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Sample records for carcinoma targeted therapies

  1. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  2. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, P H; Chaganti, R.S.K.; Motzer, R J

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has historically been refractory to cytotoxic and hormonal agents; only interleukin 2 and interferon alpha provide response in a minority of patients. We reviewed RCC biology and explored the ways in which this understanding led to development of novel, effective targeted therapies. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and novel agents are all being studied, and phase II studies show promising activity of sunitinib, sorafenib a...

  3. Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Carcinoma: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Donalisio da Silva; Diedra Gustafson; Leticia Nogueira; Werahera, Priya N.; Molina, Wilson R.; Kim, Fernando J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is associated with poor outcomes in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Advances in the understanding of tumor molecular biology and the implementation of new drugs that target these molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced RCC and improved outcomes in these patients. Herein, we briefly describe the latest data on targeted therapies used in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Search strategy was performed according to PRISMA guide...

  4. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wachsmann, Jason; PENG, FANGYU

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many ...

  5. Biliary tract carcinomas: from chemotherapy to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Donatella; Leone, Francesco; Cavalloni, Giuliana; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Aglietta, Massimo

    2013-02-01

    Biliary tract carcinomas (BTC) are a group of tumours arising from the epithelial cells of intra- and extra-hepatic biliaryducts and the gallbladder, characterised by a poor prognosis. Surgery is the only curative procedure, but the risk of recurrence is high and furthermore, the majority of patients present with unresectable disease at the time of diagnosis. Systemic therapy is the mainstay of treatment for patients who present recurrent or metastatic disease. Progress has been made in the last decade to identify the most effective chemotherapy regimens, with the recent recommendation of the combination of gemcitabine-cisplatin as the standard schedule. Comprehension of the molecular basis of cholangiocarcinogenesis and tumour progression has recently led to the experimentation of targeted therapies in patients with BTC, demonstrating promising results. In this review we will discuss the clinical experience with systemic treatment for BTC, focusing on future directions with targeted therapies. PMID:22809696

  6. Multiple oncogenic mutations related to targeted therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhang; Hong-Yuan Zhao; Yu-Xiang Ma; Zhi-Huang Hu; Pei-Yu Huang; Li Zhang; Tao Qin; Shao-Dong Hong; Jing Zhang; Wen-Feng Fang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yun-Peng Yang; Cong Xue; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:An increasing number of targeted drugs have been tested for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations have not been fully evaluated. This study aimed to detect targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations in NPC and to determine which targeted therapy might be potentially effective in treating NPC. Methods:By using the SNaPshot assay, a rapid detection method, 19 mutation hotspots in 6 targeted therapy-related oncogenes were examined in 70 NPC patients. The associations between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic factors were analyzed. Results:Among 70 patients, 12 (17.1%) had mutations in 5 oncogenes:7 (10.0%) had v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) mutation, 2 (2.8%) had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation, and 1 (1.4%) had simultaneous EGFR and v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutations. No significant differences were observed between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics. Additionally, these oncogenic mutations were not associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis. Conclusions:Oncogenic mutations are present in NPC patients. The efficacy of targeted drugs on patients with the related oncogenic mutations requires further validation.

  7. Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Carcinoma: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Donalisio da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional chemotherapy is associated with poor outcomes in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Advances in the understanding of tumor molecular biology and the implementation of new drugs that target these molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced RCC and improved outcomes in these patients. Herein, we briefly describe the latest data on targeted therapies used in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Search strategy was performed according to PRISMA guidelines. Abstracts of relevant studies published in PubMed between 2000 and 2014 were analyzed by two authors. Abstracts were selected if they were published in English, data reported was of phase II or III clinical trials, and outcomes followed FDA approval.  If consensus between the two authors was achieved, they were included in the review. Key words used were “target therapy” and “metastatic renal cell carcinoma”. The results of the studies analyzed in this review support the benefits of targeted therapy in metastatic RCC. These include improved progression-free survival, overall survival, and quality of life as well as reduced toxicities compared to immunotherapy. The improvement in outcomes in metastatic RCC makes these drugs a preferred option as a primary treatment for these patients. 

  8. Neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive nephrectomy as an independent option in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cannot be considered as the only effective method, with rare exception, of a few patients with solitary metastases. Cytoreductive nephrectomy is now part of a multimodal approach encompassing surgical treatment and systemic drug therapy. Many retrospective and two prospective studies have demonstrated that it is expedient to perform cytoreductive nephrectomy. Immunotherapy should not be used as preoperatively in the era of cytokine therapy for mRCC due to that fact that it has no impact on primary tumor. In the current targeted therapy era, many investigators have concentrated attentionon the role of neoadjuvant targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with both localized and locally advanced mRCC. The potential benefits of neoadjuvant therapy for localized and locally advanced RCC include to make surgery easier and to increase the possibility of organsparing treatment, by decreasing the stage of primary tumor and the size of tumors. The possible potential advantages of neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with mRCC include prompt initiation of necessary systemic therapy; identification of patients with primary refractory tumors; and a preoperative reduction in the stage of primary tumor. Numerous retrospective and some prospective phase II studies have shown that neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with localized and locally advanced RCC is possible and tolerable and surgical treatment after neoadjuvant targeted therapy is safe and executable with a low incidence of complications. If neoadjuvant therapy is to be performed, it should be done within 2–4 months before surgery. Sorafenib and sunitinib are now most tested and suitable for neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Sorafenib is a more preferred drug due to its shorter half-life and accordingly to the possibility of discontinuing the drug immediately prior to

  9. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: The next lap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Tan, Min-Han

    2014-01-01

    Advances in rationally targeted therapeutics over the last decade have transformed the clinical care of advanced kidney cancer. While oncologists consolidate the gains of the wave of new agents, comprising a panoply of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), there is an increasing sense that a plateau has been reached in the short term. It is sobering that all currently approved targeted therapies have not yielded durable remissions and remain palliative in intent. In the context of recent insights in kidney cancer biology, we review promising ongoing and future approaches for kidney cancer therapeutics aimed toward forging new paths in the systemic management of renal cell carcinoma. Broadly, candidate agents for such innovative strategies include immune check-point inhibitors, anti-cancer stem cell agents, next-generation anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and anti-mTOR agents as well as more investigational agents in the preclinical and early clinical development settings. PMID:24737951

  10. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: The next lap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindran Kanesvaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in rationally targeted therapeutics over the last decade have transformed the clinical care of advanced kidney cancer. While oncologists consolidate the gains of the wave of new agents, comprising a panoply of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, there is an increasing sense that a plateau has been reached in the short term. It is sobering that all currently approved targeted therapies have not yielded durable remissions and remain palliative in intent. In the context of recent insights in kidney cancer biology, we review promising ongoing and future approaches for kidney cancer therapeutics aimed toward forging new paths in the systemic management of renal cell carcinoma. Broadly, candidate agents for such innovative strategies include immune check-point inhibitors, anti-cancer stem cell agents, next-generation anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and anti-mTOR agents as well as more investigational agents in the preclinical and early clinical development settings.

  11. Role of targeted therapy in combination with surgery in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bex, Axel; Powles, Thomas; Karam, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Surgical complete resection is the only curative treatment of renal cell carcinoma including patients with locally advanced disease and those with limited metastatic disease. Patients at high risk of recurrence after complete resection might theoretically benefit from adjuvant and neoadjuvant systemic treatment strategies to prolong disease-free survival and ultimately overall survival. Another rationale for using targeted therapy includes downsizing/downstaging of surgically complex locally advanced renal cell carcinoma to facilitate complete resection or primary tumors to allow for nephron-sparing strategies. Unfortunately, a considerable percentage of patients are diagnosed with metastatic disease at first presentation. Although large population-based studies consistently show a survival benefit after cytoreductive nephrectomy in the targeted therapy era, confounding factors preclude definite conclusions for this heterogeneous patient group until ongoing phase III trials are published. Presurgical targeted therapy has been proposed to identify patients with clinical benefit and potentially long-term survival after cytoreductive nephrectomy. Recently, the use of targeted therapy before or after local treatment of metastases has been reported in small retrospective series. The present review revisits the current evidence base of targeted therapy in combination with surgery for the various disease stages in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26238981

  12. Retrospective analysis of the efficacy of chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy for advanced pulmonary pleomorphic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Yosuke; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noboru; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Kanda, Shintaro; Goto, Yasushi; Kubo, Emi; Kitahara, Shinsuke; Tsuruoka, Kenjiro; Tsuta, Koji; Ohe, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary pleomorphic carcinoma (PPC) follows an aggressive clinical course and outcomes are disappointing. Due to its rarity, however, the clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of this disease remain unclear. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy in 16 patients with PPC who received chemotherapy or EGFR-TKI. We also investigated the status of EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation and ALK expression. Results On histologi...

  13. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies. PMID:26645975

  14. Molecular targeted therapy to improve radiotherapeutic outcomes for non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Bhaskar; Bhardwaj, Himanshu; Balusu, Sree; Shwaiki, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatments for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) remain elusive. The use of concurrent chemotherapy with radiotherapy (RT) has improved outcomes, but a significant proportion of NSCLC patients are too frail to be able to tolerate an intense course of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The development of targeted therapies ignited new hope in enhancing radiotherapeutic outcomes. The use of targeted therapies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has offered slight but significant benefits in concurrent use with RT for certain patients in certain situations. However, despite theoretical promise, the use of anti-angiogenics, such as bevacizumab and endostatin, has not proven clinically safe or useful in combination with RT. However, many new targeted agents against new targets are being experimented for combined use with RT. It is hoped that these agents may provide a significant breakthrough in the radiotherapeutic management of NSCLC. The current review provides a brief discussion about the targets, the targeted therapies, the rationale for the use of targeted therapies in combination with RT, and a brief review of the existing data on the subject. PMID:26904572

  15. [Molecular biological foundation of targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lai; Xiaodong, Teng

    2016-05-25

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing. Radical cure by surgery can only be achieved in patients with early stage tumors. How to precisely use antineoplastic agents after surgery is an important problem to be solved. Most metastatic RCCs are pathologically identified as clear cell RCC (ccRCC), thus to develop agents targeting ccRCC is critical. Most clinically available targeted therapies are based on targeting some spots in specific pathways; or based on targeting new anti-tumor mechanisms, such as programmed death-1(PD-1), antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) and stem cells. There is still no targeted therapy having definite effect to most RCC patients. Only von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway so far has been confirmed to be related to ccRCC development and progression; the inactivation of VHL gene causes many significant downstream gene changes. The key proteins involved in VHL pathway may be potential therapeutic targets for ccRCC. In this article, we review the current progress of targeted therapy for RCC, focus on the molecular characteristics of ccRCC, its relation to VHL pathway, the potential therapeutic targets and future clinical application for metastatic ccRCC. PMID:27045248

  16. Docetaxel grafted magnetic nanoparticles as dual-therapeutic agentia for targeting perfusion therapy of urethral carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although urethral carcinoma has a low incidence, it suffers from a poor curative rate for the low retention of medicine around urethra. In the present study, we developed a kind of magnetic targeting perfusion chemotherapy to detain the chemotherapeutic drugs. Docetaxel (TXT) grafted magnetic nanoparticles, of which size was around 40 nm, were obtained by the conjugation of TXT to amino-functionalized iron oxide (NH2@Fe3O4). They have shown great potential to be targeted to and stayed in desired position of urethra under the externally applied magnetism through in vitro mimic urethral study. Furthermore, they have validly inhibited the growth of direct-contacted human urethral squamous carcinoma cells in vitro (up to 56.34 %) by the combination effects of TXT and NH2@Fe3O4, however, less than 3 % of TXT released from the nanoparticles, which was very few to impair the adjacent normal cells and tissues. Therefore, this kind of novel agentia was expected to hold great potential in clinic urethral carcinoma therapy

  17. Docetaxel grafted magnetic nanoparticles as dual-therapeutic agentia for targeting perfusion therapy of urethral carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiao; Wang, Zhen [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory for Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China); Dai, Hong [Chongqing Three Gorges Central Hospital, Department of Urology (China); Wang, Chunmei [Chongqing Three Gorges Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics (China); Xia, Bing [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Medical Research (China); Chen, Lan; Pan, Jun, E-mail: panj@cqu.edu.cn [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory for Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China)

    2014-12-15

    Although urethral carcinoma has a low incidence, it suffers from a poor curative rate for the low retention of medicine around urethra. In the present study, we developed a kind of magnetic targeting perfusion chemotherapy to detain the chemotherapeutic drugs. Docetaxel (TXT) grafted magnetic nanoparticles, of which size was around 40 nm, were obtained by the conjugation of TXT to amino-functionalized iron oxide (NH{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). They have shown great potential to be targeted to and stayed in desired position of urethra under the externally applied magnetism through in vitro mimic urethral study. Furthermore, they have validly inhibited the growth of direct-contacted human urethral squamous carcinoma cells in vitro (up to 56.34 %) by the combination effects of TXT and NH{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, however, less than 3 % of TXT released from the nanoparticles, which was very few to impair the adjacent normal cells and tissues. Therefore, this kind of novel agentia was expected to hold great potential in clinic urethral carcinoma therapy.

  18. Rationale for targeted therapies and potential role of pazopanib in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Clark

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Peter E ClarkVanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USAAbstract: Advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC remains a challenging, major health problem. Recent advances in understanding the fundamental biology underlying one form of RCC, ie, clear cell (or conventional RCC, have opened the door to a series of targeted agents, such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, which have become the standard of care in managing advanced clear cell RCC. Among the newest of these agents to receive Food and Drug Administration approval in this disease is pazopanib. This review will summarize what is known about the fundamental biology that underlies clear cell RCC, the data surrounding the previously approved targeted agents for this disease, including not only the TKIs but also the mTOR inhibitors and the vascular endothelial growth factor-specific agent, bevacizumab, and the newest TKI, pazopanib. It will also explore the potential role for pazopanib relative to the other available agents and where it may fit into the armamentarium for treatment of advanced/metastatic RCC.Keywords: pazopanib, targeted therapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, clear cell renal cell carcinoma

  19. Hepatic cancer stem cells and drug resistance: Relevance in targeted therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caecilia HC Sukowati, Natalia Rosso, Lory S Crocè, Claudio Tiribelli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of most common malignancies in the world. Systemic treatments for HCC, particularly for advanced stages, are limited by the drug resistance phenomenon which ultimately leads to therapy failure. Recent studies have indicated an association between drug resistance and the existence of the cancer stem cells (CSCs as tumor initiating cells. The CSCs are resistant to conventional chemotherapies and might be related to the mechanisms of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC transporters and alterations in the CSCs signaling pathways. Therefore, to contribute to the development of new HCC treatments, further information on the characterization of CSCs, the modulation of the ABC transporters expression and function and the signaling pathway involved in the self renewal, initiation and maintenance of the cancer are required. The combination of transporters modulators/inhibitors with molecular targeted therapies may be a potent strategy to block the tumoral progression. This review summarizes the association of CSCs, drug resistance, ABC transporters activities and changes in signaling pathways as a guide for future molecular therapy for HCC.

  20. Study on the possibility of insulin as a carrier of IUdR for hepatocellular carcinoma-targeted therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hong Ou; An-Ren Kuang; Xian Peng; Yu-Guo Zhong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the possibility of using insulin as a carrier for carcinoma-targeted therapy mediated by receptor, and to investigate the expression of insulin receptor in human hepatocellular carcinoma and the receptor binding characteristics of insulin-IUdR (iododeoxyuridine).METHODS: IUdR was covalently conjugated to insulin.Receptor binding assays of 125Ⅰ-insulin to human hepatocellular carcinoma and its adjacent tissue were performed.Competitive displacements of 125Ⅰ-insulin by insulin and insulin-IUdR to bind to insulin receptor were respectively carried out. Statistical comparisons between the means were made with paired t-test at a confidence level of 95%.RESULTS: The data indicated that there were high- and low-affinity binding sites for 125Ⅰ-insulin on both hepatocellular carcinoma and its adjacent tissue. Hepatocellular carcinoma had a significantly higher Bmax for high affinity binding site than its adjacent liver tissue (P<0.05, t=2.275). Insulin-IUdR competed as effectively as insulin with 125Ⅰ-insulin for binding to insulin receptor. Values of IC501, C502, KI1 and KI2 for Values of IC50l and KI1 for insulin-IUdR were significantly higher than that for insulin (P<0.01,t=4.537 and 4.813).CONCLUSION: It is possible to use insulin as a carrier for carcinoma-targeted therapy mediated by receptor.

  1. Targeted Therapy of Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarene Koh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy using a patient’s own T cells redirected to recognize and kill tumor cells has achieved promising results in metastatic melanoma and leukemia. This technique involves harnessing a patient’s T cells and then delivering a gene that encodes a new T cell receptor (TCR or a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR that allow the cells to recognize specific cancer antigens. The prospect of using engineered T cell therapy for persistent viral infections like hepatitis B virus (HBV and their associated malignancies is promising. We recently tested in a first-in-man clinical trial, the ability of HBV-specific TCR-redirected T cells to target HBsAg-productive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and demonstrated that these redirected T cells recognized HCC cells with HBV–DNA integration [1] We discuss here the possibility to use HBV-specific TCR-redirected T cells targeting hepatitis B viral antigens as a tumor specific antigen in patients with HBV-related HCC, and the potential challenges facing the development of this new immunotherapeutic strategy.

  2. Emerging therapies for thyroid carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, S

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed endocrine malignancy. Its incidence is currently rising worldwide. The discovery of genetic mutations associated with the development of thyroid cancer, such as BRAF and RET, has lead to the development of new drugs which target the pathways which they influence. Despite recent advances, the prognosis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is still unfavourable. In this review we look at emerging novel therapies for the treatment of well-differentiated and medullary thyroid carcinoma, and advances and future directions in the management of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  3. Targeted therapies in the management of renal cell carcinoma: role of bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Escudier

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Escudier1, Jan Cosaert2, Sangeeta Jethwa21Unité Immunothérapie, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; 2F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks, in combination with interferon alpha-2a (IFN, is an effective option for first-line therapy for advanced and/or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Two phase III trials clearly show significant improvements in progression-free survival and response rate in patients with treatment-naïve metastatic RCC receiving bevacizumab combined with IFN compared with IFN. The dose of IFN, which was initiated at 9 MIU 3 times a week in these trials, can be reduced to effectively manage IFN-related side effects without compromising the efficacy of bevacizumab plus IFN. Bevacizumab has good tolerability with manageable side effects, both alone and in combination with other agents; the tolerability profile of bevacizumab in combination with IFN is consistent with the well-characterized and well-established profiles of these therapies. The tolerability of bevacizumab combined with IFN and the flexibility to manage IFN-related side effects are important considerations when selecting first-line therapy. With a number of options now available for RCC therapy, optimizing their use is a key consideration in improving patient benefit.Keywords: bevacizumab (Avastin®, interferon alpha, efficacy, tolerability, renal cell carcinoma (RCC, low-dose interferon

  4. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Current treatment and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common renal tumor and accounts for 3% of all adult cancers. The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC has recently evolved from being a predominantly cytokine-based treatment to the use of targeted agents, which include Sorafenib, Sunitinib, Bevacizumab, Temsirolimus, Everolimus, Pazopanib, Axitinib, and most recently Tivozanib. Despite these advances mRCC remains a major health problem. Additional studies are needed to optimize the use of these agents in both advanced and early stage disease, either in combination or sequentially. In addition the development of biomarkers should be a priority in order to guide rational tailored development of emerging agents. This literature review was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane databases for articles published until January 2013. Abstracts from relevant meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European society of medical oncology were also included.

  5. HER2 overexpression and amplification is present in a subset of ovarian mucinous carcinomas and can be targeted with trastuzumab therapy

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    Swenerton Kenneth D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response rate of ovarian mucinous carcinomas to paclitaxel/carboplatin is low, prompting interest in targeted molecular therapies. We investigated HER2 expression and amplification, and the potential for trastuzumab therapy in this histologic subtype of ovarian cancer. Methods HER2 status was tested in 33 mucinous carcinomas and 16 mucinous borderline ovarian tumors (BOT. Five cases with documented recurrence and with tissue from the recurrence available for testing were analyzed to determine whether HER2 amplification status changed over time. Three prospectively identified recurrent mucinous ovarian carcinomas were assessed for HER2 amplification and patients received trastuzumab therapy with conventional chemotherapy. Results Amplification of HER2 was observed in 6/33 (18.2% mucinous carcinomas and 3/16 (18.8% BOT. HER2 amplification in primary mucinous carcinomas was not associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence. The prospectively identified recurrent mucinous carcinomas showed overexpression and amplification of HER2; one patient's tumor responded dramatically to trastuzumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy, while another patient experienced an isolated central nervous system recurrence after trastuzumab therapy. Conclusion HER2 amplification is relatively common in ovarian mucinous carcinomas (6/33, 18.2%, although not of prognostic significance. Trastuzumab therapy is a treatment option for patients with mucinous carcinoma when the tumor has HER2 amplification and overexpression.

  6. Basal Cell Carcinoma: From the Molecular Understanding of the Pathogenesis to Targeted Therapy of Progressive Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Göppner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to intensified research over the past decade, the Hedgehog (HH pathway has been identified as a pivotal defect implicated in roughly 25% of all cancers. As one of the most frequent cancer worldwide, the development of Basal cell carcinoma (BCC due to activation of the HH pathway has been convincingly demonstrated. Thus the discovery of this central tumor-promoting signalling pathway has not only revolutionized the understanding of BCC carcinogenesis but has also enabled the development of a completely novel therapeutic approach. Targeting just a few of several potential mutations, HH inhibitors such as GDC-0449 achieved already the first promising results in metastatic or locally advanced BCC. This paper summarizes the current understanding of BCC carcinogenesis and describes the current “mechanism-based” therapeutic strategies.

  7. Cellular Signaling Pathway Alterations and Potential Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Giunti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parafollicular C-cell-derived medullary thyroid cancer (MTC comprises 3% to 4% of all thyroid cancers. While cytotoxic treatments have been shown to have limited efficacy, targeted molecular therapies that inhibit rearranged during transfection (RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors that are mainly involved in angiogenesis have shown great promise in the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced MTC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as vandetanib, which is already approved for the treatment of progressive MTC, and cabozantinib have shown distinct advantages with regard to rates of disease response and control. However, these types of tyrosine kinase inhibitor compounds are able to concurrently block several types of targets, which limits the understanding of RET as a specific target. Moreover, important resistances to tyrosine kinase inhibitors can occur, which limit the long-term efficacy of these treatments. Deregulated cellular signaling pathways and genetic alterations in MTC, particularly the activation of the RAS/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR cascades and RET crosstalk signaling, are now emerging as novel and potentially promising therapeutic treatments for aggressive MTC.

  8. Construction of a regulable gene therapy vector targeting for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Ying Lu; Yan-Fang Sui; Zeng-Shan Li; Cheng-En Pan; Jing Ye; Wen-Yong Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a gene modified hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specific EGFP expression vector regulated by abbreviated cis-acting element of AFP gene.METHODS: The minimal essential DNA segments of AFP gene enhancer and promoter were synthesized through PCR from Genome DNA of HepG2 cells. Gene fragments were then cloned into the multiple cloning site of non-promoter EGFP vector pEGFP-t. Recombinant plasmid was transferred into positive or negative AFP cell lines by means of lipofectamine. The expression of EGFP was tested by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on the expression of EGFP was tested in different concentrations.RESULTS: By the methods of restriction digestion and sequence analyses we confirmed that the length, position and orientation of inserted genes of cis-acting element of AFP were all correct. The transcription of EGFP was under the control of AFP cis-acting element. The expressing EGFP can only been detected in AFP producing hepatoma cells.The expression rate of EGFP in G418 screened cell line was 34.9±4.1%. 48 h after adding 1×10-7M retinoic acid, EGFP expression rate was 14.7±3.5%. The activity of AFP gene promoter was significantly suppressed by addition of 1×10-7M retinoic acid (P<0.05, P=0.003, t=6.488).CONCLUSION: This recombinant expression vector can be used as a gene therapy vector for HCC. The expression of tumor killing gene will be confined within the site of tumor and the activity of which can be regulated by retinoic acid.

  9. Mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinoma and challengesand opportunities for molecular targeted therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) have fallen dramatically in China and elsewhereover the past several decades. Nonetheless, HCC remainsa major public health issue as one of the mostcommon malignant tumors worldwide and one of theleading causes of death caused by cancer in China.Hepatocarcinogenesis is a very complex biologicalprocess associated with many environmental risk factorsand factors in heredity, including abnormal activation ofcellular and molecular signaling pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin, hedgehog, MAPK, AKT, and ERK signalingpathways, and the balance between the activationand inactivation of the proto-oncogenes and anti-oncogenes,and the differentiation of liver cancer stem cells.Molecule-targeted therapy, a new approach for thetreatment of liver cancer, blocks the growth of cancercells by interfering with the molecules required forcarcinogenesis and tumor growth, making it both specificand selective. However, there is no one drug completelydesigned for liver cancer, and further developmentin the research of liver cancer targeted drugs is nowalmost stagnant. The purpose of this review is to discussrecent advances in our understanding of the molecularmechanisms underlying the development of HCC andin the development of novel strategies for cancertherapeutics.

  10. Prostate carcinoma and radiation therapy: therapeutic treatment resistance and strategies for targeted therapeutic intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, TJ; Tao WANG; Goel, Hira Lal; Huang, Jiayi; Stein, Gary; Lian, Jane; Davis, Roger J.; Doxsey, Steven; Balaji, KC; Aronowitz, Jesse; Languino, Lucia R.

    2008-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the prostate remains a significant public health problem and a prevalent cancer in men. Prostate-specific antigen used as a biomarker has established a clear migration of patients towards earlier-stage disease at presentation. However, in spite of process improvements in traditional therapies including surgery, radiation therapy, and hormone management, there remains a significant cohort of patients with intermediate- to high-risk features for poor outcome in spite of optima...

  11. Safety assessment of molecular targeted therapies in association with radiotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a real-life report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langrand-Escure, Julien; Vallard, Alexis; Rivoirard, Romain; Méry, Benoîte; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Espenel, Sophie; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Ben Mrad, Majed; Diao, Peng; Rancoule, Chloé; Suchaud, Jean-Philippe; Fournel, Pierre; Guillot, Aline; Chargari, Cyrus; Escudier, Bernard; Négrier, Sylvie; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Molecular targeted therapies (TT) are the cornerstone of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment. There is a paucity of data on the safety of the radiotherapy (RT)-TT association in a sequential or a concomitant setting. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively assess the safety of the RT-TT association. From 2006 to 2014, data from 84 consecutive patients treated with RT and TT for metastatic RCC were retrospectively collected. RT-TT sequential and concomitant associations were, respectively, defined by a time interval of more than five TT half-lives and less than or equal to five TT half-lives between the last TT administration and RT initiation. Toxicities in the fields of RT were assessed systematically. As many patients received several TT and RT courses, 136 RT-TT associations were analyzed, with 66 sequential and 70 concomitant schemes. RT was mainly delivered on bone (75%) and brain metastases (14.7%). TT were tyrosine kinase inhibitors (73.5%), mTOR inhibitors (19.8%), and monoclonal antibodies (6.7%). With a median follow-up of 9.5 months, whatever the sequence, no grade≥4 toxicity was reported. Two grade 3 toxicities were reported with sequential (3%) and concomitant (2.9%) RT-TT, respectively. Sequential or concomitant RT-TT associations in metastatic RCC do not seem to cause major toxicity. PMID:27045782

  12. Mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy covers the following issues: development, anatomy and physiology of the mammary glands, pathology of benign and malign mammary gland changes, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography; ultrasonic mammography; magnetic resonance tomography of the mammary glands; imaging diagnostics findings; mammary interventions; examination concepts; operative therapy of the mammary carcinoma; chemotherapy of the mammary carcinoma; radio-oncological therapy of the mammary carcinoma; logistics in a medical center for mammary gland diseases; logistics in an interdisciplinary center for mammary diseases; dialogue conduction and psycho-social attendance.

  13. Targeted gene therapy of LS174 T human colon carcinoma by anti-TAG-72 immunoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K S; Lee, Y K; Kim, J S; Koo, K H; Hong, H J; Park, Y S

    2008-05-01

    Anti-tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 PEG-immunoliposomes (PILs) were prepared by conjugation of Fab' fragments of recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody, HuCC49, to sterically stabilize unilamellar liposomes (90-110 nm in diameter) to target TAG-72-overexpressing cancer cells. The liposomes consisted of 1-palmitonyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 92 mol percent, O,O'-dymyrisyl-N-lysyl aspartate (DMKD cationic lipid), 4 mol percent, distearoyl-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine-polyethylene glycol 2000 (DSPE-PEG(2000)), 3 mol percent and DSPE-maleimide (DSPE-PEG(2000)-Mal), 1 mol percent. These anti-TAG-72 PILs were able to adhere to the surface of TAG-72-overexpressing LS174 T human colon cancer cells more effectively than conventional liposomes. Also, in vitro gene transfection of the LS174 T cells by the anti-TAG-72 PILs in the presence of a high concentration of fetal bovine serum (up to 60%) was greater than that by conventional cationic lipoplexes. Intravenously administered anti-TAG-72 PILs efficiently localized in the LS174 T tumor tissues, while the non-targeted conventional liposomes did not. Intravenous administration of the anti-TAG-72 PILs containing plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins, such as angiostatin K1/3, endostatin and saxatilin, significantly inhibited in vivo growth of LS174 T tumors and angiogenesis in the tumor tissues. These results demonstrated the potential of TAG-72-mediated targeting of immunoliposomes as a modality for systemic gene delivery to human colon cancer cells. PMID:18309354

  14. Molecularly Targeted Therapy of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts with Radio-iodinated Anti-VEGFR2 Murine-Human Chimeric Fab

    OpenAIRE

    Jianfei Huang; Qi Tang; Changjun Wang; Huixin Yu; Zhenqing Feng; Jin Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is traditionally regarded as an important therapeutic target in a wide variety of malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We previously generated a murine-human anti-VEGFR2 chimeric Fab (cFab), named FA8H1, which has the potential to treat VEGFR2-overexpressing solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether FA8H1 can be used as a carrier in molecularly targeted therapy in HCC xenograft models. FA8H1 was labeled with 131I, and t...

  15. SEQUENTIAL TARGETED THERAPY FOR DISSEMINATED KIDNEY CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Matveev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy is a standard treatment in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Stabilization is an expected response to targeted therapy. The main goal of targeted therapy is to improve progression-free survival. This purpose is served through the sequential use of targeted agents. First-line therapy agents in the good and intermediate MSKCC prognostic groups are antiangiogenic ones such as bevacizumab, sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib; in the poor MSKCC prognostic group treatment of choice is an mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. The antiangiogenic agent axitinib and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus were proved to be effective as second-line therapy. Axitinib administration after anti-VEGF drugs is associated with cumulative toxicity. The efficacy of axitinib in sorafenib-refractory renal cell carcinoma has not been proven. So everolimus remains the agent of choice for second-line targeted therapy. The effect of repeated antiangiogenic therapy may be anticipated after everolimus therapy

  16. Improved overall survival after implementation of targeted therapy for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Results from the Danish Renal Cancer Group (DARENCA) study-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne V.; Donskov, Frede; Hermann, Gregers G.; Jensen, Niels V.; Petersen, Astrid; Spliid, Henrik; Sandin, Rickard; Fode, Kirsten; Geertsen, Poul F.

    2014-01-01

    AbstractAim To evaluate the implementation of targeted therapy on overall survival (OS) in a complete national cohort of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods All Danish patients with mRCC referred for first line treatment with immunotherapy, TKIs or mTOR-inhibitors between...... received first line treatment. From 2006 to 2010 we observed a significant increase in the number of referred patients; a significant increase in treated patients (64% versus 75%, P = 0.0188); a significant increase in first line targeted therapy (22% versus 75%, P < 0.0001); a significant increase in...... second line treatment (20% versus 40%, P = 0.0104), a significant increased median OS (11.5 versus 17.2 months, P = 0.0435) whereas survival for untreated patients remained unchanged. Multivariate analysis validated known prognostic factors. Moreover, treatment start years 2008 (HR 0.74, 95% CI, 0...

  17. Characterizing the Impact of Lymph Node Metastases on the Survival Outcome for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Targeted Therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroeger, Nils; Pantuck, Allan J; Wells, J Connor; Lawrence, Nicola; Broom, Reuben; Kim, Jenny J; Srinivas, Sandy; Yim, Jessica; Bjarnason, Georg A; Templeton, Arnoud; Knox, Jennifer; Bernstein, Ezra; Smoragiewicz, Martin; Lee, Jae; Rini, Brian I; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Wood, Lori A; Beuselinck, Benoit; Donskov, Frede; Choueiri, Toni K; Heng, Daniel Y

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether lymph node metastases (LNM) and their localization negatively affect clinical outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinicopathological features, survival outcome, and treatment response in mRCC patients with LNM...... supradiaphragmatic (SPD) LNM, subdiaphragmatic (SBD) LNM, and patients with LNM in both locations (SPD+/SBD+) without histologic considerations, and then separately in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and non-clear cell RCC (nccRCC) patients, respectively. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The primary outcome was...... with shorter survival outcome when metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients are treated with targeted therapies. Clinical trials should evaluate whether surgical removal of regional lymph nodes at the time of nephrectomy may improve outcomes in high-risk RCC patients....

  18. [Outlook: Future therapy of renal cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Lothar; Miller, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Targeted therapies have fundamentally altered the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Sunitinib today is an internationally recommended reference standard in first-line therapy; other drugs such as Temsirolimus, Everolimus, Bevacizumab (in combination with Interferon-alpha) and Sorafenib are part of the therapeutic arsenal. Practitioners thus have now more and better therapeutic options at hand, leading to a significantly improved prognosis for mRCC patients. Numerous ongoing research activities aim at the improvement of the benefits of the new compounds in the metastatic situation or application earlier in the course of the disease. Key aspects of future development in RCC are the optimization of the current therapy options by developing new targeted therapies, the search for the best combinations and sequences including the role of nephrectomy and the assessment in the adjuvant or neo-adjuvant setting. The following contribution provides an overview of ongoing studies, thus giving insight into the future therapy of RCC. PMID:20164673

  19. Photodynamic therapy activated STAT3 associated pathways: Targeting intrinsic apoptotic pathways to increase PDT efficacy in human squamous carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Li; Xu, Chengshan; Li, Qiang; Mei, Zhusong; Li, Xinji; Cai, Hong; Liu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    5-Aminolaevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) has been used for part of squamous cell carcinoma (premalignant conditions or in situ cutaneous SCC-Bowen disease). However, mechanism of ALA-PDT is not fully understood yet on the cell apoptosis pathway. The aim of this study was to further investigate the effect and mechanism of 5-ALA-PDT on human squamous carcinoma A431cells. Apoptosis and cell viability after PDT were evaluated using Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit and MTT assay. The mRNA and protein levels were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. Our data showed that 5-ALA-PDT significantly inhibited cell proliferation (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference when the photosensitizer reached to 4.8mM. The inhibition in cell proliferation after 5-ALA-PDT treatment was correlated to more cells being arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle (p<0.01). Immunocytochemical observations using anti-active caspase-3 antibodies showed active caspase-3 was translocated from cytoplasm to nuclear during apoptosis. STAT3 and its downstream gene Bax and BCL-2 were changed after 5-ALA-PDT treatment for the mRNA and protein expression. Our studies confirmed that 5-ALA-PDT might be an effective treatment for human squamous carcinoma by inhibiting the tumor cell A431growth and for the first time demonstrated that the expression of STAT3 was significantly reduced at 24h after 5-ALA-PDT treatment. PMID:26607555

  20. Chemoradiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: focus on targeted therapies; La chimioradiotherapie des carcinomes epidermoides des voies aerodigestives superieures: point sur les therapeutiques ciblees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozec, A. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Dept. de Chirurgie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France); Thariat, J.; Bensadoun, R.J. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Dept. de Radiotherapie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France); Milano, G. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Unite d' Oncopharmacologie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France)

    2008-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential treatment for many patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Its association with molecular targeted therapies represents a real progress. Among the recent advances in the molecular targeted therapy of cancer, the applications centred on E.G.F.R. are currently the most promising and the most advanced at clinical level. Considering the set of therapeutic tools targeting E.G.F.R., there are at present two well-identified emerging categories of drugs with monoclonal antibodies, on the one hand, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, on the other. In many preclinical studies, the combination of anti-E.G.F.R. drugs with irradiation has led to additive or supra-additive cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, anti-angiogenic agents have shown promising results in association with anti-E.G.F.R. drugs and radiotherapy. This research effort has recently produced encouraging clinical results in advanced head and neck cancer with combination of cetuximab (an anti-E.G.F.R. monoclonal antibody) with irradiation with a significant impact on patient survival. Active and efficient clinical research is currently ongoing to determine the place of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of head and neck cancer, particularly in association with radiotherapy. (authors)

  1. HepatomiRNoma: The proposal of a new network of targets for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Fabrizio; Bronte, Giuseppe; Fanale, Daniele; Caruso, Stefano; Bronte, Enrico; Bavetta, Maria Grazia; Fiorentino, Eugenio; Rolfo, Christian; Bazan, Viviana; Di Marco, Vito; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) underwent a huge advancement in the last years. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been also studied to provide a new tool for early diagnosis of high risk patients, for prognostic classification to identify those patients who benefit cancer treatment and for predictive definition to select the right targeted drug. In this review we revised all the available data obtained to explore the role of miRNAs in HCC. This analysis led to identification of miRNAs which could gain a diagnostic, prognostic or predictive role. The results of studies on miRNAs involved in HCC are initial and far from providing scientific evidences to translate into clinical practice. We propose a classification of these miRNAs, that we could name HepatomiRNoma as a whole. Anyway prospective studies have to be designed to clarify the real clinical impact of this new tool. PMID:26603462

  2. Comparative effectiveness of everolimus and axitinib as second targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the US: a retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Pal, Sumanta K; Signorovitch, James E; Reichmann, William M; Li, Nanxin; Yang, Chelsey; Liu, Zhimei; Perez, Jose Ricardo; Jonasch, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Background Second targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) include mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORis) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This observational study compares overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients treated with everolimus (an mTORi) and axitinib (a TKI) following first TKI, and assesses the impact of type and duration of first TKI on the relative effectiveness of these second targeted therapies. Methods Retrospective reviews of medical records were conducted by medical oncologists or hematologists/oncologists recruited from a nationwide panel. Included patients with mRCC were required to have discontinued a first TKI (sunitinib, sorafenib, or pazopanib) for medical reasons, and to have initiated everolimus or axitinib as second targeted therapy between February 2012 and January 2013. OS and PFS were compared between patients treated with everolimus vs. axitinib using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Comparative results were also stratified by type and duration of first TKI. Results Included patients (n = 325 for everolimus and n = 127 for axitinib) had a mean age of 61 years and 31% were female. Sunitinib was the most commonly used first TKI (73%). After adjusting for patient characteristics, no statistically significant differences were observed in OS or PFS between everolimus and axitinib. When stratifying by type and duration of first TKI, there was no statistically significant difference in OS between everolimus and axitinib in all subgroups except for patients with sorafenib as first TKI. No significant difference in PFS was observed in any subgroup. Limitations Important limitations include potential missing or inaccurate data in medical charts, and confounding due to unobserved factors. Conclusions In this retrospective chart review, no significant differences were detected in OS or PFS between axitinib and everolimus as second targeted

  3. Targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Neal Rosen; Carlos Arteaga

    2011-01-01

    With unprecedented understanding of molecular events underlying human cancer in this genomic era, a large number of drugs specifically targeting hypothesized oncogenic drivers to which tumors are potentially addicted to have been developed and continue to be developed. These targeted cancer therapies are being actively tested in clinical trials with mixed successes. This editorial provides an overview on successful targeted cancer drugs on the market and those drugs that are in late clinical development stages. Importantly, the article lays out main challenges in developing molecular targeted therapies and potential path forward to overcome these challenges, as well as opportunities for China in this new era of targeted agents. The editorial serves as an introduction to the Targeted Cancer Therapies serias that will review in depth of major pathways and drugs targeting these pathways to be published in the coming issues of the Chinese Journal of Cancer.

  4. The role of cofilin-l in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma: A marker of carcinogenesis, progression and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Jiang, Ying; Cui, Shoubin; Wang, Yanshi; Wu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Numerous studies have revealed that cofilin-l (CFL1) is associated with cancer cell migration and invasion in various types of tumor tissues. We investigated the roles of CFL1 in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC). CFL1 expression was detected in VSCC and normal vulvar tissues using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The vulvar carcinoma SW962 cell line was transfected with CFL1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and exposed to periplocoside. We then assessed changes in cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis. We detected changes in CFL1 mRNA and protein expression by RT-PCR and western blotting, and alterations in protein expression of various relevant molecules by western blotting. CFL1 expression was found to be significantly upregulated in the VSCC tissues compared with the normal vulvar tissues by immunohistochemistry and western blotting (PInternational Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, differentiation and lymphatic metastasis (Pmigration, and lamellipodium formation. Periplocoside exposure resulted in lower CFL1, Bcl-xL, cyclin A1, MMP2, MMP9 and STAT3 levels, but a higher Bax level compared with the control group. We demonstrated that abnormal CFL1 expression may affect vulvar carcinogenesis and subsequent progression. CFL1 silencing by siRNA significantly inhibited VSCC cell progression, which suggests that CFL1 is a potential therapeutic target for vulvar cancer. Periplocoside, which was utilized in the present study for the clinical treatment of vulvar cancer, showed strong antitumor effects by suppression of CFL1 expression. PMID:26936386

  5. Is there a role for neoadjuvant targeted therapy to downsize primary tumors for organ sparing strategies in renal cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bex, A; Kroon, B K; de Bruijn, R

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of small renal masses being diagnosed organ-preserving treatment strategies such as nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) or radiofrequency and cryoablation are gaining importance. There is evidence that preserving renal function reduces the risk of death of any cause, cardiovascular events, and hospitalization. Some patients have unfavourable tumor locations or large tumors unsuitable for NSS or ablation which is a clinical problem especially in those with imperative indications to preserve renal function. These patients may benefit from downsizing primary tumors by targeted therapy. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence, safety, controversies, and ongoing trials. PMID:22778936

  6. Radiation therapy in bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Response of intrathoracic symptoms to thoracic irradiation was evaluated in 330 patients. Superior vena caval syndrome and hemoptysis showed the best response, with rates of 86% and 83%, respectively, compared to 73% for pain in the shoulder and arm and 60% for dyspnea and chest pain. Atelectasis showed re-expansion in only 23% of cases, but this figure increased to 57% for patients with oat-cell carcinoma. Vocal cord paralysis improved in only 6% of cases. Radiation therapy has a definite positive role in providing symptomatic relief for patients with carcinoma of the lung

  7. Target splitting non-coplanar RapidArc radiation therapy for a diffuse sebaceous carcinoma of the scalp: a novel delivery technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare conventional lateral photon-electron, fixed-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), coplanar and non-coplanar RapidArc for the treatment of a diffuse sebaceous gland carcinoma of the scalp. Comprehensive dosimetry comparisons were performed among 3D-CRT, IMRT and various RapidArc plans. Target coverage, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and doses to organs at risk (OAR) were calculated. Monitor unites (MUs) and delivery time of each treatment were also recorded to evaluate the execution efficiency. The influence of target splitting technique and non-coplanar planning on plan quality was discussed. IMRT was superior to 3D-CRT concerning targets’ coverage at the sacrifice of larger irradiated brain volumes to low doses. CIs and HIs were better in coplanar RapidArc and non-coplanar RapidArc plans than 3D-CRT and IMRT. Best dose coverage and sparing of OARs were achieved in non-coplanar plans using target splitting technique. Treatment delivery time was longest in the IMRT plan and shortest in the coplanar RapidArc plan without target splitting. The 3%/3 mm gamma test pass rates were above 95% for all the plans. Target splitting technique and non-coplanar arcs are recommended for total scalp irradiation

  8. Targeted therapies for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be untrue. Possible side effects from targeted therapies include: Diarrhea Liver problems Skin problems such as rash, dry skin, and nail changes Problems with blood clotting and wound healing High blood pressure As with any treatment, you ...

  9. Health Economic Changes as a Result of Implementation of Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: National Results from DARENCA Study 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne V; Donskov, Frede; Kjellberg, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on the economic consequences of implementing targeted therapy (TT) for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a real-world setting. OBJECTIVE: To analyze health care and productivity costs for TT implementation in a national cohort of patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND...... STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Generalized linear models were used to analyze costs adjusted for age, gender, and civil status. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: A total of 439 patients were included for 2006-2009 and 192 for 2002-2005. Comparison of the health care cost per patient per year between 2006-2009 and 2002...... productivity were €7852 and €8265, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A different pattern of health care costs were observed but total health care costs per patient per year did not significantly differ after implementation of TT for patients with mRCC. PATIENT SUMMARY: In this nationwide study, we found changes in...

  10. Quantification of activity by alpha-camera imaging and small-scale dosimetry within ovarian carcinoma micrometastases treated with targeted alpha therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chouin, N; Lindegren, S; Jensen, Holger;

    2012-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) a promising treatment for small, residual, and micrometastatic diseases has questionable efficacy against malignant lesions larger than the α-particle range, and likely requires favorable intratumoral activity distribution. Here, we characterized and quantified the...... activity distribution of an alpha-particle emitter radiolabelled antibody within >100-µm micrometastases in a murine ovarian carcinoma model. Nude mice bearing ovarian micrometastases were injected intra-peritoneally with 211At-MX35 (total injected activity 6 MBq, specific activity 650 MBq/mg). Animals......% IA/g at 4 h) in the outer tumor layer and a sharp drop beyond a depth of 50 µm. Small-scale dosimetry was performed on a multi-cellular micrometastasis model, using time-integrated activities derived from the experimental data. With injected activity of 400 kBq, tumors exhibiting uniform activity...

  11. α-Fetoprotein promoter-driven Cre/LoxP-switched RNA interference for hepatocellular carcinoma tissue-specific target therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Fei Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA interference (RNAi has recently emerged as a potential treatment modality for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC therapy, but the lack of cellular targets and sustained efficacy limits its application. The purpose of this study is to develop an HCC tissue-specific RNAi system and investigate its possibility for HCC treatment. METHODS: Two different HCC-specific RNAi systems in which therapeutic miRNA or shRNA against target gene (Beclin 1 was directly or indirectly driven by alpha-fetoprotein promoter (AFP-miRNA and AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA were constructed. Human HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B and HCCLM3 and non-HCC cell lines (L-02, Hela and SW1116 were infected with the systems. The effectiveness and tissue-specificity of the systems were examined by Q-PCR and western blot analysis. The efficacy of the systems was further tested in mouse model of HCC by intravenous or intratumoral administration. The feasibility of the system for HCC treatment was evaluated by applying the system as adjuvant therapy to enhance sorafenib treatment. An AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA system targeting Atg5 gene (AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA-Atg5 was constructed and its efficacy in sensitizing HCC cells (MHCC97L/PLC to sorafenib treatment was examined by apoptosis assay in vitro and tumorigenesis assay in vivo. RESULTS: The AFP-miRNA system could silence target gene (Beclin 1 but required a high titer which was lethal to target cells. The AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA system could efficiently knockdown target gene while maintain high HCC specificity. Intratumoral injection of the AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA system could efficiently silence target gene (Beclin 1 in vivo while intravenous administration could not. The AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA system target Atg5 gene could significantly sensitize MHCC97L/PLC cells to sorafenib-induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor growth suppression in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: An efficient HCC tissue-specific RNAi system (AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA was successfully established. The system

  12. Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Early evaluation of response to targeted therapy and prognostic value of Perfusion CT and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Ultrasound. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate whether there is any correlation between standard endpoints and tumor perfusion measurements with Perfusion CT and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography (DCE-US) in patients with advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with targeted therapy. Materials and methods: Nineteen patients were evaluated during targeted therapy (sorafenib n = 16, sunitinib n = 3). Changes in tumor perfusion measurements between baseline and month 1 were assessed and compared using RECIST progression criteria at month 2. Results: Median time to progression according to RECIST was 117 days and median time to death was 208 days. Perfusion CT values before treatment were significantly increased in HCC compared to the surrounding liver (n = 17, P < .02). Eleven patients received complete examinations with both techniques at baseline and month 1. A non-significant decrease was found in all Perfusion CT values between RECIST nonprogressors (n = 7) and progressors (n = 4): mean Blood Volume: −27.9 vs. −11.1% and mean Blood Flow: −25.0 vs. −11.7% respectively. With DCE-US, opposite changes were found (mean Area Under the Curve AUC: −38.3 vs. 436.3%). RECIST progression at month 2 was significantly correlated with a threshold 40% decrease in AUC (P = .015). None of the patients with a decrease in AUC ≥ 40% was a progressor at month 2. Conclusion: Despite perfusion changes with both Perfusion CT and DCE-US in patients receiving treatment, only DCE-US at month 1 (with a decrease in the AUC of more than 40%) predicted non-progression at month 2 and may be a potential surrogate marker of tumor response during targeted therapy

  13. Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Early evaluation of response to targeted therapy and prognostic value of Perfusion CT and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Ultrasound. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frampas, Eric, E-mail: eric.frampas@chu-nantes.fr [Central Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Hôtel-Dieu, 1 Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes Cedex 1 (France); Lassau, Nathalie, E-mail: Nathalie.LASSAU@igr.fr [IR4M UMR 8081, Université Paris Sud 11, Institut Gustave Roussy, 114 Av. Edouard Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Zappa, Magaly, E-mail: magaly.zappa@bjn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, APHP Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Beaujon, 100 Bd du général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Vullierme, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.vullierme@bjn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, APHP Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Beaujon, 100 Bd du général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Koscielny, Serge, E-mail: serge.koscielny@igr.fr [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Gustave Roussy, 114 Av. Edouard Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Vilgrain, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.vilgrain@bjn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, APHP Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Beaujon, 100 Bd du général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, INSERM CRB3 U773, 75018 Paris (France)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether there is any correlation between standard endpoints and tumor perfusion measurements with Perfusion CT and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography (DCE-US) in patients with advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with targeted therapy. Materials and methods: Nineteen patients were evaluated during targeted therapy (sorafenib n = 16, sunitinib n = 3). Changes in tumor perfusion measurements between baseline and month 1 were assessed and compared using RECIST progression criteria at month 2. Results: Median time to progression according to RECIST was 117 days and median time to death was 208 days. Perfusion CT values before treatment were significantly increased in HCC compared to the surrounding liver (n = 17, P < .02). Eleven patients received complete examinations with both techniques at baseline and month 1. A non-significant decrease was found in all Perfusion CT values between RECIST nonprogressors (n = 7) and progressors (n = 4): mean Blood Volume: −27.9 vs. −11.1% and mean Blood Flow: −25.0 vs. −11.7% respectively. With DCE-US, opposite changes were found (mean Area Under the Curve AUC: −38.3 vs. 436.3%). RECIST progression at month 2 was significantly correlated with a threshold 40% decrease in AUC (P = .015). None of the patients with a decrease in AUC ≥ 40% was a progressor at month 2. Conclusion: Despite perfusion changes with both Perfusion CT and DCE-US in patients receiving treatment, only DCE-US at month 1 (with a decrease in the AUC of more than 40%) predicted non-progression at month 2 and may be a potential surrogate marker of tumor response during targeted therapy.

  14. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Song; Jing Huang; Ling Shan; Hong-Tu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC),but biomarkers of activity are lacking.The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene status,vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) or stem cell factor receptor (KIT) expression,and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC.Methods:A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute,Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012.Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry.Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS) and ovcrall survival (OS) were calculated and then compared based on expression status.The Chi-square test,the KaplanMeier method,and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses.Results:Of 59 patients,objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%).The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months.There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features:Male gender,number of metastatic sites 2 or less,VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive.Eleven patients (18.6%) had evidence of VHL mutation,with an objective response rate of 45.5%,which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%).VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P =0.938) or PFS (P =0.277).The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients,respectively,which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P =0.026 and P =0.043).Conclusion:VHL mutation status could not predict

  15. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, but biomarkers of activity are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene status, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR or stem cell factor receptor (KIT expression, and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC. Methods: A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry. Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were calculated and then compared based on expression status. The Chi-square test, the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses. Results: Of 59 patients, objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%. The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months. There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features: Male gender, number of metastatic sites 2 or less, VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive. Eleven patients (18.6% had evidence of VHL mutation, with an objective response rate of 45.5%, which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%. VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P = 0.938 or PFS (P = 0.277. The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients, respectively, which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P = 0.026 and P = 0.043. Conclusion

  16. Radionuclide targeting with particular emphasis on urinary bladder carcinoma

    CERN Document Server

    Sjöström, A

    2001-01-01

    primary bladder carcinoma tumours was investigated. Both receptors were expressed in the majority of metastases and primary tumours. Targeting the EGF receptor and/or HER-2 in urinary bladder carcinoma is an exciting new concept The incidence of urinary bladder carcinoma is increasing and many patients die every year of this disease despite assumed radical therapy. Thus, there is a need for improved methods of diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide targeting is based on achieving specific delivery of radioactive nuclides to tumour cells with minimal damage to surrounding normal tissues. Two possible target structures are the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and the related receptor HER-2. Cellular binding and retention of sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 I-EGF-dextran conjugates was investigated in two bladder carcinoma cell lines. The conjugate bound specifically to the EGF receptor with delayed maximum binding, limited intracellular degradation and prolonged cellular retention compared to sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 I-EGF. EGF w...

  17. Targeted therapy in lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalli Franco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Discovery of new treatments for lymphoma that prolong survival and are less toxic than currently available agents represents an urgent unmet need. We now have a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of lymphoma, such as aberrant signal transduction pathways, which have led to the discovery and development of targeted therapeutics. The ubiquitin-proteasome and the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways are examples of pathological mechanisms that are being targeted in drug development efforts. Bortezomib (a small molecule protease inhibitor and the mTOR inhibitors temsirolimus, everolimus, and ridaforolimus are some of the targeted therapies currently being studied in the treatment of aggressive, relapsed/refractory lymphoma. This review will discuss the rationale for and summarize the reported findings of initial and ongoing investigations of mTOR inhibitors and other small molecule targeted therapies in the treatment of lymphoma.

  18. Methodologies for localizing loco-regional hypopharyngeal carcinoma recurrences in relation to FDG-PET positive and clinical radiation therapy target volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Focal methods to determine the source of recurrence are presented, tested for reproducibility and compared to volumetric approaches with respect to the number of recurrences ascribed to the FDG-PET positive and high dose volumes. Material and methods. Six patients treated for hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were extracted from archives. Inclusion criteria were: FDG-PET/CT for primary radiotherapy planning and clinical complete remission followed by loco-regional relapse. CT scan at the time of recurrence was also required. The recurrence volume was delineated in the follow-up scans by a radiologist. Putative points of origin (PO) of the recurrence were determined by two strategies 1) defined by an oncologist or 2) as the center-of-volume (COV) of the recurrence. The most likely recurrence point of origin on the treatment planning scan was also determined. All expert based points of origin were repeated to estimate reproducibility. The recurrence volume and PO were propagated to the treatment planning scan using a rigid transformation. Relations of the PO to target volumes, radiation doses and therapy-points-of-origin were quantified. For the volumetric methods, the overlap of the recurrence volume and target volumes was used to determine the source of the recurrence. Results. All recurrences were located in-field, but the volumetric approaches tended to designate fewer recurrences in the PET positive volume (25% for the 95% threshold, 95% confidence interval (CI):3-65%) than the observer-based methods (50% for the COV and both expert evaluations on the recurrence scan, 95% CI: 16-84%). The reproducibility of the expert POs is better on the recurrence scan than on the therapy scan. Conclusion. Volumetric approaches favor large target volumes as the source of the recurrence, thus underestimating the number of recurrences originating in the PET positive volume. Expert based and COV approaches on the recurrence scan are the most reproducible methods

  19. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June Key [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using {sup 125}I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of {sup 131}I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by {sup 125}I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to {sup 131}I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system.

  20. Changes in the planning target volume and liver volume dose based on the selected respiratory phase in respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Baek, Seong-Min

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the changes in the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume dose based on the respiratory phase to identify the optimal respiratory phase for respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on the standardized procedure for respiratory-gated radiation therapy, we performed a 4-dimensional computed tomography simulation for 0 ˜ 90%, 30 ˜ 70%, and 40 ˜ 60% respiratory phases to assess the respiratory stability (S R ) and the defined PTV i for each respiratory phase i. A treatment plan was established, and the changes in the PTV i and dose volume of the liver were quantitatively analyzed. Most patients (91.5%) passed the respiratory stability test (S R = 0.111 ± 0.015). With standardized respiration training exercises, we were able to minimize the overall systematic error caused by irregular respiration. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis to identify the optimal respiratory phase revealed that when a short respiratory phase (40 ˜ 60%) was used, the changes in the PTV were concentrated inside the center line; thus, we were able to obtain both a PTV margin accounting for respiration and a uniform radiation dose within the PTV.

  1. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT: differences in target volumes and improvement in clinically relevant doses to small bowel in rectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delclos Marc E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong dose-volume relationship exists between the amount of small bowel receiving low- to intermediate-doses of radiation and the rates of acute, severe gastrointestinal toxicity, principally diarrhea. There is considerable interest in the application of highly conformal treatment approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, to reduce dose to adjacent organs-at-risk in the treatment of carcinoma of the rectum. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive dosimetric evaluation of IMRT compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in standard, preoperative treatment for rectal cancer. Methods Using RTOG consensus anorectal contouring guidelines, treatment volumes were generated for ten patients treated preoperatively at our institution for rectal carcinoma, with IMRT plans compared to plans derived from classic anatomic landmarks, as well as 3DCRT plans treating the RTOG consensus volume. The patients were all T3, were node-negative (N = 1 or node-positive (N = 9, and were planned to a total dose of 45-Gy. Pairwise comparisons were made between IMRT and 3DCRT plans with respect to dose-volume histogram parameters. Results IMRT plans had superior PTV coverage, dose homogeneity, and conformality in treatment of the gross disease and at-risk nodal volume, in comparison to 3DCRT. Additionally, in comparison to the 3DCRT plans, IMRT achieved a concomitant reduction in doses to the bowel (small bowel mean dose: 18.6-Gy IMRT versus 25.2-Gy 3DCRT; p = 0.005, bladder (V40Gy: 56.8% IMRT versus 75.4% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, pelvic bones (V40Gy: 47.0% IMRT versus 56.9% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, and femoral heads (V40Gy: 3.4% IMRT versus 9.1% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, with an improvement in absolute volumes of small bowel receiving dose levels known to induce clinically-relevant acute toxicity (small bowel V15Gy: 138-cc IMRT versus 157-cc 3DCRT; p = 0.005. We found that the IMRT treatment volumes were typically larger than that

  2. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for kidney cancer Targeted therapies for kidney cancer Biologic therapy (immunotherapy) for kidney cancer Chemotherapy for kidney cancer Pain control for kidney cancer Treatment choices by stage for ...

  3. Mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy; Diagnostik und Therapie des Mammakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann (eds.) [Diagnostisches Brustzentrum Goettingen BZG, Goettingen(Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The book on mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy covers the following issues: development, anatomy and physiology of the mammary glands, pathology of benign and malign mammary gland changes, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography; ultrasonic mammography; magnetic resonance tomography of the mammary glands; imaging diagnostics findings; mammary interventions; examination concepts; operative therapy of the mammary carcinoma; chemotherapy of the mammary carcinoma; radio-oncological therapy of the mammary carcinoma; logistics in a medical center for mammary gland diseases; logistics in an interdisciplinary center for mammary diseases; dialogue conduction and psycho-social attendance.

  4. Radiation therapy for endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although pelvic irradiation has traditionally been employed as an adjunct to surgery, the role of radiation therapy as a definitive therapeutic modality continues to be controversial. One-hundred and twenty-one patients were treated for endometrial carcinoma between 1978 and 1985 at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. These patients were divided into three groups with respect to their treatment. Group 1 consisted of 16 patients who had preoperative radiation therapy, group 2 consisted of 77 patients who had postoperative radiation therapy, and group 3 consisted of 28 patients who had radiation therapy alone. Ninety-three percent of the patients in groups 1 and 2 and 68% of patients in group 3 had stages I and II disease. In group 3, 32% of the patients had stages III and IV disease. Two-thirds of the patients in groups 1 and 2 had moderately differentiated tumor. One-third of patients in group 3 had poorly differentiated tumor. Sixty percent of the study's population in group 2 had deep myometrial invasion. The treatment doses utilized and local failures will be presented. All of the patients have been followed for a minimum period of 2 years. The observed actuarial 5-year survival was 85%, 80%, and 53%, respectively, for groups 1, 2, and 3. The overall survival of the entire patient population was 77%. There was 1 fatality secondary to small bowel complication in group 2 and another serious complication of rectovaginal fistula in group 1 requiring colostomy. Other side effects were skin reaction, diarrhea, and cystitis, which were treated symptomatically. Analysis of the authors' institution experience with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium and its management with radiation therapy is presented. Survival is correlated with stage, grade, and depth of myometrial invasion

  5. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27 cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment

  6. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kim, Tae K. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women' s College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shyn, Paul [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Cheng, Jason C. [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Feng, Mary U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Stephans, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital/McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Crane, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27 cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment

  7. Feasibility of Using Volumetric Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound with a 3-D Transducer to Evaluate Therapeutic Response after Targeted Therapy in Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Young Jae; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) with a 3-D transducer to evaluate therapeutic responses to targeted therapy. Rabbits with hepatic VX2 carcinomas, divided into a treatment group (n = 22, 30 mg/kg/d sorafenib) and a control group (n = 13), were evaluated with DCE-US using 2-D and 3-D transducers and computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging at baseline and 1 d after the first treatment. Perfusion parameters were collected, and correlations between parameters were analyzed. In the treatment group, both volumetric and 2-D DCE-US perfusion parameters, including peak intensity (33.2 ± 19.9 vs. 16.6 ± 10.7, 63.7 ± 20.0 vs. 30.1 ± 19.8), slope (15.3 ± 12.4 vs. 5.7 ± 4.5, 37.3 ± 20.4 vs. 15.7 ± 13.0) and area under the curve (AUC; 1004.1 ± 560.3 vs. 611.4 ± 421.1, 1332.2 ± 708.3 vs. 670.4 ± 388.3), had significantly decreased 1 d after the first treatment (p = 0.00). In the control group, 2-D DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time to peak and slope had significantly changed (p AUC, AUC during wash-in and AUC during wash-out had significantly changed (p = 0.00). CT perfusion imaging parameters, including blood flow, blood volume and permeability of the capillary vessel surface, had significantly decreased in the treatment group (p = 0.00); however, in the control group, peak intensity and blood volume had significantly increased (p = 0.00). It is feasible to use DCE-US with a 3-D transducer to predict early therapeutic response after targeted therapy because perfusion parameters, including peak intensity, slope and AUC, significantly decreased, which is similar to the trend observed for 2-D DCE-US and CT perfusion imaging parameters. PMID:26365926

  8. Comparative Effectiveness of Second-Line Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Real-World Observational Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y Heng

    Full Text Available The optimal sequencing of targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC is unknown. Observational studies with a variety of designs have reported differing results. The objective of this study is to systematically summarize and interpret the published real-world evidence comparing sequential treatment for mRCC.A search was conducted in Medline and Embase (2009-2013, and conference proceedings from American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium (ASCO-GU, and European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO (2011-2013. We systematically reviewed observational studies comparing second-line mRCC treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi versus vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI. Studies were evaluated for 1 use of a retrospective cohort design after initiation of second-line therapy, 2 adjustment for patient characteristics, and 3 use of data from multiple centers. Meta-analyses were conducted for comparisons of overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS.Ten studies reported OS and exhibited significant heterogeneity in estimated second-line treatment effects (I2 = 68%; P = 0.001. Four of these were adjusted, multicenter, retrospective cohort studies, and these showed no evidence of heterogeneity (I2 = 0%; P = 0.61 and a significant association between second-line mTORi (>75% everolimus and longer OS compared to VEGF TKI (>60% sorafenib (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.98 in a meta-analysis. Seven studies comparing PFS showed significant heterogeneity overall and among the adjusted, multicenter, retrospective cohort studies. Real-world observational data for axitinib outcomes was limited at the time of this study.Real-world studies employed different designs and reported heterogeneous results comparing the effectiveness of second-line mTORi and VEGF TKI in the treatment of mRCC. Within the subset of adjusted

  9. Angiotensin system inhibitors and survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with VEGF-targeted therapy: A pooled secondary analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorich, Michael J; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Rowland, Andrew; Woodman, Richard J; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2016-05-01

    Use of angiotensin system inhibitors (ASIs; angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) has been reported to be associated with improved survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), particularly when used with vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapies. This study was a secondary pooled analysis of two Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of patients with mRCC: NCT00334282 comparing pazopanib to placebo and NCT00720941 comparing pazopanib to sunitinib. ASI users were defined as patients using an ASI at baseline. Association with overall survival (OS; primary outcome) and progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. The association was adjusted in multivariable analysis for baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP), use of other antihypertensive drugs and prognostic factors comprising the Heng risk criteria for mRCC. Of 1,545 patients pooled from the two RCTs, 649 (42%) were using one or more antihypertensive drugs at baseline, 385 (59%) of which were using an ASI. In the multivariable analysis of patients using pazopanib or sunitinib, no significant association was observed between baseline ASI use and OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-1.18], p = 0.80) or PFS (HR 0.88 [95% CI 0.73-1.06], p = 0.17). Exploratory subgroup analysis of NCT00720941 highlighted that the effect of baseline ASI use on OS may differ between patients treated with sunitinib and pazopanib. In conclusion, use of ASIs at baseline was not a significant independent prognostic factor for improved survival in a pooled analysis of mRCC patients treated with pazopanib or sunitinib. PMID:26685869

  10. Clinical trials of antiangiogenic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic target to inhibit tumor growth. This review summarizes data from clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. A systematic search of PubMed was performed to identify clinical trials of specific antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment, particularly phase III trials involving treatment guidelines for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Sorafenib is the only systemic drug approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Two large-scale, randomized phase III trials using sorafenib involving patients with unresectable HCC showed a significant survival benefit compared with placebo control groups. However, subsequent phase III trials of antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma have failed to improve survival compared with standard treatment protocols using sorafenib. The efficacy of antiangiogenic agents in combination with other drugs, transarterial chemoembolization, and surgical resection is currently being investigated. Future research is expected to optimize antiangiogenic therapies in combination with standard treatment with sorafenib. PMID:26899258

  11. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  12. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Buti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC.

  13. Repeated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety and effectiveness of repeated proton beam therapy for newly developed or recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From June 1989 through July 2000, 225 patients with HCC underwent their first course of proton beam therapy at University of Tsukuba. Of them, 27 with 68 lesions who had undergone two or more courses were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Median interval between the first and second course was 24.5 months (range 3.3-79.8 months). Median total dose of 72 Gy in 16 fractions and 66 Gy in 16 fractions were given for the first course and the rest of the courses, respectively. Results: The 5-year survival rate and median survival period from the beginning of the first course for the 27 patients were 55.6% and 62.2 months, respectively. Five-year local control rate for the 68 lesions was 87.8%. Of the patients, 1 with Child-Pugh class B and another with class C before the last course suffered from acute hepatic failure. Conclusions: Repeated proton beam therapy for HCC is safe when the patient has a target in the peripheral region of the liver and liver function is Child-Pugh class A

  14. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  15. Laryngeal adenocystic carcinoma treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenocystic carcinoma most commonly develops in the major salivary glands, on the other hand it is rare for adenocystic carcinoma to develop in the larynx. We report a case of adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. A 54-year-old male was hospitalized with symptoms of hoarseness and dyspnea on exertion. He presented a tumor that developed at the base of the right arytenoid, and covered over the glottis. It was confirmed to be adenocystic carcinoma (solid type) by biopsy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT also revealed a left cervical lymph node metastasis and multiple pulmonary metastases (T1N2cM1). He was treated with proton therapy to the larynx to prevent airway obstruction by growth of the tumor and to preserve the larynx because he had uncontrollable pulmonary metastasis. Although the tumor vanished after the treatment, one month later he had halitosis, dyspnea and bilateral vocal cord palsy. Despite administration of an antibacterial drug and steroid, there was no improvement to the narrowness of the glottis. A tracheotomy was therefore performed three months after the proton therapy. PET-CT, which was performed after the tracheotomy, suggested growth of the residual tumor or laryngeal radionecrosis. This study confirmed that proton therapy is effective for adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. However, proton therapy also was found to cause laryngeal radionecrosis. These results indicate the importance of evaluating the side effects of radiation therapy and providing that information to the patient. (author)

  16. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spallone, Giulia; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.costanzo@uniroma2.it [Department of Dermatology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier 1, 00199, Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-03

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC), representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC). The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  17. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Spallone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC, representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC. The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  18. HpD Photobiology And Photodynamic Therapy Of Bladder Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Wei

    1988-02-01

    Bladder carcinoma is considered one of the most favorable targets for the application of photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to the accessibility of the bladder for light delivery. Examination of the bladder and surgical procedures are routinely performed by the insertion of an optical instrument called cystoscope through the urethra. Thus, the treatment of bladder cancer by PDT can be conducted through the cystoscope with minimal invasion. However, to achieve optimal results from this treatment, one must consider both the structure of the bladder and the nature of the carcinoma.

  19. Bone-Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmen, J.; Banys-Paluchowski, M.; Fehm, T.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates and denosumab are well established components of the therapy for osteoporosis and osseous metastases. Their relevance in the adjuvant situation for breast cancer patients is being discussed in part controversially due to the heterogeneous nature of the available data. In particular, it appears that post-menopausal women benefit from an adjuvant therapy with bisphosphonates. In the present contribution we discuss the clinical relevance of osteoprotective therapy in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. Above all the current AGO guidelines on osteo-oncology and bone health have been taken into consideration for recommendations to implement the available data. PMID:26166839

  20. Response to targeted therapy in urachal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Testa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a young woman diagnosed with metastatic urachal carcinoma. A multimodal approach was used for the management of this patient. Due to disease progression despite surgery and two different chemotherapy regimens (neoadjuvant capecitabine + irinotecan + oxaliplatin and docetaxel + cisplatin after surgery, treatment with sunitinib was eventually started. Treatment with sunitinib resulted in stable disease and improvement of symptoms. Sunitinib was discontinued due to the occurrence of metrorrhagia, and restarted one week later. Disease eventually progressed and the patient died 18 months after the onset of symptoms. This is the first report on the use of sunitinib for the management of urachal carcinoma and provides initial evidence supporting the use of targeted therapy in this setting.

  1. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    Stoff-Khalili, MA; Dall, P.; Curiel, DT

    2006-01-01

    In view of the limited success of available treatment modalities for breast cancer, alternative and complementary strategies need to be developed. The delineation of the molecular basis of breast cancer provides the possibility of specific intervention by gene therapy through the introduction of genetic material for therapeutic purposes. In this regard, several gene therapy approaches for carcinoma of the breast have been developed. These approaches can be divided into six broad categories: (...

  2. Targeted therapy for human hepatic carcinoma cells using folate-functionalized polymeric micelles loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide and sorafenib in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lei Zhang,1 Faming Gong,2 Fang Zhang,3 Jing Ma,1 Peidong Zhang,1 Jun Shen3 1Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, 2PCFM Laboratory of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 3Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of targeted folate-functionalized micelles containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs and sorafenib on human hepatic carcinoma (HepG2 cells in vitro, and to observe the feasibility of surveillance of this targeting therapeutic effect by magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Sorafenib and SPIONs were loaded into polymeric micelles. The targeted nanocarrier was synthesized by functionalizing the micelles with folate. Folate-free micelles loaded with sorafenib and SPIONs were used as control (nontargeted micelles. Uptake of the nanocarrier by cells was assessed using Prussian blue staining after 1 hour of incubation with the polymeric micelles. The inhibitory effect of the targeted micelles on HepG2 cell proliferation at various concentrations of sorafenib was assessed in vitro using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay and apoptotic analysis using flow cytometry. Magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 1.5 T scanner was performed to detect changes in the signal intensity of cells after incubation with the targeted micelles. Results: Prussian blue staining showed significantly more intracellular SPIONs in cells incubated with the targeted micelles than those incubated with nontargeted micelles. The MTT assay showed that the average inhibitory ratio in the targeted group was significantly higher than that in the nontargeted group (38.13% versus 22.54%, P = 0.028. The mean apoptotic rate in the targeted cells, nontargeted cells, and untreated cells was 17.01%, 11.04%, and 7.89%, respectively. The apoptotic rate in the

  3. Monoclonal antibodies in targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Powroźnik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy is a new therapeutic method consisting in the inhibition of specific molecular pathways. In modern therapy, the key role is played by monoclonal antibodies, included in the group of biological agents. The success of molecularly targeted therapy is to define the proper “molecular target”, selecting the right drug active against a specific “target” and selecting a group of patients who benefit from treatment. Introduction of targeted therapy resulted in improved results of the treatment of many serious and chronic diseases. In general, targeted molecular therapies have good toxicity profiles, but some patients are exquisitely sensitive to these drugs and can develop particular and severe toxicities. Patient selection and proper monitoring significantly decrease the risk of life-threatening adverse events. Data concerning late side effects are still unavailable because of the short follow-up of molecularly targeted therapy. Currently in the U.S. and Europe there are approximately 31 registered therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, while 160 are subjected to clinical trials. This paper presents an overview of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies currently used in therapy and the present state of knowledge about them. 

  4. Targeted therapy: tailoring cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yan; Quentin Qiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapies include small-molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies,have made treatment more tumor-specific and less toxic,and have opened new possibilities for tailoring cancer treatment.Nevertheless,there remain several challenges to targeted therapies,including molecular identification,drug resistance,and exploring reliable biomarkers.Here,we present several selected signaling pathways and molecular targets involved in human cancers including Aurora kinases,PI3K/mTOR signaling,FOXO-FOXM1 axis,and MDM2/MDM4-p53 interaction.Understanding the molecular mechanisms for tumorigenesis and development of drug resistance will provide new insights into drug discovery and design of therapeutic strategies for targeted therapies.

  5. Molecular Targets for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular targeted radionuclide cancer therapy is becoming of increasing importance, especially for disseminated diseases. Systemic chemotherapies often lack selectivity while targeted radionuclide therapy has important advantages as the radioactive cytotoxic unit of the targeting vector is specifically directed to the cancer, sparing normal tissues. The principle strategy to improve cancer selectivity is to couple therapeutic agents to tumour-targeting vectors. In targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT), the cytotoxic portion of the conjugates normally contains a therapeutic radiometal immobilised by a bifunctional chelator. The aim is therefore to use as ligand-targeted therapeutics vectors coupled to Auger-, alpha- and/or beta-emitting radionuclides. An advantage of using radiation instead of chemotherapeutics as the cytotoxic agent is the so called 'crossfire effect'. This allows sterilisation of tumour cells that are not directly targeted due to heterogeneity in target molecule expression or inhomogeneous vector delivery. However, before the targeting ligands can be selected, the target molecule on the tumour has to be selected. It should be uniquely expressed, or at least highly overexpressed, on or in the target cells relative to normal tissues. The target should be easily accessible for ligand delivery and should not be shed or down- regulated after ligand binding. An important property of a receptor (or antigen) is its potential to be internalized upon binding of the ligand. This provides an active uptake mechanism and allows the therapeutic agent to be trapped within the tumour cells. Molecular targets of current interest include: Receptors: G-protein coupled receptors are overexpressed on many major human tumours. The prototype of these receptors are somatostatin receptors which show very high density in neuroendocrine tumours, but there are many other most interesting receptors to be applied for TRT. The targeting ligands for these receptors are

  6. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forscher C

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Charles Forscher,1 Monica Mita,2 Robert Figlin3 1Sarcoma Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Experimental Therapeutics Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Academic Development Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and Division of Hematology/Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing's sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing's sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. Keywords: sarcoma, targeted agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mTor inhibition

  7. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yichun Chiu; Allen W. Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN) is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN). Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy...

  8. Combined interventional therapies of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Qian; Gan-Sheng Feng; Thomas Vogl

    2003-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonmalignancies in the world, responsible for an estimated one million deaths annually. It has a poor prognosis due to its rapid infiltrating growth and complicating liver cirrhosis.Surgical resection, liver transplantation and cryosurgery are considered the best curative options, achieving a high rate of complete response, especially in patients with small HCC and good residual liver function. In nonsurgery, regional interventional therapies have led to a major breakthrough in the management of unresectable HCC, which include transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave coagulation therapy (MCT), laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), etc. As a result of the technical development of locoregional approaches for HCC during the recent decades,the range of combined interventional therapies has been continuously extended. Most combined multimodal interventional therapies reveal their enormous advantages as compared with any single therapeutic regimen alone,and play more important roles in treating unresectable HCC.

  9. Therapeutic response to a novel enzyme-targeting radiosensitization treatment (Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas) in patients with recurrent breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOYAMA, NOBUTAKA; OGAWA, YASUHIRO; YASUOKA, MIKI; TAKAHASHI, MASAO; IWASA, HITOMI; MIYATAKE, KANA; YAMANISHI, TOMOAKI; HAMADA, NORIHIKO; TAMURA, TAIJI; NISHIOKA, AKIHITO; YAMAGAMI, TAKUJI

    2016-01-01

    Linear accelerator-based radiotherapy has little effect on the majority of locally advanced neoplasms. Thus, the novel radiosensitizer Kochi Oxydol Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II), which contains hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate, was developed. The effectiveness of KORTUC II for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant supraclavicular lymph node metastases has been previously demonstrated. The present study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of KORTUC II in patients with recurrent breast cancer. A total of 20 patients (age range, 39–84 years) were enrolled in the study. The majority of patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) examinations prior to and 1–7 months following KORTUC II treatment, and every 6 months thereafter when possible. The radiotherapy regimen was 2.75 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week, for 16–18 fractions, with a total radiation dose of 44.00–49.50 Gy (X-ray irradiation), or 4.00 Gy/fraction, 3 fractions/week, for 10–12 fractions, with a total radiation dose of 40.00–48.00 Gy (electron beam irradiation). The injection of 3–6 ml of the KORTUC II agent was initiated at the fifth radiotherapy fraction, and was performed twice/week under ultrasonographic guidance. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by PET-CT examinations prior and subsequent to KORTUC II treatment, which was observed to be well tolerated with minimal adverse effects. Of the 24 lesions presented by the 20 patients, 18 exhibited complete response, 5 partial response, 0 stable disease and 1 progressive disease. The overall survival rate was 100% at 1 year and 95% at 2 years. The mean duration of follow-up at the end of June 2014 was 51 months. Based on the results of the PET-CT studies conducted, KORTUC II treatment demonstrated marked therapeutic effects, with satisfactory treatment outcomes and acceptable adverse events.

  10. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinoma of the ear is rarely reported. From 1978 through 1992, we treated 9 patients, of whom 5 had malignant tumors of the external auditory canal and 4 had malignant tumors of the middle ear, with radiation. These patients accounted for only 0.9% of all patients with head and neck carcinomas treated with radiation at our hospital. Most patients had otorrhea and otalgia, but few patients had specific symptoms of carcinoma. The outcome in cases in which radiotherapy was given after tumor was completely resected was good. The overall 5-year survival rate was 55%. In addition, the 3-year survival rates in cases of carcinoma of the middle ear and of the external auditory canal were 50% and 60%. However, there was no statistical difference in 5-year survival rates between the two sites. We believe factors that affect prognosis are early diagnosis of malignant change, the area of tumor involvement at diagnosis, and combined therapy with surgery and radiation. (author)

  11. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Are a Promising Therapeutic Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, Shinsaku, E-mail: shinsaku@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Polanska, Urszula M. [CR-UK Stromal-Tumour Interaction Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, The University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Horimoto, Yoshiya [Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Atopy Research Centre, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Department of Breast Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Orimo, Akira, E-mail: shinsaku@juntendo.ac.jp [CR-UK Stromal-Tumour Interaction Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, The University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Atopy Research Centre, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan)

    2013-01-31

    Human carcinomas frequently exhibit significant stromal reactions such as the so-called “desmoplastic stroma” or “reactive stroma”, which is characterised by the existence of large numbers of stromal cells and extracellular matrix proteins. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which are rich in activated fibroblast populations exemplified by myofibroblasts, are among the predominant cell types present within the tumour-associated stroma. Increased numbers of stromal myofibroblasts are often associated with high-grade malignancies with poor prognoses in humans. CAF myofibroblasts possess abilities to promote primary tumour development, growth and progression by stimulating the processes of neoangiogenesis as well as tumour cell proliferation, survival, migration and invasion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that CAFs serve as a niche supporting the metastatic colonisation of disseminated carcinoma cells in distant organs. Their contribution to primary and secondary malignancies makes these fibroblasts a potential therapeutic target and they also appear to be relevant to the development of drug resistance and tumour recurrence. This review summarises our current knowledge of tumour-promoting CAFs and discusses the therapeutic feasibility of targeting these cells as well as disrupting heterotypic interactions with other cell types in tumours that may improve the efficacy of current anti-tumour therapies.

  12. Development of a gene therapy strategy to target hepatocellular carcinoma based inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A using the α-fetoprotein promoter enhancer and pgk promoter: an in vitro and in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Current therapies are insufficient, making HCC an intractable disease. Our previous studies confirmed that inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer. Unfortunately, constitutive expression of PP2A in normal tissues limits the application of PP2A inhibition. Thus, a HCC-specific gene delivery system should be developed. The α-fetoprotein (AFP promoter is commonly used in HCC-specific gene therapy strategies; however, the utility of this approach is limited due to the weak activity of the AFP promoter. It has been shown that linking the AFP enhancer with the promoter of the non-tissue-specific, human housekeeping phosphoglycerate kinase (pgk gene can generate a strong and HCC-selective promoter. Methods We constructed a HCC-specific gene therapy system to target PP2A using the AFP enhancer/pgk promoter, and evaluated the efficiency and specificity of this system both in vitro and in vivo. Results AFP enhancer/pgk promoter-driven expression of the dominant negative form of the PP2A catalytic subunit α (DN-PP2Acα exerted cytotoxic effects against an AFP-positive human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Hep3B, but did not affect AFP-negative human hepatoma cells (SK-HEP-1 or normal human liver cells (L-02. Moreover, AFP enhancer/pgk promoter driven expression of DN-PP2Acα inhibited the growth of AFP-positive HepG2 tumors in nude mice bearing solid tumor xenografts, but did not affect AFP-negative SK-HEP-1 tumors. Conclusions The novel approach of AFP enhancer/pgk promoter-driven expression of DN-PP2Acα may provide a useful cancer gene therapy strategy to selectively target HCC.

  13. Development of a gene therapy strategy to target hepatocellular carcinoma based inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A using the α-fetoprotein promoter enhancer and pgk promoter: an in vitro and in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Current therapies are insufficient, making HCC an intractable disease. Our previous studies confirmed that inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer. Unfortunately, constitutive expression of PP2A in normal tissues limits the application of PP2A inhibition. Thus, a HCC-specific gene delivery system should be developed. The α-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter is commonly used in HCC-specific gene therapy strategies; however, the utility of this approach is limited due to the weak activity of the AFP promoter. It has been shown that linking the AFP enhancer with the promoter of the non-tissue-specific, human housekeeping phosphoglycerate kinase (pgk) gene can generate a strong and HCC-selective promoter. We constructed a HCC-specific gene therapy system to target PP2A using the AFP enhancer/pgk promoter, and evaluated the efficiency and specificity of this system both in vitro and in vivo. AFP enhancer/pgk promoter-driven expression of the dominant negative form of the PP2A catalytic subunit α (DN-PP2Acα) exerted cytotoxic effects against an AFP-positive human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Hep3B), but did not affect AFP-negative human hepatoma cells (SK-HEP-1) or normal human liver cells (L-02). Moreover, AFP enhancer/pgk promoter driven expression of DN-PP2Acα inhibited the growth of AFP-positive HepG2 tumors in nude mice bearing solid tumor xenografts, but did not affect AFP-negative SK-HEP-1 tumors. The novel approach of AFP enhancer/pgk promoter-driven expression of DN-PP2Acα may provide a useful cancer gene therapy strategy to selectively target HCC

  14. 靶向时代肝细胞癌的介入治疗%Transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma in the era of molecular targeted therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王维娟; 韩国宏

    2012-01-01

    原发性肝细胞癌(hepatocellular carcinoma,HCC)的发病率逐年上升,对于不适于肝移植或手术切除的肝内病灶,肝动脉化疗栓塞(transarterial embolization,TACE)是最主要的治疗方法.随机试验已证实该疗法能为HCC患者带来临床获益.荟萃分析显示,与保守治疗相比,TACE可改善HCC患者的临床结局.然而,TACE治疗后,血管内皮生长因子水平的上升会增大疾病进展的几率.分子靶向药物索拉非尼(sorafenib)的引入改变了HCC治疗的现状,其可以阻断多种细胞表面及细胞内与增殖和血管生成相关的受体.已有2项国际研究(SHARP和Asia-Pacific)证实,索拉非尼可有效延长晚期HCC患者的疾病进展时间和生存时间.TACE联合索拉非尼通过阻断TACE术后血管生成信号的激活,有望改善治疗结局.已有许多临床研究探索二者联合在HCC治疗中的应用.初步资料显示,联合疗法安全可行.尽管如此,目前尚不推荐在临床研究的环境之外采取联合治疗.随着临床研究的深入,相关资料将进一步指导临床.%The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been increasing year by year. For patients with liver-limited disease who are not candidates for liver transplantation or resection, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the most widely used approach. Randomized trials have shown clinical benefit of this approach in HCC patients, and meta-analyses have demonstrated that TACE can improve clinical outcomes of HCC patients compared with conservative management. However, treatment with. TACE causes transient elevations of levels of ar.giogenic growth factors such, as vascular endothelial growth factor, which, may be associated with an increased chance of disease progression. The introduction of sorafenib has changed the landscape of systemic therapy for HCC. Sorafenib may block cell surface and intraedlular receptors associated with proliferation and angiogenesis. in two large international

  15. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-three patients suffering from squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were treated with radiation therapy alone between 1961 and 1980 at the NIRS. The five-year survival rate and local control rate in each stage were 91 % and 36 % in T2 and 71 % and 64 % in T3, respectively. These results indicated that the early detection of recurrent tumor by close follow-up and an adequate retreatment procedure is very important for prologing survival. Late recurrence, more than five years after treatment, appeared in 30 % of the patients and this may be one of the special figures of postirradiated vulval carcinoma. The primary site was irradiated with external electron beams or radium needles, and better results were obtained with the later. Irradiation to the lymph node area in the pelvic cavity was necessary in patients with a more advanced stage of disease than T2. (author)

  16. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic ablation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gene therapy strategy of mutation compensation is designed to rectify the molecular lesions that are etiologic for neoplastic transformation. For dominant oncogenes, such approaches involve the functional knockout of the dysregulated cellular control pathways provoked by the overexpressed oncoprotein. On this basis, molecular interventions may be targeted to the transcriptional level of expression, via antisense or ribozymes, or post-transcriptionally, via intracellular single chain antibodies (intrabodies). For carcinoma of the breast, these approaches have been applied in the context of the disease linked oncogenes erbB-2 and cyclin D1, as well as the estrogen receptor. Neoplastic revision accomplished in modal systems has rationalized human trials on this basis

  17. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN. Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (RPN. On the other hand, thermoablative therapy and cryoablation also play an important role in the renal preservation therapy to improve the patient procedural tolerance. Novel modalities, but limited to small number of patients, include high-intensity ultrasound (HIFU, radiosurgery, microwave therapy (MWT, laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT, and pulsed cavitational ultrasound (PCU. Although initial results are encouraging, their real clinical roles are still under evaluation. On the other hand, active surveillance (AS has also been advocated by some for patients who are unfit for surgery. It is reasonable to choose the best therapeutic method among varieties of treatment modalities according to patients' age, physical status, and financial aid to maximize the treatment effect among cancer control, patient morbidity, and preservation of renal function.

  18. Carcinoma hepatocelular: parte 2. Tratamento Hepatocelular carcinoma: part 2. Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinício Paride CONTE

    2000-04-01

    alternative in the treatment of inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. The potential role of intersticial laser coagulation for patients with irresectable hepatic tumors was investigated, and in terms of experience, it has now been developed sufficiently to study its effect on these patients survival. The homeostatic control of angiogenesis and its influences on the tumor growth and for migration of metastatic cells, was focused in this concise review, given that hepatocytes are the source of much of the precursor pool, regulation of angiogenesis may be regarded as a new liver function with important consequences for tissue repair and cancer. Early hepatocellular carcinoma and its recognition in routine clinical pratice contributes to improved patients survival. Recombinant-Interferon-alpha therapy surely prevents, the development of cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma in about one-third of patients, with chronic hepatitis C, with sustained response. Finally, in individuals with life-threatening liver disease, such as those with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, the liver transplantation, must be considered, besides controversial, however, with increasing experience the results of the procedure in these patients have improved, and may offer a better long-term survival than liver resection.

  19. Trimodal combination therapy for maxillary sinus carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of trimodal combination therapy (radiotherapy, intra-arterial chemotherapy, antrotomy) for the treatment of primary maxillary sinus carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1977 and 1996, 110 patients with maxillary squamous cell carcinoma were treated with trimodal combination therapy at Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital. All tumors were classified according to the 1997 UICC TNM staging system. Eighty percent of patients had T3 or T4 tumors. The T3 and T4 tumors were also classified into three groups according to their location, as visualized using computed tomography: the posterior-lateral (P) group, the medial (M) group, and the upper (U) group. Eight patients received additional radiotherapy, and 37 patients underwent a second surgical procedure, in addition to the trimodal combination therapy. Results: The 5-year cause-specific survival and local control rates were 71% and 65%, respectively. The 5-year local control rate was 80% for the T1+2 tumors, 64% for the T3 tumors, and 52% for the T4 tumors (p=0.06). Patients in the P+M group who received a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) dosage of more than 3500 mg had a better 5-year local control rate than patients who received a 5-FU dosage of less than 3500 mg (p=0.01). No improvement in the local control rate after a second surgical procedure or additional irradiation treatment was observed in any of the groups. Conclusion: Trimodal combination therapy provides good local control, with the final outcome depending on the T stage of the tumor and the dosage of 5-FU

  20. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuse, Junji, E-mail: jfuruse@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8611 (Japan); Okusaka, Takuji [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-05-03

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important.

  1. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important

  2. Therapy of neuroendocrine carcinoma with Y-90 DOTA- preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Aim: Cell membrane-specific somatostatin receptors are usually expressed by neuroendocrine tumors. Radiolabelled receptor-binding somatostatin analogues target tissues expressing these receptors and can be used for visualization and treatment. After the localization of tumors bearing somatostatin receptors with 111In or 99mTc labeled somatostatin analogues, in the case of high tumor uptake related to non target tissues, different radioisotopes have been used for their treatment. Thus, application of high doses of 111In- DTPA-octreotide had an impact on improvement of the clinical symptoms, without significant reduction of the tumor mass. However, 90Y somatostatin analogues (DOTA TOC, lanreotide) may be more effective for reduction of the tissue of the larger tumors while 177Lu labeled ones may be applied in smaller tumors. Combination of both of them seems to be the most effective therapy, particularly in tumors bearing both small and large lesions. The aim of this work is presentation of the preliminary results of the therapy of NETs with another octreotide analogue, 90Y DOTA TATE, which so far has been proved to have high therapeutic potential when labeled with 177Lu. Patients and methods: We investigated 7 patients with neuroendocrine tumors (two patients had neuroendocrine pancreatic carcinomas with liver metastases (one of them had metastases in peritoneal lymph nodes), one patient with operated (resected) bronchial carcinoid and liver metastases, three patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas of unknown origin and hepatic metastases (one with skeletal metastases) and one with pancreatic gastrinoma without metastases (surgery was impossible to perform). In all of them, together with other laboratory analyses and imaging methods, scintigraphy with somatostatin analogues was performed (in 3 with 111In Octreoscan and in the other 4 with 99mTc HYNIC TOC) and high tumor uptake was observed. The therapy was performed with 2- 4,5 GBq 90Y DOTA TATE per

  3. Effects of integrin-targeted photodynamic therapy on pancreatic carcinoma cell%整合素靶向光动力学疗法对胰腺癌细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪倩雯; 杨姗莹; 瞿春莹; 周敏; 赵鹏程; 张建成; 徐雷鸣

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨整合素靶向光动力学疗法(PDT)对人胰腺癌的体外抗癌作用.方法 将胰腺癌SW1990细胞分成4组,以不加量子点、无光辐照培养的细胞作为空白对照,另设单纯光辐照组、光敏剂组、PDT组.合成量子点-精氨酸甘氨酸-天冬氨酸(RGD)整合素探针,利用激光共聚焦显微镜验证其靶向性,将其作为光敏剂进行PDT.用荧光显微镜观察各组处理后48 h胰腺癌细胞的形态学变化.MTT法、流式细胞术(FCM)法检测细胞增殖、凋亡和周期的变化.RT PCR法检测各处理组细胞髓样细胞白血病-1(Mcl-1)、蛋白激酶B(Akt)、肿瘤坏死因子相关凋亡诱导配体(TRA IL)表达.荧光探针检测各组活性氧表达.组间比较采用单因素方差分析,分析PDT组的治疗效果.结果 量子点-RGD探针能有效靶向标记胰腺癌细胞.MTT法PDT组24、48、72 h时的胰腺癌细胞增殖相对抑制率均高于空白对照组,差异有统计学意义(F=73.00、85.10、126.58,P均<0.01).FCM法结果示48 h时PDT组细胞凋亡率(17.860%±1.230%)高于其他各组(F=130.617,P<0.01);细胞G0/G1期(69.14%±2.63%)和S期(24.41%±2.67%)出现阻滞(P均<0.05).PDT组增殖、凋亡相关基因Mcl-1、Akt的mRNA表达低于其他各组,而凋亡诱导配体TRAIL mRNA表达高于其他各组(F=567.456、446.817,145.238,P均<0.05).PDT组活性氧水平高于其他各组(F=3262.559,P<0.01).结论 量子点-RGD整合素靶向探针介导的PDT能明显抑制胰腺癌细胞增殖,促进细胞凋亡.%Objective To investigate the anti carcinoma role of integrin targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) on pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro.Methods Pancreatic carcinoma cells SW1990 were divided into four groups:cells without quantum dots (QDs) and light-treated as blank control group,pure light-treated group,photosensitizer group and PDT group.The targeting of QDs-arginine,glycine,aspartic acid (RGD) and integrin probe was confirmed by laser

  4. Maxillary sinus carcinoma: result of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This hundred and sixteen patients with carcinoma of the maxillary sinus received primary therapy consisting of external beam irradiation alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy at the Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital, between 1953 and 1982. In our institution, methods of treating cancer of the maxillary sinus have been changed from time to time and showed different control rates and clinical courses. An actuarial 10-year survival rate of 21% has been obtained by the megavoltage irradiation alone as well as 34% actuarial 10-year survival rate by megavoltage irradiation with surgery. After the introduction of conservative surgery followed by conventional trimodal combination therapy, the local control rate has been improved. The amount of functional, cosmetic, and brain damages have been remarkably decreased by this mode of therapy. The actuarial five year survival rate was 67%. In addition, along with the improvement of the local control rate, the control of nodal and distant organ metastases have been emerging as one of the important contributions to the prognosis of this disease

  5. Comprehensive sequential interventional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang; FAN Wei-jun; HUANG Jin-hua; LI Chuan-xing; ZHAO Ming; WANG Li-gang; TANG Tian

    2009-01-01

    Background Since the 1980s, various approaches to interventional therapy have been developed, with the development and achievement of medical imaging technology. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of comprehensive sequential interventional therapy especially personal therapeutic plan in 53 radical cure patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Methods From January 2003 to January 2005, a total of 203 patients with HCC received sequential interventional treatment in our hospital. Fifty-three patients achieved radical cure outcomes. Those patients were treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), or high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), sequentially and in combination depending on their clinical and pathological features. PET-CT was used to evaluate, assess, and guide treatment.Results Based on the imaging and serological data, all the patients had a personal therapeutic plan. The longest follow-up time was 24 months, the shortest was 6 months, and mean survival time was 16.5 months.Conclusion Comprehensive sequential interventional therapy especially personal therapeutic plan for HCC play roles in interventional treatment of HCC in middle or advanced stage.

  6. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in gene transfer technology have greatly expanded the opportunities for developing immunotherapy strategies for breast carcinoma. Genetic immunotherapy approaches include the transfer of genes encoding cytokines and costimulatory molecules to modulate immune function, as well as genetic immunization strategies which rely on the delivery of cloned tumor antigens. Improved gene transfer vectors, coupled with a better understanding of the processes that are necessary to elicit an immune response and an expanding number of target breast tumor antigens, have led to renewed enthusiasm that effective immunotherapy may be achieved. It is likely that immunotherapeutic interventions will find their greatest clinical application as adjuvants to traditional first-line therapies, targeting micrometastatic disease and thereby reducing the risk of cancer recurrence

  7. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford R Hirsch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future.

  8. Target Therapy in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarotti, Stefano; Lococo, Filippo; Froesh, Patrizia; Zappa, Francesco; Andrè, Dutly

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is an extremely heterogeneous disease, with well over 50 different histological variants recognized under the fourth revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) typing system. Because these variants have differing genetic and biological properties correct classification of lung cancer is necessary to assure that lung cancer patients receive optimum management. Due to the recent understanding that histologic typing and EGFR mutation status are important for target the therapy in lung adenocarcinoma patients there was a great need for a new classification that addresses diagnostic issues and strategic management to allow for molecular testing in small biopsy and cytology specimens. For this reason and in order to address advances in lung cancer treatment an international multidisciplinary classification was proposed by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS), further increasing the histological heterogeneity and improving the existing WHO-classification. Is now the beginning of personalized therapy era that is ideally finalized to treat each individual case of lung cancer in different way. PMID:26667341

  9. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  10. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  11. Radium therapy for carcinoma of the tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of radium therapy with or without multi-disciplinary treatment for carcinoma of the tongue were studied in 117 patients treated from 1973 to 1981 at Gunma Cancer Center. 1. The patients were classified according to the TNM classification of UICC (1978). Seventeen patients were T1, 42 were T2, 31 were T3, 27 were T4, 92 were NO, 18 were N1, 2 were N2 and 5 were N3. 2. The treatment methods included external irradiation with 1,000-2,000 rads by 6MV X-ray followed by radium interstitial implants of 6,000-8,000 rads in 93 patients (73.9 per cent), radium therapy with additional Bleomycin 45-60 mg in 24 patients (20.5 per cent), and cryosurgery in 3 patients. 3. The five year survival rate was 41.6 per cent; 100.0 per cent for T1, 50.0 per cent for T2, 38.8 per cent for T3 and 10.5 per cent for T4. The overall five-year cumulative survival rate was 46.9 per cent. For primary lesions of T3 or T4, greater efforts should be made with combined modalities, such as planned multi-disciplinary treatments with combined radiation and major surgery. (author)

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery: a "targeted" therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zeng; Liang-Fu Han

    2012-01-01

    The developments of medicine always follow innovations in science and technology.In the past decade,such innovations have made cancer-related targeted therapies possible.In general,the term "targeted therapy" has been used in reference to cellular and molecular level oriented therapies.However,improvements in the delivery and planning of traditional radiation therapy have also provided cancer patients more options for "targeted" treatment,notably stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).In this review,the progress and controversies of SRS and SBRT are discussed to show the role of stereotactic radiation therapy in the ever evolving multidisciplinary care of cancer patients.

  13. Postoperative therapy options for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Hong; Ma, Liang; Li, Le-Qun

    2014-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with poor prognosis and often recurs even after curative hepatic resection (HR) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). In fact, recurrence is the most frequent cause of postoperative death in patients with HCC; it can arise through intrahepatic metastasis by the primary tumor or through the emergence of de novo tumors. Even though studies have examined numerous adjuvant therapies and chemotherapies for their ability to prevent recurrence, no consensus recommendations exist about their clinical application. To gain a comprehensive picture of clinical options, we identified 39 randomized controlled trials, involving 4113 participants, which explore the efficacy of adjuvant or chemotherapies to prevent HCC recurrence after potentially curative HR or RFA. The available evidence suggests a significant improvement in recurrence-free survival and overall survival when transarterial chemoembolization is used for patients who are at high risk for recurrence, lamivudine for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC (>500 copies of HBV DNA/ml), and interferon-α for patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected HCC. In contrast, available evidence does not definitively establish clinical benefits of interferon-β for patients with HCV-related HCC, interferon-α for patients with HBV-related HCC, or any of the following therapies for patients with HCC: iodine-125 brachytherapy, autologous tumor vaccination, adoptive immunotherapy, or therapy involving acyclic retinoid, vitamin K2 analog, iodine-131-labeled lipiodol, sorafenib, heparanase inhibitor PI-88, or capecitabine. Though the findings of our review should be interpreted with caution because of clinical heterogeneity and small sample size in the included trials, they highlight gaps in the evidence base, and therefore, may guide future research. PMID:24716523

  14. Percutaneous local therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma impair gastric function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fumihiko Kinekawa; Shigeki Kuriyama; Kazuya Matsuda; Tsutomu Masaki; Kazutaka Kurokohchi; Hirohito Yoneyama; Hideyuki Inoue; Hirohide Kurata; Yoshihito Uchida; Seishiro Watanabe

    2006-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Percutaneous local therapies, such as percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), microwave coagulation and radiofrequency ablation (RFA), are frequently used worldwide for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) because of their high effectiveness.

  15. Volumetric FDG-PET predicts overall and progression- free survival after 14 days of targeted therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether changes in the metabolism of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) assessed by F18-FDG-PET after 14 and 28 days of treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors can predict overall and progression- free patient survival. Thirty-nine consecutive patients with mRCC were included prospectively and underwent PET examinations prior to and after 14 and 28 days of standard treatment with sunitinib (n = 18), sorafenib (n = 19) or pazopanib (n = 2). The PET response was analyzed in terms of SUVmax, SULpeak, and total lesion glycolysis and a positive response (defined as a 30% reduction) compared to overall and progression- free survival. Thirty-five patients with at least one metabolically active metastatic lesion prior to treatment underwent additional FDG-PET examinations after 14 (n = 32) and/or 28 days (n = 30) of treatment. Changes in either SULpeak or total lesion glycolysis were correlated to both progression-free and overall survival (for TLG2.5 responders, HR = 0.38 (95% CI: 0.18-0.83) and 0.22 (95% CI: 0.09-0.53), and for TLG50 responders, HR = 0.25 (0.10-0.62) and 0.25 (95% CI: 0.11-0.57) and for SULpeak responders, HR = 0.39 (95% CI: 0.17-0.91) and 0.38 (95% CI: 0.15-0.93), respectively). In contrast SUVmax response did not predict progression- free or overall survival (HR = 0.43 (95% CI: 0.18-1.01) and 0.50 (95% CI: 0.21-1.19), respectively). Assessment of early changes in SULpeak and total lesion glycolysis undergoing treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors by FDG-PET can possibly predict progression- free and overall survival in patients with mRCC

  16. Persistence of endometrial activity after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is a proved treatment for cervical carcinoma; however, it destroys ovarian function and has been thought to ablate the endometrium. Estrogen replacement therapy is often prescribed for patients with cervical carcinoma after radiation therapy. A review of records of six teaching hospitals revealed 16 patients who had endometrial sampling for uterine bleeding after standard radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Fifteen patients underwent dilatation and curettage, and one patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy when a dilatation and curettage was unsuccessful. Six patients had fibrosis and inflammation of the endometrial cavity, seven had proliferative endometrium, one had cystic hyperplasia, one had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and one had adenocarcinoma. Although the number of patients who have an active endometrium after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma is not known, this report demonstrates that proliferative endometrium may persist, and these patients may develop endometrial hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma. Studies have indicated that patients with normal endometrial glands have an increased risk of developing endometrial adenocarcinoma if they are treated with unopposed estrogen. Patients who have had radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma should be treated with estrogen and a progestational agent to avoid endometrial stimulation from unopposed estrogen therapy

  17. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the major salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From January 1967 through November 1991, a total of 135 patients with carcinoma of the major salivary glands (parotid: 95; submandibular: 39, sublingual: 1) were treated at our department. 40 patients had adenocarcinoma, 29 adenoid cystic carcinoma, 24 mucoepidermoid carcinoma and 16 squamous cell carcinoma. 100 patients were irradiated postoperatively and the remaining 35 were treated with radiation alone. Total radiation doses delivered were 50 Gy for the postoperative group and 50 to 66 Gy for the group receiving only radiation using a 60Co single portal with or without wedged paired or single electron portal boost. Actuarial five-year survivals after radiation therapy were 55% for the postoperative group and 26% for radiation only group (p=0.0004). The local control rates for the postoperative group were 83% for adenocarcinoma, 81% for adenoid cystic carcinoma, 83% for mucoepidermoid carcinoma and 62% for squamous cell carcinoma. Corresponding figures for the radiation only group were 40% for adenocarcinoma, 38% for adenoid cystic carcinoma and 33% for mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Conventional irradiation techniques continue to play an important role because they offer superior local control for postoperative patients with carcinoma of the major salivary glands. However, the local control rates for the radiation only group were only 30 to 40%, so that new irradiation modalities such as provided by a high LET machine are needed for these patients. (orig.)

  18. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the major salivary glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Inoue, Ta. (Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Inoue, To. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Ikeda, H. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Yamazaki, H. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Ohtani, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Shimizutani, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Furukawa, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Kozuka, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Murayama, S. (National Inst. of Radiological Science, Chiba (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    From January 1967 through November 1991, a total of 135 patients with carcinoma of the major salivary glands (parotid: 95; submandibular: 39, sublingual: 1) were treated at our department. 40 patients had adenocarcinoma, 29 adenoid cystic carcinoma, 24 mucoepidermoid carcinoma and 16 squamous cell carcinoma. 100 patients were irradiated postoperatively and the remaining 35 were treated with radiation alone. Total radiation doses delivered were 50 Gy for the postoperative group and 50 to 66 Gy for the group receiving only radiation using a [sup 60]Co single portal with or without wedged paired or single electron portal boost. Actuarial five-year survivals after radiation therapy were 55% for the postoperative group and 26% for radiation only group (p=0.0004). The local control rates for the postoperative group were 83% for adenocarcinoma, 81% for adenoid cystic carcinoma, 83% for mucoepidermoid carcinoma and 62% for squamous cell carcinoma. Corresponding figures for the radiation only group were 40% for adenocarcinoma, 38% for adenoid cystic carcinoma and 33% for mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Conventional irradiation techniques continue to play an important role because they offer superior local control for postoperative patients with carcinoma of the major salivary glands. However, the local control rates for the radiation only group were only 30 to 40%, so that new irradiation modalities such as provided by a high LET machine are needed for these patients. (orig.)

  19. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Barry J.; Raja, Chand; Rizvi, Syed; Li, Yong; Tsui, Wendy; Zhang, David; Song, Emma; Qu, Chang Fa; Kearsley, John; Graham, Peter; Thompson, John

    2004-08-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The 213Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 µCi in human

  20. Induction of hepatocellular carcinoma by in vivo gene targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Rong; Xu, Mei; Toffanin, Sara; Li, Yi; Llovet, Josep M.; Russell, David W.

    2012-01-01

    The distinct phenotypic and prognostic subclasses of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are difficult to reproduce in animal experiments. Here we have used in vivo gene targeting to insert an enhancer-promoter element at an imprinted chromosome 12 locus in mice, thereby converting ∼1 in 20,000 normal hepatocytes into a focus of HCC with a single genetic modification. A 300-kb chromosomal domain containing multiple mRNAs, snoRNAs, and microRNAs was activated surrounding the integration site. An identical domain was activated at the syntenic locus in a specific molecular subclass of spontaneous human HCCs with a similar histological phenotype, which was associated with partial loss of DNA methylation. These findings demonstrate the accuracy of in vivo gene targeting in modeling human cancer and suggest future applications in studying various tumors in diverse animal species. In addition, similar insertion events produced by randomly integrating vectors could be a concern for liver-directed human gene therapy. PMID:22733778

  1. Palliative nephrectomy until targeted therapy of disseminated kidney cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Klimov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the role of palliative nephrectomy in disseminated kidney cancer patients planned to undergo targeted antiangiogenic treatment.Subjects and methods. The investigation included data on 83 patients with T1-4N0 / +M1 disseminated renal cell carcinoma (RCC who had received at least 2 targeted therapy cycles in 2009 to 2011. In 48 (57.8 % patients, the treatment was preceded by palliative nephrectomy that was not carried out in 35 (42.2 %. Before starting targeted therapy, all the cases were confirmed to be diagnosed with clear cell RCC, with a sarcomatoid component being in 7 (8.4 % patients. The median follow-up of all the patients was 21 (12–36 months.Results. The unremoved affected kidney in disseminated kidney cancer patients receiving targeted antiangiogenic therapy is an independent factor for the poor prognosis of progression-free (odds ratio (OR, 2.4; 95 % confidence interval (CI, 1.2–4.7 and overall (OR, 2.8; 95 % CI, 1.3–6.3 survival. Palliative nephrectomy does not improve the prognosis in patients with a low somatic status, the N+ category, and metastases into the bones and nonregional lymph nodes.Conclusion. Palliative nephrectomy in the selected patients with disseminated kidney cancer on targeted antiangiogenic therapy increases progression-free and overall survival.

  2. Oncolytic vaccinia therapy of squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel therapies are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC of the head and neck. Historically, vaccinia virus was administered widely to humans as a vaccine and led to the eradication of smallpox. We examined the therapeutic effects of an attenuated, replication-competent vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68 as an oncolytic agent against a panel of six human head and neck SCC cell lines. Results All six cell lines supported viral transgene expression (β-galactosidase, green fluorescent protein, and luciferase as early as 6 hours after viral exposure. Efficient transgene expression and viral replication (>150-fold titer increase over 72 hrs were observed in four of the cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1, GLV-1h68 was highly cytotoxic to the four cell lines, resulting in ≥ 90% cytotoxicity over 6 days, and the remaining two cell lines exhibited >45% cytotoxicity. Even at a very low MOI of 0.01, three cell lines still demonstrated >60% cell death over 6 days. A single injection of GLV-1h68 (5 × 106 pfu intratumorally into MSKQLL2 xenografts in mice exhibited localized intratumoral luciferase activity peaking at days 2–4, with gradual resolution over 10 days and no evidence of spread to normal organs. Treated animals exhibited near-complete tumor regression over a 24-day period without any observed toxicity, while control animals demonstrated rapid tumor progression. Conclusion These results demonstrate significant oncolytic efficacy by an attenuated vaccinia virus for infecting and lysing head and neck SCC both in vitro and in vivo, and support its continued investigation in future clinical trials.

  3. Radiation therapy for advanced laryngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1967 through 1985, 92 patients with T3 and T4 laryngeal carcinoma were treated with radiation at Osaka University Hospital. Of 92 patients, patients with 14 T3 and 29 T4 carcinoma were treated with a total dose of 60 Gy or more, and those with 14 T3 and 21 T4 carcinoma were treated with a total dose of 40 to 58 Gy and followed by total laryngectomy. Other 14 patients were palliatively treated with a total dose less than 60 Gy without surgery. The 5-year local control rates for T3 and T4 carcinoma treated with radical radiation were 48% and 24%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific survival rates for T3 carcinoma treated with radical and preoperative radiotherapy were 48% and 71%, and corresponding figures for T4 carcinoma were 52% and 43%. There were no statistically significant differences between cause-specific survival rates of radical and preoperative groups. The 5-year cause-specific survival rates for T3N0 and T4N0 cases treated with radical radiation were 83% and 56%, and corresponding figures for T3N+ and T4N+ cases were 13% and 45%. Voice preservation rates of T3 and T4 patients treated with radical radiation were about 1/2 and 1/4, respectively. Considering the QOL of patients, radiotherapy for advanced carcinoma of larynx should be considered as a primary treatment especially for N0 cases. (author)

  4. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    MISHRA, LOPA

    2014-01-01

    Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the fun...

  5. Recent progress in radiofrequency ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kenji; Osaki, Yukio; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Nasu, Akihiro; Kawamura, Yusuke; Jyoko, Koji; Sano, Takatomo; Sunagozaka, Hajime; Uchino, Koji; Minami, Yasunori; Saito, Yu; Nagai, Kazumasa; Inokuchi, Ryosuke; Kokubu, Shigehiro; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    In order to attain better ablation and more effective management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), new approaches and devices in radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapy were presented and discussed in a workshop at the 50th Annual Meeting of the Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan. A novel bipolar RFA apparatus was introduced in Japan in January 2013. Hundreds of subjects with HCC were treated with multipolar RFA with varied devices and plans. Among these, no-touch ablation was one of the most useful procedures in the treatment of HCC with the apparatus. In RFA therapy, a few assisting devices and techniques were applied for convenience and improvement of the thermal ablation procedure. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and three-dimensional fusion imaging technique using volume data of CT or MRI could improve exact targeting and shorten the treatment time for RFA procedures under ultrasonographic guidance. A more complicated method using a workstation was also reported as being helpful in planning the ablated shape and volume in multineedle RFA. The effective use of sedatives and antianalgesics as well as a novel microwave apparatus with a cooled-tip electrode was also discussed. PMID:25427736

  6. Targeted anti-cancerous therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowning decades of efforts in fundamental and applied research, the first generation of targeted anti cancerous drugs is now on the market. Drugs coming from a new approach, conceived from molecular knowledge of cancer and directed against beforehand identified targets. In theory: a miracle of precision and technical success. In practice: a new sources of questions and new problems. (N.C.)

  7. Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and target genes during combined therapy with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the effects the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE) on transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and target genes and the feasibility of combination therapy with reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: The tolerability and response to bortezomib 0.6 mg/m2 and 0.9 mg/m2 given twice weekly concurrent with daily reirradiation to 50-70 Gy was explored. Blood proteasome inhibition and NF-κB-modulated cytokines and factors were measured. Proteasome inhibition, nuclear localization of NF-κB phospho-p65, apoptosis, and expression of NF-κB-modulated mRNAs were compared in serial biopsies from accessible tumors. Results: The maximally tolerated dose was exceeded, and study was limited to 7 and 2 patients, respectively, given bortezomib 0.6 mg/m2 and 0.9 mg/m2/dose with reirradiation. Grade 3 hypotension and hyponatremia were dose limiting. Mucositis was Grade 3 or less and was delayed. The mean blood proteasome inhibition at 1, 24, and 48 h after 0.6 mg/m2 was 32%, 16%, and 7% and after 0.9 mg/m2 was 56%, 26%, and 14%, respectively. Differences in proteasome and NF-κB activity, apoptosis, and expression of NF-κB-modulated cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis factor mRNAs were detected in 2 patients with minor tumor reductions and in serum NF-κB-modulated cytokines in 1 patient with a major tumor reduction. Conclusions: In combination with reirradiation, the maximally tolerated dose of bortezomib was exceeded at a dose of 0.6 mg/m2 and the threshold of proteasome inhibition. Although this regimen with reirradiation is not feasible, bortezomib induced detectable differences in NF-κB localization, apoptosis, and NF-κB-modulated genes and cytokines in tumor and serum in association with tumor reduction, indicating that other schedules of bortezomib combined with primary radiotherapy or reirradiation may merit future investigation

  8. New therapeutic targets in the management of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverrisson EF

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Einar F Sverrisson, Patrick N Espiritu, Philippe E SpiessDepartment of Genitourinary Oncology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, despite the myriad of treatment approaches and our progressively increasing knowledge into its disease processes, remains one of the most clinically challenging problems in modern urological clinical practice. New therapies target biomolecular pathways and cellular mediators responsible for regulating cell growth and metabolism, both of which are frequently overexpressed in malignant urothelial cells, with the intent of inducing cell death by limiting cellular metabolism and growth, creating an immune response, or selectively delivering or activating a cytotoxic agent. These new and novel therapies may offer a potential for reduced toxicity and an encouraging hope for better treatment outcomes, particularly for a disease often refractory or not amenable to the current therapeutic approaches.Keywords: targeted therapy, intravesical agents, systemic therapies

  9. Locally advanced cervix carcinoma - innovation in combined modality therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locally advanced cervical carcinoma continues to be a challenge to the clinician due to local failure as well as systemic metastases. Standard intracavitary and external beam techniques result in local control rates of only 35-65%, with long term survival rates of 25-60% in patients with state IIIA-IVA disease, indicating the need to identify new treatment strategies. Optimization programs for remote-afterloading interstitial brachytherapy allow the delivery of higher local doses of radiation to volumes that more closely approximate tumor target volumes as identified on MR scans, leading to improved therapeutic ratios. Identification of subsets of patients more likely to fail standard therapy, either locally or systemically, may be possible through such techniques as in vivo measurements of hypoxia with Eppendorf oxygen electrodes, interstitial fluid pressure measurements, the Comet assay, and nitroimidazole binding methods. Traditional chemotherapies, administered in either a neoadjuvant role or concomitantly with radiation have been disappointing in prospective trials. A variety of new agents are being investigated to determine if they can increase the frequency or duration of complete response. The taxanes, with response rates of 17-23% by themselves, are being assessed as potential radiosensitizers. The camptotheicin CRT-11 (Irinotecan) has demonstrated activity in platinum resistant cervix cancer, with response rates of 24%. Bioradiotherapeutic approaches, using 13-cis-retinoic acid and interferon-2a, are undergoing phase II studies. Neoangiogenesis inhibitors and vaccines against HPV are also being examined. The aggressive pursuit of techniques that help identify those patients most likely to fail, that allow the delivery of higher radiation doses more safely to the target volume, and that incorporate the use of more effective systemic therapies is necessary to improve the outcome for this disease

  10. Molecular features of renal cell carcinoma: early diagnostics and perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kovaleva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Kidney cancer (renal cell carcinoma is one of the major problems of modern urological oncology. In Russia renal cell carcinoma accountsfor 4.3 % of all cancers. The global incidence of renal cell carcinoma has increased over the past two decades. Worldwide renal cell carcinoma accounts for 3.6 % of all cancers and is 10th frequent malignancy. For some malignancies, for instance tumours of prostate, there are markers known that allowed improved early diagnostics. Kidney cancer, however, remains to be hard to diagnose and to treat, since the symptoms can be detected on advanced stages of the disease. In Russia 75.4 % of renal cell carcinoma cases detected at the stage of local and locally advanced disease. Though there are various target drugs on the market aimed to treat this disease, the results of renal cell carcinoma treatment did not reach any substantial success. Most of existing target drugs for kidney cancer treatment include inhibitors of a single signalingpathway regulated by VHL1, which expression is lost in the vast majority of renal-cell carcinomas. Till now existing drugs did not reach sufficient efficacy. Therefore, it is highly important to search for new signaling pathways, regulating such cellular processes as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Further, prognostic markers and therapy targets identified so far are not sufficient and poorly specific. Therefore identification and validation of new markers, and especially new specific targets for the treatment of kindey oncopathologies is highly important and timely task.

  11. Re-188 Lipiodol therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignant epithelial tumour arising from parenchymatous liver cells. It is one of the world's most common malignancies, causing almost one million deaths annually. About 315,000 new cases of HCC are reported per year which constitutes 5.6% of all cancers among males and 2.7% of all cancers among females. Control strategies to prevent occurrence of HCC are sub-optimal; this is evident by the rising incidence of HCC even in developed nations like the USA, where the prevalence of the disease is one of the lowest in the world. Currently, patients with HCC have an extremely poor prognosis with a five year survival rate of less than 5% . However, morbidity and mortality in such patients are not determined by the presence of HCC alone, but are also influenced by the activity of the underlying liver disease, as well as the functional status of the liver. The stage of the tumor (size, number, vascular invasion, extra hepatic spread) has been consistently documented to be an important determinant of the natural course of the disease. These factors are major variables that influence various therapeutic strategies directed against this tumor in recent times. Therefore, therapy in HCC needs to be optimized depending upon the above mentioned influences on the final outcome of the disease. Various forms of therapy such as surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), percutaneous injection to induce coagulative necrosis of the tumor using agents like ethanol, acetic acid, hot saline, microwave and laser have been considered as radical treatment of HCC, aiming at curing the disease. The understanding of pathology, pathogenesis, natural course and risk factors of HCC during the last three decades has resulted in the development of multiple therapeutic approaches with promising yet varying results. Most patients with hepatoma from the developing countries at the time of their presentation to the doctor fall into the

  12. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Following Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Graves' Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hee Young; Jung, Kwang Yoon; Choi, Dong Seop; Kim, Sin Gon

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy has been used as a treatment option for Graves' disease, and it has been widely accepted to be safe. On the other hand, some evidence suggests that RAI therapy is possibly associated with a small increased risk of thyroid cancer. Herein, we report a rare case of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) associated with Graves' disease, following RAI treatment. A 42-year-old woman had been diagnosed with Graves' disease and although she was treated with an antithyroid...

  13. Combined radio- and hormone therapy of the prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intention of this study is to detect in 49 patients suffering from prostate carcinomas, effects and side effects of radiotherapy. According to the present results, there is not any doubt that prostate carcinomas are radiosensitive. In all patients radiotherapy induced a prostate shrinkage and an increasing of consistency. It resulted that a prostate biopsy must be carried out in order to control the success of therapy. The success of the treatment depends upon tumour spreading and on its degree of differentiation. Within the observation period only in four cases metastasation of the prostate carcinoma occurred after radiotherapy. According to literature, the 5-year survival rate with an organ-defined prostate carcinoma ranges between 70 and 80% when radiotherapeutic methods are applied. The same authors indicate a 5-year survival rate between 42 and 48% for scattered carcinomas. Only minor side effects are provoked by radiotherapy. In 75% of the patients pollakisuria and dysuria resulted. After irradiation was finished, the symptoms disappeared and did not cause in any case any late complications. In 12% of the cases proctitic pain occurred during irradiation, which in 6% remained even after the treatment was terminated. We could prove unequivocally on our patients that passage impairments caused by a prostate carcinoma are improved by radiotherapy. Finally it can be said that this treatment is applicable for curing carcinoma which is localised on the prostate. In the case of an undefined, scattered carcinoma radiotherapy combined with hormone therapy is the treatment of choice. With regards to undesired side effects radiotherapy is superior to other therapeutic measures. (orig./MG)

  14. Radioiodine therapy for papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine (131I) therapy is used in patients with papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma for ablation of thyroid remnants and for treatment of persistent or recurrent disease. It should be used selectively, i.e. only in those patients for whom a clinical benefit may be expected. (orig.)

  15. Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar de la Puente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to the treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is the resistance to therapy. Novel agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM, including immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, cell signaling targeted therapies, and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment. We have previously reviewed in detail the contemporary immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies therapies for MM. Therefore, in this review, we focused on the role of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, including cell signaling targeted therapies (HDAC, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Hsp90, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and cell cycle and strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment (hypoxia, angiogenesis, integrins, CD44, CXCR4, and selectins. Although these novel agents have improved the therapeutic outcomes for MM patients, further development of new therapeutic agents is warranted.

  16. New targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andrada; Petrusel, Livia; Seicean, Radu

    2015-05-28

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor prognosis with a median survival of 4-6 mo and a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Despite therapy with gemcitabine, patient survival does not exceed 6 mo, likely due to natural resistance to gemcitabine. Therefore, it is hoped that more favorable results can be obtained by using guided immunotherapy against molecular targets. This review summarizes the new leading targeted therapies in pancreatic cancers, focusing on passive and specific immunotherapies. Passive immunotherapy may have a role for treatment in combination with radiochemotherapy, which otherwise destroys the immune system along with tumor cells. It includes mainly therapies targeting against kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor, Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, insulin growth factor-1 receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR and hepatocyte growth factor receptor. Therapies against DNA repair genes, histone deacetylases, microRNA, and pancreatic tumor tissue stromal elements (stromal extracellular matric and stromal pathways) are also discussed. Specific immunotherapies, such as vaccines (whole cell recombinant, peptide, and dendritic cell vaccines), adoptive cell therapy and immunotherapy targeting tumor stem cells, have the role of activating antitumor immune responses. In the future, treatments will likely include personalized medicine, tailored for numerous molecular therapeutic targets of multiple pathogenetic pathways. PMID:26034349

  17. Multimodality Therapy: Bone-Targeted Radioisotope Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Podoloff, Donald A.; Logothetis, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest that bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals can be used to treat prostate cancer bone metastasis and improve the clinical outcome of patients with advanced prostate cancer. It remains to be elucidated whether radiopharmaceuticals enhance the disruption of the onco-niche or the eradication of micrometastatic cells in the bone marrow. The purpose of this review is to investigate the role of bone-targeted radioisotope therapy in the setting of multimodality therapy for advanced prostate cancer. We examine available data and evaluate whether dose escalation, newer generations, or repeated dosing of radiopharmaceuticals enhance their antitumor effects and whether their combination with hormone ablative therapy, chemotherapy, or novel targeted therapy can improve clinical efficacy. PMID:20551894

  18. Results of surgical therapy for lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, F; Padilla, J; Tarazona, V; Blasco, E; Canto, A; Pastor, J; Zarza, A G

    1979-01-01

    A series of 300 pulmonary resections in patients with lung carcinoma is presented. Total survival rate of the series since the operation, including surgical mortality, was 33% at 3 years and 24% at 5 years. The survival rate and surgical criteria were correlated, having better results when standard surgery was performed. The authors emphasize that the surgical figures of the series are of great value as the surgical indications were large and nonselective, with 85% of resectability in the thoracotomies. PMID:229985

  19. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Bradford R.; Burke, John M.; Manish Agrawal; Hauke, Ralph J.; Hutson, Thomas E.; Gury Doshi; Mark T Fleming; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our though...

  20. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastiano Buti; Melissa Bersanelli; Maddalena Donini; Andrea Ardizzoni

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to d...

  1. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjees Hasan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  2. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Emma; El-Helw, Loaie; Hasan, Jurjees, E-mail: jurjees.hasan@christie.nhs.uk [Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust / Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-23

    Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  3. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer

  4. Value and importance of intracavitary therapy in uterine cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guiding topic of this report was 'the value and importance of intracavitary therapy in uterine cervix carcinoma'. This implies first of all the task to assess the importance of contact therapy within the scope of all therapeutic measures taken in case of uterine cervix carcinoma. Furthermore it was necessary to compare the importance of the different methods of contact therapy: conventional radium therapy as well as low dose rate and high dose rate afterloading techniques. As to surgical intervention, it is clear that only favorable stages can be taken into consideration for this treatment. It is shown by means of data taken from the Annual Report, Vol. 18, that a considerable number of patients with uterine cervix carcinoma I are irradiated even in hospitals whose field of activity lies preponderantly in surgery, and that by far most of the patients cured from uterine cervix cancer owe their recovery to contact therapy. The consideration of contact therapy methods show clearly that radium should no longer be used in clinical practice. Psychological doubts often hinder the decision if long-term or short-term afterloading therapy is to be applied. It is therefore shown that the very different forms of radium therapy with their chronological and spatial dose distribution were due to the characteristics of radium (e.g. little specific activity) or to other compelling features and that they were not based on radiobiological aspects. The radium dose values obtained by empirical research and the resulting spatial and chronological dose distribution are therefore not imperative. So it is not inevitable to choose the low dose rate afterloading method. On the contrary, the high dose rate technique with an adequate fractionation is very probably the method of choice. To sum up it can be said that contact therapy is still the most important therapeutic method in uterine cervix cancer. (orig.)

  5. Antagonism between gene therapy and epigenetic therapy on human laryngeal carcinoma tumor-bearing mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN Meng; WANG Qi; FANG Ju-gao; WANG Hong; FAN Er-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene therapy and epigenetic therapy have gained more attention in cancer treatment.However,the effect of a combined treatment of gene therapy and epigenetic therapy on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma have not been studied yet.To study the mechanism and clinical application,human laryngeal carcinoma cell (Hep-2) tumor-bearing mice were used.Methods A xenograft tumor model was established by the subcutaneous inoculation of Hep-2 cells in the right armpit of BALB/c nu/nu mice.The mice with well-formed tumor were randomly divided into six groups.Multisite injections of rAd-p53 and/or 5-aza-dC were used to treat tumor.Tumor growth was monitored by measuring tumor volume and growth rate.p53 and E-cadherin protein levels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining.The mRNA levels were monitored with FQ-PCR.Results Gene therapy was much more effective than single epigenetic therapy and combined therapy.The gene therapy group has the lowest tumor growth rate and the highest expression levels of p53 and E-cadherin.Conclusions The combined treatment of gene and epigenetic therapy is not suggested for treating head and neck carcinoma,because gene therapy shows an antagonistic effect to epigenetic therapy.However,the mechanisms of action are still unclear.

  6. Hepatocarcinoma: from pathogenic mechanisms to target therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Manzione

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is among the most prevalent and lethal cancers worldwide. It is currently estimated that there are 14,000–18,000 new cases of hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States each year. It is often difficult to identify individuals at risk for HCC. The main associated diseases are chronic hepatitis B and chronic hepatitis C viral infections. While a significant number of potential mutations have been generated including p53 and Insulin-like Growth Factor, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving the genesis and progression of HCC remain limited. HCC screening is recommended in high-risk patients. High-risk patients include virtually all patients with cirrhosis and some HBV-infected patients irrespective of cirrhosis (>40 years in men and >50 years in women. A diagnostic approach to HCC has been developed incorporating serology, cytohistology, and radiological characteristics. A precise staging of the disease may help decide on prognosis as well as choice of therapy with the greatest survival potential. Liver transplantation, in theory, is the optimal therapeutic option for HCC; it simultaneously removes the tumor and underlying cirrhosis thus minimizing the risk of HCC recurrence. When it is impossible for this to be performed, percutaneous ablation, chemoembolization, chemotherapy and the newer molecular therapies can be used. Sorafenib is the only drug registered today for the treatment of advanced HCC.

  7. Immunhistochemische Untersuchungen von Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Mundhöhle und des Oropharynx in Hinblick auf Anwendungsmöglichkeiten einer innovativen zielgerichteten Therapie ("targeted therapy")

    OpenAIRE

    Höfle, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the results of pathohistological examinations of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas with immunohistochemically staining with eight immunohistochemical markers. The aim was to find molecular structures with immunohistochemical methods which could be targets for the targeted therapy. 95 histological specimens of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were investigated in the institute for pathology of the Helios Klinikum Bad Saarow. First clinic...

  8. HER2 as a target in invasive urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated primary tumors from two cohorts, Spain (N = 111) and Greece (N = 102), for patients who were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients were tested for HER2 status (IHC score of 3+ or FISH ratio of ≥2.2) by immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), DNA copy number, mRNA expression, and mutation status in patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC), and its impact on survival. ERBB2 mutation was determined by hotspot sequencing. mRNA expression was assessed using NanoString counting. Association of overall survival (OS) and HER2 status was assessed by a Cox regression model. NIH-3T3 cells containing HER2 V777L were assessed for growth, invasion, and HER2 kinase activation. In all, 22% of Spanish and 4% of Greek cohorts had 3+ HER2 staining by IHC. FISH amplification was identified in 20% of Spanish and 4% of Greek cohorts. Kappa coefficient between FISH and IHC was 0.47. HER2 status was not associated with OS in univariate (Spanish P = 0.34; Greek P = 0.11) or multivariate (Spanish P = 0.49; Greek P = 0.12) analysis. HER2-positive tumors expressed higher levels of HER2 mRNA than HER2-negative tumors (P < 0.001). HER2 mutations (V777L and L755S) were identified in two (2%) patients. In vitro analysis of V777L results in transformation of NIH-3T3 cells, leading to increased growth, invasion on soft agar, and HER2 kinase constitutive activation. In summary, HER2 overexpression or amplification in the primary tumor did not predict OS in patients with metastatic UC. HER2 positivity rates can differ between different populations. Further trials in genomically screened patients are needed to assess HER2-targeted therapies in UC

  9. Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of parotid carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy appears to be useful in postoperative management of patients with parotid gland tumors. Because the local recurrence rate is excessive, postoperative irradiation should be routinely considered for high grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas, all squamous cell, adeno- and undifferentiated carcinomas of the parotid. Doses should be at least equivalent to 6500 rads in 6 weeks to 4 cm. depth (or measured tumor depth). The radiation fields should cover the base of skull and lower neck to prevent extension of the cancer. (U.S.)

  10. [50 years of hepatology - from therapeutic nihilism to targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Michael P

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 50 years significant progress has been made in the whole field of hepatology. Part of this is translation of basic research (biochemistry, immunology, virology, molecular biology and others) into clinical hepatology. This enabled us to understand more about the pathogenesis of liver diseases and led to the discovery of the five major hepatotropic viruses, the identification of hepatocellular autoantigens, and to the development of specific therapies for chronic hepatitis B, C and D. In addition, the molecular basis of most genetic liver diseases has been identified. Significant progress was made in the development of medical therapies for various liver diseases with different underlying etiologies. Surgery significantly contributed to the progress in the management of liver diseases; examples are laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the development of liver transplantation. A multimodal therapeutic algorithm has been established for the therapy of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC); with Sorafenib "targeted therapy" has entered the area of HCC. The progress made over the last 50 years not only led to an aetiological differentiation of acute and chronic liver diseases but also to specific therapies based on the identification and understanding of the underlying etiology. PMID:23585265

  11. Targeted therapy for squamous cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Rachel G.; Watanabe, Hideo; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is the second most common subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer and leads to 40,000–50,000 deaths per year in the USA. Management of non-small-cell lung cancer has dramatically changed over the past decade with the introduction of targeted therapeutic agents for genotypically selected individuals with lung adenocarcinoma. These agents lead to improved outcomes, and it has now become the standard of care to perform routine molecular genotyping of lung adenoc...

  12. Determining appropriate timing of adaptive radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma during intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine appropriate timing of an adaptive radiation therapy (ART) replan by evaluating anatomic and dosimetric changes of target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Nineteen NPC patients were recruited. Each patient had repeat computed tomography (CT) scans after each five fractions and at treatment completion. Automatic re-contouring the targets and OARs by using deformable registration algorithm was conducted through CT-CT fusion. Anatomic changes were assessed by comparing the initial CT and repeated CT. Hybrid plans with re-contouring were generated and the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the hybrid plan and the original plan were compared. Progressive volume reductions in gross target volume for primary disease (GTVnx), gross target volume for involved lymph nodes (GTVnd), and parotids were observed over time. Comparing with the original plan, each hybrid plan had no significant difference in homogeneity index (HI) for all the targets. Some parameters for planning target volumes for primary disease and high-risk clinical target volume (PTVnx and PTV1, respectively) improved significantly, notably starting from the 10th fraction. These parameters included mean dose (Dmean), dose to 95 % of the volume (D95), percentage of the volume receiving 95 % of the prescription dose (V95), and conformity index (CI) for PTVnx, and Dmean, D95, and CI for PTV1. The dosimetric parameters for PTVnd remained the same in general except for D95 and V95 which had significant improvement at specific time points; whereas for PTV2, similar trend of dosimetric changes was also observed. Dose to some OARs increased significantly at some time points. There were significant anatomic and dosimetric changes in the targets and OARs. The target dose coverage in the hybrid plans did not get worse, but overdose occurred in some critical structures. Significant dosimetric changes should be considered as a

  13. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jurjees Hasan; Loaie El-Helw; Emma Dean

    2010-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the a...

  14. Antiepidermal Growth Factor Receptor Therapy in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Shaib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is the most common neoplasm of the upper aerodigestive tract. In this paper, we attempt to summarize the role and applications of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors monoclonal antibodies (moAbs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs locally advanced as well as metastatic SCCHN. Targeted therapy in SCCHN is now incorporated in the first-line regimes for advanced disease. Novel targeted agents, including the EGFR antibody, cetuximab, have been approved for use as single agents or in combination with radiation therapy or chemotherapy in treatment of recurrent metastatic or locally advanced SCCHN. Refractory mechanisms that bypass the pathway of EGFR inhibitors activity are identified explaining resistance to targeted therapy. Strategies of cotargeting EGFR and other pathways are under investigation. Examples of targeted therapy being used include mammalian target of rapamycin (mtor inhibitors, antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF moAb, and other inhibitors. We will be focusing our paper on the preclinical and clinical aspects of EGFR inhibition in SCCHN and touch upon other targeted therapies in application.

  15. Percutaneous Local Ablation Therapy in Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng-Yn Lin

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Periodic screening programs conducted in various countries, applying sonography andserum alfa-fetoprotein to patients with chronic liver disease, have identified numerous smallhepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Although surgical resection is generally preferred forcurative ablation, the long-term survival rates following resection are no better than thosefollowing local ablation. Current local ablation modalities are typically easily performed,safe and repeatable procedures, and include percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI, percutaneousacetic acid injection (PAI, radiofrequency ablation (RFA and microwave coagulationtherapy (MCT. The mechanisms of PEI or PAI are based on the dehydration, intracellularprotein damage, and thrombo-ischemic effects of absolute ethanol or acetic acid on thetumor cells. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of RFA or MCT are based on the generation offriction heat between the tissue and electric current or microwave emitted by an RF ormicrowave electrode into the tumor. The heat causes coagulation, followed by cellular deathas soon as the temperature in the target area exceeds 60oC. From previous comparativestudies of these procedures, RFA may be superior to PEI, PAI or MCT owing to its largerablation volume, fewer treatment sessions and more predictable ablation size. The rate ofcomplete necrosis of the target tumors was approximately 90-98% by RFA, 80-95% by PEI,90-95% by PAI and 94% by MCT. Moreover, the survival rates of these four modalitieswere approximately 90% at 1 year, 70% at 3 years, and 40-50% at 5 years. In tentativeconclusion, RFA is the preferred local ablation therapy for most small HCC. However, PEIis a useful alternative where RFA is unavailable.

  16. Anal canal carcinoma: Diagnosis - therapy - prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    78 patients with anal canal carcinoma were treated between 1970 and 1988 at the University Hospital Erlangen. 48 patients (35 women, 13 men) were treated by surgery alone, 44/48 by abdominoperineal resection, 4/48 by local excision. Median age was 63 years, median follow-up 8.5 years. The overall local recurrence rate was 16.7%, the overall five-year-survival was 51%. 30 patients received a combined radio-chemotherapy. The small pelvis was treated with a.-p./p.-a. fields up to a total dose between 42 and 50 Gy. Two courses of chemotherapy consisting of 5-FU (800 to 1000 mg/m2 days 1 to 4 and 29 to 32) and Mitomycin C (10 mg/m2 days 1 and 29) were administered. Two months after completion of treatment 83% had a biopsy proven complete remission. After a median follow-up of 15 months 87% are alive with NED, 74% are continent. The combined regimen of radio-chemotherapy is considered as the treatment of the choice for anal canal carcinoma. Abdominoperineal resection is only performed in patients with non response or local recurrent disease. (orig.)

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic carcinoma is poor. Studies by Mayo Clinic and the Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group (GITSG) have established combined modality treatment with chemotherapy and radiation as the standard of care. Use of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy alone has also been shown to provide a benefit, but 5‑year overall survival still remains less than 5%. Conventional radiotherapy is traditionally delivered over a six week period and high toxicity is seen with the concomitant use of chemotherapy. In contrast, SBRT can be delivered in 3–5 days and, when used as a component of combined modality therapy with gemcitabine, disruption to the timely delivery of chemotherapy is minimal. Early single-institution reports of SBRT for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma demonstrate excellent local control with acceptable toxicity. Use of SBRT in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma warrants further investigation in order to improve the survival of patients with historically poor outcomes

  18. Diagnostics and therapy of rectal and anal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of rectal and anal carcinomas is often reached too late, although the diagnostic possibilities are very good. The surgery of the rectal carcinoma (in regard to the growth and widespread of the tumour) consists of local excision, anterior resection or abdominoperineal extirpation. The 5-year survival rate of out patients (according to the staging) ranges between 47 and 78%. In case of anal carcinoma a radical operation is possible only, if the tumour is not widespread and without advanced metastases. In such a case it is sometimes possible to perform a continent resection. The radiotherapy is indicated in advanced cases with metastases, or as curative method in tumours which are radio-sensitive. This combined surgical and radiological therapy has given in our patients a 5-year survival rate of 64%. (orig./MG)

  19. Overcoming Resistance to Targeted Therapies in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Keara L; Papafili, Anastasia; Lawler, Mark; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    The recent discovery of oncogenic drivers and subsequent development of novel targeted strategies has significantly added to the therapeutic armamentarium of anti-cancer therapies. Targeting BCR-ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or HER2 in breast cancer has led to practice-changing clinical benefits, while promising therapeutic responses have been achieved by precision medicine approaches in EGFR mutant lung cancer, colorectal cancer and BRAF mutant melanoma. However, although initial therapeutic responses to targeted therapies can be substantial, many patients will develop disease progression within 6-12 months. An increasing application of powerful omics-based approaches and improving preclinical models have enabled the rapid identification of secondary resistance mechanisms. Herein, we discuss how this knowledge has translated into rational, novel treatment strategies for relapsed patients in genomically selected cancer populations. PMID:26615134

  20. Current gene therapy for stomach carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Tai Xu; Lian-Tian Huang; Bo-Rong Pan

    2001-01-01

    astric cancer is common in China [1-42],and its early diagnosis and treatment in advanced stage are difficult [31-50].In recent years ,gene study in cancer is a hotspot ,and great progress has been achieved [41-80] .Cancer gene therapy has shifted from the imagination into the laboratory and clinical trials.

  1. Intraperitoneal seeding from hepatocellular carcinoma following percutaneous ethanol ablation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurl, S; Farin, P; Rytkonen, H; Soimakallio, S

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of intraperitoneal seeding in a 36-year-old woman with a large primary hepatocellular carcinoma located superfically in the left lobe of the otherwise normal liver. The patient was treated with percutaneous ethanol ablation therapy. Eight months after the treatment computed tomography and ultrasonography (US) revealed an intraperitoneal seeding that was confirmed with US-guided percutaneous biopsy. PMID:9107646

  2. Targeted Alpha Therapy: From Alpha to Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review covers the broad spectrum of Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT) research in Australia; from in vitro and in vivo studies to clinical trials. The principle of tumour anti-vascular alpha therapy (TAVAT) is discussed in terms of its validation by Monte Carlo calculations of vascular models and the potential role of biological dosimetry is examined. Summmary of this review is as follows: 1. The essence of TAT 2. Therapeutic objectives 3. TAVAT and Monte Carlo microdosimetry 4. Biological dosimetry 5. Preclinical studies 6. Clinical trials 7. What next? 8. Obstacles. (author)

  3. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Radiation Therapy: Review of Evidence and Future Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of global cancer death. Curative therapy is not an option for most patients, often because of underlying liver disease. Experience in radiation therapy (RT) for HCC is rapidly increasing. Conformal RT can deliver tumoricidal doses to focal HCC with low rates of toxicity and sustained local control in HCC unsuitable for other locoregional treatments. Stereotactic body RT and particle therapy have been used with long-term control in early HCC or as a bridge to liver transplant. RT has also been effective in treating HCC with portal venous thrombosis. Patients with impaired liver function and extensive disease are at increased risk of toxicity and recurrence. More research on how to combine RT with other standard and novel therapies is warranted. Randomized trials are also needed before RT will be generally accepted as a treatment option for HCC. This review discusses the current state of the literature and opportunities for future research.

  4. Targeting DNA Methylation for Epigenetic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Lay, Fides; Han, Han; Jones, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are established during embryonic development and faithfully copied through somatic cell divisions. Based on our understanding of DNA methylation and other interrelated epigenetic modifications, a comprehensive view of the epigenetic landscape and cancer epigenome is evolving. The cancer methylome is highly disrupted, making DNA methylation an excellent target for anti-cancer therapies. During the last few decades, an increasing number of drugs targeting DNA methylation have been developed in an effort to increase efficacy, stability and to decrease toxicity. The earliest and the most successful epigenetic drug to date, 5-Azacytidine, is currently recommended as the first-line treatment for high risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients. Encouraging results from clinical trials have prompted further efforts to elucidate epigenetic alterations in cancer and subsequently develop new epigenetic therapies. This review delineates the latest cancer epigenetic models, recent discovery of hypomethylation agents and their application in the clinic. PMID:20846732

  5. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. ► Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. ► Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. ► Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1+/−K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5–7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm3 shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  6. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccitelli, Richard, E-mail: rich@bioelectromed.com [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Tang, Jean Y. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  7. Network systems biology for targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The era of targeted cancer therapies has arrived.However,due to the complexity of biological systems,the current progress is far from enough.From biological network modeling to structural/dynamic network analysis,network systems biology provides unique insight into the potential mechanisms underlying the growth and progression of cancer cells.It has also introduced great changes into the research paradigm of cancer-associated drug discovery and drug resistance.

  8. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy Robson; David G. Hirst

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these stra...

  9. IGF-1受体介导的信号通路与肝癌靶向治疗%Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor-mediated signaling pathway in molecular targeted-therapy for hepatocelluar carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚宁华; 姚登福

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) associate with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug-resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Both IGF-Ⅰ receptor and IGF- Ⅱ are frequently over expression in HCC progression.Binding of IGF- Ⅱ combined with IGF-Ⅰ R activates its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity leading to signaling through cellular pathways increasing the tumorigenic potential of liver. IGF- Ⅰ R has recently been accepted as a credible treatment target. In recently, more and more evidence suggest molecule targeted IGF- Ⅰ R also rationally in the treatment of HCC.In this review, we summarize the interaction of IGF- Ⅰ R with the possible causes of HCC and its potential role in hepatocarcinogenesis as well as current targeting IGF- Ⅰ R approaches in vitro and/or in vivo.%胰岛素样生长因子家簇(IGFs)与肝癌(HCC)发生发展、转移和耐药相关.IGF-ⅠR和IGF-Ⅱ在HCC进展过程中过量表达,IGF-ⅠR与IGF-Ⅱ结合导致自身酪氨酸激酶磷酸化,激活下游信号通路,使肝细胞恶性转化潜力增加,已证实IGF-ⅠR是HCC分子治疗的理想靶点.本文概述了IGF-ⅠR在HCC发生发展过程中表达、作用及所介导的肝癌靶向治疗进展.

  10. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques

  11. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong Hospital, Geelong, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  12. Personalized therapy on the horizon for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Sang; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Soo, Ross A; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2013-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC) of the lung is the second-largest subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), causing an estimated 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Recent developments in cancer genome sequencing technology expanded our knowledge of driver mutations, which were identified as novel candidates for targeted therapy in various cancers. Successful targeted treatments for lung adenocarcinoma, NSCLC's primary subtype, with EGFR mutation or ALK fusion are clinically available, and a clinical trial of personalized targeted therapy in patients with lung adenocarcinoma is underway by the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium. Although there are targeted treatments for lung adenocarcinoma, no personalized therapies currently exist for SQCC. Recently, comprehensive genomic characterization of lung SQCC using massively parallel sequencing has enabled us to identify several potential driver mutations/signaling pathways. These are FGFR1 amplifications, PI3KCA mutations, PTEN mutations/deletions, PDGFRA amplifications/mutations, and DDR2 mutations. The march toward personalized therapy may have taken a step forward with the discovery of these potential biomarkers for the treatment of SQCC of the lung. This article reviewed the current knowledge of genomic landscape of lung SQCC and summarized ongoing clinical trials of targeted agents for lung SQCC. Also, we will suggest several other actionable mutations with matching drugs that should be investigated in future clinical trials for the personalized treatment of lung SQCC. PMID:23489560

  13. Trimodal therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matuschek C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with ESCC (squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus are most commonly diagnosed with locally advanced tumor stages. Early metastatic disease and late diagnosis are common reasons responsible for this tumor's poor clinical outcome. The prognosis of esophageal cancer is very poor because patients usually do not have symptoms in early disease stages. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus frequently complicates patients with multiple co-morbidities and these patients often require interdisciplinary diagnosis and treatment procedures. At present time, neoadjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy followed by surgery are regarded as the international standard of care. Meta-analyses have confirmed that this approach provides the patient with better local tumor control and an increased overall survival rate. It is recommended that patients with positive tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and who are poor surgical candidates should consider definitive radiochemotherapy without surgery as a treatment option. In future, EGFR antibodies may also be administered to patients during therapy to improve the current treatment effectiveness. Positron-emission tomography proves to be an early response-imaging tool used to evaluate the effect of the neoadjuvant therapy and could be used as a predictive factor for the survival rate in ESCC. The percentage proportions of residual tumor cells in the histopathological analyses represent a gold standard for evaluating the response rate to radiochemotherapy. In the future, early response evaluation and molecular biological tests could be important diagnostic tools in influencing the treatment decisions of ESCC patients.

  14. Trimodal therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuschek, C; Bölke, E; Zahra, T; Knoefel, W T; Peiper, M; Budach, W; Erhardt, A; Scherer, A; Baldus, S E; Gerber, P A; Buhren, B A; Schauer, M; Hoff, N-Ph; Gattermann, N; Orth, K

    2011-10-10

    Patients with ESCC (squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus) are most commonly diagnosed with locally advanced tumor stages. Early metastatic disease and late diagnosis are common reasons responsible for this tumor's poor clinical outcome. The prognosis of esophageal cancer is very poor because patients usually do not have symptoms in early disease stages. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus frequently complicates patients with multiple co-morbidities and these patients often require interdisciplinary diagnosis and treatment procedures. At present time, neoadjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy followed by surgery are regarded as the international standard of care. Meta-analyses have confirmed that this approach provides the patient with better local tumor control and an increased overall survival rate. It is recommended that patients with positive tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and who are poor surgical candidates should consider definitive radiochemotherapy without surgery as a treatment option. In future, EGFR antibodies may also be administered to patients during therapy to improve the current treatment effectiveness. Positron-emission tomography proves to be an early response-imaging tool used to evaluate the effect of the neoadjuvant therapy and could be used as a predictive factor for the survival rate in ESCC. The percentage proportions of residual tumor cells in the histopathological analyses represent a gold standard for evaluating the response rate to radiochemotherapy. In the future, early response evaluation and molecular biological tests could be important diagnostic tools in influencing the treatment decisions of ESCC patients. PMID:22024422

  15. Extended-field radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival of cervical carcinoma patients with paraaortic/high common iliac nodal metastases was evaluated by retrospective chart review during a 13-year interval. Thirty-three patients with cervical carcinoma and surgically documented nodal metastases received primary, extended-field radiation therapy. Overall 2-year and 5-year actuarial survival rates after diagnosis were 37% and 31%, respectively. Survival was analyzed in terms of the variables patient age, clinical stage, tumor histologic type, the presence of enlarged paraaortic/high common iliac lymph nodes, the extent of nodal involvement (microscopic versus macroscopic), the presence of intraperitoneal disease, and whether intracavitary brachytherapy was administered. The use of intracavitary radiation therapy was associated with improved local control and survival (P = 0.017). None of the other variables were statistically related to patient survival. Twenty-two of the patients died of cervical cancer and five are surviving without evidence of cancer. Four patients died of intercurrent disease. Two patients developed bowel-related radiation complications; both patients received chemotherapy concurrent with the radiation therapy. One of the two patients died of radiation enteritis. The use of extended-field radiation therapy does benefit a small group of patients and may result in extended patient survival

  16. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy in advanced stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the feasibility and the toxicity of the neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the treatment of patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. We analyzed 77 previously untreated and histologically confirmed advanced stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy at the Seoul National University Hospital between 1984 and 1996. The stage distribution was as follows: AJCC stage 111-2, stage IV-75. Sixty-six patients received infusion of 5-FU (1000 mg/m2, on Day 1-5) and cisplatin (100 mg/m2, on Day 1), eleven patients received infusion of 5.FU (1000 mg/m2, on Day 1-5) and carboplatin (300 mg/m2, on Day 1) as neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to radiation therapy. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 44 months. The overall chemotherapy response rates were 87%. The toxicities of chemotherapy were mild. Only 3 patients experienced Grade 3 toxicities (1 for cytopenia, 2 for nausea/vomiting). The degree of radiation induced mucositis was not severe, and ten patients developed Grade 2 mucositis. The 5-year overall survival rates were 68% and the 5-year disease free survival rates were 65%. The 5-year freedom from distant metastasis rates were 82% and 5-year locoregional control rates were 75%. This single institution experience suggests that neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves overall survival and disease free survival for patients with advanced stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma without increase of toxicity

  17. Molecular therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Greten, T.F.; Korangy, F; Manns, M P; Malek, N. P.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy has failed to show a substantial benefit for patients with HCC. Recently, a number of new drugs targeting molecular mechanisms involved in liver cell transformation have entered into clinical trials and led to encouraging results. In this review we summarise this data and point to a number of new compounds, which are currently being tested and can potentially broaden our therapeutic a...

  18. The role and progress of interventional therapy in the prevention and treatment of postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The articles concerning intensive effect and progress of interventional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence were comprehensively reviewed. Along with unceasing abundance of all interventional methods (including transcatheter arterial chemoemblization (TACE), percutaneous dehydrated ethanol injection, radio frequency ablation, percutaneous microwave therapy, argon-helium cryoablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound and radionuclide interventional therapy, etc), combined interventional therapies mainly TACE were increasingly appreciated in postoperative HCC recurrence, but still have to be further standardized. With further emerging and maturing of new technologies, such as antiangiogenesis, gene therapy and targeted therapy on HCC metastatic and recurrence specific cycle; the effect of combined therapy will be further promoted. Interventional therapy will play an important role in the prevention and treatment of postoperative HCC recurrence in the foreseen furture. (authors)

  19. [Molecular alterations in melanoma and targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourah, Samia; Lebbé, Céleste

    2014-12-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer whose incidence is increasing steadily. The recent discovery of frequent and recurrent genetic alterations in cutaneous melanoma allowed a molecular classification of tumors into distinct subgroups, and paved the way for targeted therapy. Several signaling pathways are involved in the progression of this disease with oncogenic mutations affecting signaling pathways: MAPK, PI3K, cAMP and cyclin D1/CDK4. In each of these pathways, several potential therapeutic targets have been identified and specific inhibitors have already been developed and have shown clinical efficacy. The use of these inhibitors is often conditioned by tumors genotyping. In France, melanomas genotyping is supported by the platforms of the National Cancer Institute (INCA), which implemented a national program ensuring access to innovation for personalized medicine. The identification of new targets in melanoma supplies a very active dynamic development of innovative molecules contributing to changing the therapeutic landscape of this pathology. PMID:25776766

  20. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical infiltrative

  1. Targeted therapy using nanotechnology: focus on cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna V

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanna Sanna, Nicolino Pala, Mario SechiDepartment of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Laboratory of Nanomedicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, ItalyAbstract: Recent advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology have contributed to the development of engineered nanoscale materials as innovative prototypes to be used for biomedical applications and optimized therapy. Due to their unique features, including a large surface area, structural properties, and a long circulation time in blood compared with small molecules, a plethora of nanomaterials has been developed, with the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases, in particular by improving the sensitivity and recognition ability of imaging contrast agents and by selectively directing bioactive agents to biological targets. Focusing on cancer, promising nanoprototypes have been designed to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents, as well as for early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. However, several obstacles, including difficulty in achieving the optimal combination of physicochemical parameters for tumor targeting, evading particle clearance mechanisms, and controlling drug release, prevent the translation of nanomedicines into therapy. In spite of this, recent efforts have been focused on developing functionalized nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents to specific molecular targets overexpressed on different cancer cells. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has resulted in a new programmable nanotherapeutic formulation of docetaxel, namely BIND-014, which recently entered Phase II clinical testing for patients with solid tumors. BIND-014 has been developed to overcome the limitations facing delivery of nanoparticles to many neoplasms, and represents a validated example of targeted nanosystems with the optimal biophysicochemical properties needed for

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Will novel targeted drugs really impact the next future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montella, Liliana; Palmieri, Giovannella; Addeo, Raffaele; Del Prete, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment has been revolutionized by the advent of new molecular targeted and immunotherapeutic agents. Identification of the role of tumor angiogenesis changed the understanding of many tumors. After the unsuccessful results with chemotherapy, sorafenib, by interfering with angiogenic pathways, has become pivotal in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Sorafenib is the only systemic treatment to show a modest but statistically significant survival benefit. All novel drugs and strategies for treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma must be compared with the results obtained with sorafenib, but no new drug or drug combination has yet achieved better results. In our opinion, the efforts to impact the natural history of the disease will be directed not only to drug development but also to understanding the underlying liver disease (usually hepatitis B virus- or hepatitis C virus-related) and to interrupting the progression of cirrhosis. It will be important to define the role and amount of mutations in the complex pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and to better integrate locoregional and systemic therapies. It will be important also to optimize the therapeutic strategies with existing chemotherapeutic drugs and new targeted agents.

  3. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-05-27

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  4. Metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma - an unusual response to Temsirolimus in second line therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanculeanu, D L; Lazescu, A; Zob, D D; Bunghez, R; Anghel, R; Poteca, T D

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents 3% of all cancers, with the highest incidence occurring in the most developed countries and representing the seventh most common cancer in men and the ninth most common cancer in women. The understanding of the tumor molecular biology and the discovery of new drugs that target molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced renal cell carcinoma and improved the outcomes in the patients suffering from these affections. Studying the molecular signaling that controls the tumor growth and the progression has led to the development of molecular therapies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, resulting in a significant improvement in the overall survival and quality of life. Sunitinib represents an inhibitor of VEGFR 1-3, c-kit, FLT-3 and PDGFR. We present the case of a patient with metastatic clear cell RCC with a treatment effect following sequential VEGF and mTOR inhibitor treatment. Under sunitinib treatment, the patient had a progression free survival (PFS) of approximately 9 months, similar to the PFS observed in clinical trials. Sunitinib was well tolerated by this patient. Temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, is currently only approved for the first-line treatment of mRCC patients with poor prognosis. This study analyzes a treatment effect of second line temsirolimus in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). PMID:27453754

  5. PD-1 as an emerging therapeutic target in renal cell carcinoma: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tykodi SS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Scott S Tykodi Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common primary malignant tumor of the kidney in adults, representing approximately 4% of all adult cancers in the United States. Metastatic RCC is poorly responsive to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapies but can be sensitive to T-cell-directed immunotherapies such as interferon-α or interleukin-2. Despite recent progress in the application of antiangiogenic “targeted therapies” for metastatic RCC, high-dose interleukin-2 remains an appropriate first-line therapy for select patients and is associated with durable complete remissions in a small fraction of treated patients. Thus, advanced RCC provides a unique opportunity to investigate the requirements for effective antitumor immunotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that resistance mechanisms exploited by RCC and other tumor types may play a dominant role in limiting the effectiveness of tumor-reactive adaptive immune responses. Expression of the inhibitory coreceptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within RCC tumors, as well as the expression of the PD-1 ligand (PD-L1 on RCC tumor cells, are strong negative prognostic markers for disease-specific death in RCC patients. Monoclonal antibodies targeting either PD-1 or PD-L1 have now entered clinic trials and have demonstrated promising antitumor effects for refractory metastatic RCC. This review summarizes the results of published and reported studies of PD-1- and PD-L1-targeted therapies enrolling patients with advanced RCC, focusing on key safety, toxicity, and efficacy end points. Prospects for advanced phase clinical testing and novel therapy combinations with PD-1- and PD-L1-targeted agents are discussed. Keywords: renal cell carcinoma, immune checkpoint, immunotherapy, T-lymphocyte, PD-1, PD-L1

  6. Targeted therapy for esophagogastric cancers: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattak MA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad A Khattak,1 Hilary L Martin,2 Christos S Karapetis1,31Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, South Australia; 2Calvary Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, AustraliaAbstract: The incidence of esophagogastric cancers is increasing rapidly in the Western population. Despite better understanding of the biology and intense research in the treatment of these cancers, the long-term survival remains poor both in the locally advanced and metastatic settings. The addition of combined modality strategies has resulted in modest improvement in 5-year survival rates. A number of biologic agents targeting epidermal-derived growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial derived growth factor and its receptor, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR are being currently evaluated in Phase II and III clinical trials. Some of these, like trastuzumab, cetuximab, and bevacizumab, have shown promising results. This review provides a brief overview of the recent developments in biologic agents for the treatment of esophagogastric cancers.Keywords: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, VEGF, trastuzumab, Her2- positive EGC

  7. Potential molecular targets for Ewing's sarcoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jully, Babu; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2012-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is a highly malignant tumor of children and young adults. Modern therapy for Ewing's sarcoma combines high-dose chemotherapy for systemic control of disease, with advanced surgical and/or radiation therapeutic approaches for local control. Despite optimal management, the cure rate for localized disease is only approximately 70%, whereas the cure rate for metastatic disease at presentation is less than 30%. Patients who experience long-term disease-free survival are at risk for significant side-effects of therapy, including infertility, limb dysfunction and an increased risk for second malignancies. The identification of new targets for innovative therapeutic approaches is, therefore, strongly needed for its treatment. Many new pharmaceutical agents have been tested in early phases of clinical trials in ES patients who have recurrent disease. While some agents led to partial response or stable disease, the percentages of drugs eliciting responses or causing an overall effect have been minimal. Furthermore, of the new pharmaceuticals being introduced to clinical practice, the most effective agents also have dose-limiting toxicities. Novel approaches are needed to minimize non-specific toxicity, both for patients with recurrence and at diagnosis. This report presents an overview of the potential molecular targets in ES and highlights the possibility that they may serve as therapeutic targets for the disease. Although additional investigations are required before most of these approaches can be assessed in the clinic, they provide a great deal of hope for patients with Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:23580819

  8. ''Total'' therapy for oat cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undifferentiated small cell (oat cell) carcinoma of the lung is almost predictably disseminated at the time of diagnosis, even in seemingly early clinical presentations. The need for combined modality therapy is mandatory when this aspect of the natural history of disease is appreciated. Between November 1974, and April 1976, 31 consecutive patients without prior treatment received simultaneous radiotherapy of bulk disease, prophylactic whole brain irradiation, and intensive systematic chemotherapy. Primary treatment was completed in 3 months, following which all patients were observed without maintenance therapy. Complete remissions were achieved in 29/31 cases (94%) and the median disease-free interval after termination of therapy was 9 months. The median survival (actuarial) exceeds 14 months, despite consideration of 4 deaths from treatment complications (no residual tumor identified at autopsy) as deaths caused by cancer. Most encouraging have been the sustained remissions for more than 1 year accompanied by resumption of normal activity in one-half of patients with regional clinical presentations (intrathoracic disease). The latter suggests that curative treatment may be potentially available using current therapeutic tools in a fraction of cases with oat cell carcinoma of the lung. Tolerance to the treatment program utilized could be correlated with the radiotherapy technique and the experience using three different fractionation schemes is described. Also reported are the substantial iatrogenic complications encountered with this combined modality regimen

  9. Radionuclide molecular target therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer harms people's health or even lives severely. Currently, the morbidity and mortality of lung cancer are ascending all over the world. Accounting for 38.08% of malignant tumor caused death in male and 16% in female in cities,ranking top in both sex. Especially, the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer has not been obviously improved for many years. Recently, sodium/iodide transporter gene transfection and the therapy of molecular target drugs mediated radionuclide are being taken into account and become the new research directions in treatment of advanced lung cancer patients with the development of technology and theory for medical molecular biology and the new knowledge of lung cancer's pathogenesis. (authors)

  10. Functionalized Nanocarriers for Enhanced Bioactive Delivery to Squamous Cell Carcinomas: Targeting Approaches and Related Biopharmaceutical Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebowale, Adeyemi S; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been described as one of the major and leading causes of death worldwide. By the year 2030, it has been postulated that over 21.4 million new cases of cancer could be expected, 17 million cancer deaths yearly and a total of 75 million people will be living with cancer within five years of diagnosis. Chemotherapy is the main therapeutic intervention for treating people living with SCC. However, drug resistance has rendered it inefficient and ineffective in combating the disease even after combination chemotherapy. Many peptides and proteins have been investigated to possess biological activities that mark them as potential anti-cancer agents. Targeting peptides are conjugated with other functional peptides or nanoparticles to augment drug delivery both in vitro and in vivo assays. The current identification of tumor-homing peptides through phage display technology has opened a new strategy for targeted therapy in SCC diseases. Despite the advances in cancer nanomedicine, targeted approaches in the delivery of therapeutics for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma related tumours have not been well established. In this review, current drugs employed in cancer nanomedicine are highlighted, possible rate limiting factors for the application of polymeric materials in cancer nanomedicine are elucidated and functionalized nano-constructs using receptor ligands and homing peptides as targeted moieties are discussed. The combinatorial strategy of attaching both homing peptides and receptor ligands as dual moieties on nano-cargos should further strengthen the advantages of each technology in cancer targeted therapy. PMID:26027569

  11. A case report of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid gland developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Cuevas, S.; Baena Ocampo, L. [Hospital de Oncologia (Mexico). Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1995-12-01

    This a report on a 19-year-old female who developed a low grade T2 N0 M0 mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the right parotid gland 3 years and 5 months after the post-operative treatment of 100 mCi of radioactive iodine ({sup 131}I) for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. The parotid tumour appeared during the patient`s pregnancy. There are few reports of salivary gland cancer developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma and it is hoped that this report may stimulate others to investigate this association further in order to clarify the risk of secondary malignancies after radioiodine therapy. (author).

  12. A case report of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid gland developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This a report on a 19-year-old female who developed a low grade T2 N0 M0 mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the right parotid gland 3 years and 5 months after the post-operative treatment of 100 mCi of radioactive iodine (131I) for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. The parotid tumour appeared during the patient's pregnancy. There are few reports of salivary gland cancer developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma and it is hoped that this report may stimulate others to investigate this association further in order to clarify the risk of secondary malignancies after radioiodine therapy. (author)

  13. Adjuvant therapy in case of mammary carcinoma (high risk)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    108 patients with high risk stage of a mammary carcinoma (four or more positive axillar lymph nodes) were submitted after surgery to a prospectively randomized study: a postirradiation in three series with additional administration of tamoxifen was opposed to a reduced-dose irradiation and subsequent simultaneous combination of polychemotherapy and irradiation. In patients with an age of less than 50 years, the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy caused a significant prolongation of the recurrence-free interval (>57 months versus 12,75 months). The comparison with literature shows that an average interval of 39.1 months without recurrences for the total group of patients treated with combination therapy corresponds to the result of a high-dose adjuvant CMF therapy. With respect to mean life expectancy, there was no significant difference between both groups of randomization. (orig.)

  14. Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Molecular Signaling Pathways and Emerging Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Gómez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC over the last 55 years has led to a good understanding of the genetic defects and altered molecular pathways associated with its development. Currently, with the use of genetic testing, patients at high risk for MTC can be identified before the disease develops and offered prophylactic treatment. In cases of localized neck disease, surgery can be curative. However, once MTC has spread beyond the neck, systemic therapy may be necessary. Conventional chemotherapy has been shown to be ineffective; however, multikinase inhibitors have shown promise in stabilizing disease, and this year will probably see the approval of a drug (Vandetanib for advanced unresectable or metastatic disease, which represents a new chapter in the history of MTC. In this paper, we explore newly understood molecular pathways and the most promising emerging therapies that may change the management of MTC.

  15. Neuropilins: A New Target for Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent investigations highlighted strong similarities between neural crest migration during embryogenesis and metastatic processes. Indeed, some families of axon guidance molecules were also reported to participate in cancer invasion: plexins/semaphorins/neuropilins, ephrins/Eph receptors, netrin/DCC/UNC5. Neuropilins (NRPs) are transmembrane non tyrosine-kinase glycoproteins first identified as receptors for class-3 semaphorins. They are particularly involved in neural crest migration and axonal growth during development of the nervous system. Since many types of tumor and endothelial cells express NRP receptors, various soluble molecules were also found to interact with these receptors to modulate cancer progression. Among them, angiogenic factors belonging to the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family seem to be responsible for NRP-related angiogenesis. Because NRPs expression is often upregulated in cancer tissues and correlated with poor prognosis, NRPs expression might be considered as a prognostic factor. While NRP1 was intensively studied for many years and identified as an attractive angiogenesis target for cancer therapy, the NRP2 signaling pathway has just recently been studied. Although NRP genes share 44% homology, differences in their expression patterns, ligands specificities and signaling pathways were observed. Indeed, NRP2 may regulate tumor progression by several concurrent mechanisms, not only angiogenesis but lymphangiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. In view of their multiples functions in cancer promotion, NRPs fulfill all the criteria of a therapeutic target for innovative anti-tumor therapies. This review focuses on NRP-specific roles in tumor progression

  16. AAV-Based Targeting Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfang Shi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first parvovirus serotype AAV2 was isolated from human and used as a vector for gene therapy application, there have been significant progresses in AAV vector development. AAV vectors have been extensively investigated in gene therapy for a broad application. AAV vectors have been considered as the first choice of vector due to efficient infectivity, stable expression and non-pathogenicity. However, the untoward events in AAV mediated in vivo gene therapy studies proposed the new challenges for their further applications. Deep understanding of the viral life cycle, viral structure and replication, infection mechanism and efficiency of AAV DNA integration, in terms of contributing viral, host-cell factors and circumstances would promote to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages and provide more insightful information for the possible clinical applications. In this review, main effort will be focused on the recent progresses in gene delivery to the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction and DNA specific integration regulation. Furthermore AAV receptor and virus particle intracellular trafficking are also discussed.

  17. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  18. Adjuvant therapy for ampullary carcinomas: The Mayo Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 125 patients who underwent definitive surgery for carcinomas involving the ampulla of Vater between April 1977 and February 2005 and who survived more than 50 days after surgery. Twenty-nine of the patients also received adjuvant radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Adverse prognostic factors were investigated, and overall survival (OS) and local and distant failure were estimated. Results: Adverse prognostic factors for decreased OS by univariate analysis included lymph node (LN) involvement, locally advanced tumors (T3/T4), and poor histologic grade. By multivariate analysis, positive LN status (p = 0.02) alone was associated with decreased OS. The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy improved OS for patients with positive LN (p = 0.01). Median survival for positive LN patients receiving adjuvant therapy was 3.4 years, vs. 1.6 years for those with surgery alone. Conclusions: The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy may improve OS in patients with LN involvement. The effect of adjuvant therapy on outcomes for patients with poor histologic grade or T3/T4 tumors without LN involvement could not be assessed

  19. Results of radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-nine consecutive patients who were treated with radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix between April 1982 and December 1986 were reviewed. Twelve patients were treated with low dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using radium-226, and 46 were treated with high dose-rate irradiation using a remote afterloading system combined with external irradiation, and the other one was treated with external irradiation alone. The 5-year-survival rates for stage Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIb, and IVa were 77.8, 85.7, 87.5, 45.5 and 40.0%, respectively. The 5-year-survival rates for the low and high dose-rates irradiation were 66.7 and 73.9%, respectively. The most common complication of radiation therapy was rectal bleeding, which required conservative treatment (grade 2) in 11 (18.6%). The morbidities for the low and high dose-rates irradiation were similar. The causes of death in 17 patients were local recurrence in 14, metastases in 2 and other specified in one. These findings suggest that high dose-rate intracavitary irradiation is as effective as low dose-rate irradiation for carcinoma of the uterine cervix, and that further efforts for controlling the local tumors with stage IIIb disease without an increased rate of side-effects is required. (author)

  20. Active radar guides missile to its target: receptor-based targeted treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by nanoparticulate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing-Jun; Liao, Jia-Zhi; Lin, Ju-Sheng; He, Xing-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually present at advanced stages and do not benefit from surgical resection, so drug therapy should deserve a prominent place in unresectable HCC treatment. But chemotherapy agents, such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel, frequently encounter important problems such as low specificity and non-selective biodistribution. Recently, the development of nanotechnology led to significant breakthroughs to overcome these problems. Decorating the surfaces of nanoparticulate-based drug carriers with homing devices has demonstrated its potential in concentrating chemotherapy agents specifically to HCC cells. In this paper, we reviewed the current status of active targeting strategies for nanoparticulate systems based on various receptors such as asialoglycoprotein receptor, transferrin receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, folate receptor, integrin, and CD44, which are abundantly expressed on the surfaces of hepatocytes or liver cancer cells. Furthermore, we pointed out their merits and defects and provided theoretical references for further research. PMID:25424700

  1. Lactosylated liposomes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin to hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou X

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoju Zhou,1,2,* Mengzi Zhang,2,* Bryant Yung,2 Hong Li,2 Chenguang Zhou,2 L James Lee,3,4 Robert J Lee2,41State Key Laboratory of Virology, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery, Wuhan University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 2Division of Pharmaceutics, 3Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 4NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: N-lactosyl-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Lac-DOPE was synthesized and evaluated as a liver-specific targeting ligand via asialoglycoprotein receptors for liposomal delivery of doxorubicin.Methods: Lactosylated liposomes encapsulating calcein (Lac-L-calcein or doxorubicin (Lac-L-DOX composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, monomethoxy polyethylene glycol 2000-distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and Lac-DOPE at 50:35:5:10 (mol/mol were prepared by polycarbonate membrane extrusion and evaluated in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Cellular uptake of Lac-L-calcein was monitored by confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of Lac-L-DOX was evaluated by MTT assay. The pharmacokinetic properties of Lac-L-DOX were studied in normal mice, and its biodistribution and antitumor activity were studied in nude mice with HepG2 xenografts.Results: The size of Lac-L-DOX was less than 100 nm and the liposomes demonstrated excellent colloidal stability. In vitro uptake of Lac-L-calcein by HepG2 cells was four times greater than that of non-targeted L-calcein. In the presence of 20 mM lactose, the uptake of Lac-L-calcein was inhibited, suggesting that asialoglycoprotein receptors mediated the observed cellular uptake. Lac-L-DOX exhibited enhanced in vivo cytotoxicity compared with the nontargeted liposomal doxorubicin (L

  2. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  3. Novel targeted therapies in chordoma: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Maio S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Di Maio,1 Stephen Yip,2 Gmaan A Al Zhrani,3,4 Fahad E Alotaibi,3,4 Abdulrahman Al Turki,3,4 Esther Kong,2 Robert C Rostomily5 1Division of Neurosurgery, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Neuroscience Institute, Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada; 5Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Chordomas are rare, locally aggressive skull base neoplasms known for local recurrence and not-infrequent treatment failure. Current evidence supports the role of maximal safe surgical resection. In addition to open skull-base approaches, the endoscopic endonasal approach to clival chordomas has been reported with favorable albeit early results. Adjuvant radiation is prescribed following complete resection, alternatively for gross residual disease or at the time of recurrence. The modalities of adjuvant radiation therapy reported vary widely and include proton-beam, carbon-ion, fractionated photon radiotherapy, and photon and gamma-knife radiosurgery. As of now, no direct comparison is available, and high-level evidence demonstrating superiority of one modality over another is lacking. While systemic therapies have yet to form part of any first-line therapy for chordomas, a number of targeted agents have been evaluated to date that inhibit specific molecules and their respective pathways known to be implicated in chordomas. These include EGFR (erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib, PDGFR (imatinib, mTOR (rapamycin, and VEGF (bevacizumab. This article provides an update of the current multimodality treatment of cranial base

  4. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overview of what is known about the mechanisms by which activation of Hedgehog signaling leads to the development of BCCs and will review two recent papers suggesting that agents that modulate sterol levels might influence the Hh pathway. Thus, sterols may be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of BCCs, and readily available agents such as statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) or vitamin D might be helpful in reducing BCC incidence

  5. Targeting hepatocellular carcinoma with aptamer-functionalized PLGA/PLA-PEG nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigum, Shannon E.; Sutton, Melissa; Barnes, Eugenia; Miller, Sarah; Betancourt, Tania

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide, particularly in regions where chronic Hepatitis B and C infections are common. Nanoparticle assemblies that incorporate high-affinity aptamers which specifically bind malignant hepatocellular carcinoma cells could be useful for targeted drug delivery or enhancing contrast with existing ablation therapies. The in vitro interactions of a tumor-specific aptamer, TLS11a, were characterized in a hepatoma cell line via live-cell fluorescence imaging, SDS-PAGE and Western Blotting techniques. Cell surface binding of the aptamer-AlexaFluor®546 conjugate was found to occur within 20 minutes of initial exposure, followed by internalization and localization to late endosomes or lysosomes using a pH-sensitive LysoSensor™ Green dye and confocal microscopy. Aptamer-functionalized polymer nanoparticles containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(lactide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) were then prepared by nanoprecipitation and passively loaded with the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, yielding spherical nanoparticles approximately 50 nm in diameter. Targeted drug delivery and cytotoxicity was assessed using live/dead fluorescent dyes and a MTT colorimetric viability assay with elevated levels of cell death found in cultures treated with either the aptamer-coated and uncoated polymer nanoparticles. Identification and characterization of the cell surface protein epitope(s) recognized by the TLS11a aptamer are ongoing along with nanoparticle optimization, but these preliminary studies support continued investigation of this aptamer and functionalized nanoparticle conjugates for targeted labeling and drug delivery within malignant hepatocellular carcinomas.

  6. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  7. Radiolabeled Cetuximab Conjugates for EGFR Targeted Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wiebke Sihver; Jens Pietzsch; Mechthild Krause; Michael Baumann; Jörg Steinbach; Hans-Jürgen Pietzsch

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has evolved over years into a main molecular target for the treatment of different cancer entities. In this regard, the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab has been approved alone or in combination with: (a) chemotherapy for treatment of colorectal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and (b) with external radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The conjugation of radionuclides to cetuximab in combination with the specif...

  8. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called “tumor microenvironment (TME”, in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  9. TARGETED NANOPARTICLES FOR PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndrasGLacko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The two major forms of leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML account for about one third of the malignancies diagnosed in children. Despite the marked successes in ALL and AML treatment, concerns remain regarding the occurrence of resistant disease in subsets of patients the residual effects of therapy that often persist for decades beyond the cessation of treatment. Therefore, new approaches are needed to reduce or to avoid off target toxicities, associated with chemotherapy and their long term residual effects. Recently, nanotechnology has been employed to enhance cancer therapy, via improving the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of anti-cancer agents. While in the last several years, numerous review articles appeared detailing the size, composition, assembly and performance evaluation of different types of drug carrying nanoparticles, the description and evaluation of lipoprotein based drug carriers have been conspicuously absent from most of these major reviews. The current review focuses on such information regarding nanoparticles with an emphasis on high density lipoprotein (HDL-based drug delivery systems to examine their potential role(s in the enhanced treatment of children with leukemia.

  10. Cytotoxic and targeted therapy for hereditary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2016-01-01

    There is a number of drugs demonstrating specific activity towards hereditary cancers. For example, tumors in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers usually arise via somatic inactivation of the remaining BRCA allele, which makes them particularly sensitive to platinum-based drugs, PARP inhibitors (PARPi), mitomycin C, liposomal doxorubicin, etc. There are several molecular assays for BRCA-ness, which permit to reveal BRCA-like phenocopies among sporadic tumors and thus extend clinical indications for the use of BRCA-specific therapies. Retrospective data on high-dose chemotherapy deserve consideration given some unexpected instances of cure from metastatic disease among BRCA1/2-mutated patients. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is characterized by high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H), increased antigenicity and elevated expression of immunosuppressive molecules. Recent clinical trial demonstrated tumor responses in HNPCC patients treated by the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab. There are successful clinical trials on the use of novel targeted agents for the treatment or rare cancer syndromes, e.g. RET inhibitors for hereditary medullary thyroid cancer, mTOR inhibitors for tumors arising in patients with tuberous sclerosis (TSC), and SMO inhibitors for basal-cell nevus syndrome. Germ-line mutation tests will be increasingly used in the future for the choice of the optimal therapy, therefore turnaround time for these laboratory procedures needs to be significantly reduced to ensure proper treatment planning. PMID:27555886

  11. Long-term outcomes of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who achieved complete remission after sorafenib therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Gil

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Sorafenib is currently the sole molecular targeted agent that improves overall survival in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite the efficacy of sorafenib, the response rate varies in patients with advanced HCC. We retrospectively analyzed a series of Korean patients with advanced HCC with complete remission (CR) after sorafenib therapy. Methods In total, 523 patients with advanced HCC were treated with sorafenib in 3 large tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. A su...

  12. Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yance, Donald R; Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiological pathways that support tumor development while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The authors will focus on natural health products (NHPs) that have a high degree of antiangiogenic activity but also describe some of their many other interactions that can inhibit tumor progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. NHPs target various molecular pathways besides angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the HER-2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the NF-kB transcription factor, the protein kinases, Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbalist has access to hundreds of years of observational data on the anticancer activity of many herbs. Laboratory studies are confirming the knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The following herbs are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and are antiangiogenic through multiple interdependent processes that include effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities: Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinale (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens (rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking on clinical trials. More data are required on dose response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations

  13. Targeted therapies and radiation therapy in non-small cell lung cancer; Therapies ciblees et radiotherapie dans les cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, S.; Quero, L.; Wong Hee Kam, S.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C. [Service de cancerologie radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75010 Paris (France); Deutsch, E. [UMR 1030 ' radiosensibilite des tumeurs et tissus sains ' , Inserm, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. Between 80-85% of lung cancers are non-small cell lung carcinomas. One third of the patients are diagnosed with locally advanced stage. In this condition, concomitant radio-chemotherapy is the standard treatment for patients with good performance status. Despite important improvements in the last years, non-small cell lung carcinoma prognosis remains poor, with high rates of both local recurrences and metastases. The heterogeneity of molecular characteristics of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells and a better knowledge of potential targets offer promising developments for new pharmacologic agents. Hereafter we will review the currently most studied pathways and the most promising ones for the treatment of locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung carcinoma. Two of the most attractive pathways where new agents have been developed and assessed in combination with thoracic radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy are the EGFR pathway (either with the use of monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors) and the angiogenesis inhibition. The development of targeted agents could lead to individualized therapeutic combinations taking into account the intrinsic characteristics of tumor cells. Pharmacological modulation of tumour cells radiosensitivity by targeted therapies is only starting, but yet offers promising perspectives. (authors)

  14. Novel applications of proton therapy in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaron1, John J; MacDonald, Shannon M; Cahlon, Oren

    2016-08-01

    This review will focus on the indications, clinical experience, and technical considerations of proton beam radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. For patients with early stage disease, proton therapy delivers less dose to non-target breast tissue for patients receiving partial breast irradiation (PBI) therapy, which may result in improved cosmesis but requires further investigation. For patients with locally advanced breast cancer requiring treatment to the regional lymph nodes, proton therapy allows for an improved dosimetric profile compared with conventional photon and electron techniques. Early clinical results demonstrate acceptable toxicity. The possible reduction in cardiopulmonary events as a result of reduced dose to organs at risk will be tested in a randomized control trial of protons vs. photons. PMID:27558253

  15. Targeted therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, P; Khamashta, Ma

    2013-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem disorder characterised by loss of tolerance to endogenous nuclear antigens and autoantibody formation. Recent insight into the immunopathogenesis of lupus has provided the foundation for a novel class of agents which target specific, dysregulated components of the immune system. Efforts have focused predominantly on B-cell depleting therapies, of which belimumab was the first to demonstrate success in phase III studies and thus receive marketing authorisation. Off-label prescribing of rituximab in refractory cases is common and supported by uncontrolled studies, which suggest a favourable risk:benefit profile. However, two placebo-controlled trials failed to show benefit, possibly because of inappropriate patient selection and other aspects of trial methodology. Inhibition of dysregulated co-stimulatory signals and cytokines are other therapeutic strategies currently under investigation. Some candidate drugs failed to meet primary endpoints in early-phase clinical trials, yet demonstrated clinical benefit when alternative assessment criteria were applied or specific patient sub-groups analysed. Well-designed studies of greater size and duration are needed to clarify the therapeutic utility of these agents. Future immunomodulatory strategies targeting interferon-alpha, T cells, oxidative stress and epigenetic abnormalities may reduce multisystem disease activity and prolong survival in this complex and heterogeneic disease. PMID:23963429

  16. Stromal targeted therapy in bone metastatic prostate cancer: promise delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor; William Goeckeler; Oyvind Bruland

    2011-01-01

    The ability of epithelial neoplasms to evade both hormonal and cytotoxic therapies is self-evident as the common carcinomas (lung,stomach,breast,colon and prostate) at their metastatic stage are rarely curable with current therapies.Though the precise reasons for incurability are debated,virtually all agree that tumor genetic heterogeneity makes eradication of the tumor difficult given ‘Darwinian' selection processes that are associated with the emergence of drug-resistant cellular clones.

  17. Carcinoma of the male breast: A review of adjuvant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of male breast cancer patients seen for adjuvant therapy at a single institution. A retrospective review of computerized records in the Departments of Medical and Radiation Oncology at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) was undertaken. Between 1983 and 1996, 24 men were referred for treatment of breast cancer. Of these, 19 had localized breast cancer, four had metastatic disease and one had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The median age was 57.5 years (range: 26-78) and median follow-up was 6.2 years (range: 0.6-36). Pathological staging was performed. Survival was assessed using actuarial life table analysis. All patients underwent surgery. Eleven patients received radiotherapy. The median dose and dose per fraction were 50 Gy and 2 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant systemic therapy was delivered to 10 patients, of whom nine were node-positive. Four patients received chemotherapy alone, three patients received chemotherapy and tamoxifen, and three patients received tamoxifen only. Seven patients relapsed (one local, five distant, one both). Of the two patients with local relapses, one had received radiotherapy. Of the distant failures, four of six patients had no systemic therapy. There were only two node-positive patients who were not given systemic treatment and both relapsed. Median survival in all patients with invasive cancer was 7.5 years, and in those with localized disease it was 7.6 years. The median survival of node-positive patients was 3.8 years. In node-negative patients the median survival had not been reached at a median follow-up of 6.2 years. Systemic therapy was found to be beneficial in patients with node-positive disease. Chemotherapy was administered more frequently than hormonal therapy. The median survivals were consistent with those reported in other series. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Metastatic Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Outcome On RAI-131 Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to assess the variable grades of response of distant functioning thyroid metastases to serial radioactive iodine-131 therapy. One hundred fifty patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer, mainly to lung and bone, were assessed to evaluate the therapeutic response of metastatic lesions to serial RAI-131 therapy regarding the site of metastases (bone or lung), type of response achieved (complete, partial, stable disease or disease progression) and patient survival. Out of 1368 patients with DTC, 150 patients (10.9%) had functioning distant metastases. The peak age of onset was between 40-59 years, 99 patients (66%) were females compared to 51 males (34%). 77 patients (51.3%) had papillary type while 73 patients (48.7%) had follicular type. Lung was the commonest site of metastases (62 patients, 41.4%) followed by bone (38 patients, 25.3%), bone and lung (32 patients, 21.3%) and other sites (18 patients, 12%). Metastases were more common at initial presentation or detected after the first therapy dose (118 patients, 78.7%) than during follow-up (32 patients, 21.3%). 25 patients (16.6%) achieved complete response, 52 patients (34.7%) showed partial response, 52 patients (34.7%) were in stationary state, and 21 patients (14%) showed evidence of disease progression. The overall survival from the detection of metastases was 71% at 5 years and 63% at 10 years. Up to the present time, radioiodine is the only available effective systemic therapy to treat patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) and for this reason, serial therapy doses are recommended for patient with metastatic DTC with favorable outcome and overall 5 and 10 year survival.

  19. Osteoradionecrosis of the skull after radiation therapy for invasive carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michaela T; Billington, Alicia; Habal, Mutaz B

    2011-09-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the skull is a rare but fatal complication of radiation therapy for the treatment of head and neck malignancies. The pathogenesis of ORN follows the "3Hs Theory" proposed by Marx (J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1983;41:283-288) in which radiation induces tissue injury by causing vessel thrombosis (hypovascularity), which leads to hypoxia, and results in cell death of the skin and the underlying structure of the bony element (hypocellularity) including the deep visceral structures. This note details a patient with severe and extensive ORN of the parietooccipital region of the skull because of a large dose of radiation therapy for the treatment of an invasive basal cell carcinoma of the scalp. The patient's condition was further complicated by an extensive infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which leads to meningitis and cerebral edema as well as cerebritis. The patient was successfully treated with interdisciplinary medical and surgical aggressive therapy and radical procedures involving 4 separate trips to the operating room for an 18-month period. Success was achieved because of early clinical diagnosis of ORN, aggressive eradication of infected and necrotic tissues including the brain, and restoration of functioning and viable tissues through the use of local flaps to change an open wound to a closed wound. PMID:21959411

  20. Residual tumor after neoadjuvant chemoradiation outside the radiation therapy target volume : a new prognostic factor for survival in esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijs, Christina; Smit, Justin; Karrenbeld, Arend; Beukema, Jannet C.; Mul, Veronique; van Dam, Go; Hospers, Geke; Kluin, Phillip; Langendijk, Johannes; Plukker, John

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE(S): The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation and clinical target volume (CTV) margins for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (neo-CRT) in esophageal carcinoma at pathologic examination and to determine the impact on survival. METHODS

  1. Residual Tumor After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Outside the Radiation Therapy Target Volume : A New Prognostic Factor for Survival in Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijs, Christina; Smit, Justin; Karrenbeld, Arend; Beukema, J.C.; Mul, Veronique; van Dam, Go; Hospers, Geke; Kluin, Phillip; Langendijk, Johannes; Plukker, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation and clinical target volume (CTV) margins for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (neo-CRT) in esophageal carcinoma at pathologic examination and to determine the impact on survival. Methods

  2. Preoperative radiation therapy for muscle-invading bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on low-dose and high-dose radiation therapy (RT) followed by cystectomy for bladder carcinoma that was evaluated for survival, failure patterns, and complications as these outcomes have been incompletely documented in the past. One hundred five patients with clinical stages T2-T4 (muscle-invading) transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder who completed preoperative RT followed by total cystectomy were evaluated. Eighty-five patients received 20-27 Gy in 4-7 fractions (group A). Twenty patients received 40-50 Gy in 20-28 fractions (group B). Actuarial 5-year survival was 45% and 29% (P = .06) for groups A and B, respectively; 6% of group A was stage T4 compared with 30% of group B. Five-year actuarial survival for patients with stages T2-T3 in groups A and B was 46% and 42%, respectively, while that for T4 was 33% and 0% in groups A and B, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that stage, grade, and presence of hydronephrosis independently affected survival. Five-year actuarial local control rates for T2, T3, and T4 were 93%, 93%, and 22%, respectively, with no significant difference between RT groups. Rates of distant metastasis and complications versus preoperative regime and stage were similar

  3. Leptin signaling molecular actions and drug target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang N

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nan Jiang,1,* Rongtong Sun,2,* Qing Sun3 1Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Weihai Municipal Hospital, Weihai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pathology, QianFoShan Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Previous reports indicate that over 13 different tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, are related to obesity. Obesity-associated inflammatory, metabolic, and endocrine mediators, as well as the functioning of the gut microbiota, are suspected to contribute to tumorigenesis. In obese people, proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-1 and IL-6, insulin and insulin-like growth factors, adipokines, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, adiponectin, and leptin are found to play crucial roles in the initiation and development of cancer. The cytokines induced by leptin in adipose tissue or tumor cells have been intensely studied. Leptin-induced signaling pathways are critical for biological functions such as adiposity, energy balance, endocrine function, immune reaction, and angiogenesis as well as oncogenesis. Leptin is an activator of cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis in several cell types, and an inducer of cancer stem cells; its critical roles in tumorigenesis are based on its oncogenic, mitogenic, proinflammatory, and pro-angiogenic actions. This review provides an update of the pathological effects of leptin signaling with special emphasis on potential molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targeting, which could potentially be used in future clinical settings. In addition, leptin-induced angiogenic ability and molecular mechanisms in HCC are discussed. The stringent binding affinity of leptin and its receptor Ob-R, as well as the highly upregulated expression of both

  4. Vocal changes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for glottic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.; Harrison, L.B.; Solomon, B.; Sessions, R.B. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A prospective evaluation of vocal changes in patients receiving radiation therapy for T1 and T2 (AJC) glottic carcinoma was undertaken in January 1987. Vocal analysis was performed prior to radiotherapy and at specific intervals throughout the radiation treatment program. The voicing ratio was extrapolated from a sustained vowel phonation using the Visipitch interfaced with the IBM-PC. Preliminary observations suggested three distinct patterns of vocal behavior: 1. reduced voicing ratio with precipitous improvement within the course of treatment, 2. high initial voicing ratio with reduction secondary to radiation induced edema, with rapid improvement in the voicing component after the edema subsided, and 3. fluctuating voicing ratio during and following treatment. Enrollment of new patients and a 2-year follow-up of current patients was undertaken.

  5. Carcinoma of the nasal vestibule treated with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, N.P.; Parsons, J.T.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1987-05-01

    Twenty-two patients with squamous carcinoma of the nasal vestibule were treated at the University of Florida Division of Radiation Therapy with curative intent. Fifteen lesions were de novo and seven recurrent after surgery. By AJCC classification, 7 lesions were Tx or T1, 2 were T2, 2 were T3, and 11 were T4. Management of the primary tumor and regional lymphatic drainage was highly individualized. Local control was achieved in 19 out of 22 lesions. The ultimate regional lymph node control rate was 22 out of 22, although two patients required radical neck dissection after development of lymph node disease in untreated regional lymphatics. Two patients have died of cancer and three of intercurrent disease. Cosmetic results are generally excellent but may be compromised by previous surgery in recurrent lesions or tumor destruction of normal tissues in advanced lesions. Complications of treatment are minimal.

  6. Vocal changes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective evaluation of vocal changes in patients receiving radiation therapy for T1 and T2 (AJC) glottic carcinoma was undertaken in January 1987. Vocal analysis was performed prior to radiotherapy and at specific intervals throughout the radiation treatment program. The voicing ratio was extrapolated from a sustained vowel phonation using the Visipitch interfaced with the IBM-PC. Preliminary observations suggested three distinct patterns of vocal behavior: 1. reduced voicing ratio with precipitous improvement within the course of treatment, 2. high initial voicing ratio with reduction secondary to radiation induced edema, with rapid improvement in the voicing component after the edema subsided, and 3. fluctuating voicing ratio during and following treatment. Enrollment of new patients and a 2-year follow-up of current patients was undertaken

  7. Carcinoma of the nasal vestibule treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-two patients with squamous carcinoma of the nasal vestibule were treated at the University of Florida Division of Radiation Therapy with curative intent. Fifteen lesions were de novo and seven recurrent after surgery. By AJCC classification, 7 lesions were Tx or T1, 2 were T2, 2 were T3, and 11 were T4. Management of the primary tumor and regional lymphatic drainage was highly individualized. Local control was achieved in 19 out of 22 lesions. The ultimate regional lymph node control rate was 22 out of 22, although two patients required radical neck dissection after development of lymph node disease in untreated regional lymphatics. Two patients have died of cancer and three of intercurrent disease. Cosmetic results are generally excellent but may be compromised by previous surgery in recurrent lesions or tumor destruction of normal tissues in advanced lesions. Complications of treatment are minimal

  8. Review of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound guidance in ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasunori Minami; Masatoshi Kudo

    2011-01-01

    Local ablative techniques-percutaneous ethanol injection, microwave coagulation therapy and radiofrequency ablation (RFA)-have been developed to treat unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The success rate of percutaneous ablation therapy for HCC depends on correct targeting of the tumor via an imaging technique. However, probe insertion often is not completely accurate for small HCC nodules, which are poorly defined on conventional B-mode ultrasound (US) alone. Thus, multiple sessions of ablation therapy are frequently required in difficult cases. By means of two breakthroughs in US technology, harmonic imaging and the development of second-generation contrast agents, dynamic contrast-enhanced harmonic US imaging with an intravenous contrast agent can depict tumor vascularity sensitively and accurately, and is able to evaluate small hypervascular HCCs even when B-mode US cannot adequately characterize the tumors. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced US can facilitate RFA electrode placement in hypervascular HCC, which is poorly depicted by B-mode US. The use of dynamic contrast-enhanced US guidance in ablation therapy for liver cancer is an efficient approach. Here, we present an overview of the current status of dynamic contrast-enhanced US-guided ablation therapy, and summarize the current indications and outcomes of reported clinical use in comparison with that of other modalities.

  9. The Role of Nephrectomy for Kidney Cancer in the Era of Targeted and Immune Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Ulka N

    2016-01-01

    Although two phase III trials support the recommendation of nephrectomy followed by interferon alpha in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), this procedure cannot be applied to every patient with this condition. Systemic therapy has changed from interferon alpha to antiangiogenic-targeted therapy, and the clinical impact of nephrectomy in the era of targeted therapy has not been proven. The SEER database shows that only 35% of patients with advanced RCC undergo nephrectomy as their initial treatment. Retrospective studies showed improved overall survival (OS) outcomes with nephrectomy and interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy; however, the inherent selection bias of younger and healthier patients receiving IL-2 likely accounts for this finding. Neoadjuvant therapy has demonstrated only modest efficacy in unresectable disease, and if remission is obtained with systemic therapy, it is unclear whether nephrectomy has any incremental benefit. In the absence of proven benefit of nephrectomy in the setting of targeted therapy, it seems advisable for patients with RCC with severely symptomatic disease, competing comorbidities, poor performance status, or unresectable disease to avoid nephrectomy and proceed directly to systemic therapy. The clinical implications of deferred cytoreductive nephrectomy for patients with metastatic RCC are poorly understood, and patient cohorts that do not undergo this procedure are likely to be comprised of patients with unfavorable disease characteristics. Unfortunately, the completed trials of targeted therapy were 90% comprised of patients with prior nephrectomy (the majority of trials incorporate prior nephrectomy as an eligibility requirement) and hence may not reflect the outcomes of the majority of the patients with advanced RCC who have not undergone nephrectomy. Newer therapies such as nivolumab and cabozantinib have also been evaluated for a population in which 90% of the patients underwent nephrectomy. Future clinical trials and registry

  10. Studies on radiation therapy for carcinoma of the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied local control rates and survival rates according to primary sites, TNM classifications and treatment modalities such as radiation alone and radiation combined with surgical treatment. The results were as follows; 1) Local control rate of basal cell carcinoma was 81 % (13/16) by initial therapy and relapsed 3 patients have been all salvaged by re-treatment. 2) Overall local control rate of squamous cell carcinoma was 61 % (59/96) and 39 % (22/56) in group with radiation alone including 100 % in T1, 58 % in T2, 18 % in T3 and 0 % in T4. With respect to primary sites, lesions on the penis and pudendum above T2 were poor in local control. On the other hand, patients irradiated after surgical treatment showed good local control of 100 % with little respect for T-factors and primary sites. 3) Overall 5-year relative survival rate of squamous cell carcinoma was 73 % and 55 % in radiation alone including 105 % in T1, 88 % in T2, 35 % in T3 and 0 % in T4. With respect to primary sites, lesions of T3 of the penis and T2 and T3 of the pudendum showed markedly poor prognosis of 0 %. On the other hand, 5-year relative survival rate of patients irradiated after surgical treatment was 94 % including 106 % in T1, 91 % in T2, 98 % in T3 and 0 % in T4. Moreover, there was distinct difference of 5-year relative survival rate between cases with negative lymphnode metastasis and positive lymphnode metastasis; indicating 86 % and 34 % respectively. 4) Cosmetic results were excellent in general, except for 2 cases with severe radiation damage in which radiation therapy was unable to be avoided because of necessity of local control. 5) Special techniques for management of improper T3 and T4 lesions should be developed in the near future, but radiation combined with surgical treatment seems to be the best way for the time being. The use of implant methods should be beneficial for lesions in difficult situations. (J.P.N.)

  11. Fast neutron therapy of bronchus carcinoma: the pooled results from two european centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berlin-Buch and Heidelberg centres used fast neutron therapy in bronchial carcinomas. The neutron source was a cyclotron in Berlin-Buch/Rossendorf and a d-t generator in Heidelberg. Three hundred twelve patients with inoperable bronchial carcinoma were treated with fast neutron therapy alone or in combination with photons. The results were then compared with those obtained from 594 patients treated only with photons. Altogether, 788 were treated in Berlin-Buch and 188 in Heidelberg. The results suggest that neutron therapy for bronchial carcinoma can be a good alternative in curative and palliative situations in the early stages. (author)

  12. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy compared with radiation therapy alone in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the treatment of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to assess the outcomes of patients receiving such treatment. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 137 previously untreated and histologically confirmed advanced stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with either radiation therapy only or combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy at the Seoul National University Hospital between 1984 and 1996. The stage distribution was as follows: AJCC Stage III-21, Stage IV-61 in the radiation therapy group (RT group); AJCC Stage III-1, Stage IV-54 in neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy group (CT/RT group). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 48 months. Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 71% for the CT/RT group and 59% for the RT group (p = 0.04). The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 63% for the CT/RT group and 52% for the RT group (p = 0.04). Distant metastasis (DM) incidence was significantly lower in the CT/RT group. The 5-year freedom from distant metastasis rates were 84% for the CT/RT group and 66% for the RT group (p 0.01). The incidence of locoregional failures was also lower in the CT/RT group, although this difference did not reach statistical significance (69% vs. 56%, p = 0.09) Conclusion: While not providing conclusive evidence, historical evidence from this institution suggests that neoadjuvant chemotherapy significantly improves both overall and the disease-free survival of patients with advanced stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  13. An intracellular targeted antibody detects EGFR as an independent prognostic factor in ovarian carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ovarian cancer, the reported rate of EGFR expression varies between 4-70% depending on assessment method and data on patient outcome are conflicting. Methods: In this study we investigated EGFR expression and its prognostic value in a cohort of 121 invasive ovarian carcinomas, using a novel antibody against the intracellular domain of the receptor. We further evaluated an association between EGFR, the nuclear transporter CRM1 as well as COX-2. Furthermore, we evaluated EGFR expression in ten ovarian cancer cell lines and incubated cancer cells with Leptomycin B, a CRM1 specific inhibitor. We observed a membranous and cytoplasmic EGFR expression in 36.4% and 64% of ovarian carcinomas, respectively. Membranous EGFR was an independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival in ovarian cancer patients (HR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.4, p = 0.02) which was also found in the serous subtype (HR 4.6, CI 1.6-13.4, p = 0.004). We further observed a significant association of EGFR with COX-2 and nuclear CRM1 expression (chi-square test for trends, p = 0.006 and p = 0.013, respectively). In addition, combined membranous EGFR/COX-2 expression was significantly related to unfavorable overall survival (HR 7.2, CI 2.3-22.1, p = 0.001). In cell culture, we observed a suppression of EGFR protein levels after exposure to Leptomycin B in OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells. Our results suggest that the EGFR/COX-2/CRM1 interaction might be involved in progression of ovarian cancer and patient prognosis. Hence, it is an interesting anti-cancer target for a combination therapy. Further studies will also be needed to investigate whether EGFR is also predictive for benefit from EGFR targeted therapies

  14. Photodynamic Therapy for Basal Cell Carcinoma in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    OpenAIRE

    Myn Wee Lee; George Varigos; Peter Foley; Gayle Ross

    2011-01-01

    A 22-year-old male with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with a large superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma on his right forehead was treated with photodynamic therapy. The treatment was well tolerated, and the site healed well. Patients with epidermolysis bullosa are at increased risk of developing skin cancers, particularly squamous cell carcinomas. However, basal cell carcinomas are rare in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. As patients with epidermolysis bullosa ...

  15. Review of photodynamic therapy with 5-methyl aminolevulinate in actinic keratosis, epidermoid carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliographic review was conduced on the use of 5-methyl aminolevulinate in dermatology, specifically in the treatment of actinic keratosis, epidermoid carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. The basic fundamentals of photodynamic therapy are described. The preparation and method of use of photodynamic therapy with 5-methyl aminolevulinate (MAL-PDT) are detailed. The clinical studies that were realized with photodynamic therapy for the treatment of actinic keratosis, epidermoid carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma are mentioned. Different photo-inducible agents and other current therapeutic options of first-line are compared. The MAL-PDT has have the advantage of to present less side effects and the same have been more tolerable than liquid nitrogen and 5 fluorouracil. The MAL-PDT has been considered as an effective option for the treatment of Bowen's disease. Invasive epidermoid carcinoma has existed without evidence to support the routine use of this therapeutic. For superficial basal cell carcinoma, the MAL-PDT has presented a high cure rate and transient and manageable side effects in extensive and multiple lesions. The MAL-PDT has been an effective and safe treatment in patients with basal cell carcinoma, for those with less depth of 2mm. The MAL-PDT could play an important role in the field of prevention with immunosuppressed patients, particularly, those that have required transplant and its immunosuppression has been pharmacological. The use or not of the MAL-PDT, should be evaluated individually for each patient and to have suitable characteristics for each disease that was cited in this review. The photodynamic therapy with 5-methyl aminolevulinate has been a therapeutic modality of considerable economy, however, it should be evaluated in the context of number of inquiries and side effects that have offered other therapeutic modalities

  16. Sexual function after surgical and radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred women treated for carcinoma of the cervix were interviewed more than one year later to establish the effects of radiation or surgical therapy on sexual function. Forty-three had received irradiation, 44 nonradical surgery, six combined surgery and irradiation, and seven radical surgery. The irradiation and nonradical surgery groups were each further subdivided into subgroups of patients aged 30 to 49 for age-controlled comparison. Patients in the irradiation group had statistically significant decreases in sexual enjoyment, ability to attain orgasm, coital opportunity, frequency of intercourse, and coital desire. The group who had nonradical surgical procedures had no significant change in sexual function after treatment. Similar results were found in both age-controlled subgroups, eliminating age as a major etiologic factor. Marked vaginal alterations were recorded in the majority of irradiated patients, but were not present among the groups treated with nonradical surgery. The vaginal changes alone could not be held accountable for the significant decrease in sexual function among women who received pelvic irradiation. The origin of decreased sexual desire after radiation therapy is complex, and not yet completely understood. We propose therapeutic programs to help women deal with the emotional and physical consequences of pelvic irradiation

  17. Combined therapy of corpus carcinoma with special regard to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 496 case reports of patients with a corpus carcinoma collected between 1970 and 1976, the clinical findings, separation into clinical stages and the various therapy forms were compiled and evaluated. As a mean age of 62.3 years, 56.9 per cent of patients reached an average five-year, recidivation-free survival periods. Metastases occurred in 19.1 per cent of all treated women, vaginal recidivations in 1.8 per cent. Particular attention was given to the side effects of radiation therapy and retarded harmful effects. In this connexion an increase in complications following treatment with newly introduced radiation qualities had to be recorded. 21.9 per cent of all radiation-treated patients differed side-effects, and in 11.7 per cent of all radiation-treated women retarded harmful effects were found. Owing to the experience collected meanwhile in radiotherapy with ultra-hard X-rays and to the use of computerized tomography establishing the adequate quantity of radiation, complications following radiation treatment are expected to occur less frequently in future. (orig./MG)

  18. Local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare and aggressive tumor. This tumor is similar to small cell carcinoma of the lung with a tendency to metastasize early. While there has been an increasing interest in the use of chemotherapy regimens similar to those used for small cell carcinoma of the lung, the optimum local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix remains unknown. We reviewed the treatment outcome of patients with small cell carcinoma of the cervix diagnosed in our cancer center with an emphasis on the local/regional disease control. Material and Methods: Between 1983 and 1993, medical records of patients diagnosed with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed. There were 281 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix referred to our department for radiation treatment. Seven patients had pathologic diagnosis of either small cell or neuroendocrine histology. Details of the treatments and follow-up information of these patients were reviewed with a medium follow-up period of three years (range - 1 to 4 years). Results: Five patients had pure small cell histology. Two patients had mixed histology: one with mixed small cell anaplastic neuroendocrine cells and a small foci of adenocarcinoma, the other had mixed small cell and squamous cell histology. Four patients had clinical stage IB disease. The others had IIA, IIB, and IIIB disease, respectively. All patients received either irradiation (XRT) alone or as part of the local therapy. Three patients received XRT alone, one received surgery followed by XRT, one received XRT followed by surgery, and the remaining two had triple modality treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, and XRT). Three patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence at the last follow-up. Two of these received adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to local therapy. The third patient, whose tumor was smaller than one cm at the time of diagnosis, received XRT alone. Four patients died with disease

  19. Designing gene therapy vectors targeting tumor cell endothelium

    OpenAIRE

    Pınar ÖZKAL BAYDIN; AKBULUT, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and metastasis. Targeting angiogenesis is one of the recent progresses in the therapeutic area of cancer. Gene therapy is one of the promis- ing strategies in the treatment of cancer. The gene therapy vectors targeting tumor endothelium carry the great therapeu- tic potential in cancer.

  20. Systemic Therapy for Metastatic Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Recent Progress and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Simon; Matrana, Marc; Tsang, Christopher; Atkinson, Bradley; Choueiri, Toni K.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) encompasses a heterogeneous group of histological subtypes of which clear-cell RCC (CCRCC) is the most common comprising more than 70–80% of all cases. Papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) is the next most common comprising 10–15% of cases. PRCC is refractory to chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy.

  1. Skin carcinomas in organ-transplant recipients : from early oncogenic events to therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, Ymke Grete Leontien de

    2008-01-01

    Skin carcinomas develop at a high rate in organ-transplant recipients who are kept on immune suppressive drugs to prevent graft rejection. The present study dealt with a broad range of aspects of this elevated carcinoma risk, starting from the earliest oncogenic events to the ultimate therapy. Advan

  2. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Steven M Yip; Heng, Daniel Y. C.; Tang, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium dat...

  3. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma : treatment and clinical consequences of therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoftijzer, Hendrieke Catherijn

    2011-01-01

    The first chapters of this thesis describe the treatment of radioiodine non-avid thyroid carcinoma with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib. The remainder of the thesis describes the clinical consequences of the treatment of thyroid carcinoma.

  4. The indication for 131I-therapy in occult thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevalence of occult papillary thyroid carcinoma in the normal population is several orders of magnitude higher than the incidence of clinically apparent thyroid cancer, and the recurrence rate or mortality is very low, even after conservative therapy. Therefore, occult papillary thyroid carcinoma has to be considered as distinct biologic entity. Therefore, we recommend no further surgery or ablation of the thyroid remnant with 131I for patients less than 40 years old with occult papillary carcinoma without metastases. In case of metastases, however, 131I-therapy should be performed after total thyroidectomy. All follicular thyroid carcinomas, regardless of their size, are to be treated by total thyroidectomy and 131I-therapy. All patients receive TSH-suppressive levothyroxine therapy and undergo regular follow-up. (orig.)

  5. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-08-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27621572

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia following radioactive iodine therapy for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Ankit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive iodine (RAI therapy plays an important role in the management of thyroid malignancies. Leukemia is a very rare complication of radioactive therapy. There are very few case reports with doses below 100 mCi causing leukemia. We report a case of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid treated with 80 mCi RAI who later developed acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, all patients with thyroid carcinoma treated with RAI should undergo periodic hematological examinations irrespective of RAI dose.

  7. Acute myeloid leukemia following radioactive iodine therapy for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Ankit; Premalata CS; Saini KV; Bapsy PP; Sajeevan KV; Tejinder Singh; Ullas Batra; Babu Govind; Lokanatha Dasappa; Suresh Atilli; Permeshwar R

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy plays an important role in the management of thyroid malignancies. Leukemia is a very rare complication of radioactive therapy. There are very few case reports with doses below 100 mCi causing leukemia. We report a case of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid treated with 80 mCi RAI who later developed acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, all patients with thyroid carcinoma treated with RAI should undergo periodic hematological examinations irrespective of RAI dose.

  8. Lymphangiosarcoma of the edematous thigh after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the vulva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huey, G.R.; Stehman, F.B.; Roth, L.M.; Ehrlich, C.E.

    1985-03-01

    A 66-year-old patient was treated with external radiation therapy for an advanced carcinoma of the vulva. Seven years later, a lymphangiosarcoma developed in her edematous lower extremity. Lymphangiosarcomas have been reported to occur in postmastectomy patients; however, this is only the third case in a patient with a gynecologic primary malignancy. In anticipation of possible increased use of radiation therapy in vulvar carcinoma, gynecologists should be aware of this rare, highly aggressive neoplasm.

  9. Lymphangiosarcoma of the edematous thigh after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 66-year-old patient was treated with external radiation therapy for an advanced carcinoma of the vulva. Seven years later, a lymphangiosarcoma developed in her edematous lower extremity. Lymphangiosarcomas have been reported to occur in postmastectomy patients; however, this is only the third case in a patient with a gynecologic primary malignancy. In anticipation of possible increased use of radiation therapy in vulvar carcinoma, gynecologists should be aware of this rare, highly aggressive neoplasm

  10. Inverse treatment planning for targeted radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A method for inverse treatment planning was developed for targeted radionuclide therapy. Taking into account the fact that the efficacy of targeting radionuclide therapy is affected by nonuniformity dose and dose rate distributions in tumors, we introduce the equivalent uniform biologically effective dose (EUBED) concept on treatment planning for targeting radionuclide therapy. The EUBED model converts the spatial biologically effective dose (BED) distribution into an equivalent uniform biologically effective dose value that would produce a biological response similar to that expected from de original BED distribution. According to this, the treatment planning must quantify the relationship between administered activity and the absorbed dose distribution that expressed in terms of biological effect maximizing the EUBED in tumor while the mean dose in dose-limiting normal organs is maintained within accepted values. The method is based on calculation of the absorbed dose distribution using patient-specific imaging data, incorporating radiobiologic modeling to account for effects of dose rate distribution for better prediction of tumor response. For BED calculation, we use a BED model based on cell repair and proliferation during the internal irradiation at low dose rate with beta emitters. The inverse planning process consists in the estimation of activity to be administered from treatment prescription in terms of tumor control probability (TCP), assuming that each amount of administered activity produces the same biological effect, for treatment schemes that uses multiple activity administrations equally time-spaced. From SPECT images of absorbed dose distribution at voxel level in Gy/GBq, the differential dose volume histogram is obtained and used together with the mean absorbed dose of the dose-limiting organ as input parameters. From prescribed TCP, the corresponding EUBED is calculated and divided by the number of activity administrations to

  11. More than 10 years survival with sequential therapy in a patient with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although radical nephrectomy alone is widely accepted as the standard of care in localized treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), it is not sufficient for the treatment of metastatic RCC (mRCC), which invariably leads to an unfavorable outcome despite the use of multiple therapies. Currently, sequential targeted agents are recommended for the management of mRCC, but the optimal drug sequence is still debated. This case was a 57-year-old man with clear-cell mRCC who received multiple therapies following his first operation in 2003 and has survived for over 10 years with a satisfactory quality of life. The treatments given included several surgeries, immunotherapy, and sequentially administered sorafenib, sunitinib, and everolimus regimens. In the course of mRCC treatment, well-planned surgeries, effective sequential targeted therapies and close follow-up are all of great importance for optimal management and a satisfactory outcome

  12. More than 10 years survival with sequential therapy in a patient with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, J.L.; Wang, F.L.; Yi, X.M.; Qin, W.J.; Wu, G.J. [Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Huan, Y. [Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, L.J.; Zhang, G.; Yu, L.; Zhang, Y.T.; Qin, R.L.; Tian, C.J. [Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-10-31

    Although radical nephrectomy alone is widely accepted as the standard of care in localized treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), it is not sufficient for the treatment of metastatic RCC (mRCC), which invariably leads to an unfavorable outcome despite the use of multiple therapies. Currently, sequential targeted agents are recommended for the management of mRCC, but the optimal drug sequence is still debated. This case was a 57-year-old man with clear-cell mRCC who received multiple therapies following his first operation in 2003 and has survived for over 10 years with a satisfactory quality of life. The treatments given included several surgeries, immunotherapy, and sequentially administered sorafenib, sunitinib, and everolimus regimens. In the course of mRCC treatment, well-planned surgeries, effective sequential targeted therapies and close follow-up are all of great importance for optimal management and a satisfactory outcome.

  13. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeuti...

  14. Treatment of bile duct carcinoma using photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Biliary papillomatosis, is a rare, benign tumour characterised by extensive mucosal involvement of the bile duct with carcinoma in 30% of cases. Treatment has been largely limited to surgical resection and is often accompanied by tumour recurrence. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was used to treat a 64 year old man with mucous-secreting papillomatosis of the common bile hepatic duct which presented with obstructive jaundice and recurrent cholangitis. The successful use of PDT in treating a case of cholangiocarcinoma and the treatment of similar colonic villous tumours encourage the use of PDT in this patient. Porfimer Sodium (Photofrin), 2 mg/kg was given intravenously 64 hours prior to light exposure. A Spectra Physics argon-ion pumped dye laser was used to provide 50 mW of 630 nm wavelength light at a 3 cm long diffusing tip attached to a 3 m optical fibre. A power density of approximately 15 mW.cm-2 was provided at the tissue surface under illumination at a radial distance of approximately 1.8 mm from the diffusing tip. The dose was designed to give a necrosis depth of 3 mm. A transparent 3.6 mm outer diameter catheter was placed in the duct using fluoroscopy and the fibre and diffusing tip then manoeuvred into position. The transparent catheter was left in place during the treatment and forced a minimum inner diameter on the duct of 3.6 mm and also helped to centre the diffuser within the duct. Repeat endoscopy, 48 hours after treatment revealed little duct mucous; necrosed tissue was removed with a balloon catheter with significant increase in size of the duct lumen. Since then, the patient's bilirubin has remained normal. Repeat endoscopic cholangiography one month later has shown no diminution in the diameter of the bile duct. The use of Photodynamic Therapy in the biliary tree using endoscopic retrograde placement of light source is feasible and the results in this patient encourage a trial of its use in operable bile duct carcinoma

  15. Understanding the molecular target therapy and it's approved synchronous use with radiation therapy in current Indian oncology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular targeted drugs (MTD) are of two types; large and small. The large molecular targeted drugs (LMTD) cannot cross the cancer cell membrane whereas those that cross the cancer cell membrane are nicknamed small molecular target drugs (SMTD). India has availability of almost all MTD originals approved by USA Food and Drug administration. However a few LMTD like inj vectibix, inj Zevalin, Inj Bexar etc.; and SMTD like cap Tipifarnib approved for AML, are not available in India currently although approved and available in USA. The MTD may he used alone as singlet; along with chemotherapy as doublet or triplet; or along with radiation and chemotherapy combo (nicknamed chemo-radiation-bio therapy). The molecular target therapy approved by USA and/or European FDA and currently available in India and used along with radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy, indication wise are; Brain Tumor Inj Nimotuzumab (LMTD) and Inj bevacizumab (LMTD) in Glioblasoma Multiforme; for Carcinoma Head and neck Inj Cetuximab and Inj Nimotuzumab (LMTT), Tab Geftinib (SMTD). (author)

  16. Radiation therapy for portal venous invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiichi Nakagawa; Masatoshi Makuuchi; Kuni Ohtomo; Hideomi Yamashita; Kenshiro Shiraishi; Naoki Nakamura; Masao Tago; Hiroshi Igaki; Yoshio Hosoi; Shuichiro Shiina; Masao Omata

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the efficacy and safety of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT) for this disease and to specify patient subgroups suitable for this treatment.METHODS: Fifty-two patients with HCC received PVI-targeted radiation therapy from January 1995 through December 2003. Portal venous invasion (PVI) was found in the second or lower order branches of the portal vein in 6 patients, in the first branch in 24 patients and in the main trunk in 22 patients. Child classifications of liver function before radiation therapy were A, B, and C for 19, 24 and 2 patients, respectively. All patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a total dose ranging from 39 to 60 Gy (57.0 Gy in average).RESULTS: Overall survival rates at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 45.1%, 25.3%, 15.2%, 10.1%, and 5.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that Child status, the number of tumor foci, tumor type,transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) after radiation therapy were statistically significant prognostic factors.Multivariate analysis showed that the number of tumor foci and TAE after radiation therapy were statistically significant.CONCLUSION: The results of this study strongly suggest the efficacy of 3-D CRT as treatment for PVI in HCC. 3-D CRT is recommended in combination with postradiation TAE for PVI of HCC with 5 tumor foci or less in the liver and with Child A liver function.

  17. An individual drug-therapy and genetic testing report of temporal bone verrucous carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan HL

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Haolei Tan, Yong Liu, Gangcai Zhu, Leiming Pi, Donghai Huang, Xin Zhang Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China Objective: To investigate the pathology and pathogenesis of and treatment methods for temporal bone verrucous carcinoma. Materials and methods: A single-patient report of verrucous carcinoma on the left external auditory canal is presented and analyzed along with all cases of temporal bone verrucous carcinoma that have been documented in the English literature. Results: Most of the patients with verrucous carcinoma of the temporal bone have histories of surgery, trauma, or infection, and verrucous carcinomas are sensitive to antimicrotubule chemotherapeutic medicines. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not effective, but surgical treatment might be relatively more effective. Conclusion: Temporal bone verrucous carcinoma has a poor prognosis; therefore, the preferred treatment is surgical resection facilitated with antimicrotubule chemotherapeutic treatment. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not a preferred treatment for temporal bone verrucous carcinoma. Keywords: verrucous carcinoma, temporal bone, drug therapy, genetic testing

  18. Radiation therapy for primary carcinoma of the eyelid. Tumor control and visual function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Surgical excision remains the standard and most reliable curative treatment for eyelid carcinoma, but frequently causes functional and cosmetic impairment of the eyelid. We therefore investigated the efficacy and safety of radiation therapy in eyelid carcinoma. Patients and methods: Twenty-three patients with primary carcinoma of the eyelid underwent radiation therapy. Sebaceous carcinoma was histologically confirmed in 16 patients, squamous cell carcinoma in 6, and basal cell carcinoma in 1. A total dose of 50-66.6 Gy (median, 60 Gy) was delivered to tumor sites in 18-37 fractions (median, 30 fractions). Results: All but 3 of the 23 patients had survived at a median follow-up period of 49 months. The overall survival and local progression-free rates were 87% and 93% at 2 years, and 80% and 93% at 5 years, respectively. Although radiation-induced cataracts developed in 3 patients, visual acuity in the other patients was relatively well preserved. There were no other therapy-related toxicities of grade 3 or greater. Conclusion: Radiation therapy is safe and effective for patients with primary carcinoma of the eyelid. It appears to contribute to prolonged survival as a result of good tumor control, and it also facilitates functional and cosmetic preservation of the eyelid. (orig.)

  19. Radiation therapy for primary carcinoma of the eyelid. Tumor control and visual function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Kasuya, T.; Minagawa, Y.; Kaizu, H.; Mukai, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Maegawa, J. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan). Dept. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; Kaneko, A. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan). Dept. of Ophthalmology

    2012-12-15

    Background and purpose: Surgical excision remains the standard and most reliable curative treatment for eyelid carcinoma, but frequently causes functional and cosmetic impairment of the eyelid. We therefore investigated the efficacy and safety of radiation therapy in eyelid carcinoma. Patients and methods: Twenty-three patients with primary carcinoma of the eyelid underwent radiation therapy. Sebaceous carcinoma was histologically confirmed in 16 patients, squamous cell carcinoma in 6, and basal cell carcinoma in 1. A total dose of 50-66.6 Gy (median, 60 Gy) was delivered to tumor sites in 18-37 fractions (median, 30 fractions). Results: All but 3 of the 23 patients had survived at a median follow-up period of 49 months. The overall survival and local progression-free rates were 87% and 93% at 2 years, and 80% and 93% at 5 years, respectively. Although radiation-induced cataracts developed in 3 patients, visual acuity in the other patients was relatively well preserved. There were no other therapy-related toxicities of grade 3 or greater. Conclusion: Radiation therapy is safe and effective for patients with primary carcinoma of the eyelid. It appears to contribute to prolonged survival as a result of good tumor control, and it also facilitates functional and cosmetic preservation of the eyelid. (orig.)

  20. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS

  1. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Théberge, Valérie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Hôpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wen-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Meei-Shyuan [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ko, Kai-Hsiung [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  3. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Parsons, J.T.; Vogel, S.B.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1988-07-01

    This is an analysis of 34 patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy with curative intent at the University of Florida between September 1966 and May 1985. All patients have a minimum 2-year follow-up and 28 (82%) have at least 5 years of follow-up. Patients were staged according to the recommendations of the AJCC. Patients who died within 2 years of treatment with the primary site continuously disease-free were excluded from the local control analysis; all patients were included in the analysis of complications and survival. Irradiation resulted in control of the primary lesion in 1 of 2 patients who presented with T1 lesions, in 4 of the 12 patients with T2 lesions, and 3 of 17 patients who presented with T3 lesions. One patient with a T3 lesion that recurred locally was successfully salvaged by an operation. The 5-year absolute survival rates by stage were as follows: no patients with stage I lesions survived; of 11 stage II patients, one survived; and of 16 stage III patients, three survived. Interestingly, all four of the 5-year survivors were women.

  4. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an analysis of 34 patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy with curative intent at the University of Florida between September 1966 and May 1985. All patients have a minimum 2-year follow-up and 28 (82%) have at least 5 years of follow-up. Patients were staged according to the recommendations of the AJCC. Patients who died within 2 years of treatment with the primary site continuously disease-free were excluded from the local control analysis; all patients were included in the analysis of complications and survival. Irradiation resulted in control of the primary lesion in 1 of 2 patients who presented with T1 lesions, in 4 of the 12 patients with T2 lesions, and 3 of 17 patients who presented with T3 lesions. One patient with a T3 lesion that recurred locally was successfully salvaged by an operation. The 5-year absolute survival rates by stage were as follows: no patients with stage I lesions survived; of 11 stage II patients, one survived; and of 16 stage III patients, three survived. Interestingly, all four of the 5-year survivors were women

  5. Results of radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1962 to 1982, 20 cases of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were treated by radiation alone at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo. 80% (16/20) of these cases were over 60 years old. Treatment was made by interstitial irradiation (Radium needle or Au-Grain) and external irradiation (Betatron electron or Linac X-rays), alone or with various combinations. As for the stage of these cases, Stage I was 3 cases (15%), Stage II was 5 (25%) and Stage III was 12 (60%). Serious complications after treatment were observed in 15% (3/20) and all cases were treated with external irradiation alone. The 5 year survival rates by stage were as follows; Stage I 100% (3/3), Stage II 50% (2/4) and Stage III 22.2% (2/9). Surgery is considered the treatment of choice in this disease. However, radiation therapy may be indicated when the tumor has extended beyond the limit of surgical resections; when distant metastases are present; when the patient's general condition precludes surgery, or when surgery is refused. (author)

  6. Results of radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of vulva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Kakehi, Masae; Ono, Ryosuke (National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1984-04-01

    From 1962 to 1982, 20 cases of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were treated by radiation alone at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo. 80% (16/20) of these cases were over 60 years old. Treatment was made by interstitial irradiation (Radium needle or Au-Grain) and external irradiation (Betatron electron or Linac X-rays), alone or with various combinations. As for the stage of these cases, Stage I was 3 cases (15%), Stage II was 5 (25%) and Stage III was 12 (60%). Serious complications after treatment were observed in 15% (3/20) and all cases were treated with external irradiation alone. The 5 year survival rates by stage were as follows; Stage I 100% (3/3), Stage II 50% (2/4) and Stage III 22.2% (2/9). Surgery is considered the treatment of choice in this disease. However, radiation therapy may be indicated when the tumor has extended beyond the limit of surgical resections; when distant metastases are present; when the patient's general condition precludes surgery, or when surgery is refused.

  7. Results of combined therapy for maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of 54 cases of maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1980 and 2002 were analyzed retrospectively. The T classification according to the 1997 Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) was as follows: 2 with stage T1, 29 with T3, and 23 with T4. Ten patients (18.5 %) had lymph node metastases at diagnosis. All patients underwent combined therapy including radiotherapy, surgery, and regional or systemic chemotherapy. Fifteen patients received hyperfractionated twice-daily radiotherapy (1.2 Gy or 1.5 Gy/fraction), and the remaining 39 patients received a conventional once-daily regimen (1.5-2 Gy/fraction). The 5-year overall survival and 5-year disease-free survival for all patients were 56.0% and 46.7%, respectively. The N classification was the only significant prognostic factor for 5-year disease-free survival by univariate analysis (favoring N=0, p=0.04). There were no significant differences in other prognostic factors including gender, T classification (T1-3 vs. T4), hyperfractionated radiotherapy (yes vs. no), total dose (biological effective dose (BED): 10 vs. ≥69 Gy10), and intra-arterial chemotherapy (yes vs. no). Although radiation-induced cataract was observed in 9 patients, no other severe late complications developed. (author)

  8. Personalized therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: Where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen L; Wong, Alissa M; Lee, Kirsty; Wong, Nathalie; Chan, Allen K C

    2016-04-01

    Following the approval of sorafenib, a large number of molecular targeted agents have been tested clinically for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but all have failed to demonstrate significant efficacy in clinical trials. Multiple reasons for this phenomenon have been discussed in the literature, with one reason being the lack of patient selection on the basis of molecular profile in clinical trials. The concept of drug testing in selected populations has been recently suggested by retrospective analyses of HCC clinical trials in which a particular subgroup of patients, either enriched by clinical factors or by tissue biomarkers, derived more benefits from the novel drug. In addition, recent advances in genomic medicine have enhanced the understanding of genetic and epigenetic events occurring in HCC, raising the possibility of personalizing targeted agents in accordance with the genetic make-up of the tumors. The development of 'personalized' treatment for HCC is, however, hindered by the lack of fresh biopsy of advanced HCC, the low incidence of genetic driver mutations in HCC and the tumor heterogeneity. These limitations may be overcome by sequencing cell-free DNA in plasma, frequently known as liquid biopsy, and revolution in the concept of the design of clinical trials. In this review article, we aim to: (1) give a summary of the recent sequencing results of HCC and the related implications for drug development; (2) highlight potential individual targeted agents and existing research on biomarker selection in clinical trials; and (3) discuss future directions, including the potential of liquid biopsy and umbrella clinical trials, to enhance personalized drug testing for HCC. PMID:26995632

  9. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  10. Intricacies for Posttranslational Tumor-Targeted Cytokine Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffry Cutrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The safest and most effective cytokine therapies require the favorable accumulation of the cytokine in the tumor environment. While direct treatment into the neoplasm is ideal, systemic tumor-targeted therapies will be more feasible. Electroporation-mediated transfection of cytokine plasmid DNA including a tumor-targeting peptide-encoding sequence is one method for obtaining a tumor-targeted cytokine produced by the tumor-bearing patient’s tissues. Here, the impact on efficacy of the location of targeting peptide, choice of targeting peptide, tumor histotype, and cytokine utilization are studied in multiple syngeneic murine tumor models. Within the same tumor model, the location of the targeting peptide could either improve or reduce the antitumor effect of interleukin (IL12 gene treatments, yet in other tumor models the tumor-targeted IL12 plasmid DNAs were equally effective regardless of the peptide location. Similarly, the same targeting peptide that enhances IL12 therapies in one model fails to improve the effect of either IL15 or PF4 for inhibiting tumor growth in the same model. These interesting and sometimes contrasting results highlight both the efficacy and personalization of tumor-targeted cytokine gene therapies while exposing important aspects of these same therapies which must be considered before progressing into approved treatment options.

  11. Multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma: a model for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen GS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Gary S Cohen1, Martin Black2 1Liver Tumor Program, Temple University Hospital, 2Liver Transplantation, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: A multidisciplinary model is a useful approach in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC to coordinate, individualize, and optimize care. The HCC Multidisciplinary Team (MDT at Temple University Hospital was established in 2008 and comprises hepatologists, interventional radiologists, transplant surgeons, oncologists, residents, midlevel providers, and support staff. Patients may be enrolled by referral from (1 oncologists at Temple, (2 the hepatitis screening clinic recently established at Temple and staffed by hepatology residents, or (3 community practices. MDT conferences are held weekly, during which cases are discussed (based on medical history, interpretation of images, and laboratory analyses and treatment plans are formulated. The Temple treatment algorithm follows current standards of care, guided by tumor volume and morphology, but the novel multidisciplinary interaction challenges members to tailor therapy to achieve the best possible outcomes. Patients with a solitary lesion ≤2 cm may receive no treatment until eligible for transplantation or locoregional therapy or resection, with imaging every 3 to 6 months to monitor tumor progression. In patients with tumors > 2 cm and ≤5 cm, microwave ablation therapy is used if lesions are discrete and accessible. Conventional transarterial chemoembolization (TACE or drug-eluting bead TACE (DEB-TACE or yttrium-90 microspheres are utilized in multifocal disease. Patients with lesions > 5 cm are candidates for TACE for downstaging the tumor. Sorafenib is typically reserved for unresectable lesions between 2 cm and 5 cm. Frequently, we administer sorafenib continuously and in combination with DEB-TACE. In our experience, sorafenib does not produce effects on the tumor vasculature or blood flow that would impair

  12. Autophagy- An emerging target for melanoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoye, Abibatou; Weeraratna, Ashani T

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma accounts for only 5% of all cancers but is the leading cause of skin cancer death due to its high metastatic potential. Patients with metastatic melanoma have a 10-year survival rate of less than 10%. While the clinical landscape for melanoma is evolving rapidly, lack of response to therapies, as well as resistance to therapy remain critical obstacles for treatment of this disease. In recent years, a myriad of therapy resistance mechanisms have been unravelled, one of which is autophagy, the focus of this review. In advanced stages of malignancy, melanoma cells hijack the autophagy machinery in order to alleviate drug-induced and metabolic stress in the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting resistance to multiple therapies, tumor cell survival, and progression.  Autophagy is an essential cellular process that maintains cellular homeostasis through the recycling of intracellular constituents. Early studies on the role of autophagy in cancer generated controversy as to whether autophagy was pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Currently, there is a consensus that autophagy is tumor-suppressive in the early stages of cancer and tumor-promoting in established tumors.  This review aims to highlight current understandings on the role of autophagy in melanoma malignancy, and specifically therapy resistance; as well as to evaluate recent strategies for therapeutic autophagy modulation. PMID:27583134

  13. Off-label use of targeted therapies in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levêque, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Off-label use is defined by the prescription of a marketed drug outside the conditions described in the summary of product characteristics. In oncology, off-label prescribing of targeted therapies may occur in patients with other tumor types expressing the same target. Agents associated to phenotypic approaches such as therapies against the tumoral vasculature (anti-angiogenic drugs) and new immunotherapies (checkpoint inhibitors) also carry the potential of alternative indications or combinations. Off-label use of targeted therapies is little documented and appears to be in the same range than that regarding older drugs with wide variations among agents. When compared with older agents, off-label use of targeted therapies is probably more rational through tumoral genotyping but is faced with a limited clinical support, reimbursement challenges related to the very high pricing and the cost of genotyping or molecular profiling, when applicable. PMID:27081648

  14. Targeted Toxins in Brain Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter A. Hall

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeted toxins, also known as immunotoxins or cytotoxins, are recombinant molecules that specifically bind to cell surface receptors that are overexpressed in cancer and the toxin component kills the cell. These recombinant proteins consist of a specific antibody or ligand coupled to a protein toxin. The targeted toxins bind to a surface antigen or receptor overexpressed in tumors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor or interleukin-13 receptor. The toxin part of the molecule in all clinically used toxins is modified from bacterial or plant toxins, fused to an antibody or carrier ligand. Targeted toxins are very effective against cancer cells resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. They are far more potent than any known chemotherapy drug. Targeted toxins have shown an acceptable profile of toxicity and safety in early clinical studies and have demonstrated evidence of a tumor response. Currently, clinical trials with some targeted toxins are complete and the final results are pending. This review summarizes the characteristics of targeted toxins and the key findings of the important clinical studies with targeted toxins in malignant brain tumor patients. Obstacles to successful treatment of malignant brain tumors include poor penetration into tumor masses, the immune response to the toxin component and cancer heterogeneity. Strategies to overcome these limitations are being pursued in the current generation of targeted toxins.

  15. 多西紫杉醇载药纳米粒子对小鼠肝癌移植瘤的靶向治疗作用%Targeting therapy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles for mouse hepatic carcinoma xenografts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文君; 刘芹

    2012-01-01

    目的 考察以两亲嵌段共聚物mPEG - PCL所制备的多西紫杉醇(Doc)载药纳米粒子的靶向抗肿瘤作用,并对其机理进行探讨.方法 采用丙酮-纳米沉淀法制备负载Doc的纳米粒子,动态光散射测定纳米粒子载药前后的粒径及多分散性.采用荧光标记粒子细胞摄取实验,探讨Doe纳米粒子抗肿瘤作用不同于裸药的机制.建立小鼠肝癌细胞H22皮下移植瘤模型,研究尾静脉注射载药纳米粒子的体内抗肿瘤作用.结果 通过纳米沉淀法制备的空白粒子平均粒径为75.7 nm,多西紫杉醇载药粒子的平均粒径为78.0 nm.体内实验结果显示单次尾静脉给药,多西紫杉醇纳米粒子的抗肿瘤效果明显优于临床上常用的泰素帝(P<0.01).结论 高分子多西紫杉醇载药纳米粒子可以提高多西紫杉醇的体内抗肿瘤效果,显示出良好的临床应用前景.%Objective To study the curative effects and possible mechanism of docetaxel (Doc) - loaded nanoparticles with bi - block copolymers mPEG - PCL against hepatic carcinoma. Methods mPEG - PCL was synthesized by ring - opening polymerization method and the nanodrug was prepared by acetone nano - precipated method. The diameters and polydispersity of the nanoparticles were evaluated by dynamic light scattering ( DLS). The in vivo antitumor effect of Doc - loaded nanoparticles was investigated on hepatic H22 tumor model via intravenous administration. Results The diameters of blank nanoparticles and Doc - loaded nanoparticle were 75. 5 and 78. 0 nm respectively. Vivo and - tumor effect showed the tumor growth inhibition of Doc - loaded nanoparticles was markedly smaller than commercial taxotere (P < 0. 01). Conclusion DOC - loaded nanoparticles could enhance the antitumor effect of taxotere and has potential for future clinical application.

  16. The quest for targeted therapy in fragile X syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidler, S.; Hukema, Renate; Willemsen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    textabstractFragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common, monogenetic cause of intellectual disability and autism-spectrum disorders. Although there is no effective therapy, greater understanding of disturbed neuronal pathways has introduced options for targeted therapy. But whereas many FXS phenotypes were improved in preclinical studies with drugs targeting these pathways in the FXS mouse model, attempts to translate these animal-model success stories into treatment of patients in clinical t...

  17. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol; Amin Hajitou

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent dev...

  18. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene th...

  19. The quest for targeted therapy in fragile X syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Zeidler; R.K. Hukema (Renate); R. Willemsen (Rob)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractFragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common, monogenetic cause of intellectual disability and autism-spectrum disorders. Although there is no effective therapy, greater understanding of disturbed neuronal pathways has introduced options for targeted therapy. But whereas many FXS phenotyp

  20. Targeting Strategies for Multifunctional Nanoparticles in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mi Kyung Yu, Jinho Park, Sangyong Jon

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials offer new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticles harboring various functions including targeting, imaging, therapy, and etc have been intensively studied aiming to overcome limitations associated with conventional cancer diagnosis and therapy. Of various nanoparticles, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with superparamagnetic property have shown potential as multifunctional nanoparticles for clinical translation because they have been used...

  1. Immunoprotective therapy with targeted anticancer drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říhová, Blanka; Strohalm, Jiří; Hoste, K.; Jelínková, Markéta; Hovorka, Ondřej; Kovář, Marek; Plocová, Daniela; Šírová, Milada; Šťastný, Marek; Ulbrich, Karel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 172, - (2001), s. 21-28. ISSN 1022-1360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV307/96/K226; GA MZd NC5050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : doxorubicin * mitomycin * immunoprotective therapy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.634, year: 2001

  2. Folate-targeted docetaxel-lipid-based-nanosuspensions for active-targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lili Wang, Min Li, Na ZhangSchool of Pharmaceutical Science, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, ChinaAbstract: The purpose of this study was to develop two novel drug delivery systems based on biodegradable docetaxel-lipid-based-nanosuspensions. The first one was poly(ethylene glycol-modified docetaxel-lipid-based-nanosuspensions (pLNS. It was developed to increase the cycle time of the drug within the body and enhance the accumulation of the drug at the tumor site. The second one was targeted docetaxel-lipid-based-nanosuspensions (tLNS using folate as the target ligand. The tLNS could target the tumor cells that overexpressed folate receptor (FR. The morphology, particle size, and zeta potential of pLNS and tLNS were characterized, respectively. The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of Duopafei®, pLNS, and tLNS were performed in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma HepG2 (FR- and B16 (FR+ cells, respectively. The in vivo antitumor efficacy and pharmacokinetics, as well as the drug tissue distribution, were evaluated in Kunming mice bearing B16 cells. The particle size of pLNS was 204.2 ± 6.18 nm and tLNS had a mean particle size of 220.6 ± 9.54 nm. Cytotoxicity of tLNS against B16 (FR+ cell lines was superior to pLNS (P < 0.05, while there was no significant difference in the half maximum inhibitory concentration values for HepG2 (FR- cells between pLNS and tLNS. The results of the in vivo antitumor efficacy evaluation showed that tLNS exhibited higher antitumor efficacy by reducing tumor volume (P < 0.01 compared with Duopafei and pLNS, respectively. The results of the in vivo biodistribution study indicate that the better antitumor efficacy of tLNS was attributed to the increased accumulation of the drug in the tumor.Keywords: lipid-based-nanosuspensions, docetaxel, cancer therapy, folate, target drug delivery

  3. The application of molecular nuclear medicine in imaging diagnosis and targeted treatment of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignancy of endocrine system. Different pathological classifications of thyroid carcinoma differ greatly in biological behavior and prognosis. As a newly-emerging subject, molecular nuclear medicine has made rapid advances in both diagnosis and treatment of thyroid carcinoma. With the application of new imaging agents and devices such as SPECT/CT and PET/CT, molecular nuclear imaging can demonstrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the alterations in specific molecules of thyroid cancer on cellular and molecular level. Meanwhile, it is capable of utilizing radiopharmaceuticals to target specifically to these molecules. Here we present a review on the latest progresses in this field. (authors)

  4. Carcinoma of vagina 10 or more years following pelvic irradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gynecologic cancer records of 4,238 patients treated between 1956 and 1974 were reviewed. Sixteen patients developed neoplasia in the cervix or vagina 10 or more years following pelvic irradiation. Three patients had squamous carcinoma in situ; the other 13 patients had invasive squamous cancer involving the upper vagina. Only 1.26 percent of invasive carcinoma of the cervix treated by radiation therapy from 1956 to 1966 presented with a late or recurrent or new primary tumor involving the vagina or cervix 10 or more years after primary treatment. The authors conclude that the risk of developing radiation-induced carcinoma in the upper vagina or cervix following pelvic irradiation is low. Follow-up Pap smears are indicated for all patients treated for cervical or vaginal malignancies by radiation therapy in order to detect vaginal neoplasia as well as recurrent carcinoma of the cervix

  5. Mitochondria-targeting for improved photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngen, Ethel J.

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapeutic modality, with great potential to selectively treat surface cancers, thus minimizing systemic side effects. In this dissertation, two approaches to deliver photosensitizers to mitochondria were investigated: 1) Reducing photosensitizer sizes to improve endocytosis and lysosomal localization. Upon irradiation the photosensitizers would then produce singlet oxygen which could rupture the lysosomal membrane releasing the lysosomally trapped photosensitizers to the cytosol, from where they could relocalize to mitochondria by passive diffusion (photochemical internalization). 2) Using delocalized lipophilic cationic dyes (DLCs) to exploit membrane potential differences between the cytoplasm and mitochondria in delivering photosensitizers to mitochondria. To investigate the effects of steric hindrance on mitochondrial localization and photodynamic response, a series of eight thiaporphyrins were studied. Two new thiaporphyrin analogues 6 and 8 with reduced steric hindrance at the 10- and 15- meso positions were studied in comparison to 5,20-diphenyl-10,15-bis[4 (carboxymethyleneoxy)-phenyl]-21,23-dithiaporphyrin 1, previously validated as a potential second generation photosensitizer. Although 6 showed an extraordinarily high uptake (7.6 times higher than 1), it was less potent than 1 (IC 50 = 0.18 muM versus 0.13 muM) even though they both showed similar sub-cellular localization patterns. This low potency was attributed to its high aggregation tendency in aqueous media (4 times higher than 1), which might have affected its ability to generate singlet oxygen in vitro . 8 on the other hand showed an even lower potency than 6 (2.28 vs 0.18 muM). However this was attributed to its low cellular uptake (20 times less than 6) and inefficient generation of singlet oxygen. Overall, although the structural modifications did improve the cellular uptake of 6, 6 was still less potent than the lead photosensitizers 1. Thus

  6. Radium contact therapy of vocal cord carcinomas: Is it still indicated today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chilla, R.; Hoelscher, U.; Krefting, E.; Eysholdt, U.

    1981-12-01

    In 148 patients treated between 1965 and 1975 by irradiation therapy because of a carcinoma of the vocal cords, the course of the disease could be elucidated. Irradiation was performed predominantly by radium contact therapy (105 patients) and less by conventional X-ray therapy (21 patients) or telecobalt irradiation (22 patients). A comparison between the tumors of the T/sub 1/ stage shows that the determinate survival rates are much more favorable (97,7% after 5, and 93,3% after 10 years) in patients receiving radium contact therapy than after telecobalt irradiation (75% after 5 and 10 years) or orthovolt therapy (81.8% after 5, and 80% after 10 years). As judged by the extent of severe paraphonia and laryngeal edema, function of the larynx is much better after radium contact therapy than after application of the other two forms of irradiation therapy. Of a total of 71 patients, only one patient who had received radium contact therapy according to the 'classical indication' developed a tumor recurrence. In comparison the rate of recurrence observed in 'extended indication' (30 patients) is 36,6% and thus reaches similar values as after telecobalt (31.8%) and orthovolt irradiation (33.3%). The undifferentiated carcinoma type is found in higher numbers among the recurrent carcinomas. Four late recurrences were detected after radium contact therapy, and two after orthovolt irradiation. The 4 late recurrences after radium contact therapy were exclusively observed after a previous 'extended indication' for this type of therapy; they were located at places where the primary tumor had gone beyond the range for 'classical indication'. Based on these results an attempt is made to establish guidelines for the application of radium contact therapy to carcinomas of the vocal cords.

  7. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma arising in the setting of previous radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antley, C.A. [Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Dept. of Pathology, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Carney, M.; Smoller, B.R. [Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Dept. of Dermatology, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    1999-01-01

    While there are several reports of microcystic adnexal carcinoma developing in patients within sites of previous therapeutic irradiation, this relationship is not well described in the dermatological literature. We report a case of 42-year-old man with a remote history of therapeutic irradiation following surgical resection of periorbital rhabdomyosarcoma. Subsequently, he developed multiple basal cell carcinomas and a microcystic adnexal carcinoma within the field of irradiation. The histologic features were those of a classic microcystic adnexal carcinoma, with well differentiated nests and cords of keratinocytes displaying follicular and ductular differentiation infiltrating diffusely into the reticular dermis. Dense fibrosis was present surrounding the neoplastic keratinocytes. Nuclear atypia and mitotic figures were not identified. A carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) stain demonstrated glandular differentiation. It is important for dermatologists to be aware of the apparent relationship between the rare microcystic adnexal carcinoma with its innocuous scar-like clinical appearance and prior local radiation therapy. (au) 11 refs.

  8. Overexpression of MicroRNA-30b Improves Adenovirus-Mediated p53 Cancer Gene Therapy for Laryngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs play important roles in laryngeal carcinoma and other cancers. However, the expression of microRNAs in paracancerous tissue has been studied less. Here, using laser capture microdissection (LCM, we detected the expression of microRNAs in paracancerous tissues. Among all down-regulated microRNAs in the center area of tumor tissues, only miR-30b expression was significantly reduced in paracancerous tissues compared to surgical margins. Therefore, to further investigate the effect of miR-30b on laryngeal carcinoma, we stably overexpressed miR-30b in laryngeal carcinoma cell line HEp-2 cells. It was found that although there was no significant difference in cell viability between miR-30b overexpressed cells and control HEp-2 cells, p53 expression was obviously enhanced in miR-30b overexpressed cells. Whether miR-30b could improve the anti-tumor effect of adenovirus-p53 (Ad-p53 in laryngeal carcinoma and other cancer cell lines was also evaluated. It was found that in miR-30b overexpressed HEp-2 cells, p53-mediated tumor cell apoptosis was obviously increased both in vitro and in vivo. MDM2-p53 interaction might be involved in miR-30b-mediated anti-tumor effect. Together, results suggested that miR-30b could modulate p53 pathway and enhance p53 gene therapy-induced apoptosis in laryngeal carcinoma, which could provide a novel microRNA target in tumor therapy.

  9. Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Does the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Represent a Rational Therapeutic Target?

    OpenAIRE

    Albiges, Laurence; Molinie, Vincent; Escudier, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The disparate subtypes of non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the criteria for diagnosis, and the prognoses associated with each subtype, in addition to evaluating the potential use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in treating patients with this type of cancer are reviewed.

  10. Development of targeted therapies in treatment of glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Xu; Pei Gao; Ying Sun; You-Rong Duan

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a type of tumor that is highly lethal despite maximal therapy. Standard therapeutic approaches provide modest improvement in progression-free and overall survival, necessitating the investigation of novel therapies. Oncologic therapy has recently experienced a rapid evolution toward “targeted therapy”, with drugs directed against speciifc targets which play essential roles in the proliferation, survival, and invasiveness of GBM cells, including numerous molecules involved in signal transduction pathways. Inhibitors of these molecules have already entered or are undergoing clinical trials. However, signiifcant challenges in their development remain because several preclinical and clinical studies present conlficting results. In this article, we will provide an up-to-date review of the current targeted therapies in GBM.

  11. Intra-oral electron therapy for carcinoma of the oral cavity using transparent acrylic tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral electron therapy for carcinoma of the oral cavity is a well-established treatment modality. However, the conventional metallic tubes were inconvenient to use because the irradiation field had to be confirmed by a side mirror. We devised transparent acrylic tubes which enable the positioning easy by confirming the tumor and irradiation field directry. Seven cases of various intra-oral carcinomas were treated with these new transparent acrylic tubes and good results were obtained. (author)

  12. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent developments of bacteriophage-derived vectors and their contributions in targeting cancer with therapeutic genes following systemic administration.

  13. Retroviral-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: an innovative approach for cancer therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, B E; Richards, C. A.; Krenitsky, T A

    1991-01-01

    An approach involving retroviral-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of neoplastic disease is described. This therapeutic approach is called "virus-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy" (VDEPT). The VDEPT approach exploits the transcriptional differences between normal and neoplastic cells to achieve selective killing of neoplastic cells. We now describe development of the VDEPT approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Replication-defective, amphotrophic retroviruses were constr...

  14. Ablative radioactive iodine therapy for apparently localized thyroid carcinoma. A decision analytic perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.B.; Kaplan, M.M.; Meyer, K.B.; Pauker, S.G. (Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Adjuvant therapy with ablative radioiodine after surgical resection of apparently localized thyroid carcinoma remains controversial because of the favorable prognosis of thyroid carcinoma and the risk of leukemia from the radioiodine. No controlled trials have been performed to examine this issue. We constructed a decision analytic model to examine whether patients with apparently localized thyroid carcinoma should receive radioiodine. Our analysis suggests that radioiodine modestly improves life expectancy by 2 to 15 months, depending on the patient's age and sex. This model predicts that the benefit of a reduction in the likelihood of recurrence outweighs the risk of leukemia from radioiodine.

  15. Immunological targeting of cytomegalovirus for glioblastoma therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Smita K.; Sampson, John H.; Mitchell, Duane A.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is purportedly present in glioblastoma (GBM) while absent from the normal brain, making CMV antigens potentially ideal immunological anti-GBM targets. We recently demonstrated that patient-derived CMV pp65-specific T cells are capable of recognizing and killing autologous GBM tumor cells. This data supports CMV antigen-directed immunotherapies against GBM.

  16. Oligopeptides as targeting structures in cancer therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš; Fabra, A.; Stevenson, M.; Seymour, L.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 101, 1-3 (2005), s. 376-379. ISSN 0168-3659. [European Symposium on Controlled Drug Delivery /8./. Noordwijk, 07.04.2004-09.04.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : oligopeptide targeting * HPMA * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2005

  17. The quest for targeted therapy in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, Shimriet; Hukema, Renate K; Willemsen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common, monogenetic cause of intellectual disability and autism-spectrum disorders. Although there is no effective therapy, greater understanding of disturbed neuronal pathways has introduced options for targeted therapy. But whereas many FXS phenotypes were improved in preclinical studies with drugs targeting these pathways in the FXS mouse model, attempts to translate these animal-model success stories into treatment of patients in clinical trials have been extremely disappointing. Complicating factors, particularly in animal studies, include mouse inbred strains, variability in functional studies between laboratories, publication bias and lack of reliable and objective primary outcome measures in both mice and patients. Possibly most important, however, is one factor that has been little explored: the complexity of the molecular imbalance in FXS and the need to simultaneously target several different disturbed pathways and different cellular compartments. New, well-conceived animal studies should generate more productive approaches in the quest for targeted therapy for FXS. PMID:26294013

  18. Trimodal therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Matuschek C; Bölke E; Zahra T; Knoefel WT; Peiper M; Budach W; Erhardt A; Scherer A; Baldus SE; Gerber PA; Buhren BA; Schauer M; Hoff N-Ph; Gattermann N; Orth K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Patients with ESCC (squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus) are most commonly diagnosed with locally advanced tumor stages. Early metastatic disease and late diagnosis are common reasons responsible for this tumor's poor clinical outcome. The prognosis of esophageal cancer is very poor because patients usually do not have symptoms in early disease stages. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus frequently complicates patients with multiple co-morbidities and these patients often r...

  19. Usefulness of Photodynamic Therapy as a Possible Therapeutic Alternative in the Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Savoia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer in individuals with fair skin type (I–II and steadily increasing in incidence (70% of skin malignancy. It is locally invasive but metastasis is usually very rare, with an estimated incidence of 0.0028%–0.55%. Conventional therapy is surgery, especially for the H region of the face and infiltrative lesions; in case of inoperable tumors, radiotherapy is a valid option. Recently, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT has become an effective treatment in the management of superficial and small nodular BCC. PDT is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the administration of a photo-sensibilizing agent followed by irradiation at a pre-defined wavelength; this determines the creation of reactive oxygen species that specifically destroy target cells. The only major side effect is pain, reported by some patients during the irradiation. The high cure rate and excellent cosmetic outcome requires considering this possibility for the management of patients with both sporadic and hereditary BCC. In this article, an extensive review of the recent literature was made, in order to clarify the role of PDT as a possible alternative therapeutic option in the treatment of BCC.

  20. Reassessing target antigens for adoptive T cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Christian S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy can target and kill widespread malignant cells thereby inducing durable clinical responses in melanoma and selected other malignances. However, many commonly targeted tumor antigens are also expressed by healthy tissues, and T cells do not distinguish between benign and malignant tissues if both express the target antigen. As such, autoimmune toxicity from T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissue has limited the development and adoption of this otherwise promising type of cancer therapy. A review of the unique biology of T-cell therapy and of recent clinical experience compels a reassessment of target antigens that traditionally have been viewed from the perspective of weaker immunotherapeutic modalities. In selecting target antigens for adoptive T-cell therapy, expression by tumors and not by essential healthy tissues is of paramount importance. The risk of autoimmune adverse events can be further mitigated by generating antigen receptors using strategies that reduce the chance of cross-reactivity against epitopes in unintended targets. In general, a circumspect approach to target selection and thoughtful preclinical and clinical studies are pivotal to the ongoing advancement of these promising treatments. PMID:24142051

  1. Study on non-coplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy in esophageal carcinoma implanted with permanent cardiac pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim is to evaluate the physical dose distributions in esophageal carcinoma implanted with permanent cardiac pacemaker treated with non-coplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy (no-co-IMRT). Eight patients with esophageal carcinoma implanted cardiac pacemaker proven by histology were treated by IMRT. For each patient, we designed two IMRT plans by Eclipse IMRT inverse plan system: non-coplanar IMRT plan (3 coplanar fields and 2 non-coplanar fields) and coplanar IMRT plan (5 coplanar fields). The same physical parameter was applied to the same patient in both plans. Plans were evaluated in terms of dose-volume histogram, conformity index, homogeneity index monitor unit and control points. The results showed that no-co-IMRT plan could significantly reduce the max dose of implantable cardiac pacemaker and the wires (p<0.05), but no significant difference was found between no-co-IMRT plan and co-IMRT plan in target volume and other normal tissues Compared with co-IMRT plan, the monitor unit (MU) and control points of no-co-IMRT plan were not increased significantly (p>0.05). These findings indicate that the technique of no-co-IMRT can obtain the fewer max dose of implantable cardiac pacemaker and the wires during intensity modulated radiation therapy of esophageal carcinoma. (authors)

  2. Percutaneous targeted argon-helium cryoablation for renal carcinoma under CT guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish initially the technique and evaluate the principle, safety and short term efficacy of argon-helium superconductor operation system (or Ar-He knife) targeted cryotherapy for renal carcinoma. Methods: Seven patients with renal carcinoma were treated with CT-guided percutaneous Ar-He knife targeted cryotherapy. Results: After cryotherapy, no serious complications, such as bleeding, skin cold injury, infection, implantation metastasis inside the puncture path occurred, and one month later, CT scans showed low-density local necrosis in all tumors of the 7 cases, but the tumor reduction in size was found only in 2 cases. Conclusion: CT guiding percutaneous Ar-He knife targeted cryoablation for renal carcinoma is a safe, effective and minimally invasive therapeutic method, particularly for inoperable cases. (authors)

  3. Phosphoproteomics and targeted anti-tumor therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed procedures to acquire the phosphoproteomic profiles of cell lines before and after stimulation with activators or treatment with kinase inhibitors. The profiles were obtained combining affinity chromatography, electrophoretic separation and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for protein identification. Studies were performed using a collection of cell lines from melanoma, hepatoma and other tumor types derived from thyroid, colon, breast and ovary tissues. Stimulations were performed using ligands for receptor tyrosine kinases and inhibitions using drugs specific for molecular targets, including Iressa, RPI-1, Erlotinib, PLX4032 and Sorafenib. This work has identified several new targets now being validated on clinical specimens. This second line of studies prompted to establish adequate methods of processing and storing of tissues to preserve protein phosphorylation status. Remarkably these activities, taken together, have contributed to the development of new interdisciplinary programs in 'Fondazione'

  4. Target volume and position variations during intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan W

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wenyong Tan,* Yanping Li,* Guang Han, Jiaozhen Xu, Xiaohong Wang, Ying Li, Desheng HuDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: Considerable anatomical changes occur during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. This study aimed to quantify volumetric and positional variations of the target volume during IMRT.Materials and methods: Twenty patients with locally advanced NPC who received concurrent (13 patients or sequential (seven patients chemoradiotherapy were prospectively recruited and underwent planning computed tomography (CT and six repeat CTs (every five fractions. Each repeat CT was rigidly registered to the planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV and elective clinical target volume (CTV were manually delineated on each axial CT image. CTVs of the primary tumor and lymph nodes were expanded with 5 mm margins to corresponding GTVs, with necessary modifications. Volume loss, system and random errors, and the mean and three-dimensional vector displacements were calculated and compared statistically.Results: Volumes of the primary tumor and small (>1 cm, ≤3 cm and large (>3 cm positive neck lymph nodes decreased at a rate of 2.6%, 3.7%, and 3.9% per treatment day, respectively. CTVs of the primary tumor, lymph nodes, and elective region decreased 1.5%, 2.3%, and 0.3% per treatment day, respectively. Average displacements of the GTVs and CTVs were <1.3 mm in all directions. GTVs and CTVs of the large and small lymph nodes shifted medially by 0.8–1.3 and 0.6–1.2 mm, respectively, on average. Average three-dimensional displacements of the GTVs and CTVs were 3.4–4.3 mm and 2.5–3.7 mm, respectively. Volume loss and displacements in most directions were significantly larger in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy than in those receiving sequential therapy. Volume loss and displacements of the

  5. Targeting RNA Splicing for Disease Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Havens, Mallory A.; Duelli, Dominik M.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicin...

  6. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    LU, HONG-YANG; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Mao, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounted for 12.95% of all lung cancer histological types in 2002. Despite trends toward modest improvement in survival, the outcome remains extremely poor. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in SCLC. More than two-thirds of patients who succumb to lung cancer in the United States are over 65 years old. Elderly patients tolerate chemotherapy poorly and need novel therapeutic agents. Targeted...

  7. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jean Y.; So, Po-Lin; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2006-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastro-intestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overvi...

  8. Noncoding RNA as therapeutic targets for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    George, Joseph; Patel, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These RNA genes may be involved in various pathobiological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Aberrant expression of ncRNA resulting from deregulated epigenetic, transcriptional or post-transcriptional activity has been described in several studies. ncRNAs comprise of a highly diverse group of transc...

  9. Targeted treatments in advanced renal cell carcinoma: focus on axitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzoni E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elena Verzoni, Paolo Grassi, Isabella Testa, Roberto Iacovelli, Pamela Biondani, Enrico Garanzini , Filippo De Braud, Giuseppe ProcopioDepartment of Medical Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Antiangiogenesis options have evolved rapidly in the last few years, with an increasing number of agents currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer cell. Axitinib is a third-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and is currently being developed for the treatment of various malignancies. The pharmacokinetic properties of axitinib may have a selective therapeutic effect, with minimal adverse reactions and enhanced safety. In a large Phase III study of previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib achieved a longer progression-free survival than sorafenib with an acceptable safety profile and good quality of life. This review focuses on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of axitinib in the current treatment of renal cell carcinoma. The role of axitinib in the adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant setting needs to be evaluated in further clinical trials.Keywords: axitinib, renal cell carcinoma, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, angiogenesis

  10. Peptide-conjugated nanoparticles for targeted imaging and therapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chen-Yun; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Wang, Yi-Ping; Lan, Chun-Hsin; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-08-01

    While there has been extensive development of anti-cancer drugs for treatment of prostate cancer, the therapeutic efficacy of such drugs remains inadequate in many cases. Here, we performed in vitro biopanning of the PC3 human prostate carcinoma cell line to select prostate cancer-specific peptides by phage display. We successfully identified specific peptides targeting prostate cancer cells, and their specificity was confirmed by cellular ELISA and flow cytometry. Moreover, we found that the phage clones also recognize other prostate cancer cell lines and surgical specimens from prostate cancer patients. The tumor targeting ability of these phages was validated in a xenograft model, in which high accumulation of targeting phage was observed. To investigate whether selected peptides are able to target tumors and enhance drug delivery into cancer cells, we synthesized peptide-PEGylated lipids and post-inserted them into preformed liposomal doxorubicin and vinorelbine. The results of our cellular uptake and MTT assays indicate that peptide-conjugated liposomes exhibit enhanced drug intracellular delivery and cytotoxicity. The conjugation of targeting peptide to imaging agents, such as quantum dots (QDs) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), results in more precise delivery of these agents to tumor sites. Furthermore, administration of liposomal doxorubicin and vinorelbine conjugated with targeting peptides was found to markedly increase the inhibition of human prostate tumor growth in mouse xenograft and orthotopic models. These results indicate that targeting peptide, SP204, has significant potential for targeted therapy and molecular imaging in prostate cancer. PMID:27209258

  11. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  12. Targeted nanodrugs for cancer therapy: prospects and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottini, Massimo; Sacchetti, Cristiano; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Bellucci, Stefano; Magrini, Andrea; Rosato, Nicola; Bottini, Nunzio

    2014-01-01

    The recent advent of nanomedicine holds potential to revolutionize cancer therapy. This innovative discipline has paved the way for the emergence of a new class of drugs based on nanoengineered particles. These "nanodrugs" are designed to greatly enhance drug therapeutic indices. First-generation nanodrugs consisted of conventional anti-cancer drugs loaded into/onto nanoengineered particles (nanocarriers) devoid of targeting features (non-targeted nanodrugs). Non-targeted nanodrugs have provided the opportunity to carry large amounts of drugs, including poorly water-soluble and/or permeable drugs, to several types of tumors, improving the therapeutic index with respect to comparable free drugs. Although effective, the primary delivery mechanism of non-targeted nanodrugs was through passive tissue accumulation, due to pathophysiological differences between tumor-associated and healthy vessels, and through non-specific targeting of cell subsets, posing the danger of off-target binding and effects. Recently, the therapeutic indices of certain anti-cancer drugs were further improved by attaching targeting ligands to nanodrugs (targeted-nanodrugs). Targeted-nanodrugs selectively bind to cognate receptors expressed on target cells and enter cells more efficiently than non-targeted formulations. Although these advancements have been sufficiently beneficial to place targeted-nanodrugs into clinical development for use in cancer therapy, they also come at a price. The addition of ligands to drug-loaded nanocarriers often leads to additional synthesis steps and costs, and more complex biological performance relative to ligand-devoid nanodrugs. Here, we will discuss the benefits and challenges facing the addition of targeting features to nanodrugs for cancer therapy. PMID:24730253

  13. Quantification of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound in HCC: prediction of response to a new combination therapy of sorafenib and panobinostat in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knieling, Ferdinand; Waldner, Maximilian J; Goertz, Ruediger S; Strobel, Deike

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the case of a patient, who showed an antitumour response to a new combination therapy of sorafenib and the histon deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH-589). D-CEUS (Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography) was able to predict response to the new therapy regime and may be an interesting tool in the early evaluation of response to therapy. It might be especially useful to differentiate between responders and non-responders of new-targeted pharmaceuticals like multikinase inhibitors in hepatocellular carcinomas. PMID:23257272

  14. Targeted therapy in the treatment of malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimas V Lukas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Rimas V Lukas1, Adrienne Boire2, M Kelly Nicholas1,2 1Department of Neurology; 2Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas are invasive tumors with the potential to progress through current available therapies. These tumors are characterized by a number of abnormalities in molecular signaling that play roles in tumorigenesis, spread, and survival. These pathways are being actively investigated in both the pre-clinical and clinical settings as potential targets in the treatment of malignant gliomas. We will review many of the therapies that target the cancer cell, including the epidermal growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, histone deacetylase, and farnesyl transferase. In addition, we will discuss strategies that target the extracellular matrix in which these cells reside as well as angiogenesis, a process emerging as central to tumor development and growth. Finally, we will briefly touch on the role of neural stem cells as both potential targets as well as delivery vectors for other therapies. Interdependence between these varied pathways, both in maintaining health and in causing disease, is clear. Thus, attempts to easily classify some targeted therapies are problematic.Keywords: glioma, EGFR, mTOR, HDAC, Ras, angiogenesis

  15. Individualized therapies in colorectal cancer: KRAS as a marker for response to EGFR-targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kuiyuan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Individualized therapies that are tailored to a patient's genetic composition will be of tremendous value for treatment of cancer. Recently, Kirsten ras (KRAS status has emerged as a predictor of response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeted therapies. In this article, we will discuss targeted therapies for colorectal cancers (CRC based on EGFR signaling pathway and review published data about the potential usefulness of KRAS as a biological marker for response to these therapies. Results from relevant studies published since 2005 and unpublished results presented at national meetings were retrieved and summarized. These studies reflected response (or lack of response to EGFR-targeted therapies in patients with metastatic CRC as a function of KRAS status. It has become clear that patients with colorectal cancer whose tumor has an activating mutation in KRAS do not respond to monoclonal antibody therapies targeting EGFR. It should now become a standard practice that any patients being considered for EGFR targeted therapies have their tumors tested for KRAS status and only those with wild-type KRAS being offered such therapies.

  16. Clinical Challenges to Current Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Gagan; Eggert, Ashley; Puri, Neelu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is difficult to treat with a poor prognosis and a five year survival of 15%. Current molecularly targeted therapies are initially effective in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, they are plagued with difficulties including induced resistance and small therapeutically responsive populations. This mini review describes the mechanism of resistance to several molecularly targeted therapies which are currently being used to treat NSCLC. The major targets discussed are c-Met, EGFR, HER2, ALK, VEGFR, and BRAF. The first generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) resulted in resistance; however, second and third generation TKIs are being developed, which are generally more efficacious and have potential to treat NSCLC patients with resistance to first generation TKIs. Combination therapies could also be effective in preventing TKI resistance in NSCLC patients.

  17. Imatinib: A Breakthrough of Targeted Therapy in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deregulated protein tyrosine kinase activity is central to the pathogenesis of human cancers. Targeted therapy in the form of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs has transformed the approach to management of various cancers and represents a therapeutic breakthrough. Imatinib was one of the first cancer therapies to show the potential for such targeted action. Imatinib, an oral targeted therapy, inhibits tyrosine kinases specifically BCR-ABL, c-KIT, and PDGFRA. Apart from its remarkable success in CML and GIST, Imatinib benefits various other tumors caused by Imatinib-specific abnormalities of PDGFR and c-KIT. Imatinib has also been proven to be effective in steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease because of its anti-PDGFR action. This paper is a comprehensive review of the role of Imatinib in oncology.

  18. Proton Beam Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Comparison of Three Treatment Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Our previous results for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with proton beam therapy revealed excellent local control with low toxicity. Three protocols were used to avoid late complications such as gastrointestinal ulceration and bile duct stenosis. In this study, we examined the efficacy of these protocols. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 266 patients (273 HCCs) treated by proton beam therapy at University of Tsukuba between January 2001 and December 2007. Three treatment protocols (A, 66 GyE in 10 fractions; B, 72.6 GyE in 22 fractions; and C, 77 GyE in 35 fractions) were used, depending on the tumor location. Results: Of the 266 patients, 104, 95, and 60 patients were treated with protocols A, B, and C, respectively. Seven patients with double lesions underwent two different protocols. The overall survival rates after 1, 3 and 5 years were 87%, 61%, and 48%, respectively (median survival, 4.2 years). Multivariate analysis showed that better liver function, small clinical target volume, and no prior treatment (outside the irradiated field) were associated with good survival. The local control rates after 1, 3, and 5 years were 98%, 87%, and 81%, respectively. Multivariate analysis did not identify any factors associated with good local control. Conclusions: This study showed that proton beam therapy achieved good local control for HCC using each of three treatment protocols. This suggests that selection of treatment schedules based on tumor location may be used to reduce the risk of late toxicity and maintain good treatment efficacy.

  19. Metastatic gastric cancer – focus on targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Junco J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Judith Meza-Junco, Michael B SawyerDepartment of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gastric cancer (GC is currently the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide; unfortunately, most patients will present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Despite recent progress in diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, prognosis remains poor. A better understanding of GC biology and signaling pathways is expected to improve GC therapy, and the integration of targeted therapies has recently become possible and appears to be promising. This article focuses on anti-Her-2 therapy, specifically trastuzumab, as well as other epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists such as cetuximab, panitumub, matuzumab, nimotzumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib. Additionally, drugs that target angiogenesis pathways are also under investigation, particulary bevacizumab, ramucirumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, and cediranib. Other targeted agents in preclinical or early clinical development include mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors, anti-insulin-like growth factor, anti-heat shock proteins, and small molecules targeting Hedgehog signaling.Keywords: gastric cancer, targeted therapy, antiangiogenesis drugs, anti-EGFR drugs

  20. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium database has the largest series of patients evaluating the impact of body mass index (BMI on outcomes in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy. Overall survival was significantly improved in overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, and this observation was externally validated in patients who participated in Pfizer trials. In contrast, sarcopenia is consistently associated with increased toxicity to inhibitors of angiogenesis and mTOR. Strengthening patients with mRCC and sarcopenia, through a structured exercise program and dietary intervention, may improve outcomes in mRCC treated with targeted therapies. At the same time, the paradox of obesity being a risk factor for RCC while offering a better overall survival in response to targeted therapy needs to be further evaluated.

  1. Symptomatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients following radiation therapy: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocrine assessment was performed in 32 relapse-free southern Chinese patients 5-17 years following radiation therapy (RT) alone for early nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Initial screening was done using questionnaires emphasizing impaired sexual function and menstrual disturbance plus measurement of serum levels of thyroxine, free thyroxine index, thyrotropic hormone, prolactin, and additionally testosterone for males only. Those showing abnormalities were subjected to detailed pituitary function tests. Hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction was found in 7 female patients and only 1 male patient. A delayed TSH response to thyrotropin releasing hormone suggesting a hypothalamic disorder was seen in 6 of the affected female patients, and hyperprolactinaemia in also 6. None of the patients had evidence of diabetes insipidus. Hypopituitarism became symptomatic 2-5 years after RT with a mean latent interval of 3.8 years. A practical protocol for regular endocrine assessment for NPC patients after RT has been proposed. Multiple linear regression analysis of the radiotherapeutic data from the 11 female patients indicates that the likelihood of late occurrence of symptomatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction following RT is dependent on the TDF of the target dose to the nasopharyngeal region and the height of the upper margin of the opposed lateral facial fields above the diaphragma sellae (coefficient of multiple correlation = 0.9025). Except when the sphenoid sinus or the middle cranial fossa is involved, it is advisable to set the height of the upper margin of the lateral facial field at a level no higher than the diaphragma sellae. The hypothalamus and possibly the pituitary stalk as well may sustain permanent damage by doses of radiation within the conventional radiotherapeutic range for carcinomas

  2. Aptamers: Active Targeting Ligands for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA...

  3. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium...

  4. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Beylergil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several molecular imaging modalities have been evaluated in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a rare and aggressive tumor with a high tendency to metastasize. Continuous progress in the field of molecular imaging might improve management in these patients. The authors review the current modalities and their impact on MCC in this brief review article.

  5. Lymphocyte chromosome aberrations in patients undergoing radiation therapy for mammary carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, A.; Fabry, L.; Lemaire, M. (Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)); Gerber, G.B. (Liege Univ. (Belgium))

    1983-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy for mammary carcinoma have been cytologically examined for the presence of polycentric chromosomes in their peripheral blood lymphocytes. The mean values of the observed yields can be fitted to a quadratic function. Due probably to a lower number of lymphocytes exposed the curve now obtained gives a smaller aberration yield than the dose effect curves published earlier for patients given telecobalt therapy.

  6. Lymphocyte chromosome aberrations in patients undergoing radiation therapy for mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy for mammary carcinoma have been cytologically examined for the presence of polycentric chromosomes in their peripheral blood lymphocytes. The mean values of the observed yields can be fitted to a quadratic function. Due probably to a lower number of lymphocytes exposed the curve now obtained gives a smaller aberration yield than the dose effect curves published earlier for patients given telecobalt therapy. (Auth.)

  7. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the skin of the face and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 300,000 new cases of carcinomas of the skin are diagnosed each year in the Unied States. The great majority of these lesions are on the skin of the face and neck. The proximity of these neoplasms to important structures such as the eyes, nose, and ears has prompted this discussion of the role of radiation therapy in their management. Most carcinomas of the skin of the nose and eyelids are basal cell carcinomas, while most tumors arising on the pinna are squamous cell carcinomas. Despite the fact that cutaneous carcinomas of the face and neck are essentially totally curable, hundreds of patients in the United States annually die or become horribly disfigured through neglect or improper treatment. Radiotherapy of cutaneous carcinomas can be rewarding when the proper care and expertise are applied. The radiation therapist is afforded an unusual opportunity to deal with a highly curable malignant neoplasm, but at the same time he can model his means to obtain the best aesthetic results. Many carcinomas of the skin are expeditiously and effectively cured by simple excision, but others, regardless of size, may be treated best by radiotherapy because of better aesthetic results. The use of acids, caustics, or electrocoagulation offers no particular advantage and is seldom as satisfactory as a clean excision. The surgical procedure often may be an excisional biopsy, which offers the opportunity of adequate histopathologic study of the specimen. Various modalities of radiation therapy may be successfully utilized, but none has the elasticity and definite advantage of relatively low kilovoltage roentgen therapy

  8. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of hypofractionated radiation protocol for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. Hypofractionated radiation therapy was applied to five cats showing single or multiple facial squamous cell carcinomas, in a total of ten histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Of the lesions, two were staged as T1, four as T2, two as T3, and two as T4. The animals were submitted to four radiation fractions from 7.6 to 10 grays each, with one week intervals. The equipment was a linear accelerator with electrons beam. The cats were evaluated weekly during the treatment and 30 and 60 days after the end of the radiation therapy. In this study, 40% of the lesions had complete remission, 40% partial remission, and 20% did not respond to the treatment. Response rates were lower as compared to other protocols previously used. However, hypofractionated radiation protocol was considered safe for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  9. Review of photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica B Ericson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Marica B Ericson1,2, Ann-Marie Wennberg1, Olle Larkö11Department of Dermatology; 2Department of Physics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, SwedenAbstract: The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide, and so also the demand for effective treatment modalities. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT using aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester has recently become good treatment options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma; especielly when treating large areas and areas with field cancerization. The cure rates are usually good, and the cosmetic outcomes excellent. The only major side effect reported is the pain experienced by the patients during treatment. This review covers the fundamental aspects of topical PDT and its application for treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. Both potentials and limitations will be reviewed, as well as some recent development within the field.Keywords: photodynamic therapy, actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma

  10. Trimodality Therapy for an Advanced Thymic Carcinoma With Both Aorta and Vena Cava Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momozane, Tohru; Inoue, Masayoshi; Shintani, Yasushi; Funaki, Soichiro; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Minami, Masato; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2016-08-01

    A case of locally advanced thymic carcinoma that was successfully resected with the great vessels after chemoradiation therapy is reported. A 57-year-old man with Masaoka stage III thymic carcinoma received two cycles of cisplatin/docetaxel and 60 Gy irradiation. The response was stable disease with 19% size reduction, and a radical resection with the ascending aorta and superior vena cava with the patient under circulatory arrest with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient has been free of disease for 28 months. Trimodality therapy with use of a cardiovascular surgical procedure might be a valuable option in locally advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:27449450

  11. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy was initially envisaged as a potential treatment for genetically inherited, monogenic disorders. The applications of gene therapy have now become wider, however, and include cardiovascular diseases, vaccination and cancers in which conventional therapies have failed. With regard to oncology, various gene therapy approaches have been developed. Among them, the use of genetic toxins to kill cancer cells selectively is emerging. Two different types of genetic toxins have been developed so far: the metabolic toxins and the dominant-negative class of toxins. This review describes these two different approaches, and discusses their potential applications in cancer gene therapy

  12. Nucleic Acid Targeting: Towards Personalized Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsel, Sean M; Grandis, Jennifer R; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-01-01

    In light of a detailed characterization of genetic aberrations in cancer, nucleic acid targeting represents an attractive therapeutic approach with significant translational potential. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide with stagnant 5-year survival rates. Advances in conventional treatment have done little to improve survival and combined chemoradiation is associated with significant adverse effects. Recent reports have characterized the genetic alterations in HNSCC and demonstrated that mutations confer resistance to conventional and molecular targeted therapies. The ability to use specific nucleic acid sequences to inhibit cancer-associated genes including non-druggable targets facilitates personalized medicine approaches with less adverse effects. Additionally, advances in drug delivery mechanisms have increased the transfection efficiency aiding in greater therapeutic responses. Given these advances, the stage has been set to translate the information garnered from genomic studies into personalized treatment strategies. Genes involved in the tumor protein 53 (TP53) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways have been extensively investigated and many promising preclinical studies have shown tumor inhibition through genetic modulation. We, and others, have demonstrated that targeting oncogene expression with gene therapy approaches is feasible in patients. Other methods such as RNA interference have proven to be effective and are potential candidates for clinical studies. This review summarizes the major advances in sequence-specific gene modulation in the preclinical setting and in clinical trials in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:26592450

  13. Saponins as tool for improved targeted tumor therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H; Bachran, D; Panjideh, H; Schellmann, N; Weng, A; Melzig, M F; Sutherland, M; Bachran, C

    2009-02-01

    Saponins are plant glycosides that consist of a steroid, steroid alkaloid or triterpenoid aglycone and one or more sugar chains that are covalently linked by glycosidic binding to the aglycone. Glucose, galactose, glucuronic acid, xylose and rhamnose are commonly bound monosaccharides. Saponins are found in all organs of a variety of higher plants. Due to the great variability of their structures, diverse functions have been described for distinct saponins; including foaming and pore forming properties as well as selective removal of protozoa from the rumen. The most interesting properties are, however, favorable anti-tumorigenic effects. Several saponins inhibit tumor cell growth by cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with half maximal inhibitory concentrations of down to 0.2 microM. A drawback of saponins in tumor therapy is the non-targeted spreading throughout the whole body. Surprisingly, certain saponins were identified that drastically enhance the efficacy of targeted chimeric toxins bearing the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin as cell-killing moiety. It was demonstrated that this effect is substantially more pronounced on target cells than on non-target cells, thus not only preserving the target specificity of the chimeric toxin but also broadening the therapeutic window with simultaneous dose lowering. This review describes the role of saponins as drug in general, their use as single drug treatment in tumor therapy, their combination with conventional tumor treatment strategies and the synergistic effects with particular targeted tumor therapies that are based on recombinant proteins. PMID:19199910

  14. The efficacy of voice therapy in patients after treatment for early glottic carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gogh, CDL; Leeuw, IMV; Boon-Kamma, BA; Rinkel, RNPM; de Bruin, MD; Langendijk, JA; Kuik, DJ; Mahieu, HF

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND. After treatment for early glottic carcinoma, a considerable]lumber of patients end tip with voice problems that interfere with daily life activities. The objective of this randomized and controlled study was to assess the efficacy of voice therapy in these patients. METHODS. Of 177 patie

  15. On the cause of brachial plexus neuropathy after radiation therapy of patients with mamma carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is often considered as cause of brachial plexus neuropathy in patients with mamma carcinoma. One case (in which metastases could be established as specific cause) is used as specific example for the possible differential diagnosis of brachial plexus neuropathy. (orig.)

  16. Intra-tumorous embolization therapy through micro-catheterization for small carcinoma of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the value of the intra-tumorous embolization therapy using the skills of micro-catheterization for small carcinoma of the liver. Methods: 83 cases of embolization therapy through micro-catheter were performed in 26 patients who had single nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (23 patients) or liver metastasis (3 patients). 80 cases of the intra-tumorous embolization therapy using hot lipiodol (100 degree C) were performed in 26 patients. The protective embolization with micro-coil were done in 2 patients. One cases of the fistula embolization using absolute alcohol was done in one patient with small intra-tumorous A-V fistula. Results: The completely filled-full intra--tumorous embolization was obtained in all patients, although the negative finding on angiogram of celiac and superior mesenteric arteries occurred in 3 patients. The complete necrosis was confirmed in 2 patients followed by carcinoma resection. Within the follow-up 14 months to 55 months (average 35 months), 26 patients were all alive and there was no serious complication occurred. Conclusions: The completely filled-full intra-tumorous embolization for small carcinoma of the liver can be achieved by using the skills of micro-catheterization therapy. The satisfactory preliminary results seem to be comparable to that of the surgery. There is need for further study

  17. Sensory neural hearing loss after concurrent cisplatin and radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensory neural hearing loss (SNHL) was evaluated in the patients who were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Ten from 48 ears showed persistent SNHL. Radiotherapy techniques, radiation dose to inner ear and post-treatment otitis media were significant predicting factors for SNHL

  18. Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy of basal cell carcinomas - an explorative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S R; Skødt, V; Wulf, H C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that daylight-photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment of actinic keratoses, nearly pain free and more convenient for both the clinics and patients. Treatment of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) is another main indication for PDT. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this...

  19. Molecular diagnosis for personalized target therapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Yong

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, the conventional chemotherapy with limited efficacy shows an overall survival period of about 10 months. Patient specific and effective treatments known as personalized cancer therapy is of significant importance. Advances in high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next generation sequencing for genes, protein expression profiles and oncogenic signaling pathways have reinforced the discovery of treatment targets and personalized treatments. However, there are numerous challenges from cancer target discoveries to practical clinical benefits. Although there is a flood of biomarkers and target agents, only a minority of patients are tested and treated accordingly. Numerous molecular target agents have been under investigation for gastric cancer. Currently, targets for gastric cancer include the epidermal growth factor receptor family, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor axis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Deeper insights of molecular characteristics for gastric cancer has enabled the molecular classification of gastric cancer, the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the prediction of prognosis, the recognition of gastric cancer driver genes, and the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Not only have we deeper insights for the molecular diversity of gastric cancer, but we have also prospected both affirmative potentials and hurdles to molecular diagnostics. New paradigm of transdisciplinary team science, which is composed of innovative explorations and clinical investigations of oncologists, geneticists, pathologists, biologists, and bio-informaticians, is mandatory to recognize personalized target therapy. PMID:24156032

  20. Quantitative proteomics approach to screening of potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for laryngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available To discover candidate biomarkers for diagnosis and detection of human laryngeal carcinoma and explore possible mechanisms of this cancer carcinogenesis, two-dimensional strong cation-exchange/reversed-phase nano-scale liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify differentially expressed proteins between the laryngeal carcinoma tissue and the adjacent normal tissue. As a result, 281 proteins with significant difference in expression were identified, and four differential proteins, Profilin-1 (PFN1, Nucleolin (NCL, Cytosolic non-specific dipeptidase (CNDP2 and Mimecan (OGN with different subcellular localization were selectively validated. Semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect the expression of the four proteins employing a large collection of human laryngeal carcinoma tissues, and the results validated the differentially expressed proteins identified by the proteomics. Furthermore, we knocked down PFN1 in immortalized human laryngeal squamous cell line Hep-2 cells and then the proliferation and metastasis of these transfected cells were measured. The results showed that PFN1 silencing inhibited the proliferation and affected the migration ability of Hep-2 cells, providing some new insights into the pathogenesis of PFN1 in laryngeal carcinoma. Altogether, our present data first time show that PFN1, NCL, CNDP2 and OGN are novel potential biomarkers for diagnosis and therapeutic targets for laryngeal carcinoma, and PFN1 is involved in the metastasis of laryngeal carcinoma.

  1. Radiation therapy for patients with obstructive jaundice caused by carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From February 1980 through September 1990, 92 patients with obstructive jaundice resulting from biliary tract cancer were registered at Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital or Ehime University Hospital. Radiation therapy (RT) was used to treat 38 of these patients (30 with carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct, excluding ampulla of Vater, and eight patients with carcinoma of the gallbladder). Of 38 patients, 11 underwent intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and 27 were treated by external radiation therapy (ERT) alone. In contrast, 54 patients (39 with carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct and eight with carcinoma of the gallbladder) were not treated by RT. All jaundiced patients received external and/or internal biliary drainage of some kind. Among patients undergoing biliary drainage with a catheter, 21 patients who underwent RT (four with IORT) survived significantly longer than 19 patients who did not (generalized Wilcoxon test: p<0.05). There were no significant differences in survival between 7 patients with recanalization and 11 patients with no recanalization. Concerning the survival of laparotomized patients, excluding those with complete resection or perioperative death, eight patients treated with postoperative ERT survived longer than 12 patients who did not have postoperative ERT (not significant). Eleven patients underwent IORT. A patient with unresectable carcinoma of the hilar bile duct survived 2 years and 3 months after a combination treatment of ERT and IOTR. In four of eight autopsied patients, radiation effects of Grade II were observed (Oboshi and Shimosato's evaluation system for the histological effects of radiation therapy). Our experience suggests that RT is effective in patients with obstructive jaundice caused by carcinoma of the biliary system. (author)

  2. Radiation therapy for patients with obstructive jaundice caused by carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Masashi; Nakagawa, Hirofumi (National Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital, Ehime (Japan)); Kataoka, Masaaki (and others)

    1992-04-01

    From February 1980 through September 1990, 92 patients with obstructive jaundice resulting from biliary tract cancer were registered at Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital or Ehime University Hospital. Radiation therapy (RT) was used to treat 38 of these patients (30 with carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct, excluding ampulla of Vater, and eight patients with carcinoma of the gallbladder). Of 38 patients, 11 underwent intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and 27 were treated by external radiation therapy (ERT) alone. In contrast, 54 patients (39 with carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct and eight with carcinoma of the gallbladder) were not treated by RT. All jaundiced patients received external and/or internal biliary drainage of some kind. Among patients undergoing biliary drainage with a catheter, 21 patients who underwent RT (four with IORT) survived significantly longer than 19 patients who did not (generalized Wilcoxon test: p<0.05). There were no significant differences in survival between 7 patients with recanalization and 11 patients with no recanalization. Concerning the survival of laparotomized patients, excluding those with complete resection or perioperative death, eight patients treated with postoperative ERT survived longer than 12 patients who did not have postoperative ERT (not significant). Eleven patients underwent IORT. A patient with unresectable carcinoma of the hilar bile duct survived 2 years and 3 months after a combination treatment of ERT and IOTR. In four of eight autopsied patients, radiation effects of Grade II were observed (Oboshi and Shimosato's evaluation system for the histological effects of radiation therapy). Our experience suggests that RT is effective in patients with obstructive jaundice caused by carcinoma of the biliary system. (author).

  3. Early onset recall pneumonitis during targeted therapy with sunitinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunitinib interacts with radiation therapy, leading to synergism of the toxicities of these treatments. Radiation recall pneumonitis is a rare but serious complication of targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The case of a patient with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) who developed recall pneumonitis on the first cycle of systemic sunitinib treatment is reported here. A 65-year-old man with RCC and bone metastasis underwent radiation therapy on his thoracic vertebrae (Th5-8) with a total dose of 24 Gy. Sunitinib (37.5 mg) was started 14 days after completing the radiation therapy. On the 14th day of sunitinib treatment, the patient developed progressive fever with worsening of dyspnea and general weakness. Treatment with pulse administration of prednisolone 1,000 mg for 3 days was initiated. Thereafter, the symptoms and the radiological findings regarding the interstitial filtration gradually improved over 7 days. To our knowledge, this is the first report of early onset recall pneumonitis during sunitinib therapy. At present, how sunitinib interacts with radiation therapy remains unclear. The possibility that tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, including with sunitinib, after radiation therapy may lead to adverse effects should be kept in mind

  4. Inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy for pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong DJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dao-Jun Gong,1 Jia-Min Zhang,1 Min Yu,1 Bo Zhuang,1 Qing-Qu Guo21Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Jinhua Hospital of Zhejiang University, Jinhua, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Pancreatic carcinoma possesses one of the highest lethality rates, highest drug-resistance, and highest incidence rates. The objective of this research was to enhance the efficacy and drug-resistance for pancreatic carcinoma by using inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy methods.Methods: Three pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1 cells, BxPC-3 cells, and SW1990 cells received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vitro; then BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice also received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vivo.Results: The cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP-1 effect of drug in pancreatic carcinoma cells was significantly different (P < 0.05 and the efficacy in descending order was the combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine, inhibition of SIRT1, and gemcitabine. The BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice model received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vivo and the results showed that the tumor volumes decreased and the survival rate within 45 days increased according to the order of the given drugs and the difference was significant (P < 0.05.Conclusion: Combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine could improve efficacy and survival time in a BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice model, compared with single inhibition of SIRT1, or single

  5. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy: Practical Applications and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukotynski, Katherine; Jadvar, Hossein; Capala, Jacek; Fahey, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a proliferation in the development of targeted radionuclide cancer therapy. It is now possible to use baseline clinical and imaging assessments to determine the most effective therapy and to tailor this therapy during the course of treatment based on radiation dosimetry and tumor response. Although this personalized approach to medicine has the advantage of maximizing therapeutic effect while limiting toxicity, it can be challenging to implement and expensive. Further, in order to use targeted radionuclide therapy effectively, there is a need for multidisciplinary awareness, education, and collaboration across the scientific, industrial, and medical communities. Even more important, there is a growing understanding that combining radiopharmaceuticals with conventional treatment such as chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy may limit patient morbidity while improving survival. Developments in radiopharmaceuticals as biomarkers capable of predicting therapeutic response and targeting disease are playing a central role in medical research. Adoption of a practical approach to manufacturing and delivering radiopharmaceuticals, assessing patient eligibility, optimizing post-therapy follow-up, and addressing reimbursement issues will be essential for their success. PMID:27226737

  6. Histone lysine demethylases as targets for anticancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Agger, Karl; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    interesting drug targets. The successful introduction of DNA methylation and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for the treatment of specific subtypes of cancer has paved the way for the use of epigenetic therapy. Here, we highlight key biological findings demonstrating the roles of members of the histone...

  7. Auger radiation targeted into DNA: a therapy perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger electron emitters that can be targeted into DNA of tumour cells represent an attractive systemic radiation therapy goal. In the situation of DNA-associated decay, the high linear energy transfer (LET) of Auger electrons gives a high relative biological efficacy similar to that of α particles. In contrast to α radiation, however, Auger radiation is of low toxicity when decaying outside the cell nucleus, as in cytoplasm or outside cells during blood transport. The challenge for such therapies is the requirement to target a high percentage of all cancer cells. An overview of Auger radiation therapy approaches of the past decade shows several research directions and various targeting vehicles. The latter include hormones, peptides, halogenated nucleotides, oligonucleotides and internalising antibodies. Here, we will discuss the basic principles of Auger electron therapy as compared with vector-guided α and β radiation. We also review some radioprotection issues and briefly present the main advantages and disadvantages of the different targeting modalities that are under investigation. (orig.)

  8. Current issues in the targeted therapy of advanced colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijn, N.; Tol, J.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Currently used cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (ACC) are primarily the fluoropyrimidines, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin. The introduction of targeted therapy has increased the therapeutic arsenal. Two classes of monoclonal antibodies have been approved for clinical use i

  9. Lipid-AuNPs@PDA nanohybrid for MRI/CT imaging and photothermal therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yongyi; Zhang, Da; Wu, Ming; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Ling; Li, Zheng; Han, Xiao; Wei, Xueyong; Liu, Xiaolong

    2014-08-27

    Multifunctional theranostic nanoparticles represent an emerging agent with the potential to offer extremely sensitive diagnosis and targeted cancer therapy. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of a multifunctional theranostic agent (referred to as LA-LAPNHs) for targeted magnetic resonance imaging/computed X-ray tomography (MRI/CT) dual-mode imaging and photothermal therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. The LA-LAPNHs were characterized as having a core-shell structure with the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)@polydopamine (PDA) as the inner core, the indocyanine green (ICG), which is electrostatically absorbed onto the surface of PDA, as the photothermal therapeutic agent, and the lipids modified with gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid and lactobionic acid (LA), which is self-assembled on the outer surface as the shell. The LA-LAPNHs could be selectively internalized into the hepatocellular cell line (HepG2 cells) but not into HeLa cells due to the specific recognition ability of LA to asialoglycoprotein receptor. Additionally, the dual-mode imaging ability of the LA-LAPNH aqueous solution was confirmed by enhanced MR and CT imaging showing a shorter T1 relaxation time and a higher Hounsfield unit value, respectively. In addition, the LA-LAPNHs showed significant photothermal cytotoxicity against liver cancer cells with near-infrared irradiation due to their strong absorbance in the region between 700 and 850 nm. In summary, this study demonstrates that LA-LAPNHs may be a promising candidate for targeted MR/CT dual-mode imaging and photothermal therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25090604

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  11. Why targeted therapies are necessary for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcan, L; Petri, M

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) continues to have important morbidity and accelerated mortality despite therapeutic advances. Targeted therapies offer the possibility of improved efficacy with fewer side effects. Current management strategies rely heavily on nonspecific immunosuppressive agents. Prednisone, in particular, is responsible for a considerable burden of later organ damage. There are a multitude of diverse mechanisms of disease activity, immunogenic abnormalities and clinical manifestations to take into consideration in SLE. Many targeted agents with robust mechanistic preclinical data and promising early phase studies have ultimately been disappointing in phase III, randomized, controlled studies. Recent efforts have focused on B-cell therapies, in particular given the success of belimumab in clinical trials, with limited success. We remain optimistic regarding other specific therapies being evaluated, including interferon-alpha blockade. It is likely that in SLE, given the heterogeneity of the population involved, precision medicine is needed, rather than expecting that any single biologic will be universally effective. PMID:27497251

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed

  13. Radiolabeled Cetuximab Conjugates for EGFR Targeted Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Sihver

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has evolved over years into a main molecular target for the treatment of different cancer entities. In this regard, the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab has been approved alone or in combination with: (a chemotherapy for treatment of colorectal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and (b with external radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The conjugation of radionuclides to cetuximab in combination with the specific targeting properties of this antibody might increase its therapeutic efficiency. This review article gives an overview of the preclinical studies that have been performed with radiolabeled cetuximab for imaging and/or treatment of different tumor models. A particularly promising approach seems to be the treatment with therapeutic radionuclide-labeled cetuximab in combination with external radiotherapy. Present data support an important impact of the tumor micromilieu on treatment response that needs to be further validated in patients. Another important challenge is the reduction of nonspecific uptake of the radioactive substance in metabolic organs like liver and radiosensitive organs like bone marrow and kidneys. Overall, the integration of diagnosis, treatment and monitoring as a theranostic approach appears to be a promising strategy for improvement of individualized cancer treatment.

  14. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma; Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, S.C.S.; Corgozinho, K.B.; Holguin, P.G.; Ferreira, A.M.R., E-mail: simonecsc@gmail.co [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, L.A.V. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Canary, P.C.; Reisner, M. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, A.N.; Souza, H.J.M. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The efficacy of hypofractionated radiation protocol for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. Hypofractionated radiation therapy was applied to five cats showing single or multiple facial squamous cell carcinomas, in a total of ten histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Of the lesions, two were staged as T{sub 1}, four as T{sub 2}, two as T{sub 3}, and two as T{sub 4}. The animals were submitted to four radiation fractions from 7.6 to 10 grays each, with one week intervals. The equipment was a linear accelerator with electrons beam. The cats were evaluated weekly during the treatment and 30 and 60 days after the end of the radiation therapy. In this study, 40% of the lesions had complete remission, 40% partial remission, and 20% did not respond to the treatment. Response rates were lower as compared to other protocols previously used. However, hypofractionated radiation protocol was considered safe for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  15. Contributions of imaging to radiation therapy planning for uterine cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External irradiation and brachytherapy are curative in the treatment of carcinoma of the cervix. The aim of radiotherapy is to optimize the irradiation of the target volume and to optimize the irradiation of the target volume and to reduce the dose to critical organs. The use of imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging added to clinical findings and standard guidelines) are studied in the treatment planning of external irradiation and brachytherapy in carcinoma of the cervix. Imaging allows an individualized and conformal treatment planning. (author)

  16. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. (author)

  17. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. PMID:24522270

  18. Stereotactic radiation therapy and selective internal radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma; Radiotherapie stereotaxique et radiotherapie interne selective du carcinome hepatocellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujold, A.; Dawson, L.A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610, University Avenue, Toronto M5G 2C1 (Canada)

    2011-02-15

    Recent technological advances allow precise and safe radiation delivery in hepatocellular carcinoma. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a conformal external beam radiation technique that uses a small number of relatively large fractions to deliver potent doses of radiation therapy to extracranial sites. It requires stringent breathing motion control and image guidance. Selective internal radiotherapy or radio-embolization refers to the injection of radioisotopes, usually delivered to liver tumors via the hepatic artery. Clinical results for both treatments show that excellent local control is possible with acceptable toxicity. Most appropriate patient populations and when which type of radiation therapy should be best employed in the vast therapeutic armamentarium of hepatocellular carcinoma are still to be clarified. (authors)

  19. DNA repair in cancer: emerging targets for personalized therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is under constant threat from endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair machinery to process DNA damage and maintain genomic integrity. Impaired DNA repair is a major driver for carcinogenesis and could promote aggressive cancer biology. Interestingly, in established tumors, DNA repair activity is required to counteract oxidative DNA damage that is prevalent in the tumor microenvironment. Emerging clinical data provide compelling evidence that overexpression of DNA repair factors may have prognostic and predictive significance in patients. More recently, DNA repair inhibition has emerged as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Synthetic lethality exploits intergene relationships where the loss of function of either of two related genes is nonlethal, but loss of both causes cell death. Exploiting this approach by targeting DNA repair has emerged as a promising strategy for personalized cancer therapy. In the current review, we focus on recent advances with a particular focus on synthetic lethality targeting in cancer

  20. Ocular toxicities of MEK inhibitors and other targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjepanovic, N; Velazquez-Martin, J P; Bedard, P L

    2016-06-01

    Many classes of anticancer therapy, including chemotherapeutic agents, hormonal and molecular targeted treatments, can produce ocular toxicity. Novel agents that target different cellular pathways have been related to a wide spectrum of ophthalmologic toxicities that can range from mild to severe, and include conjunctivitis, blurred vision, keratitis and optic neuritis, among others. Special attention has been drawn to the inhibitors of the MEK signaling pathway, due to their sine qua non ocular toxicity, defined as MEK retinopathy and described as symmetrical bilateral disease that develops in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. In this review, we discuss ophthalmologic toxicities associated with molecular targeted therapies, with particular focus on MEK retinopathy, including its nomenclature, incidence, symptoms and management. PMID:26951625

  1. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  2. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A dosimetric comparison with TomoTherapy and step-and-shoot IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a novel technique, employs a linear accelerator to conduct dynamic modulation rotation radiotherapy. The goal of this study was to compare VMAT with helical tomotherapy (HT) and step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with regard to the sparing effect on organs at risk (OARs), dosimetric quality, and efficiency of delivery. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with NPC treated by HT were re-planned by VMAT (two arcs) and IMRT (7–9 fields) for dosimetric comparison. The target area received three dose levels (70, 60, and 54 Gy) in 33 fractions using simultaneous integrated boosts technique. The Philips Pinnacle Planning System 9.0 was adopted to design VMAT, using SmartArc as the planning algorithm. For a fair comparison, the planning target volume (PTV) coverage of the 3 plans was normalized to the same level. Dosimetric comparisons between VMAT, HT, and IMRT plans were analyzed to evaluate (1) coverage, homogeneity, and conformity of PTV, (2) sparing of OARs, (3) delivery time, and (4) monitor units (MUs). Results: The VMAT, HT, and IMRT plans had similar PTV coverage with an average of 96%. There was no significant difference between VMAT and HT in homogeneity, while the homogeneity indices of VMAT (1.06) and HT (1.06) were better than IMRT plans (1.07, p < 0.05). HT plans provided a better conformity index (1.17) than VMAT (1.28, p = 0.01) and IMRT (1.36, p = 0.02). When compared with IMRT, VMAT and HT had a better sparing effect on brain stem and spinal cord (p < 0.05). The effect of parotid sparing was similar between VMAT (mean = 26.3 Gy) and HT (mean = 27.5 Gy), but better than IMRT (mean = 31.3 Gy, p < 0.01). The delivery time per fraction for VMAT (5.7 min) were much lower than for HT (9.5 min, p < 0.01) and IMRT (9.2 min, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Our results indicate that VMAT provides better sparing of normal tissue, homogeneity, and

  3. Swallowing performance after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, I.C.; Tiver, K.; Bull, C.; Gebski, V.; Langlands, A.O.

    1988-05-15

    The purpose of the study reported in this article was to tabulate the incidence and etiologic factors of importance in the development of strictures after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus and to analyze the outcome of patients who develop such strictures. Eighty patients were treated with radiotherapy, 50 having radical and 30 having palliative treatment. Sixty-nine patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had adenocarcinoma, one had sarcoma, one had mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and five had undifferentiated tumors. Forty percent developed no stricture, 30% had benign fibrotic stricture, and 28% developed malignant stricture. The etiologic factors analysed included age, pretreatment swallowing score, histology and length (size) of tumor; stage of disease, dose of radiotherapy, and use of chemotherapy. None of these factors were shown to be of etiologic importance. The survival of patients who developed benign strictures was found to be significantly longer (1-year survival 88%) than those who developed no stricture (50%) or malignant stricture (19%). Using a success score for palliation of dysphagia, it was found that the majority of patients (71%) who developed a benign stricture had a moderately successful outcome--they were able to tolerate a full or soft diet and required dilatation with a median duration between dilatations of 5 months. Patients who developed a malignant stricture were palliated poorly by dilatation alone, and most required esophageal intubation.

  4. Swallowing performance after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study reported in this article was to tabulate the incidence and etiologic factors of importance in the development of strictures after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus and to analyze the outcome of patients who develop such strictures. Eighty patients were treated with radiotherapy, 50 having radical and 30 having palliative treatment. Sixty-nine patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had adenocarcinoma, one had sarcoma, one had mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and five had undifferentiated tumors. Forty percent developed no stricture, 30% had benign fibrotic stricture, and 28% developed malignant stricture. The etiologic factors analysed included age, pretreatment swallowing score, histology and length (size) of tumor; stage of disease, dose of radiotherapy, and use of chemotherapy. None of these factors were shown to be of etiologic importance. The survival of patients who developed benign strictures was found to be significantly longer (1-year survival 88%) than those who developed no stricture (50%) or malignant stricture (19%). Using a success score for palliation of dysphagia, it was found that the majority of patients (71%) who developed a benign stricture had a moderately successful outcome--they were able to tolerate a full or soft diet and required dilatation with a median duration between dilatations of 5 months. Patients who developed a malignant stricture were palliated poorly by dilatation alone, and most required esophageal intubation

  5. The clinicalapplication of interleukin-2therapy in patients withmetastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Wen Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical application of interleukin-2 therapy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.Methods:From January 2010 to July 2014 of 108 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients in our hospital as research subjects were randomly divided into the experimental group and the control group. The experimental group received IL-2 combined with Nexavar therapy, and the control group only received Nexavar treatment, clinical efficacy and incidence of adverse reactions between the two groups of patients were compared.Results:Compared with the control group, clinical efficacy in the experimental group was significantly higher, the difference was statistically significant. The incidence of adverse events was higher in patients than that in the experimental group, the difference was statistically significant, but IL-2 had no new adverse reactions and side effects.Conclusions:Interleukin-2 combined with Nexavar treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma can improve the clinical efficacy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in patients, and ease the patient's condition from worsening and promote the quality of life. However, adverse reactions caused by drugs were inevitable; we should pay attention to treatment and prevention of adverse reactions in order to improve the quality of life of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Concomitant cetuximab and radiation therapy: A possible promising strategy for locally advanced inoperable non-melanoma skin carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    DELLA VITTORIA SCARPATI, GIUSEPPINA; PERRI, FRANCESCO; PISCONTI, SALVATORE; COSTA, GIUSEPPE; RICCIARDIELLO, FILIPPO; DEL PRETE, SALVATORE; NAPOLITANO, ALBERTO; CARRATURO, MARCO; MAZZONE, SALVATORE; ADDEO, RAFFAELE

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) include a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from the epidermis, comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), Merkel cell carcinoma and more rare entities, including malignant pilomatrixoma and sebaceous gland tumours. The treatment of early disease depends primarily on surgery. In addition, certain patients present with extensive local invasion or metastasis, which renders these tumours surgically unresectable. Improving the outcome of radiotherapy through the use of concurrent systemic therapy has been demonstrated in several locally advanced cancer-treatment paradigms. Recently, agents targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have exhibited a consolidated activity in phase II clinical trials and case series reports. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to and completely inhibits the EGFR, which has been revealed to be up-regulated in a variety of SCCs, including NMSCs. The present review aimed to summarize the role of anti-EGFR agents in the predominant types of NMSC, including SCC and BCC, and focuses on the cetuximab-based studies, highlighting the biological rationale of this therapeutic option. In addition, the importance of the association between cetuximab and radiotherapy for locally advanced NMSC is discussed. PMID:27073643

  7. Impact of adjuvant therapy on survival of patients with early-stage uterine papillary serous carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in patients with early-stage uterine papillary serous carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Data were collected on all surgically staged Stage I-II uterine papillary serous carcinoma patients. Statistical analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression methods. Results: Of 68 patients, 50 had Stage I and 18 had Stage II disease; 35 underwent adjuvant treatment, including radiotherapy in 26, chemotherapy in 7, and combined RT and chemotherapy in 2. The remaining 33 were treated expectantly. The median follow-up was 56 months (range 1-173). The 5-year overall survival rate was 69%. Of 19 patients with disease limited to the endometrium, 10 received no additional therapy, 3 of whom developed recurrence. However, all 9 women who underwent adjuvant treatment remained free of disease. Patients receiving adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy or radiotherapy had a prolonged 5-year overall and disease-free survival compared with those who were treated expectantly (85% vs. 54%, p = 0.002 for overall survival and 85% vs. 49%, p 0.01 for disease-free survival). In multivariate analysis, adjuvant therapy (p = 0.035) and the absence of lymphovascular space invasion (p = 0.001) remained as independent prognostic factors for improved survival. Conclusion: Adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy or radiotherapy improves the survival of women with early-stage uterine papillary serous carcinoma

  8. Radiation therapy for the treatment of feline advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of radiation therapy for feline advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. A full course radiation therapy protocol was applied to six cats showing single or multiple facial squamous cell carcinomas, in a total of seven histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Of the lesions, one was staged as T1, and six as T4 according to WHO staging system of epidermal tumors. The animals were submitted to twelve radiation fractions of 4 Gy each, on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule, and the equipment used was an orthovoltage unit. Energy used was 120 kV, 15 mA and 2 mm aluminum filter. The cats were evaluated during the treatment and 30 and 60 days after the end of the radiation therapy. In this study, 87% of the lesions had complete remission and 13% partial remission to the treatment. Side effects were considered mild according to Veterinary Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Toxicity criteria, and included erythema, epilation and rhinitis. Radiation Therapy was considered safe for feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, leading to mild side effects and can represent a good therapeutic option. (author)

  9. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONFORMAL RADIATION THERAPY FOR LOCALLY RECURRENT NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: From April 1998 to March 2000, 34 patients who had undergone previous external beam radiation therapy were retreated with 3-D CRT for locally recurrent NPC (33 poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, 1 adenoma). The patients were re-staged according to Huaqing staging system with the following distribution: T1N0M0 in 5 cases, T2N0M0 in 11 cases, T3N0M0 in 12 cases, T4N0M0 in 6 cases. The maximal dimension of the gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 1.0 cm to 5.0 cm (median: 2.9 cm). CT simulation and 3-D planning were used to ensure full and conformal coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) by treated volume, while minimizing the absorbed dose of the adjacent normal tissue. 5-7 static conformal coplanar or noncoplanar portals were delivered for each fraction irradiation. The total dose delivered ranged from 65-70 Gy, with 2.5 Gy per fractionation, one fractionation per day, 5 days a week. Median follow-up time from 3-D CRT was 25 months (range: 12-36 months). Results: Over the follow-up period, local recurrence was observed in 3 patients, regional failure in 3, distant metastasis in 3, and six patients died; 88.2% (30/34) of the patient maintained local control, 82.4% (28/34) survived, and 76.5% (26/34) survived with no evidence of tumor. Acute complications were minor and few. The overall incidence of late complication was 20.6% (7/34), and severe complication was 14.7% (5/34), after re-irradiation with 3-D CRT. Conclusion: 3-D CRT is safety and effectiveness for most of the patients with locally recurrent NPC. Our preliminary results indicate a high local control rate and a low complication rate. The long-term curative effect and sequelae await further study.

  10. Photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging of hypericin-treated squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercarz Joel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cancer therapy including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy often are physically debilitating and largely ineffective in previously treated patients with recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. A natural photochemical, hypericin, could be a less invasive method for laser photodynamic therapy (PDT of these recurrent head and neck malignancies. Hypericin has powerful photo-oxidizing ability, tumor localization properties, and fluorescent imaging capabilities as well as minimal dark toxicity. The current study defined hypericin PDT in vitro with human SCC cells before the cells were grown as tumor transplants in nude mice and tested as a model for hypericin induced tumor fluorescence and PDT via laser fiberoptics. Methods SNU squamous carcinoma cells were grown in tissue culture, detached from monolayers with trypsin, and incubated with 0.1 μg to 10 μg/ml of hypericin before exposure to laser light at 514, 550, or 593 nm to define optimal dose, time, and wavelength for PDT of tumor cells. The SCC cells also were injected subcutaneously in nude mice and grown for 6–8 weeks to form tumors before hypericin injection and insertion of fiberoptics from a KTP532 surgical laser to assess the feasibility of this operating room instrument in stimulating fluorescence and PDT of tumors. Results In vitro testing revealed a hypericin dose of 0.2–0.5 μg/ml was needed for PDT of the SCC cells with an optimal tumoricidal response seen at the 593 nm light absorption maximum. In vivo tumor retention of injected hypericin was seen for 7 to10 days using KTP532 laser induced fluorescence and biweekly PDT via laser fiberoptics led to regression of SCC tumor transplants under 0.4 cm2 diameter, but resulted in progression of larger size tumors in the nude mice. Conclusion In this preclinical study, hypericin was tested for 514–593 nm dye laser PDT of human SCC cells in vitro and for KTP532 surgical laser targeting

  11. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK cell therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yue

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer (CIK cell therapy in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and methods Randomized phase II and III trials on CIK cell-based therapy were identified by electronic searches using a combination of "hepatocellular carcinoma" and "cytokine-induced killer cells". Results The analysis showed significant survival benefit (one-year survival, p p p p p p +, CD4+, CD4+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells significantly increased in the CIK group, compared with the non-CIK group (p Conclusions CIK cell therapy demonstrated a significant superiority in prolonging the median overall survival, PFS, DCR, ORR and QoL of HCC patients. These results support further larger scale randomized controlled trials for HCC patients with or without the combination of other therapeutic methods.

  12. Radiation therapy of a metastatic tumour of the orbit caused by prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of metastatic carcinoma to the apex of the orbit in a 66-year old patient. Orbital metastasis occurred while the patient suffered from another metastatic activity especially in his bony structures. The orbital tumour caused rapid visual impairment because of compression of the optic nerve. The metastasis was treated by radiation therapy. With CT-scan, electrophysiological examination, visual field examination, and visual function we demonstrate the regression of the tumour. One year after therapy the tumor was no longer detectable. Visual function had recovered and visual fields were normally. Radiation therapy prolonged high quality life for our patient due to preservation of visual function. (authors)

  13. Long term control of a maxillary sinus mucoepidermoid carcinoma with low dose radiation therapy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the maxillary sinus is a rare malignancy of the head and neck. The location of this tumour near vital structures and its large size at presentation makes surgical resection with negative margins challenging. In incurable cases, relief from symptoms such as epistaxis may be achieved with radiation therapy. We present a case of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the maxillary sinus that was effectively palliated with a short course of radiation therapy, achieving complete cessation of bleeding, decrease in tumour size, and long term control. We surveyed the literature on mucoepidermoid carcinomas and propose that some tumours may be particularly radiosensitive, benefiting from even short courses of radiation therapy

  14. EU 2020 Targets: the health 2020 targets and the role of primary care and occupational therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2013-01-01

    Invited keynote presentation at the 19 Annual Meeting of the European Network of Occupational Therapy in Higher Education which aimed to explore the role of primary care and occupational therapy in delivery of the EU Health 2020 targets. Health 2020, the European policy framework supporting action across government and society for health and wellbeing, was published in 2012 and led by the World Health Organization regional office in Europe. The policy sets out to enable people to achieve thei...

  15. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for gingival carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to review the efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. In all, 34 patients (21 men and 13 women) with squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva underwent radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of daily external irradiation and concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion with cisplatin and docetaxel. A median total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was delivered to tumors. Of the 34 patients, 29 (85 %) achieved a complete response (CR) and 5 had residual tumors. Of the 29 patients with a CR, 2 had local recurrences and 1 had distant metastasis 1-15 months after treatment. Twenty-six of the 36 patients had survived at a median follow-up time of 36 months (range 12-79 months); 4 died of cancer and 4 died of non-cancer-related causes. At both 3 and 5 years after treatment, the overall survival rates were 79 % and the cause-specific survival rates were 85 %. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandibular bone only developed in 1 patient after treatment. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy was effective and safe in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. This treatment may be a promising curative and organ-preserving treatment option for gingival carcinoma. (orig.)

  16. Emerging targeted therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eAdamo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few therapeutic options were available for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Since 2010, four new molecules with a demonstrated benefit (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone and denosumab have been approved in this setting, and to-date several other agents are under investigation in clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to present an update of targeted therapies for CRPC. Presented data are obtained from literature and congress reports updated until December 2011. Targeted therapies in advanced phases of clinical development include novel hormone-therapeutic, intracellular molecular pathways inhibiting, anti-angiogenic, bone microenvironment targeting and immunotherapeutic agents. Radium-223 and MDV3100 demonstrated a survival advantage in phase III trials and the road for their introduction in clinical practice is rapidly ongoing. Results are also awaited for phase III studies currently underway or planned with new drugs given as monotherapy (TAK-700, cabozantinib, tasquinimod, PROSTVAC-VF, ipilimumab or in combination with docetaxel (custirsen, aflibercept, dasatinib, zibotentan. Optimal timing, right combination and/or sequencing of emerging therapies as well as use of more sensitive biological markers to individualize therapies for CRPC remain challenging and studies to investigate these aspects are needed.

  17. Catamnestic studies of radiosurgical combination therapy of advanced carcinoma of the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of the study summarizes the post-therapeutical course of development of 165 patients who have been treated for advanced internal and external carcinoma of the larynx with a combined, pre- or postoperative radiosurgical therapy, with particular attention being paid to the frequency of focal or lymph node recidivation, post-therapeutical apparent distant metastases and postoperative complications, and also to tumour-independent mortality. The second part of the study is concerned with the determination of survival rates of patients suffering from advanced carcinoma of the larynx or hypopharynx, following low-dose preoperative irradiation (119 patients) or postoperative irradiation (209 patients). (orig./MG)

  18. A Clinical Study of Photodynamic Therapy for Superficial Esophageal Carcinoma by YAG-OPO Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Kazunari Yoshida; Shigeru Suzuki; Seishiro Mimura; Hiroyuki Narahara; Hiroshi Tanimura; Yugo Nagai; Kaichi Isono; Teruo Kozu; Hisayuki Fukutomi; Akira Nakahara; Hiromasa Kashimura; Toshio Hirashima; Yoko Murata; Hiroko Ide; Harubumi Kato

    1998-01-01

    A cooperative clinical study of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for superficial esophageal carcinoma was conducted at 6 medical institution. PHE (2mg/kg) with high tumor affinity was used as the oncotropic compound. The light source was a pulse wave YAG-OPO laser with high penetration into the tissue. Irradiation was performed at an energy density of 60–180 J/cm2 48–72 h after PHE administration. Eight lesions in 6 patients were treated. All were type 0-II superficial carcinomas. The depth of inva...

  19. Role of anti-angiogenesis therapy in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma: The jury is still out

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong; Sun; Man-Sheng; Zhu; Wen-Rui; Wu; Xiang-De; Shi; Lei-Bo; Xu

    2014-01-01

    As the leading cause of disease-related deaths,cancer is a major public health threat worldwide.Surgical resection is still the first-line therapy for patients with early-stage cancers.However,postoperative relapse and metastasis remain the cause of 90%of deaths of patients with solid organ malignancies,including hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC).With the rapid development of molecular biology techniques in recent years,molecularly targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies,small molecules,and vaccines have become a milestone in cancer therapeutic by significantly improv-ing the survival of cancer patients,and have opened a window of hope for patients with advanced cancer.Hypervascularization is a major characteristic of HCC.It has been reported that anti-angiogenic treatments,which inhibit blood vessel formation,are highly effective for treating HCC.However,the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenesis therapies remain controversial.Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor with antiproliferative and anti-angiogenic effects and is the first molecular target drug approved for the treatment of advanced HCC.While sorafenib has shown promising therapeutic effects,substantial evidence of primary and acquired resistance to sorafenib has been reported.Numerous clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate a large number of molecularly targeted drugs for treating HCC,but most drugs exhibited less efficacy and/or higher toxicity compared to sorafenib.Therefore,understanding the mechanism(s)underlying sorafenib resistance of cancer cells is highlighted for efficiently treating HCC.This concise review aims to provide an overview of anti-angiogenesis therapy in the management of HCC and to discuss the common mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  20. Rule of lymph node metastasis and proper target of postoperative radiotherapy for thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the rule of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal carcinoma, and to study the proper radiation target. Methods: From September 1986 to December 1997,549 patients with esophageal carcinoma who had undergone radical resection were divided into surgery alone group (S,275 patients) or surgery plus radiotherapy group(S + R,274 patients). Radiotherapy was begun 3 to 4 weeks after operation. The radiation target included both supra-clavicular areas and the entire mediastinum. The total dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks for the supra-clavicular areas and 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks for the entire mediastinum. Results: The 5-year overall survival of patients with lymph node metastasis in one anatomic site and two anatomic sites was 31.5% and 13.9% (P=0.013), respectively. For patients with > 2 positive nodes metastasis receiving surgery alone, the corresponding 5-year survival was 24.8% and 4.9% (P=0.046), respectively. The median number of dissected lymph nodes of the upper-, middle-and lower-segment esophageal carcinoma was 13, 17 and 20, respectively. The rate of metastatic lymph node in the para-esophagus region was the highest(61.5%-64.9%), which was not different among the different primary sites (P=0.922). The anastomotic stoma recurrence rate of the upper-segment esophageal carcinoma was higher than that of the middle- or lower-segment carcinomas (16.7%, 3.1%, and 7.7%, χ2=9.02,P<0.05). Conclusions: For the thoracic esophageal carcinoma, the number of anatomic sites of lymph node metastasis is an important factor affecting the survival. The lower rate of lymph node metastasis of the upper segment esophageal carcinoma may be corrected with the less lymph node dissected. The rate of lymph node metastasis in para-esophageal region is not related with the lesion segment. The anastomotic stoma is an important radiotherapy target for upper segment esophageal carcinoma. (authors)

  1. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology. PMID:25012686

  2. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.;

    2009-01-01

    DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA......Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  3. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Chiu Liu; Zan Shen; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Marie CM Lin

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971,scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of antiangiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has Received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy.

  4. Locoregional extension patterns of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and suggestions for clinical target volume delineation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Fei Li; Jun Ma; Ying Sun; Mo Chen; Ling-Long Tang; Li-Zhi Liu; Yan-Ping Mao; Lei Chen; Guan-Qun Zhou; Li Li

    2012-01-01

    Clinical target volume (CTV) delineation is crucial for tumor control and normal tissue protection.This study aimed to define the Iocoregional extension patterns of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to improve CTV delineation.Magnetic resonance imaging scans of 2366 newly diagnosed NPC patients were reviewed.According to incidence rates of tumor invasion,the anatomic sites surrounding the nasopharynx were classified into high-risk (>30%),medium-risk (5%-30%),and low-risk (<5%) groups.The lymph node (LN) level was determined according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group guidelines,which were further categorized into the upper neck (retropharyngeal region and level Ⅱ),middle neck (levels Ⅲ and Va),and lower neck (levels IV and Vb and the supraclavicular fossa).The high-risk anatomic sites were adjacent to the nasopharynx,whereas those at medium-or low-risk were separated from the nasopharynx.If the high-risk anatomic sites were involved,the rates of tumor invasion into the adjacent medium-risk sites increased; if not,the rates were significantly lower (P < 0.01).Among the 1920 (81.1%) patients with positive LN,the incidence rates of LN metastasis in the upper,middle,and lower neck were 99.6%,30.2%,and 7.2%,respectively,and skip metastasis happened in only 1.2% of patients.In the 929 patients who had unilateral upper neck involvement,the rates of contralateral middle neck and lower neck involvement were 1.8% and 0.4%,respectively.Thus,local disease spreads stepwise from proximal sites to distal sites,and LN metastasis spreads from the upper neck to the lower neck.Individualized CTV delineation for NPC may be feasible.

  5. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease. PMID:26858964

  6. Targeted Alpha Therapy Approach to the Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence for the efficacy of targeted alpha therapy for the control of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models is reviewed. Results are given for in vitro pancreatic cancer cells and clusters and micro-metastatic cancer lesions in vivo. Two complementary targeting vectors are examined. These are the C595 monoclonal antibody that targets the MUC1 antigen and the PAI2 ligand that targets the uPA receptor. The expression of the tumor-associated antigen MUC-1 and the uPA receptor on three pancreatic cancer cell lines is reported for cell clusters, human mouse xenografts and lymph node metastases, as well as for human pancreatic cancer tissues, using immuno-histochemistry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The targeting vectors C595 and PAI2 were labeled with the alpha emitting radioisotope 213Bi using the chelators cDTPA and CHX-A″ to form the alpha-conjugates (AC). Cell clusters were incubated with the AC and examined at 48 hours. Apoptosis was documented using the TUNEL assay. In vivo, the anti-proliferative effect for tumors was tested at two days post-subcutaneous cell inoculation. Mice were injected with different concentrations of AC by local or systemic administration. Changes in tumor progression were assessed by tumor size. MUC-1 and uPA are strongly expressed on CFPAC-1, PANC-1 and moderate expression was found CAPAN-1 cell clusters and tumor xenografts. The ACs can target pancreatic cells and regress cell clusters (∼100 μm diameter), causing apoptosis in some 70–90 % of cells. At two days post-cell inoculation in mice, a single local injection of 74 MBq/kg of AC causes complete inhibition of tumor growth. Systemic injections of 111, 222 and 333 MBq/kg of alpha-conjugate caused significant tumor growth delay in a dose dependent manner after 16 weeks, compared with the non-specific control at 333 MBq/kg. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the MTS and TUNEL assays. The C595 and PAI2-alpha conjugates are indicated for the treatment of micro

  7. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N0 patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease

  8. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantril, S.T. (Children' s Hospital of San Francisco, CA); Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.

  9. Targeting the insulin-like growth factor pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mónica; Enguita-Germán; Puri; Fortes

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Only 30%-40% of the patients with HCC are eligible for curative treatments, which include surgical resection as the first option, liver transplantation and percutaneous ablation. Unfortunately, there is a high frequency of tumor recurrence after surgical resection and most HCC seem resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Sorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the only chemotherapeutic option for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients treated with Sorafenib have a significant increase in overall survival of about three months. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop alternative treatments. Due to its role in cell growth and development, the insulin-like growth factor system is commonly deregulated in many cancers. Indeed, the insulin-like growth factor(IGF) axis has recently emerged as a potential target for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. To this aim, several inhibitors of the pathway have been developed suchas monoclonal antibodies, small molecules, antisense oligonucleotides or small interfering RNAs. However recent studies suggest that, unlike most tumors, HCC development requires increased signaling through insulin growth factor Ⅱ rather than insulin growth factor Ⅰ. This may have great implications in the future treatment of HCC. This review summarizes the role of the IGF axis in liver carcinogenesis and the current status of the strategies designed to target the IGF-Ⅰ signaling pathway for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

  10. ShRNA-targeted COMMD7 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: COMMD7 is a newly identified gene overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis. We aim to examine the biological function of COMMD7 in HCC by shRNA silencing. METHODS: COMMD7 expressions were examined in human HCC cell lines HepG2, Huh7, Hep3B, HLE, HLF, SK-Hep-1 and PLC/PRF/5 cells. Recombinant pGenesil-COMMD7-shRNA was transfected into COMMD7-abundant HepG2 cells to silence COMMD7 expression. The effects of COMMD7 silencing on HepG2 cell proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo were evaluated. Flow cytometry profiling was used to detect the presence of apoptosis in COMMD7-silenced HepG2 cells and to differentiate cell cycle distribution. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assays to examine the activities of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB signaling pathways in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in COMMD7-silenced HepG2 cells. RESULTS: COMMD7 expression level was abundance in HepG2 and SK-Hep-1 cells. COMMD7 was aberrantly overexpressed in HepG2 cells, whilst pGenesil-COMMD7-shRNA exhibited a maximal inhibition rate of 75%. COMMD7 silencing significantly reduced HepG2 cell proliferation and colony formation. The knockdown of COMMD7 resulted in an increased apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S-phase. COMMD7 knockdown also exhibited an antineoplastic effect in vivo, which manifested as tumor xenograft growth retardation. COMMD7 silencing also suppressed the responsiveness of NF-κB signaling pathway to the stimulation with TNF-α in vitro. Moreover, the similar suppressive effects of COMMD7 silence on SK-Hep-1 cells were also observed. CONCLUSIONS: COMMD7 contributes to HCC progression by reducing cell apoptosis and overcoming cell cycle arrest. The proliferative and antiapoptotic effects of COMMD7 may be mediated by NF-κB signaling pathway.

  11. Phase 1 Study of Erlotinib Plus Radiation Therapy in Patients With Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, C. Hope; Deep, Nicholas L.; Nabell, Lisle; Carroll, William R.; Desmond, Renee; Clemons, Lisa; Spencer, Sharon; Magnuson, J. Scott [Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Rosenthal, Eben L., E-mail: oto@uab.edu [Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity profile of erlotinib therapy combined with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, prospective, phase 1 open-label study of erlotinib with radiation therapy to treat 15 patients with advanced cutaneous head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Toxicity data were summarized, and survival was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The majority of patients were male (87%) and presented with T4 disease (93%). The most common toxicity attributed to erlotinib was a grade 2-3 dermatologic reaction occurring in 100% of the patients, followed by mucositis (87%). Diarrhea occurred in 20% of the patients. The 2-year recurrence rate was 26.7%, and mean time to cancer recurrence was 10.5 months. Two-year overall survival was 65%, and disease-free survival was 60%. Conclusions: Erlotinib and radiation therapy had an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. The disease-free survival in this cohort was comparable to that in historical controls.

  12. Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, R.; Chaturvedi, H.K.; Sastry, D.V.L.N. (Cancer Inst., Madras (India))

    1994-11-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) has been used for many years in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis, both for the primary tumour and for lymph node involvement in the groin. The main advantage of RT is preservation of the penis, which eliminates the psychological distress associated with amputation. Further, the proponents of RT claim that it is curative and allows surgical salvage without affecting the ultimate disease-free survival (DFS). Cancer of the penis is a common disease in southern India with a crude incidence of 1.9 per 100 000 men (population-based cancer registry, Cancer Institute, Madras). At the centre an average of 70 patients with penile carcinoma are treated every year. This study reports our experience with the use of RT for patients with penile carcinoma. (author).

  13. Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the penis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy (RT) has been used for many years in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis, both for the primary tumour and for lymph node involvement in the groin. The main advantage of RT is preservation of the penis, which eliminates the psychological distress associated with amputation. Further, the proponents of RT claim that it is curative and allows surgical salvage without affecting the ultimate disease-free survival (DFS). Cancer of the penis is a common disease in southern India with a crude incidence of 1.9 per 100 000 men (population-based cancer registry, Cancer Institute, Madras). At the centre an average of 70 patients with penile carcinoma are treated every year. This study reports our experience with the use of RT for patients with penile carcinoma. (author)

  14. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke M. F. Alen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed.

  15. Epithelioid Sarcoma: Opportunities for Biology-driven Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNoujaim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelioid sarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of children and young adults for which the preferred treatment for localised disease is wide surgical resection. Medical management is to a great extent undefined, and therefore for patients with regional and distal metastases, the development of targeted therapies is greatly desired. In this review we will summarize clinically-relevant biomarkers (e.g., SMARCB1, CA125, dysadherin and others with respect to targeted therapeutic opportunities. We will also examine the role of EGFR, mTOR and polykinase inhibitors (e.g., sunitinib in the management of local and disseminated disease. Towards building a consortium of pharmaceutical, academic and non-profit collaborators, we will discuss the state of resources for investigating epithelioid sarcoma with respect to cell line resources, tissue banks, and registries so that a roadmap can be developed towards effective biology-driven therapies.

  16. Osteoblastic flare effect during targeted therapy in lung adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Incidence of osteoblastic bone flare effect during treatment of advanced lung cancer is rare. There were reported cases of this phenomenon after targeted therapy in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Case: The authors present a case of 55-year old patient with lung adenocarcinoma, where osteoblastic flare effect was observed after the first line treatment of chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. At progression of the disease genetic testing from biopsy of metastasis was performed and revealed EGFR mutation. Erlotinib was successfully introduced in the second line treatment, the second osteoblastic flare effect was observed. Conclusion: Knowledge of possible incidence of osteoblastic flare phenomenon during targeted therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer is important for correct evaluation of bone metastases development on scans and for proper decision not to stop this effective treatment prematurely. (author)

  17. Targeted gene therapy and in vivo bioluminescent imaging for monitoring postsurgical recurrence and metastasis in mouse models of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q; Yao, C L; Li, L; Xin, Z; Jing, Z K; Li, L X

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of combined targeted gene therapy on recurrence and metastasis after liver cancer resection in nude mice. Twenty BALB/C mice were randomly divided into control and treatment groups with 10 mice in each group and a male/female ratio of 1:1. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H was then used to prepare a carcinoma model. An optical in vivo imaging technique (OIIT) was used 10 days later to detect the distribution of tumor cells, followed by partial liver resection and gene therapy. In the treatment group, 100 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing 1 x 1012 rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene viral vectors was injected into liver sections and peritumoral posterior peritoneal tissues; in the control group, the same amount of PBS containing 1 x 1012 empty viral vectors was injected at the same sites. OIIT was then used to detect the in vivo tumor metastasis 21 days later. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H successfully infected 20 nude mice, and OIIT showed that the two groups exhibited metastasis after local tumor resection, but there were more tumor cells in the control group (P AFP/IL-24 gene therapy can inhibit recurrence after liver cancer resection. PMID:27525931

  18. Targeted therapies for diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olden KW

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Kevin W OldenDepartment of Medicine, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS causes gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and bowel pattern abnormalities, which compromise patients' daily functioning. Common therapies address one or two IBS symptoms, while others offer wider symptom control, presumably by targeting pathophysiologic mechanisms of IBS. The aim of this targeted literature review was to capture clinical trial reports of agents receiving the highest recommendation (Grade 1 for treatment of IBS from the 2009 American College of Gastroenterology IBS Task Force, with an emphasis on diarrhea-predominant IBS. Literature searches in PubMed captured articles detailing randomized placebo-controlled trials in IBS/diarrhea-predominant IBS for agents receiving Grade I (strong 2009 American College of Gastroenterology IBS Task Force recommendations: tricyclic antidepressants, nonabsorbable antibiotics, and the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist alosetron. Studies specific for constipation-predominant IBS were excluded. Tricyclic antidepressants appear to improve global IBS symptoms but have variable effects on abdominal pain and uncertain tolerability; effects on stool consistency, frequency, and urgency were not adequately assessed. Nonabsorbable antibiotics show positive effects on global symptoms, abdominal pain, bloating, and stool consistency but may be most efficacious in patients with altered intestinal microbiota. Alosetron improves global symptoms and abdominal pain and normalizes bowel irregularities, including stool frequency, consistency, and fecal urgency. Both the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin and the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist alosetron improve quality of life. Targeted therapies provide more complete relief of IBS symptoms than conventional agents. Familiarization with the quantity and quality of evidence of effectiveness can facilitate more individualized

  19. Targeting p53 and its domains for cancer gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Julia Matissek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated proteins in human cancer and has been extensively targeted for cancer therapy. This resulted in wild type p53 gene therapeutic approval for the treatment of head and neck cancer in China. p53 mainly functions as a transcription factor and stimulates a variety of genes involved in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway by binding to p53 responsive elements as a t...

  20. Delivery of Retinoid-Based Therapies To Target Tissues†

    OpenAIRE

    Moise, Alexander R.; Noy, Noa; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Blaner, William S.

    2007-01-01

    Through its various metabolites, vitamin A controls essential physiological functions. Both naturally occurring metabolites and novel retinoid analogues have shown effectiveness in many clinical settings that include skin diseases and cancer, and in animal models of human conditions affecting vision. In this review, we analyze several potential retinoid-based therapies from the point of view of drug metabolism and transport to target tissues. We focus on the endogenous factors that affect the...

  1. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ching-Chiu; Shen, Zan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie CM

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971, scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of anti-angiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized an...

  2. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  3. Influence of percutaneous local therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma on gastric function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Kobayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the influence of percutaneous local therapy on gastric myoelectrical activity in patients with hepatocellular carcinomas. METHODS: Forty-four patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC [27 males and 17 females, ranging in age from 49 to 81 years old (69.7 ± 8.01 years] who were admitted for percutaneous local therapy were enrolled in this study. We examined clinical abdominal symptoms using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS before and 3 d after percutaneous local therapy. We also measured cutaneous fasting and postprandial electrogastrography (EGG recordings before and 3 d after percutaneous local therapy. RESULTS: We found that the percentage of normogastria in the fasting period was lower in the Child B group than in the Child A group (66.8% ± 8.6% vs 84.0% ± 3.8%. After percutaneous local therapy for HCC, the percentages of normogastria in the fasting period were significantly decreased (81.6% ± 3.5% vs 75.2% ± 4.5%. None of the postprandial EGG parameters changed significantly after percutaneous local therapy for HCC. Percutaneous local therapy for HCC reduced the power ratio (PR. In particular, the PR of tachygastria was significantly decreased after therapy (P < 0.01. However, no significant differences were found in the postprandial EGG parameters. Likewise, no significant differences were found in the calculated GSRS scores obtained from the questionnaire before and after therapy. CONCLUSION: Gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias were induced by percutaneous local therapy in HCC patients, even though the GSRS scores obtained from the questionnaire did not change significantly.

  4. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Lei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC.

  5. Feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy and high intensity photon beams for hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report technical features, early outcome and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments with volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty patients (22 lesions) were prospectively enrolled in a feasibility study. Dose prescription was 50Gy in 10 fractions. Seven patients (35%) were classified as AJCC stage I-II while 13 (65%) were stages III-IV. Eighteen patients (90%) were Child-Pugh stage A, the remaining were stage B. All patients were treated with RapidArc technique with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of 10MV from a TrueBeam linear accelerator. Technical, dosimetric and early clinical assessment was performed to characterize treatment and its potential outcome. Median age was 68 years, median initial tumor volume was 124 cm3 (range: 6–848). Median follow-up time was 7.4 months (range: 3–13). All patients completed treatment without interruption. Mean actuarial overall survival was of 9.6 ± 0.9 months (95%C.L. 7.8-11.4), median survival was not reached; complete response was observed in 8/22 (36.4%) lesions; partial response in 7/22 (31.8%), stable disease in 6/22 (27.3%), 1/22 (4.4%) showed progression. Toxicity was mild with only 1 case of grade 3 RILD and all other types were not greater than grade 2. Concerning dosimetric data, Paddick conformity index was 0.98 ± 0.02; gradient index was 3.82 ± 0.93; V95% to the clinical target volume was 93.6 ± 7.7%. Mean dose to kidneys resulted lower than 3.0Gy; mean dose to stomach 4.5 ± 3.0Gy; D1cm3 to spinal cord was 8.2 ± 4.5Gy; D1% to the esophagus was 10.2 ± 9.7Gy. Average beam on time resulted 0.7 ± 0.2 minutes (range: 0.4-1.4) with the delivery of an average of 4.4 partial arcs (range: 3–6) of those 86% non-coplanar. Clinical results could suggest to introduce VMAT-RapidArc as an appropriate SBRT technique for patients with HCC in view of a prospective dose escalation trial

  6. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  7. New perspectives on targeted therapy in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coward JIG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jermaine IG Coward,1–3 Kathryn Middleton,1 Felicity Murphy1 1Mater Health Services, Raymond Terrace, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Inflammtion and Cancer Therapeutics Group, Mater Research, University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Abstract: Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. During the last 15 years, there has been only marginal improvement in 5 year overall survival. These daunting statistics are compounded by the fact that despite all subtypes exhibiting striking heterogeneity, their systemic management remains identical. Although changes to the scheduling and administration of chemotherapy have improved outcomes to a degree, a therapeutic ceiling is being reached with this approach, resulting in a number of trials investigating the efficacy of targeted therapies alongside standard treatment algorithms. Furthermore, there is an urge to develop subtype-specific studies in an attempt to improve outcomes, which currently remain poor. This review summarizes the key studies with antiangiogenic agents, poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose inhibitors, and epidermal growth factor receptor/human epidermal growth factor receptor family targeting, in addition to folate receptor antagonists and insulin growth factor receptor inhibitors. The efficacy of treatment paradigms used in non-ovarian malignancies for type I tumors is also highlighted, in addition to recent advances in appropriate patient stratification for targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer. Keywords: antiangiogenic therapy, high-grade serous, low grade ovarian cancer, PARP inhibition, cancer-related inflammation

  8. [Development of molecular targeted therapies in lung cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    Human cancers usually possess cumulative genetic aberrations. However, recent studies have revealed that the proliferation and survival of specific subsets of lung cancer depend on a few somatic mutation(s), so-called driver mutations. Representative driver mutations include the EGFR mutation and ALK translocation identified in about 40% and 3% of lung adenocarcinomas in Japan, respectively. These tumors are extremely sensitive to the respective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This sensitivity has encouraged researchers and clinicians to explore novel driver mutations in lung cancers as future molecular targets. Driver mutations reported so far include the HER2 mutation, BRAF mutation, ROS1 translocation, RET translocation, and NTRK translocation in lung adenocarcinomas, and FGFR1 amplification, DDR2 mutation, and FGFR3 translocation in lung squamous cell carcinomas. However, despite initial dramatic responses, the acquisition of resistance to molecular targeted drugs is almost inevitable. Overcoming resistance to molecular targeted drugs, the key drugs at this time, is an urgent issue to improve the outcomes of lung cancer patients. PMID:24946519

  9. Carcinoma of the maxillary antrum: surgery or radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between the years 1968 and 1978, 57 patients with malignant tumors of the para-nasal sinuses were seen at the Medical College of Virginia. Thirty-nine patients presenting with squamous cell epitheliomas of the maxillary antrum, free of lymph node or distant metastases, and primarily treated at the Medical College of Virginia, form the basis of this study. Nineteen patients underwent radical craniofacial surgery with orbital exenteration and reconstruction. Twenty patients underwent Caldwell-Luc procedure followed by radical radiation therapy. The crude 3 year disease-free survivals are 50% and 37% in the radiation therapy and the surgery group, respectively. Local control, survival, and patterns of failure are discussed

  10. Systemic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): from bench to bedside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the third most common cause of cancer mortality. For patients with early resectable disease, surgical resection or transplantation is considered a potentially curative modality for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); on the other hand, for patients with unresectable or metastatic disease, treatment is essentially palliative and prior to the approval of sorafenib, there was no globally approved systemic treatment for patients presenting with unresectable or metastatic HCC. Sorafenib is the only systemic treatment to demonstrate a statistically significant but modest overall survival benefit in a large phase III trial. Thus, novel systemic approaches represent a high unmet medical need in advanced HCC. In this review article, we will try to take a journey through the history of systemic therapeutic options for HCC passing through the current standard options and exploring the potential new systemic options for this disease.

  11. Thyroid hormone therapy following the thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medication with thyroid hormones following total thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma is based on the following principles: 1. The patient is informed about the lifelong necessity of taking a thyroid hormones daily before breakfast. This hormone must be given orally and its bioligical effect is identical with that of the tyhroid hormone secreted by the healthy thyroid gland. 2. The daily dosage of thyroid hormones may be assessed on the basis of the following parameters: a) the patient's clinical euthyroidism, b) suppression of thyrotropic activity, c) unrestricted tolerance of the preparation. 3. The in vitro parameters associated with optimal medication should be within the following ranges: Thyroxine value (TT4 or FT4): above the normal range, triiodothyronine value (TT3 or FT3): within the upper normal range and thyrotropin value (TSH 'ultrasensitive' or TRH-test): suppressed. (orig.)

  12. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Ying

    Full Text Available Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients.Tissue microarray (TMA was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner.Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44% CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4-ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1. One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing.The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy.

  13. Abdominopelvic radiation therapy in the treatment of ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From May 1981 through December 1990, 167 patients with ovarian carcinoma were treated with whole abdominal irradiation. All patients of the first group (n = 62) presented with no or minimal (< 2 cm) residual disease at the time of irradiation. They received whole abdominal irradiation after initial surgery. Residual disease was left after initial surgery for patients of the second group (n = 105). They underwent a cisplatin polychemotherapy regimen followed by second-look laparotomy and abdominopelvic irradiation. The irradiation was performed by a four orthogonal field's technique. Thirty grays were given with a 25 MV photon beam. Boosts were performed in 50 cases (mean dose of 15 Gy): 91% have completed irradiation at the prescribed dose level: 5% had severe intestinal toxicity requiring surgery. The median follow-up was 68 months. The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 50%, 67% group 1, 40% group 2. Five-year actuarial survival was 84% for T1, 61.5% for T2, 38% for T3. Five-year survival depended on tumor rest after initial surgery (residual disease 36.5%, no residual disease 70%). For patients in group 2, the size of residual disease at second-look laparotomy was a significant prognostic factor: five-year actuarial survival 76% with negative second-look, microscopic residual disease (positive cytology or random biopsies) 60% microscopic disease after cytoreductive surgery at second-look 22%, macroscopic residual disease (small nodules) 10%. These results indicate that abdominopelvic irradiation is valuable in the treatment of ovarian carcinoma when there is no macroscopic residual disease after initial surgery or second-look laparotomy. To assess the place of radiotherapy, randomized trials comparing whole abdominal irradiation with chemotherapy, watch policy for staged patients is warranted. 42 Refs

  14. A Patient with Refractory Psoriasis Who Developed Sebaceous Carcinoma on the Neck during Cyclosporine Therapy and Showed Rapid Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Okuhira, Hisako; Mikita, Naoya; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient who developed sebaceous carcinoma on the neck during therapy with immunosuppressive agents (cyclosporine, corticosteroid, methotrexate) for refractory psoriasis vulgaris, which showed rapid enlargement, leading to a fatal outcome. Multiple-organ metastases were detected. Weekly carboplatin + paclitaxel therapy resulted in the disappearance of tumor cells, but the patient died of febrile neutropenia. The development of sebaceous carcinoma is rare among psoriasis patients receiving immunosuppressive agents including cyclosporine. PMID:27462222

  15. Analysis of late toxicity in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To observe the late toxicities in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who achieved long-term survival after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). 208 untreated NPC patients who received IMRT and survived more than five years with locoregional disease control and no metastasis were evaluated in this study. The prescription dose to the gross target volume of nasopharynx (GTVnx), positive neck lymph nodes (GTVnd), clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) and 2 (CTV2) was 68Gy/30f, 60-66Gy/30f, 60 Gy/30f and 54Gy/30f, respectively. The nasopharynx and upper neck targets were irradiated using IMRT, and the lower neck and supraclavicular fossae targets were irradiated using the half-beam technique with conventional irradiation. The late toxicities were evaluated according to the LENT/SOMA criteria of 1995. The median follow-up time was 78 months (60–96 months). The occurrence rates of cervical subcutaneous fibrosis, hearing loss, skin dystrophy, xerostomia, trismus, temporal lobe injury, cranial nerve damage, cataract, and brain stem injury induced by radiotherapy were 89.9%, 67.8%, 47.6%, 40.9%, 7.21%, 4.33%, 2.88%, 1.44%, and 0.48%, respectively. No spinal cord injury and mandible damage were found. Grade 3–4 late injuries were observed as follows: 1 (0.48%) skin dystrophy, 4 (1.92%) cervical subcutaneous fibrosis, 2 (0.96%) hearing loss, 2 (0.96%) cranial nerve palsy, and 1 (0.48%) temporal lobe necrosis. No grade 3–4 late injuries occurred in parotid, temporomandibular joints and eyes. Xerostomia decreased gradually over time and then showed only slight changes after 4 years. The change in the incisor distance stabilised by 1 year after RT, however, the incidence of hearing loss, skin dystrophy, subcutaneous fibrosis and nervous system injuries increased over time after RT. The late injuries in most NPC patients who had long-term survivals after IMRT are alleviated. Within the 5 years of follow-up, we found xerostomia decreased gradually; The change in the

  16. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  17. RADIATION THERAPY OF A PRESUMPTIVE URETHRAL TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA IN AN EASTERN GRAY SQUIRREL (SCIURUS CAROLINENSIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Sanford, Sara E; St-Vincent, Rachel; Hiss, Anne

    2015-12-01

    An adult female Eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), with a previous history of primary renal transitional cell carcinoma treated by nephrectomy, was diagnosed with a metastatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) utilizing the veterinary bladder tumor antigen test in combination with other noninvasive diagnostic tests. The squirrel was treated with piroxicam and external beam radiation therapy given in 18 treatments over 30 days to achieve a total of 54 gray. Mild to moderate side effects from the pelvic irradiation were self-limiting and easily managed. Resolution of clinical signs was achieved for approximately 6 mo until recurrence of metastasis. This report represents the first published account of both TCC and external beam radiation therapy in an Eastern gray squirrel. PMID:26667551

  18. Bispecific antibody complex pre-targeting and targeted delivery of polymer drug conjugates for imaging and therapy in dual human mammary cancer xenografts. Targeted polymer drug conjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaw, Ban-An; Gada, Keyur S.; Patil, Vishwesh; Panwar, Rajiv; Mandapati, Savitri [Northeastern University, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Bouve College of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Boston, MA (United States); Hatefi, Arash [Rutgers University, Department of Pharmaceutics, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Majewski, Stan [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Morgantown, WV (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Doxorubicin, a frontline chemotherapeutic agent, limited by its cardiotoxicity and other tissue toxicities, was conjugated to N-terminal DTPA-modified polyglutamic acid (D-Dox-PGA) to produce polymer pro-drug conjugates. D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m labeled DTPA-succinyl-polylysine polymers (DSPL) were targeted to HER2-positive human mammary carcinoma (BT-474) in a double xenografted SCID mouse model also hosting HER2-negative human mammary carcinoma (BT-20). After pretargeting with bispecific anti-HER2-affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab complexes (BAAC), anti-DTPA-Fab or only phosphate buffered saline, D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m DSPL were administered. Positive therapeutic control mice were injected with Dox alone at maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Only BT-474 lesions were visualized by gamma imaging with Tc-99 m-DSPL; BT-20 lesions were not. Therapeutic efficacy was equivalent in mice pretargeted with BAAC/targeted with D-Dox-PGA to mice treated only with doxorubicin. There was no total body weight (TBW) loss at three times the doxorubicin equivalent MTD with D-Dox-PGA, whereas mice treated with doxorubicin lost 10 % of TBW at 2 weeks and 16 % after the second MTD injection leading to death of all mice. Our cancer imaging and pretargeted therapeutic approaches are highly target specific, delivering very high specific activity reagents that may result in the development of a novel theranostic application. HER/2 neu specific affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab bispecific antibody pretargeting of HER2 positive human mammary xenografts enabled exquisite targeting of polymers loaded with radioisotopes for molecular imaging and doxorubicin for effective therapy without the associating non-tumor normal tissue toxicities. (orig.)

  19. Bispecific antibody complex pre-targeting and targeted delivery of polymer drug conjugates for imaging and therapy in dual human mammary cancer xenografts. Targeted polymer drug conjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxorubicin, a frontline chemotherapeutic agent, limited by its cardiotoxicity and other tissue toxicities, was conjugated to N-terminal DTPA-modified polyglutamic acid (D-Dox-PGA) to produce polymer pro-drug conjugates. D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m labeled DTPA-succinyl-polylysine polymers (DSPL) were targeted to HER2-positive human mammary carcinoma (BT-474) in a double xenografted SCID mouse model also hosting HER2-negative human mammary carcinoma (BT-20). After pretargeting with bispecific anti-HER2-affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab complexes (BAAC), anti-DTPA-Fab or only phosphate buffered saline, D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m DSPL were administered. Positive therapeutic control mice were injected with Dox alone at maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Only BT-474 lesions were visualized by gamma imaging with Tc-99 m-DSPL; BT-20 lesions were not. Therapeutic efficacy was equivalent in mice pretargeted with BAAC/targeted with D-Dox-PGA to mice treated only with doxorubicin. There was no total body weight (TBW) loss at three times the doxorubicin equivalent MTD with D-Dox-PGA, whereas mice treated with doxorubicin lost 10 % of TBW at 2 weeks and 16 % after the second MTD injection leading to death of all mice. Our cancer imaging and pretargeted therapeutic approaches are highly target specific, delivering very high specific activity reagents that may result in the development of a novel theranostic application. HER/2 neu specific affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab bispecific antibody pretargeting of HER2 positive human mammary xenografts enabled exquisite targeting of polymers loaded with radioisotopes for molecular imaging and doxorubicin for effective therapy without the associating non-tumor normal tissue toxicities. (orig.)

  20. Validation of Bmi1 as a Therapeutic Target of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibo Qi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bmi1 is a member of the polycomb group family of proteins, and it drives the carcinogenesis of various cancers and governs the self-renewal of multiple types of stem cells. Our previous studies have revealed that Bmi1 acts as an oncogene in hepatic carcinogenesis in an INK4a/ARF locus independent manner. However, whether Bmi1 can be used as a potential target for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment has not been fully confirmed yet. Here, we show that perturbation of Bmi1 expression by using short hairpin RNA can inhibit the tumorigenicity and tumor growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, Bmi1 knockdown can block the tumor growth, both in the initiating stages and the fast growing stages. Cellular biology analysis revealed that Bmi1 knockdown induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our findings verify Bmi1 as a qualified treatment target for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and support Bmi1 targeting treatment with chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Stunning effects in radioiodine therapy of thyroid carcinoma. Existence, clinical effects and ways out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radioiodine therapy for malignant thyroid disease, the pre-therapeutically administered iodine-131-dose can reduce the potential of thyroid or thyroid carcinoma cells to absorb the following therapeutic iodine-131-dose, possibly leading to its failure. This so called stunning effect is controversially discussed in the scientific community. Here we summarize and evaluate publications with regard to the existence and the effects of stunning as well as possible countermeasures. (orig.)

  2. Complete remission of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma by radiofrequency ablation after sorafenib therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Gil; Park, Soo Young; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib, a potent multikinase inhibitor, lead to a significant improvement in progression free survival and overall survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Though sorafenib has proven its efficacy in advanced stage HCC, there are limited reports on the role of sorafenib allowing for curative treatment by down-staging. We herein report a case of advanced HCC with vascular invasion, which showed treatment response by sorafenib therapy as to allow for radiofrequency ...

  3. Novel Topical Photodynamic Therapy of Prostate Carcinoma Using Hydroxy-aluminum Phthalocyanine Entrapped in Liposomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sutoris, K.; Rakušan, J.; Karásková, M.; Mattová, J.; Beneš, J.; Nekvasil, Miloš; Ježek, Petr; Zadinová, M.; Poučková, P.; Větvička, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2013), s. 1563-1568. ISSN 0250-7005 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) 2A-1TP1/026; GA MŠk(CZ) OE09026; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01010781 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : PC prostate carcinomas * LNCaP * liposomes * hydroxy- aluminum phthalocyanine * photodynamic therapy Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 1.872, year: 2013

  4. Pathologic Assessment of Rectal Carcinoma after Neoadjuvant Radio(chemo)therapy: Prognostic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Monirath Hav; Louis Libbrecht; Liesbeth Ferdinande; Karen Geboes; Piet Pattyn; Cuvelier, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radio(chemo)therapy is increasingly used in rectal cancer and induces a number of morphologic changes that affect prognostication after curative surgery, thereby creating new challenges for surgical pathologists, particularly in evaluating morphologic changes and tumour response to preoperative treatment. Surgical pathologists play an important role in determining the many facets of rectal carcinoma patient care after neoadjuvant treatment. These range from proper handling of macr...

  5. Noninvasive and Curative Radiation Therapy for Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Eyelid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid is a rare malignancy. Surgical excision remains the standard and most reliable curative treatment. However, surgery is sometimes not possible because many patients are elderly, and it frequently causes functional and cosmetic impairment of the eyelid. We therefore carried out a study to determine the role of radiation therapy in relation to sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid underwent radiation therapy with curative intent. There were 6 men and 7 women, and their ages at irradiation ranged from 60 to 85 years (median, 78 years). Only 1 patient had cervical lymph node metastasis, and none of the patients had distant metastasis. A total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy (median, 60 Gy) was delivered to tumor sites in 22 to 37 fractions. Results: All irradiated tumors were controlled at a median follow-up period of 55 months. Only 1 patient had recurrence of cervical lymph node metastasis outside the radiation field, at 22 months after irradiation. The 5-year local progression–free and disease-free rates were 100% and 89%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 89%, respectively. Although acute and transient therapy-related reactions of Grade 2 or less were observed, there were no severe toxicities of Grade 3 or greater. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid. It appears to contribute to prolonged survival as a result of good tumor control, and it also facilitates functional and cosmetic preservation of the eyelid.

  6. Noninvasive and Curative Radiation Therapy for Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Eyelid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Masaharu, E-mail: mhata@syd.odn.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Koike, Izumi; Omura, Motoko [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Maegawa, Jiro [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid is a rare malignancy. Surgical excision remains the standard and most reliable curative treatment. However, surgery is sometimes not possible because many patients are elderly, and it frequently causes functional and cosmetic impairment of the eyelid. We therefore carried out a study to determine the role of radiation therapy in relation to sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid underwent radiation therapy with curative intent. There were 6 men and 7 women, and their ages at irradiation ranged from 60 to 85 years (median, 78 years). Only 1 patient had cervical lymph node metastasis, and none of the patients had distant metastasis. A total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy (median, 60 Gy) was delivered to tumor sites in 22 to 37 fractions. Results: All irradiated tumors were controlled at a median follow-up period of 55 months. Only 1 patient had recurrence of cervical lymph node metastasis outside the radiation field, at 22 months after irradiation. The 5-year local progression-free and disease-free rates were 100% and 89%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 89%, respectively. Although acute and transient therapy-related reactions of Grade 2 or less were observed, there were no severe toxicities of Grade 3 or greater. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid. It appears to contribute to prolonged survival as a result of good tumor control, and it also facilitates functional and cosmetic preservation of the eyelid.

  7. Results of radiation therapy in carcinomas of the floor of the mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is chiefly based on the results achieved with radiation therapy alone in a group of patients suffering from floor-of-the-mouth carcinomas which, at an advanced stage (T3 and T4), are suggestive of a particularly unfavourable patient outcome in no less than 85% of the cases. In addition to results of treatment recorded at this clinic, a general survey is given on the various regimens currently used for radiotherapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  8. Minimally invasive image-guided therapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma: What is the evidence today?

    OpenAIRE

    Seinstra, Beatrijs A.; van Delden, Otto M; van Erpecum, Karel J; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; van den Bosch, Maurice A.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignant tumor of the liver that accounts for an important health problem worldwide. Only 10–15% of HCC patients are suitable candidates for hepatic resection and liver transplantation due to the advanced stage of the disease at time of diagnosis and shortage of donors. Therefore, several minimally invasive image-guided therapies for locoregional treatment have been developed. Tumor ablative techniques are either based on thermal tumor destruction,...

  9. Impact of immunosuppressant therapy on early recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Kim, Yul Hee; Yi, Nam-Joon; Kim, Hyang Sook; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Byung Koo; Kim, Hyeyoung; Choi, Young Rok; Hong, Geun; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The most commonly used immunosuppressant therapy after liver transplantation (LT) is a combination of tacrolimus and steroid. Basiliximab induction has recently been introduced; however, the most appropriate immunosuppression for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients after LT is still debated. Methods Ninety-three LT recipients with HCC who took tacrolimus and steroids as major immunosuppressants were included. Induction with basiliximab was implemented in 43 patients (46.2%...

  10. Progress in clinical oncolytic virus-based therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jebar, AH; Errington-Mais, F; Vile, RG; Selby, PJ; Melcher, AA; S. Griffin(Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) carries a dismal prognosis, with advanced disease being resistant to both radiotherapy and conventional cytotoxic drugs, whilst anti-angiogenic drugs are marginally efficacious. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) offer the promise of selective cancer therapy through direct and immune-mediated mechanisms. The premise of OVs lies in their preferential genomic replication, protein expression and productive infection of malignant cells. Numerous OVs are being tested in preclin...

  11. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (SDS-PAGE).

  12. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  13. Change of tumor target volume during waiting time for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the influence of change in tumor target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) while waiting for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: From March 2005 to December 2005, 31 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma received IMRT as the initial treatment at the Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academic of Medical Sciences. The original simulation CT scan was acquired before IMRT planning. A second CT scan was acquired before the start of radiotherapy. Wait- ing time was defined as the duration between CT simulation and start of radiotherapy. CT-CT fusion was used to minimize the error of delineation between the first tumor target volume (GTV) and the second tumor target volume (sGTV). Tumor target volume was calculated by treatment planning system. T test was carried out to analyse the difference between GTV and sGTV. Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression was used to analyse the influence factor of the change betweent GTV and sGTV. Results: Median waiting time was 18 days (range, 9-27 days). There were significant differences between GTV and sGTV of both primary tumor (P=0.009) and metastatic lymphoma (P=0.005 ). Both Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression showed that the change of primary tumor target volume had significant correlation with the first tumor target volume but had no significant correlation with the waiting time, sex, age, T stage and N stage (1992 Chinese Fuzhou Staging Classification). Conclusions: Within the range of the waiting time ob- served in our study, large volume primary tumor would have had a significant increase in volume, but whether the therapeutic effect would be influenced or not would need to be proved by study of large number of cases. Patients with large volume tumor should be considered to reduce the influence of waiting time by enlarging gross target volume and clinical targe volume and by neoadjuveant chemotherapy. For avoiding the unnecessary high-dose to normal

  14. The current status and evaluation of comprehensive therapy of pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of pancreatic carcinoma is increasing obviously in recent years with a serious threat to the people's life, and yet there is not a single treatment for obtaining satisfactory prognosis. At present, the radical resection is the primary method for resectable pancreatic carcinoma, together with radiotherapy can improve the surgical resection rate and reduce the dissemination of tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy can alleviate the pain and increase the survival rate, but the role of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is still in controversial. There is a lot of advantages for regional chemotherapy theoretically, but lack of evidence in practice. Physical therapy and biological therapy in the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma have been recognized extensively. It is possible to change fundamentally the current status of treatment and to improve the long-term survival rates with the quality of life until establishing a comprehensive treatment system mainly depended on surgical resection with combination of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, physical and biological treatment. The interventional therapy has been significantly developed as an important palliative treatment during recent years. (authors)

  15. Adenovirus-p53 gene therapy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: One major challenge to human cancer gene therapy, is efficient delivery of the gene-vector complex. Methods and results: Using two distinct human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) models, we demonstrate that intra-tumoural (IT) administration of adenoviral-mediated wild-type p53 gene therapy (Ad-p53) caused no greater inhibition of tumour growth as compared to ionizing radiation (XRT) alone. Detailed histologic examination of tumour sections demonstrated that <15% of tumour cells were transduced by IT adv-β-gal. Conclusions: This report underscores the importance of developing gene transfer vectors, which can provide therapeutic levels of transgene expression efficiently in solid tumours

  16. Investigation of the results of therapy of anaplastic thyroid gland carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the treatment of 28 patients with an anaplastic thyroid gland carcinoma are investigated, to see whether an optimal therapy is indicated. The execution of an operation before radiotherapy does not appear to improve the prognosis (statistically this conclusion is not wholly justified). The presence of metastases at the beginning of the therapy gave rise to a worse prognosis than the absence of metastases. The combination treatment of chemotherapy and either surgery or radiotherapy was only applied to two patients so no conclusions can be made about its benefit. (C.F.)

  17. siRNA targeting RBP2 inhibits expression, proliferation, tumorigenicity and invasion in thyroid carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    KONG, LING-LING; MAN, DONG-MEI; Wang, Tian; ZHANG, GUO-AN; Cui, Wen

    2015-01-01

    In order to estimate the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2) on the proliferation, expression, invasion, migration and tumorigenicity abilities of papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells, siRNA targeting RBP2 (RBP2-siRNA) and negative control siRNA were transfected into K1 cells. The mRNA levels of RBP2 in the transfected cells were estimated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and the protein levels of...

  18. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in triple negative feline mammary carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Maniscalco, Lorella; Millán, Yolanda; Iussich, Selina; Denina, Mauro; Sánchez-Céspedes, Raquel; Gattino, Francesca; Biolatti, Bartolomeo; Sasaki, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; De Maria, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Background Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in humans is defined by the absence of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 overexpression. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is overexpressed in TNBC and it represents a potential target for the treatment of this aggressive tumour. Feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is considered to be a model for hormone-independent human breast cancer. This study investigated mTOR and p-mTOR expression in FMC in relation to triple negat...

  19. Targeted alpha anticancer therapies: update and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen BJ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Barry J Allen,1,2 Chen-Yu Huang,3 Raymond A Clarke2 1Faculty of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Faculty of Medicine, Ingham Institute, University of Western Sydney, Liverpool, NSW, Australia; 3Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Targeted alpha therapy (TAT is an emerging option for local and systemic cancer treatment. Preclinical research and clinical trials show that alpha-emitting radionuclides can kill targeted cancer cells while sparing normal cells, thus reducing toxicity. 223RaCl2 (Xofigo® is the first alpha emitting radioisotope to gain registration in the US for palliative therapy of prostate cancer bone metastases by indirect physiological targeting. The alpha emitting radioisotopes 211At, 213Bi, 225Ac and 227Th are being used to label targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies for specific cancer therapy indications. In this review, safety and tolerance aspects are considered with respect to microdosimetry, specific energy, Monte Carlo model calculations, biodosimetry, equivalent dose and mutagenesis. The clinical efficacy of TAT for solid tumors may also be enhanced by its capacity for tumor anti-vascular (TAVAT effects. This review emphasizes key aspects of TAT research with respect to the PAI2-uPAR complex and the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, C595 and J591. Clinical trial outcomes are reviewed for neuroendocrine tumors, leukemia, glioma, melanoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and prostate bone metastases. Recommendations and future directions are proposed.Keywords: biodosimetry, microdosimetry, mutagenesis, PAI2, bevacizumab, C595, J591, tumors, cancer, metastases

  20. Molecular Approach to Targeted Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbet, Gajanan V

    2016-01-01

    The development and evolution of targeted therapy to any disease require the identification of targets amenable to treatment of patients. Here the pathogenetic signalling systems involved in multiple sclerosis are scrutinised to locate nodes of deregulation and dysfunction in order to devise strategies of drug development for targeted intervention. Oliogoclonal bands (OCB) are isoelectric focusing profiles of immunoglobulins synthesised in the central nervous system. OCBs enable the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis with high sensitivity and specificity and are related to the course of the disease and progression. The OCB patterns can be linked with the expression of angiogenic molecular species. Angiogenic signalling which has also been implicated in demyelination provides the option of using angiogenesis inhibitors in disease control. The PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt axis has emerged with a key role in myelination with its demonstrable links with mTOR mediated transcription of downstream target genes. Inflammatory signals and innate and acquired immunity from the activation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) responsive genes are considered. NF-κB signalling could be implicated in myelination. The transcription factor STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) and the EBV (Epstein- Barr virus) transcription factor BZLF1 contributing significantly to the disease process are a major environmental factor linked to MS. EBV can activate TGF (transforming growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) signalling. EBV microRNAs are reviewed as signalling mediators of pathogenesis. Stem cell transplantation therapy has lately gained much credence, so the current status of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell therapy is reviewed with emphasis on the differential expression immune-related genes and operation of signalling systems. PMID:26560895

  1. Gene Therapy In Squamous Cell Carcinoma – A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Susan Varghese

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer remains one of the leading causes of death world wide. Various means to destroy tumor cells preferentially have been developed; gene therapy is one among them with less treatment morbidity. Gene therapy involves the transfer of therapeutic or working copy of genes into a specific cell of an individual in order to repair a faulty copy of gene. The alteration can be accomplished by repairing or replacing the damaged DNA by various strategies and vectors. To date genetically altered viruses are commonly used as gene delivery vehicle (vector which has an advantage of evolutionary selection of host-virus relation. Non viral vectors which include the physical transfection of genes can be accomplished by electrophoration, microinjection, or use of ballistic particles and chemical transfection by forming liposomes.

  2. First-line therapy for treatment-naive patients with advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a systematic review of published randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takyar, Shweta; Diaz, Jose; Sehgal, Manu; Sapunar, Francisco; Pandha, Hardev

    2016-06-01

    In the recent years, a number of targeted therapies have been approved for first-line treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. A systematic review was conducted to assess the clinical efficacy, safety and effect of all first-line treatments evaluated to date on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A systematic search of Embase, Cochrane and MEDLINE databases was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (1980-2015) evaluating any targeted therapy/immunotherapy against placebo or any other targeted intervention/immunotherapy in treatment-naive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Conference proceedings from major cancer congresses (2007-2015) were handsearched. Sixteen randomized controlled trials were identified, mostly phase III. Overall, targeted therapies were associated with either improved [sunitinib, bevacizumab+interferon α (IFNα) and temsirolimus] or comparable (sorafenib) progression-free survival (PFS) versus IFNα monotherapy. Sunitinib demonstrated comparable PFS and overall survival to pazopanib, comparable PFS to sorafenib and shorter PFS compared with bevacizumab+IFNα (although no conclusions were made with regard to superiority/inferiority). Compared with sorafenib, tivozanib demonstrated a significantly longer PFS, and both tivozanib and axitinib demonstrated higher response rates. Nintedanib demonstrated comparable PFS and overall survival to sunitinib in a phase II trial. Temsirolimus, sunitinib and sorafenib treatment led to better HRQoL versus IFNα; pazopanib was associated with better HRQoL versus sunitinib. No direct meta-analyses or indirect treatment comparison analysis were undertaken because of noncomparability of the trials. In general, targeted therapies demonstrated favourable clinical efficacy and improved HRQoL compared with IFNα monotherapy. The newer therapies, tivozanib and axitinib (but not nintedanib), appeared to exhibit greater clinical benefit (response rate) than older tyrosine

  3. [Hormonal therapy in differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, G; Davì, M V; Petroziello, A; Sussi, P L

    1994-01-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH) suppression therapy using thyroid hormone plays an important role in the management of patients thyroidectomized for differentiated thyroid cancer. The rationale for TSH suppression is that differentiated thyroid cancer cells have TSH receptors and show increased adenylate cyclase activity following TSH exposure. L-thyroxine is used for long-term therapy. L-triiodothyronine is preferred when suppressive therapy must be discontinued for radioiodine scan, since its shorter half-life allows more rapid increases of TSH levels. The assessment of TSH suppression is still uncertain. The development of second and third TSH assay generations with progressive improvement in sensitivity has made the TRH test unnecessary and has raised the issue of the TSH level indicative of TSH suppression. In clinical practice TSH values below 0.1 mU/L are considered compatible with appropriate TSH suppression. Serum thyroglobulin is a reliable marker of metastatic disease after total surgical and radioiodine ablation of the thyroid gland and it is useful in the surveillance of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. PMID:7882445

  4. Therapeutic Strategies for Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Whom First-Line Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-Directed Therapies Fail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, Gabriel G; Flippot, Ronan; Khayat, David

    2016-05-01

    Metastases are present in one third of renal cell carcinomas at diagnosis. The overall survival duration in metastatic renal cell carcinoma is approximately 22 months, which underlines the need for more effective systemic treatments. Therapies on the basis of antiangiogenic agents and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin have been approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, but only benefits for progression-free survival were demonstrated in the second-line setting. Fortunately, promising treatments are emerging, from new antiangiogenic agents to immune checkpoint inhibitors. For the first time, both an immune checkpoint inhibitor (nivolumab) and a dual inhibitor of the tyrosine kinases c-Met and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (cabozantinib) have demonstrated improvements in overall survival in the second-line setting. Finding the best sequence for these novel agents will be crucial to improving outcomes in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This article comprises both a systematic review of the literature and recommendations for second-line therapeutic strategies for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma in whom inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor have failed. PMID:27170687

  5. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  6. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells

  7. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  8. Current Trends in Targeted Therapies for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiharu Ohka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most frequently occurring tumors in the central nervous system and the most malignant tumor among gliomas. Despite aggressive treatment including surgery, adjuvant TMZ-based chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, GBM still has a dismal prognosis: the median survival is 14.6 months from diagnosis. To date, many studies report several determinants of resistance to this aggressive therapy: (1 O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, (2 the complexity of several altered signaling pathways in GBM, (3 the existence of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs, and (4 the blood-brain barrier. Many studies aim to overcome these determinants of resistance to conventional therapy by using various approaches to improve the dismal prognosis of GBM such as modifying TMZ administration and combining TMZ with other agents, developing novel molecular-targeting agents, and novel strategies targeting GSCs. In this paper, we review up-to-date clinical trials of GBM treatments in order to overcome these 4 hurdles and to aim at more therapeutical effect than conventional therapies that are ongoing or are about to launch in clinical settings and discuss future perspectives.

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Maliandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  10. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  11. Radiation therapy for abdominal lymph node metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of radiotherapy for abdominal lymph node metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). From 1998 to 2004, 45 cases were treated with radiotherapy (RT), with a dose between 30 and 55 Gy. The radiation response, overall survival, prognostic factors, and complications were evaluated. Thirty-nine cases were able to be evaluated for response: 10 cases showed complete response; 21 cases showed a partial response; and 8 cases showed stable disease. The overall response rate was 79.5%. The response rate was 87.5% for patients receiving ≥40 Gy10 (biologically effective dose, α/β=10) and 42.9% for patients receiving 10 (P=0.02). The median survival time was 10 months for responders and 6 months for nonresponders (P=0.01). The absence of other concurrent distant metastasis and controllable primary HCC were significant prognostic factors. RT induced gastric or duodenal ulcer development in nine patients. All of these patients had received more than 50 Gy10, and these complications were not detected among patients receiving 10 (0% vs 37.5%, P10 to 50 Gy10 might be the optimal RT dose. (author)

  12. A dosimetric comparative study: Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas. The treatment of 10 patients, who had completed IMRT treatment for resected tumors of the nasal cavity, was replanned with the Philips Pinnacle3 Version 9 treatment-planning system. The IMRT plans used a 9-beam technique whereas the VMAT (known as SmartArc) plans used a 3-arc technique. Both types of plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle3 Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. IMRT and VMAT plans' quality was compared by evaluating the maximum, minimum, and mean doses to the target volumes and organs at risk, monitor units (MUs), and the treatment delivery time. Our results indicate that VMAT is capable of greatly reducing treatment delivery time and MUs compared with IMRT. The reduction of treatment delivery time and MUs can decrease the effects of intrafractional uncertainties that can occur because of patient movement during treatment delivery. VMAT's plans further reduce doses to critical structures that are in close proximity to the target volume

  13. Comparison of coplanar and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the differences in dose-volume data among coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), noncoplanar IMRT, and helical tomotherapy (HT) among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Nine patients with unresectable HCC and PVT underwent step and shoot coplanar IMRT with intent to deliver 46 - 54 Gy to the tumor and portal vein. The volume of liver received 30Gy was set to keep less than 30% of whole normal liver (V30 < 30%). The mean dose to at least one side of kidney was kept below 23 Gy, and 50 Gy as for stomach. The maximum dose was kept below 47 Gy for spinal cord. Several parameters including mean hepatic dose, percent volume of normal liver with radiation dose at X Gy (Vx), uniformity index, conformal index, and doses to organs at risk were evaluated from the dose-volume histogram. HT provided better uniformity for the planning-target volume dose coverage than both IMRT techniques. The noncoplanar IMRT technique reduces the V10 to normal liver with a statistically significant level as compared to HT. The constraints for the liver in the V30 for coplanar IMRT vs. noncoplanar IMRT vs. HT could be reconsidered as 21% vs. 17% vs. 17%, respectively. When delivering 50 Gy and 60-66 Gy to the tumor bed, the constraints of mean dose to the normal liver could be less than 20 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. Noncoplanar IMRT and HT are potential techniques of radiation therapy for HCC patients with PVT. Constraints for the liver in IMRT and HT could be stricter than for 3DCRT

  14. New targets for therapy in breast cancer: Farnesyltransferase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current systemic therapies for breast cancer are often limited by their nonspecific mechanism of action, unwanted toxicities on normal tissues, and short-term efficacy due to the emergence of drug resistance. However, identification of the molecular abnormalities in cancer, in particular the key proteins involved in abnormal cell growth, has resulted in development of various signal transduction inhibitor drugs as new treatment strategies against the disease. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) were originally designed to target the Ras signal transduction pathway, although it is now clear that several other intracellular proteins are dependent on post-translational farnesylation for their function. Preclinical data revealed that although FTIs inhibit the growth of ras-transformed cells, they are also potent inhibitors of a wide range of cancer cell lines that contain wild-type ras, including breast cancer cells. Additive or synergistic effects were observed when FTIs were combined with cytotoxic agents (in particular the taxanes) or endocrine therapies (tamoxifen). Phase I trials with FTIs have explored different schedules for prolonged administration, and dose-limiting toxicities included myelosuppression, gastrointestinal toxicity and neuropathy. Clinical efficacy against breast cancer was seen for the FTI tipifarnib in a phase II study. Based on promising preclinical data that suggest synergy with taxanes or endocrine therapy, combination clinical studies are now in progress to determine whether FTIs can add further to the efficacy of conventional breast cancer therapies

  15. Targeted delivery of chemically modified anti-miR-221 to hepatocellular carcinoma with negatively charged liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wendian Zhang,1 Fangqi Peng,1 Taotao Zhou,1 Yifei Huang,2 Li Zhang,3 Peng Ye,4 Miao Lu,1 Guang Yang,5 Yongkang Gai,1 Tan Yang,1 Xiang Ma,1 Guangya Xiang1 1School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, 2Department of Pharmacy, 3Department of Ultrasound, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 4Department of Pharmacy, Wuhan University, Renmin Hospital, 5School of Medicine, Jianghan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Gene therapy was established as a new strategy for treating HCC. To explore the potential delivery system to support the gene therapy of HCC, negatively charged liposomal delivery system was used to deliver miR-221 antisense oligonucleotide (anti-miR-221 to the transferrin (Tf receptor over expressed HepG2 cells. The liposome exhibited a mean particle size of 122.5 nm, zeta potential of -15.74 mV, anti-miR-221 encapsulation efficiency of 70%, and excellent colloidal stability at 4°C. Anti-miR-221-encapsulated Tf-targeted liposome demonstrated a 15-fold higher delivery efficiency compared to nontargeted liposome in HepG2 cells in vitro. Anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome effectively delivered anti-miR-221 to HepG2 cells, upregulated miR-221 target genes PTEN, P27kip1, and TIMP3, and exhibited greater silencing efficiency over nontargeted anti-miR-221 liposome. After intravenous injection into HepG2 tumor-bearing xenografted mice with Cy3-labeled anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome, Cy3-anti-miR-221 was successfully delivered to the tumor site and increased the expressions of PTEN, P27kip1, and TIMP3. Our results demonstrate that the Tf-targeted negatively charged liposome could be a potential therapeutic modality in the gene therapy of human HCC. Keywords: transferrin, gene, HCC, target delivery system, anionic liposome 

  16. Heat-Shock Protein 90-Targeted Nano Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochani, Ankit K; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Borah, Ankita; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal chemotherapy of anticancer drugs may be attributed to a variety of cellular mechanisms, which synergize to dodge the drug responses. Nearly 2 decades of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-targeted drug discovery has shown that the mono-therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors seems to be relatively ineffective compared with combination treatment due to several cellular dodging mechanisms. In this article, we have tried to analyze and review the Hsp90 and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR)-mediated drug resistance mechanisms. By using this information we have discussed about the rationale behind use of drug combinations that includes both or any one of these inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, biodegradable nano vector (NV)-loaded novel drug delivery systems have shown to resolve the problems of poor bioavailability. NVs of drugs such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and others have been successfully introduced for medicinal use. Hence, looking at the success of NVs, in this article we have also discussed the progress made in the delivery of biodegradable NV-loaded Hsp90 and m-TOR-targeted inhibitors in multiple drug combinations. We have also discussed the possible ways by which the market success of biodegradable NVs can positively impact the clinical trials of anti-Hsp90 and m-TOR combination strategy. PMID:26886301

  17. Molecular targets in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braconi, C; Bracci, R; Cellerino, R

    2008-08-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchimal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Such tumors usually have activating mutations in either KIT (75-80%) or Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor alpha (PDGFRa) (5-10%) which lead to ligand-independent signal transduction. Targeting these activated proteins with Imatinib mesylate, a small-molecule kinase inhibitor, has proven useful in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic GISTs. However, more than half of patients develop resistance to Imatinib after about 2 years. Therefore, other targets have been studying in order to implement the therapeutical armamentarium for this disease. Sunitinib malate is an oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several receptor tyrosine kinases and has proved to prolong survival in Imatinib-resistant patients. Other molecules, such as Nilotinib, Sorafenib and Dasatinib were shown to be useful in Imatinib resistant mutant cell lines and the results of their activity in humans are being awaited. Recent evidence suggests that GIST cells acquire the capability to escape from the control of KIT and PDGFRa through the activation of alternative pathways. Therefore, further effort should be invested in the discovery of new signaling pathways, such as AXL, MET, IGF-R, which might be involved in the evolution of the disease. After a description of KIT and PDGFRa as known targets of anti-GIST treatments, we review other mechanisms and mediators that might be potential targets of new therapies, providing a comprehensive revision of the new molecular strategies under investigation. PMID:18690842

  18. The necessity of nuclear reactors for targeted radionuclide therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijger, Gerard C; Ponsard, Bernard; Harfensteller, Mark; Wolterbeek, Hubert T; Nijsen, Johannes W F

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine has been contributing towards personalized therapies. Nuclear reactors are required for the working horses of both diagnosis and treatment, i.e., Tc-99m and I-131. In fact, reactors will remain necessary to fulfill the demand for a variety of radionuclides and are essential in the expanding field of targeted radionuclide therapies for cancer. However, the main reactors involved in the global supply are ageing and expected to shut down before 2025. Therefore, the fields of (nuclear) medicine, nuclear industry and politics share a global responsibility, faced with the task to secure future access to suitable nuclear reactors. At the same time, alternative production routes should be industrialized. For this, a coordinating entity should be put into place. PMID:23731577

  19. Transarterial therapy: An evolving treatment modality of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A Jazieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men, the seventh most common in women, and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Only 30-40% of liver cancer patients present early enough to undergo curative treatments such as surgery or liver transplantation. Local treatment with radiofrequency ablation or ethanol injection is often reserved for non-surgical candidates with early stages of disease. Transarterial embolization has become a widely accepted treatment for asymptomatic patients with unresectable lesions. This review discusses in details the three major forms of transarterial therapies: Bland embolization, chemoembolization, and radioembolization.

  20. MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redova, Martina; Svoboda, Marek [Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Department of Comprehensive Cancer Care, Brno (Czech Republic); Slaby, Ondrej, E-mail: slaby@mou.cz [Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Department of Comprehensive Cancer Care, Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} MiRNAs are related to the processes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in RCC. {yields} MiRNAs expression profiles are associated with several RCC-specific genetic alterations. {yields} It has been well documented that several miRNAs are downstream effector molecules of the HIF-induced hypoxia response. {yields} MiR-200 family is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition which is one of the most significant pathogenetic mechanism in RCC. {yields} Mechanistic studies in RCC have provided the rationale of using miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding short single stranded RNAs in the size range 19-25 nucleotides that are associated with gene regulation at the transcriptional and translational level. Recent studies have proved that miRNAs play important roles in a large number of biological processes, including cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, etc. Changes in their expression were found in a variety of human cancers, including renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis. Specific miRNA alterations were associated with key pathogenetic mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma like hypoxia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in renal cell carcinoma with an emphasis on miRNAs potential to serve as a powerful biomarker of disease and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  1. MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → MiRNAs are related to the processes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in RCC. → MiRNAs expression profiles are associated with several RCC-specific genetic alterations. → It has been well documented that several miRNAs are downstream effector molecules of the HIF-induced hypoxia response. → MiR-200 family is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition which is one of the most significant pathogenetic mechanism in RCC. → Mechanistic studies in RCC have provided the rationale of using miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding short single stranded RNAs in the size range 19-25 nucleotides that are associated with gene regulation at the transcriptional and translational level. Recent studies have proved that miRNAs play important roles in a large number of biological processes, including cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, etc. Changes in their expression were found in a variety of human cancers, including renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis. Specific miRNA alterations were associated with key pathogenetic mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma like hypoxia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in renal cell carcinoma with an emphasis on miRNAs potential to serve as a powerful biomarker of disease and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  2. Developing an adaptive radiation therapy strategy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has recently been introduced to restore the planned dose distribution by accounting for the anatomic changes during treatment. By quantifying the anatomic changes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients, this study aimed to establish an ART strategy for NPC cases. A total of 30 NPC patients treated with helical tomotherapy were recruited. In the pretreatment megavoltage CT images, the anatomic changes of the posterolateral wall of nasopharynx (P-NP), neck region and parotid glands were measured and assessed. One-way repeated measure ANOVA was employed to define threshold(s) at any time-point. The presence of a threshold(s) would indicate significant anatomical change(s) such that replanning should be suggested. A pragmatic schedule for ART was established by evaluating the threshold for each parameter. Results showed the P-NP, parotid gland and neck volumes demonstrated significant regressions over time. Respectively, the mean loss rates were 0.99, 1.35, and 0.39 %/day, and the mean volume losses were 35.70, 47.54 and 11.91% (all P < 0.001). The parotid gland shifted medially and superiorly over time by a mean of 0.34 and 0.24 cm, respectively (all P < 0.001). The neck region showed non-rigid posterior displacement, which increased from upper to lower neck. According to the threshold occurrences, three replans at 9th, 19th and 29th fractions were proposed. This ART strategy was able to accommodate the dosimetric consequences due to anatomic deviation over the treatment course. It is clinically feasible and would be recommended for centers where an adaptive planning system was not yet available. (author)

  3. Results of Surgical Therapy in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Mihaela; Zosin, Ioana; Timar, Bogdan; Lazar, Fulger; Vlad, Adrian; Timar, Romulus; Cornianu, Marioara

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare form of malignancy, having an intermediate prognosis. Controversies exist regarding the best surgical approach. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome in a group of patients with MTC, diagnosed and followed up in a single care center. We performed a retrospective analysis of all the patients diagnosed with MTC in the Department of Endocrinology from the County Emergency Hospital Timisoara between 1992 and 2012. The study group included 19 patients, 6 men (31.6 %), mean age 41.2 ± 12.5 years (20-72 years). The preoperative diagnosis was based on the protocol for nodular thyroid disease. Total or near-total thyroidectomy was performed in 10 out of 16 patients who could be operated. Postoperative follow-up included repeated measurements of serum calcitonin and imaging investigations. Nine out of the total of 19 (47.3 %) patients had hereditary forms of MTC. Most of the cases (84.2 %) were submitted to surgery. The median duration of follow-up was 84 months. The pTNM staging indicated that the majority of the patients with hereditary MTC were diagnosed in an earlier stage. Disease remission was achieved in 7 cases (43.8 %). Four patients, all with sporadic forms, died. Survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were significantly higher (p = 0.048) in patients with hereditary MTC. An early diagnosis of MTC allows a better surgical approach and an improved survival rate. We support the general recommendation that modified radical neck dissection is not necessary for all the patients with MTC. PMID:27574350

  4. High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy in combination with gemcitabine for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv W

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wei Lv, Tao Yan, Guojin Wang, Wei Zhao, Tao Zhang, Dinghua Zhou Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, Second Artillery General Hospital, Xicheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy combined with gemcitabine in treating unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: The 45 patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma were randomized into two groups. The patients in the experimental group (n=23 received HIFU in combination with gemcitabine and those in the control group (n=22 received gemcitabine alone. The effect and clinical benefit rates in the two groups were compared. The median survival time and 6-month and 12-month survival rates were calculated by Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. Results: The median survival time and 6-month survival rate were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (8.91 months vs 5.53 months, 73.9% vs 40.9%, respectively P<0.05, but 12-month survival rate was not statistically different between the two groups (13.0% vs 4.5%, P>0.05. The clinical benefit rates in the experimental group and the control group were 69.6% and 36.3%, respectively (P<0.05. The pain remission rate in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group (65.2% vs 31.8%, P<0.05. Conclusion: HIFU in combination with gemcitabine is better than gemcitabine alone. This combinatorial therapy may become a better and effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Keywords: pancreatic carcinoma treatment, high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy, gemcitabine

  5. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  6. Kinase inhibitors for advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schlumberger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent availability of molecular targeted therapies leads to a reconsideration of the treatment strategy for patients with distant metastases from medullary thyroid carcinoma. In patients with progressive disease, treatment with kinase inhibitors should be offered.

  7. Target volumes in radiation therapy of childhood brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric tumors have enjoyed considerable improvements for the past 30 years. This is mainly due to the extensive use of combined therapeutical modalities in which chemotherapy plays a prominent role. In many children, local treatment including radiotherapy, can nowadays be adapted in terms of target volume and dose to the 'response' to an initial course of chemotherapy almost on a case by case basis. This makes precise recommendation on local therapy highly difficult in this age group. We will concentrate in this paper on brain tumors in which chemotherapy is of limited value and radiotherapy still plays a key-role. (authors)

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted molecularly therapies of cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been known to be a significant factor in the development and growth of many types of cancers. It is now accepted that the EGFR signal transduction net work plays an important role in multiple tumorigenic processes, contributing to cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis, as well as protection from apoptosis. Recently, EGFR monoclonal antibodies (McAb) and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) inhibitors have been validated as new treatment approach for those EGFR-positive cancers and have shown activity aginst advanced, chemofractory cancers in clinical trials. This article focuses on three EGFR targeted molecularly therapies of cancers. (authors)

  9. Unravelling the complexity of metastasis - molecular understanding and targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Nilay; Kang, Yibin

    2011-10-01

    Despite recognizing the devastating consequences of metastasis, we are not yet able to effectively treat cancer that has spread to vital organs. The inherent complexity of genomic alterations in late-stage cancers, coupled with numerous heterotypic interactions that occur between tumour and stromal cells, represent fundamental challenges in our quest to understand and control metastatic disease. The incorporation of genomic and other systems level approaches, as well as technological breakthroughs in imaging and animal modelling, have galvanized the effort to overcome gaps in our understanding of metastasis. Future research carries with it the potential to translate the wealth of new knowledge and conceptual advances into effective targeted therapies. PMID:21941285

  10. Bcl-2 Inhibitors: Targeting Mitochondrial Apoptotic Pathways in Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Min H.; Reynolds, C. Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Defects in apoptotic pathways can promote cancer cell survival and also confer resistance to antineoplastic drugs. One pathway being targeted for antineoplastic therapy is the anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-w, Mcl-1, Bfl1/A-1, and Bcl-B) that bind to and inactivate BH3-domain pro-apoptotic proteins. Signals transmitted by cellular damage (including antineoplastic drugs) or cytokine deprivation can initiate apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic ...

  11. 鼻咽癌临床靶区定义%Definition of clinical target volume (CTV) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林少俊; 潘建基; 郭巧娟

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the mainstay treatment modality for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and the outcome is well associated to radiation dose. As a precise radiation technology, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers the possibility of improving survival and simultaneously protect the surrounding normal tissue. The improvement of local control by IMRT has been well confirmed by a number of studies form domestic and abroad. However, the selection and definition of clinical target volume (CTV) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma has not yet reached a consensus. This article aimed to discovery the direction and mode for future research of reducing the treatment volume by reviewing the domestic and international development of CTV.%鼻咽癌为放射剂量相关性恶性肿瘤,放射治疗是鼻咽癌的首选治疗方法.调强放射治疗作为精确的放疗技术为提高剂量、保护周围正常组织提供了可能,国内外多家放疗中心的研究结果己证实调强放疗可提高鼻咽癌局部控制率.然而,当前对鼻咽癌的亚临床靶区(clinical target volume,CTV)的界定尚未达成共识,本文通过回顾国内外鼻咽癌CTV定义的发展过程,探讨未来缩小鼻咽癌靶区定义的发展方向和模式.

  12. Residual dormant cancer stem-cell foci are responsible for tumor relapse after antiangiogenic metronomic therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Padura, Ines; Marighetti, Paola; Agliano, Alice; Colombo, Federico; Larzabal, Leyre; Redrado, Miriam; Bleau, Anne-Marie; Prior, Celia; Bertolini, Francesco; Calvo, Alfonso

    2012-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid tumor and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Currently available chemotherapeutic options are not curative due in part to tumor resistance to conventional therapies. We generated orthotopic HCC mouse models in immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2rγ null mice by injection of human alpha-feto protein (hAFP)- and/or luciferase-expressing HCC cell lines and primary cells from patients, where tumor growth and spread can be accurately monitored in a non-invasive way. In this model, low-dose metronomic administration of cyclophosphamide (LDM-CTX) caused complete regression of the tumor mass. A significant increase in survival (P<0.0001), reduced aberrant angiogenesis and hyperproliferation, and decrease in the number of circulating tumor cells were found in LDM-CTX-treated animals, in comparison with untreated mice. Co-administration of LDM-CTX with anti-VEGF therapy further improved the therapeutic efficacy. However, the presence of residual circulating hAFP levels suggested that some tumor cells were still present in livers of treated mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed that those cells had a hAFP+/CD13+/PCNA- phenotype, suggesting that they were dormant cancer stem cells (CSC). Indeed, discontinuation of therapy resulted in tumor regrowth. Moreover, in-vitro LDM-CTX treatment reduced hepatosphere formation in both number and size, and the resulting spheres were enriched in CD13+ cells indicating that these cells were particularly resistant to therapy. Co-treatment of the CD13-targeting drug, bestatin, with LDM-CTX leads to slower tumor growth and a decreased tumor volume. Therefore, combining a CD13 inhibitor, which targets the CSC-like population, with LDM-CTX chemotherapy may be used to eradicate minimal residual disease and improve the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:22546866

  13. Virus Capsids as Targeted Nanoscale Delivery Vessels of Photoactive Compounds for Site-Specific Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brian A.

    The research presented in this work details the use of a viral capsid as an addressable delivery vessel of photoactive compounds for use in photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that involves the interaction of light with a photosensitizing molecule to create singlet oxygen, a reactive oxygen species. Overproduction of singlet oxygen in cells can cause oxidative damage leading to cytotoxicity and eventually cell death. Challenges with the current generation of FDA-approved photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy primarily stem from their lack of tissue specificity. This work describes the packaging of photoactive cationic porphyrins inside the MS2 bacteriophage capsid, followed by external modification of the capsid with cancer cell-targeting G-quadruplex DNA aptamers to generate a tumor-specific photosensitizing agent. First, a cationic porphyrin is loaded into the capsids via nucleotide-driven packaging, a process that involves charge interaction between the porphyrin and the RNA inside the capsid. Results show that over 250 porphyrin molecules associate with the RNA within each MS2 capsid. Removal of RNA from the capsid severely inhibits the packaging of the cationic porphyrins. Porphyrin-virus constructs were then shown to photogenerate singlet oxygen, and cytotoxicity in non-targeted photodynamic treatment experiments. Next, each porphyrin-loaded capsid is externally modified with approximately 60 targeting DNA aptamers by employing a heterobifunctional crosslinking agent. The targeting aptamer is known to bind the protein nucleolin, a ubiquitous protein that is overexpressed on the cell surface by many cancer cell types. MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells and MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells were selected as an in vitro model for breast cancer and normal tissue, respectively. Fluorescently tagged virus-aptamer constructs are shown to selectively target MCF-7 cells versus MCF-10A cells. Finally, results are shown in which porphyrin

  14. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavroudi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The grim statistics speak for themselves with reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem guided gene therapy. Stem cells have the unique potential for self-renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for therapeutic use of stem cells is their cancerous transformation. Therefore, we

  15. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Moon, Hye Seong; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Chong Il; Ahn, Jung Ja [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy, and to investigate the prognostic factors for FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer patients who were treated with simple hysterectomy, or who had high-risk factors following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Between March 1986 and December 1998, 58 patients, with FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer were included in this study, The indications for postoperative radiation therapy were based on the pathological findings, including lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin, parametrial extension, Iymphovascular invasion, invasion of more than half the cervical stroma, uterine extension and the incidental finding of cervix cancer following simple hysterectomy. All patients received external pelvic radiotherapy, and 5 patients, received an additional intracavitary radiation therapy. The radiation dose from the external beam to the whole pelvis was 45 - 50 Gy. Vagina cuff irradiation was performed, after completion of the external beam irradiation, al a low-dose rate of CS-137, with the total dose of 4488-4932 chy (median: 4500 chy) at 5 mm depth from the vagina surface. The median follow-up period was 44 months (15-108 months), The 5-yr actuarial local control rate, distant free survival and disease-free survival rate were 98%, 95% and 94%, respectively. A univariate analysis of the clinical and pathological parameters revealed that the clinical stage (p=0.0145), status of vaginal resection margin (p=0.0002) and parametrial extension (p=0.0001) affected the disease-free survival. From a multivariate analysis, only a parametrial extension independently influenced the disease-free survival. Five patients (9%) experienced Grade 2 late treatment-related complications, such as radiation proctitis (1 patient), cystitis (3 patients) and lymphedema of the leg (1 patient). No patient had grade 3 or 4 complications. Our results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy can

  16. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy, and to investigate the prognostic factors for FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer patients who were treated with simple hysterectomy, or who had high-risk factors following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Between March 1986 and December 1998, 58 patients, with FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer were included in this study, The indications for postoperative radiation therapy were based on the pathological findings, including lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin, parametrial extension, Iymphovascular invasion, invasion of more than half the cervical stroma, uterine extension and the incidental finding of cervix cancer following simple hysterectomy. All patients received external pelvic radiotherapy, and 5 patients, received an additional intracavitary radiation therapy. The radiation dose from the external beam to the whole pelvis was 45 - 50 Gy. Vagina cuff irradiation was performed, after completion of the external beam irradiation, al a low-dose rate of CS-137, with the total dose of 4488-4932 chy (median: 4500 chy) at 5 mm depth from the vagina surface. The median follow-up period was 44 months (15-108 months), The 5-yr actuarial local control rate, distant free survival and disease-free survival rate were 98%, 95% and 94%, respectively. A univariate analysis of the clinical and pathological parameters revealed that the clinical stage (p=0.0145), status of vaginal resection margin (p=0.0002) and parametrial extension (p=0.0001) affected the disease-free survival. From a multivariate analysis, only a parametrial extension independently influenced the disease-free survival. Five patients (9%) experienced Grade 2 late treatment-related complications, such as radiation proctitis (1 patient), cystitis (3 patients) and lymphedema of the leg (1 patient). No patient had grade 3 or 4 complications. Our results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy can

  17. Targeting ryanodine receptors for anti-arrhythmic therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark D McCAULEY; Xander H T WEHRENS

    2011-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic drugs are a group of pharmaceuticals that suppress or prevent abnormal heart rhythms, which are often associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Current antiarrhythmic drugs that typically target plasma membrane ion channels have limited clinical success and in some cases have been described as being pro-arrhythmic. However, recent studies suggest that pathological release of calcium (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2) could represent a promising target for antiarrhythmic therapy. Diastolic SR Ca2+ release has been linked to arrhythmogenesis in both the inherited arrhythmia synSeveral classes of pharmaceuticals have been shown to reduce abnormal RyR2 activity and may confer protection against triggered arrhythmias through reduction of SR Ca2+ leak. In this review, we will evaluate the current pharmacological methods for stabilizing RyR2 and suggest treatment modalities based on current evidence of molecular mechanisms.

  18. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for better dose targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Intensity modulated radiation therapy generally implies the use of inverse planning using preselected organ dose constraints and dose volume histogram analysis. Then modulated beams are created by multi leaf collimator (MLC) sequences. This new method of modulating each beam produces fine resolution dose maps around the target volume. New and exciting tumour visualisation techniques using PET and MRS imaging may ensure that the new technology in dose delivery is matched by improved biological aided targeting images which better specifying the tumour volume. Implementing IMRT into the clinic is a complex and time consuming task however some examples of clinical sites which lend themselves to IMRT over conventional radiotherapy will be shown. One vendors approach (the pinnacle radiotherapy planning computer) is described. It maintains forward computation of the final dose map to ensure integrity of the inverse planning process. Planning dose tool calculations are compared with film dosimetry results. These comparisons ensure accurate doses are delivered to the patient

  19. The challenges associated with molecular targeted therapies for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Toni Rose; McDonald, Kerrie L

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive malignant brain tumor in adults. Improvements in the treatment of GBM have remained static since the advent of the standard therapy which includes radiation with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide treatment. Developing treatment and diagnostic or companion biomarker combinations is transforming the way we treat numerous cancers. However, can this emerging paradigm be also effective for GBM? Can GBM be treated the same way as other cancers? Here we review the challenges for a personalized molecular targeted therapeutic approach in GBM. The specific challenges for establishing a personalized molecular targeted medicine program for GBM patients include overcoming the blood brain barrier, unravelling the intra- and inter-heterogeneity that exists and the importance of developing more relevant animal models that recapitulate a patient's GBM tumor. PMID:26900075

  20. External Radiation Therapy Combined with Hyperthermia in the Carcinoma of Extrahepatic Biliary System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hoon Sik [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-06-15

    From January 1980 to September 1990, 7 patients with carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary system received external radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia. of the 3 patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer, two were primary cholangiocarcinoma and one was metastatic peripancreatic carcinoma. Of the 4 patients with carcinoma of the gallbladder, two were locoregionally advanced and unresectable carcinoma and the remaining two were local-regional recurrence after cholecystectomy. They were all pathologically proven adenocarcinoma. The radiation dose received ranged from 3000 cGy/2 weeks to 5040 cGy/ 7 weeks. The hyperthermia was done once or twice a week and 4 to 12 sessions in total. The tumor response was confirmed by T-tube cholangiography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and CT scan. 6 out of 7(86%) showed partial regression of the tumor. The median survival time was 7 months (range 4-11 Months). 6 out of 7 patients were dead : one died of septicemia, 4 of primary disease, one of distant metastases. Only one out of 7 patients is still alive but new metastatic lesion was found. There was not any treatment related deaths. There was also no evidence of treatment related problems with liver, stomach and duodenum, although the observation period was short.

  1. Aiming at the target: improved adjuvant medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Philippe L; Dinh, Phuong; Sotiriou, Christos; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J

    2009-10-01

    The 2007 St. Gallen Expert Panel recognized the existence of molecular tools for risk stratification, but recommended the use of high-quality standard pathological testing alone for risk allocation and treatment selection. Over the last two years, much has been learned about these novel molecular tools: they demonstrate similar prognostic power; their performance appears to be driven by improved quantification of cellular proliferation; tumour burden remains an important determinant of long-term outcome; and their prediction of responsiveness to systemic therapy is suboptimal. In the meantime, great effort has continued to be invested in evaluating individual predictive markers to guide treatment selection. A number of putative targets that showed early promise--such as HER-2 and TOP2A gene amplification for anthracyclines, Myc amplification for trastuzumab, and Tau expression for taxanes--have yielded disappointing results when subjected to subsequent validation. These failings underscore the difficulty of accurate, reproducible target measurement and the inherent complexity of early breast cancer which is unlikely to be captured by a single gene or protein alteration. Future progress in adjuvant treatment tailoring will require a fundamental shift towards multi-dimensional thinking--with the development of multi-parameter assays that integrate tumour biology, disease burden, and host-related factors. The traditional model of post hoc predictive marker validation appears unlikely to produce tangible gains in the era of targeted systemic therapy. It is hoped that coupling prospective biomarker discovery with new drug development in earlier stages of disease will yield additional targets that can be used to guide clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:19914538

  2. Preparation of human hepatocellular carcinoma-targeted liposome microbubbles and their immunological properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Na Bian; Yun-Hua Gao; Kai-Bin Tan; Ping Liu; Gong-Jun Zeng; Xin Zhang; Zheng Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To prepare the human hepatocellular carcinoma.(HCC)-targeted liposome microbubbles and to investigate their immunological properties.METHODS: Human hepatocarcinoma specific monoclonal antibody HAb18 was attached to the surface of home-made liposome microbubbles by static attraction to prepare the targeted liposome microbubbles. The combination of HAb18 with liposome microbubbles was confirmed by the slide agglutination test and immunofluorescent assay. Their immunological activity was measured by ELISA. Rosette formation test, rosette formation blocking test and immunofluorescent assay were used to identify the specific binding of targeted liposome microbubbles to SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells, and cytotoxicity assay was used to detect their effect on human hepatocytes.RESULTS: The targeted liposome microbubbles were positive in the slide agglutination test and immunofluorescent assay. ELISA indicated that the immunological activity of HAb18 on the liposome microbubbles was similar to that of free HAb18. SMMC-7721 cells were surrounded by the targeting liposome microbubbles to form rosettes, while the control SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells were not. Proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells and normal human hepatocytes was not influenced by the targeted liposome microbubbles.CONCLUSION: The targeted liposome microbubbles with a high specific biological activity have been successfully prepared, which specifically bind to human hepatocarcinoma cells, and are non-cytotoxic to hepatocytes. These results indicate that the liposome microbubbles can be used as a HCC-targeted ultrasound contrast agent that may enhance ultrasound images and thus improve the diagnosis of HCC,especially at the early stage.

  3. Combination Gene Therapy for Liver Metastasis of Colon Carcinoma in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Hsai; Chen, X. H. Li; Wang, Yibin; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Finegold, Milton J.; Rich, Susan S.

    1995-03-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8^+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver.

  4. Interventional Radionuclide Therapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma:Assessment of Intratumoral Retention of HPMA Copolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Jian-chao; MIAO Cheng-ping; ZENG Xian-wu; GUO Hong-yun; WANG Xiao-qi; LIAO Shi-qi; XIE Xiao-li

    2013-01-01

    To develop new radiopharmaceuticals for the interventional radionuclide therapy of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma,poly(HPMA)-APMA-DTPA[HPMA=N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide; APMA=N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide; DTPA=diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid] was synthesized by free radical precipitation polymerization in acetone/dimethylsulfoxide with N,N'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) as the initiator.The copolymers were characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography(GPC,Mn=2.2×104,Mw/Mn=1.38).Subsequently,poly(HPMA)-APMA-DTPA was conjugated with 99mTc radionuclide.Prolonged retention of poly(HPMA)-APMA-DTPA conjugate within the tumor tissues was demonstrated by single-photon emission computed tomography computed tomography(SPECT-CT) at 1,2,4 and 24 h following intra-tumoral injection of the conjugate to hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in mice.DTPA-99mTC was also synthesized and characterized for comparison.The data suggest that the poly(HPMA)-APMA-DTPA conjugates might be useful for the interventional radionuclide therapy of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma in humans.

  5. Management of side effects associated with sunitinib therapy for patients with renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Schwandt1; Wood, Laura S.; Brian Rini; Robert Dreicer1,2

    2009-01-01

    Anita Schwandt1, Laura S Wood1, Brian Rini1,2, Robert Dreicer1,21Department of Solid Tumor Oncology; 2Taussig Cancer Institute and the Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute; Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: Advances in the understanding of the biology of renal cell carcinoma have led to recent approval of several new agents including drugs that target vascular endothelial growth factor. Sunitinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor which interferes with multiple intra...

  6. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the submandibular gland after high-dose radioiodine therapy: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case report of a 42 year old female, who recieved from 14th-20th year of life six radioiodine therapies with altogether 19,2 GBq 131I because of a papillary thyroid carcinoma. 17 years after the last therapy, she developed a histologicaly proven chronic radiogenic sialadenitis of the left submandibular gland. Further four years later, the right submandibular gland has been extirpated because of a mucoepidermoid carcinoma with infiltration of a regionary lymphatic node. Review of the previous published secondary-malignancies of the salivary glands after high-dose radioiodine therapies. (orig.)

  7. Current trends and recent advances in diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Wey, Keh-Cherng; Mo, Lein-Ray; Chang, Kuo-Kwan; Lin, Ruey-Chang; Kuo, Jen-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been one of the most fatal malignant tumors worldwide and its associated morbidity and mortality remain of significant concern. Based on in-depth reviews of serological diagnosis of HCC, in addition to AFP, there are other biomarkers: Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive AFP (AFP-L3), des- carboxyprothrombin (DCP), tyrosine kinase with Ig and eprdermal growth factor (EGF) homology domains 2 (TIE2)-espressing monocytes (TEMs), glypican-3 (GPC3), Golgi protein 73 (GP73), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) have been proposed as biomarkers for the early detection of HCC. The diagnosis of HCC is primarily based on noninvasive standard imaging methods, such as ultrasound (US), dynamic multiphasic multidetector-row CT (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Some experts advocate gadolinium diethyl-enetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) MRI and contrast-enhanced US as the promising imaging madalities of choice. With regard to recent advancements in tissue markers, many cuting-edge technologies using genome-wide DNA microarrays, qRT-PCR, and proteomic and inmunostaining studies have been implemented in an attempt to identify markers for early diagnosis of HCC. Only less than half of HCC patients at initial diagnosis are at an early stage treatable with curative options: local ablation, surgical resection, or liver transplant. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is considered the standard of care with palliation for intermediate stage HCC. Recent innovative procedures using drug-eluting-beads and radioembolization using Yttrium-90 may exhibit beneficial effects in HCC treatment. During the past few years, several molecular targeted agents have been evaluated in clinical trials in advanced HCC. Sorafenib is currently the only approved systemic treatment for HCC. It has been approved for the therapy of asymptomatic HCC patients with well-preserved liver function who are not candidates for potentially

  8. Evaluation of parotid function using dynamic parotid scintigraphy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluation of the parotid function using dynamic parotid scintigraphy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with external beam radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty-one nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were included into this study. Dynamic parotid scintigraphy was performed before and after external beam radiation therapy. Semi-quantitative parameters of parotid (uptake index, excretion rate and excretion index) was used to evaluate the changes of parotid function. Results: UI, ER and EI of parotid were decreased markedly after external beam radiation therapy, t is 56.65, 41.34, 30.69 respectively, P<0.001. The uptake and excretion function of the parotid were all impaired, which correlated with the dray mouth symptom of the patients. Conclusion: Dynamic parotid scintigraphy can play a key role in the evaluation of parotid function in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with external beam radiation therapy. (authors)

  9. The efficacy of gold-198 grain mold therapy for mucosal carcinomas of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold-198 grain mold therapy was given to 27 patients with 29 oral cancers and the results were analysed. Single plane mold alone was chosen for treatment when the maximum thickness of the tumor was below 2 mm. For thicker tumors, external irradiation prior to mold therapy was added. The 5-year survival following these principles was 82%. Initial tumor control was obtained in all 27 lesions followed for more than 2 years but recurrence took place in 7 (26%). Of 20 patients whose primary lesion did not recur within 2 years, 6 subsequently required surgery (2 cases) or non-surgical treatment (4 cases) for bone complications. The results obtained by single plane mold therapy are encouraging, particularly with regard to gum cancers showing a minimum bone invasion, and should therefore be advocated for selected patients with oral carcinoma. (orig.)

  10. Carcinoma of penis. Review of cases treated by surgery and radiation therapy 1960-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis treated by surgery and radiation therapy at Moffitt Hospital, University of California, and Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center are reviewed. Only cases followed for more than three years or with autopsy findings are presented. For the primary lesion, over-all surgical control rate locally was 15/17 or 88 per cent. Over-all control rate with radiation therapy alone was 9/12 (75 per cent), and with surgical salvage 11/12 (92 per cent). Radiation therapy appears to be the treatment of choice for early stage lesions, reserving surgery for salvage. Prophylactic ilioinguinal lymph node dissection for N0 lesions is not warranted. The role of chemotherapy needs further investigation

  11. The effect of strontium-89 therapy in a patient with cholangiocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 77-year-old man was diagnosed as having cholangiocellular carcinoma. The patient underwent partial right hepatectomy in June 2008, and multiple bone metastases occurred approximately 9 months after surgery. He refused salvage chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Although he had been treated with opiate analgesics, he was unable to sit up owing to severe pain in the left ilium. He was hospitalized because of buttock pain and left leg numbness. Even a combination of fentanyl patch, gabapentin, and subarachnoid block was ineffective in controlling pain. Strontium-89 (89Sr) therapy was successful in eliminating the intractable pain, and there were no serious side effects during therapy. The patient was discharged from the hospital, and he received palliative care at home for a short period. (author)

  12. The Anticoagulated Atrial Fibrillation Patient Who Requires Curative Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma: a Bleeding Conundrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Reiffel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available With the aging of the population, the incidence of both prostate carcinoma (PCa and atrial fibrillation (AF has increased.  Options for "curative therapy" PCa now include surgery, external beam radiation (EBT, and radioactive seed implantation (RSI.  The latter two approaches, especially EBT, can produce radiation proctitis (RP with rectal bleeding (RB.  This poses an issue for anticoagulating the elderly AF patient who develops PCa.  The attached case report of a 77 year old male who was treated with a combination of RSI and "low dose" EBT followed by recurrent severe rectal bleeding demonstrates the significance of this problem.  In the AF patient with a CHADS2 score of 2 or more, and hence an indication for chronic warfarin therapy, the therapy of subsequently detected PCa requires careful consideration of the risks associated with its therapeutic options.

  13. Targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Peng

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Hong Peng1,4, Ximei Qian2,4, Hui Mao3,4, Andrew Y Wang5, Zhuo (Georgia Chen1,4, Shuming Nie2,4, Dong M Shin1,4*1Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering; 3Department of Radiology; 4Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Ocean Nanotech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR, USAAbstract: Magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles with a long blood retention time, biodegradability and low toxicity have emerged as one of the primary nanomaterials for biomedical applications in vitro and in vivo. IO nanoparticles have a large surface area and can be engineered to provide a large number of functional groups for cross-linking to tumor-targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules for diagnostic imaging or delivery of therapeutic agents. IO nanoparticles possess unique paramagnetic properties, which generate significant susceptibility effects resulting in strong T2 and T*2 contrast, as well as T1 effects at very low concentrations for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which is widely used for clinical oncology imaging. We review recent advances in the development of targeted IO nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy.Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, tumor imaging, MRI, therapy

  14. Brown Adipose Tissue: A New Target for Antiobesity Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human fat consist of white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT. Though most fat is energy-storing WAT, the thermogenic capacity of even small amounts of BAT makes it an attractive therapeutic target for inducing weight loss through energy expenditure. CONTENT: Over the past year, several independent research teams used a combination of positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT imaging, immunohistochemistry and gene and protein expression assays to prove conclusively that adult humans have functional BAT. BAT is important for thermogenesis and energy balance in small mammals and its induction in mice promotes energy expenditure, reduces adiposity and protects mice from diet-induced obesity. The thermogenic capacity of BAT is impressive. In humans, it has been estimated that as little as 50g of BAT could utilize up to 20% of basal caloric needs if maximally stimulated. SUMMARY: The obesity pandemic requires new and novel treatments. The past few years have witnessed multiple studies conclusively showing that adult humans have functional BAT, a tissue that has a tremendous capacity for obesity-reducing thermogenesis. Novel therapies targeting BAT thermogenesis may be available in the near future as therapeutic options for obesity and diabetes. Thermogenic ingredients may be considered as functional agents that could help in preventing a positive energy balance and obesity. KEYWORDS: brown adipose tissue, thermogenesis, energy expenditure, antiobesity therapy.

  15. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  16. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  17. Potential combination of target therapy and radiation therapy in gastro intestinal (G.I.) tract cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At cellular level, marking pathway activated by E.r.b.B. receptors participate to the proliferation, migration and differentiation of many cellular types. Observed alterations are mutations, over expressions with or without gene amplification or abnormal stimulation by their ligands. The most frequently observed mutation is an extracellular deletion aiming to activate tyrosine kinase activity without ligand. Strategies to target the E.G.F.r. receptor include antisense oligonucleotides, antibodies directed to extracellular component of tyrosine kinase receptor. Only monoclonal antibodies and T.K.I. have been developed in clinical research, mainly for oesophageal and rectal carcinomas. Solid tumor proliferation is under control of tumoral mechanisms and the interaction between tumor and microenvironment. In particular, angio genesis is important during invasive and metastasis phases. The major role of Vascular endothelial Growth Factor (V.E.G.F.) in angio genesis is useful for tumor growth, which has been demonstrated by many convergent studies. Radiosensitization or reversion of radioresistance could be obtained by inhibition of V.E.G.F. pathway. Antibodies directed against this molecule have been introduced in G.I. tract malignancies for the treatment of pancreatic and colic carcinomas. (authors)

  18. Fibroblast recruitment as a tool for ovarian cancer detection and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Roni; Addadi, Yoseph; Narunsky Haziza, Lian; Dafni, Hagit; Rotkopf, Ron; Meir, Gila; Fishman, Ami; Neeman, Michal

    2016-10-15

    Metastatic ovarian cancer, the most lethal of gynecologic malignancies, is typically managed by debulking surgery, followed by chemotherapy. However, despite significant efforts, survival rate remains low. We have previously demonstrated, in mouse models, a specific systemic homing of labeled fibroblasts to solid ovarian tumors. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing this specific homing of genetically modified fibroblasts for detection and targeted therapy of orthotopic metastatic ovarian carcinoma model in immune-deficient mice. Using an in vivo metastatic mouse model for ovarian cancer, we demonstrated that fibroblasts expressing fluorescent reporters injected intra-peritoneally, were specifically recruited to peritoneal tumor nodules (resulting in 93-100% co-localization). We further used fibroblasts over expressing the soluble receptor variant of VEGFR1 (s-Flt1). Mice bearing tumors were injected weekly with either control or s-Flt1 expressing fibroblasts. Injection of s-Flt1 expressing fibroblasts resulted in a significant reduction in the ascites volume, reduced vascularization of adherent metastases, and improved overall survival. Using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts for tumor detection with readily available intra-operative fluorescence imaging tools may be useful for tumor staging and directing biopsies or surgical efforts during exploratory or debulking surgery. Fibroblasts may serve as a beacon pointing to the otherwise invisible metastases in the peritoneal cavity of ovarian cancer patients. Utilizing the recruited fibroblasts also for targeted delivery of anti angiogenic or antitumor molecules may aid in controlling tumor progression. Thus, these results suggest a novel approach for targeting ovarian tumor metastases for both tumor detection and therapy. PMID:27242346

  19. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for invasive thyroid carcinoma in dogs: a retrospective analysis of survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen dogs with invasive thyroid carcinoma (WHO classification T2b or T3b) seen between January 1991 and October 1997 were treated by external beam Irradiation. Four once-weekly fractions of 9 gray of 4 MeV X-rays were administered. Four of the dogs died of progression of the primary disease and four from metastatic spread. Of the remaining dogs, three died of unrelated problems, although two were still alive at the time of the censor. Kaplan-Meier analysis of the survival time from first dose to death from either primary or metastatic disease gave a median survival time of 96 weeks (mean 85 weeks, range six to 247 weeks). Radiographic evidence of pulmonary metastatic disease at presentation had no prognostic value whereas crude growth rate was a highly significant factor. The present series Indicates that radiation therapy should be considered an important modality for the control of invasive thyroid carcinoma in the dog

  20. Low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost against esophageal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of treatment of 54 esophageal carcinomas managed with low-dose-rate telecobalt therapy (LDRT) as a boost were compared with those of 89 esophageal carcinomas treated with conventionally fractionated irradiation alone (CFI). The LDRT (1 Gy/hr, 5-7 Gy/day, to a total dose of 14-20 Gy) was boosted about 10 days after the CFI dose of 60 Gy. Although the LDRT group included more advanced cases than the CFI group, local effects and survival rate of the LDRT group, especially those with tumorous X-P and serrated types, were better than those of the CFI group. Late complications were more severe in the LDRT group. However, they were acceptable when the total dose in the LDRT group was brought under 80 Gy. (author)