare disease primarily affecting the retinal ganglion cells. In most cases patients with LHON develop permanent visual loss with a large central scotoma in the visual field of both eyes. The optic disc becomes partially or completely pale. At the onset of the disease many patients are considered to suffer from an optic neuritis and are treated under the diagnostic and therapeutic regimen of optic neuritis. LHON is mostly only considered when high dose cortisone therapy fails to be effective or the second eye is affected. Thereafter, molecular genetic analysis will prove LHON in these cases. Detailed anamnesis including pedigree analysis in combination with observance of the peripapillary microangiopathic alterations at the fundus will help to speed up the diagnosis of LHON, but even after exact clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis of LHON some aspects of the disease still remain a mystery today.

  20. The Association between Baseline Subjective Anxiety Rating and Changes in Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Activity in Response to Tryptophan Depletion in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chih Yin; Tsai, Hsin Chun; Chi, Mei Hung; Chen, Kao Chin; Chen, Po See; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of serotonin on anxiety and autonomic nervous system (ANS) function; the correlation between subjective anxiety rating and changes of ANS function following tryptophan depletion (TD) in healthy volunteers was examined. Twenty-eight healthy participants, consisting of 15 females and 13 males, with an average age of 33.3 years, were recruited.Baseline Chinese Symptom Checklist-90-Revised and ANS function measurements were taken. TD was carried out on the testing day, and participants provided blood samples right before and 5 hours after TD. ANS function, somatic symptoms, and Visual Analogue Scales (VASs) were determined after TD. Wilcoxon signed rank test and Spearman ρ correlation were adapted for analyses of the results.The TD procedure reduced total and free plasma tryptophan effectively. After TD, the sympathetic nervous activity increased and parasympathetic nervous activity decreased. Baseline anxiety ratings positively correlated with post-TD changes in sympathetic nervous activity, VAS ratings, and physical symptoms. However, a negative correlation with post-TD changes in parasympathetic nervous activity was found.The change in ANS function after TD was associated with the severity of anxiety in healthy volunteers. This supports the fact that the effect of anxiety on heart rate variability is related to serotonin vulnerability. Furthermore, it also shows that the subjective anxiety rating has a biological basis related to serotonin.

  1. Treatment of chronic inflammatory neuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Eftimov

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the efficacy of existing and alternative treatments in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and explores predictors of treatment response in patients with CIDP treated with corticosteroids. The efficacy of intra

  2. [Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: characteristics, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istenes, Ildikó; Nagy, Zsolt; Demeter, Judit

    2016-06-01

    Longer remissions and better overall survival rates can be achieved with the introduction of new, effective treatments and targeted therapies in the past 1-2 decades, however, the incidence of side effects is also increasing parallelly. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common and potentially debilitating side effect due to peripheral somatic or autonomic nerve dysfunction. CIPN becomes increasingly important, as it affects patients' quality of life, and it is very often a dose limiting factor with the potential for reduced treatment efficacy. The pathomechanism, diagnosis, prevention and treatment possibilities are described in this review with special attention to the different groups of drugs. PMID:27275643

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ability to feel pain, heat, and cold. Deep pain perception, the feeling of pain from injuries to bones, ... growth factor beta gene (NGFB) causes loss of pain perception. Hum Mol Genet. 2004 Apr 15;13(8): ...

  4. Bladder dysfunction in distal autonomic neuropathy of acute onset.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, R S; Fowler, C J; Gosling, J A; Bannister, R

    1985-01-01

    A patient with cholinergic dysautonomia and a patient with pandysautonomia have each been investigated for disturbances of bladder and urethral function. Both patients suffered from an inability to develop or sustain a detrusor contraction, while retaining normal bladder sensation. Biopsy specimens of bladder muscle stained for acetylcholinesterase revealed a significant reduction in cholinergic nerves compared with controls; however, the prominent cholinergic subepithelial plexus was strikin...

  5. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  6. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of rare subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Price, Ray S.; Chen, Kevin S.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination, but limited diagnostic evaluation. Rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, however, often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. Objective To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. Evidence Review References were identified from PubMed searches with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the author's own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Findings Diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Effective disease modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies including GBS, CIDP, MMN, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyoptrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Conclusions and Relevance Recognition of rare localizations of periperhal neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important early step in the

  7. An update on electrophysiological studies in neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The review concentrates on the use of clinical neurophysiology in peripheral nerve disorders covered in the present issue. It is pertinent to distinguish different types of involvement of fibers in diabetic neuropathy, including the involvement of small and large fibers, to outline the diagnostic...... criteria of inflammatory neuropathies, and to describe the spectrum of peripheral nerve pathophysiology in inherited neuropathies. Painful neuropathies represent a particular challenge to clinical neurophysiology since it is mainly small fibers, which are difficult to study, that are affected....

  8. [Autonomic nervous system in diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, M

    2001-08-01

    Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia have a primary role in determining the early functional and later anatomic changes at the level of the autonomic pathways controlling the circulation, and besides in directly influencing cardiac and vascular cellular targets and feed-back baroreceptor system sensitivity to neurohumoral modulation in patients with diabetes mellitus. The basic mechanisms of dysfunction and damage, and the clinical and prognostic value of diabetic cardiovascular dysautonomia are discussed together with the diagnostic apparatus and the possible therapeutic approaches.

  9. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  10. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-09-15

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  11. Peripheral neuropathy and antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C

    2001-03-01

    Patients treated with nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) develop a varying degree of myopathy or neuropathy after long-term therapy. Zidovudine (AZT) causes myopathy; zalcitabine (ddC), didanosine (ddl) and lamuvidine (3TC) cause neuropathy; stavudine (d4T) and fialuridine (FIAU) cause neuropathy or myopathy and lactic acidosis. The tissue distribution of phosphorylases responsible for phosphorylation of NRTIs relates to their selective tissue toxicity. The myopathy is characterized by muscle wasting, myalgia, fatigue, weakness and elevation of CK. The neuropathy is painful, sensory and axonal. In vitro, NRTIs inhibit the gamma-DNA polymerase, responsible for replication of mtDNA, and cause mtDNA dysfunction. In vivo, patients treated with AZT, the best studied NRTI, develop a mitochondrial myopathy with mtDNA depletion, deficiency of COX (complex IV), intracellular fat accumulation, high lactate production and marked phosphocreatine depletion, as determined with in vivo MRS spectroscopy, due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Animals or cultured cells treated with NRTIs develop neuropathy, myopathy, or cell destruction with similar changes in the mitochondria. There is evidence that the NRTI-related neuropathy is also due to mitochondrial toxicity. The NRTIs (AZT, ddC, ddl, d4T, 3TC) contain azido groups that compete with natural thymidine triphosphate as substrates of DNA pol-gamma and terminate mtDNA synthesis. In contrast, FIAU that contains 3'-OH groups serves as an alternate substrate for thymidine triphosphate with DNA pol-gamma and is incorporated into the DNA causing permanent mtDNA dysfunction. The NRTI-induced mitochondrial dysfunction has an influence on the clinical application of these agents, especially at high doses and when combined. They have produced in humans a new category of acquired mitochondrial toxins that cause clinical manifestations resembling the genetic mitochondrial disorders.

  12. Inflammation: therapeutic targets for diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiyin; Zhou, Shiwen

    2014-02-01

    There are still no approved treatments for the prevention or of cure of diabetic neuropathy, and only symptomatic pain therapies of variable efficacy are available. Inflammation is a cardinal pathogenic mechanism of diabetic neuropathy. The relationships between inflammation and the development of diabetic neuropathy involve complex molecular networks and processes. Herein, we review the key inflammatory molecules (inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules, chemokines) and pathways (nuclear factor kappa B, JUN N-terminal kinase) implicated in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy. Advances in the understanding of the roles of these key inflammatory molecules and pathways in diabetic neuropathy will facilitate the discovery of the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches for the inhibition of the development of neuropathy. Specifically, many anti-inflammatory drugs significantly inhibit the development of different aspects of diabetic neuropathy in animal models and clinical trials.

  13. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and Related Hereditary Neuropathies: From Gene Function to Associated Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareyson, D; Saveri, P; Piscosquito, G

    2014-10-10

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related neuropathies are a genetically highly heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. CMT affects both the sensory and motor nerves, distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies (dHMN) are phenotypically similar disorders involving only motor nerves, while Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies (HSAN) are rare distinct disorders affecting sensory and sometimes autonomic nerves. Almost 70 genes have been identified as responsible for these disorders. It is astonishing to learn how diverse are the cellular sublocalisation and the functional roles of the encoded proteins of CMT-associated genes which all lead to similar disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Myelin formation and maintenance, mitochondrial dynamics, cytoskeleton organization, axonal transport, and vesicular trafficking are the most frequently involved pathways. However, dysfunction of several activities from the nucleus to the neuromuscular junction forms the basis for these hereditary neuropathies, making it challenging predicting the functions of newly identified mutated genes. In this review we will discuss the function and related phenotypes of all the genes thus far associated with CMT, dHMN, and HSAN.

  14. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here.

  15. Early onset (childhood) monogenic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) with onset in childhood are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission and, in selected cases, pathological findings. Especially relevant to pediatrics are the items "secondary" versus "primary" neuropathy, "syndromic versus nonsyndromic," and "period of life." Different combinations of these parameters frequently point toward specific monogenic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first concern in pediatrics. As a rule, metabolic diseases include additional, orienting symptoms or signs, and their biochemical diagnosis is based on logical algorithms. Primary, motor sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating autosomal dominant (AD) forms (CMT1). Other forms include demyelinating autosomal recessive (AR) forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Peripheral motor neuron disorders are dominated by AR SMN-linked spinal muscular atrophies. (Distal) hereditary motor neuropathies represent 40 genes with various biological functions have been found to be responsible for primary HN. Many are responsible for various phenotypes, including some without the polyneuropathic trait, and some for various types of transmission.

  16. Nerve Regeneration Should Be Highly Valued in the Treatment of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-chun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common chronic complication of the long-term complications of diabetes, affecting up to 90% of patients during the progress of the disease. Many parts of the nerve system, including the sensory nerves, motor nerves and autonomic nerves, can be affected, leading to various clinical features. DPN leads not only to a great degree of mutilation and death but also to the occurrence and development of other long-term complications in diabetics.

  17. An Electerophisioligic Study Of Autonomic Nervous System In Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorolahi Moghaddam H

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in diabetics can occur apart from peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and sometimes leads to complaints which may be diagnosed by electrodiagnostic methods. Moreover glycemic control of these patients may prevent such a complications."nMaterials and Methods: 30 diabetic patients were compared to the same number of age and sex-matched controls regarding to electrophysiologic findings of autonomic nervous system. Symptoms referable to autonomic disorder including nightly diarrhea, dizziness, urinary incontinence, constipation, nausea, and mouth dryness were recorded in all diabetic patients. Palmar and plantar SSR and expiration to inspiration ratio (E: I and Valsalva ratio were recorded in all diabetics and control individuals by electromyography device. In addition NCS was performed on two sensory and two motor nerves in diabetic patients."nResults: There was no relation between age of diabetics and abnormal D: I ratio, Valsalva ratio and degree of electrophysiologic autonomic impairment. Also no relation between peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment was found. Plantar SSR was absent in 80% of diabetics with orthostatic hypotension (p~ 0.019. Palmar and plantar SSR were absent in many diabetics in comparison to control group (for palmar SSR p~ 0.00 and for plantar SSR p< 0.015. There was no relation between diabetes duration since diagnosis and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment."nConclusion: According to the above mentioned findings diabetic autonomic neuropathy develops apart from peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and probably with different mechanisms. Remarkable absence of palmar SSR in diabetics with orthostatic hypotension can be due to its sympathetic origin. Absence of any relation between diabetes duration and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment can be due to late diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or no pathophysiologic relation between chronic

  18. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuropathy, type V distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects nerve cells ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by ...

  20. Neuropathies optiques héréditaires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy...

  1. Uremic Neuropathy: Epiemiological Study in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims. Uremic Neuropathy (UN) highly limits the individual self-sufficiency causing near-continuous pain. An estimation of the actual UN prevalence among hemodialysis patients was the aim of the present work. Methods. We studied 225 prevalent dialysis patients from two Italian Centres. The Michigan Neuropathy Score Instrument (MNSI), already validated in diabetic neuropathy, was used for the diagnosis of UN. It consisted of a questionnaire (MNSI_Q) and a physical-clinical evaluat...

  2. Dyslipidemia-Induced Neuropathy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Andrea M.; Hayes, John M.; McLean, Lisa L.; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Eva L Feldman

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Neuropathy is a frequent and severe complication of diabetes. Multiple metabolic defects in type 2 diabetic patients result in oxidative injury of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Our previous work focused on hyperglycemia clearly demonstrates induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress and acute injury in DRG neurons; however, this mechanism is not the only factor that produces neuropathy in vivo. Dyslipidemia also correlates with the development of neuropathy, even in pre-diabet...

  3. Treatment of chronic inflammatory neuropathies

    OpenAIRE

    Schaik, van, I.N.; Eftimov, F.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the efficacy of existing and alternative treatments in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and explores predictors of treatment response in patients with CIDP treated with corticosteroids. The efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in CIDP and MMN was confirmed in meta-analyses. In CIDP, IVIg efficacy was similar to the efficacy of plasma exchange, prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone. ...

  4. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Saad; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Alam, Uazman; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating consequence of diabetes that may be present in as many as one in five patients with diabetes. The objective assessment of PDN is difficult, making it challenging to diagnose and assess in both clinical practice and clinical trials. No single treatment exists to prevent or reverse neuropathic changes or to provide total pain relief. Treatment of PDN is based on three major approaches: intensive glycaemic control and risk factor management, tr...

  5. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun; Bilge Koçer; Funda Kaplan; Nesrin Yılmaz; Nezih Yücemen; Canan Yücesan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neu...

  6. Peripheral neuropathies in Sjögren's syndrome: a critical update on clinical features and pathogenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlakis, P P; Alexopoulos, H; Kosmidis, M L; Mamali, I; Moutsopoulos, H M; Tzioufas, A G; Dalakas, M C

    2012-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease that, apart from exocrine glands, may affect every organ or system. Involvement of different sections of the peripheral nervous system results in a wide spectrum of neuropathic manifestations. Based on distinct clinical, electrophysiological and histological criteria, the types of neuropathies seen in Sjögren's syndrome include: a) pure sensory which presents with distal symmetric sensory loss due to axonal degeneration of sensory fibers; sensory ataxia due to loss of proprioceptive large fibers (ganglionopathy); or with painful dysethesias (small fiber sensory neuropathy) due to degeneration of cutaneous axons. The latter appears to be the most common neuropathy in Sjögren's syndrome and requires skin biopsy for diagnosis to document loss or reduction of nerve fiber density; b) sensorimotor polyneuropathy affecting sensory and motor axons, often associated with severe systemic or pro-lymhomatous manifestations, such as palpable purpura and cryoglobulinemia, and c) rare types that include autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex and autonomic neuropathy. In this review, the frequency, prevalence and diagnostic criteria for each neuropathy subset are discussed and possible pathogenetic mechanisms are outlined.

  7. Evolving Insights into the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Neuropathy: Implications of Malfunctioning Glia and Discovery of Novel Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy subsequent to chronic high blood glucose-induced nerve damage is one of the most frustrating and debilitating complications of diabetes, which affects the quality of life in patients with diabetes. Approximately 60-70% of patients with diabetes suffer from a distal symmetrical form of mild to severe neuropathy that progresses in a fiber-length-dependent pattern, with sensory and autonomic manifestations predominating. High glucose and oxidative stress-mediated damage in neurons and glial cells, as well as neuroinflammation and crosstalk between these disease processes, have garnered immense attention as the essential mechanisms underlying the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy. Although the metabolic causes of diabetic neuropathy are well understood and documented, treatment options for this disorder are still limited, highlighting the need for further studies to identify new molecular and therapeutic targets. This review covers recent advances in our knowledge of the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy, discusses how persistent hyperglycemic conditions and malfunctioning glia drive disease progression, and finally explores the possibilities and challenges offered by several potential novel therapeutic targets for both preventing and reversing diabetic neuropathy.

  8. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad TALEBIAN*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Talebian A, Goudarzi RM, Mohammadzadeh M , Mirzadeh AS. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:66-68. Abstract Vincristine (VCR is a vinca alkaloid that is used for treatment of many malignancies. The vinca alkaloids are neurotoxic, usually causing a peripheral neuropathy, but cranial neuropathies are rare as side effects. Described here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy, a known case of Wilms’ tumor, treated by vincristine (0/067 mg/kg/day and dactinomycin (0/045 mg/kg/day after surgery. Three weeks after treatment, he presented with bilateral ptosis. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis with normal pupillary reflex and eye movement. He received 3.015 mg cumulative dose of vincristine before development of ptosis. Treatment with pyridoxine (150 mg/m2 p.o. BID and pyridostigmine (3 mg/kg p.o. BID started as neuroprotective agents, and after 7 days the problem disappeared. The treatment continued for 6 weeks and there were no signs of ptosis or a recurrence in follow up 2 months later.

  9. Autonomous Search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Decades of innovations in combinatorial problem solving have produced better and more complex algorithms. These new methods are better since they can solve larger problems and address new application domains. They are also more complex which means that they are hard to reproduce and often harder to fine-tune to the peculiarities of a given problem. This last point has created a paradox where efficient tools are out of reach of practitioners. Autonomous search (AS) represents a new research field defined to precisely address the above challenge. Its major strength and originality consist in the

  10. Imaging of neuropathies about the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.martinoli@unige.it [Radiologia – DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Miguel-Perez, Maribel [Unit of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapy, Faculty of Medicine (C Bellvitge), University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Padua, Luca [Fondazione Don Gnocchi Onlus and Department of Neurology, Policlinico “A. Gemelli”, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Gandolfo, Nicola [IM2S – Institut Monégasque de Médecine and Chirurgie Sportive, Montecarlo (Monaco); Zicca, Anna [Radiologia – DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Tagliafico, Alberto [Radiologia – National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies about the hip may be cause of chronic pain and disability. In most cases, these conditions derive from mechanical or dynamic compression of a segment of a nerve within a narrow osteofibrous tunnel, an opening in a fibrous structure, or a passageway close to a ligament or a muscle. Although the evaluation of nerve disorders primarily relies on neurological examination and electrophysiology, diagnostic imaging is currently used as a complement to help define the site and aetiology of nerve compression and exclude other disease possibly underlying the patient’ symptoms. Diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies about the hip with US and MR imaging requires an in-depth knowledge of the normal imaging anatomy and awareness of the anatomic and pathologic factors that may predispose or cause a nerve injury. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of hip neuropathies with an emphasis on the relevant anatomy, aetiology, clinical presentation, and their imaging appearance. The lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meiralgia paresthetica), femoral neuropathy, sciatic neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, superior and inferior gluteal neuropathies and pudendal neuropathy will be discussed.

  11. Axonal loss and neuroprotection in optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Most optic neuropathies do not have effective treatments. Examples are ischemic optic neuropathy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, optic neuritis, and traumatic optic neuropathy. In some cases, the pathophysiology of the optic nerve injury is not fully understood. For example, while the demyelinative aspects of optic neuritis have been studied, the mechanism by which the axonal loss occurs is less apparent. In other cases, although the pathophysiology of the optic neuropathy may be understood, there is difficulty treating the disease, for example, with traumatic optic neuropathy. In response to this therapeutic dearth, the concept of neuroprotection has arisen. Neuroprotection is a therapeutic paradigm for preventing death of neurons from injury and maintaining function. In optic neuropathies, the corresponding neuron is the retinal ganglion cell. These cells are unable to divide, and optic neuropathies irrevocably result in their death; therefore, the primary target of neuroprotection are retinal ganglion cells and their axons. This review emphasizes that most optic neuropathies are axonal and thus good targets for neuroprotection. PMID:17508035

  12. Imaging of neuropathies about the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuropathies about the hip may be cause of chronic pain and disability. In most cases, these conditions derive from mechanical or dynamic compression of a segment of a nerve within a narrow osteofibrous tunnel, an opening in a fibrous structure, or a passageway close to a ligament or a muscle. Although the evaluation of nerve disorders primarily relies on neurological examination and electrophysiology, diagnostic imaging is currently used as a complement to help define the site and aetiology of nerve compression and exclude other disease possibly underlying the patient’ symptoms. Diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies about the hip with US and MR imaging requires an in-depth knowledge of the normal imaging anatomy and awareness of the anatomic and pathologic factors that may predispose or cause a nerve injury. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of hip neuropathies with an emphasis on the relevant anatomy, aetiology, clinical presentation, and their imaging appearance. The lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meiralgia paresthetica), femoral neuropathy, sciatic neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, superior and inferior gluteal neuropathies and pudendal neuropathy will be discussed

  13. Novel systems for in vivo monitoring and microenvironmental investigations of diabetic neuropathy in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Sharon; Yaron, Avraham

    2012-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a devastating complication of diabetes conferring vast morbidity and mortality. Despite prolonged efforts to elucidate the mechanisms underlying diabetic related neuropathic phenomena and develop effective therapies, current treatment is for the most part glycemic control and symptomatic care. This is partially due to the intricate pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy and the scarcity of valid experimental models. The aim of the study was to establish novel systems enabling monitoring and dissection of significant processes in the development of diabetic neuropathy. In a non-invasive in vivo model, two-photon microscopy is applied to evaluate mechanoreceptors (Meissner corpuscles) within an intact footpad of transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent neuronal tracer. By applying this advanced technology, which couples potent tissue penetration with superb resolution, we documented qualitative and quantitative diabetes-specific alterations in these sensory structures. Detection of such changes previously required laborious invasive histopathological techniques. In parallel, we present an ex vivo system that mimics the native microenvironment of the nerve ending via a unique co-culture of primary sensory neurons and thin skin slices. In conjunction with innovative high-throughput digital axonal measurements and computerized quantification tools, this method enables an unbiased exploration of neuronal autonomous and non-autonomous malfunctions. Using this setup we demonstrate that while the diabetic nerve retains a near-normal growth and regeneration capacities, the diabetic skin exhibits a decreased ability to support axonal outgrowth. Thus, an early target organ failure rather than intrinsic neuronal failure may initiate the neuropathy. Overall, the illustrated experimental platforms may greatly facilitate the holistic investigation of diabetic neuropathy.

  14. Novel systems for in vivo monitoring and microenvironmental investigations of diabetic neuropathy in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Sharon; Yaron, Avraham

    2012-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a devastating complication of diabetes conferring vast morbidity and mortality. Despite prolonged efforts to elucidate the mechanisms underlying diabetic related neuropathic phenomena and develop effective therapies, current treatment is for the most part glycemic control and symptomatic care. This is partially due to the intricate pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy and the scarcity of valid experimental models. The aim of the study was to establish novel systems enabling monitoring and dissection of significant processes in the development of diabetic neuropathy. In a non-invasive in vivo model, two-photon microscopy is applied to evaluate mechanoreceptors (Meissner corpuscles) within an intact footpad of transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent neuronal tracer. By applying this advanced technology, which couples potent tissue penetration with superb resolution, we documented qualitative and quantitative diabetes-specific alterations in these sensory structures. Detection of such changes previously required laborious invasive histopathological techniques. In parallel, we present an ex vivo system that mimics the native microenvironment of the nerve ending via a unique co-culture of primary sensory neurons and thin skin slices. In conjunction with innovative high-throughput digital axonal measurements and computerized quantification tools, this method enables an unbiased exploration of neuronal autonomous and non-autonomous malfunctions. Using this setup we demonstrate that while the diabetic nerve retains a near-normal growth and regeneration capacities, the diabetic skin exhibits a decreased ability to support axonal outgrowth. Thus, an early target organ failure rather than intrinsic neuronal failure may initiate the neuropathy. Overall, the illustrated experimental platforms may greatly facilitate the holistic investigation of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22592935

  15. Assessment of the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic complications of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Christina; Brock, Birgitte; Pedersen, Anne Grave;

    2016-01-01

    of the pathophysiological processes that cause diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Secondly, to discuss both the established and emerging cardiometric methods for evaluating autonomic nervous system function in vivo. Thirdly, to examine the tools for assessing pan-GI and segmental motility and finally, we will provide......The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing; arguably as a consequence of changes in diet, lifestyle and the trend towards urbanization. Unsurprisingly, the incidence of both micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes mirrors this increasing prevalence. Amongst the complications...

  16. Pure Autonomic Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs GARD Information Navigator FAQs About Rare Diseases Pure autonomic failure Title Other Names: Bradbury Eggleston syndrome; ... Categories: Nervous System Diseases ; RDCRN Summary Summary Listen Pure autonomic failure is characterized by generalized autonomic failure ...

  17. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review on psychological and behavioral comorbidities in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. In Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), psychotic symptoms are reported during early stages in 30% of patients. Typical associations include mechanical ventilation, autonomic dysfunction, inability to communicate, and severe weakness. Anxiety and depression are frequent comorbidities. Anxiety may increase post-hospital admissions and be a predictor of mechanical ventilation. Posttraumatic stress disorder may affect up to 20% of ventilated patients. Sleep disturbances are common in early-stage GBS, affecting up to 50% of patients. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, memory and quality of sleep may be impaired. An independent link between depression and pretreatment upper limb disability and ascites was reported in POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin) syndrome, with an association with early death. Hematological treatment of POEMS appears effective on depression. Published literature on psychological/behavioral manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies remains scarce, and further research is needed. Muscle Nerve 54: 1-8, 2016. PMID:26999767

  18. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  19. Sensory neuropathy in two Border collie puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, K; Van Ham, L; Braund, K G; Bhatti, S; Tshamala, M; Chiers, K; Schrauwen, E

    2005-06-01

    A peripheral sensory neuropathy was diagnosed in two Border collie puppies. Neurological, electrophysiological and histopathological examinations suggested a purely sensory neuropathy with mainly distal involvement. Urinary incontinence was observed in one of the puppies and histological examination of the vagus nerve revealed degenerative changes. An inherited disorder was suspected. PMID:15971901

  20. Demyelinating polyneuropathy in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (G11778A mtDNA) and a severe demyelinating neuropathy, for which no other cause except his mitochondrial disorder could be found. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system of patients with LHON, in particular with a 11778 mtDNA, is di

  1. The distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Alexander M; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Reilly, Mary M

    2012-01-01

    The distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that share the common feature of a length-dependent predominantly motor neuropathy. Many forms of dHMN have minor sensory abnormalities and/or a significant upper-motor-neuron component, and there is often an overlap with the axonal forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2) and with juvenile forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia. Eleven causative genes and four loci have been identified with autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked patterns of inheritance. Despite advances in the identification of novel gene mutations, 80% of patients with dHMN have a mutation in an as-yet undiscovered gene. The causative genes have implicated proteins with diverse functions such as protein misfolding (HSPB1, HSPB8, BSCL2), RNA metabolism (IGHMBP2, SETX, GARS), axonal transport (HSPB1, DYNC1H1, DCTN1) and cation-channel dysfunction (ATP7A and TRPV4) in motor-nerve disease. This review will summarise the clinical features of the different subtypes of dHMN to help focus genetic testing for the practising clinician. It will also review the neuroscience that underpins our current understanding of how these mutations lead to a motor-specific neuropathy and highlight potential therapeutic strategies. An understanding of the functional consequences of gene mutations will become increasingly important with the advent of next-generation sequencing and the need to determine the pathogenicity of large amounts of individual genetic data.

  2. De novo mutations in the motor domain of KIF1A cause cognitive impairment, spastic paraparesis, axonal neuropathy, and cerebellar atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Jae Ran; Srour, Myriam; Kim, Doyoun; Hamdan, Fadi F.; Lim, So Hee; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Décarie, Jean Claude; Rossignol, Elsa; Mitchell, Grant A.; Schreiber, Allison; Moran, Rocio; Van Haren, Keith; Richardson, Randal; Nicolai, Joost; Oberndorff, Karin M E J; Wagner, Justin D.; Boycott, Kym M.; Rahikkala, Elisa; Junna, Nella; Tyynismaa, Henna; Cuppen, Inge; Verbeek, Nienke E.; Stumpel, Connie T R M; Willemsen, Michel A.; de Munnik, Sonja A.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Kim, Eunjoon; Kamsteeg, Erik Jan; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Michaud, Jacques L.

    2015-01-01

    KIF1A is a neuron-specific motor protein that plays important roles in cargo transport along neurites. Recessive mutations in KIF1A were previously described in families with spastic paraparesis or sensory and autonomic neuropathy type-2. Here, we report 11 heterozygous de novo missense mutations (p

  3. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yeon; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Chung, Jin Il; Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it.

  4. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it

  5. Autosomal recessive hereditary auditory neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋菊; 顾瑞; 曹菊阳

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory neuropathy (AN) is a sensorineural hearing disorder characterized by absent or abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and normal cochlear outer hair cell function as measured by otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Many risk factors are thought to be involved in its etiology and pathophysiology. Three Chinese pedigrees with familial AN are presented herein to demonstrate involvement of genetic factors in AN etiology. Methods: Probands of the above - mentioned pedigrees, who had been diagnosed with AN, were evaluated and followed up in the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, China PLA General Hospital. Their family members were studied and the pedigree diagrams were established. History of illness, physical examination,pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, ABRs and transient evoked and distortion- product otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs and DPOAEs) were obtained from members of these families. DPOAE changes under the influence of contralateral sound stimuli were observed by presenting a set of continuous white noise to the non - recording ear to exam the function of auditory efferent system. Some subjects received vestibular caloric test, computed tomography (CT)scan of the temporal bone and electrocardiography (ECG) to exclude other possible neuropathy disorders. Results: In most affected subjects, hearing loss of various degrees and speech discrimination difficulties started at 10 to16 years of age. Their audiological evaluation showed absence of acoustic reflex and ABRs. As expected in AN, these subjects exhibited near normal cochlear outer hair cell function as shown in TEOAE & DPOAE recordings. Pure- tone audiometry revealed hearing loss ranging from mild to severe in these patients. Autosomal recessive inheritance patterns were observed in the three families. In Pedigree Ⅰ and Ⅱ, two affected brothers were found respectively, while in pedigree Ⅲ, 2 sisters were affected. All the patients were otherwise normal without

  6. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B;

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  7. Usefulness of myocardial imaging by [sup 123]I-MIBG in assessment of diabetic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katono, Eiichi; Owada, Kenji; Takeda, Hiroto; Techigawara, Masa-aki (Ohta Nishinouchi Hospital, Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan)); Watanabe, Naohiko; Maruyama, Yukio

    1993-10-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, it is suggested that there is a reduced uptake of [sup 123]I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in the heart. We compared the difference of myocardial [sup 123]I-MIBG accumulation between 4 diabetic patients with triopathy and 6 patients without it. In all 10 patients, coronary angiography and [sup 201]Tl imaging (rest and 4 hours later) were performed. [sup 123]I-MIBG (111 MBq) was administered intravenously and its imaging was recorded on 15 minutes and 4 hours after injection. In all 4 cases with triopathy, [sup 123]I-MIBG imaging showed defect in apical and inferior region. In 2 out of 6 cases without triopathy, rapid clearance was noticed in apical and inferior region. There was no significant stenosis in right coronary artery and no defect in initial and delayed [sup 201]Tl images in all cases. We concluded that diabetic autonomic neuropathy in the heart was prominent in apical and inferior region and [sup 123]I-MIBG imaging might be useful for the evaluation of degrees in diabetic neuropathy. (author).

  8. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  9. [Hereditary optic neuropathies: clinical and molecular genetic characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanakova, N A; Sheremet, N L; Loginova, A N; Chukhrova, A L; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a review of literature on hereditary optic neuropathies: Leber mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathy, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive optic neuropathies, X-linked optic atrophy. Clinical and molecular genetic characteristics are covered. Isolated optic neuropathies, as well as hereditary optic disorders, being a part of a complex syndromic disease are described.

  10. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  11. Recessively transmitted predominantly motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, Yeşim; Battaloğlu, Esra

    2013-01-01

    Recessively transmitted predominantly motor neuropathies are rare and show a severe phenotype. They are frequently observed in populations with a high rate of consanguineous marriages. At least 15 genes and six loci have been found to be associated with autosomal recessive CMT (AR-CMT) and X-linked CMT (AR-CMTX) and also distal hereditary motor neuronopathy (AR-dHMN). These disorders are genetically heterogeneous but the clinical phenotype is relatively homogeneous. Distal muscle weakness and atrophy predominating in the lower extremities, diminished or absent deep tendon reflexes, distal sensory loss, and pes cavus are the main clinical features of this disorder with occasional cranial nerve involvement. Although genetic diagnosis of some of subtypes of AR-CMT are now available, rapid advances in the molecular genetics and cell biology show a great complexity. Animal models for the most common subtypes of human AR-CMT disease provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of CMT and also help to reveal possible treatment strategies of inherited neuropathies. This chapter highlights the clinical features and the recent genetic and biological findings in these disorders based on the current classification.

  12. Clinical assessment of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes mellitus and its correlation with glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday B Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Clinical assessment of the autonomic nervous system in Diabetes mellitus (DM and its correlation with glycemic control. STUDY DESIGN: Cross sectional study of 50 adult diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with DM who were on regular treatment with either insulin and/or oral hypoglycemic agents were studied. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN score was calculated using the clinical test variables. Results: Of the 50 patients 30 had no CAN, 10 had early CAN and 10 had severe CAN. The mean of CAN score increased with duration of diabetes. The mean HbA 1C was 7.73. The mean CAN score was higher in patients who had complication of diabetes as compared to patients without complications. The heart rate variability with respiration was found to be 15.84 ± 7.02/min. The mean valsalva ratio was 1.31 ± 0.23. The mean drop in BP on standing was 7.30 ± 7.24 mmHg. The mean 30:15 ratio was 1.06 ± 0.04. The mean rise in diastolic BP on sustained hand grip was 16.04 ± 4.11 mmHg. Conclusions: The prevalence of autonomic neuropathy in DM as assessed by CAN score was 40%. The CAN score did not correlate with the duration of DM. The HbA 1C had a significant correlation with the severity of autonomic neuropathy. Occurrence of CAN correlated with the presence of peripheral neuropathy but not with the presence of retinopathy or nephropathy. All individual tests in the battery of CAN score were significantly associated with the presence of autonomic neuropathy, except 30:15 ratio.

  13. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad TALEBIAN*

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Talebian A, Goudarzi RM, Mohammadzadeh M , Mirzadeh AS. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:66-68. AbstractVincristine (VCR is a vinca alkaloid that is used for treatment of many malignancies.The vinca alkaloids are neurotoxic, usually causing a peripheral neuropathy, but cranial neuropathies are rare as side effects. Described here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy, a known case of Wilms’ tumor, treated by vincristine (0/067 mg/kg/day and dactinomycin (0/045 mg/kg/day after surgery. Three weeks after treatment, he presented with bilateral ptosis.Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis with normal pupillary reflex and eye movement. He received 3.015 mg cumulative dose of vincristine before development of ptosis.Treatment with pyridoxine (150 mg/m2 p.o. BID and pyridostigmine (3 mg/kg p.o. BID started as neuroprotective agents, and after 7 days the problem disappeared.The treatment continued for 6 weeks and there were no signs of ptosis or a recurrence in follow up 2 months later. References:Toopchizade V, Hosseini M, et al. Electrophysiological signs of neuropathy caused by vincristine. Medical Journal of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. 2010 Autumn;31(3; 19-25.Gursel E.S. Vincristine-Induced Unilateral Ptosis in a Child. Pediatr Neurol 2009; 41:461-463.Ngamphaiboon N, Sweeney R, Wetzler M, Wang ES. Pyridoxine treatment of vincristine-induced cranial polyneuropathy in an adult patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia: Case report and review of the literature. Leuk Res. 2010 Aug;34(8:e194-6.Lash SC, Williams CP, Marsh CS, Crithchley C, Hodgkins PR, Mackie EJ. Acute Sixth-Nerve Palsy After Vincristine Therapy. Journal of AAPOS 2004 Feb;8(1: 67-8.Bay A, Yilmaz C, Yilmaz N, Oner AF. Vincristine induced cranial polyneuropathy. Indian J Pediatr. 2006 Jun;73(6:531-3.Tuxen M K, Hansen SW. Complication of treatment, Neurotoxicity secondary to antineoplastic

  14. Comparing the Accuracy of ES-BC, EIS-GS, and ES Oxi on Body Composition, Autonomic Nervous System Activity, and Cardiac Outputto Standardized Assessments%ES-BC,EIS-GS与ES Oxi测量方法准确率研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋军

    2014-01-01

    人体生物刺激反馈仪通常包括三种测量原理,即ES-BC(生物电阻抗)、EIS-GS(皮电反应)和ES Oxi(光度法),本文通过文献检索研究,分析三种测量方式的准确性,探讨其在临床应用中的价值。%The Electro Sensor Complex (ESC) is software that combines three devices using bioelectrical impedance, galvanic skin response, and spectrophotometry: (1) ES-BC (Electro Sensor-Body Composition; to assess body composition, (2) EIS-GS to predict autonomic nervous system activity, and (3) ES Oxi to assess cardiac output. analysis of clinical application of human biological stimulation feedback Instrument.

  15. Chronic dysimmune neuropathies: Beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadilkar Satish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of chronic dysimmune neuropathies has widened well beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP. Pure motor (multifocal motor neuropathy, sensorimotor with asymmetrical involvement (multifocal acquired demylinating sensory and motor neuropathy, exclusively distal sensory (distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy and very proximal sensory (chronic immune sensory polyradiculopathy constitute the variants of CIDP. Correct diagnosis of these entities is of importance in terms of initiation of appropriate therapy as well as prognostication of these patients. The rates of detection of immune-mediated neuropathies with monoclonal cell proliferation (monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, multiple myeloma, etc. have been facilitated as better diagnostic tools such as serum immunofixation electrophoresis are being used more often. Immune neuropathies associated with malignancies and systemic vasculitic disorders are being defined further and treated early with better understanding of the disease processes. As this field of dysimmune neuropathies will evolve in the future, some of the curious aspects of the clinical presentations and response patterns to different immunosuppressants or immunomodulators will be further elucidated. This review also discusses representative case studies.

  16. Drugs for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent in association with systemic diseases as well as isolated disorders. Recent advances in the therapy of specific neuropathies led to the approval of new drugs/treatments. This review selected those peripheral neuropathies where the most recent approvals were provided and revised the potential future developments in diabetic and toxic-induced neuropathies, although they do not have a currently available causal therapy in view of their epidemiological and social relevance. Data have been extracted from the most important published trials and from clinical experience. In addition, data from the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency indications on the treatment of the selected peripheral neuropathies and from recently updated international guidelines have also been included. The website of the U.S. National Institutes of Health www.clinicaltrials.gov registry has been used as the reference database for phase III clinical trials not yet published or ongoing. This review gives a general overview of the most recent advances in the treatment of amyloid, inflammatory, and paraproteinemic peripheral neuropathies. Moreover, it briefly describes the unmet medical need in disabling and frequent conditions, such as diabetic and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, highlighting the most promising therapeutic approaches to their treatment.

  17. A patient with PMP22-related hereditary neuropathy and DBH-gene-related dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Chiaro, Giacomo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Contin, Manuela; Scaglione, Cesa; Barletta, Giorgio; Cecere, Annagrazia; Garagnani, Paolo; Tieri, Paolo; Ferrarini, Alberto; Piras, Silvia; Franceschi, Claudio; Delledonne, Massimo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent focal neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a relatively frequent autosomal-dominant demyelinating neuropathy linked to peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene deletions. The combination of PMP22 gene mutations with other genetic variants is known to cause a more severe phenotype than expected. We present the case of a patient with severe orthostatic hypotension since 12 years of age, who inherited a PMP22 gene deletion from his father. Genetic double trouble was suspected because of selective sympathetic autonomic disturbances. Through exome-sequencing analysis, we identified two novel mutations in the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene. Moreover, with interactome analysis, we excluded a further influence on the origin of the disease by variants in other genes. This case increases the number of unique patients presenting with dopamine-β-hydroxylase deficiency and of cases with genetically proven double trouble. Finding the right, complete diagnosis is crucial to obtain adequate medical care and appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:26410747

  18. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A;

    2014-01-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy...... of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted...... toward the therapeutic efficacy of drug interventions....

  19. Electrodiagnostic testing in diabetic neuropathy: Which limb?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, E; Cocito, D

    2015-10-01

    Electrodiagnosis of subclinical diabetic neuropathies by nerve conduction studies remains challenging. The question arises about which nerves should be tested and what the best electrodiagnostic protocol to make an early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathies would be. On the basis of our findings and other evidence, which highlighted the remarkable prevalence of electrophysiological abnormalities in nerve conduction studies of the upper limbs, often in the presence of normal lower limb conduction parameters, we suggest that both ulnar and median nerves, in their motor and sensitive component, should be the two target nerves for electrodiagnostic protocols in diabetic neuropathies.

  20. Cardiac sympathetic neuronal imaging using PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautamaeki, Riikka; Tipre, Dnyanesh [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Bengel, Frank M. [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Balance of the autonomic nervous system is essential for adequate cardiac performance, and alterations seem to play a key role in the development and progression of various cardiac diseases. PET imaging of the cardiac autonomic nervous system has advanced extensively in recent years, and multiple pre- and postsynaptic tracers have been introduced. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PET enables noninvasive quantification of neurophysiologic processes at the tissue level. Ligands for catecholamine receptors, along with radiolabeled catecholamines and catecholamine analogs, have been applied to determine involvement of sympathetic dysinnervation at different stages of heart diseases such as ischemia, heart failure, and arrhythmia. This review summarizes the recent findings in neurocardiological PET imaging. Experimental studies with several radioligands and clinical findings in cardiac dysautonomias are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy after conventional coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorecka, Mariola; Miniewicz-Kurkowska, Joanna; Romaniuk, Dorota; Gajdzik-Gajdecka, Urszula; Wójcik-Niklewska, Bogumiła

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Perioperative optic neuropathy is a disease which can lead to serious, irreversible damage of vision. This complication could be the result of non-ocular surgery, for example, cardiac or spinal procedures. We present a case of anterior ischemic neuropathy (AION) which occurred following a conventional coronary artery bypass graft procedure. Case Report A 57-year-old man, 4 days after Conventional Coronary Artery Bypass Graft surgery as result of multi-vessel stabile coronary artery disease and history of anterolateral wall myocardial infarction, was admitted to the Eye Clinic due to significant loss of vision in his right eye. The patient had hypertension and was a heavy smoker. On admission, the slit lamp examination revealed a relative afferent pupillary defect in the right eye. The fundus examination showed optic disc edema with the presence of flame hemorrhages. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.02. The results of eye examination and fluorescein angiography confirmed the diagnosis of AION. Anti-aggregation and antithrombotic treatment was continued with steroids and vasodilators. After 7 days of this treatment we noticed the improvement of BCVA to 0.2. At 6-month follow-up, the vision was stable, and fundus examination revealed optic disc atrophy. Conclusions After cardiac surgical operations, such as coronary artery bypass graft procedures, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy may occur. In those cases, close cooperation between the various specialists is necessary. PMID:21629193

  2. Linezolid-induced optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Karuppannasamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many systemic antimicrobials have been implicated to cause ocular adverse effects. This is especially relevant in multidrug therapy where more than one drug can cause a similar ocular adverse effect. We describe a case of progressive loss of vision associated with linezolid therapy. A 45-year-old male patient who was on treatment with multiple second-line anti-tuberculous drugs including linezolid and ethambutol for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB presented to us with painless progressive loss of vision in both eyes. Color vision was defective and fundus examination revealed optic disc edema in both eyes. Ethambutol-induced toxic optic neuropathy was suspected and tablet ethambutol was withdrawn. Deterioration of vision occurred despite withdrawal of ethambutol. Discontinuation of linezolid resulted in marked improvement of vision. Our report emphasizes the need for monitoring of visual function in patients on long-term linezolid treatment.

  3. Infectious optic neuropathies: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahloun R

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rim Kahloun, Nesrine Abroug, Imen Ksiaa, Anis Mahmoud, Hatem Zeghidi, Sonia Zaouali, Moncef KhairallahDepartment of Ophthalmology, Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Monastir, Monastir, TunisiaAbstract: Different forms of optic neuropathy causing visual impairment of varying severity have been reported in association with a wide variety of infectious agents. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious conditions is based on epidemiological data, history, systemic symptoms and signs, and the pattern of ocular findings. Diagnosis is confirmed by serologic testing and polymerase chain reaction in selected cases. Treatment of infectious optic neuropathies involves the use of specific anti-infectious drugs and corticosteroids to suppress the associated inflammatory reaction. The visual prognosis is generally good, but persistent severe vision loss with optic atrophy can occur. This review presents optic neuropathies caused by specific viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal diseases.Keywords: optic neuropathy, viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungi, vaccination

  4. Bicycling induced pudendal nerve pressure neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, P L; Dunne, J W; Edis, R H; Stewart-Wynne, E G

    1991-01-01

    Pudendal neuropathies are well recognised as part of more generalised peripheral neuropathies; however, focal abnormalities of the pudendal nerve due to cycling-related injuries have been infrequently reported. We describe two patients who developed pudendal neuropathies secondary to pressure effects on the perineum from racing-bicycle saddles. Both were male competitive athletes, one of whom developed recurrent numbness of the penis and scrotum after prolonged cycling; the other developed numbness of the penis, an altered sensation of ejaculation, with disturbance of micturition and reduced awareness of defecation. Both patients improved with alterations in saddle position and riding techniques. We conclude that pudendal nerve pressure neuropathy can result from prolonged cycling, particularly when using a poor riding technique. PMID:1821826

  5. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in giant axonal neuropathy: new insights into disease mechanisms. Muscle Nerve. 2012 Aug;46(2):246-56. ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  6. [Peripheral neuropathy caused by acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Campos, J; Ramos-Peek, J; Martínez-Barros, M; Zamora-Peralta, M; Martínez-Cerrato, J

    1998-01-01

    Although peripheral neuropathy is a fairly common finding in chronic arsenic poisoning, little is known about the acute effects of this metal on peripheral nerves. This report shows clinical and electrophysiological findings in a patient who developed peripheral neuropathy only three days after a high-dose ingestion of this metal due to a failed suicide attempt. We speculate that peripheral nerves and some cranial nerves can show not only clinical but also subclinical involvement that can only be detected by neurophysiological studies.

  7. Multiple cranial neuropathies following etanercept administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There have been recent reports of sarcoid-like granulomatosis development following the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. To date, only four cases of neurosarcoidosis have been reported in association with TNF inhibitors, two of which were attributed to etanercept. We present the first case of etanercept-induced neurosarcoidosis involving multiple cranial neuropathies, including the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves, while also highlighting the differential diagnoses of multiple cranial neuropathies and the association of TNF inhibitors and neurosarcoidosis. PMID:27178520

  8. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function.

  9. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  10. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed 9/2/2015. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy Summary. Dysautonomia International . http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID= ... page Basic Information In Depth Information Basic Information Dysautonomia International offers an information page on Autoimmune autonomic ...

  11. MOMORDICA CHARANTIA PROTECTS AGAINST CARDIAC DAMAGE IN STREPTOZOTOCIN-INDUCED DIABETIC WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A Komolafe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important world health problems, especially in developing countries where prevalence and incidence rates are highest. Diabetic patients are particularly prone to cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetic cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. The present study investigated the effects of Momordica charantia (M. charantia on histological changes of the left ventricle of the heart in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Forty healthy adult Wistar rats of both sexes were randomly assigned into five groups A, B, C, D and E of eight rats each. Group A were the control (normal rats; B were the experimentally-induced diabetic rats; C were diabetic rats treated with methanolic extracts of M. charantia for two weeks (withdrawal group; D were diabetic rats treated with methanolic extracts of M. charantia for four weeks. E was diabetic rats treated with glimepiride for four weeks. Tissues were harvested, processed routinely in paraffin wax and stained with routine and special stains. Histological studies revealed disorganization of myofibril in the left ventricle of diabetic rats. Histochemical analysis also revealed abnormal deposition of glycogen in left ventricle of diabetic rats. M. charantia and glimperide attenuated the morphological alterations and reduced the glycogen deposits.

  12. [Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, M Yu; Piradov, M A; Suanova, E T; Sineva, N A

    2015-01-01

    Review of literature on the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are presented. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are primary headaches with phenotype consisting of trigeminal pain with autonomic sign including lacrimation, rhinorrhea and miosis. Discussed are issues of classification, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of this headache. Special attention is paid to cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT syndrome, hemicrania continua.

  13. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction and serum levels of neurotoxic and neurotrophic cytokines in patients with cobalamin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan Çeneli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available neurotrophiccytokines epidermal growth factor (EGF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 plays a role in the pathogenesisof cobalamin (Cbl deficiency-induced neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomicnervous system dysfunction and to look for any relationship between autonomic nervous systemdisturbances and serum cytokine levels (TNF-

  14. MR neurography in ulnar neuropathy as surrogate parameter for the presence of disseminated neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Bäumer

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Patients with ulnar neuropathy of unclear etiology occasionally present with lesion extension from elbow to upper arm level on MRI. This study investigated whether MRI thereby distinguishes multifocal neuropathy from focal-compressive neuropathy at the elbow. METHODS: This prospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. 122 patients with ulnar mononeuropathy of undetermined localization and etiology by clinical and electrophysiological examination were assessed by MRI at upper arm and elbow level using T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences at 3T. Twenty-one patients were identified with proximal ulnar nerve lesions and evaluated for findings suggestive of disseminated neuropathy (i subclinical lesions in other nerves, (ii unfavorable outcome after previous decompressive elbow surgery, and (iii subsequent diagnosis of inflammatory or other disseminated neuropathy. Two groups served as controls for quantitative analysis of nerve-to-muscle signal intensity ratios: 20 subjects with typical focal ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and 20 healthy subjects. RESULTS: In the group of 21 patients with proximal ulnar nerve lesion extension, T2-w ulnar nerve signal was significantly (p<0.001 higher at upper arm level than in both control groups. A cut-off value of 1.92 for maximum nerve-to-muscle signal intensity ratio was found to be sensitive (86% and specific (100% to discriminate this group. Ten patients (48% exhibited additional T2-w lesions in the median and/or radial nerve. Another ten (48% had previously undergone elbow surgery without satisfying outcome. Clinical follow-up was available in 15 (71% and revealed definitive diagnoses of multifocal neuropathy of various etiologies in four patients. In another eight, diagnoses could not yet be considered definitive but were consistent with multifocal neuropathy. CONCLUSION: Proximal ulnar nerve T2 lesions at upper

  15. Cardiac Malpositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Shi Joon; Im, Chung Gie; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Hasn, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    Cardiac Malposition refers to any position of the heart other than a left-sided heart in a situs solitus individual. Associated cardiac malformations are so complex that even angiocardiographic and autopsy studies may not afford an accurate information. Although the terms and classifications used to describe the internal cardiac anatomy and their arterial connections in cardiac malpositions differ and tend to be confusing, common agreement exists on the need for a segmental approach to diagnosis. Authors present 18 cases of cardiac malpositions in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between 1971 and 1979. Authors analyzed the clinical, radiographic, operative and autopsy findings with the emphasis on the angiocardiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 18 cases with cardiac malpositions, 6 cases had dextrocardia with situs inversus, 9 cases had dextrocardia with situs solitus and 3 cases had levocardia with situs inversus. 2. There was no genuine exception to visceroatrial concordance rule. 3. Associated cardiac malpositions were variable and complex with a tendency of high association of transposition and double outlet varieties with dextrocardia in situs solitus and levocardia in situs inversus. Only one in 6 cases of dextrocardia with situs inversus had pure transposition. 4. In two cases associated pulmonary atresia was found at surgery which was not predicted by angiocardiography. 5. Because many of the associated complex lesions can be corrected surgically provided the diagnosis is accurate, the selective biplane angiocardiography with or without cineradiography is essential.

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Prem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the fourth leading cause of death world-wide and a further increase in the prevalence as well as mortality of the disease is predicted for coming decades. There is now an increased appreciation for the need to build awareness regarding COPD and to help the thousands of people who suffer from this disease and die prematurely from COPD or its associated complication(s. Peripheral neuropathy in COPD has received scanty attention despite the fact that very often clinicians come across COPD patients having clinical features suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. Electrophysiological tests like nerve conduction studies are required to distinguish between axonal and demyelinating type of disorder that cannot be analyzed by clinical examination alone. However, various studies addressing peripheral neuropathy in COPD carried out so far have included patients with COPD having markedly varying baseline characteristics like severe hypoxemia, elderly patients, those with long duration of illness, etc. that are not uniform across the studies and make it difficult to interpret the results to a consistent conclusion. Almost one-third of COPD patients have clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathy and two-thirds have electrophysiological abnormalities. Some patients with no clinical indication of peripheral neuropathy do have electrophysiological deficit suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. The more frequent presentation consists of a polyneuropathy that is subclinical or with predominantly sensory signs, and the neurophysiological and pathological features of predominantly axonal neuropathy. The presumed etiopathogenic factors are multiple: chronic hypoxia, tobacco smoke, alcoholism, malnutrition and adverse effects of certain drugs.

  17. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Saad; Petropoulos, Ioannis N; Alam, Uazman; Malik, Rayaz A

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating consequence of diabetes that may be present in as many as one in five patients with diabetes. The objective assessment of PDN is difficult, making it challenging to diagnose and assess in both clinical practice and clinical trials. No single treatment exists to prevent or reverse neuropathic changes or to provide total pain relief. Treatment of PDN is based on three major approaches: intensive glycaemic control and risk factor management, treatments based on pathogenetic mechanisms, and symptomatic pain management. Clinical guidelines recommend pain relief in PDN through the use of antidepressants such as amitriptyline and duloxetine, the γ-aminobutyric acid analogues gabapentin and pregabalin, opioids and topical agents such as capsaicin. Of these medications, duloxetine and pregabalin were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2004 and tapentadol extended release was approved in 2012 for the treatment of PDN. Proposed pathogenetic treatments include α-lipoic acid (stems reactive oxygen species formation), benfotiamine (prevents vascular damage in diabetes) and aldose-reductase inhibitors (reduces flux through the polyol pathway). There is a growing need for studies to evaluate the most potent drugs or combinations for the management of PDN to maximize pain relief and improve quality of life. A number of agents are potential candidates for future use in PDN therapy, including Nav 1.7 antagonists, N-type calcium channel blockers, NGF antibodies and angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonists. PMID:25553239

  18. [Current issues in hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, A

    2013-12-01

    This short review highlights five studies published in 2012 in the field of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and transthyretin familial amyloid neuropathies (TTR-FAN). Regarding CMT, an Australian pediatric study shows the high prevalence of impaired speech perception and hearing disability in children with CMT1 or CMT2 with normal or near normal audiometry (Rance et al., 2012). In a second study, the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of 14 patients with CMT4C due to mutations in SH3TC2 gene are described (Yger et al., 2012). The 3 clinical hallmarks of CMT4C patients in this French cohort are the high prevalence of scoliosis, the proximal motor weakness and the cranial nerves involvement. Concerning TTR-FAN, the first data from French and international registries are reported (Adams et al., 2012; Coelho et al., 2013) and a phase II trial describes the results of taurourodeoxycholic acid and doxycycline treatment (Obici et al., 2012).

  19. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Reichmann, Heinz

    2010-02-15

    Symptoms of cardiovascular dysautonomia are a common occurrence in Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition to this dysautonomia as part of PD itself, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) can be triggered as a side-effect of drug treatment interacting with the ANS or - if prominent and early - an indication of a different disease such as multiple system atrophy (MSA). Various diagnostic tests are available to demonstrate autonomic failure. While autonomic function tests can differentiate parasympathetic from sympathetic dysfunction, cardiac imaging can define the pathophysiologically involved site of a lesion. Standard tests such as 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements can identify significant autonomic failure which needs treatment. The most frequent and disturbing symptom of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is orthostatic hypotension. Symptoms include generalized weakness, light-headiness, mental "clouding" up to syncope. Factors like heat, food, alcohol, exercise, activities which increase intrathoraric pressure (e.g. defecation, coughing) and certain drugs (e.g. vasodilators) can worsen a probably asymptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Non-medical and medical therapies can help the patient to cope with a disabling symptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Supine hypertension is often associated with orthostatic hypotension. The prognostic role of cardiovagal and baroreflex dysfunction is still not yet known.

  20. [The role of the immune system in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäurer, M; Toyka, K V; Martini, R

    2005-06-01

    Hereditary neuropathies, e.g., Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are inherited diseases of the peripheral nervous system causing chronic progressive motor and sensory dysfunction. Most neuropathies are due to mutations in myelin genes such as PMP22, P0, and the gap junction protein Cx32. Myelin mutant mice are regarded as suitable animal models for several forms of hereditary neuropathies and are important neurobiological tools for the evaluation of pathogenetic and therapeutic concepts in hereditary neuropathies. Using these animal models we could recently show that the immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies. Due to the phenotypic similarities we also consider the immune system important for human inherited neuropathies, in particular since several case reports demonstrate a beneficial effect of immune therapies in patients with hereditary neuropathies. In this review we compare findings from animal models and human disease to elucidate the role of the immune system in hereditary neuropathies.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions NARP neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa ( NARP ) is a condition that ...

  2. Ischemic neuropathy and rhabdomyolysis as presenting symptoms of postpartum cardiomyopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Schoonderwaldt, H.C.; Janssen, M.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis and peripheral neuropathy are two distinct disease entities which are rarely encountered in combination. We present a woman with rhabdomyolysis and peripheral neuropathy 3 weeks postpartum. Her symptoms were caused by bilateral femoral artery thrombosis due to postpartum cardiomyopath

  3. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  4. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 2: PROXIMAL AND ASSYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    OpenAIRE

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy, there are many other subtypes of diabetic neuropathies which have been defined since the 1800’s. Included in these descriptions are patients with proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these n...

  5. Health State Preference Assessment in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Sean D.; Doris P. Lew; E. Beth Devine; Zafar Hakim; Gayle E. Reiber; Veenstra, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess patient preferences for health states associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Design and intervention: Seven health states describing varying stages of disease severity in DPN were developed: mild neuropathy, painful neuropathy, severe neuropathy, minor ulcer, severe ulcer, minor amputation and major amputation. Using a computer interview, both rating scale (RS) and standard gamble (SG) preference scores were elicited from 52 patients with diabetes mellitus....

  6. Animal Models of Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Environmental Toxicants

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Deepa B.; Jortner, Bernard S.; Sills, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress in our understanding of pathogeneses and the identification of etiologies of peripheral neuropathy, idiopathic neuropathy remains common. Typically, attention to peripheral neuropathies resulting from exposure to environmental agents is limited relative to more commonly diagnosed causes of peripheral neuropathy (diabetes and chemotherapeutic agents). Given that there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and that at...

  7. Femoral compressive neuropathy from iliopsoas haematoma complicating dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sneha Ganu; Yesha Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is a debilitating mosquito-borne disease caused by dengue virus. We reported a case of femoral compression neuropathy due to iliopsoas hematoma complicating dengue hemorrhagic fever. Iliopsoas muscle hematoma can cause femoral neuropathy with resultant pain and paralysis. Such manifestations are not well documented in the literature. The pathogenesis of hematoma and compressive neuropathy with its appropriate management is discussed.

  8. Autonomic and sensory nerve dysfunction in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katalin Keresztes; Ildikó Istenes; Aniko Folhoffer; Peter L Lakatos; Andrea Horvath; Timea Csak; Peter Varga; Peter Kempler; Ferenc Szalay

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Cardiovascular autonomic and peripheral sensory neuropathy is a known complication of chronic alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver diseases. We aimed to assess the prevalence and risk factors for peripheral sensory nerve and autonomic dysfunction using sensitive methods in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC).METHODS: Twenty-four AMA M2 positive female patients with clinical, biochemical and histological evidence of PBC and 20 age matched healthy female subjects were studied.Five standard cardiovascular reflex tests and 24-h heart rate variability (HRV) analysis were performed to define autonomic function. Peripheral sensory nerve function on median and peroneal nerves was characterized by current perception threshold (CPT), measured by a neuroselective diagnostic stimulator (Neurotron, Baltimore, MD).RESULTS: Fourteen of 24 patients (58%) had at least one abnormal cardiovascular reflex test and thirteen (54%)had peripheral sensory neuropathy. Lower heart rate response to deep breathing (P = 0.001), standing (P = 0.03)and Valsalva manoeuvre (P = 0.01), and more profound decrease of blood pressure after standing (P = 0.03) was found in PBC patients than in controls. As a novel finding we proved that both time domain and frequency domain parameters of 24-h HRV were significantly reduced in PBC patients compared to controls. Each patient had at least one abnormal parameter of HRV. Lower CPT values indicated hyperaesthesia as a characteristic feature at peroneal nerve testing at three frequencies (2000 Hz: P = 0.005;250 Hz: P = 0.002; 5 Hz: P = 0.004) in PBC compared to controls. Correlation of autonomic dysfunction with the severity and duration of the disease was observed. Lower total power of HRV correlated with lower CPT values at median nerve testing at 250 Hz (P = 0.0001) and at 5 Hz (P = 0.002), as well as with those at peroneal nerve testing at 2000 Hz (P = 0.01).CONCLUSION: Autonomic and sensory nerve dysfunctions are frequent in PBC. Twenty

  9. Exercise and the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Levine, Benjamin D

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays a crucial role in the cardiovascular response to acute (dynamic) exercise in animals and humans. During exercise, oxygen uptake is a function of the triple-product of heart rate and stroke volume (i.e., cardiac output) and arterial-mixed venous oxygen difference (the Fick principle). The degree to which each of the variables can increase determines maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max). Both "central command" and "the exercise pressor reflex" are important in determining the cardiovascular response and the resetting of the arterial baroreflex during exercise to precisely match systemic oxygen delivery with metabolic demand. In general, patients with autonomic disorders have low levels of V˙O2max, indicating reduced physical fitness and exercise capacity. Moreover, the vast majority of the patients have blunted or abnormal cardiovascular response to exercise, especially during maximal exercise. There is now convincing evidence that some of the protective and therapeutic effects of chronic exercise training are related to the impact on the autonomic nervous system. Additionally, training induced improvement in vascular function, blood volume expansion, cardiac remodeling, insulin resistance and renal-adrenal function may also contribute to the protection and treatment of cardiovascular, metabolic and autonomic disorders. Exercise training also improves mental health, helps to prevent depression, and promotes or maintains positive self-esteem. Moderate-intensity exercise at least 30 minutes per day and at least 5 days per week is recommended for the vast majority of people. Supervised exercise training is preferable to maximize function capacity, and may be particularly important for patients with autonomic disorders. PMID:24095123

  10. Treatment of Diabetic Neuropathy- Principles and Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is one of the common complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), its incidence can be as high as over 90%. The lesion can involve the sensory, motor and vegetative nerves. As a whole, the lesion can be divided into symmetric multiple neuropathy and asymmetric single neuropathy. Because the pathogenesis of the disease is not clear, no specific therapy is available so far. Besides control of blood sugar level, vitamin B, vasodilators and analgesics are often used in Western medicine for expectant treatment. Basic studies on chronic complications of DM show that aldose reductase and non-enzymatic glycosylation of protein are factors initiating the pathological changes, inhibitors against them have been tested in experimental studies and proved effective. Unfortunately, they are not used clinically due to severe side effects. Screening for herbal drugs to treat DN is still a popular trend in the TCM circle.

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  12. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve function in alcoholic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Andersen, K; Smith, T;

    1984-01-01

    The peripheral sympathetic vasomotor nerve function was investigated in 18 male chronic alcoholics admitted for intellectual impairment or polyneuropathy. By means of the local 133Xenon washout technique, the sympathetic veno-arteriolar axon-reflex was studied. This normally is responsible for a 50...... (18% and 48% decrease respectively). However, in three patients with moderate neuropathy, and in one patient with no signs of neuropathy, this veno-arteriolar reflex was absent, indicating dysfunction of the peripheral sympathetic adrenergic nerve fibres. The three patients also showed a lesser degree...

  13. [Peripheral neuropathies associated with hereditary cerebellar ataxias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, M; Tranchant, C

    2011-01-01

    Inherited cerebellar ataxias constitute a complicated and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting the cerebellum and/or spinocerebellar tract, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. A peripheral neuropathy is frequently seen in inherited cerebellar ataxias although it rarely reveals the disease. Moreover, the peripheral neuropathy is helpful for the diagnostic procedure and contributes to the functional prognosis of the disease. Thus, electroneuromyography is essential in the algorithm for the diagnosis of inherited cerebellar ataxias, as well as brain MRI (looking especially for cerebellar atrophy) and the assessment of several biomarkers (alpha-foetoprotein, vitamin E, albumin, LDL cholesterol, lactic acid, phytanic acid).

  14. Quick, non-invasive and quantitative assessment of small fiber neuropathy in patients receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Mehdi; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tafani, Camille; Sallansonnet-Froment, Magali; Calvet, Jean-Henri; Vilier, Alice; Tigaud, Jean-Marie; Bompaire, Flavie; Lebouteux, Marie; de Greslan, Thierry; Ceccaldi, Bernard; Poirier, Jean-Michel; Ferrand, François-Régis; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Huillard, Olivier; Goldwasser, François; Taillia, Hervé; Maisonobe, Thierry; Ricard, Damien

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (CIPN) is a common, potentially severe and dose-limiting adverse effect; however, it is poorly investigated at an early stage due to the lack of a simple assessment tool. As sweat glands are innervated by small autonomic C-fibers, sudomotor function testing has been suggested for early screening of peripheral neuropathy. This study aimed to evaluate Sudoscan, a non-invasive and quantitative method to assess sudomotor function, in the detection and follow-up of CIPN. Eighty-eight patients receiving at least two infusions of Oxaliplatin only (45.4%), Paclitaxel only (14.8%), another drug only (28.4%) or two drugs (11.4%) were enrolled in the study. At each chemotherapy infusion the accumulated dose of chemotherapy was calculated and the Total Neuropathy Score clinical version (TNSc) was carried out. Small fiber neuropathy was assessed using Sudoscan (a 3-min test). The device measures the Electrochemical Skin Conductance (ESC) of the hands and feet expressed in microSiemens (µS). For patients receiving Oxaliplatin mean hands ESC changed from 73 ± 2 to 63 ± 2 and feet ESC from 77 ± 2 to 66 ± 3 µS (p < 0.001) while TNSc changed from 2.9 ± 0.5 to 4.3 ± 0.4. Similar results were observed in patients receiving Paclitaxel or another neurotoxic chemotherapy. During the follow-up, ESC values of both hands and feet with a corresponding TNSc < 2 were 70 ± 2 and 73 ± 2 µS respectively while they were 59 ± 1.4 and 64 ± 1.5 µS with a corresponding TNSc ≥ 6 (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0003 respectively). This preliminary study suggests that small fiber neuropathy could be screened and followed using Sudoscan in patients receiving chemotherapy. PMID:26749101

  15. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, Franz

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  16. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 2: PROXIMAL AND ASSYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy, there are many other subtypes of diabetic neuropathies which have been defined since the 1800’s. Included in these descriptions are patients with proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most of these requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions but are quite controversial. PMID:23642718

  17. Autonomic hyper-vigilance in post-infective fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yumiko; Cooper, Gavin; Burton, Alexander R; Lemon, Jim; Schall, Ulrich; Lloyd, Andrew; Vollmer-Conna, Ute

    2010-09-01

    This study examined whether post-infective fatigue syndrome (PIFS) is associated with a disturbance in bidirectional autonomic signalling resulting in heightened perception of symptoms and sensations from the body in conjunction with autonomic hyper-reactivity to perceived challenges. We studied 23 patients with PIFS and 25 healthy matched control subjects. A heartbeat discrimination task and a pressure pain threshold test were used to assess interoceptive sensitivity. Cardiac response was assessed over a 4-min Stroop task. PIFS was associated with higher accuracy in heartbeat discrimination and a lower pressure pain threshold. Increased interoceptive sensitivity correlated strongly with current symptoms and potentiated differences in the cardiac response to the Stroop task, which in PIFS was characterized by insensitivity to task difficulty and lack of habituation. Our results provide the first evidence of heightened interoceptive sensitivity in PIFS. Together with the distinct pattern in cardiac responsivity these findings present a picture of physiological hyper-vigilance and response inflexibility. PMID:20678991

  18. Unusual presentation of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andary Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP is an autosomal-dominant painless peripheral neuropathy characterized by episodes of repeated focal pressure neuropathies at sites of entrapment/compression, with a considerable variability in the clinical course. Electrodiagnostic and genetic testing are important in the diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Case presentation We report an unusual HNPP phenotype, five compression neuropathies in four nerves in a patient with bilateral hand numbness. A 42-year-old female, presented with acute bilateral paresthesias and weakness in her hands after starting yoga exercises requiring hyperextension of her hands at the wrists. Her presentation was complicated by: a a remote history of acute onset foot drop and subsequent improvement, b previous diagnoses of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, possibly Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and c exposure to leprosy. Electrodiagnostic testing showed 5 separate compression neuropathies in 4 nerves including: severe left and right ulnar neuropathies at the wrist, left and right median neuropathies at the wrist and left ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. There was a mild generalized, primarily demyelinating, peripheral polyneuropathy. Based on the clinical suspicion and electrodiagnostic findings, consistent with profound demyelination in areas of compression, genetic analysis was done which identified a deletion of the PMP-22 gene consistent with HNPP. Conclusion HNPP can present with unusual phenotypes, such as 5 separate mononeuropathies, bilateral ulnar and median neuropathies at the wrists and ulnar neuropathy at the elbow with mild peripheral demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with the PMP-22 gene deletion.

  19. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Liong, Hiew; Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Shanthi, Viswanathan; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetri...

  20. Late onset Leber's optic neuropathy: a case confused with ischaemic optic neuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Borruat, F X; Green, W T; Graham, E M; Sweeney, M G.; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Sanders, M D

    1992-01-01

    A case is reported of a 63-year-old man with progressive central visual loss in one eye followed 11 months later by involvement of the fellow eye. A diagnosis of chronic ischaemic optic neuropathy was considered. However, despite a negative family history, the absence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, and minimal fundus changes a diagnosis of Leber's optic neuropathy was made on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging findings and the mitochondrial DNA mutation at base pair 11778.

  1. Funções autonômica cardíaca e mecânica ventricular na cardiopatia chagásica crônica assintomática Cardiac autonomic and ventricular mechanical functions in asymptomatic chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel França Vasconcelos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A associação das funções autonômica cardíaca e ventricular sisto-diastólica variavelmente alteradas ainda é controversa e pouco explorada na cardiopatia chagásica crônica. OBJETIVO: Avaliar em que extensão as funções autonômica cardíaca e mecânica ventricular estão alteradas e se ambas estão relacionadas na cardiopatia chagásica assintomática. MÉTODOS: EM 13 cardiopatas chagásicos assintomáticos e 15 indivíduos normais (grupo controle, foram avaliadas e correlacionadas a modulação autonômica da variabilidade da frequência cardíaca durante cinco minutos, nos domínios temporal e espectral, nas posições supina e ortostática, e a função ventricular com base em variáveis morfofuncionais Doppler ecocardiográficas. A análise estatística empregou o teste de Mann-Whitney e a correlação de Spearman. RESULTADOS: Em ambas as posições, os índices temporais (p = 0,0004-0,01 e as áreas espectrais total (p = 0,0007-0,005 e absoluta, de baixa e alta frequências (p = 0,0001-0,002, mostraram-se menores no grupo chagásico. O balanço vagossimpático mostrou-se semelhante em ambas as posturas (p = 0,43-0,89. As variáveis ecocardiográficas não diferiram entre os grupos (p = 0,13-0,82, exceto o diâmetro sistólico final do ventrículo esquerdo que se mostrou maior (p = 0,04, correlacionando-se diretamente com os reduzidos índices da modulação autonômica global (p = 0,01-0,04 e parassimpática (p = 0,002-0,01, nos pacientes chagásicos, em posição ortostática. CONCLUSÃO: AS DEpressões simpática e parassimpática com balanço preservado associaram-se apenas a um indicador de disfunção ventricular. Isso sugere que a disfunção autonômica cardíaca pode preceder e ser independentemente mais severa que a disfunção ventricular, não havendo associação causal entre ambos os distúrbios na cardiopatia chagásica crônica.BACKGROUND: The association of variably altered cardiac autonomic and

  2. Sympathetic re-innervation of myocardium after liver transplant in the hereditary amyloid neuropathy; Reinnervation sympathique du myocarde apres transplantation hepatique dans la neuropathie amyloide hereditaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahaye, N.; Le Guludec, D. [Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Bichat, Paris (France); Slama, M. [Cardiologie, Hopital A.Beclere, Paris (France); Guyen, C.N. [SHFJ, DSV-CEA, Orsay (France); Dinanian, S. [Cardiologie, Hopital A.Beclere, Paris (France); Merlet, P. [SHFJ, DSV-CEA, Orsay (France)

    1997-12-31

    The hereditary amyloid neuropathy (HAN) is characterized by a progressive sensory-motor poly-neuropathy and a dysautonomia with myocardium sympathetic denervation. This is established by MIBL scintigraphy and may enhance the troubles of conduction and of cardiac rhythm. The amyloid deposits are constituted of anomalous pre-albumin fabricated by liver. The hepatic transplant (HT) is the only known treatment. Four patients (GI: 39 {+-} 5 years) have been studied by MIBG scintigraphy, 2.2 {+-} 0.7 years after HT, and compared with 12 patients (GII: 39 {+-} 12 years) studied before HT. The left ventricular function, the coronary arteries and the at-rest scintigraphy with thallium were normal for all of them. The cardiac capture of MIBG, evaluated by the cardio-mediastinal activity ratio (C/M), measured on an anterior thoracic planar acquisition performed 4 hours after the intravenous injection of 300 MBq, was higher for GI than for GII (1.49 {+-} 0.12 vs 1.29 {+-} 0.13, p 0.02). The washouts (4 h / 20 min) were not different. In tomography, the patients of GI presented focal anomalies with a more-or-less extended apical defect, a satisfying fixation of the basal half of the anterior wall, more-or-less overflowing the septal and lateral walls, and for 2 patients, a satisfying inferior fixation. On the contrary, 9/12 patients of GII have had a diffuse absence of fixation, the other three heaving a satisfying antero-basal fixation ({chi}{sup 2}, p = 0.05). The results are not explained by difference of severity or evolution duration of HAN. Thus, it appears that there exists a sympathetic re-innervation of myocardium after HT in the HAN, debuting by the heart base, similarly with the effect of anatomic interruption of innervation in cardiac transplants

  3. Autonomic nervous dysfunction in hamsters infected with West Nile virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    Full Text Available Clinical studies and case reports clearly document that West Nile virus (WNV can cause respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI complications. Other functions controlled by the autonomic nervous system may also be directly affected by WNV, such as bladder and cardiac functions. To investigate how WNV can cause autonomic dysfunctions, we focused on the cardiac and GI dysfunctions of rodents infected with WNV. Infected hamsters had distension of the stomach and intestines at day 9 after viral challenge. GI motility was detected by a dye retention assay; phenol red dye was retained more in the stomachs of infected hamsters as compared to sham-infected hamsters. The amplitudes of electromygraphs (EMGs of intestinal muscles were significantly reduced. Myenteric neurons that innervate the intestines, in addition to neurons in the brain stem, were identified to be infected with WNV. These data suggest that infected neurons controlling autonomic function were the cause of GI dysfunction in WNV-infected hamsters. Using radiotelemetry to record electrocardiograms and to measure heart rate variability (HRV, a well-accepted readout for autonomic function, we determined that HRV and autonomic function were suppressed in WNV-infected hamsters. Cardiac histopathology was observed at day 9 only in the right atrium, which was coincident with WNV staining. A subset of WNV infected cells was identified among cells with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel 4 (HCN4 as a marker for cells in the sinoatrial (SA and atrioventricular (AV nodes. The unique contribution of this study is the discovery that WNV infection of hamsters can lead to autonomic dysfunction as determined by reduced HRV and reduced EMG amplitudes of the GI tract. These data may model autonomic dysfunction of the human West Nile neurological disease.

  4. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke. PMID:26802767

  5. Suboccipital neuropathy after bone conduction device placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, H.T.; Ru, J.A. de

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics of a 70-year-old female with occipital neuropathy following bone conduction device surgery. DESCRIPTION: A 65-year-old woman underwent bone conduction device placement surgery on the left temporal bone. Postoperatively she progressively developed c

  6. Trigeminal Neuropathy in Sjogren′s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro L

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuropathy is the most common CNS disorder in Sjogren′s syndrome. It is believed to be caused by vasculitis. Unless this is recognised, a diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia is often made. The therapeutic response to steroids is unpredictable. There are two subgroups - those with associated collagen disorders and those only with the sicca syndrome.

  7. Poisoning by organophosphorus insecticides and sensory neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Moretto, A; M. Lotti

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Poisoning by organophosphate insecticides causes cholinergic toxicity. Organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy (OPIDP) is a sensory-motor distal axonopathy which usually occurs after ingestion of large doses of certain organophosphate insecticides and has so far only been reported in patients with preceding cholinergic toxicity. Surprisingly, it was recently reported by other authors that an exclusively sensory neuropathy developed in eight patients afte...

  8. Idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy in a poodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Aparicio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A seven years old, male poodle is examined presenting acute mandible paralysis (dropped jaw, drooling and difficulty for the apprehension and chewing; not evidence of an other alteration of cranial nerves. The muscular biopsy rules out a myositisof masticatory muscles. The disorder is resolved completely in 3 weeks confirming diagnosis of idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy.

  9. An update on electrophysiological studies in neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The review concentrates on the use of clinical neurophysiology in peripheral nerve disorders covered in the present issue. It is pertinent to distinguish different types of involvement of fibers in diabetic neuropathy, including the involvement of small and large fibers, to outline the diagnostic...

  10. [Sudden blindness: consider Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schieving, J.H.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hol, F.A.; Stroink, H.

    2008-01-01

    In 3 young male patients, aged 10, 19 and 21 years respectively, sequential, severe, painless bilateral visual loss occurred. Ophthalmological examination revealed no other abnormalities and this delayed the diagnosis Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a mitochondrial genetic diseas

  11. A REVIEW ON DIABETIC NEUROPATHY AND NEPHROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Muneer Ahamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major public health problem. Diabetes mellitus now affects large number of people in many developing countries than western countries where only two or three percent of the population is affected. With on estimated 33 million people in India alone affected by diabetes. It is a major epidemic of the twentieth century. Diabetes is a chronic disorder, which is associated with obesity, hypertension, advancing age, accumulation of harmful agents in the vascular endothelium causing development of microangiopathies or micro vascular complications. These complications include peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy, which cause early death and increased morbidity. These complications vary in prevalence in different populations depending on various factors such as genetic predisposition and ethnicity. Besides these complications cardiovascular changes are also occurring. Peripheral neuropathy (PN is characterized by pain, numbness, and tingling in the extremities with slow nerve conduction. Up to 50% of all patients with diabetes develop neuropathy and the prevalence of painful neuropathy ranges from 10 to 20% of patients with diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by increased urinary protein, loss of renal function, excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in the mesangium, and clear cytoplasm of the proximal tubular epithelial cells due to excessive reabsorbed glycogen. Evaluation of diabetes and its complications is very essential for proper control and prevention of the disease associated complications.

  12. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological...

  13. Molecular genetics of distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irobi, Joy; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2004-10-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies comprise a wide variety of diseases primarily affecting the peripheral nervous system. The best-known peripheral neuropathy is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) described in 1886 by J.-M. Charcot, P. Marie and H.H. Tooth. In 1980, A.E. Harding and P.K. Thomas showed that in a large group of individuals with CMT, several only had motor abnormalities on clinical and electrophysiological examination, whereas sensory abnormalities were absent. This exclusively motor variant of CMT was designated as spinal CMT or hereditary distal spinal muscular atrophy, and included in the distal hereditary motor neuropathies (distal HMN). The distal HMN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and are subdivided according to the mode of inheritance, age at onset and clinical evolution. Since the introduction of positional cloning, 12 chromosomal loci and seven disease-causing genes have been identified for autosomal dominant and recessive distal HMN. Most of the genes involved have housekeeping functions, as in RNA processing, translation synthesis, glycosylation, stress response, apoptosis, but also axonal trafficking and editing. Functional characterization of the mutations will help to unravel the cellular processes that underlie the specificity of motor neuropathies leading to neurogenic muscular atrophy of distal limb muscles. Here we review the recent progress of the molecular genetics of distal HMN and discuss the genes implicated.

  14. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training Improves Deficits of Cardiovascular Autonomic Function in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Moderate Hyperglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Grisé, Kenneth N.; T. Dylan Olver; Matthew W. McDonald; Adwitia Dey; Mao Jiang; James C. Lacefield; J. Kevin Shoemaker; Noble, Earl G.; C. W. James Melling

    2016-01-01

    Indices of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in experimental models of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are often contrary to clinical data. Here, we investigated whether a relatable insulin-treated model of T1DM would induce deficits in cardiovascular (CV) autonomic function more reflective of clinical results and if exercise training could prevent those deficits. Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (C), sedentary T1DM (D), control exercise (CX), or T1DM e...

  15. Impaired pancreatic polypeptide response to a meal in type 1 diabetic patients: vagal neuropathy or islet cell dysfunction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Carstensen, H; List, S;

    1993-01-01

    The pancreatic polypeptide (PP) response to a mixed meal was investigated in seven insulin-dependent diabetics without measurable signs of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, and in seven healthy subjects. Since acute changes in metabolic regulation might influence the meal-induced PP response...... is independent of short-term changes in metabolic control. Since the response was attenuated in the insulin-dependent diabetic patients, who had no otherwise measurable signs of neuropathy, the PP response to a meal could be a sensitive indicator of dysfunction of the reflex arc controlling PP secretion......, the insulin-dependent diabetic patients were studied during normo- and hyperglycemic experimental conditions at blood glucose levels of 5 and 15 mmol/l, respectively. The PP response was identical on the two occasions, the response being significantly smaller than in the healthy subjects. Thus, PP response...

  16. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  17. Advances in the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy%糖尿病周围神经病变发病机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董琪; 李全民

    2015-01-01

    糖尿病周围神经病变(diabetic peripheral neuropathy,DPN)为糖尿病最常见慢性并发症之一,发病率为10%~90%,通常累及患者感觉、运动以及自主神经,严重影响患者日常生活。研究糖尿病周围神经病变的相关机制,可为治疗方向探索提供思路。本文就糖尿病周围神经病变发病机制搜集近年相关文献,相关进展综述如下。%As one of the most common chronic complications of diabetes, diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN)usually involves patients with their sensory, motor and autonomic.The incidence rate of the disease is 10% to 90%.Diabetic peripheral neuropathy seriously affect the patient’s daily life.Therefore, it is particularly important to study the mechanisms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, in order to provide more direction and ideas for treatment. This paper collected the literature on the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in recent years, related developments are summarized below.

  18. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias

    OpenAIRE

    Benoliel, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs) are headaches/facial pains classified together based on:a suspected common pathophysiology involving the trigeminovascular system, the trigeminoparasympathetic reflex and centres controlling circadian rhythms;a similar clinical presentation of trigeminal pain, and autonomic activation.

  19. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  20. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  1. A study of relationship between function of cardiac autonomic nervous system and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in diabetes mellitus%糖尿病患者心自主神经系统功能与24 小时动态血压变化关系的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荣; 严钟德; 刘东方

    2000-01-01

    目的 探讨偶测血压正常的糖尿病(DM)患者心自主神经系统功能(ANSF)状况与24小时动态血压(24小时AMBP)的变化关系。方法对71例偶测血压正常的DM患者进行心率功率谱分析及24小时AMBP检测。结果无心自主神经病变(AN)的DM患者与健康人有类似的24小时AMBP;伴轻度AN的DM患者,其24小时动态收缩压及压力负荷发生率明显高于正常对照组,而昼夜改变百分率明显低于正常对照组;伴重度AN的DM患者,其24小时动态收缩压及24小时AMBP负荷发生率高于伴轻度AN的DM患者,昼夜改变百分率低于伴轻度AN的DM患者,但两者间无显著性差异。结论偶测血压正常的DM患者一旦发生心AN,则会对血压造成明显不利的影响;DM患者异常的ANSF和血压参与了急性心血管病变的发生、发展;随访DM患者心ANSF状况及对偶测血压正常、伴AN的DM患者进行早期干预治疗尤为重要。%Objective To study the relationship between function of cardiac autonomic nervous system and 24-hourambulatory blood pressure in diabetes mellitus with normal blood pressure in the casual assay.Methods71 DMpatients with normal blood pressure in casual assay were measured with cardiac power spectral analysis and 24hAMBPassessment.Results There was no difference in 24hAMBP between DM patients without AND and normal subjects.24-hour ambulatory systolic pressure values and the prevalence of blood pressure burden in DM patients with mild AND were significantly higher than that in the control group and the percentage of day-night change in AMBP weresignificantly lower than that in the control group.In DM patients with severe AND, 24-hour ambulatory systolicpressure values and the prevalence of 24hAMBP burden were higher and the percentage of day-night change was lowerthan that in DM patients with mild AND, however, there was no significant difference between them.Conclusion Blood pressure was in severe disorder as

  2. Autonomic nervous system function in type 2 diabetes using conventional clinical autonomic tests, heart rate and blood pressure variability measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sucharita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are currently approximately 40.9 million patients with diabetes mellitus in India and this number is expected to rise to about 69.9 million by the year 2025. This high burden of diabetes is likely to be associated with an increase in associated complications. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 (15 male and 8 female patients with type 2 diabetes of 10-15 years duration and their age and gender matched controls (n=23 were recruited. All subjects underwent detailed clinical proforma, questionnaire related to autonomic symptoms, anthropometry, peripheral neural examination and tests of autonomic nervous system including both conventional and newer methods (heart rate and blood pressure variability. Results: Conventional tests of cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic activity were significantly lower in patients with diabetes compared to the controls (P<0.05. The diabetic patients group had significantly lower high frequency and low-frequency HRV when expressed in absolute units (P<0.05 and total power (P<0.01 compared to the controls. Conclusion: Data from the current study demonstrated that diabetics had both cardiac sympathetic and cardiac parasympathetic nervous system involvement. The presence of symptoms and involvement of both components of the autonomic nervous system suggest that dysfunction has been present for a while in these diabetics. There is a strong need for earlier and regular evaluation of autonomic nervous system in type 2 diabetics to prevent further complications.

  3. Duloxetine Contributing to a Successful Multimodal Treatment Program for Peripheral Femoral Neuropathy and Comorbid ‘Reactive Depression’ in an Adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmyla Kachko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, duloxetine has been approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in the adult population. Data regarding the use of duloxetine in the pediatric population, however, are very limited. Femoral nerve injury is a rare complication of cardiac catheterization. In the case described, duloxetine contributed to a successful multimodal treatment program for peripheral neuropathic pain due to femoral neuropathy in an adolescent with ‘reactive depression’ and conversion symptoms. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the present article is only the third such report on this dual use of duloxetine in children and adolescents, and the first report of such treatment following femoral neuropathy induced by cardiac catheterization.

  4. Autonomous linear lossless systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Shodhan; Rapisarda, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    We define a lossless autonomous system as one having a quadratic differential form associated with it called an energy function, which is positive and which is conserved. We define an oscillatory system as one which has all its trajectories bounded on the entire time axis. In this paper, we show that an autonomous system is lossless if and only if it is oscillatory. Next we discuss a few properties of energy functions of autonomous lossless systems and a suitable way of splitting a given ener...

  5. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. PMID:25744760

  6. Surgical approach to lower extremity nerve decompression in the patient with diabetic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellon, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathy associated with Diabetes is increasing at epidemic rates throughout the world. Traditionally, this neuropathy causes loss of protective sensation leading to ulceration, infection , and amputation. Even with good glycemic control, this neuropathy is still considered progressive and irrever

  7. Tumefactive Brain Demyelination Accompanying MADSAM Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şefik Evren Erdener

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor (MADSAM neuropathy is characterized by asymmetric multifocal motor and sensory loss and conduction blocks in peripheral nerves. Peripheral demyelinating diseases may be accompanied by demyelination in central nervous system (CNS. In this report, a MADSAM patient with a solitary tumefactive demyelinating lesion in brain is presented. Neuroimaging due to a visual field defect revealed a right parietooccipital lesion, which was initially misdiagnosed as a tumor. Pathological examination showed that it was demyelinating in nature. Peripheral nervous symptoms of the patient developed two years later and she was then diagnosed with MADSAM. There was prominent clinical and electrophysiological response to steroid treatment. Tumefactive brain involvement was not previously reported for MADSAM neuropathy, although it was documented in a single case with typical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP. CNS involvement should therefore be considered in MADSAM patients.

  8. Optic neuropathy in a patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departmento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Nagao, Karina E.; Walton, David S. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Ophthalmology, Boston, MA (United States); Caruso, Paul A. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a genetic disorder of mitochondrial metabolism. The clinical manifestations range from severe neonatal lactic acidosis to chronic neurodegeneration. Optic neuropathy is an uncommon clinical sequela and the imaging findings of optic neuropathy in these patients have not previously been described. We present a patient with PDH deficiency with bilateral decreased vision in whom MRI demonstrated bilateral optic neuropathy and chiasmopathy. (orig.)

  9. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder Masquerading as Social Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Behere, Rishikesh V.; Rao, Mukund G.; Mishra, Shree; Varambally, Shivarama; Nagarajarao, Shivashankar; Bangalore N Gangadhar

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 47-year-old man who presented with treatment-resistant anxiety disorder. Behavioral observation raised clinical suspicion of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. The presence of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was confirmed on audiological investigations. The patient was experiencing extreme symptoms of anxiety, which initially masked the underlying diagnosis of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. Challenges in diagnosis and treatment of auditory neur...

  10. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Blaes, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, ...

  11. Axonal neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    GORSON, K.; Ropper, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is typically a predominantly demyelinating process that may have additional features of axonal degeneration. Sixteen patients with MGUS and a pure or predominantly axonal neuropathy are reported and compared with 20 consecutive patients with demyelinating neuropathy and MGUS who were seen during the same period.
METHODS—Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients w...

  12. North America and South America (NA-SA) neuropathy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Trivedi, Jaya; Wolfe, Gil I; Nations, Sharon; Herbelin, Laura; de Freitas, M G; Quintanilha, Giseli; Khan, Saud; Dimachkie, Mazen; Barohn, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological disorder. There may be important differences and similarities in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy between North America (NA) and South America (SA). Neuromuscular databases were searched for neuropathy diagnosis at two North American sites, University of Kansas Medical Center and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and one South American site, Federal Fluminense University in Brazil. All patients were included into one of the six major categories: immune-mediated, diabetic, hereditary, infectious/inflammatory, systemic/metabolic/toxic (not diabetic) and cryptogenic. A comparison of the number of patients in each category was made between North America and South America databases. Total number of cases in North America was 1090 and in South America was 1034 [immune-mediated: NA 215 (19.7%), SA 191 (18%); diabetic: NA 148 (13.5%), SA 236 (23%); hereditary: NA 292 (26.7%), SA 103 (10%); infectious/inflammatory: NA 53 (4.8%), SA 141 (14%); systemic/metabolic/toxic: NA 71 (6.5%), SA 124 (12%); cryptogenic: NA 311 (28.5%), SA 239 (23%)]. Some specific neuropathy comparisons were hereditary neuropathies [Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) cases] in NA 246/292 (84.2%) and SA 60/103 (58%); familial amyloid neuropathy in SA 31/103 (30%) and none in NA. Among infectious neuropathies, cases of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) neuropathy in SA were 36/141(25%), Chagas disease in SA were 13/141(9%) and none for either in NA; cases of neuropathy due to leprosy in NA were 26/53 (49%) and in SA were 39/141(28%). South American tertiary care centers are more likely to see patients with infectious, diabetic and hereditary disorders such as familial amyloid neuropathies. North American tertiary centers are more likely to see patients with CMT. Immune neuropathies and cryptogenic neuropathies were seen equally in North America and South America.

  13. Infectious optic neuropathies: a clinical update

    OpenAIRE

    Kahloun R; Abroug N; Ksiaa I; Mahmoud A; Zeghidi H; Zaouali S; Khairallah M

    2015-01-01

    Rim Kahloun, Nesrine Abroug, Imen Ksiaa, Anis Mahmoud, Hatem Zeghidi, Sonia Zaouali, Moncef KhairallahDepartment of Ophthalmology, Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Monastir, Monastir, TunisiaAbstract: Different forms of optic neuropathy causing visual impairment of varying severity have been reported in association with a wide variety of infectious agents. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious conditions is based on epidemiological data...

  14. Assessment of autonomic function in untreated adult coeliac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gian Marco Giorgetti; Antonio Tursi; Cesare Iani; Flavio Arciprete; Giovanni Brandimarte; Ambrogio Capria; Luigi Fontana

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Some recent studies showed that alteration of upper-gut motility in coeliac disease may be related to dysfunction of autonomic nervous system. The aim of our study was to investigate whether autonomic nervous system was altered in untreated and unselected coeliac disease patients.METHODS: We studied 8 untreated and consecutive coeliac disease patients (2 males and 6 females, age range 37±14.5 years). Histological evaluation of duodenal mucosa, anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), antiendomysial antibodies (EMA) and anti-tTG antibodies and sorbitol H2 breath test were performed in all patients. Extrinsic autonomic neuropathy was assessed by the standardized measurement of cardiovascular reflexes (lying-to-standing, Valsalva manoeuvre, deep breathing, sustained handgrip). The results obtained were compared with a healthy, asymptomatic control group (6 males and 7females, age range 42.3±13.5 years). RESULTS: Coeliac patients exhibited a lower increase of PAS as a response to isometric effort, a reduction of spectral power LF as a response to clinostatic position, but without statistical significance. Also they showed a lower tolerance to orthostatic position, associated with a latent disequilibrium of sympathetic-vagal balance, a relative prevalence of parasympathetic component of the autonomic function. However, these results were not statistically significant when compared with control group (P = n.s.). And they were unchanged after 6 and 12 mo of gluten-free diet.CONCLUSION: This study failed to confirm a significant correlation between autonomic dysfunction and coeliac disease, yet we could not exclude a role of autonomic dysfunction in the genesis of systemic symptoms in some coeliacs.

  15. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLa Morgia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases of the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e. the maternally inherited Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA. They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone. Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising venue that still needs to be validated.

  16. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  17. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated.

  18. Highly Autonomous Systems Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, R.; Rasmussen, R.; Man, G.; Patel, K.

    1998-01-01

    It is our aim by launching a series of workshops on the topic of highly autonomous systems to reach out to the larger community interested in technology development for remotely deployed systems, particularly those for exploration.

  19. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result of another disease, such as Parkinson's disease, alcoholism and diabetes. Problems can affect either part ...

  20. Diabetic neuropathy part 2: proximal and asymmetric phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, many other subtypes have been defined since the 1800s, including proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control. Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions however are controversial. PMID:23642718

  1. Painful diabetic neuropathies, cases report and diagnostic criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lacerenza

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Painful diabetic neuropathy is a model for the investigation of drug’s efficacy in neuropathic pain. Diabetes, through multiple pathophysiological mechanisms causes several painful neuropathies. In this paper two clinical cases of painful diabetic neuropathic conditions are described and clinical and neurophysiological criteria to make the correct diagnosis are examined. Diabetes causes different painful diabetic neuropathies, at times even in a single patient. Different types of pains may originate from different nerve injuries, and harbour different pathophysiological mechanisms. A comprehensive and accurate evaluation of clinical and neurophysiological abnormalities in painful diabetic neuropathies provides insight on the pathophysiological mechanism and directs the clinician towards rational treatment strategies.

  2. Validity of the neurological examination in diagnosing diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höliner, Isabella; Haslinger, Vera; Lütschg, Jürg; Müller, Guido; Barbarini, Daniela Seick; Fussenegger, Jörg; Zanier, Ulrike; Saely, Christoph H; Drexel, Heinz; Simma, Burkhard

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and examine whether the neurological examination validly diagnoses diabetic peripheral neuropathy as compared with the gold standard of nerve conduction velocity in these patients. Nerve conduction velocity was measured in an unselected consecutive series of patients aged 8-18 years who had been suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least 1 year. For the neurological examination, neuropathy disability scores and neuropathy sign scores were used. Of the 39 patients, six (15%) had clinically evident diabetic peripheral neuropathy, whereas nerve conduction velocity testing revealed diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 15 (38%) patients. Sensitivity and specificity of the neurological examination for the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy were 40% and 100%, respectively. The corresponding positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 72.7%, respectively. This conclusions from this study are that in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, diabetic peripheral neuropathy is highly prevalent, but in the majority of patients it is subclinical. Sensitivity and negative predictive values of the neurological examination are low. Therefore, routine nerve conduction velocity measurement for the assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy appears to be warranted in these patients.

  3. Effect of Tinospora cordifolia on experimental diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha D Nadig

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Tinospora cordifolia prevents the hyperalgesia in experimental diabetic neuropathy. It has an aldose reductase inhibitory activity in-vitro which may contribute to the beneficial effects.

  4. Abnormal Nutritional Factors in Patients Evaluated at a Neuropathy Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latov, Norman; Vo, Mary L; Chin, Russell L; Carey, Bridget T; Langsdorf, Jennifer A; Feuer, Naomi T

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal concentrations of nutritional factors were found in 24.1% of 187 patients with neuropathy who were newly seen at our academic neuropathy referral center over a 1-year period. All patients presented with sensory axonal or small fiber neuropathy. In 7.3%, they were present in association with at least one other identifiable cause for neuropathy. Elevated levels of pyridoxal phosphate or mercury occurred more frequently than deficiencies in vitamins B1, B12, or B6. The nutritional abnormalities are amenable to correction by dietary intervention. PMID:27224436

  5. Diabetic neuropathy part 2: proximal and asymmetric phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, many other subtypes have been defined since the 1800s, including proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control. Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions however are controversial.

  6. Sympathetic re-innervation of myocardium after liver transplant in the hereditary amyloid neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hereditary amyloid neuropathy (HAN) is characterized by a progressive sensory-motor poly-neuropathy and a dysautonomia with myocardium sympathetic denervation. This is established by MIBL scintigraphy and may enhance the troubles of conduction and of cardiac rhythm. The amyloid deposits are constituted of anomalous pre-albumin fabricated by liver. The hepatic transplant (HT) is the only known treatment. Four patients (GI: 39 ± 5 years) have been studied by MIBG scintigraphy, 2.2 ± 0.7 years after HT, and compared with 12 patients (GII: 39 ± 12 years) studied before HT. The left ventricular function, the coronary arteries and the at-rest scintigraphy with thallium were normal for all of them. The cardiac capture of MIBG, evaluated by the cardio-mediastinal activity ratio (C/M), measured on an anterior thoracic planar acquisition performed 4 hours after the intravenous injection of 300 MBq, was higher for GI than for GII (1.49 ± 0.12 vs 1.29 ± 0.13, p 0.02). The washouts (4 h / 20 min) were not different. In tomography, the patients of GI presented focal anomalies with a more-or-less extended apical defect, a satisfying fixation of the basal half of the anterior wall, more-or-less overflowing the septal and lateral walls, and for 2 patients, a satisfying inferior fixation. On the contrary, 9/12 patients of GII have had a diffuse absence of fixation, the other three heaving a satisfying antero-basal fixation (χ2, p = 0.05). The results are not explained by difference of severity or evolution duration of HAN. Thus, it appears that there exists a sympathetic re-innervation of myocardium after HT in the HAN, debuting by the heart base, similarly with the effect of anatomic interruption of innervation in cardiac transplants

  7. Depression and Cardiac Disease: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Huffman, Jeff C.; Christopher M Celano; Beach, Scott R.; Shweta R. Motiwala; Januzzi, James L.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression is common, persistent, and associated with worse health-related quality of life, recurrent cardiac events, and mortality. Both physiological and behavioral factors—including endothelial dysfunction, platelet abnormalities, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and reduced engagement in health-promoting activities—may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Because of the potential impact of depression on quality of...

  8. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren;

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  9. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  10. Clinicopathological study of vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-fang DONG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical features and neuropathological characteristics in patients with vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN. Methods Clinical manifestations, laboratory examination and neuromuscular biopsy characteristics of 11 patients with VPN were retrospectively analyzed. The lesion of nerve, muscle and skin was observed under optical and electron microscope. Immunohistochemical analyses were carried out to detect neurofilament (NF, myelin basic protein (MBP, peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 and S-100 protein (S-100 and further observing the neuropathy of neuraxon, myelin sheath and Schwann cells, and to detect human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR, CD68, CD3 and CD20 to observe inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect the deposition of IgA, IgM, IgG and addiment C3 on vascular wall. The staining of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS, NADH-tetrazolium reductase (NADH-TR and modified Gomori trichrome (MGT were used to judge the myopathy. Results 1 Angiopathies were mainly manifested by small vessels of epineurium and perineurium, and infiltrated inflammatory cells were mainly CD3 + T cells. Three patients had active vasculitis, and 8 patients had non-active vasculitis. Among these 8 patients, 4 patients mainly presented fibrous obliteration of blood vessel, with slight inflammatroy cell infiltration, and the other 4 patients mainly showed perivascular inflammation. 2 Neuropathy: 6 patients had axon degeneration, and 5 patients had axon degeneration associated with demyelination. All of them demonstrated a reduction in myelinated fibers, mainly large diameter myelinated fibers, even on end-stage. 3 Muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy. 4 Clinicopathologic diagnosis: among these 11 patients, 8 patients were diagnosed as systemic vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (SVPN, among whom 5 patients were diagnosed as primary systemic vasculitis [including 1 patient as Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS, 2 patients as

  11. Diabetes mellitus tipo 1 na ausência de neuropatia autonômica não altera a taxa de sudorese no exercício Type 1 diabetes mellitus in the lack of autonomic neuropathy does not alter the sudoresis rate in exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Martins Rocha

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A sudorese é o principal mecanismo autonômico termorregulatório na espécie humana. A taxa de sudorese (TS durante o exercício pode ser influenciada por diversos fatores, entre eles doenças, como o diabetes mellitus tipo 1, cujos pacientes são vítimas potenciais de distúrbios termorregulatórios. Os exercícios regulares são recomendados para diabéticos e, inclusive, alguns deles tornam-se atletas. No entanto, ainda não foi medida a TS de diabéticos durante exercício progressivo até a exaustão (GXT e comparada com a de indivíduos sadios com características antropométricas semelhantes. O presente estudo comparou a TS de sete voluntários diabéticos (DM e sete controles (GC, semelhantes quanto à idade, gênero, composição corporal e capacidade aeróbica. Antes e após o GXT, foram medidos a gravidade específica da urina (GEU, o peso e a glicemia capilar. A TS global foi calculada dividindo-se a variação do peso pelo tempo de coleta e área de superfície corporal. A TS local do antebraço foi calculada utilizando-se a variação do peso de um filtro absorvente corrigido pela sua área e tempo de coleta. As TS locais do antebraço e da perna foram induzidas por iontoforese com pilocarpina (0,5% no grupo DM. A freqüência cardíaca (FC foi registrada antes, durante e após GXT. A temperatura média da pele (TMP e as condições térmicas ambientais foram medidas durante o experimento. A glicemia capilar foi maior no DM, como o esperado. As TS global e local foram semelhantes entre os grupos, enquanto que a FC no repouso e a TMP no repouso e no exercício foram maiores no DM. Não houve diferença entre as TS do antebraço e da perna no DM com a pilocarpina. Concluiu-se que a resposta sudorípara foi semelhante entre diabéticos jovens e grupo controle durante exercício progressivo em ambiente temperado.Sudoresis is the main autonomic human thermoregulatory mechanism. It can be influenced by several factors, including

  12. Resposta taquicárdica e controle autonômico no exercício físico em modelo genético de insuficiência cardíaca Tachycardic response and autonomic control in physical exercise in genetic model of cardiac insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma F. Cunha

    2009-08-01

    ática e menor efeito vagal observados. Essa resposta taquicárdica exacerbada nos camundongos α2A/α2CKO está presente mesmo quando ainda não se observa disfunção cardíaca.Increase of sympathetic nervous activity and tachycardia at rest or during physical exertions are associated with increase of morbimortality, even in the absence of clinical signs of cardiac disease. Considering the importance of the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptors in the modulation of the nervous activity and heart rate (HR, the present study uses a genetic model of cardiomyopathy induced by excess of circulating catecholamine in the gene inactivation of the α2A/α2 -adrenergic receptors in mice (α2A/α2CKO to verify the HR response to physical exercise (PE, as well as the sympathetic-vagal control of the HR to PE. The hypothesis is that there would be exacerbated tachycardic response during PE in α2A/α2CKO mice even when the cardiac function was still preserved at rest, being the α2A-adrenergic receptor the main reason for this response. Male mice of the C57Bl6J lineage, control (CO and with gene inactivation for the a2A (α2AKO, α2C α2CKO and α2A/α2CKO receptors were submitted to tolerance to a physical exercise test. Two other groups of mice, CO and α2A/α2CKO, were submitted to pharmacological blocking of the muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors as well as to progressive PE to assess the sympathetic-vagal contribution to PE tachycardia. Intolerance to physical exercise (1.220 ± 18 and 1.460 ± 34 vs. 2.630 ± 42m, respectively and higher tachycardia to PE (765 ± 16 e 792 ± 13 vs. 603 ± 18 bpm, respectively in the α2AKO and α2A/α2CKO vs. CO mice was observed. Moreover, the autonomic balance was altered in the α2A/α2CKO mice by the sympathetic hyperactivity and lower cardiac vagal effect. These outcomes demonstrated the importance of the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptors in autonomic control not only at rest, but also during PE, being theα2A-adrenergic receptor responsible for

  13. Evaluation of standard haemodynamic tests of autonomic function and HbA1c as predictors of delayed gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lydon, A

    2012-02-03

    We examined the relation between chronic glycaemic control (using glycosylated haemoglobin), haemodynamic autonomic function and rate of gastric emptying in 16 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Gastric emptying was measured using a paracetamol absorption technique. Parameters of gastric emptying include area under the plasma paracetamol concentration time curve. Patients were classified as diabetic autonomic neuropathy positive or negative using five standardized haemodynamic reflex tests. Area under the plasma paracetamol concentration time curve in the neuropathy positive (10.36 (4.5) mmol.-1. min) and negative (9.84 (3.0) mmol.-1. min) groups were similar (.P.=0.42) using unpaired Student\\'s.t. -tests. Glycosylated haemoglobin concentration and area under the plasma paracetamol concentration time curve (.n.=16) demonstrated a Pearson\\'s correlation co-efficient of 0.24. Neither tests of haemodynamic autonomic function, nor concentration of glycosylated haemoglobin, are predictive of diabetic gastroparesis.

  14. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    2016-01-01

    brain regions mediating postural and motoric actions, including respiration and cardiac output. The study of pathological processes associated with autonomic disruption shows susceptibilities of different brain structures to altered timing of neural function, notably in sleep disordered breathing, such as obstructive sleep apnea and congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. The cerebellum, in particular, serves coordination roles for vestibular stimuli and blood pressure changes, and shows both injury and substantially altered timing of responses to pressor challenges in sleep-disordered breathing conditions. The insights into central autonomic processing provided by

  15. Effect of C-Peptide on Diabetic Neuropathy in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Ekberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results indicate that proinsulin C-peptide, contrary to previous views, exerts important physiological effects and shows the characteristics of a bioactive peptide. Studies in type 1 diabetes, involving animal models as well as patients, demonstrate that C-peptide in replacement doses has the ability to improve peripheral nerve function and prevent or reverse the development of nerve structural abnormalities. Peripheral nerve function, as evaluated by determination of sensory nerve conduction velocity and quantitative sensory testing, is improved by C-peptide replacement in diabetes type 1 patients with early stage neuropathy. Similarly, autonomic nerve dysfunction is ameliorated following administration of C peptide for up to 3 months. As evaluated in animal models of type 1 diabetes, the improved nerve function is accompanied by reversal or prevention of nerve structural changes, and the mechanisms of action are related to the ability of C-peptide to correct diabetes-induced reductions in endoneurial blood flow and in Na+,K+-ATPase activity and modulation of neurotrophic factors. Combining the results demonstrates that C-peptide may be a possible new treatment of neuropathy in type 1 diabetes.

  16. n-HEXANE NEUROPATHY DUE TO SHOEMAKING: REPORT OF FIVE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sadeghniat

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available n-hexane neuropathy has been described after glue sniffing and industrial exposure. Onset may be subacute and reminiscent of Guillain-Barre' syndrome. Five patients (15-18 years old presented with paresthesia, severe weakness of the extremities particularly lower extremities, as well as muscular atrophy, total areflexia and gait disturbances were admitted in hospital in March 2003. All of these boys were workers of a small footwear production unit. They worked as gluers of leather pieces. Nerve conduction velocity studies showed latency prolongation and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis showed normal protein. In the workplace assessment, it was found that hexacarbone-containing adhesives were used in an inappropriate ventilated place and without any personal protective devices. These patients were re-examined 8 months later. Sensory and autonomic symptoms were alleviated but two of them still had gait disturbance and decreased reflexes.

  17. Autonomic involvement in Parkinson's disease: pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features and possible peripheral biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cersosimo, Maria G; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2012-02-15

    Autonomic nervous system involvement occurs at early stages in both Parkinson's disease (PD) and incidental Lewy body disease (ILBD), and affects the sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric nervous systems (ENS). It has been proposed that alpha-synuclein (α-SYN) pathology in PD has a distal to proximal progression along autonomic pathways. The ENS is affected before the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV), and distal axons of cardiac sympathetic nerves degenerate before there is loss of paravertebral sympathetic ganglion neurons. Consistent with neuropathological findings, some autonomic manifestations such as constipation or impaired cardiac uptake of norepinephrine precursors, occur at early stages of the disease even before the onset of motor symptoms. Biopsy of peripheral tissues may constitute a promising approach to detect α-SYN neuropathology in autonomic nerves and a useful early biomarker of PD.

  18. Exercise and autonomic function in health and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwinkel, E T; Bloomfield, D M; Arwady, M A; Goldsmith, R L

    2001-08-01

    Autonomic nervous system activity contributes to the regulation of cardiac output during rest, exercise, and cardiovascular disease. Measurement of HRV has been particularly useful in assessing parasympathetic activity, while its utility for assessing sympathetic function and overall sympathovagal balance remains controversial. Studies have revealed that parasympathetic tone dominates the resting state, while exercise is associated with prompt withdrawal of vagal tone and subsequent sympathetic activation. Conversely, recovery is characterized by parasympathetic activation followed by sympathetic withdrawal, although clarification of the normal trajectory and autonomic basis of heart rate decay following exercise is needed. Abnormalities in autonomic physiology--especially increased sympathetic activity, attenuated vagal tone, and delayed heart rate recovery--have been associated with increased mortality. Exercise training is associated with a relative enhancement of vagal tone, improved heart rate recovery after exercise, and reduced morbidity in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, whether exercise training leads to reduced mortality in this population because of its ability to specifically modulate autonomic function is unknown at the present time. Although the results of a recent randomized study in patients with CHF and a meta-analysis in the setting of a recent myocardial infarction determined that exercise training leads to improved outcomes in these populations, neither study measured autonomic function. Improved autonomic function due to exercise training is a promising rationale for explaining improvements in outcome, although more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:11570111

  19. Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin in chronic autoimmune neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, AEJ; van der Hoeven, JH

    1998-01-01

    Objective - To investigate the effect of Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D) in patients with an autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy. Material and methods - Three patients with an autoimmune mediated neuropathy received 1000 IU anti-D weekly for 2 months. Results - Two patients worsened gradually

  20. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three pa

  1. An early diagnostic tool for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kambiz, S.; Neck, J.W. van; Cosgun, S.G.; Velzen, M.H. van; Janssen, J.A.M.; Avazverdi, N.; Hovius, S.E.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2015-01-01

    The skin's rewarming rate of diabetic patients is used as a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. At present, the relationship between microvascular changes in the skin and diabetic neuropathy is unclear in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to invest

  2. An early diagnostic tool for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kambiz (Shoista); J.W. van Neck (Han); Cosgun, S.G. (Saniye G.); M.H.N. van Velzen (M. H N); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); Avazverdi, N. (Naim); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); E.T. Walbeehm (Erik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe skin's rewarming rate of diabetic patients is used as a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. At present, the relationship between microvascular changes in the skin and diabetic neuropathy is unclear in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The aim of this study w

  3. Lithium-induced motor neuropathy: An unusual presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Satyakam Mohapatra; Manas Ranjan Sahoo; Neelmadhav Rath

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy secondary to lithium is under-recognized. Most cases of polyneuropathy were reported with lithium intoxication. However, very few cases were reported without lithium toxicity. We present a case of motor neuropathy due to the use of lithium in a 26-year-old male with a therapeutic lithium level.

  4. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DoorenbosBot, ACC; Geerlings, W; Houtman, IA

    1996-01-01

    Four patients are discussed who underwent hemodialysis and developed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION). Three patients had been treated by hemodialysis for several years. One patient developed bilateral optic neuropathy after the first hemodialysis session, So far, only four hemodialysis pat

  5. Autonomic disturbances in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzi, Giuseppe; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Maggi, Leonardo Serra; Donadio, Vincenzo; Vetrugno, Roberto; Liguori, Rocco; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Poli, Francesca; Pizza, Fabio; Pagotto, Uberto; Ferri, Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a clinical condition characterized mainly by excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis complete the narcoleptic tetrad; disrupted night sleep, automatic behaviors and weight gain are also usual complaints. Different studies focus on autonomic changes or dysfunctions among narcoleptic patients, such as pupillary abnormalities, fainting spells, erectile dysfunction, night sweats, gastric problems, low body temperature, systemic hypotension, dry mouth, heart palpitations, headache and extremities dysthermia. Even if many studies lack sufficient standardization or their results have not been replicated, a non-secondary involvement of the autonomic nervous system in narcolepsy is strongly suggested, mainly by metabolic and cardiovascular findings. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a high risk for overweight and for metabolic syndrome in narcoleptic patients represents an important warning for clinicians in order to monitor and follow them up for their autonomic functions. We review here studies on autonomic functions and clinical disturbances in narcoleptic patients, trying to shed light on the possible contribute of alterations of the hypocretin system in autonomic pathophysiology.

  6. Sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyell, Marc W; Krahn, Andrew D; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be caused by ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation or pulseless electric activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our healthcare and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD because of pulseless electric activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized.

  7. Architecture of autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  8. Sciatic neuropathy developed after injection during curettage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altıntaş, Ayşe; Gündüz, Ayşegül; Kantarcı, Fatih; Gözübatık Çelik, Gökçen; Koçer, Naci; Kızıltan, Meral E

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular injections are likely the most common cause of sciatic nerve injury in developing countries. Less common causes include piriformis syndrome, primary tumors of the sciatic nerve, metastatic tumors invading or compressing the nerve, endometriosis, vascular malformations, and prolonged immobilization or positioning. While the most reliable diagnostic and prognostic methods include nerve conduction studies and electromyography, magnetic resonance imaging has been suggested as an alternative method of determining type of lesion, establishing location, and investigating level of nerve involvement. A case of sciatic neuropathy that developed after intramuscular injection, with patient in prolonged lithotomy position and under sedation, is described. PMID:27225613

  9. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  10. INFLUENCE ON VESTIBULAR FUNCTION BY AUDITORY NEUROPATHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jingmiao; JIANG Xinxia; SHAN Chunguang

    2013-01-01

    Objective The main purpose of the present study was to describe the vestibular function in patients with auditory neuropathy (AN), and to assess their ability to maintain balance. Methods Vestibular function tests were performed on 32 patients with AN and 36 normal subjects including electronystagmopraphy(ENG) and static postrography(SPG). The results from the two groups were compared. Results Equilibrium function in patients with AN, was abnormal, compared to normal subjects. Conclusion Vestibular function tests, espe-cially static postrography, should be performed on patients with AN.

  11. Clinical features and electrodiagnosis of ulnar neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Mark E; Campbell, William W

    2013-02-01

    In this review, we delineate clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic features of ulnar mononeuropathies. Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE) is most commonly due to lesions at the level of the retroepicondylar groove (RTC), with approximately 25% at the humeroulnar arcade (HUA). The term 'cubital tunnel syndrome' should be reserved for the latter. The diagnostic accuracy of nerve conduction studies is limited by biological (e.g. low elbow temperature) and technical factors. Across-elbow distance measurements greater than 10 cm improve diagnostic specificity at the expense of decreased sensitivity. Short-segment incremental studies can differentiate lesions at the HUA from those at the RTC.

  12. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Tio, Rene A. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Thorax Center Cardiology; Schwaiger, Markus (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2015-03-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  13. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  14. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  15. Macaque cardiac physiology is sensitive to the valence of passively viewed sensory stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Bliss-Moreau

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system activity is an important component of affective experience. We demonstrate in the rhesus monkey that both the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system respond differentially to the affective valence of passively viewed video stimuli. We recorded cardiac impedance and an electrocardiogram while adult macaques watched a series of 300 30-second videos that varied in their affective content. We found that sympathetic activity (as measured by cardiac pre-ejection period increased and parasympathetic activity (as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia decreased as video content changes from positive to negative. These findings parallel the relationship between autonomic nervous system responsivity and valence of stimuli in humans. Given the relationship between human cardiac physiology and affective processing, these findings suggest that macaque cardiac physiology may be an index of affect in nonverbal animals.

  16. Autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using “PNEUMOCARD”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Funtova, I. I.; Diedrich, A.; Chernikova, A. G.; Drescher, J.; Baranov, V. M.; Tank, J.

    2009-10-01

    Investigations of blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during long term space flights on board the "ISS" have shown characteristic changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Therefore, alterations of the autonomic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for in- and post-flight disturbances. The device "Pneumocard" was developed to further investigate autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory function aboard the ISS. The hard-software diagnostic complex "Pneumocard" was used during in-flight experiment aboard ISS for autonomic function testing. ECG, photoplethysmography, respiration, transthoracic bioimpedance and seismocardiography were assessed in one male cosmonaut (flight lengths six month). Recordings were made prior to the flight, late during flight, and post-flight during spontaneous respiration and controlled respiration at different rates. HR remained stable during flight. The values were comparable to supine measurements on earth. Respiratory frequency and blood pressure decreased during flight. Post flight HR and BP values increased compared to in-flight data exceeding pre-flight values. Cardiac time intervals did not change dramatically during flight. Pulse wave transit time decreased during flight. The maximum of the first time derivative of the impedance cardiogram, which is highly correlated with stroke volume was not reduced in-flight. Our results demonstrate that autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using "Pneumocard" is feasible and generates data of good quality. Despite the decrease in BP, pulse wave transit time was found reduced in space as shown earlier. However, cardiac output did not decrease profoundly in the investigated cosmonaut. Autonomic testing during space flight detects individual changes in cardiovascular control and may add important information to standard medical control. The recent plans to support a flight to Mars, makes these kinds of observations all the more relevant

  17. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  18. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel; Plant, Gordon T

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of autoimmune optic neuropathies (ON) is extending. The phenotypic spectrum includes single isolated optic neuritis (SION), relapsing isolated optic neuritis (RION), chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy (CRION), the neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, multiple sclerosis associated optic neuritis (MSON) and unclassified optic neuritis (UCON) forms. Epidemiological data suggests a slight female predominance. The ethnic heritage is relevant as Caucasian patients are more likely to suffer from MSON, whilst SION, RION, CRION and NMO are more frequent in non-Caucasian patients. Importantly, prognosis for recovery of visual function is good in MSON, but poorer in NMO and CRION which also have a high chance for recurrent episodes. Testing for serum anti-AQP4 autoantibodies is advised in all patients with severe, atypical or recurrent ON because of the high diagnostic specificity. The diagnostic specificity may be aided by testing for glial biomarkers in the CSF and prognostic accuracy by testing for biomarkers for neuroaxonal degeneration. Optical coherence tomography is a highly accurate tool to document the final outcome. The current clinical classification criteria rely on the phenotype, response to treatment and presence of anti-AQP4 autoantibodies.

  19. Early diabetic neuropathy: Triggers and mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maxim Dobretsov; Dmitry Romanovsky; Joseph R Stimers

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy, and specifically distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN), is one of the most frequent and troublesome complications of diabetes mellitus. It is the major reason for morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients, It is also frequently associated with debilitating pain. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the natural history and pathogenesis of this disease remains limited. For a long time hyperglycemia was viewed as a major, if not the sole factor, responsible for all symptomatic presentations of DPN. Multiple clinical observations and animal studies supported this view. The control of blood glucose as an obligatory step of therapy to delay or reverse DPN is no longer an arguable issue. However, while supporting evidence for the glycemic hypothesis has accumulated, multiple controversies accumulated as well.It is obvious now that DPN cannot be fully understood without considering factors besides hyperglycemia. Some symptoms of DPN may develop with little, if any, correlation with the glycemic status of a patient. It is also clear that identification of these putative non-glycemic mechanisms of DPN is of utmost importance for our understanding of failures with existing treatments and for the development of new approaches for diagnosis and therapy of DPN. In this work we will review the strengths and weaknesses of the glycemic hypothesis, focusing on clinical and animal data and on the pathogenesis of early stages and triggers of DPN other than hyperglycemia.

  20. Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Matthew J; Gibbs, Lawrence M; Lindsay, Tammy J

    2016-08-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in approximately 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are treated in the office setting and significantly affects quality of life. It typically causes burning pain, paresthesias, and numbness in a stocking-glove pattern that progresses proximally from the feet and hands. Clinicians should carefully consider the patient's goals and functional status and potential adverse effects of medication when choosing a treatment for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Pregabalin and duloxetine are the only medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating this disorder. Based on current practice guidelines, these medications, with gabapentin and amitriptyline, should be considered for the initial treatment. Second-line therapy includes opioid-like medications (tramadol and tapentadol), venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, and topical agents (lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream). Isosorbide dinitrate spray and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may provide relief in some patients and can be considered at any point during therapy. Opioids and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are optional third-line medications. Acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, primrose oil, and electromagnetic field application lack high-quality evidence to support their use. PMID:27479625