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Sample records for cardiac arrest complicated

  1. Postoperative cardiac arrest due to cardiac surgery complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the role of anesthetists in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with cardiac anesthesia. In this retrospective study we studied the potential performances for each of the relevant incidents among 712 patients undergoing cardiac operations at Golestan and Naft Hospitals Ahwaz between November 2006 and July 2008. Out of total 712 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, cardiac arrest occurred in 28 cases (3.9%) due to different postoperative complications. This included massive bleeding (50% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.9% of patients); pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.1% of patients); Heart Failure (7% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.2% of patients); Aorta Arc Rapture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients); Tamponade due to pericardial effusion (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of total patients); Right Atrium Rupture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients) were detected after cardiac surgery. Out of 28 cases 7 deaths occurred (25% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients). The most prevalent reason for cardiac arrest during post operative phase was massive bleeding (50%) followed by pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5%). Six patients had some morbidity and the remaining 15 patients recovered. There are often multiple contributing factors to a cardiac arrest under cardiac anesthesia, as much a complete systematic assessment of the patient, equipment, and drugs should be completed. We also found that the diagnosis and management of cardiac arrest in association with cardiac anesthesia differs considerably from that encountered elsewhere. (author)

  2. Opiate Withdrawal Complicated by Tetany and Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfanali R. Kugasia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with symptoms of opiate withdrawal, after the administration of opiate antagonist by paramedics, are a common presentation in the emergency department of hospitals. Though most of opiate withdrawal symptoms are benign, rarely they can become life threatening. This case highlights how a benign opiate withdrawal symptom of hyperventilation led to severe respiratory alkalosis that degenerated into tetany and cardiac arrest. Though this patient was successfully resuscitated, it is imperative that severe withdrawal symptoms are timely identified and immediate steps are taken to prevent catastrophes. An easier way to reverse the severe opiate withdrawal symptom would be with either low dose methadone or partial opiate agonists like buprenorphine. However, if severe acid-base disorder is identified, it would be safer to electively intubate these patients for better control of their respiratory and acid-base status.

  3. Main Complications of Mild Induced Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest: A Review Article

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    Hassan Soleimanpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to assess the complications of mild induced hypothermia (MIH in patients with cardiac arrest. Presently, based on the guidelines of the American heart Association, MIH following successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in unconscious adult patients due to ventricular fibrillation (VF with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA is essential and required. However, MIH could be associated with complications in Patients with cardiac arrest. Studies conducted on the precautions and care following cardiac arrest and MIH were included. Valid scientific data bases were used for data collection. The obtained results from different studies revealed that mild MIH could be associated with numerous complications and the knowledge and awareness of the medical staff from the complications is required to guarantee successful therapeutic approaches in MIH following cardiac arrest which is a novel medical facility with different styles and complications. Overall, further future studies are required to improve the quality of MIH, to increase survival and to decrease complications rates.

  4. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan, or MUGA, which shows how well your heart is pumping blood. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which gives doctors detailed pictures of your heart. How is SCA treated? Sudden cardiac arrest should ...

  5. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) SCA: Who's At Risk? Prevention of SCA What Causes SCA? SCA Awareness Atrial Flutter Heart Block Heart Failure Sick Sinus Syndrome Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  6. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  7. Cardiac arrest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tress Erika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners.

  8. Cardiac arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  9. Prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients receiving CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriphuwanun V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Visith Siriphuwanun,1 Yodying Punjasawadwong,1 Worawut Lapisatepun,1 Somrat Charuluxananan,2 Ketchada Uerpairojkit2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study approved by the Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai University Hospital Ethical Committee. Data used were taken from records of 751 cardiac arrest patients who received their first CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery between January 1, 2003 and October 31, 2011. The reviewed data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA physical status classification, anesthesia information, the timing of cardiac arrest, CPR details, and outcomes at 24 hours after CPR. Univariate and polytomous logistic regression analyses were used to determine prognostic factors associated with the outcome variable. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The outcomes at 24 hours were death (638/751, 85.0%, survival with complications (73/751, 9.7%, and survival without complications (40/751, 5.3%. The prognostic factors associated with death were: age between 13–34 years (OR =3.08, 95% CI =1.03–9.19; ASA physical status three and higher (OR =6.60, 95% CI =2.17–20.13; precardiopulmonary comorbidity (OR =3.28, 95% CI =1.09–9.90; the condition of patients who were on mechanical ventilation prior to receiving anesthesia (OR =4.11, 95% CI =1.17–14.38; surgery in the upper abdominal site (OR =14.64, 95% CI =2.83–75.82; shock prior to cardiac arrest (OR =6.24, 95% CI =2.53–15

  10. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  11. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often are found in public places, such as shopping malls, golf courses, businesses, airports, airplanes, casinos, ... arrest In a study published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine , ...

  13. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  14. Cardiac arrest: resuscitation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Halperin, Henry R; Becker, Lance B

    2015-06-01

    The modern treatment of cardiac arrest is an increasingly complex medical procedure with a rapidly changing array of therapeutic approaches designed to restore life to victims of sudden death. The 2 primary goals of providing artificial circulation and defibrillation to halt ventricular fibrillation remain of paramount importance for saving lives. They have undergone significant improvements in technology and dissemination into the community subsequent to their establishment 60 years ago. The evolution of artificial circulation includes efforts to optimize manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, external mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices designed to augment circulation, and may soon advance further into the rapid deployment of specially designed internal emergency cardiopulmonary bypass devices. The development of defibrillation technologies has progressed from bulky internal defibrillators paddles applied directly to the heart, to manually controlled external defibrillators, to automatic external defibrillators that can now be obtained over-the-counter for widespread use in the community or home. But the modern treatment of cardiac arrest now involves more than merely providing circulation and defibrillation. As suggested by a 3-phase model of treatment, newer approaches targeting patients who have had a more prolonged cardiac arrest include treatment of the metabolic phase of cardiac arrest with therapeutic hypothermia, agents to treat or prevent reperfusion injury, new strategies specifically focused on pulseless electric activity, which is the presenting rhythm in at least one third of cardiac arrests, and aggressive post resuscitation care. There are discoveries at the cellular and molecular level about ischemia and reperfusion pathobiology that may be translated into future new therapies. On the near horizon is the combination of advanced cardiopulmonary bypass plus a cocktail of multiple agents targeted at restoration of normal metabolism and

  15. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  16. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  17. Cognitive and Functional Consequence of Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Claudia A; Samudra, Niyatee; Aiyagari, Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Better-quality bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, cardiocerebral resuscitation principles, and intensive post-resuscitation hospital care have improved survival. However, cognitive and functional impairment after cardiac arrest remain areas of concern. Research focus has shifted beyond prognostication in the immediate post-arrest period to identification of mechanisms for long-term brain injury and implementation of promising protocols to reduce neuronal injury. These include therapeutic temperature management (TTM), as well as pharmacologic and psychological interventions which also improve overall neurological function. Comprehensive assessment of cognitive function post-arrest is hampered by heterogeneous measures among studies. However, the domains of attention, long-term memory, spatial memory, and executive function appear to be affected. As more patients survive cardiac arrest for longer periods of time, there needs to be a greater focus on interventions that can enhance cognitive and psychosocial function post-arrest. PMID:27311306

  18. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nick

    2016-05-01

    Emergency care nurses have been urged to play their part in Scotland's push to revolutionise care for cardiac arrest patients - by teaching others how to save a life. This article discusses the Scottish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest strategy, with particular focus on the drive to increase bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates, and on how emergency nurses are being enlisted to help promote the training of members of the public. PMID:27165393

  19. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. PMID:26670813

  20. Gastrointestinal Complications and Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .3–87%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug ...

  1. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest following spinal anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Pranjali Madhav Kurhekar; VSG Yachendra; Simi P Babu; Raghavelu Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has been well researched. Myocardial stunning after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest is seen in up to 2/3 rd of in-hospital cardiac arrests. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has probably not been reported earlier. Our case, an ASA physical status I lady, posted for tubal reanastomosis surgery developed bradycardia followed by asystole, approximately 5 minutes after givin...

  2. Acute kidney injury after cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Tujjar, Omar; Mineo, Giulia; Dell’Anna, Antonio; Poyatos-Robles, Belen; Donadello, Katia; Scolletta, Sabino; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of AKI in a large cohort of cardiac arrest patients. Methods We reviewed all patients admitted, for at least 48 hours, to our Dept. of Intensive Care after CA between January 2008 and October 2012. AKI was defined as oligo-anuria (daily urine output

  3. Gastrointestinal complications and cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sara J

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .3-87%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug therapy, and mechanical factors contributing. Several nonischemic mechanisms may contribute to GI complications, including bacterial translocation, adverse drug reactions, and iatrogenic organ injury. Risk factors for GI complications are advanced age (>70 years), reoperation or emergency surgery, comorbidities (renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure), perioperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump or inotrope therapy, prolonged surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative complications. Multiple strategies to reduce the incidence of GI complications exist, including risk stratification scores, targeted inotrope and fluid therapy, drug therapies, and modification of cardiopulmonary bypass. Currently, no single therapy has consistently proven efficacy in reducing GI complications. Timely diagnosis and treatment, while tailored to the specific complication and patient, is essential for optimal management and outcomes in this challenging patient population. PMID:25208431

  4. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was <50%. Restoration of Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  5. Cardiac perioperative complications in noncardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Radovanović Dragana; Kolak Radmila; Stokić Aleksandar; Radovanović Zoran; Jovanović Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are confronted with an increasing population of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for cardiac complications in the perioperative period. Perioperative cardiac complications are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of perioperative (operative and postoperative) cardiac complications and correlations between the incidence of perioperative cardiac complications and type of surgical ...

  6. Maternal Cardiac Arrest: A Practical and Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida M. Jeejeebhoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest.

  7. Characteristics of in-hospital cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Ivić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim We have studied epidemiology of in-hospital cardiac arrest, characteristics of organizing a reanimationand its,procedures as well as its documenting.Methods We analyzed all resuscitation procedure data where anesthesiology reanimation teams (RT providedcardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR during one-year period. We included resuscitation attemptsthat were initiated outside the Department of Anesthesiology, excluding incidents in operation rooms andIntensive Care Unit (ICU. Data on every cardiac arrest and CPR were entered in a special form.Results During one-year period 87 CPR were performed. Victims of cardiac arrest were principallyelderly patients (age 60 – 80, mostly male (60%. Most frequent victims were neurological patients(42%, surgical patients (21% and neurosurgical patients (10%. The leading cause of cardiac arrestwas primary heart disease, following neurological diseases and respiration disorders of severe etiology.In over 90% cases CPR was initiated by medical personnel in their respective departments, RT arrivedwithin 5 minutes in 73,56% cases. Initially survival was 32%, but full recovery was accomplished in 4patients out of 87 (4,6%.Conclusion Victims of cardiac arrest are patients whose primary disease contributes to occurrence ofcardiorespiratory complications. High mortality and low percentage of full recovery can be explainedby characteristics of patients (old age, nature and seriousness of primary disease which significantly affectthe outcome of CPR. In some cases a question is raised whether to initiate the CPR at all. We wouldlike to point out that continous monitoring of potentially critical patients may prevent cardiorespiratoryincidents whereas the quality and success of CPR may be improved by training of staff and better technicalequipment on the relevant locations in the in the hospital where such incidents usually occur.

  8. Sublingual Microcirculation is Impaired in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Omar, Yasser; Massey, Michael; Wiuff Andersen, Lars; A. Giberson, Tyler; Berg, Katherine; N. Cocchi, Michael; I. Shapiro, Nathan; W. Donnino, Michael

    2013-01-01

    markers in the post-cardiac arrest state. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated the sublingual microcirculation in post-cardiac arrest patients, severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and healthy control patients using Sidestream Darkfield microscopy. Microcirculatory flow was assessed using the...... microcirculation flow index (MFI) at 6 and 24h in the cardiac arrest patients, and within 6h of emergency department admission in the sepsis and control patients. RESULTS: We evaluated 30 post-cardiac arrest patients, 16 severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and 9 healthy control patients. Sublingual...... microcirculatory blood flow was significantly impaired in post-cardiac arrest patients at 6h (MFI 2.6 [IQR: 2-2.9]) and 24h (2.7 [IQR: 2.3-2.9]) compared to controls (3.0 [IQR: 2.9-3.0]; p<0.01 and 0.02, respectively). After adjustment for initial APACHE II score, post-cardiac arrest patients had significantly...

  9. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest following spinal anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjali Madhav Kurhekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has been well researched. Myocardial stunning after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest is seen in up to 2/3 rd of in-hospital cardiac arrests. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has probably not been reported earlier. Our case, an ASA physical status I lady, posted for tubal reanastomosis surgery developed bradycardia followed by asystole, approximately 5 minutes after giving subarachnoid block. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC was achieved within 2 minutes with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and defibrillation for pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Patient developed delayed pulmonary oedema, which was probably due to myocardial stunning. In the present case, inadequate preloading could have precipitated bradycardia progressing to cardiac arrest which, after resuscitation led to reversible myocardial dysfunction. We conclude that early vasopressor infusion, titrated fluids and echocardiography should be considered in immediate post cardiac arrest phase following spinal anaesthesia.

  10. Abulia following an episode of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Vismay Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The word 'abulia' means a lack of will, initiative or drive. The symptoms of abulia include lack of spontaneous action and speech, reduced emotional responsiveness and social interaction, poor attention and easy distractibility. These symptoms are independent of reduced levels of consciousness or cognitive impairment. We describe a case of a socially active 72-year-old female patient who presented with symptoms of abulia which may have occurred due to damage of the frontosubcortical circuits following an episode of cardiac arrest. The patient's symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with bromocriptine. PMID:26135487

  11. A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Nakashima,1 Tsuneaki Kenzaka,2 Masanobu Okayama,3 Eiji Kajii31Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 2Division of General Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan; 3Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, JapanAbstract: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.Keywords: hyperthyroidism, ventricular fibrillation, treatable cardiac arrest, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest

  12. Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Adults With Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jignesh K; Schoenfeld, Elinor; Parnia, Sam; Singer, Adam J; Edelman, Norman

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the use of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), rates of return of spontaneous circulation and survival with minimal neurologic impairment remain low. Utilization of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for CA in adults is steadily increasing. Propensity-matched cohort studies have reported outcomes associated with ECMO use to be superior to that of conventional CPR alone in in-hospital patients with CA. In this review, we discuss the mechanism, indications, complications, and evidence for ECMO in CA in adults. PMID:25922385

  13. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S;

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  14. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Kehrl,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS in the emergency department (ED can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA. We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation.

  15. [Thoracic lavage and open cardiac massage as treatment of hypothermic cardiac arrest--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Timo; Vänni, Ville; Kettunen, Minna; Reinikainen, Matti; Hakala, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is the treatment of choice for a severely hypothermic patient with cardiac arrest. However, the treatment is not always available. We describe a successful three-and-a-half hour resuscitation of a hypothermic cardiac arrest patient with manual chest compressions followed by open cardiac massage and rewarming with thoracic lavage. PMID:27188092

  16. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  17. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Resuscitation Following Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenberger, Jon C; Friess, Stuart; Polderman, Kees H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is the most common cause of death in North America. Neurocritical care interventions, including targeted temperature management (TTM), have significantly improved neurological outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Therefore, resuscitation following cardiac arrest was chosen as an emergency neurological life support protocol. Patients remaining comatose following resuscitation from cardiac arrest should be considered for TTM. This protocol will review induction, maintenance, and re-warming phases of TTM, along with management of TTM side effects. Aggressive shivering suppression is necessary with this treatment to ensure the maintenance of a target temperature. Ancillary testing, including electrocardiography, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, continuous electroencephalography monitoring, and correction of electrolyte, blood gas, and hematocrit changes, are also necessary to optimize outcomes. PMID:26438463

  18. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pediatric cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennie

    2015-02-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) remains a promising treatment for pediatric patients in cardiac arrest unresponsive to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. With venoarterial extracorporeal support, blood is drained from the right atrium, oxygenated through the extracorporeal circuit, and transfused back to the body, bypassing the heart and lungs. The use of artificial oxygenation and perfusion thus provides the body a period of hemodynamic stability, while allowing resolution of underlying disease processes. Survival rates for ECPR patients are higher than those for traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), although neurological outcomes require further investigation. The impact of duration of CPR and length of treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation vary in published reports. Furthermore, current guidelines for the initiation and use of ECPR are limited and may lead to confusion about appropriate use of this support. Many ethical concerns arise with this advanced form of life support. More often than not, the dilemma is not whether to withhold ECPR, but rather when to withdraw it. Although clinicians must decide if ECPR is appropriate and when further intervention is futile, the ultimate burden of choice is left to the patient's caregivers. Offering support and guidance to the patient's family as well as the patient is essential. PMID:25639578

  19. The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest is a relatively under researched, but clinically important area. The aim of the current study was to add to the limited existing literature exploring the psychosocial outcome for cardiac arrest survivors, but specifically explore if there is a greater impact on psychosocial outcome in individuals experiencing anoxic brain injury as a result. Methods A range of self report measures were used to c...

  20. Hospital Variation in Survival After In‐hospital Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Raina M.; Berg, Robert A.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Groeneveld, Peter W.; Chan, Paul S.; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background In‐hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is common and often fatal. However, the extent to which hospitals vary in survival outcomes and the degree to which this variation is explained by patient and hospital factors is unknown. Methods and Results Within Get with the Guidelines‐Resuscitation, we identified 135 896 index IHCA events at 468 hospitals. Using hierarchical models, we adjusted for demographics comorbidities and arrest characteristics (eg, initial rhythm, etiology, arrest locat...

  1. Sudden Cardiac Death and Post Cardiac Arrest Syndrome. An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima Endre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A satisfactory neurologic outcome is the key factor for survival in patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD, however this is highly dependent on the haemodynamic status. Short term cardiopulmonary resuscitation and regained consciousness on the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC is indicative of a better prognosis. The evaluation and treatment of SCD triggering factors and of underlying acute and chronic diseases will facilitate prevention and lower the risk of cardiac arrest. Long term CPR and a prolonged unconscious status after ROSC, in the Intensive Care Units or Coronary Care Units, indicates the need for specific treatment and supportive therapy including efforts to prevent hyperthermia. The prognosis of these patients is unpredictable within the first seventy two hours, due to unknown responses to therapeutic management and the lack of specific prognostic factors. Patients in these circumstances require the highest level of intensive care and aetiology driven treatment without any delay, independently of their coma state. Current guidelines sugest the use of multiple procedures in arriving at a diagnosis and prognosis of these critical cases.

  2. Cardiac arrest during spinal anesthesia for cervical conization: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Ikuko; Numata, Masahiro; Ikegami, Atsushi; Teramoto, Katsuhiro; Hirata, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Spinal anesthesia is regularly performed worldwide and is an integral part of the modern day anesthesia practice. Although unexpected cardiac arrests during this procedure are very rare, medical professionals should be aware of the potential for this complication. In making the decision to use spinal anesthesia, judicious patient selection, adequate preventive measures, and strict monitoring are important. PMID:27190608

  3. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  4. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Heart360 Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac ArrestCardiac Rehab • Cardiomyopathy • Cardiovascular Conditions of Childhood • Cholesterol • Congenital Heart Defects • Diabetes • Heart Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood ...

  5. How Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart (a sign of CHD). MUGA Test or Cardiac MRI A MUGA (multiple gated acquisition) test shows how ... create pictures of many parts of your heart. Cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe procedure that ...

  6. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  7. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  8. Cardiac arrest following ventilator fire: A rare cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Nazeer Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating room fires are rare events, but when occur they result in serious and sometimes fatal consequences. Anaesthesia ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest is a rare incident and has not been reported. We report a near catastrophic ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest in a patient undergoing subtotal thyroidectomy. In the present case sparks due to friction or electrical short circuit within the ventilator might have acted as source of ignition leading to fire and explosion in the oxygen rich environment. The patient was successfully resuscitated and revived with uneventful recovery and no adverse sequelae. The cardiac arrest was possibly due to severe hypoxia resulting from inhalation of smoke containing high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other noxious gases.

  9. Drug therapy in cardiac arrest: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Andreas; Djärv, Therese; Engdahl, Johan; Hollenberg, Jacob; Nordberg, Per; Ravn-Fischer, Annika; Ringh, Mattias; Rysz, Susanne; Svensson, Leif; Herlitz, Johan; Lundgren, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature on human studies of drug therapy in cardiac arrest during the last 25 years. In May 2015, a systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD databases. Prospective interventional and observational studies evaluating a specified drug therapy in human cardiac arrest reporting a clinical endpoint [i.e. return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or survival] and published in English 1990 or later were included, whereas animal studies, case series and reports, studies of drug administration, drug pharmacology, non-specified drug therapies, preventive drug therapy, drug administration after ROSC, studies with primarily physiological endpoints, and studies of traumatic cardiac arrest were excluded. The literature search identified a total of 8936 articles. Eighty-eight articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. We identified no human study in which drug therapy, compared with placebo, improved long-term survival. Regarding adrenaline and amiodarone, the drugs currently recommended in cardiac arrest, two prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials, were identified for adrenaline, and one for amiodarone, but they were all underpowered to detect differences in survival to hospital discharge. Of all reviewed studies, only one recent prospective study demonstrated improved neurological outcome with one therapy over another using a combination of vasopressin, steroids, and adrenaline as the intervention compared with standard adrenaline administration. The evidence base for drug therapy in cardiac arrest is scarce. However, many human studies on drug therapy in cardiac arrest have not been powered to identify differences in important clinical outcomes such as survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurological outcome. Efforts are needed to initiate large multicentre prospective randomized clinical trials to evaluate both currently recommended and

  10. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg Jørgensen, Mads

    years ago in Denmark. These findings led to several national initiatives to strengthen bystander resuscitation attempts and advance care. Despite these nationwide efforts, it was unknown prior to this project whether these efforts resulted in changes in resuscitation attempts by bystanders and changes...... in patient survival following out-of hospital cardiac arrest; utilizing the Danish nationwide registries, we sought to answer these questions. Moreover, in order to further improve understanding and target future national strategies for cardiac arrest management, we examined whether there were sex...

  11. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopres...

  12. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald;

    2013-01-01

    intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance...

  13. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  14. Predictors for outcome among cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrandt, Ida; Norsted, Kristine; Schmidt, Henrik; Schierbeck, Jens

    for outcome among CA patients, we can improve the management of CA, in order to strengthen the leads in the chain of survival.MethodsA retrospective cohort study including 172 CA patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in Odense University Hospital (OUH) in a three-year period was conducted...... spontaneous circulation (ROSC).ResultsThe overall mortality was 44% and a favorable neurological outcome was seen among 52%. Strong predictors for survival and favorable neurological outcome were ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) as initial rhythm, cardiac etiology and time to ROSC¿<¿20...

  15. A Unique Case of Cardiac Arrest following K2 Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD accounts for up to 450,000 deaths every year in the United States (Zipes et al. (2006. Most cases of sudden cardiac death occur in subjects with no prior history of heart disease (Myerburg et al. (1998. The incidence of sudden death in a general population has been shown to increase contemporaneously with substance abuse (Phillips et al. (1999. The causative association of sudden death with cocaine, methadone, and volatile agents is well established (Adgey et al. (1995 and Isner et al. (1986. We describe a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest temporally related to abuse of the synthetic cannabinoid street drug known as K2. To our knowledge, there are no previously documented cases of sudden cardiac death associated with synthetic cannabinoids although they have been linked to myocardial infarction in teenagers despite normal coronary angiography (Mir et al. (2011.

  16. Complications of cardiac catheterization: one centre's experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, B C; Beanlands, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Data on complication rates in a cardiac catheterization laboratory were prospectively gathered over a 6-year period. During this time 7960 catheterizations were performed. Death occurred in seven (0.1%) of the cases. The difference between the mortality rates for procedures performed with and without systemically administered heparin (0.04% and 0.2% respectively) was barely statistically significant (p less than 0.05). A significant complication occurred in 1.5% of the cases; however, most di...

  17. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use....... METHODS: A community-based case-control study was performed, with 1310 cases of SCA of the ARREST study and 5793 age, sex and SCA-date matched non-SCA controls from the PHARMO database. Only incident SCA cases, age older than 40 years, that resulted from unequivocal cardiac causes...... with electrocardiographic documentation of VT/VF were included. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between SCA and OPD. Pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed regarding age, sex, cardiovascular risk-profile, disease severity, and current use of respiratory drugs. RESULTS...

  18. Pediatric defibrillation after cardiac arrest: initial response and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Cristina; Domínguez, Pedro; Carrillo, Angel; Bellón, Jose María

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shockable rhythms are rare in pediatric cardiac arrest and the results of defibrillation are uncertain. The objective of this study was to analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included defibrillation in children. Methods Forty-four out of 241 children (18.2%) who were resuscitated from inhospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had been treated with manual defibrillation. Data were recorded according to the Utstein style. Outcome variables were a sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and one-year survival. Characteristics of patients and of resuscitation were evaluated. Results Cardiac disease was the major cause of arrest in this group. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (PVT) was the first documented electrocardiogram rhythm in 19 patients (43.2%). A shockable rhythm developed during resuscitation in 25 patients (56.8%). The first shock (dose, 2 J/kg) terminated VF or PVT in eight patients (18.1%). Seventeen children (38.6%) needed more than three shocks to solve VF or PVT. ROSC was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%) and it was sustained in 19 patients (43.2%). Only three patients (6.8%), however, survived at 1-year follow-up. Children with VF or PVT as the first documented rhythm had better ROSC, better initial survival and better final survival than children with subsequent VF or PVT. Children who survived were older than the finally dead patients. No significant differences in response rate were observed when first and second shocks were compared. The survival rate was higher in patients treated with a second shock dose of 2 J/kg than in those who received higher doses. Outcome was not related to the cause or the location of arrest. The survival rate was inversely related to the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion Defibrillation is necessary in 18% of children who suffer cardiac arrest. Termination of VF or PVT after the first defibrillation dose is achieved in a low

  19. 重度乳酸性酸中毒并心脏骤停一例诊治分析%Characteristics of Severe Lactic Acidosis Complicated with Cardiac Arrest and the Related Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红升; 苏琴; 曹阳; 姚咏明; 赵晓东

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨重度乳酸性酸中毒(lactic acidosis, LA)的临床特征及治疗方法,以提高救治成功率。方法对我院收治的重度 LA 并心脏骤停1例的临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果本例因腹泻3 d、剧烈上腹痛1 h 以急性心肌梗死(心梗)急诊入院。有糖尿病史,长期口服二甲双胍,未定期检测血糖。入院后出现腰背剧痛,经相关检查排除急性心梗、主动脉夹层,查血乳酸脱氢酶277.0 U/ L,乳酸17 mmol/ L,血气分析示代谢性酸中毒,入院诊断为糖尿病、重度 LA。入院1 h 后发生心脏骤停,经积极复苏抢救,病情逐步缓解,1个月后临床治愈出院。结论重度 LA 可以剧烈胸腹部疼痛为主要表现,甚至发生心脏骤停,及时诊断及正确评估病情对预后极为重要,积极液体复苏及有效呼吸支持、早期血液透析是救治成功的保证。%Objective To investigate the clinical features and the treatment of severe lactic acidosis (LA) and to im-prove the success rate. Methods We carried out a retrospective analysis of clinical data of a patient suffering from cardiac ar-rest with severe LA and a review of the related literature review was made. Results The patient suffered from diarrhea for 3 d, severe abdominal pain for 1 h and was admitted into our hospital for acute myocardial infarction. The patient had a history of diabetes and diabetic nephropathy and took a long-term oral metformin without testing blood sugar regularly. Relevant exam-inations ruled out acute myocardial infarction and aortic dissection, and then, and the blood lactate dehydrogenase was 277. 0 U/ L, and lactic acid was 17 mmol/ L and blood gas analysis revealed metabolic acidosis. Above all, the patient was di-agnosed with diabetes and severe LA. The patient suffered sudden cardiac arrest one hour after admission, then the condition was alleviated gradually after active recovery treatment, and in the end the patient was clinically cured and was

  20. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    OpenAIRE

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral thiamine has a very high safety profile. The most common adverse effect is local irritation; however, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions may occur, mostly related to intravenous administration. We describe a 44-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, who was admitted with alcohol intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations....

  1. Electrocardiogram characteristics prior to in-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Attin, Mina; Feld, Gregory; Lemus, Hector; Najarian, Kayvan; Shandilya, Sharad; Wang, Lu; Sabouriazad, Pouya; Lin, Chii-Dean

    2014-01-01

    Survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest (I-HCA) remains < 30 %. There is very limited literature exploring the electrocardiogram changes prior to I-HCA. The purpose of the study was to determine demographics and electrocardiographic predictors prior to I-HCA. A retrospective study was conducted among 39 cardiovascular subjects who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation from I-HCA with initial rhythms of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole. Demographics including medical history, eje...

  2. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    OpenAIRE

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-01-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by vari...

  3. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by various oxidative cellular injuries. In the cardiac arrest context, evidence of hyperoxia effects on outcome is fairly conflicting. Although prospective data are lacking, retrospective studies and meta-analysis suggest that hyperoxia could be associated with an increased mortality. However, data originate from retrospective, heterogeneous and inconsistent studies presenting various biases that are detailed in this review. Therefore, after an original and detailed analysis of all experimental and clinical studies, we herein provide new ideas and concepts that could participate to improve knowledge on oxygen toxicity and help in developing further prospective controlled randomized trials on this topic. Up to now, the strategy recommended by international guidelines on cardiac arrest (i.e., targeting an oxyhemoglobin saturation of 94-98 %) should be applied in order to avoid deleterious hypoxia and potent hyperoxia. PMID:27003426

  4. Cardiac catheterization and complications: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Dubey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac catheterization for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has been routinely used since last one year in College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur, Nepal. Because all cardiac catheterizations involve the insertion of cardiac catheters into the circulatory system, it should not be surprising that a variety of complications can ensue. These complications range from minor problems with no long-term sequelae to major problem even death. A total of 357 consecutive diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterization performed in College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur between April 2011 to April 2012 were evaluated for their complications. Among them 220 (61.6% were coronary angiogram, 65 (18.2 % percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA and stenting, 7 ( 1.9 % permanent pacemaker insertion, 65 (18.2% were others including temporary pacemaker insertion, peripheral angiography and carotid angiography. There were 3 deaths (0.84%. Two deaths occurred following coronary angiogram and 1 death following PTCA stenting. Vascular complications occurred in 5 (1.4% patients with groin haematoma in all. Contrast allergy occurred in 9 (2.5 %, vasovagal reaction in 2 (0.56%, pyrogen reaction in 6 (1.6%, and contrast induced nephropathy occurred in 3 (0.84% patients. Cardiac catheterization procedure in CMS-TH, Bharatpur has acceptable low complications including death. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 1-6 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6830

  5. The prognostic value of cardiac ultrasonography in patients with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Bolvardi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Echocardiography or cardiac imaging is proposed as a gold standard method for identifying high risk patients for cardiac arrest. In this systematic review, we studied the prognostic value of cardiac sonography in patients with cardiac arrest. Methods: PubMed was searched for the relevant articles. Case reports were not included. Inclusion criteria were all the studies applied transthorasic echocardiography in patients with cardiac arrest arrived at emergency department that studied the efficacy of this modality on patients survived to emergency discharge and returned to spontaneous circulation.Result: Overall, 870 articles were obtained through initial search and only nine articles were included after the evaluation of the title, abstract, and the full text. Echocardiography has high sensitivity and specificity in predicting the return of spontaneous circulation.Conclusion: Cardiac sonography is a fairly effective (not definitive modality in predicting death in patients with lack of cardiac activity during resuscitation. Echocardiography should not be the sole basis for the decision to cease resuscitative efforts.

  6. Mutations in the Kv1.5 channel gene KCNA5 in cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nathalie H; Winkel, Bo G; Kanters, Jørgen K; Schmitt, Nicole; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Jensen, Henrik S; Bentzen, Bo H; Sigurd, Bjarne; Larsen, Lars Allan; Andersen, Paal S; Kjeldsen, Keld; Grunnet, Morten; Christiansen, Michael; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Haunsø, Stig

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in one of the ion channels shaping the cardiac action potential can lead to action potential prolongation. However, only in a minority of cardiac arrest cases mutations in the known arrhythmia-related genes can be identified. In two patients with arrhythmia and cardiac arrest, we identi...

  7. The utility of cardiac sonography and capnography in predicting outcome in cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Bret P; Patel, Vaishali R.; Norris, Marlaina M.; Richardson, Barbara K.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency physicians and intensivists are increasingly utilizing capnography and bedside echocardiography during medical resuscitations. These techniques have shown promise in predicting outcomes in cardiac arrest, and no cases of return of spontaneous circulation in the setting of sonographic cardiac standstill and low end-tidal carbon dioxide have been reported. This case report illustrates an example of such an occurrence. Our aims are to report a case of return of spontaneous circulation ...

  8. Experience with bretylium tosylate by a hospital cardiac arrest team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, D A; Sniderman, A D; Fraser, G; Fallen, E L

    1977-03-01

    The effect of bretylium tosylate (BT) was determined in 27 consecutive cases of resistant ventricular fibrillation (VF) encountered by a hospital cardiac arrest team. The VF was sustained and completely resistant to multiple injections of lidocaine, sequential DC shocks at 400 watt-sec and one or a combination of intravenous propranolol, diphenylhydantoin or procainamide. Following 30 min of sustained cardiac massage, BT (5 mg/kg i.v.) was administered. In 20 patients, VF was terminated within 9-12 min after DC shock. Eight of these patients failed to recover while 12 (44%) of all patients resuscitated survived to be discharged from hospital. Eleven out of 20 (55%) of all patients who had a cardiac arrest outside the CCU were survivors; only one out of seven in the CCU were successfully resuscitated. While receiving maintanance BT post-resuscitation (5 mg/kg i.m. q 8-12 hrs x 48 hrs), half the patients developed hypotension and three required vasopressors and/or fluid replacement. The data indicate that BT is a useful agent in patients with sustained VF refractory to repeated lidocaine injections, some other antiarrhythmic agents, and multiple DC shocks. PMID:837490

  9. Cardiac arrest caused by multiple recurrent pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannig, Kjartan Eskjaer; Husted, Steen Elkjaer; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common condition with a high mortality. We describe a previously healthy 68-year-old male who suffered three pulmonary embolisms during a short period of time, including two embolisms while on anticoagulant treatment. This paper illustrates three important points. (1) The...... importance of optimal anticoagulant treatment in the prevention of pulmonary embolism reoccurrence. (2) The benefit of immediate accessibility to echocardiography in the handling of haemodynamically unstable patients with an unknown underlying cause. (3) Thrombolytic treatment should always be considered and...... may be life-saving in patients with cardiac arrest suspected to be caused by pulmonary embolism....

  10. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage

  11. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and post-cardiac arrest brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important topics in the field of resuscitation at present is the drafting of the 2015 version of the Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendation (CoSTR) by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. The Japan Resuscitation Council is preparing its 2015 Guideline based on this CoSTR and plans to release it in October 2015. A critical change in the upcoming CoSTR is the adoption of the GRADE system. The new Guideline incorporating the GRADE system will surely be more scientific than the previous Guideline issued in 2010. Meanwhile, an important finding appeared in a report from Nielsen et al.: hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33 degrees C did not confer a benefit versus 36 degrees in unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause. PMID:26915250

  12. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John;

    2007-01-01

    patients according to whether they received first aid, the identity of the first aid provider and the initial cardiac rhythm as diagnosed by the patient monitor.   Results: 18,666 patients where in contact with an emergency ambulance in the study period. Of those 296 (89/100,000/year) met the definition of...... cardiac arrest. 83 of those (28 %) received first aid. The first aid was provided by layman (68 %), physicians (11 %), nurses (11 %) and first-aiders (4 %). In 6 % the identity of the first aid provider was unknown. The majority of the patients (n = 177 (58 %)) had asystole upon ambulance arrival. 37 (12...... considerably higher incidence rate for OHCA, than documented by the analogue nationwide registry. Further we discovered a high rate of first aid to OHCA-patients. Finally our data showed a high occurence of asystolia in patients who met the official criteria for OHCA....

  13. Hospital discharge diagnoses of ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest were useful for epidemiologic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, M L; van Hemel, N M; Leufkens, H G M;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the validity of hospital discharge diagnosis regarding ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. METHODS: We identified patients whose record in the PHARMO record linkage system database showed a code for ventricular or unspecified cardiac arrhythmias according to codes...

  14. Student perceptions of sudden cardiac arrest: a qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Annette; Callan, Krista; Egizio, Katelyn; Kenney, Kaye; Gray, Gillian; Mundry, Gillian; Re, Gillian

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the number one cause of death in young athletes in high school and university settings. Survival and outcomes of SCA is dependent on appropriate recognition of symptoms and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), along with a shock from an automatic external defibrillator (AED). The three aims of the authors' study presented in this article were: to describe university students' perceptions and beliefs about sudden cardiac arrest, to describe university students' understanding of an AED and their level of preparedness to recognize and respond to a life threatening emergency event, and to identify university students' experiences of responding to handling life-threatening emergency events. Qualitative methodology was employed using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Three major themes emerged from data analysis: confusion, uncertainty, and fear/uncomfortableness. These themes characterised participant's perceptions about SCA. The authors concluded that a lack of understanding of what SCA is and participants' inability to respond to an emergency event was evident. PMID:22585265

  15. Variation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate variation in airway management strategies in one suburban emergency medical services system treating patients experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. Method. Retrospective chart review of all adult OHCA resuscitation during a 13-month period, specifically comparing airway management decisions. Results. Paramedics demonstrated considerable variation in their approaches to airway management. Approximately half of all OHCA patients received more than one airway management attempt (38/77 [49%], and one-quarter underwent three or more attempts (25/77 [25%]. One-third of patients arrived at the emergency department with a different airway device than initially selected (25/77 [32%]. Conclusion. This study confirmed our hypothesis that paramedics’ selection of ventilation strategies in cardiac arrest varies considerably. This observation raises concern because airway management diverts time and energy from interventions known to improve outcomes in OHCA management, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation. More research is needed to identify more focused airway management strategies for prehospital care providers.

  16. Incidence, predisposing factors, management and survival following cardiac arrest due to subarachnoid haemorrhage: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrifvars Markus B

    2012-11-01

    pulseless electrical tachycardia. In IHCA the survival rate is variable with 0-27% surviving. All survivors experience brief cardiac arrests with short latencies to ROSC. Conclusion Cardiac arrest is a fairly common complication following severe SAH and these patients are encountered both in the pre-hospital and in-hospital setting. Survival is possible if the arrest occurs in the hospital and the latency to ROSC is short. In OHCA the outcome seems to be uniformly poor despite initially successful resuscitation.

  17. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  18. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  19. Pulmonary embolism as a cause of cardiac arrest: Hypothermia in post-resuscitation period (cooling therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niković Vuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary embolism as a possible cause of acute heart failure is a potentially fatal condition that can cause death in all age groups. Patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest have a high risk of increased mortality and their poor long­term outcome is often associated with severe neurological complications. Case Outline. This is a case report of a 67­year­old man after a successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR which was followed by therapeutic hypothermia (TH. The patient visited the dermatological outpatients’ department with clinical presentation of pain and swelling of the right leg, shortness of breath and chest pain. During examination the patient lost consciousness, stopped breathing and had cardiac arrest. ECG was done which registered asystole. We began CPR. After 59 minutes of resuscitation return of heartbeat was achieved. The patient was transported to the Emergency Department. On admission, after computerized tomography (CT of the chest confirmed massive pulmonary embolism (PE, the patient was administered thrombolytic therapy with Metalyse (tenecteplase and anti­coagulation therapy (heparin. After stabilization, therapeutic hypothermia was applied. Combination of EMCOOLSpad on the chest and abdomen and cold Ringer lactate 500 ml at 4°C was flushed. Temperature was decreased to 33°C and kept stabile for 24 hours. After eight days the patient was conscious with a minimal neurological deficit. Conclusion. As shown in this case report, and according to the rich experience elsewhere, cooling therapy after out­of­hospital cardiac arrest and successful CRP may be useful in preventing neurological complications.

  20. Dexmedetomidine Related Bradycardia Leading to Cardiac Arrest in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Chen2, K-S. Chen1,2, K. M. Chang2, W. M. Lee1,2, S. C. Chang1,2 and H. C. Wang1,2

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old, mixed breed female dog (16 kg underwent an exploratory laparotomy following ultrasonographic diagnosis of foreign body and a segment of small intestine intussusceptions. The patient was classified as an ASA II. Ketamine (1mg/kg, IV, and dexmedetomidine (2.5 µg/kg, IV, and morphine (0.6 mg/kg, SC were given as anesthetic premedication. Propofol (0.1 mg/kg, IV titrated to a total amount of 4 ml (2.5 mg/ kg was given for intubation. Asystole was occurred. Cardiac resuscitation was then conducted immediately. Atipamezole (0.1 ml was injected, but showed no response on ECG. Atropine (0.02 mg/kg was then injected, and a second dosage was given. Two-three mins later, the heart rate at 84 beats/min. The NIBP showed 203/132 with MAP 153 mmHg, and the SpO2 showed 95% after the cardiac function was regained. Dexmedetomidine related bradycardia leading to cardiac arrest has been suggested in this case.

  1. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral thiamine has a very high safety profile. The most common adverse effect is local irritation; however, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions may occur, mostly related to intravenous administration. We describe a 44-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, who was admitted with alcohol intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance of recognising the symptoms of anaphylaxis and the fact that facilities for treating anaphylaxis and cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be available when thiamine or for that matter, any drug is given in-hospital. PMID:23853017

  2. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  3. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. METHODS: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists......, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with...... periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3-5 until 180 days. RESULTS: Eight TTM sites randomized 202...

  4. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p < 0.001). Specificity and sensitivity were not significantly affected by targeted temperature or sedation. A benign EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  5. Hospital Variation in Survival After In‐hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M.; Berg, Robert A.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Groeneveld, Peter W.; Chan, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Background In‐hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is common and often fatal. However, the extent to which hospitals vary in survival outcomes and the degree to which this variation is explained by patient and hospital factors is unknown. Methods and Results Within Get with the Guidelines‐Resuscitation, we identified 135 896 index IHCA events at 468 hospitals. Using hierarchical models, we adjusted for demographics comorbidities and arrest characteristics (eg, initial rhythm, etiology, arrest location) to generate risk‐adjusted rates of in‐hospital survival. To quantify the extent of hospital‐level variation in risk‐adjusted rates, we calculated the median odds ratio (OR). Among study hospitals, there was significant variation in unadjusted survival rates. The median unadjusted rate for the bottom decile was 8.3% (range: 0% to 10.7%) and for the top decile was 31.4% (28.6% to 51.7%). After adjusting for 36 predictors of in‐hospital survival, there remained substantial variation in rates of in‐hospital survival across sites: bottom decile (median rate, 12.4% [0% to 15.6%]) versus top decile (median rate, 22.7% [21.0% to 36.2%]). The median OR for risk‐adjusted survival was 1.42 (95% CI: 1.37 to 1.46), which suggests a substantial 42% difference in the odds of survival for patients with similar case‐mix at similar hospitals. Further, significant variation persisted within hospital subgroups (eg, bed size, academic). Conclusion Significant variability in IHCA survival exists across hospitals, and this variation persists despite adjustment for measured patient factors and within hospital subgroups. These findings suggest that other hospital factors may account for the observed site‐level variations in IHCA survival. PMID:24487717

  6. Multiscale Entropy Analysis of EEG for Assessment of Post-Cardiac Arrest Neurological Recovery Under Hypothermia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Maybhate, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the α-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological ex...

  7. Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in Cardiac Arrest: Current Guidelines and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Koniari, Ioanna; Apostolopoulou, Christina; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the review was to summarize the literature over the last 25 years regarding bicarbonate administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms "bicarbonates" and "cardiac arrest", limited to human studies and reviews published in English (or at least with a meaningful abstract in English) in the last 25 years. Clinical and experimental data raised questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) administration during cardiac arrest. Earlier advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines recommended routine bicarbonate administration as part of the ACLS algorithm, but recent guidelines no longer recommend its use. The debate in the literature is ongoing, but at the present time, SB administration is only recommended for cardiac arrest related to hypokalemia or overdose of tricyclic antidepressants. Several studies challenge the assumption that bicarbonate administration is beneficial for treatment of acidosis in cardiac arrest. At the present time, there is a trend against using bicarbonates in cardiac arrest, and this trend is supported by guidelines published by professional societies and organizations. PMID:26985247

  8. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Spurkeland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA.

  9. Temporal differences in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagai, Akshay; McNally, Bryan F.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.;

    2013-01-01

    Understanding temporal differences in the incidence and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has important implications for developing preventative strategies and optimizing systems for OHCA care....

  10. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh J Upadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department.

  11. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Parmar, Sarita J; Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Gauswami, Prashant K; Dadhaniya, Nikunj; Surela, Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department. PMID:25969659

  12. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Parmar, Sarita J; Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Gauswami, Prashant K; Dadhaniya, Nikunj; Surela, Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department. PMID:25969659

  13. Association of National Initiatives to Improve Cardiac Arrest Management With Rates of Bystander Intervention and Patient Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K; Folke, Fredrik;

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major health problem associated with poor outcomes. Early recognition and intervention are critical for patient survival. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is one factor among many associated with improved survival. OBJECTIVE To examine...... temporal changes in bystander resuscitation attempts and survival during a 10-year period in which several national initiatives were taken to increase rates of bystander resuscitation and improve advanced care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for which...

  14. Establishing the Aus-ROC Australian and New Zealand out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Epistry

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Ben; Bray, Janet; Smith, Karen; Walker, Tony; Grantham, Hugh; Hein, Cindy; Thorrowgood, Melanie; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Tony; Dicker, Bridget; Swain, Andy; Bailey, Mark; Bosley, Emma; Pemberton, Katherine; Cameron, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a global health problem with low survival. Regional variation in survival has heightened interest in combining cardiac arrest registries to understand and improve OHCA outcomes. While individual OHCA registries exist in Australian and New Zealand ambulance services, until recently these registries have not been combined. The aim of this protocol paper is to describe the rationale and methods of the Australian Resuscitation Outcomes Consort...

  15. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard O’Connor; Gareth Fitzpatrick; Ayman El-Gammal; Peadar Gilligan

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scena...

  16. Sudden cardiac arrest in a patient with epilepsy induced by chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxi Liu; Weicheng Hao; Xiaoming Yang; Yimin Wang; Yu Su

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed a patient with epilepsy due to chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface underwent sudden cardiac arrest. Paradoxical brain discharge, which occurred prior to epileptic seizures, induced a sudden cardiac arrest. However, when the focal brain pressure was relieved, cardiac arrest disappeared. A 27-year-old male patient underwent pre-surgical video-electroencephalogram monitoring for 160 hours. During monitoring, secondary tonic-clonic seizures occurred five times. A burst of paradoxical brain discharges occurred at 2-19 seconds (mean 8 seconds) prior to epileptic seizures. After 2-3 seconds, sudden cardiac arrest occurred and lasted for 12-22 seconds (average 16 seconds). The heart rate subsequently returned to a normal rate. Results revealed arachnoid pachymenia and adhesions, as well as mucus on the focal cerebral surface, combined with poor circulation and increased pressure. Intracranial electrodes were placed using surgical methods. Following removal of the arachnoid adhesions and mucus on the local cerebral surface, paradoxical brain discharge and epileptic seizures occurred three times, but sudden cardiac arrest was not recorded during 150-hour monitoring. Post-surgical histological examination indicated meningitis. Experimental findings suggested that paradoxical brain discharge led to cardiac arrest instead of epileptic seizures; the insult was associated with chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface, which subsequently led to hypertension and poor blood circulation in focal cerebral areas.

  17. Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C versus 36°C after Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias;

    2013-01-01

    unknown. Our objective was to compare two target temperatures, both intended to prevent fever. Methods In an international trial, we randomly assigned 950 unconscious adults after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause to targeted temperature management at either 33°C or 36°C. The......Background Unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a high risk of death or poor neurologic function. Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended by international guidelines, but the supporting evidence is limited, and the target temperature associated with the best outcome is...... (risk ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.14; P=0.87). The results of analyses adjusted for known prognostic factors were similar. Conclusions In unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause, hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33°C did not confer a benefit as...

  18. Clinical investigation: thyroid function test abnormalities in cardiac arrest associated with acute coronary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltumur, Kenan; Olmez, Gonul; Arıturk, Zuhal; Taskesen, Tuncay; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction It is known that thyroid homeostasis is altered during the acute phase of cardiac arrest. However, it is not clear under what conditions, how and for how long these alterations occur. In the present study we examined thyroid function tests (TFTs) in the acute phase of cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and at the end of the first 2 months after the event. Method Fifty patients with cardiac arrest induced by ACS and 31 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who did not require cardioversion or cardiopulmonary resuscitation were enrolled in the study, as were 40 healthy volunteers. The patients were divided into three groups based on duration of cardiac arrest (10 min). Blood samples were collected for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3), free T3, thyroxine (T4), free T4, troponin-I and creatine kinase-MB measurements. The blood samples for TFTs were taken at 72 hours and at 2 months after the acute event in the cardiac arrest and AMI groups, but only once in the control group. Results The T3 and free T3 levels at 72 hours in the cardiac arrest group were significantly lower than in both the AMI and control groups (P 0.05). At the 2-month evaluation, a dramatic improvement was observed in T3 and free T3 levels in the cardiac arrest group (P < 0.0001). In those patients whose cardiac arrest duration was in excess of 10 min, levels of T3, free T3, T4 and TSH were significantly lower than those in patients whose cardiac arrest duration was under 5 min (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion TFTs are significantly altered in cardiac arrest induced by ACS. Changes in TFTs are even more pronounced in patients with longer periods of resuscitation. The changes in the surviving patients were characterized by euthyroid sick syndrome, and this improved by 2 months in those patients who did not progress into a vegetative state. PMID:16137355

  19. Incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Thomas D; Pearce, Rachel M; Raghunathan, Trivellore E; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Jouven, Xavier; Siscovick, David S

    2004-06-15

    Estimates of the incidence of out-of-hospital primary cardiac arrest (CA) have typically relied solely upon emergency medical service or death certificate records and have not investigated incidence in clinical subgroups. Overall and temporal patterns of CA incidence were investigated in clinically defined groups using systematic methods to ascertain CA. Estimates of incidence were derived from a population-based case-control study in a large health plan from 1986 to 1994. Subjects were enrollees aged 50 to 79 years who had had CA (n = 1,275). A stratified random sample of enrollees who had not had CA was used to estimate the population at risk with various clinical characteristics (n = 2,323). Poisson's regression was used to estimate incidence overall and for 3-year time periods (1986 to 1988, 1989 to 1991, and 1992 to 1994). The overall CA incidence was 1.89/1,000 subject-years and varied up to 30-fold across clinical subgroups. For example, incidence was 5.98/1,000 subject-years in subjects with any clinically recognized heart disease compared with 0.82/1,000 subject-years in subjects without heart disease. In subgroups with heart disease, incidence was 13.69/1,000 subject-years in subjects with prior myocardial infarction and 21.87/1,000 subject-years in subjects with heart failure. Risk decreased by 20% from the initial to the final time period, with a greater decrease observed in those with (25%) compared with those without (12%) clinical heart disease. Thus, CA incidence varied considerably across clinical groups. The results provide insights regarding absolute and population-attributable risk in clinically defined subgroups, information that may aid strategies aimed at reducing mortality from CA. PMID:15194012

  20. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. METHODS: Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation wa...

  1. Optimizing Neurologically Intact Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Call to Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Goodloe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. national out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates, although improving recently, have remained suboptimal despite the collective efforts of individuals, communities, and professional societies. Only until very recently, and still with inconsistency, has focus been placed specifically on survival with pre-arrest neurologic function. The reality of current approaches to sudden cardiac arrest is that they are often lacking an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach, and without deserved funding and outcome analysis. In this manuscript, a multidisciplinary group of authors propose practice, process, technology, and policy initiatives to improve cardiac arrest survival with a focus on neurologic function. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  2. Management of survivors of cardiac arrest - the importance of genetic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter J; Dagradi, Federica

    2016-09-01

    Management of survivors of cardiac arrest is largely based on a traditional approach. However, during the past decade, arrhythmias of genetic origin have increasingly been recognized as contributing to many more cases than previously appreciated. This realization is forcing physicians managing the survivors of cardiac arrest also to consider family members. In this Perspectives article, we examine the appropriate management approaches for survivors of cardiac arrests related to channelopathies, cardiomyopathies, or ischaemic heart disease, and for their families. Important implications for families of individuals who have experienced sudden cardiac death as part of sudden infant death syndrome or during sport activity are also discussed. Congenital long QT syndrome provides a paradigm of the logical sequence of the steps that should be performed. When a diagnosis of the cause of the cardiac arrest is certain or probable, every effort should be made to identify the genetic basis of disease, because this approach will enable the identification and early protection of similarly affected family members. Accordingly, the availability in hospitals of at least one cardiologist with cardiovascular genetics expertise would improve the management of survivors of cardiac arrest as well as of their families. PMID:27383078

  3. A novel program focused on women survivors who were enrolled in a cardiac arrest pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Eyal; Tamis, Jacqueline; Aziz, Emad F; Shapiro, Janet M

    2013-03-01

    The number of cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is estimated to be 300,000/year in the United States. Two landmark studies published in 2002 demonstrated that therapeutic hypothermia decreased mortality and improved neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our institutional pathway for the management of survivors of cardiac arrest stresses teamwork involving multiple disciplines, including cardiology, critical care, nursing, neurology, infectious diseases, physical therapy, social work, and pastoral care. Involvement of the patients' families is critical in the understanding of the process and in the decision making and goals of care when neurological prognosis is poor. In a unique approach, we have included the survivors in the process. Our approach to quality improvement includes a yearly conference incorporating the voices of survivors and families. This conference serves as a means to review our experience, educate clinicians, involve all healthcare providers in the outcome, and provide a model of communication and professionalism to trainees. During review of our experience, we noted the small number of women undergoing therapeutic hypothermia, accounting for only 21% of all patients undergoing this therapy after cardiac arrest. This led to a conference that focused on cardiac disease and cardiac arrest in women. PMID:23411605

  4. Cardiac Arrest following a Myocardial Infarction in a Child Treated with Methylphenidate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Kim; Gormsen, Lise Kirstine; Kim, Won Yong;

    2015-01-01

    -years, did not report any cases of myocardial infarction in current users of methylphenidate, and the risk of serious adverse cardiac events was not found to be increased. We present a case with an 11-year-old child, treated with methylphenidate, who suffered cardiac arrest and was diagnosed with a remote...... myocardial infarction. This demonstrates that myocardial infarction can happen due to methylphenidate exposure in a cardiac healthy child, without cardiovascular risk factors....

  5. The administration of dextrose during in-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with increased mortality and neurologic morbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Teng J; Andersen, Lars W.; Saindon, Brian Z.; Giberson, Tyler A; Kim, Won Young; Berg, Katherine; Novack, Victor; Donnino, Michael W; ,

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dextrose may be used during cardiac arrest resuscitation to prevent or reverse hypoglycemia. However, the incidence of dextrose administration during cardiac arrest and the association of dextrose administration with survival and other outcomes are unknown. Methods We used the Get With The Guidelines®-Resuscitation national registry to identify adult patients with an in-hospital cardiac arrest between the years 2000 and 2010. To assess the adjusted effects of dextrose administrat...

  6. 心脏骤停后综合征%Post-cardiac arrest syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文俊; 高路; 常文毅

    2013-01-01

    Post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) is one of the most common medical emergencies in children.The fatality rate and disability rate are extremely high.Pathogenesis of PCAS remains incompletely clear,and clinical manifestation is complicated.The treatment is mainly limited to supportive care.In recent years,the phases of PCAS are defined according to the pathophysiological changes and clinical prognosis.Investigators also made some advances in the fields of pathophysiological changes and clinical treatment of brain damage and myocardial damage.For the treatment of PCAS,early therapeutic hypothermia,glucose control and seizure control,and reasonable cardiopulmonary support are promoted.In this article,we reviewed the advances in the above fields and the latest advance on the management of PCAS in foreign countries.%心脏骤停后综合征(post-cardiac arrest syndrome,PCAS)是儿童时期常见的危重症,致死率及致残率极高,其发病机制未完全阐明,临床表现复杂多样,治疗上主要是对症支持治疗.近年来根据病理生理改变及临床预后对PCAS进行分期,并在PCAS脑损伤、心肌损伤病理生理改变及临床治疗等领域取得了一些进展.在PCAS的救治上,提倡早期亚低温治疗、控制血糖、控制惊厥和合理的心肺支持.该文就上述领域的研究作一综述,并介绍国外治疗PCAS的最新治疗策略.

  7. Acute right ventricular myocardial injury and sudden cardiac arrest in a patient with persistent spontaneous coronary vasospasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hung Ming-Yow; Li Ju-Chi; Hao Wen-Rui; Wu Cheng-Hsueh; Hung Ming-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Coronary vasospasm is a rare diagnosis resulting in sudden arrhythmic cardiac arrest. We report a case of a healthy,non-smoking elderly woman resuscitated from arrhythmic cardiac arrest. She had persistent spontaneous coronaxy vasospasm, leading to right ventricular myocardial injury and failure, and shock. She responded quickly to intravenous normal saline bolus infusion, but had irreversible neurological sequelae. Additionally, she had atrial fibrillation preceding ischemic ventricular fibrillation, a rare finding in coronary vasospasm-related cardiac arrest. We suggest immediate coronary angiography of patients in sudden arrhythmic cardiac arrest with acute right ventricular failure for a prompt,accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of the coronary vasospasm.

  8. The Practice of Therapeutic Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest in France: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Cattet, Florian; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Leone, Marc; Jaber, Samir; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Ichai, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Aims Cardiac arrest is a major health concern worldwide accounting for 375,000 cases per year in Europe with a survival rate of <10%. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve patients’ neurological outcome and is recommended by scientific societies. Despite these guidelines, different surveys report a heterogeneous application of this treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical practice of therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest patients. Methods This self-declarative web based survey was proposed to all registered French adult intensive care units (ICUs) (n = 357). Paediatrics and neurosurgery ICUs were excluded. The different questions addressed the structure, the practical modalities of therapeutic hypothermia and the use of prognostic factors in patients admitted after cardiac arrest. Results One hundred and thirty-two out of 357 ICUs (37%) answered the questionnaire. Adherence to recommendations regarding the targeted temperature and hypothermia duration were 98% and 94% respectively. Both guidelines were followed in 92% ICUs. During therapeutic hypothermia, sedative drugs were given in 99% ICUs, mostly midazolam (77%) and sufentanil (59%). Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) were used in 97% ICUs, mainly cisatracurium (77%). Numerous prognostic factors were used after cardiac arrest such as clinical factors (95%), biomarkers (53%), electroencephalography (78%) and evoked potentials (35%). Conclusions In France, adherence to recommendations for therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is higher than those previously reported in other countries. Numerous prognostic factors are widely used even if their reliability remains controversial. PMID:23049783

  9. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard O’Connor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI or pulmonary embolism (PE. Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient’s cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect.

  10. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; El-Gammal, Ayman; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect. PMID:26664765

  11. Sudden Cardiac Arrest due to Brugada Syndrome: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Soleimanirad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brugada Syndrome is a rare cause of sudden cardiac arrest and has a unique ECG pattern. In fact, with ST-segment elevation down sloping in the right precordial leads (v1-v3, RBBB pattern in lateral leads and J-point elevation is revealed. We must notice and avoid trigger factors of this syndrome during general anesthesia. Patient is a 39 old man who attended to emergency department with sudden cardiac arrest and resuscitate. He was transferred to ICU for management of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Complementary studies concluded the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome. We must consider Brugada syndrome within patients with family history of sudden cardiac arrest. Moreover, we must avoid trigger factors of this syndrome such as fever, bradicardia and electrolyte abnormality (specialy Na, Ca abnormalities during general anesthesia and if they appear, we should treat them.

  12. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage as a differential diagnosis of pre-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohil Pothiawala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most common neurological disorder leading to pre-hospital cardiac arrest. ECG changes in SAH may mimic myocardial infarction or ischemia, and thus lead to delayed treatment of the primary problem. Early identification of SAH-induced cardiac arrest with the use of computed tomography scan of the brain obtained immediately after resuscitation will aid emergency physicians make further decisions. The overall prognosis of patients who are resuscitated is extremely poor. But, prompt neurosurgical referral and multidisciplinary intensive care management can improve the survival rate and the functional outcome. Thus, physicians should consider SAH as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with pre-hospital cardiac arrest.

  13. Barriers to recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency medical calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfsen, David; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Egerod, Ingrid; Lippert, Freddy K

    2015-01-01

    inductive thematic analysis of recordings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest emergency calls from December 2012. Participants were the callers (bystanders) and the emergency medical dispatchers. Data were analysed using a hermeneutic approach. RESULTS: Based on the concept of data saturation, 13 recordings...... influences the dispatchers' recognition of OHCA, focusing on the communication during the emergency call. The purpose of this study is to identify factors affecting medical dispatchers' recognition of OHCA during emergency calls in a qualitative analysis of calls. METHODS: An investigator triangulated...... of not recognised cardiac arrest and 8 recordings of recognised cardiac arrests were analysed. Three main themes, six subthemes and an embedded theme emerged from the analysis: caller's physical distance (caller near patient, caller not near patient), caller's emotional distance (keeping calm, losing...

  14. Surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Qualitative Survey Study of Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Kelly N; Brown, Frances; Christensen, Roxanne; Damino, Colleen; Newman, Mary M; Kurz, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Research describing survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) has centered on quantifying functional ability, perceived quality of life, and neurocognitive assessment. Many gaps remain, however, regarding survivors' psychosocial perceptions of life in the aftermath of cardiac arrest. An important influence upon those perceptions is the presence of support and its role in a survivor's life. An Internet-based pilot survey study was conducted to gather data from SCA survivors and friends and/or family members (FFMs) representing their support system. The survey was distributed to members of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation (SCAF) via the Internet by SCAF leadership. Questions included both discrete multiple-choice and open-ended formats. Inductive thematic analyses were completed by three independent researchers trained in qualitative research methodology to identify primary themes consistent among study participants until thematic saturation was achieved. No statistical inferences were made. A total of 205 surveys were returned over the 5-month study period (July to November 2013); nine were received blank, leaving 196 surveys available for review. Major themes identified for survivors (N = 157) include the significance of and desire to share experiences with others; subculture identification (unique experience from those suffering a heart attack); and the need to seek a new normal, both personally and inter-personally. Major themes identified for FFMs (N = 39) include recognition of loved one's memory loss; a lack of information at discharge, including expectations after discharge; and concern for the patient experiencing another cardiac arrest. This pilot, qualitative survey study suggests several common themes important to survivors, and FFMs, of cardiac arrest. These themes may serve as a basis for future patient-centered focus groups and the development of patient-centered guidelines for patients and support persons of those surviving cardiac arrest

  15. Cardiac arrest in intensive care unit: Case report and future recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiation of hemofiltration in a patient in septic shock can cause hemodynamic compromise potentially leading to cardiac arrest. We propose that the standard ′4Hs and 4Ts′ approach to the differential diagnosis of a cardiac arrest should be supplemented in critically ill patients with anaphylaxis and human and technical errors involving drug administration (the 5 th H and T. To illustrate the point, we report a case where norepinephrine infused through a central venous catheter (CVC was being removed by the central venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH catheter causing the hemodynamic instability. CVVH has this potential of interfering with the systemic availability of drugs infused via a closely located CVC.

  16. Prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest. DESIGN: Structured interview of 250 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome and relatives of 48 patients with witnessed cardiac arrest. The following courses of action...... hundred and thirteen patients (45%) knew of thrombolytic therapy. Twenty-seven of 75 patients with knowledge of the benefit of prompt treatment with thrombolysis, acted in accordance with this awareness. CONCLUSION: Patients misinterpret symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and are misguided when calling...

  17. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest--from current concepts to a future standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  18. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoppu Sanna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects.

  19. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  20. F-MARC: promoting the prevention and management of sudden cardiac arrest in football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Efraim Benjamin; Dvorak, J; Schmied, C; Meyer, T

    2015-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death is the most common cause of unnatural death in football. To prevent and urgently manage sudden cardiac arrest on the football field-of-play, F-MARC (FIFA Medical and Research Centre) has been fully committed to a programme of research, education, standardisation and practical implementation. This strategy has detected football players at medical risk during mandatory precompetition medical assessments. Additionally, FIFA has (1) sponsored internationally accepted guidelines for the interpretation of an athlete's ECG, (2) developed field-of-play-specific protocols for the recognition, response, resuscitation and removal of a football player having sudden cardiac arrest and (3) introduced and distributed the FIFA medical emergency bag which has already resulted in the successful resuscitation of a football player who had a sudden cardiac arrest on the field-of-play. Recently FIFA, in association with the Institute of Sports and Preventive Medicine in Saarbrücken, Germany, established a worldwide Sudden Death Registry with a view to documenting fatal events on the football field-of-play. These activities by F-MARC are testimony to FIFA's continued commitment to minimising sudden cardiac arrest while playing football. PMID:25878076

  1. Automated external defibrillators inaccessible to more than half of nearby cardiac arrests in public locations during evening, nighttime, and weekends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carolina Malta; Wissenberg, Mads; Weeke, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite wide dissemination, use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in community settings is limited. We assessed how AED accessibility affected coverage of cardiac arrests in public locations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified cardiac arrests in public locations (1994-2011) in...

  2. Efficacy analysis of intravenous thrombolysis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of intravenous thrombolysis in the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction(AMI)and cardiac arrest after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Methods 120 patients with AMI and cardiac arrest admitted in our hospital from Mar2009 to Mar 2013 were divided into thrombolytic group(n=50)and control group(n=70)according to the

  3. Early and Late Neurological Complications after Cardiac Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Balkanay

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The clinical use of cyclosporine as an immunosuppressant improved the recipient’s life span and revolutionized the field of cardiac transplantation. But most of the immunesuppressant drugs including cyclosporine may cause neurological and many other side effects. In this article we present three cases, from 58 patients, undergoing cardiac transplantation at our hospital from 1989 to 2008 in whom developed transient neurological complications.

  4. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.;

    2010-01-01

    2006 to November 2006. Interviews were focussed on barriers and recommendations for teamwork in the cardiac arrest team, optimal policy for improvement of resuscitation training and clinical practice, use of cognitive aids and adoption of European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines 2005. Interviews...... task management. Important barriers that were identified were inexperienced team leaders, task overload and hierarchic structure in the teams' inability to maintain focus on chest compressions. Conclusion: Interview participants pointed out that NTSs of teams could improve the treatment of cardiac...

  5. Location of cardiac arrest in a city center: strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in public locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy; Nielsen, Søren Loumann;

    2009-01-01

    arrests were defined as those with 1 cardiac arrest every 2 or 5 years, respectively. There were 1274 cardiac arrests in public locations. According to the European Resuscitation Council or AHA guidelines, AEDs needed to be deployed in 1.2% and 10.6% of the city area, providing coverage for 19.5% (n=249......: All cardiac arrests in public in Copenhagen, Denmark, from 1994 through 2005 were geographically located, as were 104 public AEDs placed by local initiatives. In accordance with European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines, areas with a high incidence of cardiac......) and 66.8% (n=851) of all cardiac arrests, respectively. The excessive cost of such AED deployments was estimated to be $33 100 or $41 000 per additional quality-adjusted life year, whereas unguided AED placement covering the entire city had an estimated cost of $108 700 per quality-adjusted life year...

  6. Prolonged cardiac arrest and resuscitation by extracorporeal life support: favourable outcome without preceding anticoagulation in an experimental setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, K; D'Inka, M; Beyersdorf, F; Benk, C; Nguyen-Thanh, T; Mader, I; Fritsch, B; Ihling, C; Mueller, K; Heilmann, C; Trummer, G

    2013-11-01

    State-of-the-art cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) restores circulation with inconsistent blood-flow and pressure. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) following CPR opens the opportunity for "controlled reperfusion". In animal experiments investigating CPR with ECLS, systemic anticoagulation before induced cardiac arrest is normal, but a major point of dispute, since preliminary heparinization in patients undergoing unwitnessed cardiac arrest is impossible. In this study, we investigated options for ECLS after an experimental 15 minutes normothermic cardiac arrest, without preceding anticoagulation, in pigs. Neurological recovery was assessed by a scoring system, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, brain histology was performed on day seven after cardiac arrest. We demonstrated that preliminary heparin administration was not necessary for survival or neurological recovery in this setting. Heparin flushing of the cannulae seemed sufficient to avoid thrombus formation. These findings may ease the way to using ECLS in patients with sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:23827862

  7. Pyruvate stabilizes electrocardiographic and hemodynamic function in pigs recovering from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Williams, Arthur G; Hoxha, Besim; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac electromechanical dysfunction may compromise recovery of patients who are initially resuscitated from cardiac arrest, and effective treatments remain elusive. Pyruvate, a natural intermediary metabolite, energy substrate, and antioxidant, has been found to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. This study tested the hypothesis that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation restores hemodynamic, metabolic, and electrolyte homeostasis following cardiac arrest. Forty-two Yorkshire swine underwent pacing-induced ventricular fibrillation and, after 6 min pre-intervention arrest, 4 min precordial compressions followed by transthoracic countershocks. After defibrillation and recovery of spontaneous circulation, the pigs were monitored for another 4 h. Sodium pyruvate or NaCl were infused i.v. (0.1 mmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) throughout precordial compressions and the first 60 min recovery. In 8 of the 24 NaCl-infused swine, the first countershock converted ventricular fibrillation to pulseless electrical activity unresponsive to subsequent countershocks, but only 1 of 18 pyruvate-treated swine developed pulseless electrical activity (relative risk 0.17; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.22). Pyruvate treatment also lowered the dosage of vasoconstrictor phenylephrine required to maintain systemic arterial pressure at 15-60 min recovery, hastened clearance of excess glucose, elevated arterial bicarbonate, and raised arterial pH; these statistically significant effects persisted up to 3 h after sodium pyruvate infusion, while infusion-induced hypernatremia subsided. These results demonstrate that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation achieves electrocardiographic and hemodynamic stability in swine during the initial recovery from cardiac arrest. Such metabolically based treatment may offer an effective strategy to support cardiac electromechanical recovery immediately after cardiac arrest. PMID:26088865

  8. Distinct properties and metabolic mechanisms of postresuscitation myocardial injuries in ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest versus asphyxiation cardiac arrest in a porcine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Caijun; Li Chunsheng; Zhang Yi; Yang Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background The two most prevalent causes of sudden cardiac death are ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) and asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA).Profound postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction has been demonstrated in both VFCA and ACA animal models.Our study aimed to characterize the two porcine models of cardiac arrest and postresuscitation myocardial metabolism dysfunction.Methods Thirty-two pigs were randomized into two groups.The VFCA group (n=16) were subject to programmed electrical stimulation and the ACA group (n=16) underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce cardiac arrest (CA).Once induced,CA remained untreated for a period of 8 minutes.Two minutes following initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR),defibrillation was attempted until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved or animals died.To assess myocardial metabolism,18F-FluoroDeoxyGlucose Positron Emission Tomography was performed at baseline and 4 hours after ROSC.Results ROSC was 100% successful in VFCA and 50% successful in ACA.VFCA had better mean arterial pressure and cardiac output after ROSC than ACA.Arterial blood gas analysis indicated more detrimental metabolic disturbances in ACA compared with VFCA after ROSC (ROSC 0.5 hours,pH:7.01±0.06 vs.7.21±0.03,P<0.01; HCO3-:(15.83±2.31 vs.20.11±1.83) mmol/L,P<0.01; lactate:(16.22±1.76 vs.5.84±1.44) mmol/L,P<0.01).Myocardial metabolism imaging using Positron Emission Tomography demonstrated that myocardial injuries after ACA were more severe and widespread than after VFCA at 4 hours after ROSC (the maximum standardized uptake value of the whole left ventricular:1.00±0.17 vs.1.93±0.27,P<0.01).Lower contents of myocardial energy metabolism enzymes (Na+-K+-ATPase enzyme activity,Ca2+-ATPase enzyme activity,superoxide dismutase and phosphodiesterase) were found in ACA relative to VFCA.Conclusions Compared with VFCA,ACA causes more severe myocardium injury and metabolism hindrance,therefore they

  9. Time-differentiated target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Rasmussen, Bodil S; de Haas, Inge;

    2016-01-01

    24 or 48 hours. Inclusion criteria are: age older than 17 and below 80 years; presumed cardiac origin of arrest; and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) <8, on admission. The primary outcome is neurological outcome at 6 months using the Cerebral Performance Category score (CPC) by an assessor blinded to...

  10. Out-of-Hospital Perimortem Cesarean Section as Resuscitative Hysterotomy in Maternal Posttraumatic Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gatti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal treatment of a severe hemodynamic instability from shock to cardiac arrest in late term pregnant women is subject to ongoing studies. However, there is an increasing evidence that early “separation” between the mother and the foetus may increase the restoration of the hemodynamic status and, in the cardiac arrest setting, it may raise the likelihood of a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in the mother. This treatment, called Perimortem Cesarean Section (PMCS, is now termed as Resuscitative Hysterotomy (RH to better address the issue of an early Cesarean section (C-section. This strategy is in contrast with the traditional treatment of cardiac arrest characterized by the maintenance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers without any emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a prehospital perimortem delivery by Caesarean (C section of a foetus at 36 weeks of gestation after the mother’s traumatic cardiac arrest. Despite the negative outcome of the mother, the choice of performing a RH seems to represent up to date the most appropriate intervention to improve the outcome in both mother and foetus.

  11. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA......-reviewed journals and presented at relevant scientific symposia....

  12. Successful emergency splenectomy during cardiac arrest due to cytomegalovirus-induced atraumatic splenic rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glesner, Matilde Kanstrup; Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Nielsen, Jesper Meng Rahn;

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with fever and a petechial rash on suspicion of meningitis. Shortly after arriving she developed cardiac arrest. Blood work up showed severe lactate acidosis, anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A focused assessment with sonography in trauma...... essential for the management and the eventual recovery of the patient....

  13. Sinus bradycardia during hypothermia in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bradycardia is a common finding in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), presumably as a normal physiological response to low body temperature. We hypothesized that a normal physiological response with sinus bradycardia (SB) ...

  14. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L;

    1991-01-01

    form of a test for dementia was assessed in long-term survivors (n = 30) together with 28 patients surviving acute myocardial infarction and 11 control persons. The results of the investigation demonstrate that the more intensive the prehospital treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the more...

  15. Cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, U; Berild, D; Nielsen, T L

    1992-01-01

    A 27-year-old man, HIV-positive for 4 years, developed ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate. The dosage was 4 mg/kg/day for 18 days. Nephrotoxicity occurred and raised serum potassium. The plasma...

  16. Should prehospital resuscitative thoracotomy be incorporated in advanced life support after traumatic cardiac arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, A; Xanthos, T

    2014-06-01

    The survival of traumatic cardiac arrest patients poses a challenge for Emergency Medical Services initiating advanced life support on-scene, especially with regard to having to decide immediately whether to initiate prehospital emergency thoracotomy. Although the necessity for carrying out the procedure remains a cause for debate, it can be life-saving when performed with the correct indications and approaches. PMID:26816077

  17. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  18. Prolonged Intraoperative Cardiac Resuscitation Complicated by Intracardiac Thrombus in a Patient Undergoing Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang; DeMaria, Samuel; Cohen, Edmond; Silvay, George; Zerillo, Jeron

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of successful resuscitation after prolonged cardiac arrest during orthotopic liver transplantation. After reperfusion, the patient developed ventricular tachycardia, complicated by intracardiac clot formation and massive hemorrhage. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated stunned and nonfunctioning right and left ventricles, with developing intracardiac clots. Treatment with heparin, massive transfusion and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation ensued for 51 minutes. Serial arterial blood gases demonstrated adequate oxygenation and ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiothoracic surgery was consulted for potential use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, however, the myocardial function improved and the surgery was completed without further intervention. On postoperative day 6, the patient was extubated without neurologic or cardiac impairment. The patient continues to do well 2 years posttransplant, able to perform independent daily activities of living and his previous job. This case underscores the potential for positive outcomes with profoundly prolonged, effective advanced cardiovascular life support in patients who experience postreperfusion syndrome. PMID:27233818

  19. Case series: CT scan in cardiac arrest and imminent cardiogenic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging a patient having a cardiac arrest on the examination table is not a common occurrence. Altered hemodynamics resulting from pump failure causes stasis of blood in the dependent organs of the body, which is manifested on imaging by dependent contrast pooling and layering. Often a patient with imminent cardiogenic shock also shows a similar dependent contrast pooling and layering, which is a marker of the worsening clinical condition. We report the contrast-enhanced CT scan features in four cases, two of whom had cardiac arrest during imaging, while the other two developed cardiogenic shock soon after the examination. Dependent contrast pooling and layering were found in all of them, with faint or no opacification of the left cardiac chambers. Contrast pooling was noted in the dependent lumbar veins, hepatic veins, hepatic parenchyma, and the right renal vein, as well as in the dependent part of the IVC and the right heart chambers

  20. In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: An Update on Pulseless Electrical Activity and Asystole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attin, Mina; Tucker, Rebecca G; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Nonshockable rhythms, including pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole, precede more than 70% of in-hospital cardiac arrests (I-HCA). Compared with shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), nonshockable rhythms have higher mortality and morbidity. Therefore, investigating the underlying mechanisms of these arrhythmias to improve the quality of care and outcome for patients who suffer cardiac arrest is a priority. As the first responders to I-HCA, nurses must have the proper knowledge and training to provide timely and efficient cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. This article provides an overview of nonshockable cardiac arrhythmias preceding I-HCA as a means of addressing the gap between science and clinical practice. PMID:27484665

  1. Hospital admissions and pharmacotherapy before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy K; Olesen, Jonas B; Andersson, Charlotte; Wissenberg, Mads; Poulsen, Henrik E; Nielsen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The underlying etiology of sudden cardiac death varies with age and is likely to be reflected in type and number of healthcare contacts. We aimed to determine the specific type of healthcare contact shortly before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) across ages. METHODS: OHCA patients...... were identified in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Register and Copenhagen Medical Emergency Care Unit (2001-2006). We matched every OHCA patients with 10 controls on sex and age. Healthcare contacts were evaluated 30 days before event by individual-level-linkage of nationwide registers. RESULTS......: We identified 16,924 OHCA patients, median age 70.0 years (Q1-Q3: 59-80). OHCA patients had a higher number of hospitalizations and received more pharmacotherapy compared to the control population across all ages (p for difference 89) were...

  2. Cardiac and systemic haemodynamic complications of liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2009-01-01

    physical and pharmacological strain. Cardiac failure is an important cause of mortality after liver transplantation and stressful procedures as insertions of transjugular intrahepatic portal systemic shunt (TIPS), peritoneal venous shunting, and other types of surgery. Improvement of liver function has......Cardiovascular complications of liver cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central-, splanchnic,- and peripheral circulation. Vasodilatation prevails, but vascular beds with various degrees of reduced and increased haemodynamic resistance are the results of massive...... been shown to reverse the cardiovascular complications. The clinical significance is an important topic for future research. At present, no specific treatment can be recommended, and the cardiac failure in cirrhosis should be treated as in non-cirrhotic patients with sodium restriction, diuretics, and...

  3. Survival of male patients with spinal cord injury after cardiac arrest in Department of Veterans Affairs hospital: Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Caruso, MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Survivability characteristics after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the population with spinal cord injury (SCI are unclear but may be useful for advanced care planning discussions with patients. Retrospective evaluation from records of all SCI patients over 10 yr at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest was performed. Demographic data and other common measurements were recorded. Thirty-six male subjects were identified, and only two patients survived to discharge (5.5% survival rate, both of whom were admitted for nonacute issues and were asymptomatic shortly before the cardiac arrest. The mean age at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest was 62.4 yr, with a mean time from cardiac arrest to death of 3.02 d. No significant demographic parameters were identified. Overall, SCI likely portends worse outcome for acutely ill patients in the situation of a cardiac arrest. Conclusions are limited by sample size.

  4. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term function of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors are sparse. We examined return to work as a proxy of preserved function without major neurologic deficits in survivors. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Denmark, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have been systematically...... reported to the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register since 2001. During 2001-2011, we identified 4354 patients employed before arrest among 12 332 working-age patients (18-65 years), of whom 796 survived to day 30. Among 796 survivors (median age, 53 years [quartile 1-3, 46-59 years]; 81.5% men), 610 (76.......6%) returned to work in a median time of 4 months [quartile 1-3, 1-19 months], with a median time of 3 years spent back at work. A total of 74.6% (N=455) remained employed without using sick leave during the first 6 months after returning to work. This latter proportion of survivors returning to work increased...

  5. American Heart Association Response to the 2015 Institute of Medicine Report on Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumar, Robert W; Eigel, Brian; Callaway, Clifton W; Estes, N A Mark; Jollis, James G; Kleinman, Monica E; Morrison, Laurie J; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Rea, Thomas D; Sendelbach, Sue

    2015-09-15

    The American Heart Association (AHA) commends the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act (2015). The AHA recognizes the unique opportunity created by the report to meaningfully advance the objectives of improving outcomes for sudden cardiac arrest. For decades, the AHA has focused on the goal of reducing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease though robust support of basic, translational, clinical, and population research. The AHA also has developed a rigorous process using the best available evidence to develop scientific, advisory, and guideline documents. These core activities of development and dissemination of scientific evidence have served as the foundation for a broad range of advocacy initiatives and programs that serve as a foundation for advancing the AHA and IOM goal of improving cardiac arrest outcomes. In response to the call to action in the IOM report, the AHA is announcing 4 new commitments to increase cardiac arrest survival: (1) The AHA will provide up to $5 million in funding over 5 years to incentivize resuscitation data interoperability; (2) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support for local and regional implementation opportunities to increase cardiac arrest survival by improving out-of-hospital and in-hospital systems of care; (3) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support to launch an AHA resuscitation research network; and (4) the AHA will cosponsor a National Cardiac Arrest Summit to facilitate the creation of a national cardiac arrest collaborative that will unify the field and identify common goals to improve survival. In addition to the AHA's historic and ongoing commitment to improving cardiac arrest care and outcomes, these new initiatives are responsive to each of the IOM recommendations and demonstrate the AHA's leadership in the field. However, successful implementation of the IOM recommendations will require a timely

  6. August 2014 Tucson critical care journal club: bacteremia in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hypes C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is an uncommon, but important, condition encountered in the emergency department (ED. While cardiac arrest represents the final common pathway of multiple conditions, early evaluation often focuses on cardiac abnormalities. However, observed associations between infection, particularly pneumonia, and in-hospital cardiac arrest led Coba et al. (1 to investigate the incidence of bacteremia among OHCA patients. The study prospectively investigated 250 adult patients who presented to an academic ED with OHCA between 2007 and 2009. Two blood culture samples were drawn during resuscitation or shortly after return of spontaneous circulation through vascular devices placed for clinical purposes. Children, pregnant women, victims of trauma were excluded. To minimize false positive results, patients were classified as bacteremic if one sample was positive for a typical pathogen or both samples were positive for the same skin colonizing organism. Patients in whom only 1 sample was positive for suspected skin contaminant ...

  7. Sudden cardiac arrest in sports - need for uniform registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, E E; Borjesson, M; Sharma, S;

    2015-01-01

    . This paper discusses the uncertainties about available data and provides comprehensive suggestions for standard definitions and a guide for uniform registration parameters of SCA/SCD. The parameters include a definition of what constitutes an 'athlete', incidence calculations, enrolment of cases, the...... preparticipation screening and cardiac safety at sport facilities requires increased data quality concerning incidence, aetiology and management of SCA/SCD in sports. Uniform standard registration of SCA/SCD in athletes and leisure sportsmen would be a first step towards this goal....

  8. Antipsychotics and Associated Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Jensen, Aksel; Folke, Fredrik;

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCA in Denmark (2001-2010). Risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug...... use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of event. Overall treatment with any antipsychotic was associated with OHCA (odds ratio [OR]= 1.53, 95...

  9. A case of Ventricular Tachycardia and Cardiac Arrest Associated with Sertraline and Mirtazapine Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Atmaca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old male suffering from depressive symptomatology was admitted to the inpatient clinic at Firat University School of Medicine; and his psychiatric evaluation revealed major depressive episode according to DSM-IV. He developed chest discomfort, chest pain and shortness of breath of acute onset accompanying pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT leading to cardiac arrest following sertraline and mirtazapine combination treatment. He died after two days in the Intensive Care Unit. The present case suggests that psychiatrists should be aware of unexpected cardiac events, especially when they use combination treatments.

  10. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Regina Vancini Campanharo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of survivors was evaluated at discharge, after six months and one year.RESULTSOf the 285 patients, 16 survived until hospital discharge, and 13 remained alive after one year, making possible to identify factors associated with survival. There were no losses in the process.CONCLUSIONCohort studies help identify risks and disease outcomes. Considering cardiac arrest, they can subsidize public policies, encourage future studies and training programs for CPR, thereby improving the prognosis of patients.

  11. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of survivors was evaluated at discharge, after six months and one year.RESULTSOf the 285 patients, 16 survived until hospital discharge, and 13 remained alive after one year, making possible to identify factors associated with survival. There were no losses in the process.CONCLUSIONCohort studies help identify risks and disease outcomes. Considering cardiac arrest, they can subsidize public policies, encourage future studies and training programs for CPR, thereby improving the prognosis of patients. PMID:26516745

  12. Effect of electroconvulsive stimulation on morphological and physiological aspects of post-cardiac arrest cerebral microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Aizberg, Oleg R; Korotkevich, Alexander E; Nedzved, Mikhail K

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) on cerebral circulation in vivo using the method for measuring microcirculation in real time with the photosensitizer dye Photosense and the fiber optic spectrofluorometer LESA-01-BIOSPEC. We have found that electroconvulsive stimulation significantly improved cerebral microcirculation (fourfold higher comparing to the control cerebral perfusion) after 30 min of room-temperature cardiac arrest. Morphologic study of the brain tissue showed the absence of rouleaux formation of erythrocytes ("sludged blood") in the cerebral cortex microcirculation after the application of electrical stimulus. Electroconvulsive stimulation may be useful for improving cerebral microcirculation (blood flow) in cases of long-term brain hypoxia/anoxia after prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:18586374

  13. Risk factors for cardiac complications after spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Guyot, Juan P.; Cizik, Amy; Bransford, Richard; Bellabarba, Carlo; Lee, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Study design:  Registry study using prospectively collected data Objective:  To determine risk factors for cardiac complications in spine surgery. Methods:  The Spine End Results Registry 2003–2004 is an exhaustive database of 1,592 patients who underwent spine surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center or Harborview Medical Center. Detailed information regarding patient demographic, medical comorbidity, surgical invasiveness and adverse outcomes were prospectively recorded. The p...

  14. Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia : Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J. K.; Verkade, H. J.; Burgerhof, J. G.; Bierens, J. J.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Kneyber, M. C.; Albers, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the outcome of drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia, and to determine distinct criteria for termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in drowned children with hypothermia and absence of spontaneous circulation. DESIGN Nationwide retrospective cohort study. S

  15. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  16. Prolonged closed cardiac massage using LUCAS device in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged transport time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Matevossian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Edouard Matevossian1, Dietrich Doll4, Jakob Säckl1, Inga Sinicina5, Jürgen Schneider2, Gerhard Simon3, Norbert Hüser11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive-Care Medicine; 3Department of Radiology, Technische Universität of Munich, Germany; 4Department of Visceral, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Philips University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 5Institute of Clinical Forensic Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Saving more human lives through more effective reanimation measures is the goal of the new international guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation as the decisive aspect for survival after cardiovascular arrest is that basic resuscitation should start immediately. According to the updated guidelines, the greatest efficacy in cardiac massage is only achieved when the right compression point, an adequate compression depth, vertical pressure, the correct frequency, and equally long phases of compression and decompression are achieved. The very highest priority is placed on restoring continuous circulation. Against this background, standardized continuous chest compression with active decompression has contributed to a favorable outcome in this case. The hydraulically operated and variably adjustable automatic Lund University Cardiac Arrest System (LUCAS device (Jolife, Lund, Sweden undoubtedly meets these requirements. This case report describes a 44-year-old patient who – approximately 15 min after the onset of clinical death due to apparent ventricular fibrillation – received cardiopulmonary resuscitation, initially by laypersons and then by the emergency medical team (manual chest compressions followed by situation-adjusted LUCAS compressions. Sinus rhythm was restored after more than 90 min of continuous resuscitation, with seven defibrillations. Interventional diagnostic workup did not reveal a causal morphological correlate for the condition on coronary

  17. Critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Maaløe, Rikke; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2010-01-01

    hundred and seven reports describing 122 separate incidents were identified and classified into incidents related to: alerting the resuscitation team (n = 32; 26%), human performance (n = 22; 18%), equipment failure (n = 19; 16%), resuscitation equipment not available (n = 13; 11%), physical environment...... (n = 14; 11%), insufficient monitoring (n = 14; 11%), and medication error (n = 8; 7%). Conclusion Critical incidents related to cardiac arrest occur due to logistical, technical, teamworking and knowledge problems. These findings should be considered when planning education and implementing...

  18. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners. PMID:26980272

  19. Factors associated with the clinical outcomes of paediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Takashi; Abe, Takeru; Noda, Eiichiro; Hasegawa, Manabu; Hashizume, Makoto; Hagihara, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To better understand and predict clinical outcomes of paediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Design A population-based, observational study. Setting The National Japan Utstein Registry. Participants 2900 children aged 5–17 years who experienced OHCA and received resuscitation by emergency responders. Signal detection analysis using 17 variables was applied to identify factors associated with OHCA outcomes; the primary endpoint was cerebral performance category (CPC) 1 or...

  20. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Nesreen Yaghmour; Mohammad Reza Movahed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we...

  1. Interposed Abdominal Compression CPR for an Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Victim Failing Traditional CPR

    OpenAIRE

    McClung, Christian D.; Alexander J. Anshus

    2015-01-01

    Interposed abdominal compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR) is an alternative technique to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that can improve perfusion and lead to restoration of circulation in patients with chest wall deformity either acquired through vigorous CPR or co-morbidity such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where IAC-CPR allowed for restoration of spontaneous circulation and eventual ...

  2. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Meisner, Jessica A.; Wilcox, Susan R.; Jeremy B. Richards

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the liter...

  3. Efficacy of Mild Hypothermia for the Treatment of Patients with Cardiac Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Gao; Kang-Li Hui; Yu-Jie Wang; Lin Wu; Man-Lin Duan; Jian-Guo Xu; De-Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Therapeutic hypothermia has been recommended for the treatment of cardiac arrest patients who remain comatose after the return of spontaneous circulation.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of mild hypothermia on patients with cardiac arrest by conducting a meta-analysis.Methods:The relevant trials were searched in Cochrane Library,PubMed,Web of Science,Embase,CNKI and Wan Fang Data from the date of their establishment to October 2014.Thereafter,the studies retrieved were screened based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria.Data were extracted,and the quality of the included studies was evaluated.A meta-analysis was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 5.2 software.Results:Six randomized controlled trials involving 531 cases were included,among which 273 cases were assigned to the treatment group and the other 258 cases to the control group.The meta-analysis indicated that mild hypothermia therapy after cardiac arrest produced significant differences in survival rate (relative risk [RR] =1.23,95% confidence interval [CI]:1.02-1.48,P =0.03) and neurological function (RR =1.33,95% CI:1.08-1.65,P =0.007) after 6 months compared with normothermia therapy.However,no significant differences were observed in the survival to the hospital discharge (RR =1.35,95% CI:0.87-2.10,P =0.18),favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (RR =1.53,95% CI:0.95-2.45,P =0.08) and adverse events.Conclusions:The meta-analysis demonstrated that mild hypothermia can improve the survival rate and neurological function of patients with cardiac arrest after 6 months.On the other hand,regarding the survival to hospital discharge,favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge,and adverse events,our meta-analysis produced nonsignificant results.

  4. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppu Sanna; Kämäräinen Antti; Silfvast Tom; Virkkunen Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies o...

  5. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Cássia Regina Vancini Campanharo; Rodrigo Luiz Vancini; Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira Lopes; Meiry Fernanda Pinto Okuno; Ruth Ester Assayag Batista; Álvaro Nagib Atallah; Aécio Flávio Teixeira de Góis

    2015-01-01

    AbstractOBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of...

  6. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesi...

  7. Cerebral perfusion in cardiac surgery : with special reference to circulatory arrest during profound hypothermia

    OpenAIRE

    Astudillo Ley, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-nine pediatric and 82 adult patients were studied during cardiac surgery with cardio pulmonary bypass (CPB) performed with moderate hypothermia or with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest (DHCA) with or-without retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was estimated from Doppler measurements of the blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAv). Arterio-venous (jugular bulb) differences of blood lactate and oxygen were used to study cereb...

  8. Complications of cardiac catheterization: Incidence, causes, and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cooperative Study involved a small group of major medical centers at a time when the caseload involved primarily valvular heart disease; coronary angiography was a part of the catheterization procedure in only 27% of the patients in that report. In contrast, the Registry report from the Society for Cardiac Angiography, based on self-reporting from a mixture of academic and private laboratories, covered a time period when suspected or known coronary artery disease was the commonest indication for catheterization: 41,204 of the 53,581 patients (77%) were studied by coronary angiography and did not have valvular, congenital, or other types of coronary disease. Major complications (including death, myocardial infarction, stroke, serious arrhythmias, vascular injury) occurred in 1.82% of cases in the Registry report, less than the 3.4% serious complication rate in the Cooperative Study. While this difference may represent improvement in the safety of cardiac catheterization in the 14 years separating the two studies, it is worth noting that in the Registry report at least 28% of the patients studied had either minimal or no cardiac disease. Thus, laboratories where the percentage of normal or nearly normal studies is lower may expect to have a higher rate of death and other major complications than 1.8%

  9. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  10. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Jessica A; Wilcox, Susan R; Richards, Jeremy B

    2016-04-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine's clinical effects. A 40-year-old man who used ibogaine for symptoms of heroin withdrawal suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death. His presentation was consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest, and a review of the literature regarding the history, mechanisms, risks and clinical outcomes associated with ibogaine is presented. The case presented underscores the significant potential clinical risks of ibogaine. It is important the healthcare community be aware of the possible effects of ibogaine such that clinicians can provide informed counseling to their patients regarding the risks of attempting detoxification with ibogaine. PMID:27141291

  11. [Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelić, Sladjana

    2008-01-01

    Organ injury caused by ischaemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two randomised clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischaemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v.) fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia,will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal "therapeutic window" for gene therapy. PMID:19069351

  12. Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić Slađana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ injury caused by ischemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35ºC is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Two randomized clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v. fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia, will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal 'therapeutic window' for gene therapy.

  13. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Henrik; Madsen Hardig Bjarne; Steen Stig; Sjoberg Trygve; Harnek Jan; Olivecrona Goran K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs) have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow), but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the cor...

  14. Bystander-initiated chest compression-only CPR is better than standard CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrini, L; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Landoni, G; Greco, M.; Vinciguerra, F; Greco, T; Ruggeri, L; Sayeg, J; Zangrillo, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has a low survival rate to hospital discharge. Recent studies compared a simplified form of CPR, based on chest compression alone versus standard CPR including ventilation. We performed systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, focusing on survival at hospital discharge. Methods We extensively searched the published literature on out-of hospital CPR for non traumatic cardiac arrest in different databases. Results We identi...

  15. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  16. Serial measurement of neuron specific enolase improves prognostication in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (NSE has repeatedly been evaluated for neurological prognostication in patients after cardiac arrest. However, it is unclear whether current guidelines for NSE cutoff levels also apply to cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Thus, we investigated the prognostic significance of absolute NSE levels and NSE kinetics in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Methods In a prospective study of 35 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, NSE was measured daily for four days following admission. Outcome was assessed at ICU discharge using the CPC score. All patients received hypothermia treatment for 24 hours at 33°C with a surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Results The cutoff for absolute NSE levels in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 72 hours after cardiac arrest was 57 μg/l with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity 47%, specificity 100%. The cutoff level for NSE kinetics in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 was an absolute increase of 7.9 μg/l (AUC 0.78, sensitivity 63%, specificity 100% and a relative increase of 33.1% (AUC 0.803, sensitivity 67%, specificity 100% at 48 hours compared to admission. Conclusion In cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, prognostication of unfavourable outcome by NSE kinetics between admission and 48 hours after resuscitation may be superior to prognostication by absolute NSE levels.

  17. Vascular changes after cardiopulmonary bypass and ischemic cardiac arrest: roles of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.W. Sellke

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery involving ischemic arrest and extracorporeal circulation is often associated with alterations in vascular reactivity and permeability due to changes in the expression and activity of isoforms of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase. These inflammatory changes may manifest as systemic hypotension, coronary spasm or contraction, myocardial failure, and dysfunction of the lungs, gut, brain and other organs. In addition, endothelial dysfunction may increase the occurrence of late cardiac events such as graft thrombosis and myocardial infarction. These vascular changes may lead to increased mortality and morbidity and markedly lengthen the time of hospitalization and cost of cardiac surgery. Developing a better understanding of the vascular changes operating through nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase may improve the care and help decrease the cost of cardiovascular operations.

  18. Cardiac Arrest following a Myocardial Infarction in a Child Treated with Methylphenidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Kim; Gormsen, Lise; Kim, Won Yong; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2015-01-01

    The use of psychostimulants labeled to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder increases. Among side effects these drugs raise blood pressure and heart rate, and the safety has been scrutinised in recent years. Data from large epidemiological studies, including over a million person-years, did not report any cases of myocardial infarction in current users of methylphenidate, and the risk of serious adverse cardiac events was not found to be increased. We present a case with an 11-year-old child, treated with methylphenidate, who suffered cardiac arrest and was diagnosed with a remote myocardial infarction. This demonstrates that myocardial infarction can happen due to methylphenidate exposure in a cardiac healthy child, without cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26221559

  19. Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, G; Nilsson, G; Nielsen, N;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may experience psychological distress but the actual prevalence is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate anxiety and depression within a large cohort of OHCA-survivors. METHODS: OHCA-survivors randomized to targeted temperature of...... 33 °C or 36 °C within the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM-trial) attended a follow-up after 6 months that included the questionnaire Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A control group with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) completed the same follow-up. Correlations to...... normative data. Subjective cognitive problems were associated with an increased risk for psychological distress. Since psychological distress affects long-term prognosis of cardiac patients in general it should be addressed during follow-up of survivors with OHCA due to a cardiac cause. Clinical...

  20. Survival to admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Seoul, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Hue Kim,1 Tai-Hwan Uhm2 1Department of Emergency Medical Technology, Sun Moon University, Asan-si, Chungnam, South Korea; 2Department of Emergency Medical Services, Eulji University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea Purpose: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA data derived according to the Utstein Style guidelines was used to try to determine factors influencing survival to admission (STA and epidemiological rates of OHCA. Patients and methods: This was an observational study of all age groups based on data from prehospital care reports in Seoul, South Korea. The collected data were reported according to the Utstein Style template for OHCA and analyzed in order to compare STA with non-STA. Univariate analysis was conducted using a binomial logistic regression model to identify predictors associated with trauma patients. Results: Eighty-three (4.8% OHCA survivors were admitted to the emergency department with carotid pulse. The median time from arrest to emergency medical personnel defibrillation was statistically significantly shorter in STA cases (8.0 minutes than in non-STA cases (12.0 minutes; P<0.001. Factors independently associated with better prognosis in terms of trauma patients were female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 0.67; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.50–0.91; P=0.01, arrest at home (OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.27–0.49; P<0.001, and witnessed arrest (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.94–3.39; P<0.001. Conclusion: Early basic life support, performed by either a layperson or emergency medical personnel, had a positive effect on STA. Male sex, arrest outside of the home, and witnessed arrest are significantly associated with trauma. Keywords: Utstein Style, prehospital, defibrillation, basic life support

  1. Cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy: an analysis of incidence and risk factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Johanne

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is thought that patients with cardiomyopathy have an increased risk of cardiac arrest on induction of anesthesia, but there is little available data. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and potential risk factors for cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy in our institution. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed. Eligible patients included patients admitted between 1998 and 2008 with the International Statistical Classification of Disease code for cardiomyopathy (ICD-9 code 425) who underwent airway intervention for sedation or general anesthesia in the operating room, cardiac diagnostic and interventional unit (CDIU) or intensive care unit. Patients undergoing emergency airway intervention following cardiovascular collapse were excluded. For each patient, we recorded patient demographics, disease severity, anesthesia location, and anesthetic technique. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with cardiomyopathy underwent a total of 236 anesthetic events, and four cardiac arrests were identified. One was related to bradycardia (HR<60), two were attributed to bradycardia in association with severe hypotension (systolic blood pressure<45), and the fourth arrest was related to isolated severe hypotension. Two occurred in the operating suite and two in the CDIU. There was no resulting mortality. One patient progressed to heart transplantation. Multiple combinations of anesthetic drugs were used for induction of anesthesia. CONCLUSION: We performed a review of the last 10 years of anesthesia events in children with cardiomyopathy. We report four cardiac arrests in two patients and 236 anesthetic events (1.7%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest review of these patients to date but is limited by its retrospective nature. The low cardiac arrest incidence prevents the identification of risk factors and the development of a cardiac arrest risk predictive clinical

  2. Echocardiography integrated ACLS protocol versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojtaba Chardoli; Farhad Heidari; Helaleh Rabiee; Mahdi Sharif-Alhoseini; Hamid Shokoohi; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the utility of bedside echocardiography in detecting the reversible causes of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) cardiac arrest and predicting the resuscitation outcomes.Methods: In this prospective interventional study,patients presenting with PEA cardiac arrest were randomized into two groups.In Group A,ultrasound trained emergency physicians performed echocardiography evaluating cardiac activity,right ventricle dilation,left ventricle function,pericardial effusion/tamponade and ⅣC size along with the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) protocol.Patients in Group B solely underwent ACLS protocol without applying echocardiography.The presence or absence of mechanical ventricular activity (MVA) and evidences of PEA reversible causes were recorded.The return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death were evaluated in both groups.Results: One hundred patients with the mean age of (58±6.1) years were enrolled in this study.Fifty patients (Group A) had echocardiography detected in parallel with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).Among them,7 patients (14%) had pericardial effusion,11 (22%) had hypovolemia,and 39 (78%) were revealed the presence of MVA.In the pseudo PEA subgroup (presence of MVA),43% had ROSC (positive predictive value) and in the true PEA subgroup with cardiac standstill (absence of MVA),there was no recorded ROSC (negative predictive value).Among patients in Group B,no reversible etiology was detected.There was no significant difference in resuscitation results between Groups A and B observed (P=0.52).Conclusion: Bedside echocardiography can identify some reversible causes of PEA.However,there are no significant changes in survival outcome between the echo group and those with traditional CPR.

  3. Development of a theoretical guide for nursing care in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliandra Bittencourt da Silva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the knowledge on cardiorespiratory arrest among nurses in a hospital of Vale do Paraíba, São Paulo, Brazil, and develop a theoretical guide for care of this emergency. We prepared an instrument of data collection based on relevant literature and the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR, from August to October 2012. The sample consisted of 41 nurses who deliver care activities in various units of the hospital. The study showed that professional participants said they were able to act in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, however, there were limitations of knowledge about the theme. Given the above, we developed a theoretical guide for cardiac arrest care based on scientific literature and covering questions submitted by nurses.

  4. Comparing anesthesia with isoflurane and fentanyl/fluanisone/midazolam in a rat model of cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels; Malte, Christian Lind; Tønnesen, Else;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only one in ten patients survives cardiac arrest (CA), underscoring the need to improve CA management. Isoflurane has shown cardio- and neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Therefore, beneficial effect of isoflurane should be tested in an experimental...... CA model. We hypothesize that isoflurane anesthesia improves short-term outcome following resuscitation from CA compared with a subcutaneous fentanyl/fluanisone/midazolam anesthesia. METHODS: Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to anesthesia with isoflurane (n=11) or fentanyl...... function, all of which are important parameters in CA models....

  5. Interposed Abdominal Compression CPR for an Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Victim Failing Traditional CPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D. McClung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Interposed abdominal compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR is an alternative technique to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR that can improve perfusion and lead to restoration of circulation in patients with chest wall deformity either acquired through vigorous CPR or co-morbidity such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where IAC-CPR allowed for restoration of spontaneous circulation and eventual full neurologic recovery when traditional CPR was failing to generate adequate pulses with chest compression alone.

  6. EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jeschke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the EMuRgency project. The project has the goal to increase awareness and competences regarding the problem of cardiac arrest in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine (EMR and to use socio-technical innovations to transfer it into a smart learning region. Based on the conscious competence framework solutions for stakeholders on different levels of the framework are introduced, namely a public display network, mobile learning apps and a volunteer notification system. Finally, a future research outlook is given.

  7. The role of the immuno-inflammatory response in patients after cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Samborska-Sablik, Anna; Sablik, Zbigniew; Gaszynski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the research was to assess whether concentrations of inflammatory markers in blood of patients after cardiac arrest (CA) are related to their clinical state and survival. Material and methods Forty-six patients, aged 63 ±12 years, 21 of them after out-of-hospital CA and 25 after in-hospital CA, were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five patients survived and were discharged from hospital (CA-S); 21 died during hospitalization (CA-D). The clinical state of the patients was...

  8. Medical attention proposal for patients under the iodo therapy in cardiac arrest cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research has like aim to present a proposition about how to attend the patients which are under the iodo therapy, and the possibility they can show a cardiac arrest during their hospitalization. The physical medical department with the nurse group and the team of ICU (Intensive Care Unit) looked for to establish basic norms of radiological protection in order to avoid the radiation and contamination of all workers involved with one patient, without changing the routine of attendance service. We analyzed all rules of service including the attendance the hospital room and mainly if it is necessary to lead the patient to the ICU. (authors). 4 refs

  9. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival in rural Northwest Ireland: 17 years' experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Masterson, Siobhán

    2011-05-01

    SAVES, the name used to describe a register of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), was established in rural Northwest Ireland in 1992. From 1992 to 2008, 80 survivors were identified (population 239,000 (2006)). Most incidents were witnessed (69\\/70) and all were in shockable rhythm at the time of first rhythm analysis (66\\/66). Of 66 patients who could be traced, 46 were alive in December 2008. Average survival rates appeared to increase over the lifetime of the database. SAVES has also contributed to the development of a national OHCA register.

  10. Antidepressant Use and Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, P; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Folke, F;

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with some types of antidepressants has been associated with sudden cardiac death. It is unknown whether the increased risk is due to a class effect or related to specific antidepressants within drug classes. All patients in Denmark with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) were...... identified (2001-2007). Association between treatment with specific antidepressants and OHCA was examined by conditional logistic regression in case-time-control models. We identified 19,110 patients with an OHCA; 2,913 (15.2%) were receiving antidepressant treatment at the time of OHCA, with citalopram...... being the most frequently used type of antidepressant (50.8%). Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs; odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.50) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; OR = 1.21, CI: 1.00-1.47) were both associated with comparable increases in risk of OHCA...

  11. Cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old man caused by anomalous right coronary artery origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Heather; Curtin, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    An 18-year-old man presented to hospital following an out of hospital ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, with successful resuscitation at the scene. The incident happened during a competitive football match in which the man was playing. In the course of an extensive work up, a CT coronary angiogram demonstrated an anomalous right coronary artery (RCA) origin in the left coronary sinus. The RCA followed an initial intramural and subsequent interarterial course between the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery trunk. Cardiac MRI showed a small subendocardial area of delayed gadolinium enhancement in the inferoseptal wall, consistent with a small infarct. Treatment involved elective coronary artery bypass of the RCA with a right internal mammary artery graft. The patient made a full recovery. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was not inserted and he was advised not to return to competitive sports. PMID:26961556

  12. Cutaneous microangiopathic thrombosis complicated by pyoderma gangrenosum in post-cardiac surgery heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Suvitesh; Theodore, Sanjay; Liava'a, Matthew; Atkinson, Victoria; Tatoulis, James

    2009-08-01

    Thrombotic cutaneous gangrene is a rare complication of heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia after cardiac surgery. We report a case and discuss management issues with cardiopulmonary bypass for cardiac surgery in this condition. PMID:18375181

  13. Prevention of cardiac complications in peripheral vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevalence of severe coronary artery disease in peripheral vascular patients exceeds 50 per cent. Complications of coronary artery disease are the most common causes of mortality following peripheral vascular operations. To reduce the incidence of cardiac complications, it is first necessary to identify patients at risk through screening tests. Screening methods in current use include risk factor analysis, exercise testing, routine coronary angiography, and dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy. The risk factor approach has the advantage of being widely applicable since it makes use of historical, physical, and electrocardiographic findings that are already familiar to surgeons and anesthesiologists. It is also inexpensive. However, it may overlook the patient who has no symptoms of coronary artery disease, possibly as a result of the sedentary lifestyle imposed by complications of peripheral vascular disease. The electrocardiographically monitored stress test will identify the asymptomatic patient with occult coronary disease and is helpful in predicting operative risk. However, a meaningful test is dependent on the patient's ability to exercise--an activity that is frequently limited by claudication, amputation, or arthritis. Exercise testing also suffers from a lack of sensitivity and specificity when compared with coronary arteriography. Routine preoperative coronary angiography overcomes the exercise limitation of treadmill testing but is not widely applicable as a screening test for reasons of cost and inherent risk. Dipyridamole thallium-201 scanning, on the other hand, is safe and of relatively low cost and does not require exercise

  14. Prevention of cardiac complications in peripheral vascular surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, B.S.

    1986-04-01

    The prevalence of severe coronary artery disease in peripheral vascular patients exceeds 50 per cent. Complications of coronary artery disease are the most common causes of mortality following peripheral vascular operations. To reduce the incidence of cardiac complications, it is first necessary to identify patients at risk through screening tests. Screening methods in current use include risk factor analysis, exercise testing, routine coronary angiography, and dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy. The risk factor approach has the advantage of being widely applicable since it makes use of historical, physical, and electrocardiographic findings that are already familiar to surgeons and anesthesiologists. It is also inexpensive. However, it may overlook the patient who has no symptoms of coronary artery disease, possibly as a result of the sedentary lifestyle imposed by complications of peripheral vascular disease. The electrocardiographically monitored stress test will identify the asymptomatic patient with occult coronary disease and is helpful in predicting operative risk. However, a meaningful test is dependent on the patient's ability to exercise--an activity that is frequently limited by claudication, amputation, or arthritis. Exercise testing also suffers from a lack of sensitivity and specificity when compared with coronary arteriography. Routine preoperative coronary angiography overcomes the exercise limitation of treadmill testing but is not widely applicable as a screening test for reasons of cost and inherent risk. Dipyridamole thallium-201 scanning, on the other hand, is safe and of relatively low cost and does not require exercise.

  15. Spontaneous defibrillation after cessation of resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a case of Lazarus phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Holopainen, Leevi; Erkkilä, Elja-Pekka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2007-12-01

    This report describes a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with spontaneous defibrillation and subsequent return of circulation after cessation of resuscitative efforts. A 47-year-old man was found in cardiac arrest and resuscitation was initiated. As no response was achieved, the efforts were withdrawn and final registered cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation. Fifteen minutes later the patient was found to be normotensive and breathing spontaneously. The patient made a poor neurological recovery and died 3 months after the arrest. The authors are unable to give an explanation to the event, but suspect the effect of adrenaline combined with mild hypothermia to have contributed to the self-defibrillation of the myocardium. PMID:17629389

  16. Hypothermia ameliorates gastrointestinal ischemic injury sustained in a porcine cardiac arrest model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yi; WANG Shuo; LI Chun-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background During cardiac arrest,the gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to ischemia.Protection of the gastrointestinal tract is a critical factor in determining prognosis following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).This study seeks to determine the extent of gastrointestinal tract injury and the potential protective effect of inducing hypothermia following a porcine cardiac arrest model and CPR.Methods Ventricular fibrillation was induced by programmed electrical stimulation in 16 male domestic pigs (n=8 per group).Four minutes after ventricular fibrillation,CPR was performed.Pigs that successfully restored spontaneous circulation then received intravenous infusions of saline at either 4C or room temperature to produce hypothermic and control conditions respectively.Serum diamine oxidase and gastrointestinal adenosine triphosphate enzyme activity were determined and histopathology of the gastrointestinal tract was performed by light microscopy and electron microscopy.Results Significant injury of the gastrointestinal tract after CPR was found.Na+-K+ and Ca2+ adenosine triphosphate enzyme activity in the gastric tissue were significantly high in animals receiving hypothermia treatment compared to controls.Hypothermia also significantly reduced serum diamine oxidase after CPR compared to the control group.Moreover,severe injury sustained by the gastrointestinal tissue was significantly ameliorated under hypothermic conditions compared to controls.Conclusions Gastrointestinal injury and abnormal energy metabolism are strikingly evident following CPR.Hypothermia,which is induced by an infusion of 4C saline,can rapidly reduce internal body temperature,improve energy metabolism,and ameliorate injury to the gastrointestinal mucosa after CPR.

  17. Detection of ROSC in Patients with Cardiac Arrest During Chest Compression Using NIRS: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Tsukasa; Nagao, Ken; Kawamorita, Tsuyoshi; Soga, Taketomo; Ishii, Mitsuru; Chiba, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Shigemasa; Yoshino, Atsuo; Hirayama, Atsushi; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during chest compression is generally detected by arterial pulse palpation and end-tidal CO2 monitoring; however, it is necessary to stop chest compression during pulse palpation, and to perform endotracheal intubation for monitoring end-tidal CO2. In the present study, we evaluated whether near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows the detection of ROSC during chest compression without interruption. We monitored cerebral blood oxygenation in 19 patients with cardiac arrest using NIRS (NIRO-200NX, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan). On arrival at the emergency room, the attending physicians immediately assessed whether a patient was eligible for this study after conventional advanced life support (ALS) and employed NIRS to measure cerebral blood oxygenation (CBO) in the bilateral frontal lobe in patients. We found cerebral blood flow waveforms in synchrony with chest compressions in all patients. In addition, we observed abrupt increases of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygen index (TOI), which were associated with ROSC detected by pulse palpation. The present findings indicate that NIRS can be used to assess the quality of chest compression in patients with cardiac arrest as demonstrated by the detection of synchronous waveforms during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). NIRS appears to be applicable for detection of ROSC without interruption of chest compression and without endotracheal intubation. PMID:26782207

  18. The optimum timing of resuscitative thoracotomy for non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, M; Okada, Y

    1993-08-01

    Open-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a promising method for non-traumatic cardiac arrest. In this preliminary study, we investigated the optimum timing of thoracotomy which brings high rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and keeps the incidence of unnecessary thoracotomy minimal. Ninety-five adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were analyzed. Of those, 26 patients were treated by the open-chest CPR in a prospective consecutive fashion. In this group, the ROSC rate was investigated in connection with the interval from hospital arrival, or ambulance call, to thoracotomy. Another 69 patients were treated by standard CPR. In this uncontrolled group, the interval from arrival at hospital to ROSC was investigated to define the 'natural hospital course' by the conventional treatment. Patient characteristics in the open-chest CPR group and the standard CPR group were similar. In the open-chest CPR group, 15 patients obtained ROSC. There was a tendency that the ROSC rate was highest in the patients with thoracotomy within 5 min of hospital arrival and declined as the timing of thoracotomy was delayed. Similar tendency was noted when the timing of thoracotomy was counted from the ambulance call. In the standard CPR group, only two patients obtained ROSC during the initial 5 min of hospital course. These results suggest that thoracotomy within 5 min of hospital arrival brings the highest ROSC rate while keeps the incidence of unnecessary thoracotomy acceptable. PMID:8210734

  19. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow, but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP. In this study our aim was to correlate average peak coronary flow velocity (APV to CPP during mechanical CCs. Methods In a closed chest porcine model, cardiac arrest was established through electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in eleven pigs. After one minute, mechanical chest compressions were initiated and then maintained for 10 minutes upon which the pigs were defibrillated. Measurements of coronary blood flow in the left anterior descending artery were made at baseline and during VF with a catheter based Doppler flow fire measuring APV. Furthermore measurements of central (thoracic venous and arterial pressures were also made in order to calculate the theoretical CPP. Results Average peak coronary flow velocity was significantly higher compared to baseline during mechanical chests compressions and this was observed during the entire period of mechanical chest compressions (12 - 39% above baseline. The APV slowly declined during the 10 min period of mechanical chest compressions, but was still higher than baseline at the end of mechanical chest compressions. CPP was simultaneously maintained at > 20 mmHg during the 10 minute episode of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Our study showed good correlation between CPP and APV which was highly significant, during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs in a closed chest porcine model. In addition APV was even higher during mechanical CCs compared to baseline. Mechanical

  20. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCabe Chris

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. Conclusion The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942.

  1. Cardiac arrest teams and time of day: effects on surviving in-hospital resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christ M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Martin Christ, Wolfgang Dierschke, Katharina Isabel von Auenmueller, Marc van Bracht, Martin Grett, Hans-Joachim Trappe Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Marienhospital Herne, Ruhr – University Bochum, Herne, Germany Objectives: Little is known about the factors that influence survival following in-hospital resuscitation, but previous investigations have suggested that in-hospital resuscitations outside of regular working hours are associated with worse survival rates. Material and methods: In-hospital cardiac arrest teams at our hospital were instructed to complete a questionnaire following every emergency call between July 2011 and June 2013. Data on all resuscitation attempts were collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 65 in-hospital resuscitations were recorded in 42 males (64.6% and 23 females (35.4% (mean age 72.0±14.3 years. A total of 54 (83.1% cardiac arrests were witnessed; seven (10.8% showed a shockable rhythm at the time of the first ECG. Resuscitation attempts lasted 29.3±41.3 minutes, and 4.1±3.1 mg epinephrine was given. Return of spontaneous circulation could be achieved in 38 patients (58.5%; 29 (44.6% survived the first day, 23 (35.4% the seventh day, and 15 patients (23.1% were discharged alive. Significantly more in-hospital resuscitations were obtained for those performed during non-regular working hours (P<0.001, with higher neuron-specific enolase levels at 72 hours after resuscitation during nonregular working hours (P=0.04. Patients who were discharged alive were significantly younger (P=0.01, presented more often with an initial shockable rhythm (P=0.04, and had a shorter duration of resuscitation (P<0.001 with the need of a lower dose of epinephrine (P<0.001. Discussion: Survival rates following in-hospital resuscitation were poor at any time, but appear to depend less on time-dependent effects of the quality of resuscitation and more on time-dependent effects of recognition of cardiac arrests

  2. Temporal trends in survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients with and without underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sidsel G.; Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has tripled during the past decade in Denmark as a likely result of improvements in cardiac arrest management. This study analyzed whether these improvements were applicable for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). M...

  3. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in an urban/rural area during 1991 and 1996 : have emergency medical service changes improved outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Absalom, AR; Bradley, P; Soar, J

    1999-01-01

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is influenced by pre-hospital emergency medical care. This study compares outcome of cardiac arrest victims presenting to an emergency department serving a mixed urban/rural area (Norfolk, UK) in 1991 with 1996. Between these years the regional emergency

  4. Neurological and cardiac complications in a cohort of children with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumana H Albaramki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with chronic kidney disease are at risk of major neurologic and cardiac complications. The purpose of this study is to review the neurological and cardiac complications in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. A retrospective review of medical records of children with ESRD at Jordan University Hospital was performed. All neurological and cardiac events were recorded and analyzed. Data of a total of 68 children with ESRD presenting between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed. Neurological complications occurred in 32.4%; seizures were the most common event. Uncontrolled hypertension was the leading cause of neurological events. Cardiac complications occurred in 39.7%, the most common being pericardial effusion. Mortality from neurological complications was 45%. Neurological and cardiac complications occurred in around a third of children with ESRD with a high mortality rate. More effective control of hypertension, anemia, and intensive and gentle dialysis are needed.

  5. Risk Assessment of Mortality Following Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest Using POSSUM and P-POSSUM in Adults Undergoing Non-Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Shin Hyung; Kil, Hae Keum; Kim, Hye Jin; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Physiological and Operative Severity Score for enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity (POSSUM) and its Portsmouth modification (P-POSSUM) are comprehensive assessment methods for evaluating patient and surgical factors widely used to predict 30-day mortality rates. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the usefulness of POSSUM and P-POSSUM in predicting 30-day mortality after intraoperative cardiac arrests in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods...

  6. Cognitive function in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest after target temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Gisela; Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans;

    2015-01-01

    cardiac arrest performed the same assessments. Half of the cardiac arrest survivors had cognitive impairment, which was mostly mild. Cognitive outcome did not differ (P>0.30) between the 2 temperature groups (33°C/36°C). Compared with control subjects with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction......BACKGROUND: Target temperature management is recommended as a neuroprotective strategy after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Potential effects of different target temperatures on cognitive impairment commonly described in survivors have not been investigated sufficiently. The primary aim of this...... study was to evaluate whether a target temperature of 33°C compared with 36°C was favorable for cognitive function; the secondary aim was to describe cognitive impairment in cardiac arrest survivors in general. METHODS AND RESULTS: Study sites included 652 cardiac arrest survivors originally randomized...

  7. Incidence of treated cardiac arrest in hospitalized patients in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nichol, Graham; Carr, Brendan G.; Mitra, Nandita; Bradley, Steven M.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Groeneveld, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The incidence and incidence over time of cardiac arrest in hospitalized patients (IHCA) is unknown. We sought to estimate the event rate and temporal trends of adult inhospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) treated with a resuscitation response. Design Three approaches were used to estimate the IHCA event rate. First approach: Calculate the IHCA event rate at hospitals (n=433) in the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) registry, years 2003–2007 and multiply this by US annual bed-days. Second approach: Use the GWTG-R, IHCA event rate to develop a regression model (including hospital demographic, geographic, organizational factors) and use the model coefficients to calculate predicted event rates for acute care hospitals (n=5,445) responding to the American Hospital Association survey. Third approach: Classify acute care hospitals into groups based on academic, urban, bed size-and determine the average event rate for GWTG-R hospitals in each group and then use weighted averages to calculate the national IHCA rate. Annual event rates were calculated to estimate temporal trends. Setting GWTG-R registry Patients Adult IHCA with a resuscitation response Measurements and main results The mean adult treated IHCA event rate at GWTG-R hospitals was 0.92/1000 bed-days (IQR 0.58 to 1.2/1000). In hospitals (n=150) contributing data for all years of the study period, the event rate increased from 2003–2007. With 2.09 million annual US bed-days, we estimated 192,000 IHCA throughout the US annually. Based on the regression model, extrapolating GWTG-R hospitals to hospitals participating in the American Hospital Association survey projected 211,000 annual IHCA. Using weighted averages projected 209,000 annual US IHCA. Conclusions There are approximately 200,000 treated cardiac arrests among US hospitalized patients annually and this rate may be increasing. This is important for understanding the burden of IHCA and developing strategies to improve care for

  8. Post return of spontaneous circulation factors associated with mortality in pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest: A prospective multicenter multinational observational study

    OpenAIRE

    López Herce, Jesús; del Castillo, Jimena; Matamoros, Marta; (et al.); Rey Galán, Corsino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most studies have analyzed pre-arrest and resuscitation factors associated with mortality after cardiac arrest (CA) in children, but many patients that reach return of spontaneous circulation die within the next days or weeks. The objective of our study was to analyze post-return of spontaneous circulation factors associated with in-hospital mortality after cardiac arrest in children. Methods A prospective multicenter, multinational, observational study in 48 hospitals from 12 co...

  9. Factors Associated With Successful Resuscitation After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Temporal Trends in Survival and Comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Hassager, Christian; Lippert, Freddy; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Friberg, Hans; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Køber, Lars; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    % (P trend <.001), whereas the percentage of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with successful resuscitation to hospital admission increased by 3% per year during the study period, from 37% in 2007 to 43% in 2011 (P trend <.001). CONCLUSION: Our observations confirm the importance of key features...

  10. Differences between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in residential and public locations and implications for public-access defibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy; Nielsen, Søren L; Weeke, Peter; Hansen, Morten L; Fosbøl, Emil L; Andersen, Søren; Rasmussen, Søren; Schramm, Tina K; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external...... defibrillators could be identified on the basis of demographic characteristics and characterized individuals with OHCA in residential locations....

  11. Brain stem death as the vital determinant for resumption of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Y W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous circulation returns to less than half of adult cardiac arrest victims who received in-hospital resuscitation. One clue for this disheartening outcome arises from the prognosis that asystole invariably takes place, after a time lag, on diagnosis of brain stem death. The designation of brain stem death as the point of no return further suggests that permanent impairment of the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery precedes death. It follows that a crucial determinant for successful revival of an arrested heart is that spontaneous circulation must resume before brain stem death commences. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that maintained functional integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a neural substrate that is intimately related to brain stem death and central circulatory regulation, holds the key to the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An animal model of brain stem death employing the pesticide mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rats was used. Intravenous administration of lethal doses of mevinphos elicited an abrupt cardiac arrest, accompanied by elevated systemic arterial pressure and anoxia, augmented neuronal excitability and enhanced microvascular perfusion in RVLM. This period represents the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation in our experimental model. Animals with restored spontaneous circulation exhibited maintained neuronal functionality in RVLM beyond this critical time-window, alongside resumption of baseline tissue oxygen and enhancement of local blood flow. Intriguingly, animals that subsequently died manifested sustained anoxia, diminished local blood flow, depressed mitochondrial electron transport activities and reduced ATP production, leading to necrotic cell death in RVLM. That amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction and

  12. Breakthrough in cardiac arrest: reports from the 4th Paris International Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudenchuk, Peter J; Sandroni, Claudio; Drinhaus, Hendrik R; Böttiger, Bernd W; Cariou, Alain; Sunde, Kjetil; Dworschak, Martin; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Deye, Nicolas; Friberg, Hans; Laureys, Steven; Ledoux, Didier; Oddo, Mauro; Legriel, Stéphane; Hantson, Philippe; Diehl, Jean-Luc; Laterre, Pierre-Francois

    2015-12-01

    Jean-Luc Diehl The French Intensive Care Society organized on 5th and 6th June 2014 its 4th "Paris International Conference in Intensive Care", whose principle is to bring together the best international experts on a hot topic in critical care medicine. The 2014 theme was "Breakthrough in cardiac arrest", with many high-quality updates on epidemiology, public health data, pre-hospital and in-ICU cares. The present review includes short summaries of the major presentations, classified into six main chapters: Epidemiology of CA Pre-hospital management Post-resuscitation management: targeted temperature management Post-resuscitation management: optimizing organ perfusion and metabolic parameters Neurological assessment of brain damages Public healthcare. PMID:26380990

  13. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity. PMID:26471891

  14. Risk Factor Analyses for the Return of Spontaneous Circulation in the Asphyxiation Cardiac Arrest Porcine Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai-Jun Wu; Zhi-Jun Guo; Chun-Sheng Li; Yi Zhang; Jun Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Animal models of asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA) are frequently used in basic research to mirror the clinical course of cardiac arrest (CA).The rates of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in ACA animal models are lower than those from studies that have utilized ventricular fibrillation (VF) animal models.The purpose of this study was to characterize the factors associated with the ROSC in the ACA porcine model.Methods:Forty-eight healthy miniature pigs underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce CA.Once induced,CA was maintained untreated for a period of 8 min.Two minutes following the initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR),defibrillation was attempted until ROSC was achieved or the animal died.To assess the factors associated with ROSC in this CA model,logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze gender,the time of preparation,the amplitude spectrum area (AMSA) from the beginning of CPR and the pH at the beginning ofCPR.A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the predictive value of AMSA for ROSC.Results:ROSC was only 52.1% successful in this ACA porcine model.The multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that ROSC significantly depended on the time of preparation,AMSA at the beginning of CPR and pH at the beginning of CPR.The area under the ROC curve in for AMSA at the beginning of CPR was 0.878 successful in predicting ROSC (95% confidence intervals:0.773~0.983),and the optimum cut-off value was 15.62 (specificity 95.7% and sensitivity 80.0%).Conclusions:The time of preparation,AMSA and the pH at the beginning of CPR were associated with ROSC in this ACA porcine model.AMSA also predicted the likelihood of ROSC in this ACA animal model.

  15. Assessment of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest in veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, B; Collins, M; Stoddard, G; Appleton, A; Livingood, R; Sobcynski, H; Vogel, K D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest on veal calf welfare, veal quality, and blood yield. Ninety calves from the same farm were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups in a balanced unpaired comparison design. The first treatment group (the "head-only" method-application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating stun to the frontal plate of the skull at the intersection of 2 imaginary lines extending from the lateral canthus to the opposite poll [CONTROL]) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun ( = 45). The second group ( = 45) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun followed by secondary electrical induction of cardiac arrest (the "head/heart" method-initial application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating captive bolt stun followed by 1 s application of an electrical stun to the ventral region of the ribcage directly caudal to the junction of the humerus and scapula while the stunned calf was in lateral recumbence [HEAD/HEART]). Stunning efficacy was the indicator of animal welfare used in this study. All calves were instantly rendered insensible by the initial stun and did not display common indicators of return to consciousness. For meat quality evaluation, all samples were collected from the 12th rib region of the longissimus thoracis. Meat samples were evaluated for color, drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The L* values (measure of meat color lightness) were darker ( 0.05) observed in a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values between treatments. No differences ( > 0.05) were observed in drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The blood yield from the CONTROL group (7,217.9 ± 143.5 g) was greater ( veal calves. PMID:26440354

  16. Risk Factor Analyses for the Return of Spontaneous Circulation in the Asphyxiation Cardiac Arrest Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Jun Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Animal models of asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA are frequently used in basic research to mirror the clinical course of cardiac arrest (CA. The rates of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in ACA animal models are lower than those from studies that have utilized ventricular fibrillation (VF animal models. The purpose of this study was to characterize the factors associated with the ROSC in the ACA porcine model. Methods: Forty-eight healthy miniature pigs underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce CA. Once induced, CA was maintained untreated for a period of 8 min. Two minutes following the initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, defibrillation was attempted until ROSC was achieved or the animal died. To assess the factors associated with ROSC in this CA model, logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze gender, the time of preparation, the amplitude spectrum area (AMSA from the beginning of CPR and the pH at the beginning of CPR. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the predictive value of AMSA for ROSC. Results: ROSC was only 52.1% successful in this ACA porcine model. The multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that ROSC significantly depended on the time of preparation, AMSA at the beginning of CPR and pH at the beginning of CPR. The area under the ROC curve in for AMSA at the beginning of CPR was 0.878 successful in predicting ROSC (95% confidence intervals: 0.773∼0.983, and the optimum cut-off value was 15.62 (specificity 95.7% and sensitivity 80.0%. Conclusions: The time of preparation, AMSA and the pH at the beginning of CPR were associated with ROSC in this ACA porcine model. AMSA also predicted the likelihood of ROSC in this ACA animal model.

  17. GWAS for discovery and replication of genetic loci associated with sudden cardiac arrest in patients with coronary artery disease

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    Olgin Jeffrey E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests a heritable component to risk for sudden cardiac arrest independent of risk for myocardial infarction. Recent candidate gene association studies for community sudden cardiac arrests have focused on a limited number of biological pathways and yielded conflicting results. We sought to identify novel gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with coronary artery disease by performing a genome-wide association study. Methods Tagging SNPs (n = 338,328 spanning the genome were typed in a case-control study comparing 89 patients with coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation to 520 healthy controls. Results Fourteen SNPs including 7 SNPs among 7 genes (ACYP2, AP1G2, ESR1, DGES2, GRIA1, KCTD1, ZNF385B were associated with sudden cardiac arrest (all p -7, following Bonferroni correction and adjustment for population substructure, age, and sex; genetic variation in ESR1 (p = 2.62 × 10-8; Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.277, 1.596 has previously been established as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In tandem, the role of 9 genes for monogenic long QT syndrome (LQT1-9 was assessed, yielding evidence of association with CACNA1C (LQT8; p = 3.09 × 10-4; OR = 1.18, 95% CI:1.079, 1.290. We also assessed 4 recently published gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest, validating NOS1AP (p = 4.50 × 10-2, OR = 1.15, 95% CI:1.003, 1.326, CSMD2 (p = 6.6 × 10-3, OR = 2.27, 95% CI:1.681, 2.859, and AGTR1 (p = 3.00 × 10-3, OR = 1.13, 95% CI:1.042, 1.215. Conclusion We demonstrate 11 gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation in patients with coronary artery disease. Validation studies in independent cohorts and functional studies are required to confirm these associations.

  18. Multiscale entropy analysis of EEG for assessment of post-cardiac arrest neurological recovery under hypothermia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Thakor, Nitish V; Maybhate, Anil

    2009-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the alpha-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 degrees C-34 degrees C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 degrees C-37.5 degrees C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1-R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in alpha-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  19. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

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    Breena R. Taira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest, a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, P<0.001. Statistically significant improvement was also seen on the number of critical items completed (OR=3.75, 95% CI 2.71-5.19, total items completed (OR=4.55, 95% CI 3.4-6.11, and number of “excellent” scores on a Likert scale (OR=2.66, 95% CI 1.85-3.81. Conclusions: Nicaraguan resident physicians demonstrate improved ability to manage simulated cardiac arrest scenarios after participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  20. Cardiac complication after experimental human malaria infection: a case report

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    Druilhe Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 20 year-old healthy female volunteer participated in a clinical Phase I and IIa safety and efficacy trial with candidate malaria vaccine PfLSA-3-rec adjuvanted with aluminium hydroxide. Eleven weeks after the third and last immunization she was experimentally infected by bites of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes. When the thick blood smear became positive, at day 11, she was treated with artemether/lumefantrine according to protocol. On day 16 post-infection i.e. two days after completion of treatment, she woke up with retrosternal chest pain. She was diagnosed as acute coronary syndrome and treated accordingly. She recovered quickly and her follow-up was uneventful. Whether the event was related to the study procedures such as the preceding vaccinations, malaria infection or antimalarial drugs remains elusive. However, the relation in time with the experimental malaria infection and apparent absence of an underlying condition makes the infection the most probable trigger. This is in striking contrast, however, with the millions of malaria cases each year and the fact that such complication has never been reported in the literature. The rare occurrence of cardiac events with any of the preceding study procedures may even support a coincidental finding. Apart from acute coronary syndrome, myocarditis can be considered as a final diagnosis, but the true nature and patho-physiological explanation of the event remain unclear.

  1. Effects of Intraosseous Tibial vs. Intravenous Vasopressin in a Hypovolemic Cardiac Arrest Model

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    Justin Fulkerson, MSN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study compared the effects of vasopressin via tibial intraosseous (IO and intravenous (IV routes on maximum plasma concentration (Cmax, the time to maximum concentration (Tmax, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, and time to ROSC in a hypovolemic cardiac arrest model. Methods: This study was a randomized prospective, between-subjects experimental design. A computer program randomly assigned 28 Yorkshire swine to one of four groups: IV (n=7, IO tibia (n=7, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR + defibrillation (n=7, and a control group that received just CPR (n=7. Ventricular fibrillation was induced, and subjects remained in arrest for two minutes. CPR was initiated and 40 units of vasopressin were administered via IO or IV routes. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, and 4 minutes. CPR and defibrillation were initiated for 20 minutes or until ROSC was achieved. We measured vasopressin concentrations using highperformance liquid chromatography. Results: There was no significant difference between the IO and IV groups relative to achieving ROSC (p=1.0 but a significant difference between the IV compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031 and IV compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001. There was a significant difference between the IO group compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031 and IO compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001. There was no significant difference between the CPR + defibrillation group and the CPR group (p=0.127. There was no significant difference in Cmax between the IO and IV groups (p=0.079. The mean ± standard deviation of Cmax of the IO group was 58,709±25,463pg/mL compared to the IV group, which was 106,198±62,135pg/mL. There was no significant difference in mean Tmax between the groups (p=0.084. There were no significant differences in odds of ROSC between the tibial IO and IV groups. Conclusion: Prompt access to the vascular system using the IO route can circumvent

  2. Comparison of Cerebral Metabolism between Pig Ventricular Fibrillation and Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zhang; Chun-Sheng Li; Cai-Jun Wu; Jun Yang; Chen-Chen Hang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Morbidity and mortality after resuscitation largely depend on the recovery of brain function.Ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) and asphyxial cardiac arrest (ACA) are the two most prevalent causes of sudden cardiac death.Up to now,most studies have focused on VFCA.However,results from the two models have been largely variable.So,it is necessary to characterize the features of postresuscitation cerebral metabolism of both models.Methods:Forty-four Wuzhishan miniature inbred pigs were randomly divided into three groups:18 for VFCA group,ACA group,respectively,and other 8 for sham-operated group (SHAM).VFCA was induced by programmed electric stimulation,andACA was induced by endotracheal tube clamping.After 8 min without treatment,standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated.Following neurological deficit scores (NDS) were evaluated at 24 h after achievement of spontaneous circulation,cerebral metabolism showed as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.Levels of serum markers of brain injury,neuron specific enolase (NSE),and S100β were quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results:Compared with VFCA group,fewer ACA animals achieved restoration of spontaneous circulation (61.1% vs.94.4%,P < 0.01) and survived 24-h after resuscitation (38.9% vs.77.8%,P < 0.01) with worse neurological outcome (NDS:244.3 ± 15.3 vs.168.8 ± 9.71,P < 0.01).The CPR duration of ACA group was longer than that of VFCA group (8.1 ± 1.2 min vs.4.5 ± 1.1 min,P < 0.01).Cerebral energy metabolism showed as SUVmax in ACA was lower than in VFCA (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01).Higher serum biomarkers of brain damage (NSE,S100β) were found inACA than VFCA after resuscitation (P < 0.01).Conclusions:Compared with VFCA,ACA causes more severe cerebral metabolism injuries with less successful resuscitation and worse neurological outcome.

  3. Cardiac Complication Rate In Emergent Vascular Procedures Tehran Sina Hospital (2000-2001

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    Ahmadi H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Complications of Coronary artery disease remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality after vascular surgical procedures. Goldman risk factor analysis has been suggested as peri-operative noninvasive screening method to detect significant coronary artery disease in emergent vascular procedures."nMethods and Materials: In this study, the accuracy of the Goldman scale was assessed with regard to the development of cardiac complications such as asymptomatic ischemic change in ECG, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction and cardiac death. We studied 100 patients that were required emergent vascular procedures from 2000-2001. Data about perioperative complications were extracted and analyzed using SPSS computer program."nResults: Our study indicated there is not statistical correlation between cardiac death, infarction, arrythmia, ECG change, age, sex and cardiac class."nConclusion: We concluded that Goldman scale could not be regarded as a screening method to predict peri-operative cardiac complications in emergent vascular procedures.

  4. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

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    Ogawa Toshio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (2 and very high-density (≥10,000/km2 areas, the mean call-response intervals were 9.3 and 6.2 minutes, 1-month survival rates were 5.4% and 9.1%, and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rates were 2.7% and 4.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, cause of arrest, first aid by bystander and the proportion of neighborhood elderly people ≥65 yrs, patients in very high-density areas had a significantly higher survival rate (odds ratio (OR, 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.44 - 1.87; p Conclusion Living in a low-density area was associated with an independent risk of delay in ambulance response, and a low survival rate in cases of OHCA. Distribution of EMS centers according to population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas.

  5. REGISTRO DE PARO CARDÍACO EN EL ADULTO Registries of outer hospital cardiac arrest in Bogotta-Colombia

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    Ricardo Navarro Vargas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available En nuestro país no hay un registro estandarizado de los eventos cardíacos que requieren reanimación cerebro-cardio-pulmonar (RCCP siguiendo los lineamientos "Utstein". El propósito de este estudio fue determinar la calidad de los registros extrahospitalarios de paro cardíaco en el adulto, en Bogotá-Colombia. Entre enero y marzo de 2005 se realizó un análisis retrospectivo de los casos que correspondieron a paro cardíaco en el adulto atendidos por el "Centro Regulador de Urgencias del Distrito (CRU". El estudio reveló un registro deficiente de los eventos que requirieron RCCP realizados a nivel prehospitalario, e identificó al trauma como causa de paro cardíaco en 22% de los casos, una cifra particularmente elevada si se compara con los reportes mundiales, que oscilan entre 5% y 8%. Recomienda la estandarización del registro de paro cardíaco en el adulto, para lo cual se sugiere utilizar el formato de registro que sigue los lineamientos "Utstein".There is not a standardized registry form of cardiac events requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in our country such as the Utstein style. The purpose of this study was to determine the quality of the registries of out-ofhospital cardiac arrests in Bogotá-Colombia. A retrospective survey of registries of cardiac events assisted by a regulatory center "Centro Regulador de Urgencias del Distrito (CRU" was conducted, between January and March, 2005. The study reveals a poor registry of outof-hospital cardiac arrest in Bogotá-Colombia, and identifies trauma as the cause of cardiac arrest in 22% of cases, a particularly high figure compared with 5-8% registered worldwide. Recommend the standardization of the registry form of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and suggest to use the "uniform reporting of data following cardiac arrest - the Utstein style". The registry forms are shown in appendix 1-2. Suggestions are welcome.

  6. Dextrose containing intravenous fluid impairs outcome and increases death after eight minutes of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alecy, L G; Lundy, E F; Barton, K J; Zelenock, G B

    1986-09-01

    Use of dextrose in intravenous resuscitation fluids is common practice; however, this study indicates that 5% dextrose solutions, even if administered in physiologic quantities, greatly worsens the outcome of survivable cardiac arrest. Twelve adult male mongrel dogs were premedicated with morphine, anesthetized with halothane, instrumented, intubated, and ventilated. Each dog was first given 500 ml of either lactated Ringer's (LR) (n = 6) or 5% dextrose in LR (D5LR) (n = 6). Halothane was stopped and fibrillation was induced (60 Hz). Blood glucose just before cardiac arrest was 129 mg/dl in the LR dogs and was increased to 335 mg/dl in the D5LR dogs. After eight minutes of arrest, resuscitation, including internal cardiac massage and standard advanced cardiac life support drug protocols (modified for dogs), was begun. When stable cardiac rhythm was obtained, the chest was closed, and LR or D5LR continued until a total of 1L was given. A neurologic score (0 = normal to 100 = dead) was assigned at 1, 2, 6, and 24 hours. The LR group did not differ statistically from the D5LR group in operative time, number of defibrillatory shocks, time to spontaneous ventilation, time to extubation, or drugs required. Resuscitation was successful in all six LR and five of six D5LR group; however, by 2 hours after resuscitation and thereafter, D5LR group had a significantly greater neurologic deficit (p less than 0.05) than did the LR group. By 9 hours, four of six D5LR dogs displayed convulsive activity and died. At 24 hours the D5LR group had a greater (p less than 0.008) neurologic deficit (82 +/- 11) than did the LR group (21 +/- 7), which walked and ate. We conclude that the addition of 5% dextrose to standard intravenous fluids greatly increases the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiac resuscitation. PMID:3738770

  7. Etiology of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest diagnosed via detailed examinations including perimortem computed tomography

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    Yoshihiro Moriwaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The spectrum of the etiology of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCPA has not been established. We have performed perimortem computed tomography (CT during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Aims: To clarify the incidence of non-cardiac etiology (NCE, actual distribution of the causes of OHCPA via perimortem CT and its usefulness. Settings and Design: Population-based observational case series study. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 1846 consecutive OHCPA cases and divided them into two groups: 370 showing an obvious cause of OHCPA with NCE (trauma, neck hanging, terminal stage of malignancy, and gastrointestinal bleeding and others. Results: Of a total OHCPA, perimortem CT was performed in 57.5% and 62.5% were finally diagnosed as NCE: Acute aortic dissection (AAD 8.07%, pulmonary thrombo-embolization (PTE 1.46%, hypoxia due to pneumonia 5.25%, asthma and acute worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 2.06%, cerebrovascular disorder (CVD 4.48%, airway obstruction 7.64%, and submersion 5.63%. The rates of patients who survived to hospital discharge were 6-14% in patients with NCE. Out of the 1476 cases excluding obvious NCE of OHCPA, 66.3% underwent perimortem CT, 14.6% of cases without obvious NCE and 22.1% of cases with perimortem CT were confirmed as having some NCE. Conclusions: Of the total OHCPA the incidences of NCE was 62.5%; the leading etiologies were AAD, airway obstruction, submersion, hypoxia and CVD. The rates of cases converted from cardiac etiology to NCE using perimortem CT were 14.6% of cases without an obvious NCE.

  8. Variability in case-mix adjusted in-hospital cardiac arrest rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nichol, Graham; Carr, Brendan G.; Mitra, Nandita; Bradley, Steven M.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Groeneveld, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unknown how in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) rates vary across hospitals and predictors of variability. Objectives Measure variability in IHCA across hospitals and determine if hospital-level factors predict differences in case-mix adjusted event rates. Research design Get with the Guidelines Resuscitation (GWTG-R) (n=433 hospitals) was used to identify IHCA events between 2003-2007. The American Hospital Association survey, Medicare, and US Census were used to obtain detailed information about GWTG-R hospitals. Subjects adult patients with IHCA Measures Case-mix adjusted predicted IHCA rates were calculated for each hospital and variability across hospitals was compared. A regression model was used to predict case-mix adjusted event rates using hospital measures of volume, nurse-to-bed ratio, percent ICU beds, palliative care services, urban designation, volume of black patients, income, trauma designation, academic designation, cardiac surgery capability and a patient risk score. Results We evaluated 103,117 adult IHCAs at 433 US hospitals. The case mix adjusted IHCA event rate was highly variable across hospitals, median 1/1000 bed days (interquartile range: 0.7-1.3 events/1000 bed-days). In a multivariable regression model, case-mix adjusted IHCA event rates were highest in urban hospitals (rate ratio [RR] 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.3, p=0.03) and hospitals with higher proportions of black patients (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.3, p=0.01) and lower in larger hospitals (RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.45-0.66, p<.0001). Conclusion Case-mix adjusted IHCA event rates varied considerably across hospitals. Several hospital factors associated with higher IHCA event rates were consistent with factors often linked with lower hospital quality of care. PMID:22249921

  9. Immediate prehospital hypothermia protocol in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Laure; Vitrat, François; Savary, Dominique; Debaty, Guillaume; Santre, Charles; Durand, Michel; Dessertaine, Geraldine; Timsit, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcomes of cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of an immediate prehospital cooling procedure implemented just after the return of spontaneous circulation with a prehospital setting. During 30 months, the case records of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital CA presumably due to a cardiac disease were studied. A routine protocol of immediate postresuscitation cooling had been tested by an emergency team, which consisted of an infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline. We decided to assess the efficacy and tolerance of this procedure. A total of 99 patients were studied; 22 were treated with prehospital TH, and 77 consecutive patients treated with prehospital standard resuscitation served as controls. For all patients, TH was maintained for 12 to 24 hours. The demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of the patients were similar in the 2 groups. The rate of patients with a body temperature of less than 35 degrees C upon admission was 41% in the cooling group and 18% in the control group. Rapid infusion of fluid was not associated with pulmonary edema. After 1 year of follow-up, 6 (27%) of 22 patients in the cooling group and 30 (39%) of 77 patients in the control group had a good outcome. Our preliminary observation suggests that in comatose survivors of CA, prehospital TH with infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline is feasible and can be used safely by mobile emergency and intensive care units. PMID:19497463

  10. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in a Patient With Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Case Report and a Brief Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Shah, Amar B; Gass, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a phenotypic variant of nonobstructive HCM, in which hypertrophy of the myocardium predominantly involves the left ventricular apex. It is common in Japanese and other Asian populations but is rare in the United States. Apical HCM has a relatively benign prognosis in terms of cardiovascular mortality; however, morbid events such as ventricular aneurysms, apical thrombi, diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial infarction are not uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old white man who presented to our hospital after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The patient had a witnessed collapse while playing basketball in the field. He was found to be pulseless and unresponsive by his coach, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately started. Upon arrival of emergency medical services, an automated external defibrillator advised shock and he was defibrillated thrice. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 15 minutes. He was intubated for airway protection and was brought to the hospital. Therapeutic hypothermia was initiated. He demonstrated good neurological status after active rewarming. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of apical HCM with right ventricular involvement. The patient underwent an implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement for secondary prevention and was subsequently discharged. In conclusion, apical HCM can rarely be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. The diagnosis may be missed on transthoracic 2-dimensional cardiac echocardiogram, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging should be considered to exclude apical HCM in young patients who present after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:25923227

  11. Short-term Exposure to Microgravity and the Associated Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest: Implications for Commercial Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Kevin J. C.; Russamono, Thais

    2013-02-01

    The likelihood of trained astronauts developing a life threatening cardiac event during spaceflight is relatively rare, whilst the incidence in untrained individuals is unknown. Space tourists who live a sedentary lifestyle have reduced cardiovascular function, but the associated danger of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) during a suborbital spaceflight (SOSF) is unclear. Risk during SOSF was examined by reviewing several microgravity studies and methods of determining poor cardiovascular condition. Accurately assessing cardiovascular function and improving baroreceptor sensitivity through exercise is suggested to reduce the incidence of SCA during future SOSFs. Future studies will benefit from past participants sharing medical history; allowing creation of risk profiles and suitable guidelines.

  12. Advanced life support therapy and on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: Applying signal processing and pattern recognition methods

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    Trygve Eftestøl

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the US alone, several hundred thousands die of sudden cardiac arrests each year. Basic life support defined as chest compressions and ventilations and early defibrillation are the only factors proven to increase the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and are key elements in the chain of survival defined by the American Heart Association. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines treat all patients the same, but studies show need for more individualiza- tion of treatment. This review will focus on ideas on how to strengthen the weak parts of the chain of survival including the ability to measure the effects of therapy, improve time efficiency, and optimize the sequence and quality of the various components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  13. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable...... rhythm from AEDs used by laypersons with the corresponding proportion recorded by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) on arrival. METHODS: In a 20-month study, we collected data on OHCAs in the Capital Region of Denmark where an AED was deployed prior to arrival of EMS. The AEDs were brought to the...... emergency medical dispatch centre for data downloading and rhythm analysis. Patient data were retrieved from the medical records from the admitting hospital, whereas data on EMS rhythm analyses were obtained from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2001 and 2010. RESULTS: A total of 121 AEDs were...

  14. The use of pre-hospital mild hypothermia after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Francis; Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K; Cobb, Leonard A

    2009-03-01

    Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4 degrees C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  15. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jacquelyn; Cepeda Brito, Jose R; Baker, Lauren; Hughes, Patrick G; Gothard, M David; McCarroll, Michele L; Davis, Jocelyn; Silber, Angela; Ahmed, Rami A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN) residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT) and confidence surveys (CS) were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9 ± 8.9 versus post: 72.8 ± 6.1, p = 0.01) and CS total scores (pre: 22.2 ± 6.4 versus post: 29.9 ± 3.4, p = 0.007). Significant differences were noted in airway management, p = 0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p = 0.008; left uterine displacement, p = 0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p = 0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p = 0.074; chest compressions, p = 0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p = 0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p = 0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency. PMID:27555967

  16. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jacquelyn; Cepeda Brito, Jose R.; Baker, Lauren; Hughes, Patrick G.; Gothard, M. David; Davis, Jocelyn; Silber, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN) residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT) and confidence surveys (CS) were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9 ± 8.9 versus post: 72.8 ± 6.1, p = 0.01) and CS total scores (pre: 22.2 ± 6.4 versus post: 29.9 ± 3.4, p = 0.007). Significant differences were noted in airway management, p = 0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p = 0.008; left uterine displacement, p = 0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p = 0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p = 0.074; chest compressions, p = 0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p = 0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p = 0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency. PMID:27555967

  17. Combination of Epinephrine with Esmolol Attenuates Post-Resuscitation Myocardial Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Zhang; Chunsheng Li

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the β-adrenergic effect of epinephrine significantly increases the severity of post resuscitation myocardial dysfunction. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the short-acting β₁-selective adrenergic blocking agent, esmolol, would attenuate post resuscitation myocardial dysfunction in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: After 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation and 2 min of basic li...

  18. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management 33°C versus 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragancea, Irina; Horn, Janneke; Kuiper, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reliability of some methods of neurological prognostication after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been questioned since the introduction of induced hypothermia. The aim of this study was to determine whether different treatment temperatures after resuscitation affected the...... prognostic accuracy of clinical neurological findings and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) in comatose patients. METHODS: We calculated sensitivity and false positive rate for Glasgow Coma Scale motor score (GCS M), pupillary and corneal reflexes and SSEP to predict poor neurological outcome using...

  19. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for the induction of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19674825

  20. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Adams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT and confidence surveys (CS were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9±8.9 versus post: 72.8±6.1, p=0.01 and CS total scores (pre: 22.2±6.4 versus post: 29.9±3.4, p=0.007. Significant differences were noted in airway management, p=0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p=0.008; left uterine displacement, p=0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p=0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p=0.074; chest compressions, p=0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p=0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p=0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency.

  1. Blood brain barrier is impermeable to solutes and permeable to water after experimental pediatric cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Erika E; Clark, Robert S B; Foley, Lesley M; Alexander, Henry; Hickey, Robert W; Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Manole, Mioara D

    2014-08-22

    Pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) results in unfavorable neurological outcome in most survivors. Development of neuroprotective therapies is contingent upon understanding the permeability of intravenously delivered medications through the blood brain barrier (BBB). In a model of pediatric CA we sought to characterize BBB permeability to small and large molecular weight substances. Additionally, we measured the percent brain water after CA. Asphyxia of 9 min was induced in 16-18 day-old rats. The rats were resuscitated and the BBB permeability to small (sodium fluorescein and gadoteridol) and large (immunoglobulin G, IgG) molecules was assessed at 1, 4, and 24 h after asphyxial CA or sham surgery. Percent brain water was measured post-CA and in shams using wet-to-dry brain weight. Fluorescence, gadoteridol uptake, or IgG staining at 1, 4h and over the entire 24 h post-CA did not differ from shams, suggesting absence of BBB permeability to these solutes. Cerebral water content was increased at 3h post-CA vs. sham. In conclusion, after 9 min of asphyxial CA there is no BBB permeability over 24h to conventional small or large molecule tracers despite the fact that cerebral water content is increased early post-CA indicating the development of brain edema. Evaluation of novel therapies targeting neuronal death after pediatric CA should include their capacity to cross the BBB. PMID:24937271

  2. Towards the Automated Analysis and Database Development of Defibrillator Data from Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Eftestøl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. During resuscitation of cardiac arrest victims a variety of information in electronic format is recorded as part of the documentation of the patient care contact and in order to be provided for case review for quality improvement. Such review requires considerable effort and resources. There is also the problem of interobserver effects. Objective. We show that it is possible to efficiently analyze resuscitation episodes automatically using a minimal set of the available information. Methods and Results. A minimal set of variables is defined which describe therapeutic events (compression sequences and defibrillations and corresponding patient response events (annotated rhythm transitions. From this a state sequence representation of the resuscitation episode is constructed and an algorithm is developed for reasoning with this representation and extract review variables automatically. As a case study, the method is applied to the data abstraction process used in the King County EMS. The automatically generated variables are compared to the original ones with accuracies ≥90% for 18 variables and ≥85% for the remaining four variables. Conclusions. It is possible to use the information present in the CPR process data recorded by the AED along with rhythm and chest compression annotations to automate the episode review.

  3. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay Del Rosario; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesia. Reactivity was detected through change in the power spectrum of signal before and after stimulation. Automatic results obtained almost perfect agreement (discontinuity) to substantial agreement (background reactivity) with a visual score from EEG-certified neurologists. Burst-suppression ratio was more suited to distinguish continuous EEG background from burst-suppression than approximate entropy in this specific population. Automatic EEG background and reactivity measures were significantly related to good and poor outcome. We conclude that quantitative EEG measurements can provide promising information regarding current state of the patient and clinical outcome, but further work is needed before routine application in a clinical setting. PMID:24452769

  4. Complement activation and its prognostic role in post-cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenei, Z M; Zima, E; Csuka, D;

    2014-01-01

    then allowed to rewarm to normothermia. All patients underwent diagnostic coronary angiography. On admission, at 6 and 24 h, blood samples were taken from the arterial catheter. In these, complement products (C3a, C3, C4d, C4, SC5b9 and Bb) were measured by ELISA in blood samples. Patients were...... followed up for 30 days; 22 patients (47.8%) died by the end of this period. We observed that complement activation (determined as the C3a to C3 ratio) was higher in non-survivors than in survivors at each time point. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, the C3a/C3 ratio determined 24 h after the...... initiation of therapeutic hypothermia predicted 30-day mortality regardless of age, sex and the APACHE II score. Complement activation occurs in post-cardiac arrest patients, and its extent correlates with 30-day survival. The C3a/C3 ratio might prove useful for estimating the prognosis of comatose post...

  5. Study of Cardiac Arrest Caused by Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism and Thrombolytic Resuscitation in a Porcine Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Xing Zhao; Chun-Sheng Li; Jun Yang; Nan Tong; Hong-Li Xiao; Le An

    2016-01-01

    Background:The success rate of resuscitation in cardiac arrest (CA) caused by pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is low.Furthermore,there are no large animal models that simulate clinical CA.The aim of this study was to establish a porcine CA model caused by PTE and to investigate the pathophysiology of CA and postresuscitation.Methods:This model was induced in castrated male pigs (30 ± 2 kg;n =21) by injecting thrombi (10-15 ml) via the left external jugular vein.Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was performed at baseline,CA,and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).After CTPA during CA,cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with thrombolysis (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator 50 mg) was initiated.Hemodynamic,respiratory,and blood gas data were monitored.Cardiac troponins T,cardiac troponin I,creatine kinase-MB,myoglobin,and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Data were compared between baseline and CA with paired-sample t-test and compared among different time points for survival animals with repeated measures analysis of variance.Results:Seventeen animals achieved CA after emboli injection,while four achieved CA after 5-8 ml more thrombi.Nine animals survived 6 h after CPR.CTPA showed obstruction of the pulmonary arteries.Mean aortic pressure data showed occurrence of CA caused by PTE (Z =-2.803,P =0.002).The maximal rate of mean increase of left ventricular pressure (dp/dtmax) was statistically decreased (t =6.315,P =0.000,variation coefficient =0.25),and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2) decreased to the lowest value (t =27.240,P =0.000).After ROSC (n =9),heart rate (HR) and mean right ventricular pressure (MRVP) remained different versus baseline until 2 h after ROSC (HR,P =0.036;MRVP,P =0.027).Myoglobin was statistically increased from CA to 1 h after ROSC (P =0.036,0.026,0.009,respectively),and BNP was increased from 2 h to 6 h after ROSC (P =0.012,0.014,0.039,respectively

  6. Study of Cardiac Arrest Caused by Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism and Thrombolytic Resuscitation in a Porcine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lian-Xing; Li, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Jun; Tong, Nan; Xiao, Hong-Li; An, Le

    2016-01-01

    Background: The success rate of resuscitation in cardiac arrest (CA) caused by pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is low. Furthermore, there are no large animal models that simulate clinical CA. The aim of this study was to establish a porcine CA model caused by PTE and to investigate the pathophysiology of CA and postresuscitation. Methods: This model was induced in castrated male pigs (30 ± 2 kg; n = 21) by injecting thrombi (10–15 ml) via the left external jugular vein. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was performed at baseline, CA, and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). After CTPA during CA, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with thrombolysis (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator 50 mg) was initiated. Hemodynamic, respiratory, and blood gas data were monitored. Cardiac troponins T, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase-MB, myoglobin, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were compared between baseline and CA with paired-sample t-test and compared among different time points for survival animals with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Seventeen animals achieved CA after emboli injection, while four achieved CA after 5–8 ml more thrombi. Nine animals survived 6 h after CPR. CTPA showed obstruction of the pulmonary arteries. Mean aortic pressure data showed occurrence of CA caused by PTE (Z = −2.803, P = 0.002). The maximal rate of mean increase of left ventricular pressure (dp/dtmax) was statistically decreased (t = 6.315, P = 0.000, variation coefficient = 0.25), and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2) decreased to the lowest value (t = 27.240, P = 0.000). After ROSC (n = 9), heart rate (HR) and mean right ventricular pressure (MRVP) remained different versus baseline until 2 h after ROSC (HR, P = 0.036; MRVP, P = 0.027). Myoglobin was statistically increased from CA to 1 h after ROSC (P = 0.036, 0.026, 0.009, respectively), and BNP was increased

  7. Minocycline attenuates brain tissue levels of TNF-α produced by neurons after prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabek, Tomas; Janata, Andreas; Wilson, Caleb D.; Stezoski, Jason; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Foley, Lesley M.; Verrier, Jonathan; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuro-cognitive disabilities are a well-recognized complication of hypothermic circulatory arrest. We and others have reported that prolonged cardiac arrest (CA) produces neuronal death and microglial proliferation and activation that are only partially mitigated by hypothermia. Microglia, and possibly other cells, are suggested to elaborate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) which can trigger neuronal death cascades and exacerbate edema after CNS insults. Minocycline is neuroprotective in some brain ischemia models in part by blunting the microglial response. We tested the hypothesis that minocycline would attenuate neuroinflammation as reflected by brain tissue levels of TNF-α after hypothermic CA in rats. Rats were subjected to rapid exsanguination, followed by a 6 min normothermic CA. Hypothermia (30 °C) was then induced by an aortic saline flush. After a total of 20 min CA, resuscitation was achieved via cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). After 5 min reperfusion, minocycline (90 mg/kg; n=6) or vehicle (PBS; n=6) were given. Hypothermia (34 °C) was maintained for 6 h. Rats were sacrificed at 6 or 24 h. TNF-α was quantified (ELISA) in four brain regions (cerebellum, CEREB; cortex, CTX; hippocampus, HIP; striatum, STRI). Naïve rats (n=6) and rats subjected to the same anesthesia and CPB but no CA served as controls (n=6). Immunocytochemistry was used to localize TNF-α. Naïve rats and CPB controls had no detectable TNF-α in any brain region. CA markedly increased brain TNF-α. Regional differences were seen, with the highest TNF-α levels in striatum in CA groups (10-fold higher, P<0.05 vs. all other brain regions). TNF-α was undetectable at 24 h. Minocycline attenuated TNF-α levels in CTX, HIP and STRI (P<0.05). TNF-α showed unique co-localization with neurons. In conclusion, we report region-dependent early increases in brain TNF-α levels after prolonged hypothermic CA, with maximal increases in striatum. Surprisingly, TNF-α co-localized in neurons and

  8. Even Four Minutes of Poor Quality of CPR Compromises Outcome in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Untrained bystanders usually delivered suboptimal chest compression to victims who suffered from cardiac arrest in out-of-hospital settings. We therefore investigated the hemodynamics and resuscitation outcome of initial suboptimal quality of chest compressions compared to the optimal ones in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. Methods. Fourteen Yorkshire pigs weighted 30 ± 2 kg were randomized into good and poor cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR groups. Ventricular fibrillation was electrically induced and untreated for 6 mins. In good CPR group, animals received high quality manual chest compressions according to the Guidelines (25% of animal’s anterior-posterior thoracic diameter during first two minutes of CPR compared with poor (70% of the optimal depth compressions. After that, a 120-J biphasic shock was delivered. If the animal did not acquire return of spontaneous circulation, another 2 mins of CPR and shock followed. Four minutes later, both groups received optimal CPR until total 10 mins of CPR has been finished. Results. All seven animals in good CPR group were resuscitated compared with only two in poor CPR group (P<0.05. The delayed optimal compressions which followed 4 mins of suboptimal compressions failed to increase the lower coronary perfusion pressure of five non-survival animals in poor CPR group. Conclusions. In a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, even four minutes of initial poor quality of CPR compromises the hemodynamics and survival outcome.

  9. Aetiologies of pulseless electrical activity in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests:A retrospective study and analysis of specific causes

    OpenAIRE

    Beun, L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulseless electrical activity (PEA) cardiac arrest is defined as a cardiac arrest (CA) presenting with a residual organized electrical activity on the electrocardiogram. In the last decades, the incidence of PEA has regularly increased, compared to other types of CA like ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. PEA is frequently induced by reversible conditions. The "4 (or 5) H" & "4 (or 5) T" are proposed as a mnemonic to asses for Hypoxia, Hypovolemia, ...

  10. Mild therapeutic hypothermia shortens intensive care unit stay of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to historical controls

    OpenAIRE

    Storm, Christian; Steffen, Ingo; Schefold, Joerg C.; Krueger, Anne; Oppert, Michael; Jörres, Achim; Hasper, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Persistent coma is a common finding after cardiac arrest and has profound ethical and economic implications. Evidence suggests that therapeutic hypothermia improves neurological outcome in these patients. In this analysis, we investigate whether therapeutic hypothermia influences the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and ventilator time in patients surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods A prospective observational study with historical controls was conducted at ...

  11. A knowledge translation collaborative to improve the use of therapeutic hypothermia in post-cardiac arrest patients: protocol for a stepped wedge randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wax Randy; Rubenfeld Gordon; Ferguson Niall; Dorian Paul; Needham Dale M; Brooks Steve C; Scales Damon C; Dainty Katie N; Zwarenstein Merrick; Thorpe Kevin; Morrison Laurie J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Advances in resuscitation science have dramatically improved survival rates following cardiac arrest. However, about 60% of adults that regain spontaneous circulation die before leaving the hospital. Recently it has been shown that inducing hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors immediately following their arrival in hospital can dramatically improve both overall survival and neurological outcomes. Despite the strong evidence for its efficacy and the apparent simplicity o...

  12. Cognitive function after cardiac arrest and temperature management; rationale and description of a sub-study in the Target Temperature Management trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Gisela; Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans;

    2013-01-01

    Mild to moderate cognitive impairment is common amongst long-term survivors of cardiac arrest. In the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM-trial) comatose survivors were randomized to 33°C or 36°C temperature control for 24 hours after cardiac arrest and the effects on survival and neurological...... outcome assessed. This protocol describes a sub-study of the TTM-trial investigating cognitive dysfunction and its consequences for patients' and relatives' daily life....

  13. Incidence of and factors associated with perioperative cardiac arrest within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriphuwanun V

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Visith Siriphuwanun,1 Yodying Punjasawadwong,1 Worawut Lapisatepun,1 Somrat Charuluxananan,2 Ketchada Uerpairojkit2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Mueang District, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: To determine the incidence of and factors associated with perioperative cardiac arrest within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study was approved by the ethical committee of Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Thailand. We reviewed the data of 44,339 patients receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery during the period from January 1, 2003 to March 31, 2011. The data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, anesthesia information, location of anesthesia performed, and outcomes. Data of patients who had received topical anesthesia or monitoring anesthesia care were excluded. Factors associated with cardiac arrest were identified by univariate analyses. Multiple regressions for the risk ratio (RR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were used to determine the strength of factors associated with cardiac arrest. A forward stepwise algorithm was chosen at a P-value <0.05. Results: The incidence (within 24 hours of perioperative cardiac arrest in patients receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery was 163 per 10,000. Factors associated with 24-hour perioperative cardiac arrest in emergency surgery were age of 2 years or younger (RR =1.46, CI =1.03–2.08, P=0.036, ASA physical status classification of 3–4 (RR =5.84, CI =4.20–8.12, P<0.001 and 5–6 (RR =33.98, CI =23.09–49.98, P<0.001, the anatomic site of surgery (upper intra-abdominal, RR =2.67, CI =2.14–3.33, P<0.001; intracranial, RR =1.74, CI =1.35–2.25, P<0.001; intrathoracic, RR =2.35, CI =1.70–3

  14. Right atrial tamponade complicating cardiac operation: clinical, hemodynamic, and scintigraphic correlates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, T.; Gray, R.; Chaux, A.; Lee, M.; De Robertis, M.; Berman, D.; Matloff, J.

    1982-09-01

    Persistent bleeding into the pericardial space in the early hours after cardiac operation not uncommonly results in cardiac tamponade. Single chamber tamponade also might be expected, since in this setting the pericardium frequently contains firm blood clots localized to the area of active bleeding. However, this complication has received very little attention in the surgical literature. We are therefore providing documentation that isolated right atrial tamponade can occur as a complication of cardiac operation and that there exists a potential for misdiagnosis and hence incorrect treatment of this condition. Right atrial tamponade may be recognized by a combination of low cardiac output, low blood pressure, prominent neck veins, right atrial pressure in excess of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and a poor response to plasma volume expansion. Findings on chest roentgenogram and gated wall motion scintigraphy may be highly suggestive. This review should serve to increase awareness of this complication and to provide some helpful diagnostic clues.

  15. Right atrial tamponade complicating cardiac operation: clinical, hemodynamic, and scintigraphic correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persistent bleeding into the pericardial space in the early hours after cardiac operation not uncommonly results in cardiac tamponade. Single chamber tamponade also might be expected, since in this setting the pericardium frequently contains firm blood clots localized to the area of active bleeding. However, this complication has received very little attention in the surgical literature. We are therefore providing documentation that isolated right atrial tamponade can occur as a complication of cardiac operation and that there exists a potential for misdiagnosis and hence incorrect treatment of this condition. Right atrial tamponade may be recognized by a combination of low cardiac output, low blood pressure, prominent neck veins, right atrial pressure in excess of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and a poor response to plasma volume expansion. Findings on chest roentgenogram and gated wall motion scintigraphy may be highly suggestive. This review should serve to increase awareness of this complication and to provide some helpful diagnostic clues

  16. Ubiquitous protective effects of cyclosporine A in preventing cardiac arrest-induced multiple organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cour, Martin; Abrial, Maryline; Jahandiez, Vincent; Loufouat, Joseph; Belaïdi, Elise; Gharib, Abdallah; Varennes, Annie; Monneret, Guillaume; Thibault, Hélène; Ovize, Michel; Argaud, Laurent

    2014-10-15

    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) appears to be a pivotal event in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) leads to the post-CA syndrome that encompasses, not only myocardial dysfunction, but also brain injury, failure of other organs (kidney, liver, or lung), and systemic response to I/R. We aimed to determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) might prevent multiple organ failure following CA through a ubiquitous mPTP inhibition in each distant vital organ. Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 15 min of CA and 120 min of reperfusion. At the onset of resuscitation, the rabbits received CsA, its non-immunosuppressive derivative NIM811, or vehicle (controls). Survival, hemodynamics, brain damage, organ injuries, and systemic I/R response were analyzed. Fresh mitochondria were isolated from the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and lung to assess both oxidative phosphorylation and permeability transition. CsA analogs significantly improved short-term survival and prevented multiple organ failure, including brain damage and myocardial dysfunction (P < 0.05 vs. controls). Susceptibility of mPTP opening was significantly increased in heart, brain, kidney, and liver mitochondria isolated from controls, while mitochondrial respiration was impaired (P < 0.05 vs. sham). CsA analogs prevented these mitochondrial dysfunctions (P < 0.05 vs. controls). These results suggest that CsA and NIM811 can prevent the post-CA syndrome through a ubiquitous mitochondrial protective effect at the level of each major distant organ. PMID:25213634

  17. Spatial Variation and Resuscitation Process Affecting Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (OHCA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chou Chen

    Full Text Available Ambulance response times and resuscitation efforts are critical predictors of the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA. On the other hand, rural-urban differences in the OHCA survival rates are an important public health issue.We retrospectively reviewed the January 2011-December 2013 OHCA registry data of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. With particular focus on geospatial variables, we aimed to unveil risk factors predicting the overall OHCA survival until hospital admission. Spatial analysis, network analysis, and the Kriging method by using geographic information systems were applied to analyze spatial variations and calculate the transport distance. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for OHCA survival.Among the 4,957 patients, the overall OHCA survival to hospital admission was 16.5%. In the multivariate analysis, female sex (adjusted odds ratio:, AOR, 1.24 [1.06-1.45], events in public areas (AOR: 1.30 [1.05-1.61], exposure to automated external defibrillator (AED shock (AOR: 1.70 [1.30-2.23], use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA (AOR: 1.35 [1.16-1.58], non-trauma patients (AOR: 1.41 [1.04-1.90], ambulance bypassed the closest hospital (AOR: 1.28 [1.07-1.53], and OHCA within the high population density areas (AOR: 1.89 [1.55-2.32] were positively associated with improved OHCA survival. By contrast, a prolonged total emergency medical services (EMS time interval was negatively associated with OHCA survival (AOR: 0.98 [0.96-0.99].Resuscitative efforts, such as AED or LMA use, and a short total EMS time interval improved OHCA outcomes in emergency departments. The spatial heterogeneity of emergency medical resources between rural and urban areas might affect survival rate.

  18. Out-of hospital cardiac arrest in Okayama city (Japan: outcome report according to the "Utsutein Style".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi,Hoei

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in the city of Okayama, Japan, during a 1-year period after the reorganization of defibrillation by Emergency Life-Saving Technicians (ELSTs with standing orders of CPR. The data were collected prospectively according to an Utstein style between June 1, 2003 and May 31, 2004; OHCA was confirmed in 363 patients. Cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac etiology (179 was witnessed by a bystander in 62 (34.6% cases. Of this group, ventricular fibrillation (VF was documented in 20 cases (32.3%, and 1 patient (5% was discharged alive without severe neurological disability. This outcome is average in Japan, but it is quite low level compared with Western countries because there is less VF in Japan. The Utstein style revealed that we must try to detect VF before the rhythm changes and to provide defibrillation as soon as possible in order to improve outcomes. Further research will be required to accurately evaluate OHCA in Okayama city.

  19. No fate but what we make: a case of full recovery after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Maria J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 80 years old man suffered a cardiac arrest shortly after arrival to his local health department. Basic Life Support was started promptly and nine minutes later, on evaluation by an Advanced Life Support team, the victim was defibrillated with a 200J shock. When orotracheal intubation was attempted, masseter muscle contraction was noticed: on revaluation, the victim had pulse and spontaneous breathing. Thirty minutes later, the patient had been transferred to an emergency department. As he complained of chest pain, the ECG showed a ST segment depression in leads V4 to V6 and laboratorial tests showed cardiac troponine I slightly elevated. A coronary angiography was performed urgently: significant left main plus three vessel coronary artery disease was disclosed. Eighteen hours after the cardiac arrest, a quadruple coronary artery bypass grafting operation was undertaken. During surgery, a fresh thrombus was removed from the middle left anterior descendent artery. Post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged seven days after the procedure. Twenty four months later, he remains asymptomatic. In this case, the immediate call for the Advanced Life Support team, prompt basic life support and the successful defibrillation, altogether, contributed for the full recovery. Furthermore, the swiftness in the detection and treatment of the acute reversible cause (myocardial ischemia in this case was crucial for long-term prognosis.

  20. Abordagem do paciente reanimado, pós-parada cardiorrespiratória Care of patient resuscitated from cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Ramos Gonçalves Pereira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A parada cardiorrespiratória (PCR ocorrida em ambulatório tem elevada mortalidade, sendo a sobrevida entre 5% e 35%. Dos pacientes que são reanimados uma percentagem elevada permanece com déficits neurológicos, resultantes das lesões ocorridas, tanto no período de ausência de circulação ou durante a reperfusão. No entanto a compreensão dos mecanismos da lesão cerebral não tem traduzido na melhoria do prognóstico. A hipotermia terapêutica após a reanimação parece ser uma opção válida associada à diminuição destas seqüelas neurológicas. O objetivo deste estudo foi rever a evidência científica relativa à abordagem do paciente reanimado após PCR. CONTEÚDO: Descrição e abordagem dos principais fatores de risco associados à lesão neurológica após PCR, bem como dos seus critérios de prognóstico.Feita pesquisa não sistemática na base de dados PubMed dos artigos referentes à abordagem terapêutica dos pacientes reanimados de parada cardíaca. As referências bibliográficas dos artigos de revisão foram igualmente analisadas. Elaboradas normas práticas para essa abordagem. CONCLUSÕES: Os pacientes que sobrevivem à PCR têm elevado risco de permanecer com lesões neurológicas graves. A hipotermia terapêutica e o controle das variáveis fisiológicas, com otimização da perfusão cerebral, podem melhorar o seu prognóstico.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major cause of death with survival rates as low as 5% to 35%. A large number of patients who survive resuscitation will face significant neurological damage, as a result of the ischemia that occurs both during cardiac arrest and reperfusion. However understanding of the mechanisms responsible for brain damage has not resulted in prognostic improvement. Therapeutic hypothermia after resuscitation may be a valid option associated to reduction of neurological damage. The purpose of this study was to

  1. Critical appraisal of cardiac implantable electronic devices: complications and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padeletti L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Luigi Padeletti1, Giosuè Mascioli2, Alessandro Paoletti Perini1, Gino Grifoni1, Laura Perrotta1, Procolo Marchese3, Luca Bontempi3, Antonio Curnis31Istituto di Clinica Medica e Cardiologia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italia; 2Elettrofisiologia, Istituto Humanitas Gavazzeni, Bergamo, Italia; 3Elettrofisiologia, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItaliaAbstract: Population aging and broader indications for the implant of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs are the main reasons for the continuous increase in the use of pacemakers (PMs, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs and devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-P, CRT-D. The growing burden of comorbidities in CIED patients, the greater complexity of the devices, and the increased duration of procedures have led to an augmented risk of infections, which is out of proportion to the increase in implantation rate. CIED infections are an ominous condition, which often implies the necessity of hospitalization and carries an augmented risk of in-hospital death. Their clinical presentation may be either at pocket or at endocardial level, but they can also manifest themselves with lone bacteremia. The management of these infections requires the complete removal of the device and subsequent, specific, antibiotic therapy. CIED failures are monitored by competent public authorities, that require physicians to alert them to any failures, and that suggest the opportune strategies for their management. Although the replacement of all potentially affected devices is often suggested, common practice indicates the replacement of only a minority of devices, as close follow-up of the patients involved may be a safer strategy. Implantation of a PM or an ICD may cause problems in the patients' psychosocial adaptation and quality of life, and may contribute to the development of affective disorders. Clinicians are usually unaware of the psychosocial impact of implanted PMs and ICDs. The

  2. Survival with good neurological outcome in a patient with prolonged ischemic cardiac arrest--utility of automated chest compression systems in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Meredith, Ian T; Ahmar, Walid

    2014-11-15

    The management of refractory cardiac arrest during invasive coronary procedures has substantial logistical challenges and is typically associated with disappointing outcomes. We describe the case of a young woman with recalcitrant ventricular fibrillation due to acute anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction caused by occlusion of her proximal left anterior descending artery. Survival without neurological deficit or organ failure was achieved following primary percutaneous reperfusion and a total of 52 min of intra-procedural chest compression support, made possible by the use of an automated chest compression device. PMID:24403102

  3. Load-distributing band improves ventilation and hemodynamics during resuscitation in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Shuo; Wu Jun-Yuan; Li Chun-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The use of mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has great potential for the clinical setting. The purpose of present study is to compare the hemodynamics and ventilation during and after the load-distributing band CPR, versus the manual CPR in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, and to investigate the influence of rescue breathing in different CPR protocols. Methods Sixty-four male pigs (n = 16/group), weighing 30 ± 2 kg, were induced ventricular fibrill...

  4. Prophylactic antibiotics are associated with a lower incidence of pneumonia in cardiac arrest survivors treated with targeted temperature management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, David J; Nielsen, Niklas; Fraser, Gilles L;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prophylactic antibiotics (PRO) reduce the incidence of early-onset pneumonia in comatose patients with structural brain injury, but have not been examined in cardiac arrest survivors undergoing targeted temperature management (TTM). We investigated the effect of PRO on the development...... TTM at 32-34 °C were enrolled in the registry. Differences were analyzed in univariate analyses and with logistic regression models to evaluate independent associations of clinical factors with incidence of pneumonia and good functional outcome. RESULTS: 416 of 1240 patients (33.5%) received PRO...... outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic antibiotics were associated with a reduced incidence of pneumonia but a similar rate of good functional outcome....

  5. Post resuscitation care of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in the Nordic countries: a questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    Saarinen, Sini; Castrén, Maaret; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Background Aim of this study was to compare post resuscitation care of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in Nordic (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden) intensive care units (ICUs). Methods An online questionnaire was sent to Nordic ICUs in 2012 and was complemented by an additional one in 2014. Results The first questionnaire was sent to 188 and the second one to 184 ICUs. Response rates were 51 % and 46 %. In 2012, 37 % of the ICUs treated all patients resuscitated from O...

  6. Mortality and neurological outcome in the elderly after target temperature management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess older age as a prognostic factor in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest (OHCA) and the interaction between age and level of target temperature management. METHODS AND RESULTS: 950 patients included in the target temperature management (TTM) trial were randomly...... age groups, p = 0.001, the same was true for ST segment elevation on ECG at admission, p < 0.01. Increasing age was associated with a higher mortality rate (HR = 1.04 per year, 95% CI = 1.03-1.06, p < 0.001) after adjusting for confounders. Octogenarians had an increased mortality (HR = 3.5, CI: 2...

  7. Cholesterol emboli syndrome - a rare complication of cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are reporting the case of a 57 years old male, hypertensive, diabetic, dyslipidaemic who presented with exertional angina. He had a coronary artery bypass surgery, one year ago. He underwent left heart catheterization with graft study which showed critical native triple vessel disease with patent arterial graft to left anterior descending and occluded venous grafts to obtuse marginal and right coronary artery. The procedure was complicated by catheter induced dissection of the ascending aorta. Three days later he developed cholesterol emboli syndrome, that was treated symptomatically. (author)

  8. CT and MRI evaluation of cardiac complications in patients with hematologic diseases: a pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Yoo Jin; Kim, Hwan Wook; Lee, Hae Giu

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac complications with hematologic diseases are not uncommon but it is difficult to diagnose, due to non-specific clinical symptoms. Prompt recognition of these potentially fatal complications by cardiac computed tomography (CT) or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to direct clinicians to specific treatments according to causes. Thrombosis is often related to central venous catheter use and is usually located at the catheter tip near the atrial wall. Differentiation of thrombosis from normal structure is possible with CT and, distinction of a thrombus from a tumor is possible on a delayed enhancement MRI with a long inversion time (500-600 ms). Granulocytic sarcoma of the heart is indicated by an infiltrative nature with involvement of whole layers of myocardium on CT and MRI. MRI with T2* mapping is useful in evaluating myocardial iron content in patients with hemochromatosis. Diffuse subendocardial enhancement is typically observed on delayed MRIs in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. T1 mapping is an emerging tool to diagnose amyloidosis. Myocardial abscess can occur due to an immunocompromised status. CT and MRI show loculated lesions with fluid density and concomitant rim-like contrast enhancement. Awareness of CT and MRI findings of cardiac complications of hematologic diseases can be helpful to physicians for clinical decision making and treatment. PMID:25651878

  9. Submersion, accidental hypothermia and cardiac arrest, mechanical chest compressions as a bridge to final treatment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rundgren Malin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three young men were trapped in a car at the bottom of a canal at two meters depth, after losing control of their vehicle. They were brought up by rescue divers and found in cardiac arrest. One of three patients had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, at 47 min after the accident. This sole survivor had the longest submersion time of the three and he received continued mechanical chest compressions during transportation to the hospital. His temperature at admission was 26.9°C, he was rewarmed to 33°C and kept there for 24 h, followed by continued rewarming to normothermia. On day three, he woke up from coma and was discharged from the intensive care unit after one week. At follow-up six months later, he had a complete cerebral recovery but still had myoclonic twitches in the lower extremities. A mechanical device facilitates chest compressions during transportation and may be beneficial as a bridge to final treatment in the hospital. We recommend that comatose patients after submersion, accidental hypothermia and cardiac arrest are treated with mild hypothermia for 12–24 h.

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia protects against ischemia-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity following juvenile cardiac arrest in sex-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, R M; Deng, G; Orfila, J E; Hui, X; Traystman, R J; Herson, P S

    2016-06-14

    Pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to poor neurologic outcomes, including deficits in learning and memory. The only approved treatment for CA is therapeutic hypothermia, although its utility in the pediatric population remains unclear. This study analyzed the effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia after CA in juvenile mice on hippocampal neuronal injury and the cellular model of learning and memory, termed long-term potentiation (LTP). Juvenile mice were subjected to cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) followed by normothermia (37°C) and hypothermia (30°C, 32°C). Histological injury of hippocampal CA1 neurons was performed 3days after resuscitation using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded from acute hippocampal slices 7days after CA/CPR to determine LTP. Synaptic function was impaired 7days after CA/CPR. Mice exposed to hypothermia showed equivalent neuroprotection, but exhibited sexually dimorphic protection against ischemia-induced impairment of LTP. Hypothermia (32°C) protects synaptic plasticity more effectively in females, with males requiring a deeper level of hypothermia (30°C) for equivalent protection. In conclusion, male and female juvenile mice exhibit equivalent neuronal injury following CA/CPR and hypothermia protects both males and females. We made the surprising finding that juvenile mice have a sexually dimorphic response to mild therapeutic hypothermia protection of synaptic function, where males may need a deeper level of hypothermia for equivalent synaptic protection. PMID:27033251

  11. Renal Doppler and Novel Biomarkers to Assess Acute Kidney Injury in a Swine Model of Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Mei; Chen-Chen Hang; Shuo Wang; Chun-Sheng Li; Ze-Xing Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Majority of the research on cardiac arrest (CA) have focused on post-CA brain injury and myocardial dysfunction, the renal dysfunction and acute kidney injury (AKI) in other critical illnesses after CA have not been well described.This study was designed to assess AKI with renal Doppler and novel AKI biomarkers in a swine model ofventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA).Methods: Thirty healthy piglets were divided into VFCA group (n =22) and Sham group (n =8) in a blinded manner.Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output were recorded continuously.Cardiac arrest (CA) was induced by programmed electric stimulation in the VFCA group, and then cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed.Twenty piglets retumed of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and received intensive care.Blood and urine samples were collected for AKI biomarkers testing, and Color Doppler flow imaging was performed at baseline, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h,respectively after ROSC.At ROSC 24 h, the animals were sacrificed and a semi-quantitative evaluation of pathologic kidney injury was performed.Results: In the VFCA group, corrected resistive index (cRI) increased from 0.47 ± 0.03 to 0.64 ± 0.06, and pulsatility index (PI) decreased from 0.82 ± 0.03 to 0.68 ± 0.04 after ROSC.Cystatin C (CysC) in both serum and urine samples increased at ROSC 6 h, but neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in serum increased to 5.34 ± 1.68 ng/ml at ROSC 6 h, and then decreased to 3.16 ± 0.69 ng/ml at ROSC 24 h while CysC increasing constantly.According to the renal histopathology, 18 of 20 animals suffered from kidney injury.The grade of renal injury was highly correlated with RI, cRI, NGAL, and CysC.Linear regression equation was established: Grade of renal injury =0.002 × serum CysC + 6.489 × PI + 4.544 × cRI-8.358 (r2 =0.698, F =18.506, P < 0.001).Conclusions: AKI is common in post-CA syndrome.Renal Doppler and novel AKI biomarkers in serum and urine are of significant

  12. A survey of factors associated with the successful recognition of agonal breathing and cardiac arrest by 9-1-1 call takers: design and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasaboski Ann

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac arrest victims most often collapse at home, where only a modest proportion receives life-saving bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. As many as 40% of all sudden cardiac arrest victims have agonal or abnormal breathing in the first minutes following cardiac arrest. 9-1-1 call takers may wrongly interpret agonal breathing as a sign of life, and not initiate telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions. Improving 9-1-1 call takers' ability to recognize agonal breathing as a sign of cardiac arrest could result in improved bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims. Methods/Design The overall goal of this study is to design and conduct a survey of 9-1-1 call takers in the province of Ontario to better understand the factors associated with the successful identification of cardiac arrest (including patients with agonal breathing over the phone, and subsequent administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions to callers. This study will be conducted in three phases using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In Phase One, we will conduct semi-structured qualitative interviews with a purposeful selection of 9-1-1 call takers from Ontario, and identify common themes and belief categories. In Phase Two, we will use the qualitative interview results to design and pilot a quantitative survey. In Phase Three, a final version of the quantitative survey will be administered via an electronic medium to all registered call takers in the province of Ontario. We will perform qualitative thematic analysis (Phase One and regression modelling (Phases Two and Three, to determine direct and indirect relationship of behavioural constructs with intentions to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions. Discussion The results of this study will provide valuable insight into the factors associated with the successful recognition of agonal breathing and cardiac

  13. Target Temperature Management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--a randomized, parallel-group, assessor-blinded clinical trial--rationale and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; al-Subaie, Nawaf;

    2012-01-01

    Experimental animal studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurologic function with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest. International guidelines advocate the use of a target temperature management of 32°C to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours after resuscitation...... from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A systematic review indicates that the evidence for recommending this intervention is inconclusive, and the GRADE level of evidence is low. Previous trials were small, with high risk of bias, evaluated select populations, and did not treat hyperthermia in the...... control groups. The optimal target temperature management strategy is not known....

  14. Progress of Animal Model of Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation in Rabbits%家兔心跳骤停复苏模型的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田苗苗; 张兵; 李文志

    2012-01-01

    心跳骤停是临床医学中最为危急的事件之一,其发生发展过程涉及了一系列的病理生理学改变.近几年来,有关于心跳骤停复苏的研究有很多,也取得了一定的进展,但关于其各种不同类型心跳骤停的病理生理学改变的理解仍不是十分的全面,其有效地治疗药物和治疗手段也仍需要进一步的研究.因此,成功地制备与人类心跳骤停相似的动物模型就显得非常必要来,这不仅是深入研究心跳骤停复苏病理生理学改变的重要基础和研究途径,也是研制其治疗药物及方法的有效手段.本文重点讨论家兔各种类型心跳骤停复苏模型不同的研究方法.%Cardiac arrest is one of the most critical events in the clinical medicine, involving a series ofpathophysiological changes. In recent years, there are many researches about cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation and have achieved some progress, however, it they are not enough, the explanation of the pathophysiological changes in different types of cardiac arrest is not very comprehensive, and the effective drugs and treatments which will benefit cardiac arrest also still need further study. The successed establishment of different types of animal model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation that similar to human is not only the important foundation and research approach for further study of the pathophysiology in various tapes of cardiac arrest, but also the necessary means for the research of much more effective drugs and treatment which will benefit the patients who suffered cardiac arrest. This paper mainly focused on the different research methods in various types of cardiac arrest animal model in rabbits.

  15. Five-year Outcome after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti-Aleski eMosorin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA.Methods: The immediate and 5-year outcome after CABG of a consecutive series of 48 patients who survived OHCA were compared with those of control patients having had a recent myocardial infarction without ventricular arrhythmias.Results: All OHCA patients were found to have suffered myocardial infarction-related cardiac arrest. The mean delay from OHCA to CABG was 10.3±13.0 days. Despite not statistically significant, the risk of 30-day postoperative mortality was higher among OHCA patients than control patients (6.3% vs. 0%, p=0.24, propensity score adjusted analysis: p=1.00. Cardioverter defibrillator was implanted in two patients who were alive 3.8 and 4.4 years after CABG, respectively. At 5-year the overall survival rate was 80.7% in OHCA patients and 84.5% in control patients (p=0.98, propensity score adjusted analysis: p=0.87, and survival freedom from fatal cardiac event was 86.1% in OHCA patients and 86.5% in control patients (p=0.61; propensity score adjusted analysis: p=0.90. Conclusions: Early and 5-year survival rates after CABG in OHCA patients are excellent even when cardioverter defibrillator is very selectively implanted. Such good early and intermediate results observed after CABG suggest a confident approach toward surgical revascularization also in this critically ill patient population.

  16. Alternative therapies for diabetes and its cardiac complications: role of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Tod A; Deniset, Justin F; Heyliger, Clayton E; Pierce, Grant N

    2014-01-01

    It is now well known that a cardiomyopathic state accompanies diabetes mellitus. Although insulin injections and conventional hypoglycemic drug therapy have been of invaluable help in reducing cardiac damage and dysfunction in diabetes, cardiac failure continues to be a common cause of death in the diabetic population. The use of alternative medicine to maintain health and treat a variety of diseases has achieved increasing popularity in recent years. The goal of alternative therapies in diabetic patients has been to lower circulating blood glucose levels and thereby treat diabetic complications. This paper will focus its discussion on the role of vanadium on diabetes and the associated cardiac dysfunction. Careful administration of a variety of forms of vanadium has produced impressive long-lasting control of blood glucose levels in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in animals. This has been accompanied by, in many cases, a complete correction of the diabetic cardiomyopathy. The oral delivery of vanadium as a vanadate salt in the presence of tea has produced particularly impressive hypoglycemic effects and a restoration of cardiac function. This intriguing approach to the treatment of diabetes and its complications, however, deserves further intense investigation prior to its use as a conventional therapy for diabetic complications due to the unknown long-term effects of vanadium accumulation in the heart and other organs of the body. PMID:23430125

  17. Inter-Association Task Force Recommendations on Emergency Preparedness and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in High School and College Athletic Programs: A Consensus Statement

    OpenAIRE

    Drezner, Jonathan A; Courson, Ron W; Roberts, William O; Mosesso, Vincent N.; Link, Mark S.; Maron, Barry J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assist high school and college athletic programs prepare for and respond to a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This consensus statement summarizes our current understanding of SCA in young athletes, defines the necessary elements for emergency preparedness, and establishes uniform treatment protocols for the management of SCA.

  18. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske;

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...

  19. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske;

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...

  20. Impact of Dispatcher‐Assisted Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Neurological Outcomes in Children With Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Prospective, Nationwide, Population‐Based Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; GOTO, YUMIKO

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of dispatcher‐assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on neurological outcomes in children is unclear. We investigated whether dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR shows favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2) in children with out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods and Results Children (n=5009, age

  1. Temporal Trends in Coverage of Historical Cardiac Arrests Using a Volunteer-Based Network of Automated External Defibrillators Accessible to Laypersons and Emergency Dispatch Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Knudsen Lippert, Freddy; Wissenberg, Mads;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Although increased dissemination of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) has been associated with more frequent AED use, the trade-off between the number of deployed AEDs and coverage of cardiac arrests remains unclear. We investigated how volunteer-based AED dissemination affect...

  2. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to age and early identification of patients with minimal chance of long-term survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Carolina Malta;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has increased during the last decade in Denmark. We aimed to study the impact of age on changes in survival and whether it was possible to identify patients with minimal chance of 30-day survival. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using data from the n...

  3. High resolution ECG-aided early prognostic model for comatose survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauber, Martin; Štajer, Dušan; Noč, Marko; Schlegel, Todd T; Starc, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a high mortality despite modern treatment. Reliable early prognosis in OHCA could significantly improve clinical decision making. We explored prognostic utility of advanced ECG parameters, obtained from high-resolution ECG, in combination with clinical and OHCA-related parameters during treatment with mild induced hypothermia (MIH) and after rewarming in unconscious survivors of OHCA. Ninety-two patients during MIH and 66 after rewarming were included. During MIH, a score based on initial rhythm, QRS-upslope and systolic pressure resulted in an area under curve (AUC) of 0.82 and accuracy of 80% for survival. After rewarming, a score based on admission rhythm, sum of 12 lead QRS voltages, and mean lateral ST segment level in leads I and V6 resulted in an AUC of 0.88 and accuracy of 85% for survival. ECG can assist with early prognostication in unconscious survivors of OHCA during MIH and after rewarming. PMID:25911585

  4. Induction of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest in prehospital patients using ice-cold Ringer's solution: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Silfvast, Tom

    2004-09-01

    The cooling and haemodynamic effects of prehospital infusion of ice-cold Ringer's solution were studied in 13 adult patients after successful resuscitation from non-traumatic cardiac arrest. After haemodynamics stabilisation, 30 ml/kg of Ringer's solution was infused at a rate of 100ml/min into the antecubital vein. Arterial blood pressure and blood gases, pulse rate, end-tidal CO(2) and oesophageal temperature were monitored closely. The mean core temperature decreased from 35.8 +/- 0.9 degrees C at the start of infusion to 34.0 +/- 1.2 degrees C on arrival at hospital (P < 0.0001). No serious adverse haemodynamic effects occurred. It is concluded that the induction of therapeutic hypothermia using this technique in the prehospital setting is feasible. PMID:15325449

  5. Resuscitation and post resuscitation care of the very old after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is worthwhile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    in octogenarians (≥80) to assess whether resuscitation and post resuscitation care should be avoided. METHODS: During 2007-2011 consecutive OHCA-patients were attended by the physician-based Emergency Medical Services-system in Copenhagen. Pre-hospital data based on Utstein-criteria, and data on post resuscitation......BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. As comorbidity and frailty increase with age; ethical dilemmas may arise when OHCA occur in the very old. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate mortality, neurological outcome and post resuscitation care...... care were collected. Primary outcome was successful resuscitation; secondary endpoints were 30-day mortality and neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category (CPC)). RESULTS: 2509 OHCA-patients with attempted resuscitation were recorded, 22% (n=558) were octogenarians/nonagenarians. 166 (30...

  6. Difficulties with neurological prognostication in a young woman with delayed-onset generalised status myoclonus after cardiac arrest due to acute severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Rajamani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological prognostication in cardiac arrest survivors is difficult, especially when the primary etiology is respiratory arrest. Prognostic factors designed to have zero false-positive rates to robustly confirm poor outcome are usually inadequate to rule out poor outcomes (i.e., high specificity and low sensitivity. One of the least understood prognosticators is generalised status myoclonus (GSM, with case reports confusing GSM, isolated myoclonic jerks and post-hypoxic intention myoclonus (Lance Adams syndrome [LAS]. With several prognostic indicators (including status myoclonus having been validated in the pre-hypothermia era, their current relevance is debatable. New modalities such as brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and continuous electroencephalography are being evaluated. We describe here a pregnant woman resuscitated from a cardiac arrest due to acute severe asthma, and an inability to reach a consensus based on published guidelines, with a brief overview of myoclonus, LAS and the role of MRI brain in assisting prognostication.

  7. Management of cardiac perforation and pericardial tamponade complicating percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of cute cardiac perforation and tamponade complicating percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty. Methods and Results: Percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty was performed in 772 patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis from May 1992 to Dec. 2001, 9 were diagnosed cardiac perforation, 2 which developed pericardial tamponade which was successfully controlled by contrast and X-ray guided pericardiocentesis using a sub-xiphoid approach. Conclusions: Only a minority of cardiac perforation resulted from PBMV developed pericardial tamponade. The latter could be controlled safely and effectively by contrast and X-ray guided pericardiocentesis using a sub-xiphoid approach. The diagnosis of pericardial tamponade during or after PBMV relies on a strong clinical suspicion, and contrast and X-ray guided pericardiocentesis should be carried out without echocardiography for patients in unstable state

  8. Microdialysis Assessment of Cerebral Perfusion during Cardiac Arrest, Extracorporeal Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Rats – A Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Andreas; Warenits, Alexandra M.; Testori, Christoph; Weihs, Wolfgang; Hosmann, Arthur; Högler, Sandra; Sterz, Fritz; Janata, Andreas; Scherer, Thomas; Magnet, Ingrid A. M.; Ettl, Florian; Laggner, Anton N.; Herkner, Harald; Zeitlinger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic alterations during cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary life support (ECLS) are poorly explored. Markers are needed for a more personalized resuscitation and post—resuscitation care. Aim of this study was to investigate early metabolic changes in the hippocampal CA1 region during ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VF-CA) and ECLS versus conventional CPR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (350g) underwent 8min untreated VF-CA followed by ECLS (n = 8; bloodflow 100ml/kg), mechanical CPR (n = 18; 200/min) until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Shams (n = 2) were included. Glucose, glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio were compared between treatment groups and animals with and without ROSC. Ten animals (39%) achieved ROSC (ECLS 5/8 vs. CPR 5/18; OR 4,3;CI:0.7–25;p = 0.189). During VF-CA central nervous glucose decreased (0.32±0.1mmol/l to 0.04±0.01mmol/l; p<0.001) and showed a significant rise (0.53±0.1;p<0.001) after resuscitation. Lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio showed a 5fold increase (31 to 164; p<0.001; maximum 8min post ROSC). Glutamate showed a 3.5-fold increase to (2.06±1.5 to 7.12±5.1μmol/L; p<0.001) after CA. All parameters normalized after ROSC with no significant differences between ECLS and CPR. Metabolic changes during ischemia and resuscitation can be displayed by cerebral microdialysis in our VF-CA CPR and ECLS rat model. We found similar microdialysate concentrations and patterns of normalization in both resuscitation methods used. Institutional Protocol Number: GZ0064.11/3b/2011 PMID:27175905

  9. Decreased Monocyte HLA-DR Expression in Patients After Non-Shockable out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venet, Fabienne; Cour, Martin; Demaret, Julie; Monneret, Guillaume; Argaud, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) constitutes a major health care problem with the development in immediate survivors of a post-cardiac arrest syndrome including systemic inflammatory response as observed in sepsis. As a decreased monocyte HLA-DR expression (mHLA-DR) has been repeatedly described in septic patients in association with an increased risk of death and nosocomial infections, we tested whether this immune alteration could also be observed after OHCA. Fifty-five non-shockable OHCA patients sampled at Day 0 (D0: within 4 h after OHCA), D1 (the next day), and D3: (after 2 additional days) were included. CD4+ lymphocyte count and mHLA-DR were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a marked decrease in mHLA-DR as early as D0 in patients compared with normal values. This decrease persisted till D3 and was associated with a moderate decrease in the number of circulating CD4+ lymphocytes. No correlations were identified between mHLA-DR and usual prognostic markers after OHCA. However, overtime evolution in mHLA-DR values appeared different between survivors and non-survivors with a quasisystematic decrease between D1 and D3 in non-survivors versus an increased expression in survivors. In conclusion, this preliminary pilot study describes the occurrence of OHCA-induced immune alterations as illustrated by a decreased mHLA-DR and CD4+ lymphopenia. Furthermore, we show for the first time the differential overtime evolution in mHLA-DR between survivors and non-survivors without association with usual prognostic markers and multiple organ failure. These initial results should now be confirmed in a larger cohort of OHCA patients. PMID:26796574

  10. Trends in Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest by Age in Japan: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Matsubara, Takehiro; Doi, Kent; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    Population aging has rapidly advanced throughout the world and the elderly accounting for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased yearly.We identified all adults who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the All-Japan Utstein Registry of the Fire and Disaster Management Agency, a prospective, population-based clinical registry, between 2005 and 2010. Using multivariable regression, we examined temporal trends in outcomes for OHCA patients by age, as well as the influence of advanced age on outcomes. The primary outcome was a favorable neurological outcome at 1 month after OHCA.Among 605,505 patients, 454,755 (75.1%) were the elderly (≥65 years), and 154,785 (25.6%) were the oldest old (≥85 years). Although neurological outcomes were worse as the age group was older (P < 0.0001 for trend), there was a significant trend toward improved neurological outcomes during the study period by any age group (P < 0.005 for trend). After adjustment for temporal trends in various confounding variables, neurological outcomes improved yearly in all age groups (18-64 years: adjusted OR per year 1.15 [95% CI 1.13-1.18]; 65-84 years: adjusted OR per year 1.12 [95% CI 1.10-1.15]; and ≥85 years: adjusted OR per year 1.08 [95% CI 1.04-1.13]). Similar trends were found in the secondary outcomes.Although neurological outcomes from OHCA ware worse as the age group was older, the rates of favorable neurological outcomes have substantially improved since 2005 even in the elderly, including the oldest old. Careful consideration may be necessary in limiting treatment on OHCA solely for the reason of advanced age. PMID:26656330

  11. The Effect of Compressor-Administered Defibrillation on Peri-shock Pauses in a Simulated Cardiac Arrest Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Glick

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coordination of the tasks of performing chest compressions and defibrillation can lead to communication challenges that may prolong time spent off the chest. The purpose of this study was to determine whether defibrillation provided by the provider performing chest compressions led to a decrease in peri-shock pauses as compared to defibrillation administered by a second provider, in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Methods: This was a randomized, controlled study measuring pauses in chest compressions for defibrillation in a simulated cardiac arrest model. We approached hospital providers with current CPR certification for participation between July, 2011 and October, 2011. Volunteers were randomized to control (facilitator-administered defibrillation or experimental (compressor-administered defibrillation groups. All participants completed one minute of chest compressions on a mannequin in a shockable rhythm prior to administration of defibrillation. We measured and compared pauses for defibrillation in both groups. Results: Out of 200 total participants, we analyzed data from 197 defibrillations. Compressor-initiated defibrillation resulted in a significantly lower pre-shock hands-off time (0.57 s; 95% CI: 0.47-0.67 compared to facilitator-initiated defibrillation (1.49 s; 95% CI: 1.35-1.64. Furthermore, compressor-initiated defibrillation resulted in a significantly lower peri-shock hands-off time (2.77 s; 95% CI: 2.58-2.95 compared to facilitator-initiated defibrillation (4.25 s; 95% CI: 4.08-4.43. Conclusion: Assigning the responsibility for shock delivery to the provider performing compressions encourages continuous compressions throughout the charging period and decreases total time spent off the chest. However, as this was a simulation-based study, clinical implementation is necessary to further evaluate these potential benefits. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:246–250.

  12. A survey of attitudes and factors associated with successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge transfer in an older population most likely to witness cardiac arrest: design and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brehaut Jamie C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overall survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rarely exceed 5%. While bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR can increase survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to four times, bystander CPR rates remain low in Canada (15%. Most cardiac arrest victims are men in their sixties, they usually collapse in their own home (85% and the event is witnessed 50% of the time. These statistics would appear to support a strategy of targeted CPR training for an older population that is most likely to witness a cardiac arrest event. However, interest in CPR training appears to decrease with advancing age. Behaviour surrounding CPR training and performance has never been studied using well validated behavioural theories. Methods/Design The overall goal of this study is to conduct a survey to better understand the behavioural factors influencing CPR training and performance in men and women 55 years of age and older. The study will proceed in three phases. In phase one, semi-structured qualitative interviews will be conducted and recorded to identify common categories and themes regarding seeking CPR training and providing CPR to a cardiac arrest victim. The themes identified in the first phase will be used in phase two to develop, pilot-test, and refine a survey instrument based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In the third phase of the project, the final survey will be administered to a sample of the study population over the telephone. Analyses will include measures of sampling bias, reliability of the measures, construct validity, as well as multiple regression analyses to identify constructs and beliefs most salient to seniors' decisions about whether to attend CPR classes or perform CPR on a cardiac arrest victim. Discussion The results of this survey will provide valuable insight into factors influencing the interest in CPR training and performance among a targeted group of individuals most susceptible to

  13. Effects of nimodipine on cerebral blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid pressure after cardiac arrest: correlation with neurologic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, M; Aarseth, H P; Nordby, H K; Skulberg, A; Steen, P A

    1989-04-01

    Fifty-one patients were included in a blind randomized study to evaluate whether the Ca-blocker nimodipine could influence cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) during the cerebral hypoperfusion period that follows resuscitation from cardiac arrest and to determine whether changes in CBF correlate with neurologic outcome. CBF measured 1 to 4 hours after arrest with the use of 133Xe intravenous was significantly greater with nimodipine than with placebo (27 +/- 3 versus 13 +/- 1 ml.100 g-1.min-1 at 3 hours), but with no significant difference at 24 hours. There was no clinical evidence of seriously increased CSFP in any patient in either group the first 48 hours. Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower (86 +/- 4 versus 101 +/- 4 mm Hg at 3 hours), and antiarrhythmic drugs were used significantly less frequently in the nimodipine group than in the placebo group. Twelve patients in each group eventually regained consciousness. There was no significant difference in neurologic status between the two groups at any point, and no positive correlation between CBF in the hypoperfusion period and neurologic outcome. PMID:2929976

  14. Spiral CT of Non-Graft Post Cardiac Surgery Complications: A Pictorial Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shirani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Spiral CT is a rapidly growing method for noninvasive visualization of post-operative complications, including post-operative complications in CABG (coronary artery bypass graft. In the recent years, several different, yet more efficient types have been introduced with progressive improvement in the diagnostic accuracy in the detection of post-operative complications. The introduction of 64-slice technology, which allows high resolution as well as reconstructed images, has resulted in further progress in the diagnostic process. This kind of diagnostic equipment will spread rapidly in the world. Although studies with large numbers of patients regarding spiral CT as a routine diagnostic method have not been reported, there is great need for it all over the world. In this article, we intend to review the spiral CT findings of non-graft complications in patients after cardiac surgery.

  15. The role of multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography in imaging complications post-cardiac surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been numerous advances in the field of cardiac imaging. The advent of multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography (MDCT-CA) and in particular electrocardiographic (ECG)-gated acquisition has revolutionized the investigation of the complete spectrum of complications of common cardiothoracic surgical procedures. Generic complications, such as mediastinitis, pericardial effusion, sternal osteomyelitis, and mediastinal fibrosis, are discussed with illustrative examples of multiplanar and volume-rendered three-dimensional reconstructions. Graft-related complications of both coronary artery bypass grafts and aortic root grafts are reviewed. The role of MDCT-CA in the investigation of prosthetic valve endocarditis and root abscesses is outlined. We present a complete illustration of the detailed images that are obtained when investigating a full range of graft-related complications from both aortic and coronary surgery using ECG-gated MDCT-CA. MDCT-CA has the potential to become established as the optimal technique with which to image a multitude of complications post-cardiac surgery

  16. Early-Onset Pneumonia in Non-Traumatic Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients with Special Focus on Prehospital Airway Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Amirie, Scharbanu; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Brand, Michael; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND More than half of all non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients die in the hospital. Early-onset pneumonia (EOP) has been described as one of the most common complications after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, the expanded use of alternative airway devices (AAD) might influence the incidence of EOP following OHCA. MATERIAL AND METHODS We analyzed data from all OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2014. EOP was defined as proof of the presence of a pathogenic microorganism in samples of respiratory secretions within the first 5 days after hospital admission. RESULTS There were 252 patients admitted: 155 men (61.5%) and 97 women (38.5%), with a mean age of 69.1±13.8 years. Of these, 164 patients (77.6%) were admitted with an endotracheal tube (ET) and 62 (27.4%) with an AAD. We found that 36 out of a total of 80 respiratory secretion samples (45.0%) contained pathogenic microorganisms, with Staphylococcus aureus as the most common bacteria. Neither bacterial detection (p=0.765) nor survival rates (p=0.538) differed between patients admitted with ET and those with AAD. CONCLUSIONS Irrespective of increasing use of AAD, the incidence of EOP remains high. PMID:27295123

  17. Fever After Rewarming: Incidence of Pyrexia in Post-Cardiac Arrest Patients who have Undergone Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Michael N.; Boone, Myles D.; Giberson, Brandon; Giberson, Tyler; Farrell, Emily; Salciccioli, Justin D.; Talmor, Daniel; Williams, Donna; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia, or TH (temperature 32–34°C), has become standard of care in many hospitals for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Pyrexia, or fever, is known to be detrimental in patients with neurologic injuries such as stroke or trauma. The incidence of pyrexia in the post-rewarming phase of TH is unknown. We attempted to determine the incidence of fever after TH, and hypothesized that those patients who were febrile after rewarming would have worse clinical outcomes than those who maintained normothermia in the post-rewarming period. Methods Retrospective data analysis of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) over a period of 29 months (12/2007–4/2010). Inclusion criteria: OHCA, age > 18, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and treatment with TH. Exclusion criteria: traumatic arrest, pregnancy. Data collected included age, sex, neurologic outcome, mortality, and whether the patient developed a fever (temperature > 100.4°F, 38°C) within 24 hours after being fully rewarmed to a normal core body temperature after TH. We used simple descriptive statistics and Fisher’s exact test to report our findings. Results A total of 149 patients were identified; of these, 82 (55%) underwent TH. The mean age of the TH cohort was 66 years, and 28 (31%) were female. 54 patients survived for > 24 hours after rewarming and were included in the analysis. Among the analyzed cohort, 28/54 (52 %) developed fever within 24 hours after being rewarmed. Outcome measures included in-hospital mortality, as well as neurologic outcome as defined by a dichotomized Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score. 1, 2 When comparing neurologic outcomes between the groups, 16/28 (57%) in the post-rewarming fever group had a poor outcome (CPC score 3–5), while 15/26 (58%) in the no-fever group had a favorable outcome (P=0.62). In the fever group, 15/28 (52%) died, while in the no-fever group, 14/26 (54%) died (P=0.62). Conclusion

  18. Mechanical Chest Compressions in Prolonged Cardiac Arrest due to ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Can Cause Myocardial Contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stechovsky, Cyril; Hajek, Petr; Cipro, Simon; Veselka, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is a common cause of sudden cardiac death. We present a case report of a 60-year-old man without a history of coronary artery disease who presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During transportation to the hospital, he developed ventricular fibrillation (VF) and later pulseless electrical activity. Chest compressions with LUCAS 2 (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) automated mechanical compression-decompression device were initiated. Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the left main coronary artery and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed. After the PCI, his heart started to generate effective contractions and LUCAS could be discontinued. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved after 90 minutes of cardiac arrest. The patient died of cardiogenic shock 11 hours later. An autopsy revealed a transmural anterolateral myocardial infarction but also massive subepicardial hemorrhage and interstitial edema and hemorrhages on histologic samples from regions of the myocardium outside the infarction itself and also from the right ventricle. These lesions were concluded to be a myocardial contusion. The true incidence of myocardial contusion as a consequence of mechanical chest compressions is not known. We speculate that severe myocardial contusion might have influenced outcome of our patient. PMID:27574387

  19. A rare combination of undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed by intraoperative anaphylaxis resulting in acute left ventricular outflow obstruction and cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradford B; Nickels, Andrew S; Sviggum, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old female presented for left total hip reimplantation and suffered pulseless electrical activity arrest upon lateral positioning and administering vancomycin. Resuscitation was achieved according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocol. Post-event echocardiography showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with asymmetrical septal thickening, an under-filled left ventricle, dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction, and severe mitral regurgitation related to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. Laboratory analysis showed a tryptase level of 209 ng/mL. After multispecialty evaluation, it was concluded that the patient's arrest was due to vancomycin anaphylaxis in the setting of previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leading to acute left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. After medical optimization of the patient's cardiomyopathy and an evaluation of potential intraoperative allergic triggers, the patient underwent a successful hip reimplantation without incident. This case presents a novel combination of events leading to intraoperative cardiac arrest. Rapid identification and an understanding of the cause(s) of cardiac arrest in this setting are critical for effective perioperative care. PMID:27185714

  20. Cardiac Arrest following a Myocardial Infarction in a Child Treated with Methylphenidate

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Munk; Lise Gormsen; Won Yong Kim; Niels Holmark Andersen

    2015-01-01

    The use of psychostimulants labeled to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder increases. Among side effects these drugs raise blood pressure and heart rate, and the safety has been scrutinised in recent years. Data from large epidemiological studies, including over a million person-years, did not report any cases of myocardial infarction in current users of methylphenidate, and the risk of serious adverse cardiac events was not found to be increased. We present a case with an 11-year-...

  1. The early minutes of in-hospital cardiac arrest: Shock or CPR? A population based prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skogvoll Eirik

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives In the early minutes of cardiac arrest, timing of defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation during the basic life support phase (BLS CPR is debated. Aims of this study were to provide in-hospital incidence and outcome data, and to investigate the relation between outcome and time from collapse to defibrillation, time to BLS CPR, and CPR quality. Methods Resuscitation attempts during a 3-year period at St. Olav's University Hospital (960 beds were prospectively registered. The times between collapse and initiation of BLS CPR, and defibrillation were determined. CPR quality was assessed by the resuscitation team. The relation between these variables and outcome (short term survival and discharge was explored using non-parametric correlation and logistic regression. Results CPR was started in a total of 223 arrests, an incidence of 77 episodes per 1000 beds per year. Return of spontaneous circulation occurred in 40%, and 29 patients (13% survived to discharge. Median time from collapse to BLS CPR was 1 minute; CPR was judged to be of good quality in half of the episodes. CPR during the first 3 minutes in ventricular fibrillation (VF/VT was negatively associated with survival, but later proved beneficial. For patients with non-shockable rhythms, we found no association between outcome and time to BLS or CPR quality. Conclusion Our findings indicate that defibrillation should have priority during the first 3 minutes of VF/VT. Later, patients benefit from CPR in conjunction with defibrillation. Patients presenting with non-shockable rhythms have a grave prognosis, and the outcome was not associated with time to BLS or CPR quality.

  2. Combination of epinephrine with esmolol attenuates post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the β-adrenergic effect of epinephrine significantly increases the severity of post resuscitation myocardial dysfunction. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the short-acting β₁-selective adrenergic blocking agent, esmolol, would attenuate post resuscitation myocardial dysfunction in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: After 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation and 2 min of basic life support, 24 pigs were randomized to three groups (n = 8 per group, which received central venous injection of either epinephrine combined with esmolol (EE group, epinephrine (EP group, or saline (SA group. Hemodynamic status and blood samples were obtained at 0, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 360 min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Surviving pigs were euthanatized at 24 h after ROSC, and the hearts were removed for analysis by electron microscopy, Western blotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. Compared with the EP and SA groups, EE group had a better outcome in hemodynamic function, (improved dp/dt maxima and minima and cardiac output (P<0.05, and improved oxygen metabolism (oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption (P<0.05, which suggesting that EE can protect myocardial tissue from injury and improve post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction. The protective effect of EE also correlated with reducing cardiomyocyte apoptosis, evidenced by reducing TUNEL-positive cells, increasing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax ratio and suppression of caspase-3 activity in myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Esmolol, a short-acting β₁-selective adrenergic blocking agent, given during CPR has significant effects on attenuating post resuscitation myocardial dysfunction. The current study provides a potential pharmacologic target for post resuscitation myocardial dysfunction.

  3. Cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities for breast cancer patients after routine end-inspiration gated radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Specht, Lena; Nyström, Håkan; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aarup, Lasse Rye; Josipović, Mirjana

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of radiation doses to heart and lung can be achieved using breathing adaptation of adjuvant radiotherapy following conservative surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiobiological implications after routine use of an end......-inspiration gated treatment, and to compare the results with predictions based on pre-clinical CT-studies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen consecutive patients with axillary lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer were referred for adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. Treatment was performed...... observed. The corresponding cardiac and pulmonary complication risks are of the order of 1% and smaller....

  4. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Potential Prognostic Implications After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Substudy of the Target Temperature Management Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    -1β, interleukin-2, interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-6, interleukin-9, interleukin-10, interleukin-12, interleukin-13, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin were measured. Mortality at 30 days was evaluated by Cox analysis, and the predictive capability...... of inflammatory markers was evaluated by area under the curve. Level of all inflammatory markers changed significantly within 72 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (all p values<0.001), but only procalcitonin levels showed overall differences between nonsurvivors and survivors (p=0.0002). At...... baseline, interleukin-6 was independently associated with mortality, whereas both interleukin-6 levels (hazard ratio=1.23 [1.01-1.49]; p=0.04) and procalcitonin levels (hazard ratio=1.20 [1.03-1.39]; p=0.02) 24 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were associated with 30-day mortality with no...

  5. Iatrogenic hemorrhage from left umbilical vein after cardiac surgery: An unusual complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Chowdhry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative bleeding is a concern for all patients undergoing heart surgery, which could be due to surgical causes or coagulation disorder. The patients at risk for coagulopathy include those patients with complex or prolonged procedures, those exposed to preoperative anticoagulants and, to a lesser extent, patients with a preoperatively elevated prothrombin time and activated clotting time. However, intraabdominal bleeding after cardiac surgery is rare (0.3-2%. As the mortality rate of patients exposed to these complications is high (11-59%, timely recognition and prompt management is vital for patient′s safety and for avoidance of postoperative complications. Here, we present a case of free intraabdominal hemorrhage as sequelae of pacing wire insertion in open heart surgery and its successful management.

  6. Adverse events associated with poor neurological outcome during targeted temperature management and advanced critical care after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young-Min; Youn, Chun Song; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Byung Kook; Cho, In Soo; Cho, Gyu Chong; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Oh, Sang Hoon; Choi, Seung Pill; Shin, Jong Hwan; Cha, Kyoung-Chul; Oh, Joo Suk; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Park, Kyu Nam; ,

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the association of adverse events (AEs) during targeted temperature management (TTM) and other AEs and concomitant treatments during the advanced critical care period with poor neurological outcome at hospital discharge in adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Methods This was a retrospective study using Korean Hypothermia Network registry data of adult OHCA patients treated with TTM in 24 teaching hospitals throughout Sout...

  7. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Soo Kyung; Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain c...

  8. Choice of hospital after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - a decision with far-reaching consequences: a study in a large German city

    OpenAIRE

    Wnent, Jan; Seewald, Stephan; Heringlake, Matthias; Lemke, Hans; Brauer, Kirk; Lefering, Rolf; Fischer, Matthias; Jantzen, Tanja; Bein, Berthold; Messelken, Martin; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Between 1 and 31% of patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survive to discharge from hospital. International studies have shown that the level of care provided by the admitting hospital determines survival for patients suffering from OHCA. These data may only be partially transferable to the German medical system where responders are in-field emergency medical physicians. The present study determines the influence of the emergency physician's choice of admittin...

  9. Better management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest increases survival rate and improves neurological outcome in the Swiss Canton Ticino

    OpenAIRE

    Mauri, Romano; Burkart, Roman; Benvenuti, Claudio; Caputo, Maria Luce; Moccetti, Tiziano; Del Bufalo, Alessandro; Gallino, Augusto; Casso, Carlo; Anselmi, Luciano; Cassina, Tiziano; Klersy, Catherine; Auricchio, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) fulfilling Utstein criteria in the Canton Ticino, Switzerland, the survival rate of OHCA patients and their neurological outcome. Methods and results All OHCAs treated in Canton Ticino between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2014 were followed until either death or hospital discharge. The survival and neurological outcome of those OHCA fulfilling Utstein criteria are reported. A total of 3367 OHCAs occurred in the Canton T...

  10. A Patient With Blunt Trauma and Cardiac Arrest Arriving Pulseless at the Emergency Department; is that Enough Reason to Stop Resuscitation? Review of Literature and Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Northcutt, Ashley; Youssef, Asser M.

    2013-01-01

    The decision to stop or continue resuscitation in a patient with blunt trauma and cardiac arrest arriving pulseless to the hospital has always been controversial. While many authors still believe that it is a futile effort, with no chance of success for complete neurological recovery, some recent reports have challenged the idea. Here we report complete recovery of a severely injured patient following a motor vehicle accident who lost vital signs completely before arrival at our trauma center...

  11. Sildenafil Protects against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Following Cardiac Arrest in a Porcine Model: Possible Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    OpenAIRE

    Guoxing Wang; Qian Zhang; Wei Yuan; Junyuan Wu; Chunsheng Li

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sold as Viagra, is a cardioprotector against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Our study explored whether sildenafil protects against I/R-induced damage in a porcine cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR) model via modulating the renin-angiotensin system. Male pigs were randomly divided to three groups: Sham group, Saline group, and sildenafil (0.5 mg/kg) group. Thirty min after drug infusion, ventricular fibrillation (8 min) and cardiop...

  12. Load-distributing band improves ventilation and hemodynamics during resuscitation in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR has great potential for the clinical setting. The purpose of present study is to compare the hemodynamics and ventilation during and after the load-distributing band CPR, versus the manual CPR in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, and to investigate the influence of rescue breathing in different CPR protocols. Methods Sixty-four male pigs (n = 16/group, weighing 30 ± 2 kg, were induced ventricular fibrillation and randomized into four resuscitation groups: continuous load-distributing band CPR without rescue ventilation (C-CPR, load-distributing band 30:2 CPR (A-CPR, load-distributing band CPR with continuous rescue breathing (10/min (V-CPR or manual 30:2 CPR (M-CPR. Respiratory variables and hemodynamics were recorded continuously; blood gas was analyzed. Results Tidal volume produced by compressions in the A-, C- and V-CPR groups were significantly higher compared with the M-CPR group (all p 2 of the A-, C- and V-CPR groups were significantly higher and PaCO2 were significantly lower compared with the M-CPR (both p  Conclusions The load-distributing band CPR significantly improved respiratory parameters during resuscitation by augmenting passive ventilation, and significantly improved coronary perfusion pressure. The volume of ventilation produced by the load-distributing band CPR was adequate to maintain sufficient gas exchange independent of rescue breathing.

  13. Acute myocarditis in dengue hemorrhagic fever: a case report and review of cardiac complications in dengue-affected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Lee, Wen-Huei; Liu, Jien-Wei; Yang, Kuender D

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) complicated by acute myocarditis and review the literature. A 65-year-old woman experienced DHF due to dengue virus serotype 3, complicated with acute myocarditis and acute pulmonary edema. Clinically this masqueraded as acute myocardial infarction, with an electrocardiographically depressed ST segment in precordial leads and elevated serum cardiac-specific troponin I level. Under supportive management, the patient recovered 3 days later. A total of 18 pertinent articles involving 339 dengue-affected patients with cardiac complications were found by PubMed search. Clinical manifestations of cardiac complications varied considerably, from self-limiting tachy-brady arrhythmia to severe myocardial damage, leading to hypotension and pulmonary edema. Although rare, a fatal outcome was reported in some cases of dengue with cardiac complications. To avoid otherwise preventable morbidity and mortality, physicians should have a high index of suspicion for cardiac complications in patients with dengue illness and should manage this accordingly. PMID:20851651

  14. X-ray diagnosis and treatment for severe respiratory complications during cardiac catheterizations on pediatric congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the radiological features of severe respiratory complications during cardiac catheterizations on pediatric congenital heart disease so as to make early diagnosis and treatment. We also intend to find the mechanism of these complications. Methods: A total of 9 pediatric cases with severe respiratory complications during cardiac catheterizations were included in the study. The clinical manifestations, radiological features, and corresponding treatments were reviewed. Results: Most of the cases had severe hypoxia, with 6 cases presenting with bradycardia. Opacification of two lung fields was found in 7 cases, pulmonary edema in 1 case, and atelectasis of the upper right lung in 1 case. With intubation, oxygen inhalation and administration of certain drugs, all cases were saved except 1 case with pulmonary edema. Conclusion: Severe respiratory complications during cardiac catheterizations on pediatric congenital heart disease are emergent and critical, and they often presented with various manifestations. Early diagnosis and correct treatment are the key to successful salvage. (authors)

  15. Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C Versus 36°C and Impact on Systemic Vascular Resistance and Myocardial Function After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Hassager, Christian; Wanscher, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular dysfunction is common after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest as part of the postcardiac arrest syndrome, and hypothermia may pose additional impact on hemodynamics. The aim was to investigate systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), cardiac index, and myocardial perform...... because of lower heart rate with unaffected left ventricular systolic function compared with 36°C. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01020916....

  16. Probabilities of Pulmonary and Cardiac Complications and Radiographic Parameters in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, O Kyu; Paek, Sung Ho; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang Wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Jong Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the relationship between the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of 3- dimensional (3-D) radiotherapy and the radiographic parameters of 2-dimensional (2-D) radiotherapy such as central lung distance (CLD) and maximal heart distance (MHD). We analyzed 110 patients who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. A two-field tangential technique, a three-field technique, and the reverse hockey stick method were used. The radiation dose administered to whole breast or the chest wall was 50.4 Gy, whereas a 45 Gy was administered to the supraclavicular field. The NTCPs of the heart and lung were calculated by the modified Lyman model and the relative seriality model. For all patients, the NTCPs of radiation-induced pneumonitis and cardiac mortality were 0.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis was higher in patients treated with the reverse hockey stick method than in those treated by other two techniques (0.0%, 0.0%, 3.1%, p<0.001). The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis increased with CLD. The NTCP of cardiac mortality increased with MHD (R2=0.808). We found a close correlation between the NTCP of 3-D radiotherapy and 2-D radiographic parameters. Our results are useful to reanalyze the previous 2-D based clinical reports about breast radiation therapy complications as a viewpoint of NTCP.

  17. The course of circulatory and cerebral recovery after circulatory arrest: influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, E O; Holm, S

    1999-11-01

    We evaluated the influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors on circulatory and neurological recovery for up to 1 year following circulatory arrest of cardio-pulmonary aetiology in 231 patients. Initially, all patients were unconscious and 106 had some cortical activity recorded in the immediate post-resuscitation EEG (Group I), while 125 had no such activity initially (Group II). The following variables were explored: age, sex, medical history, cause and location of arrest, initial cardiac dysrhythmia, duration of life support, metabolic acidosis, pulse-pressure product and heart pump function capacity early after resuscitation. Outcome measures were duration and quality of circulatory survival, cause of death, neurological recovery and ultimate outcome. First year survival was 33% in Group I and 16% in Group II. Severe heart failure and brain death occurred mainly in Group II. Circulatory recovery was negatively influenced by out-of-hospital arrest, metabolic acidosis and pulse-pressure products below 150. Neurological recovery was negatively influenced by initial dysrhythmias other than ventricular fibrillation, pulse-pressure products below 150, post-arrest heart failure and/or pulmonary complications. It seems that circulatory and cerebral outcomes are mainly determined by the global ischaemic insults sustained during the circulatory arrest period. PMID:10625157

  18. Physician presence in an ambulance car is associated with increased survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective cohort analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Hagihara

    Full Text Available The presence of a physician seems to be beneficial for pre-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the effectiveness of a physician's presence during CPR before hospital arrival has not been established. We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests between 2005 and 2010 in Japan. We performed a propensity analysis and examined the association between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and short- and long-term survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Specifically, a full non-parsimonious logistic regression model was fitted with the physician presence in the ambulance as the dependent variable; the independent variables included all study variables except for endpoint variables plus dummy variables for the 47 prefectures in Japan (i.e., 46 variables. In total, 619,928 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Among propensity-matched patients, a positive association was observed between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC before hospital arrival, 1-month survival, and 1-month survival with minimal neurological or physical impairment (ROSC: OR = 1.84, 95% CI 1.63-2.07, p = 0.00 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; 1-month survival: OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.61, p = 0.02 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; cerebral performance category (1 or 2: OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.03-2.29, p = 0.04 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; and overall performance category (1 or 2: OR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.01-2.24, p = 0.05 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates. A prospective observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests shows that a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride was independently associated with

  19. A knowledge translation collaborative to improve the use of therapeutic hypothermia in post-cardiac arrest patients: protocol for a stepped wedge randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wax Randy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in resuscitation science have dramatically improved survival rates following cardiac arrest. However, about 60% of adults that regain spontaneous circulation die before leaving the hospital. Recently it has been shown that inducing hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors immediately following their arrival in hospital can dramatically improve both overall survival and neurological outcomes. Despite the strong evidence for its efficacy and the apparent simplicity of this intervention, recent surveys show that therapeutic hypothermia is delivered inconsistently, incompletely, and often with delay. Methods and design This study will evaluate a multi-faceted knowledge translation strategy designed to increase the utilization rate of induced hypothermia in survivors of cardiac arrest across a network of 37 hospitals in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. The study is designed as a stepped wedge randomized trial lasting two years. Individual hospitals will be randomly assigned to four different wedges that will receive the active knowledge translation strategy according to a sequential rollout over a number of time periods. By the end of the study, all hospitals will have received the intervention. The primary aim is to measure the effectiveness of a multifaceted knowledge translation plan involving education, reminders, and audit-feedback for improving the use of induced hypothermia in survivors of cardiac arrest presenting to the emergency department. The primary outcome is the proportion of eligible OHCA patients that are cooled to a body temperature of 32 to 34°C within six hours of arrival in the hospital. Secondary outcomes will include process of care measures and clinical outcomes. Discussion Inducing hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors immediately following their arrival to hospital has been shown to dramatically improve both overall survival and neurological outcomes. However, this lifesaving treatment is

  20. Embryonic Lethality Due to Arrested Cardiac Development in Psip1/Hdgfrp2 Double-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF related protein 2 (HRP2 and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75 are closely related members of the HRP2 protein family. LEDGF/p75 has been implicated in numerous human pathologies including cancer, autoimmunity, and infectious disease. Knockout of the Psip1 gene, which encodes for LEDGF/p75 and the shorter LEDGF/p52 isoform, was previously shown to cause perinatal lethality in mice. The function of HRP2 was by contrast largely unknown. To learn about the role of HRP2 in development, we knocked out the Hdgfrp2 gene, which encodes for HRP2, in both normal and Psip1 knockout mice. Hdgfrp2 knockout mice developed normally and were fertile. By contrast, the double deficient mice died at approximate embryonic day (E 13.5. Histological examination revealed ventricular septal defect (VSD associated with E14.5 double knockout embryos. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanism(s, RNA recovered from ventricular tissue was subjected to RNA-sequencing on the Illumina platform. Bioinformatic analysis revealed several genes and biological pathways that were significantly deregulated by the Psip1 knockout and/or Psip1/Hdgfrp2 double knockout. Among the dozen genes known to encode for LEDGF/p75 binding factors, only the expression of Nova1, which encodes an RNA splicing factor, was significantly deregulated by the knockouts. However the expression of other RNA splicing factors, including the LEDGF/p52-interacting protein ASF/SF2, was not significantly altered, indicating that deregulation of global RNA splicing was not a driving factor in the pathology of the VSD. Tumor growth factor (Tgf β-signaling, which plays a key role in cardiac morphogenesis during development, was the only pathway significantly deregulated by the double knockout as compared to control and Psip1 knockout samples. We accordingly speculate that deregulated Tgf-β signaling was a contributing factor to the VSD and prenatal lethality

  1. Fibromuscular Dysplasia Leading to Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection with Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Bajwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old previously healthy female, who was six-week postpartum, experienced sudden collapse and tonic-clonic seizure. Emergency medicine services arrived at the scene and the patient was found to be in ventricular fibrillation. Advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS was initiated with return of spontaneous circulation. Afterwards, her initial EKG showed atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular rate, ST elevation in leads II, III, and aVF, and ST depression in V2–V4. She was transferred to a tertiary care hospital where emergent angiogram was performed revealing obstruction of blood flow in the proximal and mid right coronary artery (RCA. A hazy and irregularly contoured appearance of the RCA was consistent with diagnosis of fibromuscular dysplasia. Subsequently, intravascular ultrasonogram (IVUS was performed which confirmed the diagnosis of RCA dissection. Successful revascularization of the RCA was performed using two bare mental stents. After a complicated course in hospital, she was discharged in stable condition and did very well overall.

  2. Out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest due to penetrating cardiac injury treated by percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in the emergency room: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Kano, Hitoshi; Yama, Naoya; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Asai, Yasufumi

    2007-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac injury tends to generally be repaired without cardiopulmonary bypass in the operating room. We herein report the case of penetrating cardiac injury repaired using percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in an emergency room. A 57-year-old man attempted suicide by stabbing himself in the left anterior chest with a knife. Although the patient suffered cardiopulmonary arrest for 7 min in the ambulance, spontaneous circulation was restored following pericardiotomy through emergency left thoracotomy in the emergency room. To prevent coronary artery injury and control the massive bleeding, percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was instituted without systemic heparinization and the cardiac injury was repaired in the emergency room. The patient was then transferred to another hospital on day 46 for further rehabilitation. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support might be helpful for treating critical patients in an emergency room, even in the case of trauma patients. PMID:17342366

  3. Epidemiological and Survival Trends of Pediatric Cardiac Arrests in Emergency Departments in Korea: A Cross-sectional, Nationwide Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Yun; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Hyun; Yoon, Han Deok; Jang, Hye Young

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) in children is associated with high mortality rates. In Korea, cohort studies regarding the outcomes of pediatric CAs are lacking, especially in emergency departments (EDs) or in-hospital settings. This study was conducted to examine the trends in epidemiology and survival outcomes in children with resuscitation-attempted CAs using data from a cross-sectional, national, ED-based clinical registry. We extracted cases in which cardiopulmonary resuscitation and/or manual defibrillation were performed according to treatment codes using the National Emergency Department Information System (NEDIS) from 2008 to 2012. The total number of ED visits registered in the NEDIS during the 5-yr evaluation period was 20,424,530; among these, there were 2,970 resuscitation-attempted CAs in children. The annual rates of pediatric CAs per 1,000 ED visits showed an upward trend from 2.81 in 2009 to 3.62 in 2012 (P for trend = 0.045). The median number of estimated pediatric CAs at each ED was 7.8 (25th to 75th percentile, 4 to 13) per year. The overall rates for admission survival and discharge survival were 35.2% and 12.8%, respectively. The survival outcome of adults increased substantially over the past 5 yr (11.8% in 2008, 11.7% in 2010, and 13.6% in 2012; P for trend = 0.001); however, the results for children did not improve (13.6% in 2008, 11.4% in 2010, and 13.7% in 2012; P for trend = 0.870). Conclusively, we found that the overall incidence of pediatric CAs in EDs increased substantially over the past 5 yr, but without significantly higher survival outcomes. PMID:26339179

  4. Assessment of the Efficacy of Pulsed Biphasic Defibrillation Shocks for Treatment of Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Didon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the efficacy of a Pulsed Biphasic Waveform (PBW for treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients in ventricular fibrillation (VF. Large database (2001-2006, collected with automated external defibrillators (AED, (FRED®, Schiller Medical SAS, France, is processed.In Study1 we compared the defibrillation efficacy of two energy stacks (90-130-180 J vs. (130-130-180 J in 248 OHCA VF patients. The analysis of the first shock PBW efficacy proves that energies as low as 90 J are able to terminate VF in a large proportion of OHCA patients (77% at 5 s and 69% at 30 s. Although the results show a trend towards the benefit of higher energy PBW with 130 J (86% at 5 s, 73% at 30 s, the difference in shock efficacy does not reach statistical significance. Both PBW energy stacks (90-130-180 J and (130-130-180 J achieve equal success rates of defibrillation. Analysis of the post-shock rhythm after the first shock is also provided.For Study2 of 21 patients with PBW shocks (130-130-180 J, we assessed some attending OHCA circumstances: call-to-shock delay (median 16min, range 11-41 min, phone advices of CPR (67%. About 50% of the patients were admitted alive to hospital, and 19% were discharged from hospital. After the first shock, patients admitted to hospital are more often presenting organized rhythm (OR (27% to 55% than patients not admitted (0% to 10%, with significant difference at 15 s and 30 s. Post-shock VFs appear significantly rare until 15s for patients admitted to hospital (0% to 9% than for patients not admitted to hospital (40% to 50%. Return of OR (ROOR and efficacy to defibrillate VF at 5 s and 15 s with first shock are important markers to predict patient admission to hospital.

  5. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kei; Ochi, Satoko; Enatsu, Rei; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Shuji; Tanno, Katsuhiko; Narimatsu, Eichi; Maekawa, Kunihiko; Usui, Keiko; Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2016-05-15

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9-52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24-45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5-30; IQR, 3-21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4-38; IQR, 6-32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention. PMID:26948699

  6. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYATA, Kei; OCHI, Satoko; ENATSU, Rei; WANIBUCHI, Masahiko; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro; INOUE, Hiroyuki; UEMURA, Shuji; TANNO, Katsuhiko; NARIMATSU, Eichi; MAEKAWA, Kunihiko; USUI, Keiko; MIZOBUCHI, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9–52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24–45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5–30; IQR, 3–21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4–38; IQR, 6–32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention. PMID:26948699

  7. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Palomino Doza, Julián; Ortega, Ángeles; Macías-Ruiz, Rosa; Perin, Francesca; Rodríguez-Vázquez del Rey, M. Mar; Ortiz-Genga, Martín; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Blanca, Enrique; Álvarez, Miguel; Tercedor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF). Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available. Objectives The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death. Methods Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing. Results The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect. Conclusions Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation. PMID:27100291

  8. Fontan procedure: imaging of normal post-surgical anatomy and the spectrum of cardiac and extracardiac complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Univentricular congenital heart diseases include a range of entities that result in a functionally single ventricular chamber. Although the only curative therapy is cardiac transplantation, there are several palliative surgical techniques that prevent ventricular volume overload, diverting part or all the systemic venous circulation into the pulmonary arteries. The modern Fontan procedure, which consists of anastomosing both the superior (SVC) and inferior vena cava (IVC) to the right pulmonary artery (RPA), is nowadays the last step before transplantation. The importance of imaging in these entities lies not only in the understanding of the new circuit established after surgical correction, but also in the early detection of the wide spectrum of cardiac and extracardiac complications that can occur due to the new physiological condition. Due to the increased survival of these patients, long-term complications are becoming more common. The main cardiac complications are atrial enlargement, ventricular dysfunction, and stenosis or thrombosis of the conduit. Pulmonary artery stenosis, pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae (PAVF), systemic-pulmonary veno venous shunts (VVS), hepatic congestion, cardiac cirrhosis, and protein-losing enteropathy are potential extracardiac complications. - Highlights: • Fontan procedure is the main palliative surgical procedure for univentricular heart correction. • Fontan procedure entails the anastomosis of SVC and IVC to the RPA. • Complications are becoming more common due to the increased survival of patients with Fontan

  9. Preoperative protein and energy intake and postoperative complications in well-nourished, non-hospitalized elderly cardiac surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.W. van Venrooij; P.A.M. van Leeuwen; R. de Vos; M.M.M.J. Borgmeijer-Hoelen; B.A.J.M. de Mol

    2009-01-01

    Background & aims: Little is known about the impact of preoperative protein or energy intake in relation to the occurrence of postoperative complications in patients who are not undernourished but cannot keep up their daily protein or energy requirements prior to cardiac surgery. Therefore, a prospe

  10. Effect of different resuscitation strategies on post-resuscitation brain damage in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Wei; Hou Xiaomin; Li Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Background The choice of a defibrillation or a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-first strategy in the treatment of prolonged cardiac arrest (CA) is still controversial.The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of defibrillation or CPR administered first on neurological prognostic markers in a porcine model of prolonged CA.Methods After 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation (VF),24 inbred Chinese Wuzhishan minipigs were randomized to receive either defibrillation first (ID group,n=12) or chest compression first (IC group,n=12).In the ID group,a shock was delivered immediately.If defibrillation failed to attain restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC),manual chest compressions were rapidly initiated at a rate of 100 compressions/min and a compression-to-ventilation ratio of 30:2.If VF persisted after five cycles of CPR,a second defibrillation attempt was made.In the IC group,chest compressions were delivered first,followed by a shock.After successful ROSC,hemodynamic status and blood samples were obtained at 0.5,1,2,4,6,and 24 hours after ROSC.Porcine-specific neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100B were measured from sera using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.Porcine cerebral performance category scores were used to evaluate preliminary neurological function following 24 hours recovery.Surviving pigs were sacrificed at 24 hours after ROSC and brains were removed for electron microscopy analysis.Results The number of shocks,total defibrillation energy,and time to ROSC were significantly lower in the ID group compared with the IC group.Compared with the IC group,S100B expression was decreased at 2 and 4 hours after ROSC,and NSE expression decreased at 6 and 24 hours after ROSC in the ID group.Brain tissue analysis showed that injury was attenuated in the ID group compared with the IC group.There were no significant differences between 6 and 24 hours survival rates.Conclusion Defibrillation first may result in a shorter time to ROSC and

  11. Early repolarization with horizontal ST segment may be associated with aborted sudden cardiac arrest: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk stratification of the early repolarization pattern (ERP is needed to identify malignant early repolarization. J-point elevation with a horizontal ST segment was recently suggested as a malignant feature of the ERP. In this study, the prevalence of the ERP with a horizontal ST segment was examined among survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA without structural heart disease to evaluate the value of ST-segment morphology in risk stratification of the ERP. Methods We reviewed the data of 83 survivors of SCA who were admitted from August 2005 to August 2010. Among them, 25 subjects without structural heart disease were included. The control group comprised 60 healthy subjects who visited our health promotion center; all control subjects were matched for age, sex, and underlying disease (diabetes mellitus, hypertension. Early repolarization was defined as an elevation of the J point of at least 0.1 mV above the baseline in at least two continuous inferior or lateral leads that manifested as QRS slurring or notching. An ST-segment pattern of Results The SCA group included 17 men (64% with a mean age of 49.7 ± 14.5 years. The corrected QTc was not significantly different between the SCA and control groups (432.7 ± 37.96 vs. 420.4 ± 26.3, respectively; p = 0.089. The prevalence of ERP was not statistically different between the SCA and control groups (5/25, 20% vs. 4/60, 6.7%, respectively; p = 0.116. The prevalence of early repolarization with a horizontal ST segment was more frequent in the SCA than in the control group (20% vs. 3.3%, respectively; p = 0.021. Four SCA subjects (16% and one control subject (1.7% had a J-point elevation of >2 mm (p = 0.025. Four SCA subjects (16% and one (1.7% control subject had an ERP in the inferior lead (p = 0.025. Conclusion The prevalence of ERP with a horizontal ST segment was higher in patients with aborted SCA than in matched controls. This result suggests that ST morphology has

  12. Blinded Evaluation of Combination Drug Therapy for Prolonged Ventricular Fibrillation Using a Swine Model of Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Timothy J; Coute, Ryan A; Kellogg, Adam R; Nathanson, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    Despite experimental evidence supporting the use of resuscitation drugs in the treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (CA), there are no good human clinical data to support the decades-old practice of giving these medications during out-of-hospital CA resuscitation. We hypothesized that the lack of efficacy in clinical practice in ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the failure-based manner in which resuscitation drugs have historically been administered (one at a time interspersed with chest compressions and a defibrillation attempt, giving the next only if the previous one was ineffective). The aim of this study was to determine if giving and circulating a combination of commonly available, historically used resuscitation drugs together, prior to the first defibrillation attempt after prolonged VF, might improve short-term outcomes compared with the failure-based serial drug approach used in the past. We used a well-established swine model of sudden prolonged untreated VF. Animals were randomized to receive epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg), vasopressin (0.5 U/kg), amiodarone (4 mg/kg), and sodium bicarbonate (1.0 mEq/kg) in series (SERIES group [n = 53]) or a combination of epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg), vasopressin (0.5 U/kg), amiodarone (4 mg/kg), sodium bicarbonate (1.0 mEq/kg), and metoprolol (0.2 mg/kg) (COCKTAIL group) delivered in rapid succession at the beginning of the attempted resuscitation (n = 27). Data were analyzed descriptively. Baseline characteristics and chemistries between the two groups were the same. Termination of VF was statistically similar in the two groups: 88.7% (47/53) versus 85.2% (23/27) p = 0.66, with an adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) of 0.94 (0.37, 1.15). However, ROSC was higher in the SERIES group (56.6% [30/53] versus 22.2% [6/27], adjusted RRR = 2.83; [1.16, 3.84] p = 0.029) as was 20-minute survival (52.8% [28/53] versus 18.5% [5/27], adjusted RRR = 3.15 [1.14, 4.54] p = 0.032). The combination of drugs studied, at these dosages

  13. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in a 34-year-old patient with eating disorders and after the third sudden cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Orzechowski, Piotr; Bilinska, Maria; Przybylski, Andrzej; Szumowski, Lukasz; Piotrowicz, Ryszard

    2015-03-01

    Eating disorders (ED) such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia are psychiatric diseases associated with the highest mortality rate of any other psychiatric disorders. More recently, long-term outcome studies with follow-up of over 20 years report a mortality of between 15% and 18% (Casiero and Frishman, Cardiol Rev 14(5), 227, 2006). The sudden death secondary to arrhythmias is often the cause of death in these patients (Casiero and Frishman, Cardiol Rev 14(5), 227, 2006). A case of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia (VA) in a patient with ED is presented. Clinical records (cardiologic, psychiatric), electrocardiograms, echocardiogram, coronary angiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance, and endocrine diagnostics were performed. Finally a cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was implanted in the patient after her third cardiac arrest. An optimal approach to antiarrhythmic therapy in such patients is a real challenge for a cardiologist. PMID:24535846

  14. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  15. Application and Nursing of Pulse Index Continuous Cardiac Output Monitoring in Patients with Post-cardiac Arrest Syndrome%脉波指示剂连续心排血量监测在心搏骤停后综合征患者中的应用与护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈淑兰; 刘刚; 张秋真; 陈秋恋

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application effect and nursing of the pulse index continuous cardiac output (PICCO) monitoring technique in patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS). Methods The precautions and nursing points were developed for the flowsheet of operation, cooperation for the vein catheterization and measurements. Results Of the 15 patients using the PICCO monitoring technique in early stage,no complication occurred ,except one patient died of multiple organ failure and 3 abandoned the treatment,and the rest 11 patients survived. Conclusion PCAS patients undergoing PICCO monitoring device in the early stage can efficiently assist the fluid management,maintain the vital signs of the patients,and save their lives.%目的 探讨脉波指示剂连续心排血量监测( pulse index continuous cardiac output,PICCO)在心搏骤停后综合征(postcardiac arrest syndrome,PCAS)患者中的应用效果及护理.方法 制定操作流程、置管配合、测量的注意事项和护理要点.结果 15例患者通过早期采用了PICCO监测,并采取了相应的护理措施,均未出现并发症,除了1例患者因多器官功能衰竭死亡外,3例患者放弃治疗,其余11例患者均存活.结论 对PCAS患者早期进行PICCO监测,能对患者进行更准确的血流动力学监测,可以有效协助液体管理,维持患者生命体征的稳定,挽救患者生命.

  16. Long QT Syndrome Leading to Multiple Cardiac Arrests After Posaconazole Administration in an Immune-Compromised Patient with Sepsis: An Unusual Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panos, George; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Tylianakis, Minos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We present the case of a septic patient with severe immunodeficiency, who developed QT interval prolongation followed by episodes of lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Cardiac events occurred after posaconazole administration, incriminating posaconazole use, alone or in combination with voriconazole, as the culpable agent. CASE REPORT A 26-year-old female patient underwent orthopedic surgery to remove ectopic calcifications in her left hip joint. On the first post-operative day she became septic due to a surgical wound infection. Despite being treated according to the therapeutic protocols for sepsis, no clinical improvement was noticed and further assessment revealed an underlying immunodeficiency. Considering the underlying immunodeficiency and to that point poor clinical response, an antifungal agent was added to the antibiotic regiment. Following discontinuation of multiple antifungal agents due to adverse effects, posaconazole was administered. Posaconazole oral intake was followed by episodes of bradycardia and QT interval prolongation. The patient suffered continuous incidents of cardiac arrest due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsades des pointes) that degenerated to lethal ventricular fibrillation. Posaconazole was immediately discontinued and a temporary pacemaker was installed. The patient finally recovered without any neurological deficit, and was discharged in a good clinical status. CONCLUSIONS Close cardiac monitoring is recommended in cases where posaconazole administration is combined with coexisting risk factors, as they may lead to severe ECG abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT interval syndrome and torsades de pointes. Posaconazole interactions with medications metabolized via the CYP3A4 pathway should be considered an additional risk factor for lethal cardiac incidents. PMID:27125217

  17. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF. PMID:25503659

  18. Gastroscopy-related adverse cardiac events and bleeding complications among patients treated with coronary stents and dual antiplatelet therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egholm, Gro; Thim, Troels; Madsen, Morten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Pedersen, Jan Bech; Eggert Jensen, Svend; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Maeng, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is recommended following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent (DES). DAPT is a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to quantify (1) the rate of gastroscopy within 12 months after PCI, (2) the rate of adverse cardiac events and gastroscopy-related bleeding complications within 30 days of gastroscopy, and (3) the association between antiplatelet therapy and these events. Patients and methods: Patients receiving gastroscopy within 12 months of PCI were identified and two nested case-control analyses were performed within the PCI cohort by linking Danish medical registries. Cases were patients with adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or stent thrombosis) or hemostatic intervention. In both studies, controls were patients with gastroscopy including biopsy without adverse cardiac events and hemostatic intervention, respectively. Medical records were reviewed to obtain information on exposure to DAPT. Results: We identified 22 654 PCI patients of whom 1497 patients (6.6 %) underwent gastroscopy. Twenty-two patients (1.5 %) suffered an adverse cardiac event, 93 patients (6.2 %) received hemostatic intervention during or within 30 days of the index gastroscopy. Interrupting DAPT was associated with a 3.46 times higher risk of adverse cardiac events (95 %CI 0.49 – 24.7). Discontinuation of one antiplatelet agent did not increase the risk (OR 0.65, 95 %CI 0.17 – 2.47). No hemostatic interventions were caused by endoscopic complications. Conclusion: Gastroscopy can be safely performed in PCI patients treated with DES and single antiplatelet therapy while interruption of DAPT may be associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiac events. PMID:27227109

  19. STAPHYLOCOCCAL MEDIASTINITIS – A RARE COMPLICATION FOLLOWING CARDIAC SURGERY A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina Butcovan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Mediastinitis is a rare infection following cardiac surgery and is associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The reported rate of post-sternotomy mediastinitis is between 0.8 and 2.3%, with up to 79% of cases caused by staphylococci. Obesity and diabetes are the risk factors consistently involved. We present a case of staphylococcal mediastinitis diagnosed at Cardiovascular Disease Institute Iaşi as a complication of cardiac surgery. We present the clinical and morphological picture of staphylococcal post-sternotomy mediastinitis; we also performed a review of the literature data about its management.

  20. Preoperative intervention reduces postoperative pulmonary complications but not length of stay in cardiac surgical patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Snowdon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Question: Does preoperative intervention in people undergoing cardiac surgery reduce pulmonary complications, shorten length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU or hospital, or improve physical function? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of (quasi randomised trials. Participants: People undergoing coronary artery bypass grafts and/or valvular surgery. Intervention: Any intervention, such as education, inspiratory muscle training, exercise training or relaxation, delivered prior to surgery to prevent/reduce postoperative pulmonary complications or to hasten recovery of function. Outcome measures: Time to extubation, length of stay in ICU and hospital (reported in days. Postoperative pulmonary complications and physical function were measured as reported in the included trials. Results: The 17 eligible trials reported data on 2689 participants. Preoperative intervention significantly reduced the time to extubation (MD -0.14 days, 95% CI -0.26 to -0.01 and the relative risk of developing postoperative pulmonary complications (RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.66. However, it did not significantly affect the length of stay in ICU (MD -0.15 days, 95% CI -0.37 to 0.08 or hospital (MD -0.55 days, 95% CI -1.32 to 0.23, except among older participants (MD -1.32 days, 95% CI -2.36 to -0.28. When the preoperative interventions were separately analysed, inspiratory muscle training significantly reduced postoperative pulmonary complications and the length of stay in hospital. Trial quality ranged from good to poor and considerable heterogeneity was present in the study features. Other outcomes did not significantly differ. Conclusion: For people undergoing cardiac surgery, preoperative intervention reduces the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications and, in older patients, the length of stay in hospital. [Snowdon D, Haines TP, Skinner EH (2014 Preoperative intervention reduces postoperative pulmonary complications but not length of stay in

  1. Gastroscopy-related adverse cardiac events and bleeding complications among patients treated with coronary stents and dual antiplatelet therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egholm, Gro; Thim, Troels; Madsen, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    of adverse cardiac events and gastroscopy-related bleeding complications within 30 days of gastroscopy, and (3) the association between antiplatelet therapy and these events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients receiving gastroscopy within 12 months of PCI were identified and two nested case......BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is recommended following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent (DES). DAPT is a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to quantify (1) the rate of gastroscopy within 12 months after PCI, (2) the rate......-control analyses were performed within the PCI cohort by linking Danish medical registries. Cases were patients with adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or stent thrombosis) or hemostatic intervention. In both studies, controls were patients with gastroscopy including biopsy without...

  2. The relationship between cerebral oxygen saturation changes and post operative neurologic complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the relationship between cerebral oxygen saturation changes and postoperative neurologic complications. Seventy two adult patients with ASA class II, III who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery, were randomized into three groups: Group I: with CPB (on -pump) Group II: without CPB (off- pump) Group III: valve surgery. Neuropsychological outcome was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Cerebral oxygen saturation was also measured. There was no statistical difference in desaturation of more than 20% among three groups (P=0.113) but it was significant between group I and II (P=0.042). Changes of rSo/sub 2/ in different hours of surgery was significant in group I and group II (P=0.0001 in both) but it was not significant in group III ( P=0.075) . Although cerebral oximetry is a noninvasive and useful method of monitoring during cardiac surgery, it has low accuracy to determine postoperative neurologic complications. (author)

  3. Gastroscopy-related adverse cardiac events and bleeding complications among patients treated with coronary stents and dual antiplatelet therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Egholm, Gro; Thim, Troels; Madsen, Morten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Pedersen, Jan Bech; Eggert Jensen, Svend; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Maeng, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is recommended following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent (DES). DAPT is a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to quantify (1) the rate of gastroscopy within 12 months after PCI, (2) the rate of adverse cardiac events and gastroscopy-related bleeding complications within 30 days of gastroscopy, and (3) the association between antiplatelet therapy and these events. Patients and methods: ...

  4. Cerebrovascular Complications After Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejaldre, Aída; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Santos, Miguel Ángel; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Neurological complications in orthotopic heart transplantation represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite successful transplantation. The most frequent perioperative neurological complications are delirium or encephalopathy. In this period cerebrovascular complication ranges between 5-11%. After the perioperative period, the 5-year stroke risk after cardiac transplantation is 4.1%. In a retrospective study conducted with 314 patients who underwent cardiac transplantation, it was found that 20% of cerebrovascular complications occurred within the first two weeks after transplantation, while 80% occurred in the late postoperative phase. Of these, ischemic stroke is the most common subtype. In the perioperative periode, hemodynamic instability, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal circulation over 2 hours, prior history of stroke, and carotid stenosis greater than 50% have been reported to be risk factors for the occurrence of cerebrovascular complications. Perioperative cerebrovascular complications are associated with higher mortality and poor functional outcome at one year follow-up. After the perioperative period, the only factor that has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular complications is a history of prior stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic. Other associated factors include unknown atrial fibrillation, septic emboli from endocarditis, cardiac catheterization and perioperative hemodynamic shock. According to the TOAST etiologic classification, the most prevalent etiologic subtype of ischemic stroke is undetermined cause. PMID:21804780

  5. Neuron-Specific Enolase as a Predictor of Death or Poor Neurological Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C and 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammet, Pascal; Collignon, Olivier; Hassager, Christian; Wise, Matthew P; Hovdenes, Jan; Åneman, Anders; Horn, Janneke; Devaux, Yvan; Erlinge, David; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Gasche, Yvan; Wanscher, Michael; Cronberg, Tobias; Friberg, Hans; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael; Gilson, Georges; Nielsen, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a widely-used biomarker for prognostication of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest, but the relevance of recommended cutoff values has been questioned due to the lack of a standardized methodology and uncertainties over the influence of temperatu...

  6. Is the pre-hospital ECG after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest accurate for the diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salam, Idrees; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig;

    2016-01-01

    -hospital ROSC-ECG in predicting ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHOD: ROSC-ECGs of 145 comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, randomly assigned in the Target Temperature Management trial, were classified according to the current STEMI ECG criteria (third universal definition of...... myocardial infarction). RESULTS: STEs were present in the pre-hospital ROSC-ECG of 78 (54%) patients. A final diagnosis revealed that 69 (48%) patients had STEMI, 31 (21%) patients had non-STEMI and 45 (31%) patients had no myocardial infarction. STE in ROSC-ECGs had a sensitivity of 74% (95% confidence...... intervention was successful in 68% versus 36% (P<0.001) of STE compared to no STE patients. No significant difference was found in 180-day mortality rates between STE and no STE patients (36% vs. 30%, Plogrank=0.37). CONCLUSION: The pre-hospital ROSC-ECG is a suboptimal diagnostic tool to predict STEMI and...

  7. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. PMID:24782478

  8. Target temperature management of 33°C and 36°C in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial non-shockable rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Erlinge, David;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite a lack of randomized trials in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with an initial non-shockable rhythm (NSR), guidelines recommend induced hypothermia to be considered in these patients. We assessed the effect on outcome of two levels of induced hypothermia...... in comatose patient resuscitated from NSR. METHODS: Hundred and seventy-eight patients out of 950 in the TTM trial with an initial NSR were randomly assigned to targeted temperature management at either 33°C (TTM33, n=96) or 36°C (TTM36, n=82). We assessed mortality, neurologic function (Cerebral...... prognosis. We found no effect of targeted temperature management at 33°C compared to 36°C in these patients....

  9. The use of cytosolic enzyme increase in cerebrospinal fluid of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Brain Resuscitation Clinical Trial I Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaagenes, P; Mullie, A; Fodstad, D T; Abramson, N; Safar, P

    1994-11-01

    Levels of brain creatine phosphokinase (CPK), glutamic oxalic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactate in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were analyzed as an adjunctive study in a randomized clinical trial evaluating the effects of thiopental loading intravenously in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Three hospitals participated and a total of 62 cases of enzyme changes were studied. Enzyme levels but not lactate were higher at 48 hours than at 24 hours after restoration of spontaneous circulation. All enzymes were highly correlated with one another at 24 and 48 hours (P < .001). There was a significant negative correlation between cerebral recovery and increased CPK levels at 24 hours (P < .05), and a highly significant correlation with all three enzyme levels at 48 hours (P < .0001). The increase of cytosolic enzyme activity in lumbar CSF reflects permanent brain damage, and there is a relationship between activity levels and cerebral outcome. PMID:7945601

  10. Pulmonary embolism due to cardiac hydatid disease: imaging findings of unusual complication of hydatid cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two cases of primary cardiac hydatid cyst in which hydatid materials caused recurrent embolizations in pulmonary arteries and pulmonary parenchyma. Cardiac hydatid cysts may stay asymptomatic for a long time, until they reveal themselves being perforated into cardiac chambers and/or pulmonary artery or systemic circulation. The role of imaging techniques in diagnosis is discussed and the importance of dynamic enhanced CT, MR imaging, and enhanced MR angiography (MRA) is reported. Imaging findings were confirmed by surgery and pathology. Early diagnosis is essential because delayed treatment increases the morbidity and mortality rates. (orig.)

  11. Cardiac and pulmonary doses and complication probabilities in standard and conformal tangential irradiation in conservative management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The clinical benefit of irradiating the intact breast after lumpectomy must be weighted against the risk of severe toxicity. We present a study on cardiac and pulmonary dose-volume data and the related complication probabilities of tangential breast irradiation having the following objectives: (1) to quantify the sparing of the organs at risk (ORs), the heart and the lung, achieved by three-dimensional (3-D) conformal tangential irradiation (CTI) as compared to standard tangential irradiation (STI); (2) to elucidate the uncertainty in radiation tolerance data; and (3) to analyse the relation between the amount of OR irradiated and the resulting morbidity risk. Material and methods: Computed tomography (CT)-based 3-D treatment plans of 26 patients prescribed to CTI of the intact breast were applied. Contour-based STI has been our routine treatment, and was reconstructed for all patients. Dose-volume data and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) predictions from the probit and relative seriality models with several cardiac and pulmonary tolerance parameterizations were analysed and compared. Results and conclusions: A significant amount of normal tissues can be spared from radiation by using CT-based CTI, resulting in a 50% reduction of the average excess cardiac mortality risk in the left-sided cases. The risks for pericarditis and pneumonitis were too low to reveal any clinically significant difference between the treatments. For the STI set-up, a regression analysis showed that the excess cardiac mortality risk increased when larger parts of the heart were inside the fields. However, the different excess cardiac mortality and pneumonitis tolerance parameters resulted in statistically significant different NTCPs, which precluded the ability to accurately predict absolute NTCPs after tangential breast irradiation. Despite this uncertainty the different series of cardiac and pulmonary risk predictions were in relatively good agreement

  12. Cardiac tamponade: contrast reflux as an indicator of cardiac chamber equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauta Foeke Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic hemopericardium remains a rare entity; it does however commonly cause cardiac tamponade which remains a major cause of death in traumatic blunt cardiac injury. Objectives We present a case of blunt chest trauma complicated by cardiac tamponade causing cardiac chamber equalization revealed by reflux of contrast. Case report A 29-year-old unidentified male suffered blunt chest trauma in a motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a periaortic hematoma and hemopericardium. Significant contrast reflux was seen in the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins suggesting a change in cardiac chamber pressures. After intensive treatment including cardiac massage this patient expired of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Reflux of contrast on CT imaging can be an indicator of traumatic cardiac tamponade.

  13. Asystole to cross-clamp period predicts development of biliary complications in liver transplantation using donation after cardiac death donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taner, C Burcin; Bulatao, Ilynn G; Perry, Dana K; Sibulesky, Lena; Willingham, Darrin L; Kramer, David J; Nguyen, Justin H

    2012-08-01

    This study sought to determine the procurement factors that lead to development of intrahepatic bile duct strictures (ITBS) and overall biliary complications in recipients of donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver grafts. Detailed information for different time points during procurement (withdrawal of support; SBP mandatory wait period; asystole; incision; aortic cross clamp) and their association with the development of ITBS and overall biliary complications were examined using logistic regression. Two hundred and fifteen liver transplants using DCD donors were performed between 1998 and 2010 at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of all the time periods during procurement, only asystole-cross clamp period was significantly different between patients with ITBS versus no ITBS (P = 0.048) and between the patients who had overall biliary complications versus no biliary complications (P = 0.047). On multivariate analysis, only asystole-cross clamp period was significant predictor for development of ITBS (P = 0.015) and development of overall biliary complications (P = 0.029). Hemodynamic changes in the agonal period did not emerge as risk factors. The results of the study raise the possibility of utilizing asystole-cross-clamp period in place of or in conjunction with donor warm ischemia time in determining viability or quality of liver grafts. PMID:22703372

  14. Cocaine-associated increase of atrial natriuretic peptides: an early predictor of cardiac complications in cocaine users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casartelli, Alessandro; Dacome, Lisa; Tessari, Michela; Pascali, Jennifer; Bortolotti, Federica; Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Bosco, Oliviero; Cristofori, Patrizia; Tagliaro, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cocaine is known to produce life-threatening cardiovascular complications, and the investigation of the causes of death may be challenging in forensic medicine. The increasing knowledge of the cardiac function biomarkers and the increasing sensitivity of assays provide new tools in monitoring the cardiac life-threatening pathological conditions and in the sudden death investigation in chronic abusers. In this work, cardiac dysfunction was assessed in an animal model by measuring troponin I and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers, and considering other standard endpoints used in preclinical toxicology studies. Methods Lister Hooded rats were treated with cocaine in chronic self-administration studies. Troponin I (cTnI) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were evaluated at different time points and heart weight and histopathology were assessed at the end of the treatment period. Furthermore, cocaine and its main metabolites were measured in the rat fur to assess rats’ cocaine exposure. All the procedures and endpoints considered were designed to allow an easy and complete translation from the laboratory animals to human beings, and the same approach was also adopted with a group of 10 healthy cocaine abuse volunteers with no cardiac pathologies. Results Cardiac troponin I values were unaffected, and ANP showed an increasing trend with time in all cocaine-treated animals considered. Similarly, in the healthy volunteers, no changes were observed in troponin serum levels, whereas the N-terminal brain natriuretic pro-peptide (NT proBNP) showed variations comparable with the changes observed in rats. Conclusions In conclusion, natriuretic peptides could represent an early indicator of heart dysfunction liability in chronic cocaine abusers. PMID:27326180

  15. Cardiac complications of radiation therapy to the chest organs in cancer patients: the problems of early diagnosis, follow up and rehabilitation. A case discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The original findings shown the character and range of complications in the cardiovascular system at radiation therapy both using a gamma-therapy unit and a linear accelerator. The questions of development of standards of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac complications of radiation therapy are discussed. A case is described

  16. Valor da enolase específica do neurônio como indicador de prognóstico pós-parada cardiorrespiratória Serum neuron-specific enolase as a prognostic marker after a cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana H. Rech

    2006-12-01

    complication after a cardiac arrest. Many studies are trying to find prognostic markers that can be associated with outcomes in patients surviving a cardiac arrest. Biochemical markers of neuronal injury seem to be promising in this scenario. Therefore, NSE levels have been studied in patients after a cardiac arrest and high enzyme levels suggest more extensive brain damage and are associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome after a cardiac arrest is mostly determined by the degree of hypoxic brain damage and early determinations of serum NSE level can be a valuable ancillary method for assessing outcome in these patients.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging tracing of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model of cardiac arrest-induced global brain ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Fu; Xiangshao Fang; Tong Wang; Jiwen Wang; Jun Jiang; Zhigang Luo; Xiaohui Duan; Jun Shen; Zitong Huang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect survival and migration of super paramagnetic iron oxide-labeled stem cells in models of focal cerebral infarction. OBJECTIVE: To observe distribution of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in a rat model of global brain ischemia following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and to investigate the feasibility of tracing iron oxide-labeled BMSCs using non-invasive MRI. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The randomized, controlled, molecular imaging study was performed at the Linbaixin Medical Research Center, Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, and the Institute of Cardiopulmonary Cerebral Resuscitation, Sun Yat-sen University, China from October 2006 to February 2009.MATERIALS: A total of 40 clean, Sprague Dawley rats, aged 6 weeks and of either gender, were supplied by the Experimental Animal Center, Sun Yat-sen University, China, for isolation of BMSCs. Feridex (iron oxide), Gyroscan Inetra 1.5T MRI system, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation device were used in this study. METHODS: A total of 30 healthy, male Sprague Dawley rats, aged 6 months, were used to induce ventricular fibrillation using alternating current. After 8 minutes, the rats underwent 6-minute chest compression and mechanical ventilation, followed by electric defibrillation, to establish rat models of global brain ischemia due to cardiac arrest and resuscitation. A total of 24 successful models were randomly assigned to Feridex-labeled and non-labeled groups (n=12 for each group). At 2 hours after resuscitation, 5 x 10 6 Feddex-labeled BMSCs, with protamine sulfate as a carrier, and 5 × 10 6 non-labeled BMSCs were respectively transplanted into both groups of rats through the right carotid artery (cells were harvested in 1 mL phosphate buffered saline). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Feridex-labeled BMSCs were observed by Prussian blue staining and electron microscopy. Signal intensity, celluar viability

  18. NORMOTHERMIC EXTRACORPORAL PERFUSION IN SITU AS A WAY OF RECOVERY KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS FROM DONORS WITH SUDDEN IRREVERSIBLE CARDIAC ARREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Bagnenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of donors after cardiac death is actual issue. The crucial point in uncontrolled donors after cardiac death is the warm ischemical time. Definition of the limit of warm ischemic time is was the one task of our work and other one is development of preservation protocol saving quality of kidneys. There were 6 uncontrolled donors with warm ischemic time from 45 up to 91 minutes in which was adapted extracorporal perfusion device for preservation and restoration of kidneys after ischemical damage. The main attention was paid to the elimination of leucocytes as the main damaging factor from modificated donor’s blood circulating in device. In 6 of such kidneys recipients from 12 were immediately graft function, and to the end of third month the average creatinine was 121,3 ± 28,9 mmol/l. Treatment of ischemically damaged kidneys by normothermic extracorporal perfusion with leucocytes depletion before procurement could consider as challenging protocol and demands further study. 

  19. Reduction of cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities after breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine;

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of cardio-pulmonary radiation doses can be achieved using voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) or free breathing inspiration gating (IG) in radiotherapy after conserving surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiobiologica...... voluntary DIBH and free breathing IG to reduce the risk of both cardiac mortality and pneumonitis for the common technique of adjuvant tangential breast irradiation.......PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of cardio-pulmonary radiation doses can be achieved using voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) or free breathing inspiration gating (IG) in radiotherapy after conserving surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological...... implications of such dosimetric benefits. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients from previously reported studies were pooled for a total of 33 patients. All patients underwent DIBH and free breathing (FB) scans, and 17 patients underwent an additional IG scan. Tangential conformal treatment plans covering the...

  20. APPLICATION OF CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS IN PREVENTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS DURING CARDIAC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    S. V. Nedogoda

    2016-01-01

    Results of randomized clinical trials on the usage of calcium antagonists (CA) in order to prevent perioperative complications during aortocoronary bypass procedure and operations on heart valves are analyzed. CA reduced the risk of perioperative myocardial infarctions and episodes of reversible myocardial ischemia. After angioplasty of coronary arteries CA (particularly amlodipine) show positive effects on restenosis incidence and reduce about 3 times a number of repeated angioplasty and aor...

  1. Development of the probability of return of spontaneous circulation in intervals without chest compressions during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen Petter

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the factors that limits survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is the interruption of chest compressions. During ventricular fibrillation and tachycardia the electrocardiogram reflects the probability of return of spontaneous circulation associated with defibrillation. We have used this in the current study to quantify in detail the effects of interrupting chest compressions. Methods From an electrocardiogram database we identified all intervals without chest compressions that followed an interval with compressions, and where the patients had ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia. By calculating the mean-slope (a predictor of the return of spontaneous circulation of the electrocardiogram for each 2-second window, and using a linear mixed-effects statistical model, we quantified the decline of mean-slope with time. Further, a mapping from mean-slope to probability of return of spontaneous circulation was obtained from a second dataset and using this we were able to estimate the expected development of the probability of return of spontaneous circulation for cases at different levels. Results From 911 intervals without chest compressions, 5138 analysis windows were identified. The results show that cases with the probability of return of spontaneous circulation values 0.35, 0.1 and 0.05, 3 seconds into an interval in the mean will have probability of return of spontaneous circulation values 0.26 (0.24–0.29, 0.077 (0.070–0.085 and 0.040(0.036–0.045, respectively, 27 seconds into the interval (95% confidence intervals in parenthesis. Conclusion During pre-shock pauses in chest compressions mean probability of return of spontaneous circulation decreases in a steady manner for cases at all initial levels. Regardless of initial level there is a relative decrease in the probability of return of spontaneous circulation of about 23% from 3 to 27 seconds into such a pause.

  2. Combining Amplitude Spectrum Area with Previous Shock Information Using Neural Networks Improves Prediction Performance of Defibrillation Outcome for Subsequent Shocks in Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi He

    Full Text Available Quantitative ventricular fibrillation (VF waveform analysis is a potentially powerful tool to optimize defibrillation. However, whether combining VF features with additional attributes that related to the previous shock could enhance the prediction performance for subsequent shocks is still uncertain.A total of 528 defibrillation shocks from 199 patients experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were analyzed in this study. VF waveform was quantified using amplitude spectrum area (AMSA from defibrillator's ECG recordings prior to each shock. Combinations of AMSA with previous shock index (PSI or/and change of AMSA (ΔAMSA between successive shocks were exercised through a training dataset including 255shocks from 99patientswith neural networks. Performance of the combination methods were compared with AMSA based single feature prediction by area under receiver operating characteristic curve(AUC, sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and prediction accuracy (PA through a validation dataset that was consisted of 273 shocks from 100patients.A total of61 (61.0% patients required subsequent shocks (N = 173 in the validation dataset. Combining AMSA with PSI and ΔAMSA obtained highest AUC (0.904 vs. 0.819, p<0.001 among different combination approaches for subsequent shocks. Sensitivity (76.5% vs. 35.3%, p<0.001, NPV (90.2% vs. 76.9%, p = 0.007 and PA (86.1% vs. 74.0%, p = 0.005were greatly improved compared with AMSA based single feature prediction with a threshold of 90% specificity.In this retrospective study, combining AMSA with previous shock information using neural networks greatly improves prediction performance of defibrillation outcome for subsequent shocks.

  3. Mild hypothermia attenuates post-resuscitation brain injury through a V-ATPase mechanism in a rat model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J C; Lu, W; Xie, X M; Pan, H; Wu, Z Q; Yang, G T

    2016-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia is an effective treatment for post-resuscitation brain injury after cardiac arrest (CA), the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) plays a key role in cellular adaption to a hypoxic environment. This study sought to evaluate the effect of mild hypothermia on V-ATPase and its involvement in neuroprotection after CA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 6-min CA, resuscitated successfully, and then assigned to either the normothermia (NT) group or the hypothermia (HT) group. Rats were further divided into 2 subgroups based on the time of euthanasia, either 3 or 24 h after CA (NT-3 h, HT-3 h; NT-24 h, HT-24 h). Mild hypothermia was induced following CA and maintained at 33°C for 2 h. Neurologic deficit scores were used to determine the status of neurological function. Brain specimens were analyzed by TUNEL assay, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. V-ATPase activity was estimated by subtracting total ATP hydrolysis from the bafilomycin-sensitive activity. Mild hypothermia improved the neurological outcome (HT-24 h: 34.3 ± 16.4 vs NT-24 h: 50.3 ± 17.4) and significantly decreased neurocyte apoptosis 24 h after resuscitation. Mild hypothermia significantly increased V0a1 compared to NT-3 h; V0a1 expression was associated with a decrease in the cleaved caspase 3 expression. These findings suggested that mild hypothermia inhibits CA-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus, which may be associated with reduced V-ATPase impairment. These data provide new insights into the protective effects of hypothermia in vivo. PMID:27323115

  4. 高校心搏骤停四例急诊救治分析%Emergency Treatment of Four Cases with Cardiac Arrest in A University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立峰; 彭莉

    2012-01-01

    The gains and loses of rescue of 4 cardiac arrest patients in Hospital of Chongqing University of Science and Technology in recent years were summarized by reviewing field first aid of cardiopulmonary resuscitation ( CPR ) and the practical simplified flowsheet of 5 ring - joints of " chains of survival" , to deepen understanding of new concept of modern emergency medicine and make " 5E" of first - aid interlock. Medical professionals should ensure the quality of CPR, CPR education popularized in non - professionals. Thus the whole society could build first - aid systems of unexpected incidents of public health, to provide severe patients with more time and chances of receiving further treatment.%通过学习心肺复苏现场急救与"生存链"五环节实用简化流程,总结分析近年来我院在实践工作中抢救4例心搏骤停患者的得失,进而加深对现代急救医学新概念的理解,并得出现场急救"五早"环环相扣.专业医务人员应确保心肺复苏术(CPR)的高质量,非专业人员亦应学习和接受CPR教育,全社会共同构建突发性卫生事件的救护体系,使更多的危重病患者有接受进一步治疗的时间和机会.

  5. APPLICATION OF CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS IN PREVENTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS DURING CARDIAC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Nedogoda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of randomized clinical trials on the usage of calcium antagonists (CA in order to prevent perioperative complications during aortocoronary bypass procedure and operations on heart valves are analyzed. CA reduced the risk of perioperative myocardial infarctions and episodes of reversible myocardial ischemia. After angioplasty of coronary arteries CA (particularly amlodipine show positive effects on restenosis incidence and reduce about 3 times a number of repeated angioplasty and aortocoronary bypass operations. The use of CA was accompanied by more often need in heart electro stimulation without any subclass differences. It is also registered that nimodipine can strengthen intraoperative blood loss. It is concluded, that CA have significant evident base that allows recommending them to patients undertaken by cardiological surgery.

  6. Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest: An Advisory Statement by the Advanced Life Support Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Reynolds, Joshua C; Nolan, Jerry P; Morley, Peter T; Lang, Eddy; Cocchi, Michael N; Xanthos, Theodoros; Callaway, Clifton W; Soar, Jasmeet

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, mild induced hypothermia (32 °C-34 °C) has been standard of care for patients remaining comatose after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, and this has been extrapolated to survivors of cardiac arrest with initially nonshockable rhythms and to patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Two randomized trials published in 2002 reported a survival and neurological benefit with mild induced hypothermia. One recent randomized trial reported similar outcomes in patients treated with targeted temperature management at either 33 °C or 36 °C. In response to these new data, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Advanced Life Support Task Force performed a systematic review to evaluate 3 key questions: (1) Should mild induced hypothermia (or some form of targeted temperature management) be used in comatose post-cardiac arrest patients? (2) If used, what is the ideal timing of the intervention? (3) If used, what is the ideal duration of the intervention? The task force used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology to assess and summarize the evidence and to provide a consensus on science statement and treatment recommendations. The task force recommends targeted temperature management for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm at a constant temperature between 32 °C and 36 °C for at least 24 hours. Similar suggestions are made for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a nonshockable rhythm and in-hospital cardiac arrest. The task force recommends against prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluid. Additional and specific recommendations are provided in the document. PMID:26449873

  7. Proenkefalin A and protachykinin in ischemic neurological complications after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Skitek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim The evaluation of biomarkers of acute ischemic brain injury following surgical revascularization of the heart with the use of the heart-lung machine (cardiopulmonary bypass, CPB. Methods Twenty consecutive patients were divided into two groups: the first 10 patients received a potential neuroprotective human recombinant erythropoietin, while the remaining 10 comprised the control group. Neurological complications were monitored by measuring serum concentrations of neuropeptide proenkephalin A (PENK-A and protachykinin A (PTA before and in the first 5 days after surgery, comparing the neurological outcome with MRI examinations. Results Both the erythropoietin-treated group and control group were comparable with a non-significant difference shown for the postoperative concentrations of PENK-A and PTA. A comparison of serum concentrations of the biomarkers of 16 patients without brain ischemia and 4 patients with acute ischemia also displayed no significant differences, regardless of erythropoietin therapy. Conclusion In our pilot study the analysis of PENK-A and PTA serum concentrations might not be the strategy to enable the monitoring and evaluation of neuroprotective stroke treatment, but further studies are required to investigate its role in acute ischemic brain injury.

  8. Lead Burden as a Factor for Higher Complication Rate in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kolibash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lead revisions have increased over the last decade. Patients who do not undergo lead extraction face an increased lead burden. Consequences of increased lead burden have not been fully defined. We sought to characterize the complication rate and outcomes in patients with sterile redundant leads. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 242 consecutive patients [mean age 74 ± 12 years; 66.9% male] who underwent lead revision that resulted in an abandoned lead from January 2005 to June 2010. Patients were placed in a cohort based on number of leads after last recorded procedure (Group A: ≤2 [n=58]; Group B: 3-4 [n=168]; Group C: ≥5 [n=16]. Prespecified inhospital and long-term follow-up events were compared. Mortality rates were obtained from Social Security Death Index. Median follow-up was 2 years. Results: Baseline age, gender and race demographics were similar among the three groups. Increasing lead burden was associated with more adverse periprocedural events (A: 3.4%, B: 10.1%, C: 25.0%; P=0.031 and long-term device-related events (A: 1.7%, B: 13.0%, C: 18.8%; P=0.031. Device-related readmissions increased in frequency as lead burden increased (A: 3.5%, B: 18.5%, C: 37.5%; P=0.002. Combined periprocedural and late events also increased with more redundant leads (A: 5.2%, B: 23.2%, C: 44.0%; P=0.001. Total major events were infrequent (3.3%. There was no procedure-related mortality. Long-term all-cause mortality was not significantly different (A: 17.2%, B: 23.8%, C: 25.0%; P=0.567. Conclusions: Greater lead burden was associated with increased number of periprocedural and long-term minor events. It did not significantly impact major events or mortality.

  9. An unanticipated cardiac arrest and unusual post-resuscitation psycho-behavioural phenomena/near death experience in a patient with pregnancy induced hypertension and twin pregnancy undergoing elective lower segment caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridul M Panditrao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A case report of a primigravida, who was admitted with severe pregnancy induced hypertension (BP 160/122 mmHg and twin pregnancy, is presented here. Antihypertensive therapy was initiated. Elective LSCS under general anaesthesia was planned. After the birth of both the babies, intramyometrial injections of Carboprost and Pitocin were administered. Immediately, she suffered cardiac arrest. Cardio pulmonary resucitation (CPR was started and within 3 minutes, she was successfully resuscitated. The patient initially showed peculiar psychological changes and with passage of time, certain psycho-behavioural patterns emerged which could be attributed to near death experiences, as described in this case report.

  10. The secular trends in the incidence rate and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Taiwan--a nationwide population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yi Wang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the trends in incidence and mortality of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA, as well as factors associated with OHCA outcomes in Taiwan.Our study included OHCA patients requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR upon arrival at the hospital. We used national time-series data on annual OHCA incidence rates and mortality rates from 2000 to 2012, and individual demographic and clinical data for all OHCA patients requiring mechanical ventilation (MV care from March of 2010 to September of 2011. Analytic techniques included the time-series regression and the logistic regression.There were 117,787 OHCAs in total. The overall incidence rate during the 13 years was 51.1 per 100,000 persons, and the secular trend indicates a sharp increase in the early 2000s and a decrease afterwards. The trend in mortality was also curvilinear, revealing a substantial increase in the early 2000s, a subsequent steep decline and finally a modest increase. Both the 30-day and 180-day mortality rates had a long-term decreasing trend over the period (p<0.01. For both incidence and mortality rates, a significant second-order autoregressive effect emerged. Among OHCA patients with MV, 1-day, 30-day and 180-day mortality rates were 31.3%, 75.8%, and 86.0%, respectively. In this cohort, older age, the female gender, and a Charlson comorbidity index score ≥ 2 were associated with higher 180-day mortality; patients delivered to regional hospitals and those residing in non-metropolitan areas had higher death risk.Overall, both the 30-day and the 180-day mortality rates after OHCA had a long-term decreasing trend, while the 1-day mortality had no long-term decline. Among OHCA patients requiring MV, those delivered to regional hospitals and those residing in non-metropolitan areas tended to have higher mortality, suggesting a need for effort to further standardize and improve in-hospital care across hospitals and to advance pre-hospital care in non

  11. Sex and Age Aspects in Patients Suffering From Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Retrospective Analysis of 760 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegeler, Tobias; Thoeni, Nils; Kaserer, Alexander; Brueesch, Martin; Sulser, Simon; Mueller, Stefan M; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R; Ruetzler, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is indicated in patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Several studies suggest a sex- and age-based bias in the treatment of these patients. This particular bias may have a significant impact on the patient's outcome. However, the reasons for these findings are still unclear and discussed controversially. Therefore, the aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze treatment and out-of-hospital survival rates for potential sex- and age-based differences in patients requiring out-of-hospital CPR provided by an emergency physician in the city of Zurich, Switzerland.A total of 3961 consecutive patients (2003-2009) were included in this retrospective analysis to determine the frequency of out-of-hospital CPR and prehospital survival rate, and to identify potential sex- and age-based differences regarding survival and treatment of the patients.Seven hundred fifty-seven patients required CPR during the study period. Seventeen patients had to be excluded because of incomplete or inconclusive documentation, resulting in 743 patients (511 males, 229 females) undergoing further statistical analysis. Female patients were significantly older, compared with male patients (68 ± 18 [mean ± SD] vs 64 ± 18 years, P = .012). Men were resuscitated slightly more often than women (86.4% vs 82.1%). Overall out-of-hospital mortality rate was found to be 81.2% (492/632 patients) with no differences between sexes (82.1% for males vs 79% for females, odds ratio 1.039, 95% confidence interval 0.961-1.123). No sex differences were detected in out-of-hospital treatment, as assessed by the different medications administered, initial prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale, and prehospital suspected leading diagnosis.The data of our study demonstrate that there was no sex-based bias in treating patients requiring CPR in the prehospital setting in our physician-led emergency ambulance service. PMID:27149475

  12. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  13. What Causes Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart muscle. Eventually, an area of plaque can rupture (break open). This may cause a blood clot ... tendency is inherited, which means it's passed from parents to children through the genes. Members of these ...

  14. Ritmo circadiano y variaciones temporales en el paro cardiaco súbito extrahospitalario Circadian rhythm and time variations in out-hospital sudden cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. López-Messa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Analizar las características cronobiológicas y las variaciones temporales del paro cardiaco extrahospitalario (PCEH. Diseño: Estudio descriptivo retrospectivo. Pacientes: Todos los casos de PCEH de origen cardíaco registrados en la base de datos del servicio de emergencias médicas (SEM de la Comunidad Autónoma de Castilla y León (España durante 18 meses. Variables de interés principales: Edad, sexo, recuperación de la circulación espontánea, primer ritmo monitorizado (desfibrilable /no desfibrilable, lugar de alerta [(hogar, lugar público, centro atención primaria (AP], testigo (familiar, transeúnte, fuerzas de seguridad, personal AP, hora de alerta (0-8; 8-16; 16-24, hora de activación del equipo de emergencias, hora de atención y día de la semana. Análisis univariante mediante Chi², varianza y tests no paramétricos. Análisis cronobiológico mediante transformada rápida de Fourier y test Cosinor. Resultados: Se estudiaron 1.286 casos registrados entre enero 2007 y junio 2008. Se observaron diferencias estadísticas significativas en menor edad (pObjectives: To analyze the chronobiological and time variations of out- hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. Design: A retrospective descriptive study was made. Patients: All cases of OHCA of cardiac origin registered over 18 months in the database of the emergency medical service (EMS of the Autonomous Community of Castilla y León (Spain were evaluated. Variables analyzed: Age, sex, recovery of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, first monitored rhythm (amenable / not amenable to defibrillation, alert site [(home, public place, primary care (PC center], alerting person (family, witness, law enforcement member, PC center staff, alert time (0-8; 8-16; 16-24, emergency team activation time, care time and day of the week. Univariate analysis (chi-squared, variance, and nonparametric tests comparing the variables in three periods of 8hours. Chronobiological analysis by fast Fourier

  15. Daily Arrests

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset provides the public with arrest information from the Montgomery County Central Processing Unit (CPU) systems. The data presented is derived from every...

  16. 兔室颤心搏骤停模型的建立%Ventricular fibrillation-induced cardiac arrest model in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡春林; 魏红艳; 廖晓星; 李欣; 李玉杰; 詹红; 荆小莉; 熊艳; 伍贵富

    2009-01-01

    Objective To establish a simple,easily-producible and practical cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation model in rabbits.Method Cardiac ventricular fibrillation was induced in 27 New Zealand rabbits by alternating electric current.The rabbits were randomly divided into three groups according to the duration of untreated cardiac arrest(CA):CA-8 min group(n = 9),CA-5 min group(n = 9)and CA-3 min group(n = 9).All animals received cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR)until return of spontaneous circulation(ROSC).The sample of vein blood was collected for the measurement troponin I level at 4 hours after ROSC.The animals were sacrificed at 72 hours after ROSC,hippocampus were removed and fixed in 3%formalin,and coronal sections were analyzed by TUNEL staining and N1SSLE staining.The other two animals without ventricular fibrillation or CPR served as sham-operated group.One-way ANOVA or Mann-Whitney rank was used to determine the statistical significance among the three groups.R×C test was used for ROSC,LSD test for multiple comparisons,and t test for comparisons of means between two independent samples.A two-tailed value of P<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results There were no differences in rate of ROSC among groups.No animals survived until 72 hours after ROSC in CA-8 min group and CA-5 min group,while three animals in CA-3 min group survived.In group CA-8 min,CA-5 min and CA-3 min,the survival time of animals after ROSC were(1.67 ± 2.55)h,(37.78 ± 30.27)h,(12.0 ± 14.97)h,respectively.There were significant differences in the survival time of animals after ROSC and troponin I level after ROSC 4 h between CA-3 min group and the other two groups(P<0.05).Compared with animals in CA-3 min group,sham-operated animals(n = 2)did not have neuronal degeneration or TUNEL positive cells in the hippocampus CA1 area.Conclusions CPR initiated as soon as 3 min after CA can give longer survival tome to the rabbits.The rabbits have neuronal degeneration and

  17. A successful treatment of cardiac tamponade due to an aortic dissection using open-chest massage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiko, Terasumi; Yanagawa, Youichi; Isoda, Susumu

    2012-05-01

    An 81-year-old woman became unconsciousness after complaining of a backache, and then, an ambulance was called. She was suspected to have an aortic dissection by the emergency medical technicians and was transferred to our department. On arrival, she was in shock. Emergency cardiac ultrasound disclosed good wall motion with cardiac tamponade but no complication of aortic regurgitation. Computed tomography of the trunk revealed a type A aortic dissection with cardiac tamponade. During performance of pericardial drainage, she lapsed into cardiopulmonary arrest. Immediately after sterilization of the patient's upper body with compression of the chest wall, we performed a thoracotomy and dissolved the cardiac tamponade by pericardiotomy and obtained her spontaneous circulation. Fortunately, blood discharge was ceased immediately after controlling her blood pressure aggressively. As she complicated pneumonitis, conservative therapy was performed. Her physical condition gradually improved, and she finally could feed herself and communicate. In cases of acute cardiac tamponade, simple pericardiocentesis often is not effective due to the presence of the clot, and a cardiac tamponade by a Stanford type A aortic dissection is highly possible to complicate cardiac arrest, so emergency physicians should be ready to provide immediate open cardiac massage to treat such patients. PMID:21406318

  18. Neurologic Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Following Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C vs 36°C After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronberg, Tobias; Lilja, Gisela; Horn, Janneke;

    2015-01-01

    from analysis for a total sample size of 939. INTERVENTIONS: Targeted temperature management at 33°C vs 36°C. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cognitive function was measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and assessed by observers through the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the...... Elderly (IQCODE). Patients reported their activities in daily life and mental recovery through Two Simple Questions and their quality of life through the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, version 2. RESULTS: In the modified intent-to-treat population, including nonsurvivors, the...... summary score was 46.8 (13.8) and 47.5 (13.8) (P = .45), comparable to the population norm. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Quality of life was good and similar in patients with cardiac arrest receiving targeted temperature management at 33°C or 36°C. Cognitive function was similar in both intervention groups...

  19. Sympathoadrenal activation and endothelial damage are inter correlated and predict increased mortality in patients resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. a post Hoc sub-study of patients from the TTM-trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär I Johansson

    Full Text Available Sympathoadrenal activation and endothelial damage are hallmarks of acute critical illness. This study investigated their association and predictive value in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA.Post-hoc analysis of patients included at a single site in The Targeted Temperature Management at 33 degrees versus 36 degrees after Cardiac Arrest (TTM trial. The main study reported similar outcomes with targeting 33 versus 36 degrees. TTM main study ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01020916. One hundred sixty three patients resuscitated from OHCA were included at a single site ICU. Blood was sampled a median 135 min (Inter Quartile Range (IQR 103-169 after OHCA. Plasma catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and serum endothelial biomarkers (syndecan-1, thrombomodulin, sE-selectin, sVE-cadherin were measured at admission (immediately after randomization. We had access to data on demography, medical history, characteristics of the OHCA, patients and 180-day outcome.Adrenaline and noradrenaline correlated positively with syndecan-1 and thrombomodulin i.e., biomarkers reflecting endothelial damage (both p<0.05. Overall 180-day mortality was 35%. By Cox analyses, plasma adrenaline, serum sE-selectin, reflecting endothelial cell activation, and thrombomodulin levels predicted mortality. However, thrombomodulin was the only biomarker independently associated with mortality after adjusting for gender, age, rhythm (shockable vs. non-shockable, OHCA to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC time, shock at admission and ST elevation myocardial infarction (30-day Hazards Ratio 1.71 (IQR 1.05-2.77, p=0.031 and 180-day Hazards Ratio 1.65 (IQR 1.03-2.65, p=0.037 for 2-fold higher thrombomodulin levels.Circulating catecholamines and endothelial damage were intercorrelated and predicted increased mortality. Interventions aiming at protecting and/or restoring the endothelium may be beneficial in OHCA patients.

  20. Cardiac Complications of Unwitting Co-injection of Quinine/Quinidine with Heroin in an Intravenous Drug User

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Karran A.; Hirsch, Glenn A; Epstein, David H.; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2012-01-01

    Adulterants “cut into” street heroin are common and often not detected by standard urine toxicology screening; however, their unwitting co-injection may have clinical consequences. We report a case of accelerated atrioventricular junctional arrhythmia that we determined to have been caused by quinine/quinidine cut into heroin. While identification and discontinuation of the offending agent helps confirm the diagnosis and is the treatment of choice, this is often complicated by the individual’...

  1. 应用心肺复苏仪对心搏骤停患者心脑缺血性损伤的影响%The effect of resuscitator CPR on cardio-cerebral ischemic injury of cardiac arrest patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹春水; 黄亮; 吕农华; 占钻; 殷勤; 杨继斌; 熊华威

    2013-01-01

    目的 比较徒手和心肺复苏(CPR)仪行CPR对心搏骤停患者心脑缺血性损伤的影响,探讨CPR仪在CPR中的应用价值.方法 采用前瞻性、双盲、随机对照的临床研究方法,将87例心搏骤停患者按数字表法随机分成两组,分别进行徒手CPR(n=42)及心肺复苏仪(n=45)CPR,记录两组患者自主循环恢复(ROSC)率、复苏时间、存活时间及死亡率.对46例ROSC维持>24 h的患者血清心型脂肪酸结合蛋白、血清肌钙蛋白I含量及血清S100蛋白、神经元特异性烯醇化酶的含量进行监测;比较两组CPR方法对患者心脑缺血性损伤的影响.结果 两组患者血清心型脂肪酸结合蛋白、血清肌钙蛋白I、血清S100蛋白、神经元特异性烯醇化酶较健康志愿者明显升高,CPR仪CPR组明显低于徒手CPR组;徒手CPR组复苏持续时间小于CPR仪CPR组;CPR仪组患者ROSC持续>24 h例数明显多于徒手CPR组,差异有统计学意义;但患者的ROSC率和死亡率差异无统计学意义.结论 应用心肺复苏仪行CPR更能持久、有效地使心、脑血管再灌注,减轻心脑组织细胞缺血性损伤,但不能提高CPR成功率和降低死亡率.%Objective To compare the effect of barehanded CPR and resuscitator CPR on cardiac arrest cardio - cerebral ischemic injury, and investigate the value of application resuscitator on CPR. Methods The prospective, double blinded and randomized controlled clinical trail was designed. 87 cardiac arrest patients were randomly divided into two groups according to table of random number, barehanded CPR and resuscitator CPR were carried out respectively. The rate of ROSC and mortality of the patients in two groups were recorded and the duration of CPR and survival time were also recorded. The content of myocardial damage markers serum heart fatty acid - binding protein ( H - FABP) and cardial troponin I(cTnI) , the content of serum S100 protein and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in patients of ROSC

  2. 急性重度有机磷农药中毒合并呼吸、心跳停止8例临床救治%Clinical treatment of 8 cases of acute severe organophosphorus pesticide poisoning with respiratory,cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩海涛

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨急性重度有机磷农药中毒并呼吸、心跳停止的临床救治。方法:收治8例急性重度有机磷农药中毒并呼吸、心跳停止的患者,对其临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果:患者均抢救成功。结论:给予急性重度有机磷农药中毒并呼吸、心跳停止的患者积极有效的治疗,可促进其康复。%Objective:To explore the clinical treatment of acute severe organophosphorus pesticide poisoning with respiratory, cardiac arrest.Methods:8 cases with acute severe organophosphorus pesticide poisoning with respiratory,cardiac arrest were selected.The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed.Results:All the patients were successfully treated.Conclusion:The positive and effective treatment for patients with acute severe organophosphorus pesticide poisoning with respiratory,cardiac arrest,can promote the rehabilitation.

  3. Anesthesia related Complications in Pediatric GI Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sabzevari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elective upper and lower GI endoscopy is usually performed in children on an outpatient basis with the child under sedation or general anesthesia (GA. The objective of this study was to describe Anesthesia related complications in   children undergoing elective GI endoscopy.   Materials and Methods: The study design was descriptive on 1388 patients undergoing elective GI endoscopy in Sheikh Hospital from 2009 to 2013. All patient received propofol or standard inhalational anesthesia. We examined patients’ demographic data  ,  location of GI endoscopy ,  perioperative vital singe ,  recovery time , respiratory and cardiac complications , post operative nausea and vomiting , agitation , diagnosis and outcome   Results: Pediatric patients aged 2 to 17 years. 29 % of elective GI endoscopy was upper GI endoscopy and 70.3 % was lower GI endoscopy and 0.7 was both of them. 47.7 % of Pediatric patients were female and 52.3 % was male. We haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related respiratory and cardiac complications (no apnea, no cardiac arrest. 8 patients (0.5% have transient bradicardia in post operative care Unit. 83 patients (5.9% have post operative nausea and vomiting controlled by medication.  6 patients (0.4% have post operative agitation controlled by medication.   Conclusions: General anesthesia and deep sedation in children undergoing elective GI endoscopy haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related complications. We suggest Anesthesia for infants, young children, children with neurologic impairment, and some anxious older children undergoing elective GI endoscopy. Keyword: Anesthesia, Complication, Endoscopy, Pediatric.

  4. Cardiopulmonary arrest induced by anaphylactoid reaction with contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Iwao; Hori, Shingo; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Fujishima, Seitaro; Aoki, Katsunori; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Aikawa, Naoki

    2002-05-01

    Anaphylactoid reactions to iodinated contrast media can cause life-threatening events and even death. A 44-year-old woman presented with cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) immediately following the administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media for an intravenous pyelography. Her cardiac rhythm during CPA was asystole. She was successfully resuscitated by the radiologists supported by paged emergency physicians using the prompt intravenous administration of 1 mg of epinephrine. Neither laryngeal edema nor bronchial spasm was observed during the course of treatment, and she was discharged on the 4th day without any complications. The patient did not have a history of allergy, but had experienced a myocardial infarction and aortitis. She had undergone 11 angiographies and had been taking a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Planned emergency medical backup is advisable to ensure resuscitation in the event of an anaphylactoid reaction to the use of contrast media in-hospital settings. PMID:12009227

  5. Head-only followed by cardiac arrest electrical stunning is an effective alternative to head-only electrical stunning in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, K D; Badtram, G; Claus, J R; Grandin, T; Turpin, S; Weyker, R E; Voogd, E

    2011-05-01

    Many small slaughter facilities use head-only electrical stunning to render swine unconscious and insensible to pain before slaughter. Head-only electrical stunning is a reversible procedure that is optimally effective for approximately 15 s after stun completion. In many small North American slaughter plants, the authors have observed hoist speeds that are too slow to achieve a short enough stun-to-bleed interval to maintain insensibility through exsanguination. Unlike many European plants, there is no separate high-speed hoist for pigs and exsanguination on the floor is not condoned. As a result, a 2-stage stunning method was proposed where head-only stunning for 3 s was immediately followed by application of the same stunning wand to the cardiac region of the animal for 3 s while lying in lateral recumbancy. A paired-comparison study was conducted on 89 pigs in a small slaughter facility to compare the head-only method applied for 6 s with the head/heart method. The objective was to evaluate signs of return to sensibility, stun-to-bleed time, blood lactate concentration, muscle pH, drip loss, and fresh meat color to validate the head/heart electrical stunning method for small slaughter plants. Incidence of corneal reflex was not different (P > 0.05) between head/heart (93.8%) and head only (85%) stunning. Nose twitching was more common (P 0.05) between stunning methods (head only: 8.8 ± 0.7 mmol/L, head/heart: 7.8 ± 0.7 mmol/L). Stun-to-bleed time did not differ (P > 0.05; head only: 32 ± 1 s, head/heart: 33 ± 1 s). Mean time to loss of heartbeat with the head-only method was 121 ± 5 s. No heartbeat was observed with the head/heart method. Longissimus thoracis pH, color, and drip loss were not different (P > 0.05) between stunning methods. This study determined that the head/heart electrical stunning method reduces the incidence of signs of return to sensibility without significant effects on meat quality, plant operation speed, or blood lactate

  6. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation. PMID:27177932

  7. ANÁLISIS DE LA CALIDAD DEL REGISTRO DE PARO CARDÍACO EN CASOS DE RESPONSABILIDAD MÉDICO LEGAL EN MÉDICOS GENERALES, 1999-2007 Quality of cardiac arrest records in cases of medical responsibility, 1999-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Barragán

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. El registro del paro cardíaco es una actividad que se debe acompañar en la reanimación cerebro cardio pulmonar. En Colombia no existe un formato de registro oficial de paro cardiorrespiratorio, lo que dificulta la investigación en reanimación y la conducción de los procesos de responsabilidad médica que se deriven de esta atención. Objetivo. Analizar la calidad del registro de paro cardíaco en casos de responsabilidad médico legal iniciada a médicos generales que tuvieron asesoría científica del Fondo para Auxilio de Demandas de la Sociedad Colombiana de Anestesiología y Reanimación (SCARE-FEPASDE, 1999-2007. Material y métodos. Se realizó una investigación tipo serie de casos, en donde se incluyeron los casos de paro cardiorrespiratorio que tuvieron demanda médico legal y que fueron atendidos por médicos generales, entre 1999 y 2007, y que requirieron asesoría jurídica por SCAREFEPASDE. La información se registró en tablas de Excel®, según las recomendaciones Utstein. La calificación de calidad se hizo por tres médicos expertos en responsabilidad médica de manera independiente. Se utilizó un formato de calificación sobre la proporción de registros realizados sobre 25 ítem posibles. La calidad se consideró alta (mayor de 95% ítem, media (70-94% ítem y baja (menor de 70%. En los casos de desacuerdo se realizó consenso. Resultados. Se incluyeron en total 83 casos. La calidad del registro del paro fue media en 49 casos (59%, baja en 32 casos (39% y alta en dos casos. Conclusión. El registro de paro cardiorrespiratorio en casos de responsabilidad médica es de mediana calidad, por lo que no se alcanza a cumplir con los estándares internacionales y las guías al estilo Utstein.Background. Cardiac arrest must be recorded when occurring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. There is no official registration form for cardiac arrest in Colombia, thereby hampering research in resuscitation and managing

  8. ECMO for Cardiac Rescue after Accidental Intravenous Mepivacaine Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Froehle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mepivacaine is a potent local anaesthetic and used for infiltration and regional anaesthesia in adults and pediatric patients. Intoxications with mepivacaine affect mainly the CNS and the cardiovascular system. We present a case of accidental intravenous mepivacaine application and intoxication of an infant resulting in seizure, broad complex bradyarrhythmia, arterial hypotension and finally cardiac arrest. The patient could be rescued by prolonged resuscitations and a rapid initiation of ECMO and survived without neurological damage. The management strategies of this rare complication including promising other treatment options with lipid emulsions are discussed.

  9. Status epilepticus and cardiopulmonary arrest in a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning with full recovery after using a neuroprotective strategy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Salman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Carbon monoxide poisoning can be associated with life-threatening complications, including significant and disabling cardiovascular and neurological sequelae. Case presentation We report a case of carbon monoxide poisoning in a 25-year-old Saudi woman who presented to our facility with status epilepticus and cardiopulmonary arrest. Her carboxyhemoglobin level was 21.4 percent. She made a full recovery after we utilized a neuroprotective strategy and normobaric oxygen therapy, with no delayed neurological sequelae. Conclusions Brain protective modalities are very important for the treatment of complicated cases of carbon monoxide poisoning when they present with neurological toxicities or cardiac arrest. They can be adjunctive to normobaric oxygen therapy when the use of hyperbaric oxygen is not feasible.

  10. Comparing percutaneous coronary intervention and thrombolysis in patients with return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest%介入与溶栓疗法救治院外心脏骤停的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李颖庆; 柳娜; 胡春林; 魏红艳; 李慧; 李欣; 廖晓星

    2013-01-01

    目的 汇集有关ST段抬高型心肌梗死(ST-elevation myocardial infarction,STEMI)所致院外心脏骤停(out-of-hospital cardiac arrest,OHCA)的文献,分别对冠脉介入(percutaneous coronary intervention,PCI)与静脉溶栓在自主循环恢复(return of spontaneous circulation,ROSC)后患者中的疗效进行比较;通过揭示两种疗法对此阶段患者存活出院及神经功能恢复方面的作用,明确ROSC阶段治疗的重要性,以期指导对由STEMI所致OHCA患者的救治.方法 本研究通过查询PUBMED和MEDLINE数据库,对1995年1月至2011年10月间的有关STEMI所致OHCA的研究文献进行了回顾性分析,以获得ROSC的OHCA患者为研究对象,相关患者的存活出院率和神经功能良好率作为此项研究的评判标准.共有18篇文献纳入此项研究,由于Meta分析必须是同期对照性研究,笔者将同一队列研究中获得ROSC后接受PCI的患者作为治疗组、拒绝PCI的患者作为对照组;与之相应,接受静脉溶栓的患者作为治疗组、拒绝静脉溶栓的患者作为对照组;然后,利用Review Manager 5.1软件对各自相应的治疗组与对照组间进行Meta分析.此外,也对PCI与静脉溶栓两种疗法对此类患者的出院率及神经功能良好率间的差异,采用Pearson x2进行比较.结果 在由STEMI所致OHCA的患者中,Meta分析显示了对ROSC后患者的存活出院率方面PCI[OR(odds ratio,优势比),1.65; 95%CI(confidence interval,可信区间),1.05-2.59,P<0.01]与静脉溶栓(OR,2.03; 95%CI,1.24 ~3.34,P<0.01)明显优于各自的对照组;总体比较中,静脉溶栓与PCI在此类患者的存活出院率(63.00%vs.65.19%,P=0.548)及神经功能恢复率(88.62% vs.91.25%,P=0.351)方面具有相似的结果.结论 对STEMI所致的OHCA患者,在ROSC后进行PCI或静脉溶栓能够提高存活出院率;静脉溶栓在救治此类患者中具有与PCI同等的效益.%Objective To evaluate the effect of percutaneous

  11. The impact of quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on post-resuscitation inflammatory reaction in a porcine cardiac arrest model%心肺复苏的质量对复苏后炎症反应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武军元; 李春盛

    2008-01-01

    目的 评价临床上常见的不标准心肺复苏(N-CPR)和2005年国际CPR指南推荐的标准心肺复苏(S-CPR)对心脏停搏(CA)猪复苏后炎症反应的影响.方法 18头猪被随机均分成两组,经麻醉、插管、机械通气后,应用程控刺激方法制备心室纤颤(VF)模型.S-CPR组应用2005年指南推荐的CPR方式;N-CPR组模拟临床上经常出现的低质量CPR方式.VF 4 min后开始进行CPR,CPR 9 min后进行电除颤及高级生命支持,自主循环恢复(ROSC)后进行各项指标观察.24 h仍存活的猪经处死后取脑、心、肝、肾组织,应用免疫组化法检测核转录因子-kB(NF-kB)的表达.实验期间连续监测CPR后3、6和9 min的血流动力学变化,并抽取基础状态、CPR 9 rain、ROSC 4 h的静脉血,测定血清肿瘤坏死因子-a(TNF-α)、白细胞介素-1β(IL-1β)的浓度.结果 与N-CPR组比较,S-CPR组ROSC率(22.2%比88.9%)及24 h存活率(22.2%比88.9%)明显提高(P均<0.05);CPR后3、6和9 min心排血量(CO)和平均动脉压(MAP)也均显著升高(P均<0.01);并且CPR后9 min和ROSC 4 h血清促炎症因子TNF-α、IL-1β]水平和各组织NF-kB表达程度均降低.结论 高质量的CPR后不仅能提高CA猪的生存率,也明显改善CPR后的炎症反应.%Objective To evaluate the effects of quality of non-standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (N-CPR)and new guidelines recommended standard CPR(S-CPR)on post-resuscitation inflammatory reaction in a cardiac arrest(CA)porcine model.Methods Eighteen pigs were randomly divided into two groups,and ventricular fibrillation(VF)was induced by programmed electrical stimulation after giving anesthesia,intubation tube and mechanical ventilation.S-CPR(n=9):CPR was consistent with recommendation of the 2005 guidelines.N-CPR(n=9):given CPR with low quality CPR usually instituded in clinic.After 4 minutes of untreated VF,CPR was started for 9 minutes.Defibrillation and advanced lire support were attempted at 13 minutes of CA

  12. Deterrence and arrest ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Stephanie E; Piquero, Alex R

    2006-02-01

    In the limited research on the origins of sanction threat perceptions, researchers have focused on either the effects of actively engaging in crime or the effects of formal sanctioning but rarely on both (i.e., the arrest ratio or the number of arrests relative to the number of crimes committed). This article extends this line of research by using a sample of Colorado inmates and measures arrest ratios and sanction perceptions for eight different crime types. Analyses reveal that the offenders report both significant experiential and arrest ratio effects. Theoretical and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:16397123

  13. Association of positive fluid balance and cardiovascular complications after thoracotomy for noncancer lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipanmekaporn T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tanyong Pipanmekaporn,1,2 Yodying Punjasawadwong,2 Somrat Charuluxananan,3 Worawut Lapisatepun,2 Pavena Bunburaphong,3 Somchareon Saeteng41Clinical Epidemiology Program, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailandObjective: The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of positive fluid balance on cardiovascular complications after thoracotomy for noncancer lesions.Methods: After approval from an institutional review board, a retrospective cohort study was conducted. All consecutive patients undergoing thoracotomy between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011 in a single medical center were recruited. The primary outcome of the study was the incidence of cardiovascular complications, which were defined as cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, and pulmonary embolism. Univariable and multivariable risk regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between positive fluid balance and cardiovascular complications.Results: A total of 720 patients were included in this study. The incidence of cardiovascular complications after thoracotomy for noncancer lesions was 6.7% (48 of 720. Patients with positive fluid balance >2,000 mL had a significantly higher incidence of cardiovascular complications than those with positive fluid balance ≤2,000 mL (22.2% versus 7.0%, P=0.005. Cardiac arrhythmias were the most common complication. Univariable risk regression showed that positive fluid balance >2,000 mL was a significant risk factor (risk ratio =3.15, 95% confident interval [CI] =1.44–6.90, P-value =0.004. After adjustment for all potential confounding variables during multivariable risk regression analysis, positive fluid balance >2,000 mL remained a strong risk

  14. Traumatic Tricuspid Regurgitation Following Cardiac Massage

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Sungwon; Nam, Sang Beom; Lee, Yong Kyung; Oh, Young Jun; Kwak, Young-Lan

    2007-01-01

    We report a 66-yr-old male patient who developed tricuspid regurgitation secondary to internal cardiac massage. After uneventful off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, the subject experienced cardiac arrest in the intensive care unit. External cardiac massage was initiated and internal cardiac massage was performed eventually. A transesophageal echocardiography revealed avulsion of the anterior papillary muscle and chordae to the anterior leaflet after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitati...

  15. Does electrophysiological testing have any role in risk stratification for sudden cardiac death?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Lü; Wei Hua

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction Implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) has widely been accepted for secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in cardiac arrest survivors.1 Currently there are increasing interests in primary prevention of SCD in selected high risk patients who have not experienced cardiac arrest.1

  16. Using a Combined Platform of Swarm Intelligence Algorithms and GIS to Provide Land Suitability Maps for Locating Cardiac Rehabilitation Defibrillators

    OpenAIRE

    KAFFASH-CHARANDABI, Neda; SADEGHI-NIARAKI, Abolghasem; Park, Dong-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiac arrest is a condition in which the heart is completely stopped and is not pumping any blood. Although most cardiac arrest cases are reported from homes or hospitals, about 20% occur in public areas. Therefore, these areas need to be investigated in terms of cardiac arrest incidence so that places of high incidence can be identi-fied and cardiac rehabilitation defibrillators installed there.Methods: In order to investigate a study area in Petersburg, Pennsylvania State, and...

  17. Preoperative cardiac risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaković Radosav; Poldermans Don; Nešković Aleksandar N.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 100 million people undergo noncardiac surgery annually worldwide. It is estimated that around 3% of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery experience a major adverse cardiac event. Although cardiac events, like myocardial infarction, are major cause of perioperative morbidity or mortality, its true incidence is difficult to assess. The risk of perioperative cardiac complications depends mainly on two conditions: 1) identified risk factors, and 2) the type of the surgical p...

  18. Prognostic value of dipyridamole thallium-201 screening to minimize perioperative cardiac complications in diabetics undergoing kidney or kidney-pancreas transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, B.M.; Solomon, H.; Hoff, J.; Aridge, D.L.; Lindsey, L.M.; Garvin, P.J. [Saint Louis Univ. Health Sciences Center, Div. of Abdominal Transplant, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Bastani, B. [Saint Louis Univ. Health Sciences Center, Div. of Nephrology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chaitman, B.R. [Saint Louis Univ. Health Sciences Center, Div. of Cardioiogy, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    1998-04-01

    To minimize perloperative cardiac events, we utilize a screening protocol consisting of intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 myocardial imaging (DPT), with the selective use of coronary angiography based on the presence of reversible defect(s) on DPT test. A retrospective study was performed to determine the prognostic value of this protocol and to identify any clinical parameters predictive of an abnormal DPT test. To accomplish this, a detailed chart analysis of 176 consecutive kidney (n = 89) and kidney-pancreas (n = 87) transplant recipients who had undergone pre-transplant DPT testing was performed. The results of the DPT test were interpreted as normal in 111, fixed defect in 15, and reversible defect(s) in 50 patients. Forty-two of the 50 patients with reversible defect(s) underwent coronary angiography. Twelve of the 27 patients with significant coronary artery disease (CAD, > 50% stenosis in one or more coronary arteries) underwent pre-transplant revascularization and the remaining 15 were treated medically. Cardiac events (documented acute myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death) within 6 wk of transplant were stratified by the results of this protocol. Also, various clinical parameters were compared between patients with normal and abnormal (fixed and reversible defect) DPT tests. Only one of the 111 (0.9%) transplant recipients with a normal DPT test had a perioperative cardiac event. None of the 15 (0%) patients with a fixed defect and none of the 15 (0%) patients with reversible defect(s), but a nonsignificant (<50% narrowing) coronary angiogram, had a perioperative cardiac event. Three of the 27 (11.1%) patients with reversible defect(s) and significant disease on coronary angiography, who had undergone pre-transplant revascularization of were managed medically, had a perioperative coronary event. Of 14 recipients parameters analyzed, age > 50 yr was the only variable predictive of an abnormal DPT test. (au) 33 refs.

  19. Oral Phenytoin Toxicity Causing Sinus Arrest: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmisetty, Ravi K.; Gorthi, Janardhana Rao

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of sinus node arrest leading to symptomatic junctional bradycardia from oral phenytoin toxicity, which is a rare presentation. Our patient had no prior cardiac history and was on phenytoin therapy for seizure disorder. Although bradycardia is more commonly associated with intravenous phenytoin and there were few case reports of bradycardia with oral phenytoin reported, the literature is limited. In this case report, we also reviewed the pathophysiology of phenytoin-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:25343048

  20. Serum myoglobin after cardiac catheterisation.

    OpenAIRE

    McComb, J. M.; McMaster, E A

    1982-01-01

    Study of 80 consecutive patients undergoing elective diagnostic cardiac catheterisation showed that after the procedure 25 (31%) developed myoglobinaemia. This was attributed to complications of the catheterisation in two. The remaining 23 had received premedication by intramuscular injection. In patients without intramuscular injections myoglobinaemia did not occur after uncomplicated cardiac catheterisation. The study did not support the proposition that cardiac catheterisation results in m...

  1. Effects of emergency admission to hospital time and ventricular fibrillation time on defibrillation results in patients with cardiac arrest%心搏骤停患者入急诊抢救室时机与心室纤颤时间对除颤效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符兆亮; 杨新疆; 潘科; 麦泉云

    2016-01-01

    Objective To find out the effects of admission to emergency department time on cardiopulmo-nary resuscitation (CPR)results and the effects of the defibrillation and CPR sequence and ventricular fibrilla-tion time on defibrillation results in patients with cardiac arrest. Methods An analysis of clinical data for 162 patients with cardiac arrest who were admitted to the emergency room at working time and spare time be-tween January 2011 and December 2014 was done.Based on the length between cardiac arrest attack and admis-sion to emergency department,patients were divided into 10 min group (30 cases).Each group was subdivided into an immediate defibrillation group and a CPR before defibrillation group.The successful rate of defibrillation at different time of ventricular fibrillation,and with the sequence of defibrillation and CPR was comparatively analyzed. Results Comparing the successful rate of defibrillation for cardiac arrest patients admitted to the emergency room at working time (daytime)with patients admitted to the emergency room at spare time (holidays and nighttime)showed there was no statistical difference (P>0.05).With ventricular fibrillation prolonging,defibrillation success rate was significantly de-creased.In ventricular fibrillation 10 min group,the success rate of de-fibrillation was 75.61%,56.00%,20.00%,respectively.Comparison of the defibrillation success rate in ven-tricular fibrillation>10 min group with 0.05).In ventricular fibrillation 4~10 min group,CPR before defibrillation subgroup had obviously higher success rate of defibrillation than immediate defibrillation subgroup,comparison between the two groups showed statistical difference (72.00% versus 40.00%,P 10 min group,CPR before defibrillation subgroup had obviously higher success rate of defibrillation than immedi-ate defibrillation subgroup,comparison between the two groups showed statistical difference (40.00% versus 0,P10 min组(30例)。每组患者再分为直接除颤组和

  2. Capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest: Possible Kounis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Kazuhiko; Adams, Val R; Morehead, Richard S; Flannery, Alexander H

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest, possibly secondary to type I Kounis syndrome. A 47-year-old man with a history of T3N1 moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, status-post sigmoid resection, was started on adjuvant capecitabine approximately five months prior to presentation of cardiac arrest secondary to ventricular fibrillation. An electrocardiogram (EKG) revealed ST segment elevation on the lateral leads and the patient was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The catheterization revealed no angiographically significant stenosis and coronary artery disease was ruled out. After ruling out other causes of cardiac arrest, the working diagnosis was capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest. As such, an inflammatory work up was sent to evaluate for the possibility of a capecitabine hypersensitivity, or Kounis syndrome, and is the first documented report in the literature to do so when evaluating Kounis syndrome. Immunoglobulin E (IgE), tryptase, and C-reactive protein were normal but histamine, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 were elevated. Histamine elevation supports the suspicion that our patient had type I Kounis syndrome. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicates a probable adverse effect due to capecitabine with seven points. A case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest is reported, with a potential for type 1 Kounis syndrome as an underlying pathology supported by immunologic work up. PMID:25870182

  3. The effect of cardiac massage by subdiaphragmatic compression on hemodynamics and apotosis of myocardial cells of rabbit with cardiac arrest during abdomen operations%膈肌下抬挤心脏复苏法对开腹手术中心搏骤停兔血流动力学及心肌细胞凋亡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾彩虹; 王立祥; 许铁; 刘克喜; 王言理

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of cardiac massage by subdiaphragmatic compression (D-CPR) on the length of time required from cardiac arrest (CA) to restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC),hemodynamics,rate of ROSC,survival rate of 6 h,level of Caspase3 in myocardial cells and apoptosis index (AI) of myocardial cells and compare the effect of standard cardiac massage by chest compression (S-CPR) on those variables in order to choose the more effective resuscitation method for the patient with CA during abdomen operations.Methods A total of 32 healthy New Zealand rabbit were randomly (random number) divided into two groups,namely S-CPR group and D-CPR group (n =16 in each group).All of rabbits were anesthetized with ketamine and Shumianxin (a kind of hypnotics) by intraperitoneal injection,subsequently tracheotomy was made for endotracheal intubation,and right internal jugular vein was catheterized for monitoring central venous pressure (CVP) and left common carotid artery was for indwelling cannula to monitor arterial blood pressure.Lead-2 of ECG was placed.After laparotomy and vital signs of rabbits stabilized for 5 minutes,the endotracheal tube was clamped at the end expiration for 8 minutes to make asphyxial cardiac arrest model.The effects of two different methods were observed and compared in respects of changes in hemodynamics、length of time elapsed from CA to ROSC、ROSC rate and the survival rate in 6 h.The level of Caspase3 in myocardial cells and AI of myocardial cells were detected by using immunohistochemistry staining method and TUNEL,respectively 6 hours after successful resuscitation.Results ①The length of time consumed fiom CA to ROSC in D-CPR group was shorter than that in S-CPR group (P <0.05) ②Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and MAP 15 minutes after CPR were higher in D-CPR group than those in S-CPR group (P < 0.05).③SBP and DBP after ROSC were higher in D-CPR group than those in S-CPR group.④ROSC rate in D-CPR group was

  4. Spinal cord ischaemia complicating meningococcal meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Swart, S. S.; Pye, I F

    1980-01-01

    An extensive ischaemic cord syndrome developed in a patient with meningococcal meningitis complicated by 2 respiratory arrests but not by any period of prolonged hypotension or other signs of cardiovascular collapse. Excellent functional recovery occurred after intensive rehabilitation.

  5. Uso prático de um índice de risco de complicações após cirurgia cardíaca Practical use of a risk assessment model for complications after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Mara Varejão Strabelli

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Identificar os fatores de risco para complicações pós-operatórias do paciente cardiopata com indicação cirúrgica que podem influenciar na decisão sobre a conduta terapêutica. OBJETIVO: Descrever a experiência de um hospital de Cardiologia na validação e uso prático de um escore de risco pré-operatório. MÉTODOS: Para validação do escore escolhido (Tuman, avaliaram-se consecutiva e prospectivamente 300 pacientes adultos antes da cirurgia cardíaca eletiva com o uso de circulação extracorpórea (CEC. Pacientes com escore de 0 a 5 foram considerados de baixo risco; de 6 a 9 como risco moderado; e maior que 10, como alto risco para complicações cardíacas, infecciosas, neurológicas, pulmonares e renais, além de óbito. RESULTADOS: A classificação de Tuman mostrou relação estatisticamente significante com ocorrência de complicações infecciosas (p=0,010, com outras complicações pós-operatórias (p=0,034 e com evolução para óbito (pBACKGROUND: The identification of risk factors for postoperative complications in cardiac patients with surgical indication may influence the therapeutic decision. OBJECTIVE: To describe the experience of a Cardiology hospital in the validation and practical use of a preoperative risk score. METHODS:To validate TUMAN's score, chosen by considering morbidity and mortality, 300 adult patients were prospectively evaluated before elective cardiac surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation (ECC. Patients with a score of zero to five were considered as being low risk; from six to nine, as moderate risk and a score higher than 10 as high risk for cardiac, infectious, neurological, pulmonary and renal complications, as well as death. RESULTS: The TUMAN classification showed a statistically significant association with the occurrence of infectious complications (p = 0.010, with the other postoperative complications (p = 0.034 and death (p <0.001. Pulmonary infection was the most

  6. Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2008-01-01

    without adequate plasma volume expansion, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) insertion, peritoneovenous shunting and surgery. Cardiac failure is an important cause of mortality after liver transplantation, but improved liver function has also been shown to reverse the cardiac......Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction and...... abnormalities. No specific treatment can be recommended, and cardiac failure should be treated as in non-cirrhotic patients with sodium restriction, diuretics, and oxygen therapy when necessary. Special care should be taken with the use of ACE inhibitors and angiotensin antagonists in these patients. The...

  7. Prospective evaluation of stress myocardial perfusion imaging for pre-operative cardiac risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A prospective evaluation of patients who underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to assess preoperative cardiac risk was undertaken. At the time of the scan patients were classified into 4 Clinical Risk groups (CR) based on known clinical data. On completion of the scan, the patient was then categorised into 4 Scan based Risk groups (SR), incorporating size of perfusion deficit, single versus multi-vessel disease and ejection fraction. Surgery at Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre within 6 months of scan and complications were identified using the hospital medical database. Major early cardiac events coded were death (cardiac related), myocardial infarction, unstable angina, acute pulmonary oedema, cardiac arrest, and urgent revascularisation. 208 patients have reached 6 months post-MPI scan. Of these 119 (57%) were identified as having surgery. Of the Scan Risk groups, 63% of normal, 57% of increased, and 47% of high and very high groups have had surgery. An abnormal scan is associated with a three-fold risk of cardiac complication (3.5% vs 11.3%). This is lower than most previous reports and may be due to higher representation of low risk surgical procedures (14% in this series), improved peri-operative care and/or the test result influence on management (suggested by decreasing surgical rate as SR estimate rose). Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  8. Fisioterapia pré-operatória na prevenção das complicações pulmonares em cirurgia cardíaca pediátrica Preoperative physiotherapy in prevention of pulmonary complications in pediatric cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Marques Felcar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência e o risco de complicações pulmonares em crianças submetidas a intervenção fisioterapêutica pré e pós-operatória nas cirurgias cardíacas, bem como comparar com aquelas submetidas apenas a intervenção fisioterapêutica pós-operatória. MÉTODOS: Ensaio clínico aleatório, que incluiu 135 pacientes de zero a 6 anos com cardiopatias congênitas, submetidos à cirurgia cardíaca. Os pacientes foram aleatorizados para grupo intervenção (G1, que realizou fisioterapia pré e pós-operatória, ou para grupo controle (G2, somente fisioterapia pós-operatória. Para comparar as variáveis entre os grupos foi utilizado o teste de Mann-Whitney e o Qui quadrado. Foi calculado o risco absoluto e sua magnitude por meio do número necessário para tratar. A significância estatística foi estipulada em 5% (POBJECTIVE: To evaluate the occurrence and risk of pulmonary complications in children who underwent pre-and postoperative physiotherapeutic intervention in cardiac surgeries, as well as to compare these patients to those who underwent only postoperative physiotherapeutic intervention. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was performed with 135 patients from 6 years of age and younger with congenital heart disease who had undergone cardiac surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (G1 in which they underwent pre- and postoperative physiotherapy or to the control group (G2 in which they underwent only postoperative physiotherapy. Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square tests were used to compare the variables between the groups. The magnitude of the absolute risk was calculated by the number of patients needed to treat. Statistical significance was set at 5% (P<0.05. RESULTS: 17 patients (25% in G1, and 29 patients (43.3% in G2 presented pulmonary complications (P= 0.025, pneumonia was the most frequent complication, and among the 17 patients in G1, seven (10.3% developed pneumonia, six (8

  9. Acute Tension Pneumothorax Following Cardiac Herniation after Pneumonectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Steinmann; Eva Rohr; Andreas Kirschbaum

    2010-01-01

    A tension pneumothorax is one of the main causes of cardiac arrest in the initial postoperative period after thoracic surgery. Tension pneumothorax and cardiac herniation must be taken into account in hemodynamically unstable patients after pneumonectomy. We report an unusual case of successful treatment of acute tension pneumothorax following cardiac herniation and intrathoracic bleeding after pneumonectomy.

  10. Four patients with Sillence type I osteogenesis imperfecta and mild bone fragility, complicated by left ventricular cardiac valvular disease and cardiac tissue fragility caused by type I collagen mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandersteen, Anthony M; Lund, Allan M; Ferguson, David J P;

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is a hereditary disorder of connective tissue (HDCT) characterized by blue or gray sclerae, variable short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hearing loss, and recurrent fractures from infancy. We present four examples of OI type I complicated by valvular hear...

  11. 经膈肌下抬挤心脏方法对心脏停搏兔复苏的实验研究%An experimental study on cardiopulmonary resuscitation by cardiac massage under diaphragmatic muscle for rabbit with cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立祥; 丁春侠; 李旭; 顾彩虹; 孙鲲; 刘亚华

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the hemodynamic effect of standard-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (S-CPR) and of CPR by cardiac massage under the diaphragmatic muscle (D-CPR), and to evaluate the feasibility of D-CPR. Methods Twenty healthy New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, one group receiving S-CPR (n= 10) and the other group receiving D-CPR (n=10). Cardiac arrest was induced by asphyxiation at the end expiration for 8 minutes. After the hemodynamic situation was stable for 5 minutes before asphyxiation, the readings of ascending aorta systolic pressure (AOS) and diastolic pressure (AOD), transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2), right atrial systolic pressure (RASP), right atrial diastolic pressure (RADP), and electrocardiogram were recorded consecutively to the end of the experiment. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) of ascending aorta and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) were calculated, The rate of restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and the survival rate in a short duration of 6 hours were observed. Results Five rabbits in S-CPR group and 8 in D-CPR group were successfully resuscitated and obtained ROSC (50%, 80%, P=20. 05). Six hours survival rate was 400% in S-CRP group and 500% in D-CPR group. The comparisons between the two groups on AOS, AOD, MAP and CPP respectively showed that at 1 minute and 5 minutes during resuscitation the respective variables were higher in the D-CPR group than that in the S-CPR group (all P<0. 05). Compared to the bemodynamics before asphyxiation, the MAP and CPP in the D-CPR group increased 54. 1% and 33.4% of basic value at 1 minute, and they were 60. 0% and 41.8% at 5 minutes, while the AOS and AOD in the S-CPR group only increased by an average of 37. 3% and 16.5% at 1 minute, and they were 38. 5% and 17. 1% at 5 minutes, respectively. After ROSC, the hemodynamic variations of the D-CPR rabbits were more stable than those of S-CPR rabbits. Conclusion D-CPR can provide higher arterial pressure, cardiac

  12. Preoperative physical therapy for elective cardiac surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, E.H.J.; Smit, Y.; Helders, P.P.J.M.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After cardiac surgery, physical therapy is a routine procedure delivered with the aim of preventing postoperative pulmonary complications. OBJECTIVES: To determine if preoperative physical therapy with an exercise component can prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in cardiac sur

  13. Evolution of the dragonfly head-arresting system

    OpenAIRE

    Gorb, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The arrester or fixation system of the head in adult Odonata is unique among arthropods. This system involves the organs of two body segments: the head and the neck. It consists of a skeleton–muscle apparatus that sets the arrester parts in motion. The parts comprise formations covered with complicated microstructures: fields of microtrichia on the rear surface of the head and post-cervical sclerites of the neck. The arrester immobilizes the head during feeding or when the dragonfly is in tan...

  14. Modified emergency department thoracotomy for postablation cardiac tamponade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Thomas E; Haug, Eric W

    2012-04-01

    Cardiac dysrhythmias are a common problem in the United States. Radiofrequency ablation is being used more frequently as a treatment for these diagnoses. Although rare, serious complications such as cardiac tamponade have been reported as a result of ablation procedures. Traditionally, emergency department (ED) thoracotomy has been reserved for cases of traumatic arrest only. We report a case of a successful modified ED thoracotomy in a patient with postablation cardiac tamponade and subsequent obstructive shock who failed intravenous fluid resuscitation, pressor administration, and multiple attempts at pericardiocentesis. In this case, a modified approach was used to incise the pericardium. Although this was associated with large blood loss, we believed that using the traditional method of completely removing the pericardium would have resulted in uncontrolled hemorrhage. Instead, our method led to successful resuscitation of the patient until definitive care was available. A smaller pericardial incision than is traditionally used during ED thoracotomy deserves further consideration and research to determine whether and when it may be most useful as a temporizing treatment of cardiac tamponade when other methods have failed. PMID:22104519

  15. Perfusion Pressure Cerebral Infarct (PPCI) trial - the importance of mean arterial pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass to prevent cerebral complications after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Anne G; Holmgaard, Frederik; Rasmussen, Lars Simon;

    2016-01-01

    coronary vessel and/or valve disease and who are undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients are stratified by age and surgical procedure and are randomised 1:1 to either an increased mean arterial pressure (70-80 mmHg) or 'usual practice' (40-50 mmHg) during cardiopulmonary...... caused by emboli, but inadequate blood flow caused by other mechanisms may increase ischaemia in the penumbra or cause watershed infarcts. During cardiopulmonary bypass, blood pressure can be below the lower limit of cerebral autoregulation. Although much debated, the constant blood flow provided by the...... cardiopulmonary bypass system is still considered by many as appropriate to avoid cerebral ischaemia despite the low blood pressure. METHODS/DESIGN: The Perfusion Pressure Cerebral Infarct trial is a single-centre superiority trial with a blinded outcome assessment. The trial is randomising 210 patients with...

  16. Crack-arrest technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last several years, the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program has conducted several fracture mechanics experiments on large specimens that produced crack-arrest fracture-toughness values above 220 MPa·√m, which is the limit imposed by the ASME Code and the limit included in the Issues on Pressurized Thermal Shock studies. It is therefore appropriate and timely to investigate the influence that these high crack-arrest data have on the integrity assessment of nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs). A review of the evolution of the Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) issue and current methods of analysis provides insight into the motivation for the HSST Program performing the large-specimen fracture mechanics experiments. During the early 1970s, it was recognized that RPVs could be subjected to severe thermal shock as the result of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA). Analyses performed at that time indicated that thermal shock alone would not result in failure (through-wall cracking) of the vessel. However, a combination of pressure and a less severe thermal shock, the result of some postulated transients, could result in vessel failure. In March 1978, such a transient occurred at the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant. As a result of these events, parametric PTS studies were undertaken. Because of the apparent need for and the existence of high-temperature crack-arrest capability, the NRC HSST Program and others began to investigate the effect of higher crack-arrest values on the probability of failure and to determine if these values actually exist for prototypical RPV materials. This report describes the results of HSST Program large-specimen crack-arrest testing

  17. Complicações que aumentam o tempo de permanência na unidade de terapia intensiva na cirurgia cardíaca Complications that increase the time of Hospitalization at ICU of patients submitted to cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Laizo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar as complicações que aumentam a permanência na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI dos pacientes submetidos à cirurgia cardíaca. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados, retrospectivamente, 85 prontuários de pacientes submetidos à cirurgia cardíaca, no período de março a maio de 2009, na Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Juiz de Fora (MG e, destes pacientes, foram estudados 14 (16,47% que permaneceram por mais de 5 dias na UTI. Dentre os 85 pacientes, houve três óbitos, sendo dois pacientes operados em caráter de urgência, o que aumenta a morbidade, e um paciente que permaneceu internado e em ventilação mecânica (VM por 21 dias. RESULTADOS: O estudo demonstrou que as complicações que aumentaram o tempo de internação na UTI foram respiratórias e metabólicas, de acordo com a literatura. CONCLUSÃO: As complicações que aumentam o tempo de permanência na UTI são as relacionadas à função respiratória, doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, tabagismo, congestão pulmonar, desmame da VM prolongado, diabetes, infecções, insuficiência renal, acidente vascular encefálico e instabilidade hemodinâmica.OBJECTIVE: To show the complications that increase the permanence at intensive care unit (ICU of the patients submitted to cardiac surgery. METHODS: Eighty-five handbooks of patients submitted to cardiac surgery had been analyzed, retrospectively, from March to May 2009 at Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Juiz de Fora (MG - Brazil - and 14 (16.47% patients had been studied. They remained more than 5 days at ICU. In 85 patients occurred three deaths: two patients operated in urgency character and this increases the morbidity; one patient who remained in mechanical ventilation (MV by 21 days. RESULTS: Complications that had increased the time of hospitalization at ICU had been respiratory and metabolic in accordance with literature. CONCLUSION: Complications that increase the time of permanence at ICU are those related to

  18. Myocardial bridge and proximal complicated atherosclerosis of descending branch of left coronary artery as a cause of sudden cardiac death - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micić Jelena

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available When coronary artery, which is located subepicardially, submerges into myocardium and then, after a short intramural course, again appears subepicardially, it is called embedded coronary, while a part of myocardium above - a myocardial bridge. Muscular bridges are usually small and have no clinical significance. In the proximal part of coronary artery, preceding a myocardial bridge, there occurs a disturbance of blood course and myocardial perfusion, turbulence, collecting of lipids and mucopolysaccharides, lesion of elastica, which all leads to atheromatous lesions of intima of the arterial proximal part and to the resultant complications of atheroma. Degenerative changes of myocardium and its blood vessels, and in connection with it myocardial vulnerability, could be a consequence of this congenital arterial variation. We report a case of a 40-year-old male, without medical data about previous diseases, who died suddenly and unexpectedly in his apartment. The autopsy and microscopical examination revealed an acute ischemic lesion, myocardial bridge in the middle part of the left coronary artery descending branch and the complicated atherosclerotic plaque proximally of this bridge.

  19. 心肺复苏中单用肾上腺素或联合血管加压素治疗的Meta分析%Co-administration of vasopressin and epinephrine versus epinephrine alone in the treatment of patients with cardiac arrest: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧; 荆小莉; 李欣; 詹红; 熊艳; 廖晓星

    2010-01-01

    目的 在心搏骤停实施心肺复苏过程中,联合应用血管紧张素和肾上腺素的效果是否优于单用肾上腺素目前尚无统一的结论,本研究拟针对现有临床资料进行荟萃分析.方法 在NED-LINE及EMBASE数据库中检索关于比较成人心肺复苏时单用肾上腺素或联合应用血管紧张素的所有临床研究,首要观察指标为复苏后自主循环恢复率(ROSC).结果 在检索到的485篇文章中,6篇为随机对照临床研究.荟萃分析结果显示,除复苏后24 h生存率联合用药优于单用肾上腺素(OR值为2.99,95%CI 1.43~6.28)外,其余各项指标比较差异均无统计学意义.结论 荟萃分析中仅有包含122例患者的24 h生存率组联合用药优于单用肾上腺素,因此尚不支持复苏中应用血管加压素联合肾上腺素.%Objective The combination of vasopressin and epinephrine has long been thought to be more effective then epinephrine alone in cardiopulrnonary resuscitation (CPR), evidence is not enough to make such a clinical recommendation. This meta-analysis compared the efficacy of vasopressin and epinephrine used together versus epinephrine alone in cardiac arrest (ca) in order to verify the truth. Method MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for the data of randomized trials in comparing the results of co-administration of vasopressin and epinephrine with epinephrine alone in adults with cardiac arrest. The primary outcome was the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Six randomized trials in 485 articles were analyzed. We failed to get the results supporting the effectiveness of this combination therapy, except for the rate of 24 hours survival (OR: 2.99,95%CI:1.43 ~ 6.28). No evidence supported that vasopressin combined with epinephrine was better than epinephrine alone in ROSC. Conclusions This systematic review indicates the combination of vasopressin and epinephrine is better for the rate of 24 hpurs survival in only 122 patients. Further

  20. Protocolo gerenciado de tratamento do potencial doador falecido reduz incidência de parada cardíaca antes do explante dos órgãos A managed protocol for treatment of deceased potential donors reduces the incidence of cardiac arrest before organ explant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauco Adrieno Westphal

    2012-12-01

    death confirmatory test and end of the process, adherence to bundles of maintenance care essential measures, losses due to cardiac arrest, family refusal, contraindications, and the conversion rate of potential into actual donors. Student's t- and chi-square tests were used, and p-value < 0.05 was considered to be significant. RESULTS: A total of 42 potential donors were identified (18 in Phase 1 and 24 in Phase 2. The time interval between the first clinical assessment and the recovery decreased in Phase 2 (Phase 1: 35.0±15.5 hours versus Phase 2: 24.6±6.2 hours; p = 0.023. Adherence increased to 10 out of the 19 essential items of maintenance care, and losses due to cardiac arrest also decreased in Phase 2 (Phase 1: 27.8 versus 0% in Phase 2; p = 0.006, while the convertion rate increased (Phase 1: 44.4 versus 75% in Phase 2; p = 0.044. The losses due to family refusal and medical contraindication did not vary. CONCLUSION: The adoption of a managed protocol focused on the application of essential measures for the care of potential deceased donors might reduce the loss of potential donors due to cardiac arrest.

  1. An open source HPC-enabled model of cardiac defibrillation of the human heart

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabeu Llinares, Miguel Oscar; Pitt-Francis, Joe; Rodriguez, Blanca; Kay, David

    2011-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death following cardiac arrest is a major killer in the industrialised world. The leading cause of sudden cardiac death are disturbances in the normal electrical activation of cardiac tissue, known as cardiac arrhythmia, which severely compromise the ability of the heart to fulfill the body's demand of oxygen. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the most deadly form of cardiac arrhythmia. Furthermore, electrical defibrillation through the application of strong electric shocks to t...

  2. Cardiac catheterization and angiography. Third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses the papers on cardiac catheterization and angiography. The topics covered are: historical perspective and present practice of cardiac catheterization; angiography principles and utilization of radiologic and cineangiographic equipment; complications, incidence and prevention of side effects of cardiac catheterization; techniques; blood flow measurement of heart; pressure measurement; diagnostic techniques of angiography; special catheter techniques; coronary angiography, temporary and permanent pacemakers, potential role of lasers in the cardiac catheterization and evaluation of cardiac function

  3. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...

  4. [Complications of cocaine addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karila, Laurent; Lowenstein, William; Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel

    2009-06-20

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by repetitive and compulsive drug-seeking behavior and drug abuse despite negative health or social consequences. Cocaine addiction is a significant worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. Some of the most frequent complications are cardiovascular effects (acute coronary syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, increased blood pressure); respiratory effects (fibrosis, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, alveolar haemorrhage, asthma exacerbation; emphysema), neurological effects (strokes, aneurysms, seizures, headaches); risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, sexual transmitted disease and otolaryngologic effects. Other complications are not discussed here. The vast majority of studies indicate that there are cognitive deficits induced by cocaine addiction. Attention, visual and working memories, executive functioning are affected in cocaine users. Psychiatric complications found in clinical practice are major depressive disorders, cocaine-induced paranoia, cocaine-induced compulsive foraging and panic attacks. PMID:19642439

  5. Capnography during cardiac resuscitation: a clue on mechanisms and a guide to interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Gazmuri, Raúl J.; Kube, Erika

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of the end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PETCO2) during cardiac arrest has been shown to reflect the blood flow being generated by external means and to prognosticate outcome. In the present issue of Critical Care, Grmec and colleagues compared the initial and subsequent PETCO2 in patients who had cardiac arrest precipitated by either asphyxia or ventricular arrhythmia. A much higher PETCO2 was found immediately after intubation in instances of asphyxial arrest. Yet, a...

  6. Ventricular Arrhythmias in Apparently Normal Hearts: Who Needs an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Alex Y; Ellenbogen, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia is often considered a benign form of ventricular arrhythmia in patients without apparent structural heart disease. However, a subset of patients may develop malignant ventricular arrhythmias and present with syncope and sudden cardiac arrest. Survivors of cardiac arrest are candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). The indications for ICDs in patients with less than a full-blown cardiac arrest presentation but with electrocardiographically high-risk ectopy features remain uncertain. This article addresses some of the uncertainties and pitfalls in ICD risk stratification in this patient group and explores potential mechanisms for malignant conversion of benign premature ventricular complexes to sustained arrhythmia. PMID:27521094

  7. [Cardiac evaluation before non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzenbach, Jan; Boehm, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Before non-cardiac surgery, evaluation of cardiac function is no frequent part of surgical treatment. European societies of anesthesiology and cardiology published consensus-guidelines in 2014 to present a reasonable approach for preoperative evaluation. This paper intends to differentiate the composite of perioperative risk and to display the guidelines methodical approach to handle it. Features to identify patients at risk from an ageing population with comorbidities, are the classification of surgical risk, functional capacity and risk indices. Application of diagnostic means, should be used adjusted to this risk estimation. Cardiac biomarkers are useful to discover risk of complications or mortality, that cannot be assessed by clinical signs. After preoperative optimization and perioperative cardiac protection, the observation of the postoperative period remains, to prohibit complications or even death. In consideration of limited resources of intensive care department, postoperative ward rounds beyond intensive care units are considered to be an appropriate instrument to avoid or recognize complications early to reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:27479258

  8. 婴儿室间隔缺损合并肺动脉高压的早期外科治疗%Early cardiac surgical treatment of infants with ventricular septal defect complicated with pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石磊; 范太兵; 李群; 徐红亮; 李斌; 裴宇; 杨玉奇

    2010-01-01

    目的 分析460例婴儿室间隔缺损合并肺动脉高压的手术结果,验证早期外科治疗的可行性及优越性.方法 2003年1月至2009年3月我科连续行体外循环心内直视术纠治室间隔缺损伴肺动脉高压患儿460例,其中小婴儿组(6个月以下)132例,大婴儿组(6个月以上)328例.结果 本组婴儿中死亡16例,病死率3.4%,小婴儿组与大婴儿组分别死亡6例(4.5%)和10例(3.0%).其余患儿并发症有低心排、肺炎、肺不张、心律失常、切口感染等,经过治疗后均痊愈.小婴儿组与大婴儿组手术时间、体外循环时间、术后呼吸机辅助时间、术后监护时间、术后住院时间及死亡率比较差异均无统计学意义.结论 婴儿室间隔缺损合并肺动脉高压早期行外科手术治疗安全、可靠,并发症少、痛死率低;可避免患儿反复发生肺炎以及发生器质性肺高压丧失治疗机会.%Objective To analyze the surgical outcome of 460 infants with VSD complicated with PH, to investigate the feasibility and advantage of early open-heart surgery. Methods Four hundred and sixty infants with VSD and PH underwent extracorporeal circulation open -heart surgery from Jan 2003 to Mar 2009 in our hospital. Among which, there were 132 little infants(younger than 6 months)and 328 big infants (older than 6 months). Results Sixteen of all patients died, and the overall in- hospital mortality was 3.4%. The mortality of little infants group and big infants group were 4.5% (6 cases died)and 3.0% (10 cases died)respectively. Other complications were low cardiac output, pneumonia, atelectasis, arrhythmia, wound infection and so on, and they were cured. There were no significant differences in operation time, extracorporeal circulation time, duration of postoperative respiratory machine assisted ventilation, postoperative monitoring duration, postoperative hospitalization duration and mortality rate between the two groups. Conclusions The effect of

  9. Complications - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications - provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)...

  10. Complications - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Complications measures - state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and...

  11. Complications - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications - national data. This data set includes national-level data the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  12. Nursing students’ knowledge about arrest rhythms and their treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Kyrgianidou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Knowledge of health professionals for the arrest rhythms, is considered particularly important for the early recognition and proper treatment. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to assess the knowledge of nursing students on arrest rhythms and how to treat them. Material and Methods: The sample studied included 151 students from the Department of Nursing A' (n = 60, 40% and B' (n = 91, 60%, TEI of Athens, of whom 83% (n=125 were women and 17% (n=26 were men with a mean age of 23 years. Data collection was performed with specially designed questionnaire, that apart from demographics and students’ education level, it included ten questions about arrest rhythms’ knowledge and also self-assessment questions of their level of knowledge. The data were analyzed with the SPSS package v.19, using the criteria t-Test and χ2. Results: Of all the participants in the research, 95% (n = 144 did not answer correctly more than 6 questions from a total of 10. The students of the Department of Nursing A’ recognized with greater accuracy the arrest rhythms (p = 0.003. Those studying in lower semester acknowledged best the arrest rhythms (p = 0.002. Students who had recently attended course in basic or advanced resuscitation recognized best the arrest rhythms (p = 0.006. Older students knew better right treatment of the arrest rhythms (p = 0.037. Also, students who had attended the course of cardiac nursing in the last year, knew better the right treatment (p <0.001. Finally, the level of self-assessment was in line with the actual level of knowledge of students (p = 0.05. Conclusions: Continuous attendance of courses, education on certified programs and refresh courses help to maintain a good level of knowledge for longer periods.

  13. Complications of cirrhosis. A 50 years flashback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    formation of esophageal varices and ascites. The circulation becomes hyperdynamic with cardiac, pulmonary as well as renal consequences for dysfunction and reduced survival. Infections and a changed cardiac function known as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be involved in further aggravation of other...... complications such as renal failure precipitating the hepatorenal syndrome. Patients with end-stage liver disease and related complications as for example the hepatopulmonary syndrome can only radically be treated by liver transplantation....

  14. Comparative studies of defibrillation effect of biphasic and unilateral wave defibrillator for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest%不同波形自动除颤仪在院外心肺复苏中的疗效比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成杰; 关紫云; 李晚泉; 何明丰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test different automated external defibrillators ( AED) waveforms in order to improve the CPR for the patients with out - of - hospital cardiac arrest. Methods In a randomized controlled trial, patients with out - of - hospital cardiac arrest requiring defibrillation were treated with 1 of 2 AED protocols. The experimental group was treated with biphasic defibrillator, the control group was treated with a unilateral waveform defibrillator. The rate of terminating arrhythmia, the rates of restoration of spontaneous circulation, survival rates to hospital were compared between low -energy biphasic defibrillation group and high - energy unilateral defibrillation. Results 830 patients were included in the final analysis. Experimental patients(n =417) had small energy 150 ~ 200 J while the controls(n =413) had 300 ~ 360 J. Different proportions survived to hospital admission (43.4% versus 27. 1% ,P <0.05) , survived to hospital discharge( 13. 4% versus 9. 8% ,P < 0. 05) , achieved return of spontaneous circulation before physician arrival ( 49. 4% versus 30. 9% , P < 0. 05 ) , and survived to 1 year( P = 0. 45 ) . Conclusion Biphasic wave defibrillator has better hemodynamic effect, which suggests that biphasic wave method results in more successful rate of resuscitation and survival to hospital admission.%目的 探讨抢救院外心脏骤停患者的最佳自动除颤仪(AED)治疗方案,旨在提高心脏按压时间和心肺复苏的效果.方法 通过前瞻性随机对照研究,对院外因室颤或者心脏停跳需要除颤的患者使用两种不同的除颤方法,试验组(n=417)采用双相波除颤仪,能量150~200 J;对照组(n=413)采用单相波除颤仪,能量300~360 J.主要观察低能量双相与高能量单相除颤两组患者心律失常成功终止率、自主循环恢复率、复苏后存活到院率.结果 共对符合研究要求的830例患者进行了分析研究.试验组患者的安全存活到院率、电击后自主循

  15. Effects of esmolol combined with epinephrine on survival at early postresuscitation stage after cardiac arrest: experiment with rabbits%肾上腺素联合4-苯丙酸甲酯盐酸盐改善心跳骤停动物复苏早期生存率的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李响; 李培杰; 徐福林; 邓星奇; 王成碧

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of esmolol combined with epinephrine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on the survival at early postresuscitation stage after cardiac arrest Methods Thirty-six rabbits underwent tracheotomy and intratracheal intubation and then were randomly divided into 3 groups: Group A (n=6, control group without further operation), Group B (n=15, undergoing external electric shock to cause ventricular fibrillation and heart arrest and then bolus infusion of 0.01 mg/kg epinephrine via catheter during CPR), ad Group C (n=15, undergoing external electric shock to cause ventricular fibrillation and heart arrest and then bolus infusion of 0.01 mg/kg epinephrine combined with 0.2 mg/kg esmolol via catheter during CPR) . Blood samples were collected from the femoral artery 15 min before ventricular fibri11ation and 30,60, 120, 180, and 240 min after the initiation of CPR to measure the plasma levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) by ELISA to evaluate the degree of cardiac injury, The number of defibrillation was recorded and the survival rate was observed for 72 h. Results Thirteen rabbits in Group C survived, a number significantly higher than that in Group B (7, P<0.05). Electric defibrillation was conducted 1.5 times in Group C, significantly less than in Group B (3 times). During the 72 h follow up after CPR the average survival time of Group C was 43 h, significantly longer than that of Group B (19 h, P<0.05). There were not significant differences in the blood BNP and cTnT levels among these 3 groups before the experiment (all P>0.05). After the successful resuscitation the BNP and cTnT levels of Groups B and C were all significantly higher than those of Group A (all P<0.05), however, the blood BNP and cTnT levels of Group C were both significantly lower than those of Group B (both P<0.05). Conclusion Esmolol has the potential to reduce the myocardial injury and improve the survival at the

  16. Sudden cardiac death under anesthesia in pediatric patient with williams syndrome: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Punkaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome is a complex syndrome characterized by developmental abnormalities, craniofacial dysmorphic features, and cardiac anomalies. Sudden death has been described as a very common complication associated with anesthesia, surgery, and procedures in this population. Anatomical abnormalities associated with the heart pre-dispose these individuals to sudden death. In addition to a sudden and rapid downhill course, lack of response to resuscitation is another significant feature seen in these patients. The authors report a five-year-old male with Williams syndrome, hypothyroidism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. He suffered an anaphylactic reaction during CT imaging with contrast. Resuscitation was unsuccessful. Previous reports regarding the anesthetic management of patients with Williams are reviewed and the potential for sudden death or peri-procedure related cardiac arrest discussed in this report. The authors also review reasons for refractoriness to defined resuscitation guidelines in this patient population.

  17. Historical highlights in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The benchmarks in cardiac pacing are identified, beginning with F. Steiner (1871), who rhythmically stimulated the chloroform-arrested hearts of 3 horses, 1 donkey, 10 dogs, 14 cats, and 8 rabbits. The chloroform-arrested heart in human subjects was paced by T. Greene in the following year (1872) in the UK. In 1882, H. Ziemssen in Germany applied cardiac pacing to a 42-year old woman who had a large defect in the anterior left chest wall subsequent to resection of an enchondroma. Intentional cardiac pacing did not occur until 1932, when A.A. Hyman in the US demonstrated that cardiac pacing could be clinically practical. Hyman made a batteryless pacemaker for delivery in induction shock stimuli (60-120/min) to the atria. His pacemaker was powered by a hand-wound, spring-driven generator which provided 6 min of pacemaking without rewinding. Closed-chest ventricular pacing was introduced in the US in 1952 by P.M. Zoll et al. Zoll (1956) also introduced closed-chest ventricular defibrillation. W.L. Weirich et al. (1958) demonstrated that direct-heart stimulation in closed-chest patients could be achieved with slender wire electrodes. S. Furman and J.B. Schwedel (1959) developed a monopolar catheter electrode for ventricular pacing in man. In the same year, W. Greatbatch and W.M. Chardack developed the implantable pacemaker. PMID:18238328

  18. Postpartum complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the CT findings of major postpartum complications and determine what role CT plays in their evaluation. The CT scans of nine patients with major postpartum complications were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had been referred to CT for evaluation of postpartum fever, abdominal pain, and elevated results of liver function tests. Complications identified at CT included hepatic infarctions (n = 2), endometritis (n = 2), postoperative wound abscess (n = 1), massive abdominal hemorrhage (n = 1), septic thrombophlebitis (n = 1), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). CT findings of hepatic infarction included wedge-shaped areas of decreased enhancement conforming to a vascular distribution

  19. Complicações pulmonares em crianças submetidas à cirurgia cardíaca em um hospital universitário Pulmonary complications in pediatric cardiac surgery at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lago Borges

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar a prevalência de complicações pulmonares em crianças submetidas à cirurgia cardíaca, assim como características demográficas e clínicas da população estudada. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi composta por 37 crianças, de ambos os sexos, submetidas à cirurgia cardíaca no Hospital Universitário Presidente Dutra, São Luís (MA, durante o ano de 2007. Não foram incluídos pacientes que apresentaram doença pulmonar pré-cirúrgica, portadores de distúrbios neurológicos, óbito intra-operatório, além de falta de dados no prontuário. Os dados foram obtidos pela coleta nas evoluções médicas e de enfermagem dos respectivos prontuários. RESULTADOS: Quanto às características populacionais, houve predomínio de crianças do sexo feminino, provenientes do interior do estado e na faixa etária escolar. Patologias consideradas de baixo risco foram a maioria, destacando-se a persistência do canal arterial, comunicação interventricular e comunicação interatrial. Observou-se que a maior parcela das crianças fez uso de circulação extracorpórea por mais de 30 minutos, sendo a mediana igual a 80 minutos, sofreu esternotomia mediana, utilizou apenas dreno mediastinal e fez uso de ventilação mecânica pós-operatória, sendo a mediana aproximadamente de 6,6 horas. Somente três (8,1% pacientes apresentaram complicações pulmonares, sendo que destes, dois foram a óbito. CONCLUSÃO: A maioria das crianças da amostra era do sexo feminino, na faixa etária escolar e proveniente do interior do estado. Os baixos tempos de circulação extracorpórea e ventilação mecânica, além de cardiopatias congênitas consideradas de baixo risco, podem ter sido fatores contribuintes para o pequeno índice de complicações pulmonares no pós-operatório.OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of pulmonary complications in children undergone cardiac surgery, as well as demographic and clinical characteristics of this population

  20. Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

  1. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  2. Pregnancy Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 639-2888 Contact Media Pregnancy Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page Before Pregnancy ... if necessary. Mental Health Conditions Some women experience depression during or after pregnancy. Symptoms of depression are: ...

  3. Diphtheria Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  4. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a) Each detonation arrester required by this part must: (1) Be capable of arresting a detonation from either side...

  5. Extrahepatic complications to cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens H; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    , the circulation becomes hyperdynamic with cardiac, pulmonary as well as renal consequences for dysfunction and reduced survival. Infections and a changed cardiac function known as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be involved in further aggravation of other complications such as renal failure precipitating...... the hepatorenal syndrome. Patients with end-stage liver disease and related complications as for example the hepatopulmonary syndrome can only radically be treated by liver transplantation. As a bridge to this treatment, knowledge on the mechanisms of the pathophysiology of complications is essential...

  6. A Literature Review Revisiting Phenytoin-Induced Sinus Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsai, Shireen; Hariri, Imad; Taleb, Mohammad; Yoon, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Classically, phenytoin (PTN) infusion for the treatment of status epilepticus has been proven to be associated with cardiovascular toxicity, including dysrhythmias, hypotension, and cardiovascular collapse. Subsequently, fosphenytoin (FOS) was introduced on the market in 1997 with claims of having less cardiac toxicity. However, since then, many accounts of cardiac events have been reported undermining these claims. FOS gained popularity due to its water solubility, which allows 3 times faster infusion in comparison with PTN with less venous irritation and local toxicity. FOS is the phosphate ester prodrug of PTN and is rapidly converted to PTN independent of the dose and rate of administration. Intravenous FOS and PTN are bioequivalent. Adverse cardiac effects of both intravenous FOS and PTN have been correlated to the rate of infusion, concentration of the agent, known risk factors, or pre-existing hypersensitivity, and most cases have been identified after infusing a loading dose of these medications. This case report is unique, in that, the patient developed sinus arrest while concurrently receiving oral PTN and intravenous FOS. Clinicians should be more cognizant of the association of FOS and PTN with adverse cardiac events. Baseline electrocardiogram should be obtained on all patients prescribed FOS or PTN to identify underlying cardiac problems that may place the patient in a higher risk category. Telemetry should be performed on all patients receiving PTN in an inpatient setting. PMID:25549077

  7. Myocardial Oxidative Stress in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Mackie, Stewart; Peng, Yun-Wen; Donohue, Janet; Yu, Sunkyung; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Charpie, John

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease often necessitates a period of myocardial ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, followed by reperfusion after aortic cross-clamp removal. In experimental models, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is associated with significant oxidative stress and ventricular dysfunction. A prospective observational study was conducted in infants (tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Blood samples were drawn following anesthetic induction (baseline) and directly from the coronary sinus at 1, 3, 5, and 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal. Samples were analyzed for oxidant stress using assays for thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl, 8-isoprostane, and total antioxidant capacity. For each subject, raw assay data were normalized to individual baseline samples and expressed as fold-change from baseline. Results were compared using a one-sample t test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Sixteen patients (ten with TOF and six with VSD) were enrolled in the study, and there were no major postoperative complications observed. For the entire cohort, there was an immediate, rapid increase in myocardial oxidative stress that was sustained for 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal in all biomarker assays (all P < 0.01), except total antioxidant capacity. Infant cardiac surgery is associated with a rapid, robust, and time-dependent increase in myocardial oxidant stress as measured from the coronary sinus in vivo. Future studies with larger enrollment are necessary to assess any association between myocardial oxidative stress and early postoperative outcomes. PMID:26843460

  8. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart Syndrome) that has been described after acute stress. It is a reversible cardiac dysfunction with distinct imaging features(the echocardiographic or left ventricular angiographic image resembles a Tak...

  9. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient\\'s cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  10. Análisis de la inclusión de la policía en la respuesta de emergencias al paro cardiorrespiratorio extrahospitalario Analysis of the inclussion of police personnel on the out of hospital cardiac arrest emergency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Aguilera-Campos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: El presente estudio busca analizar una alternativa al pronóstico de paro cardiorrespiratorio extrahospitalario (PCE como problema de salud pública al involucrar a los cuerpos policiacos en la respuesta de emergencias. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizó retrospectivamente un registro de PCE iniciado en junio de 2009. Se contrastó un modelo basado en un número limitado de ambulancias con primera respuesta por la policía. RESULTADOS: La mortalidad fue de 100%, tiempos de respuesta elevados y 10.8% recibió reanimación cardiopulmonar (RCP por testigos presenciales. En 63.7% de los eventos la policía llegaba antes que la ambulancia y en 1.5% el policía dio RCP. El costo por vida salvada fue 5.8-60 millones de pesos en un modelo sólo con ambulancias vs. 0.5-5.5 millones de pesos en un modelo con primera respuesta policiaca. CONCLUSIONES: La intervención de la policía en la ciudad de Querétaro facilitaría la disminución de la mortalidad por PCE a un menor costo.OBJETIVE: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OCHA is a public health problem in which survival depends on community initial response among others. This study tries to analyze what's the proportional cost of enhancing such response by involving the police corps in it. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively an OCHA registry started on June 2009. We contrasted a model with limited number of ambulances and police based first response. RESULTS: Mortality was 100%, response times high and 10.8% of the victims were receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR by bystanders. In 63.7% of the events the police arrived before the ambulance, in 1.5% of these cases the police provided CPR. The cost for each saved life was of 5.8-60 million Mexican pesos per life with only ambulance model vs 0.5-5.5 million Mexican pesos on a police first response model with 12 ambulances. CONCLUSIONS: In Queretaro interventions can be performed taking advantage of the response capacity of the

  11. Anesthesia-related cardiac arrest in children. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morray, Jeffrey P

    2002-03-01

    The improvement in mortality rates for anesthetized children over the past 50 years reflects the many improvements that have been made in pediatric perioperative care. The modern pediatric anesthesiologist is better trained than the predecessors of half a century ago, and has a vastly improved arsenal of monitoring devices and anesthetic agents from which to choose. The modern pediatric perioperative environment is better equipped to meet the unique needs of children. Techniques practiced by surgeons, nurses, radiologists, and pharmacologists help create a far more sophisticated infrastructure than existed 50 years ago. Given these changes, it is not surprising that outcomes for patients have improved. PMID:11892500

  12. How Can Death Due to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you to. You should still follow a heart-healthy lifestyle, even if you take medicines to treat your ... contributes to other heart problems. Following a heart-healthy lifestyle can help you lower your risk for CHD, ...

  13. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik;

    2015-01-01

    .3%, respectively. High parental education was associated with improved survival after OHCA (OR 3.48, CI 1.27-9.41). Significant crude difference in survival (OR 3.18, CI 1.22-8.34) between high household incomes vs. low household incomes was found. CONCLUSION: OHCA incidences and survival rates varied...... population. METHODS: All OHCA patients in Denmark, ≤21 years of age, were identified from 2001 to 2010. The population was divided into infants (<1 year); pre-school children (1-5 years); school children (6-15 years); and high school adolescents/young adults (16-21 years). Multivariate logistic regression......-school children, school children and high school adolescents were 11.5, 3.5, 1.3 and 5.3 per 100,000 inhabitants. Overall bystander CPR rate was 48.8%, and for age groups: 55.4%, 41.2%, 44.9% and 63.0%, respectively. Overall 30-day survival rate was 8.1%, and for age groups: 1.4%, 4.5%, 16.1% and 9...

  14. The inflammatory marker suPAR after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rundgren, Malin; Lyngbaek, Stig; Fisker, Helle; Friberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    pilot study aimed at investigating suPAR levels in relation to outcome after CA and mild induced hypothermia. METHODS: suPAR levels were measured at 6, 36, and 72 hours in patients treated with hypothermia after CA. suPAR levels were analyzed in relation to survival after 6 months. Receiver operating...... characteristic curve (ROC)-analyses were performed, and area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was correlated to suPAR levels. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients (40 male, median 65 years) were included, and 33 (60%) were alive after 6 months. The suPAR levels were...... significantly higher in nonsurviving patients compared with survivors at 6 and 36 hours (p=0.006 and 0.034 respectively), but not at 72 hours. The suPAR levels increased from 6 to 72 hours (p<0.0001). Time to ROSC correlated positively with suPAR levels at 6 hours (p=0.003) but not at 36 and 72 hours. ROC...

  15. 1. Predictors of cardio pulmonary resuscitation outcome in post-operative cardiac children

    OpenAIRE

    Nasser, B.

    2016-01-01

    Outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in children with congenital heart disease has improved and many children survived after in hospital cardiac arrestthe purpose of this study is to determine predictor of poor outcome after CPR in critical children undergoing cardiac surgerywe conducted a retrospective chart review and data analysis of all CPR records and charts of all postoperative cardiac children who had cardiac arrest and required resuscitation from 2012 till 2015. Demographic,...

  16. Effects of different cardiopulmonary resuscitation qualities on hemodynamics and aerobic metabolism in pigs with cardiac arrest%心肺复苏质量对心博骤停猪血流动力学及氧代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘朝霞; 李春盛

    2008-01-01

    目的 应用O-CPR技术控制心肺复苏(CPR)质量,以观察在心脏骤停动物模型实施不同质量的CPR对复苏期间血流动力学和氧代谢的影响.方法 18头体质量为(30±1)kg的北京长白猪麻醉后,右侧股静脉送入Swan-Ganz导管并连接爱德华VigianceⅡ连续心排血量监测仪,左侧颈内静脉置管并放置电极到右心室,并分别行主动脉、右心房置管,连续记录血流动力学各指标,然后使用医用程控刺激仪电击致动物心博骤停,在室颤4 min后,将实验猪随机分为2组,标准CPR组和不标准CPR组,利用飞利浦HeartStart MRx监护仪/除颤器的O-CPR进行质量控制,监测胸外按压的深度、频率和回弹等.其中标准CPR组在复苏时进行标准胸外按压,频率为100次/min,按压通气比为30:2,按压深度为38~51 mm,胸廓充分回弹;不标准CPR组按压频率和按压通气比不变,但是按压深度为标准按压的60%~70%,每次胸廓回弹均不完全.在按压和通气9 min后开始电除颤.在各个时间点监测心排血量(CO)、平均主动脉压(MAP)等,计算冠脉灌注压(CPP),监测动静脉血气并计算氧输送量(DO2)和氧耗量(VO2)等,记录复苏成功的实验猪头数.数据处理采用SPSS 11.5统计软件进行y2检验和两个样本的t检验.结果 标准CPR组的自主循环恢复(ROSC)的成功率达90.9%,明显高于不标准者的28.6%(P=0.013),标准CPR组主要血流动力学指标CPP、CO、MAP高(P<0.05),全身血液氧合程度好,D02和VO2高于对照组(P<0.05).结论 在室颤心脏骤停猪模型中,应用规范化标准心肺复苏较不标准者能够明显提高CPP和CO2改善复苏期间的血流动力学,并可以提高DO2和VO2,对氧代谢的改善产生积极作用,因此ROSC成功率明显提高.%Objective To investigate the effects of different cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) qualifies under Q-CPR control on hemodynamics and aerobic metabolism in pigs with cardiac arrest. Method After eighteen

  17. The Walk to Save: Benefits of Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rion, Joann H; Kautz, Donald D

    2016-01-01

    Hospital immobilization after a cardiac event can cause complications. The pathophysiology of complications, research concerning benefits of early ambulation, and recommendations from the American College of Sports Medicine are discussed. PMID:27522842

  18. Two unsung heroes of closed-chest cardiac pacing: Green and McWilliam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, L A

    1994-07-01

    In the latter half of the last century, cardiorespiratory arrest was not uncommon due to the anesthetic used (chloroform). Animal studies showed that the heart could be paced. One physician (Green) resuscitated 5 of 7 cardiac arrest patients with single stimuli applied to body surface electrodes. Another (McWilliam) issued a proposal for adoption of closed-chest pacing and provided information on the procedure. The following historical footnote describes these pioneering events in the history of cardiac pacing. PMID:7937239

  19. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvesh Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article.

  20. Interdisciplinary preoperative patient education in cardiac surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    De Weert, J.; van Dulmen, S.; Bar, P.; Venus, E.

    2003-01-01

    Patient education in cardiac surgery is complicated by the fact that cardiac surgery patients meet a lot of different health care providers. Little is known about education processes in terms of interdisciplinary tuning. In this study, complete series of consecutive preoperative consultations of 51 cardiac surgery patients with different health care providers (physicians, nurses and health educators) were videotaped. The information exchange between patients and providers was analyzed directl...

  1. Early clinical outcome and complications related to balloon kyphoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bergmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures using transpedicular cement augmentation has grown significantly over the last two decades. The benefits of balloon kyphoplasty compared to conservative treatment remain controversial and are discussed in the literature. The complication rates of vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are considered to be low. The focus of this study was the analysis of acute and clinically relevant complications related to this procedure. In our department, all patients treated between February 2002 and February 2011 with percutaneous cement augmentation (372 patients, 522 augmented vertebral bodies were prospectively recorded. Demographic data, comorbidities, fracture types, intraoperative data and all complications were documented. The pre- and postoperative pain-level and neurological status (Frankel-Score were evaluated. All patients underwent a standardized surgical procedure. Two hundred and ninety-seven patients were treated solely by balloon kyphoplasty; 216 females (72.7% and 81 males (27.3%. Average patient age was 76.21 years (±10.71, range 35-98 years. Average American Society Anestesiologists score was 3.02. According to the Orthopedic Trauma Association classification, there were 69 A 1.1 fractures, 177 A 1.2 fractures, 178 A 3.1.1 fractures and 3 A 3.1.3 fractures. Complications were divided into preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative events. There were 4 pre-operative complications: 3 patients experienced persistent pain after the procedure. In one case, the pedicles could not be visualized during the procedure and the surgery was terminated. One hundred and twenty-nine (40.06% of the patients showed intraoperative cement leaking outside the vertebras, one severe hypotension and tachycardia as reaction to the inflation of the balloons, and there was one cardiac arrest during surgery. Postoperative subcutaneous hematomas were observed in 3 cases, 13 patients developed a

  2. Wide plate crack arrest testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To predict the behavior of a nuclear pressure vessel undergoing pressurized thermal shock, certain information on dynamic crack propagation and arrest is required. The purpose of the work described is to provide such data on wide plates fracturing at temperatures up to the upper shelf region. Four tests have been completed on the 26 MN Universal Testing Machine at NBS. The specimens are to be fractured in a thermal gradient that, in the most extreme case, might extend from -1000C to 2000 across the 1 meter specimen width. This is done so that the crack will initiate in a cold, brittle region and arrest in a hot, tough region. An important part of this study is data acquisition from the numerous strain gages, thermocouples, timing wires, crack mouth opening displacement gages, and acoustic emission transducers that are mounted on the specimen. Each test has been different with respect to conditions of testing, specimen configuration, and instrumentation used. The progressive changes in test procedure represent attempts to obtain the desired crack run and arrest behavior and to improve upon the quality of the data collected. In particular, efforts were made to initiate crack propagation at lower stress intensity factors. Also, strain gage combinations and locations were optimized to better deduce the crack position as a function of time. Another result of great interest that can be deduced from these tests is the initiation of fracture toughness and the arrest toughness

  3. Complicated Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma? ; What is the impact of organ failure on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis? ; Based on individual patient data from randomized trials, does early enteral tube feedin...

  4. Review of interventional procedures in the very low birth-weight infant (<1.5 kg): complications, lessons learned and current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology (IR) procedures in very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants (<1.5 kg) are challenging due to size, immaturity, comorbidities and lack of devices of suitable size. Infants are moved from the neonatal intensive care unit to the IR suite, further exposing them to risk. Our purpose was to review our experience of interventional procedures in VLBW infants, specifically complications and potential risks. VLBW infants referred for image-guided therapy between 1998 and 2005 were identified and medical records reviewed. ''Complications'' were divided into: major or minor, periprocedural or postprocedural, and intervention-/device-related, patient-related or equipment-related. Transport risk index of physiological stability (TRIPS) scores were calculated. A total of 116 infants (68 male, 48 female) underwent 176 procedures (159 vascular access-related and 17 nonvascular). Of 158 complications identified, 116 were major and 42 were minor. Major complications included hypothermia (n=33), line manipulations/removals (n=25), bleeding (n=12), thrombosis (n=4), cardiac arrest (n=3), tamponade (n=2), and multiorgan failure (n=1). Of the complications, 119 were categorized as intervention-/device-related, 32 patient-related and 7 equipment-related. There were no significant differences between pre- and postprocedural TRIPS scores. Successful completion of IR procedures in the VLBW infant is possible, but complications still occur in these fragile infants. (orig.)

  5. Review of interventional procedures in the very low birth-weight infant (<1.5 kg): complications, lessons learned and current practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffan, Eoghan E. [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada); McNamara, Patrick J.; Whyte, Hilary; L' Herault, Johanne [The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neonatology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; John, Philip; Connolly, Bairbre L. [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Image-Guided Therapy Unit, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    Interventional radiology (IR) procedures in very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants (<1.5 kg) are challenging due to size, immaturity, comorbidities and lack of devices of suitable size. Infants are moved from the neonatal intensive care unit to the IR suite, further exposing them to risk. Our purpose was to review our experience of interventional procedures in VLBW infants, specifically complications and potential risks. VLBW infants referred for image-guided therapy between 1998 and 2005 were identified and medical records reviewed. ''Complications'' were divided into: major or minor, periprocedural or postprocedural, and intervention-/device-related, patient-related or equipment-related. Transport risk index of physiological stability (TRIPS) scores were calculated. A total of 116 infants (68 male, 48 female) underwent 176 procedures (159 vascular access-related and 17 nonvascular). Of 158 complications identified, 116 were major and 42 were minor. Major complications included hypothermia (n=33), line manipulations/removals (n=25), bleeding (n=12), thrombosis (n=4), cardiac arrest (n=3), tamponade (n=2), and multiorgan failure (n=1). Of the complications, 119 were categorized as intervention-/device-related, 32 patient-related and 7 equipment-related. There were no significant differences between pre- and postprocedural TRIPS scores. Successful completion of IR procedures in the VLBW infant is possible, but complications still occur in these fragile infants. (orig.)

  6. Sudden Cause of Cardiac Death—Be Aware of Me: A Case Report and Short Review on Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh K. Kalavakunta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Brugada syndrome accounts for about 4% of sudden cardiac deaths (SCD. It is characterized by an ST-segment elevation in the right precordial electrocardiogram (EKG leads. Case Presentation. We describe a 39-year-old healthy Caucasian man who was admitted to the intensive care unit after being cardioverted from ventricular fibrillation (VF arrest. His past history was significant for an episode of syncope one month prior to this presentation for which he was admitted to an outlying hospital. EKG during that admission showed ST elevations in V1 and V2 leads, a pattern similar to Type 1 Brugada. A diagnosis of Brugada syndrome was missed and the patient had a cardiac arrest a month later. We discuss a short review of Brugada syndrome and emphasize the need to look for it in patients presenting with SCD and malignant arrhythmias. Conclusion. Physicians should always consider Brugada syndrome in the differential diagnosis of ST-segment elevation in anterior precordial leads of EKG and associated VT/VF. Although more than 17 years have passed since the first case was reported, increased awareness of this syndrome is needed to identify patients with EKG changes and treat them accordingly to prevent incidence of (SCD and its deleterious complications.

  7. Cardiac Penetrating Injuries and Pseudoaneurysm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shifeng

    2002-01-01

    Objective To discuss the early diagnosis and treatment of cardiac penetrating injuries and pseudoaneurysm. Methods 18 cases of cardiac penetrating injuries, in which 2 cases were complicated with pseudoaneurysm, were diagnosed by emergency operation and color Doppler echocardiography between May 1973 and Dec. 2001 in our hospital. The basis for emergency operation is the injured path locating in cardiac dangerous zone, severe shock or pericardial tamponade. ResultsAmong 18 cases of this study, 17 cases underwent emergency operation. During the operation, 11 cases were found injured in right ventricle, 2 cases were found injured in right atrium, 1 case was found injured in pulmonary artery,4 cases were found injured in left ventricle, 2 cases were found complicated with pseudoaneurysm. 17cases underwent cardiac repair including 1 case of rupture of aneurysm. 1 case underwent elective aneurysm resection. In whole group, 15 cases survived(83.33% ), 3 cases died( 16.67%). The cause of death is mainly hemorrhagic shock. Conclusion Highly suspicious cardiac penetrating injuries or hemopericaridium should undergo direct operative exploration. Pseudoaneurysm should be resected early,which can prevent severe complications.

  8. Major complications after radiofrequency ablation for liver tumors: Analysis of 255 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Tao Kong; Wei-Wei Zhang; Yu-Dong Qiu; Tie Zhou; Jun-Lan Qiu; Wei Zhang; Yi-Tao Ding

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the major complications after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumors and analyze possible risk factors that precipitate these complications.METHODS: From March 2001 to April 2008, 255 patients with liver tumors (205 male, 50 female;age range, 18-89 years; mean age, 56.0 years) who received RFA were enrolled in this study. Of these patients, 212 had hepatocellular carcinoma, 39 had metastatic liver tumors and four had cholangiocellular carcinoma. One hundred and forty eight patients had a single tumor, and 107 had multiple tumors. Maximum diameter of the tumors ranged 1.3-20 cm (mean,5.1 cm). All patients were treated with a cooledtip perfusion electrode attached to a radiofrequency generator (Radionics, Burlington, MA, USA). RFA was performed via the percutaneous approach ( n = 257),laparoscopy ( n = 7), or open surgical treatment ( n = 86). The major complications related to RFA were recorded. The resultant data were analyzed to determine risk factors associated these complications.RESULTS: Among the 255 patients, 425 liver tumors were treated and 350 RFA sessions were performed.Thirty-seven (10%) major complications were observed which included 13 cases of liver failure, 10 cases of hydrothorax requiring drainage, three cases of tumor seeding, one case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, one case of intrahepatic abscess, one case of bile duct injury, one case of cardiac arrest, and five cases of hyperglycemia. Seven patients had more than two complications. Liver failure was the most severe complication and was associated with the highest mortality. Eleven patients died due to worsening liver decompensation. Child-Pugh classification ( P = 0.001)and choice of approach ( P = 0.045) were related to post-treatment liver failure, whereas patient age,tumor size and number were not significant factors precipitating this complication.CONCLUSION: RFA can be accepted as a relatively safe procedure for the treatment of liver

  9. Epidural analgesia for cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Svircevic; M.M. Passier; A.P. Nierich; D. van Dijk; C.J. Kalkman; G.J. van der Heijden

    2013-01-01

    Background A combination of general anaesthesia (GA) with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) may have a beneficial effect on clinical outcomes by reducing the risk of perioperative complications after cardiac surgery. Objectives The objective of this review was to determine the impact of perioperativ

  10. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  11. Role of external cardiac compression in truncal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, K L; Feliciano, D V

    1982-11-01

    External cardiac compression (ECC) was originally developed for patients with nontraumatic cardiac conditions, but it is now used for a wide variety of emergency conditions. As an integral part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), ECC coupled with forced pulmonary ventilation may NOT be applicable to cases of cardiac arrest following penetrating and blunt thoracic and abdominal trauma. Review of 100 patients with penetrating or blunt truncal trauma who received CPR and ECC more than 3 minutes prehospital revealed NO survivors despite continued aggressive resuscitative efforts in 49 of the patients upon arrival at a trauma center. Major cardiovascular disruption was found at thoracotomy or autopsy in all patients. In another 12 patients receiving forced ventilation and prehospital ECC, air embolism to the coronary arteries was the cause of death. CPR by paramedics, physicians, nurses, or lay persons does not appear to be of value in patients who have sustained cardiac arrest from truncal trauma. PMID:7143499

  12. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  13. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  14. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Costello BT; Nadel J.; Taylor AJ

    2016-01-01

    Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting syst...

  15. STUDY ON COMPUETD APPARATUS FOR EXTERNAL CARDIAC MASSAGE AND ITS CLINICAL APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Mingshun; MENG Fanhang; ZHU Shouzeng

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To make and study computed apparatus for external cardiac massage and observe its clinieal effect. Method The apparatus was made and was applied. Result The apparatus was effective. Conclusion The apparatus was a effective equipment in treatment of patient with cardiac arrest.

  16. Separation of craniopagus Siamese twins using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D E; Reitz, B A; Carson, B S; Long, D M; Dufresne, C R; Vander Kolk, C A; Maxwell, L G; Tilghman, D M; Nichols, D G; Wetzel, R C

    1989-11-01

    Occipitally joined craniopagus Siamese twins were separated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. The 7-month-old infants shared a large sagittal venous sinus that precluded conventional neurosurgical approach because of risk of exsanguination and air embolism. After craniotomy and preliminary exposure of the sinus, each twin underwent sternotomy and total cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest allowed safe division and subsequent reconstruction of the sinus remnants. Several unusual problems were encountered, including transfusion of a large blood volume from one extracorporeal circuit to the other through the common venous sinus, deleterious warming of the exposed brain during circulatory arrest, and thrombosis of both pump oxygenators. Both infants survived, although recovery was complicated in each by neurologic injury, cranial wound infection, and hydrocephalus. This case demonstrates the valuable supportive role of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest in the management of complex surgical problems of otherwise inoperable patients. PMID:2682024

  17. Mutations in calmodulin cause ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Sondergaard, M.T.; Vranas, Marta; Behr, Elijah R.; Hildebrandt, L.L.; Lund, J.; Hedley, Paula L.; Camm, A. John; Wettrell, Göran; Fosdal, Inger; Christiansen, Michael; Borglum, Anders D.

    2012-01-01

    substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe......Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a devastating inherited disorder characterized by episodic syncope and/or sudden cardiac arrest during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. Although rare, CPVT is suspected to cause a...... calmodulin-binding-domain peptide at low calcium concentrations. We conclude that calmodulin mutations can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia and that the calmodulin genes are candidates for genetic screening of individual cases and families with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and unexplained sudden cardiac...

  18. Multiple cardiovascular complications in a patient with Behcet disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing; ZHENG Jun; CUI Li; XU Xian-rong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic multisystem disease that presents with recurrent oral and genital ulceration and recurrent uveitis. Vascular and cardiac thromboses are rare but life threatening complications.We report a case of right internal jugular vein and brachiocephalic vein thrombus and successive cardiac thrombosis, which was finally diagnosed with BD.

  19. Impairment of coronary flow reserve in orthotopic cardiac transplant recipients with minor coronary occlusive disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mullins, P. A.; Chauhan, A.; Sharples, L; Cary, N R; Large, S R; Wallwork, J; Schofield, P M

    1992-01-01

    Objective—Coronary occlusive disease is the major long-term complication after cardiac transplantation. The relation between minor angiographic abnormalities and myocardial perfusion has not been previously assessed in a large number of cardiac transplant patients.

  20. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka B. Kesieme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended.

  1. Tube thoracostomy: complications and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesieme, Emeka B; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  2. Focused cardiac ultrasound in the emergency department for patients admitted with respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    In patients admitted with respiratory failure, a large proportion is diagnosed incorrectly in the emergency department and an even larger proportion seems to receive inappropriate treatment. Inappropriate initial treatment of these patients in the emergency department is associated with increased...... triage, patients with cardiac arrest, patients with undifferentiated shock, patients with cardiopulmonary instability, patients with respiratory symptoms, trauma patients with suspected cardiac injuries, and assessment of the fluid status before fluid loading. When using focused cardiac ultrasound (US...

  3. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  4. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  5. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  6. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  7. Pulmonary complication associated with head and neck cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the frequency of short-term pulmonary complications in the patients undergoing various head and neck cancer surgeries in our setup and to assess possible risk factors responsible for these complications. Seventy patients of age group 20 to 80 years, regardless of gender, treated surgically for head and neck cancers were enrolled. Main outcome measures included development of pulmonary complications following 15 days of oncological surgery. The complications studied were pneumothorax, bronchopneumonia, atelectasis, pulmonary embolism and cardiopulmonary arrest. A total of 24.28% patients suffered from postoperative pulmonary complications; 17.14% developed bronchopneumonia, 5.71% pulmonary embolism, and 1.42% went into cardiopulmonary arrest, none developed pneumothorax or pulmonary atelectasis. A significant correlation of postoperative bronchopneumonia was seen with heavy smoking and assisted ventilation. Pulmonary embolism was associated with extended assisted ventilation and prolonged surgery. Cardiopulmonary arrest was associated with comorbidity and assisted ventilation after surgery. The frequency of bronchopneumonia supersedes all of the postoperative pulmonary complications in head and neck oncological surgery. Patients at risk of developing postoperative complications are heavy smokers, diabetics, those undergoing prolonged surgery, tracheostomy, and extended assisted ventilation. (author)

  8. Surgical management of infected cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Umar A R; Harling, Leanne; Ashrafian, Hutan; Athanasiou, Christina; Tsipas, Pantelis; Kokotsakis, John; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-01-15

    The growing use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) has led to infections requiring intervention. These are traditionally managed using a percutaneous transvenous approach to fully extract the culpable leads. Indications for such strategies are well-established and range from simple traction to the use of powered extraction tools including laser sheaths. Where such attempts fail, or if there are further complications, then there may be need for a cardiothoracic surgical approach. Limited evidence is currently available on the merits of individual strategies, and these are mainly drawn from case reports or series. Most utilise cardiopulmonary bypass, cardioplegic arrest and entry within the right atrium to allow direct visualisation of any vegetation and safely explant all CIED components whilst avoiding perforation, valvular and paravalvular damage. In this review, we describe a number of these and the unique challenges faced by surgeons when attempting to extract CIED. It is clear that future work should concentrate on creating clear consensus and guidelines on indications, risks and measures of efficacy outcomes for various surgical techniques. PMID:26590887

  9. A case of delayed cardiac perforation of active ventricular lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangyuan Guo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old man was admitted as for one month of repetitive dizziness and one episode of syncope. Electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia and his Holter monitoring also showed sinus bradycardia with sinus arrest, sino-atrial block and a longest pause of 4.3 s. Then sick sinus syndrome and Adam-Stokes syndrome were diagnosed. Then a dual chamber pacemaker (Medtronic SDR303 was implanted and the parameters were normal by detection. The patient was discharged 1 week later with suture removed. Then 1.5 month late the patient was presented to hospital once again for sudden onset of chest pain with exacerbation after taking deep breath. Pacemaker programming showed both pacing and sensing abnormality with threshold of?5.0V and resistance of 1200?. Lead perforation was revealed by chest X-ray and confirmed by echocardiogram. Considering the fact that there was high risk to remove ventricular lead, spiral tip of previous ventricular lead was withdrew followed by implantation of a new ventricular active lead to the septum. Previous ventricular lead was maintained. As we know that the complications of lead perforation in the clinic was rare. Here we discuss the clinical management and the possible reasons for cardiac perforation of active ventricular lead.

  10. Medical and obstetric complications among pregnant women aged 45 and older.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Grotegut

    Full Text Available The number of women aged 45 and older who become pregnant is increasing. The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of medical and obstetric complications among women aged 45 and older.The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify pregnant woman during admission for delivery. Deliveries were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9-CM codes. Using ICD-9-CM codes, pre-existing medical conditions and medical and obstetric complications were identified in women at the time of delivery and were compared for women aged 45 years and older to women under age 35. Outcomes among women aged 35-44 were also compared to women under age 35 to determine if women in this group demonstrated intermediate risk between the older and younger groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for pre-existing medical conditions and medical and obstetric complications for both older groups relative to women under 35. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were also developed for outcomes at delivery among older women, while controlling for pre-existing medical conditions, multiple gestation, and insurance status, to determine the effect of age on the studied outcomes.Women aged 45 and older had higher adjusted odds for death, transfusion, myocardial infarction/ischemia, cardiac arrest, acute heart failure, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, acute renal failure, cesarean delivery, gestational diabetes, fetal demise, fetal chromosomal anomaly, and placenta previa compared to women under 35.Pregnant women aged 45 and older experience significantly more medical and obstetric complications and are more likely to die at the time of a delivery than women under age 35, though the absolute risks are low and these events are rare. Further research is needed to determine what associated factors among pregnant women aged 45 and older may contribute to these

  11. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  12. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sevdalina; Lambova

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis(SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography(especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome.

  13. Availability and Utilization of Cardiac Resuscitation Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryn E. Mumma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The American Heart Association (AHA recommends regionalized care following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA at cardiac resuscitation centers (CRCs. Key level 1 CRC criteria include 24/7 percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI capability, therapeutic hypothermia capability, and annual volume of ≥40 patients resuscitated from OHCA. Our objective was to characterize the availability and utilization of resources relevant to post-cardiac arrest care, including level 1 CRCs in California. Methods: We combined data from the AHA, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD, and surveys to identify CRCs. We surveyed emergency department directors and nurse managers at all 24/7 PCI centers identified by the AHA to determine their post-OHCA care capabilities. The survey included questions regarding therapeutic hypothermia use and specialist availability and was pilot-tested prior to distribution. Cases of OHCA were identified in the 2011 OSHPD Patient Discharge Database using a “present on admission” diagnosis of cardiac arrest (ICD-9-CM code 427.5. We defined key level 1 CRC criteria as 24/7 PCI capability, therapeutic hypothermia, and annual volume ≥40 patients admitted with a “present on admission” diagnosis of cardiac arrest. Our primary outcome was the proportion of hospitals meeting these criteria. Descriptive statistics and 95% CI are presented. Results: Of the 333 acute care hospitals in California, 31 (9.3%, 95% CI 6.4-13% met level 1 CRC criteria. These hospitals treated 25% (1937/7780; 95% CI 24-26% of all admitted OHCA patients in California in 2011. Of the 125 hospitals identified as 24/7 PCI centers by the AHA, 54 (43%, 95% CI 34-52% admitted ≥40 patients following OHCA in 2011. Seventy (56%, 95% CI 47-65% responded to the survey; 69/70 (99%, 95% CI 92-100% reported having a therapeutic hypothermia protocol in effect by 2011. Five percent of admitted OHCA patients (402/7780; 95% CI

  14. Psychopathology in Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Gregory L.; Moore, Todd M.; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Ramsey, Susan E.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of psychopathology among women arrested for violence and whether the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) was associated with Axis I psychopathology. Women who were arrested for domestic violence perpetration and court referred to violence intervention programs (N=103) completed measures of IPV…

  15. Mechanical Thrombectomy for Stroke After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Márcio; Martins, Catarina; Koukoulis, Giovanna; Marques, Marta; Reis, João; Abecassis, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Stroke after cardiac surgery remains a devastating complication and its treatment options are limited. Systemic fibrinolysis is a relative contraindication, because it raises the risk of systemic hemorrhage. Endovascular therapy, mechanical thrombectomy, and intra-arterial fibrinolysis have emerged as safer options. We present three patients who developed strokes following cardiac surgery who underwent successful mechanical thrombectomy and review the literature on this subject. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12776 (J Card Surg 2016;31:517-520). PMID:27282492

  16. Perioperative Education of Patient Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandros Zacharis; Aikaterini Kampourelli

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the number of patients undergoing cardiac surgeries is steadily increasing. In Greece, approximately 10,500 patients per year are admitted to some kind of cardiac operation. Constant evolution of heart surgery techniques calls for adaptation of the perioperative nursing care given. Patient education, as an important part of the perioperative care, is directly related to the reduction of postoperative complications and stress management, thus promoting the patient's overall po...

  17. Bicaval obstruction complicating right atrial tuberculoma:the diagnostic value of Cardiovascular MR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajam Aref

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tuberculosis is rare and usually involves the pericardium. Myocardial tuberculoma is a very rare occurrence and only a few cases were reported. We describe the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the diagnosis of a rare case of cardiac tuberculoma involving the right atrium which was complicated by a bicaval obstruction. The patient made a remarkable improvement with the anti-tuberculous treatment. To our knowledge, this complication has never been reported in relation to cardiac tuberculoma.

  18. Demographics, Bystander CPR, and AED Use in Out-of-Hospital Pediatric Arrests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. Austin; Grahan, Brian J. H.; Haukoos, Jason S.; McNally, Bryan; Campbell, Robert; Sasson, Comilla; Slattery, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2005 the American Heart Association released guidelines calling for routine use of automated external defibrillators during pediatric out-of-hospital arrest. The goal of this study was to determine if these guidelines are used during resuscitations. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from 29 U.S. cities that participate in the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES). Patients were included if they were older than 1 year of age and had a documented resuscitation attempt from October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2009 from an arrest presumed to be cardiac in nature. Hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the associations between age, demographic factors, and AED use. Results 129 patients were 1–8 years of age (younger children), 88 patients were 9–17 years of age (older children), and 19,338 patients were ≥18 years of age (adults). When compared to adults, younger children were less likely to be found in a shockable rhythm (young children 11.6%, adults 23.7%) and were less likely to have an AED used (young children 16.3%, adults 28.3%). Older children had a similar prevalence of shockable rhythms as adults (31.8%) and AED use (20.5%). A multivariable analysis demonstrated that, when compared to adults, younger children had decreased odds of having an AED used (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.26–0.69), but there was no difference in AED use among older children and adults. Conclusions Young children suffering from presumed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests are less likely to have a shockable rhythm when compared to adults, and are less likely to have an AED used during resuscitation. PMID:24681302

  19. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  20. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.