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Sample records for carcinoma targeted therapies

  1. Targeted therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, F; Bronte, G; Cusenza, S; Fiorentino, E; Rolfo, C; Cicero, G; Bronte, E; Di Marco, V; Firenze, A; Angarano, G; Fontana, T; Russo, A

    2014-01-01

    The onset of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is related to the development of non-neoplastic liver disease, such as viral infections and cirrhosis. Even though patients with chronic liver diseases undergo clinical surveillance for early diagnosis of HCC, this cancer is often diagnosed in advanced stage. In this case locoregional treatment is not possible and systemic therapies are the best way to control it. Until now sorafenib, a Raf and multi-kinase inhibitor has been the best, choice to treat HCC systemically. It showed a survival benefit in multicenter phase III trials. However the proper patient setting to treat is not well defined, since the results in Child-Pugh B patients are conflicting. To date various new target drugs are under developed and other biological treatments normally indicated in other malignancies are under investigation also for HCC. These strategies aim to target the different biological pathways implicated in HCC development and progression. The target drugs studied in HCC include anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors. The most important challenge is represented by the best integration of these drugs with standard treatments to achieve improvement in overall survival and quality of life.

  2. Targeted therapy: a new hope for thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Francesco; Pezzullo, Luciano; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Lastoria, Secondo; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Scarpati, Giuseppina Della Vittoria; Caponigro, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid carcinomas are rare and heterogeneous diseases representing less than 1% of all malignancies. The majority of thyroid carcinomas are differentiated entities (papillary and folliculary carcinomas) and are characterized by good prognosis and good response to surgery and radioiodine therapy. Nevertheless, about 10% of differentiated carcinomas recur and become resistant to all therapies. Anaplastic and medullary cancers are rare subtypes of thyroid cancer not suitable for radioiodine therapy. A small percentage of differentiated and all the anaplastic and medullary thyroid carcinomas often recur after primary treatments and are no longer suitable for other therapies. In the last years, several advances have been made in the field of molecular biology and tumorigenesis mechanisms of thyroid carcinomas. Starting from these issues, the targeted therapy may be employed as a new option. The MAP-Kinase pathway has been found often dysregulated in thyroid carcinomas and several upstream signals have been recognized as responsible for this feature. RET/PTC mutations are often discovered both in papillary and in medullary carcinomas, while B-RAF mutation is typical of papillary and anaplastic histologies. Also mTOR disruptions and VEGFR pathway disruption are common features in all advanced thyroid cancers. Some angiogenesis inhibitors and a number of RET/PTC pathway blocking agents are yet present in the clinical armamentarium. Vandetanib, cabozatinib and sorafenib have reached clinical use. A number of other biological compounds have been tested in phase II and III trials. Understanding the biology of thyroid cancers may help us to design a well shaped targeted therapy.

  3. Multiple oncogenic mutations related to targeted therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhang; Hong-Yuan Zhao; Yu-Xiang Ma; Zhi-Huang Hu; Pei-Yu Huang; Li Zhang; Tao Qin; Shao-Dong Hong; Jing Zhang; Wen-Feng Fang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yun-Peng Yang; Cong Xue; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:An increasing number of targeted drugs have been tested for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations have not been fully evaluated. This study aimed to detect targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations in NPC and to determine which targeted therapy might be potentially effective in treating NPC. Methods:By using the SNaPshot assay, a rapid detection method, 19 mutation hotspots in 6 targeted therapy-related oncogenes were examined in 70 NPC patients. The associations between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic factors were analyzed. Results:Among 70 patients, 12 (17.1%) had mutations in 5 oncogenes:7 (10.0%) had v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) mutation, 2 (2.8%) had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation, and 1 (1.4%) had simultaneous EGFR and v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutations. No significant differences were observed between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics. Additionally, these oncogenic mutations were not associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis. Conclusions:Oncogenic mutations are present in NPC patients. The efficacy of targeted drugs on patients with the related oncogenic mutations requires further validation.

  4. Neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive nephrectomy as an independent option in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cannot be considered as the only effective method, with rare exception, of a few patients with solitary metastases. Cytoreductive nephrectomy is now part of a multimodal approach encompassing surgical treatment and systemic drug therapy. Many retrospective and two prospective studies have demonstrated that it is expedient to perform cytoreductive nephrectomy. Immunotherapy should not be used as preoperatively in the era of cytokine therapy for mRCC due to that fact that it has no impact on primary tumor. In the current targeted therapy era, many investigators have concentrated attentionon the role of neoadjuvant targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with both localized and locally advanced mRCC. The potential benefits of neoadjuvant therapy for localized and locally advanced RCC include to make surgery easier and to increase the possibility of organsparing treatment, by decreasing the stage of primary tumor and the size of tumors. The possible potential advantages of neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with mRCC include prompt initiation of necessary systemic therapy; identification of patients with primary refractory tumors; and a preoperative reduction in the stage of primary tumor. Numerous retrospective and some prospective phase II studies have shown that neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with localized and locally advanced RCC is possible and tolerable and surgical treatment after neoadjuvant targeted therapy is safe and executable with a low incidence of complications. If neoadjuvant therapy is to be performed, it should be done within 2–4 months before surgery. Sorafenib and sunitinib are now most tested and suitable for neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Sorafenib is a more preferred drug due to its shorter half-life and accordingly to the possibility of discontinuing the drug immediately prior to

  5. Epstein-Barr virus-targeted therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoker, S.D.; Novalić, Z.; Wildeman, M.A.; Huitema, A.D.R.; Verkuijlen, S.A.W.M.; Juwana, H.; Greijer, A.E.; Tan, I.B.; Middeldorp, J.M.; de Boer, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite successful primary treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), the incidence of distant metastasis remains 25-34 %. Treatment options are limited, and survival is poor. Intratumoural Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was used as treatment target. In NPC, EBV is present in a latent state, exp

  6. Gastric Carcinoma at the Era of Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Sion, Elena; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Gastric and gastro-esophageal cancers (GC/GEJ) appear as the second cancer-related death worldwide. Diagnosis is made at an advanced stage offering a curative attempt in less than 50% of cases. Despite the improvements of the systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens, the prognosis of patients with metastatic GC/GEJ cancer remains poor. Recent insights in biochemical pathways have permitted to identify potential targets. The extracellular domain of HER2 receptors is implicated in cells' proliferation and in the anti-apoptotic process occurring in GC/GEJ cancers. Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting HER2, in addition to chemotherapy permitted to obtain more than one year of survival in HER2-positive advanced GC/GEJ cancers. Recently, ramucirumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting VEGFR-2 receptor demonstrated its efficacy as a second line treatment for patients with advanced GC/GEJ cancer. These encouraging results have justified evaluating targeted therapies in GC/GEJ cancers. In this review, we summarize targeted therapies that might present clinical efficacy in the treatment of advanced GC/GEJ cancers.

  7. Targeted Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma: a Prospective study

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    Robin Joshi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: In our cohort, use of sunitinib showed similar outcome to previously published articles. Our study supports the use of sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Keywords: metastatic renal cell carcinoma; sunitinib; tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

  8. Impact of genetic targets on therapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikhoutdinov, Irina; Goldenberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technique, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the mortality from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not improved significantly. Squamous cell carcinoma is caused by tobacco use, alcohol consumption and infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus. It is the 6th most common cancer in the world, with upwards of 45,000 new cases reported yearly in the United States alone.In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the understanding of the molecular and genetic pathogenesis of head and neck cancer, shedding light on the unexpected heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic analysis has led to new classification schemes for HNSCC, with different subgroups exhibiting different prognoses. In addition, multiple targets in aberrant signaling pathways have been identified using increasingly sophisticated bio-informatics tools. Advances in technology have allowed for novel delivery mechanisms to introduce genetic material into cells to produce a therapeutic effect by targeting cancer cells via a number of different approaches.A pressing need to develop novel therapies to augment current treatment modalities has led to a number of translational studies involving gene therapy in the treatment of HNSCC. This article will focus on a review of the most recent developments in molecular biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in regards to possible targets for gene therapy, as well as the array of novel therapeutic strategies directed at these targets.

  9. Targeted therapy for cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and treatment in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2006-05-01

    This report of a case of cytokine-refractory metastatic, clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presents some current issues related to use of targeted therapy in the community. Due to the different mechanisms of cytostatic vs. cytotoxic agents, traditional response assessments may not always apply in deciding when to either continue or stop treatment. While community physicians may increasingly focus more on duration of response, symptom relief, and how well patients tolerate treatment, there is a clear need for validated surrogate markers of biologic activity and response, as well as randomized trials that directly compare some of the targeted therapies being applied in advanced RCC.

  10. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Childhood Choroid Plexus Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    adjuvant and...or adjuvant therapy remain the primary methods of treatment for CPC; however tumor progression and relapse is observed in ~70% of cases (2). Despite...T C P1 22 -T A C P1 39 -T B C P1 40 -T B C P1 41 -T B C P1 43 -T B C P1 44 -T B C P1 46 -T C P3 -T C P4 1- TA C P4 3- T C P4 6- T C P5 0- T C P5 1-

  11. Treatment outcome of radiation therapy and concurrent targeted molecular therapy in spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Rhee, Woo Joong; Lee, Jeong Shin; Cho, Yeo Na; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent radiation therapy with or without targeted molecular therapy for the treatment of spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A total of 28 spinal metastatic lesions from RCC patients treated with radiotherapy between June 2009 and June 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen lesions were treated concurrently with targeted molecular therapy (concurrent group) and 15 lesions were not (nonconcurrent group). Local control was defined as lack of radiographically evident local progression and neurological deterioration. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range, 2 to 58 months), the 1-year local progression-free rate (LPFR) was 67.0%. The patients with concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed significantly higher LPFR than those without (p = 0.019). After multivariate analysis, use of concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed a tendency towards improved LPFR (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 1.16). There was no difference in the incidence of systemic progression between concurrent and nonconcurrent groups. No grade ≥2 toxicities were observed during or after radiotherapy. Our study suggests the possibility that concurrent use of targeted molecular therapy during radiotherapy may improve LPFR. Further study with a large population is required to confirm these results.

  12. Docetaxel grafted magnetic nanoparticles as dual-therapeutic agentia for targeting perfusion therapy of urethral carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiao; Wang, Zhen [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory for Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China); Dai, Hong [Chongqing Three Gorges Central Hospital, Department of Urology (China); Wang, Chunmei [Chongqing Three Gorges Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics (China); Xia, Bing [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Medical Research (China); Chen, Lan; Pan, Jun, E-mail: panj@cqu.edu.cn [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory for Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China)

    2014-12-15

    Although urethral carcinoma has a low incidence, it suffers from a poor curative rate for the low retention of medicine around urethra. In the present study, we developed a kind of magnetic targeting perfusion chemotherapy to detain the chemotherapeutic drugs. Docetaxel (TXT) grafted magnetic nanoparticles, of which size was around 40 nm, were obtained by the conjugation of TXT to amino-functionalized iron oxide (NH{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). They have shown great potential to be targeted to and stayed in desired position of urethra under the externally applied magnetism through in vitro mimic urethral study. Furthermore, they have validly inhibited the growth of direct-contacted human urethral squamous carcinoma cells in vitro (up to 56.34 %) by the combination effects of TXT and NH{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, however, less than 3 % of TXT released from the nanoparticles, which was very few to impair the adjacent normal cells and tissues. Therefore, this kind of novel agentia was expected to hold great potential in clinic urethral carcinoma therapy.

  13. Current Status of Studies on Targeted Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoqi Wang; Shaoxiang Wang; Juan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is regarded as one of the most refractory malignancies. A further study of the molecular mechanism of RCC formation has led to a series of successful examples for treatment of patients with advanced RCC. Over the past 20 years, a nonspecific immunotherapy, with cytokines, has been employed as the gold standard for therapy of metastatic RCC. However, with scientific development and clinical testing of new drugs, targeted molecular cancer therapy has become a focus of interest. At the same time, with a better understanding of RCC,the treatment method has converged on anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and related molecular-targeted pathways.A large amount of research and numerous clinical trials have demonstrated the clinical efficacy of the targeted molecular therapies in patients with metastatic RCC. For example sorafenib and sunitinib were approved, in 2005 and 2006 respectively, by the U.S. FDA for treating advanced RCC. In this report, issues such as the importance of VEGF in RCC and the studies of bevacizumab,sunitinib and sorafenib in treating metastatic RCC etc., are reviewed.

  14. Role of cytokine therapy for renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, R.; Hotte, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Starting in the late 1980s, cytokines were considered the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (rcc) because of a lack of improved survival with either chemotherapy or hormonal therapy alone. The cytokine agents interferon alfa (ifnα) and interleukin-2 (il-2) have been the most evaluated, but a low overall response rate and a marginal survival advantage, coupled with significant toxicity, make these therapies less than ideal. Although complete tumour responses have occasionally been seen with high-dose il-2, this therapy is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and its approval has been based on limited nonrandomized evidence. Newer anti-angiogenesis agents have been evaluated as single agents and in combination with infα, and these are now considered the standard of care for most patients with rcc. However, cytokines may still occasionally be recommended when angiogenesis inhibitors are not available or are contraindicated. In the present paper, we discuss the evidence for the use of cytokine therapy in the setting of pre– and post–targeted therapy for rcc. PMID:19478896

  15. Study on the possibility of insulin as a carrier of IUdR for hepatocellular carcinoma-targeted therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hong Ou; An-Ren Kuang; Xian Peng; Yu-Guo Zhong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the possibility of using insulin as a carrier for carcinoma-targeted therapy mediated by receptor, and to investigate the expression of insulin receptor in human hepatocellular carcinoma and the receptor binding characteristics of insulin-IUdR (iododeoxyuridine).METHODS: IUdR was covalently conjugated to insulin.Receptor binding assays of 125Ⅰ-insulin to human hepatocellular carcinoma and its adjacent tissue were performed.Competitive displacements of 125Ⅰ-insulin by insulin and insulin-IUdR to bind to insulin receptor were respectively carried out. Statistical comparisons between the means were made with paired t-test at a confidence level of 95%.RESULTS: The data indicated that there were high- and low-affinity binding sites for 125Ⅰ-insulin on both hepatocellular carcinoma and its adjacent tissue. Hepatocellular carcinoma had a significantly higher Bmax for high affinity binding site than its adjacent liver tissue (P<0.05, t=2.275). Insulin-IUdR competed as effectively as insulin with 125Ⅰ-insulin for binding to insulin receptor. Values of IC501, C502, KI1 and KI2 for Values of IC50l and KI1 for insulin-IUdR were significantly higher than that for insulin (P<0.01,t=4.537 and 4.813).CONCLUSION: It is possible to use insulin as a carrier for carcinoma-targeted therapy mediated by receptor.

  16. Targeted Therapy of Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarene Koh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy using a patient’s own T cells redirected to recognize and kill tumor cells has achieved promising results in metastatic melanoma and leukemia. This technique involves harnessing a patient’s T cells and then delivering a gene that encodes a new T cell receptor (TCR or a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR that allow the cells to recognize specific cancer antigens. The prospect of using engineered T cell therapy for persistent viral infections like hepatitis B virus (HBV and their associated malignancies is promising. We recently tested in a first-in-man clinical trial, the ability of HBV-specific TCR-redirected T cells to target HBsAg-productive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and demonstrated that these redirected T cells recognized HCC cells with HBV–DNA integration [1] We discuss here the possibility to use HBV-specific TCR-redirected T cells targeting hepatitis B viral antigens as a tumor specific antigen in patients with HBV-related HCC, and the potential challenges facing the development of this new immunotherapeutic strategy.

  17. Chemotherapies and targeted therapies in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: from laboratory to clinic.

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    Voiculescu, Mihai; Winkler, Robert E; Moscovici, Marius; Neuman, Manuela G

    2008-09-01

    Chronic liver diseases alone or in conjunction with other risk factors result in increased liver damage leading to inflammation and fibrosis of the liver and rising rates of liver cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This review will address the determinants of liver injury at the initiation of the tumor and the risk factors for rapid disease progression. Regardless of the etiology, the unifying feature of these tumors are their propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. Liver disease is often associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis, which is the case in viral and autoimmune hepatitis, cholestatic diseases, and metabolic disorders. Disruption of apoptosis is responsible for HCC. The mechanisms by which apoptosis occurs in the liver might provide insights into HCC and suggest possible treatments. We aim to better understand the factors that distinguish a relatively long course of HCC from one with rapid progression. We will accomplish this task with three integrated ideas: 1 - the role of epidemiology in establishing the risk factors of co-morbidity with alcohol and hepatitis viruses; 2 - the role of apoptosis and anti-apoptotic signals in the progression of HCC; and 3 - the role of new advancements that have emerged in the field of molecular-directed chemotherapeutics in HCC in recent years. This review will also aim to describe the molecular targeted therapies of non-resectable HCC and the ways of effective combination in this otherwise chemo-resistant tumor.

  18. Emerging therapies for thyroid carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, S

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed endocrine malignancy. Its incidence is currently rising worldwide. The discovery of genetic mutations associated with the development of thyroid cancer, such as BRAF and RET, has lead to the development of new drugs which target the pathways which they influence. Despite recent advances, the prognosis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is still unfavourable. In this review we look at emerging novel therapies for the treatment of well-differentiated and medullary thyroid carcinoma, and advances and future directions in the management of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  19. Multidisciplinary management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted therapies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escudier, B.; Osanto, S.; Ljungberg, B.; Porta, C.; Wagstaff, J.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Gore, M.; Bex, A.; Bellmunt, J.; Bracarda, S.; Franklin, A.; Honore, P.H.; Ravaud, A.; Steijn, J.; Aziz, Z.; Akaza, H.

    2012-01-01

    The use of targeted agents to treat metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has significantly extended progression-free and overall survival but raises issues relating to the long-term delivery of care and the sustained monitoring of efficacy and toxicities, certain of which have not previously been

  20. Targeted therapy of renal cell carcinoma: synergistic activity of cG250-TNF and IFNg.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, S.; Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C.; Adrian, N.; Oosterwijk, E.; Fischer, E.; Wuest, T.; Stenner, F.; Perani, A.; Cohen, L.; Knuth, A.; Divgi, C.; Jager, D.; Scott, A.M.; Ritter, G.; Old, L.J.; Renner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic targeting of G250/Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX) represents a promising strategy for treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The well characterized human-mouse chimeric G250 (cG250) antibody has been shown in human studies to specifically enrich in CA-IX positive tumors and was cho

  1. Porous Matrix Stiffness Modulates Response to Targeted Therapy in Breast Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuiying; Li, Xiang; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jianjun; Han, Xinxiao; Ha, Qing; Feng, Jiantao; Liao, Fulong; Li, Dongguo; Han, Dong

    2016-09-01

    Porous matrix stiffness modulates response to targeted therapy. Poroelastic behavior within porous matrix may modulate the molecule events in cell-matrix and cell-cell interaction like the complex formation of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-Src-α6β4 integrin, influencing the targeted therapy with lapatinib.

  2. [Three Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated with Targeted Therapy of Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma : Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kimiaki; Takai, Manabu; Kawata, Kei; Horie, Kengo; Kikuchi, Mina; Kato, Taku; Mizutani, Kosuke; Seike, Kensaku; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) used for advanced renal cell carcinoma. Treatment with sorafenib prolongs progression-free survival in patients with advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. However, in spite of its therapeutic efficacy, sorafenib causes a wide range of adverse events. Cardiovascular adverse events have been observed when sorafenib was used with targeted agents. Although these adverse events like hypertension, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac ischemia or infarction were manageable with standard medical therapies in most cases, some had a poor clinical outcome. We report three cases of acute myocardial infarction associated with sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  3. Recent advances of novel targeted therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jed A. Katzel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies have proven beneficial for patients suffering from a number of different malignancies, including cancers of the head and neck. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor has shown benefit in combination with radiation for untreated patients or as a single agent for patients with platinum resistant disease. Cetuximab is the only targeted agent currently approved by the Federal Drug Administration for the treatment of head and neck cancer. A number of other agents have shown promising initial results including intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors, agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, as well as other classes of novel therapies. Some of the data supporting the use of targeted therapy, including agents not yet approved in head and neck cancer, will be presented in this review. As our understanding of the cancer cell signaling pathways and novel targeted agents increases, the potential for treatment with reduced toxicity and improved clinical outcomes will become a reality.

  4. Changing the paradigm:the potential for targeted therapy in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Megan L Ludwig; Andrew C Birkeland; Rebecca Hoesli; Paul Swiecicki; Matthew E Spector; J Chad Brenner

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Historically, it has been a model example for organ preservation and treatment stratification paradigms. Unfortunately, survival for LSCC has stagnated over the past few decades. As the era of next-generation sequencing and personalized treatment for cancer approaches, LSCC may be an ideal disease for consideration of further treatment stratification and personalization. Here, we will discuss the important history of LSCC as a model system for organ preservation, unique and potentially targetable genetic signatures of LSCC, and methods for bringing stratified, personalized treatment strategies to the 21st century.

  5. HER2 overexpression and amplification is present in a subset of ovarian mucinous carcinomas and can be targeted with trastuzumab therapy

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    Swenerton Kenneth D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response rate of ovarian mucinous carcinomas to paclitaxel/carboplatin is low, prompting interest in targeted molecular therapies. We investigated HER2 expression and amplification, and the potential for trastuzumab therapy in this histologic subtype of ovarian cancer. Methods HER2 status was tested in 33 mucinous carcinomas and 16 mucinous borderline ovarian tumors (BOT. Five cases with documented recurrence and with tissue from the recurrence available for testing were analyzed to determine whether HER2 amplification status changed over time. Three prospectively identified recurrent mucinous ovarian carcinomas were assessed for HER2 amplification and patients received trastuzumab therapy with conventional chemotherapy. Results Amplification of HER2 was observed in 6/33 (18.2% mucinous carcinomas and 3/16 (18.8% BOT. HER2 amplification in primary mucinous carcinomas was not associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence. The prospectively identified recurrent mucinous carcinomas showed overexpression and amplification of HER2; one patient's tumor responded dramatically to trastuzumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy, while another patient experienced an isolated central nervous system recurrence after trastuzumab therapy. Conclusion HER2 amplification is relatively common in ovarian mucinous carcinomas (6/33, 18.2%, although not of prognostic significance. Trastuzumab therapy is a treatment option for patients with mucinous carcinoma when the tumor has HER2 amplification and overexpression.

  6. Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma: An Overview on Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Ana Vanessa; Bousbaa, Hassan; Ferreira, Domingos; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, most cases are on an advanced and inoperable stage, with limited therapeutic options. Existing therapies have shown to be insufficient and novel strategies are urgently necessary. New advances in understanding the disease at cellular and molecular level however have helped researchers in devising novel strategies for therapy. These directed therapies limit cancer growth by targeting specific molecules related with tumor progression. Such strategies have shown to be more effective than chemotherapy and radiotherapy and can be complemented to existing therapeutic paradigm in augmenting beneficial outcome. Lung cancer could benefit from such innovative therapy. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific gene silencing mechanism and, since its discovery widespread applications have pointed it as a powerful tool in cancer treatment. Several on-going clinical trials have been successfully demonstrating its potential as a novel therapeutic, including in the treatment of NSCLC. Here, we revise the recent findings concerning the therapeutic effects of molecular variations associated with NSCLC and where targeted therapies stand in its treatment, with special focus on RNAi-mediated gene silencing as a powerful strategy for NSCLC treatment.

  7. Basal Cell Carcinoma: From the Molecular Understanding of the Pathogenesis to Targeted Therapy of Progressive Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Göppner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to intensified research over the past decade, the Hedgehog (HH pathway has been identified as a pivotal defect implicated in roughly 25% of all cancers. As one of the most frequent cancer worldwide, the development of Basal cell carcinoma (BCC due to activation of the HH pathway has been convincingly demonstrated. Thus the discovery of this central tumor-promoting signalling pathway has not only revolutionized the understanding of BCC carcinogenesis but has also enabled the development of a completely novel therapeutic approach. Targeting just a few of several potential mutations, HH inhibitors such as GDC-0449 achieved already the first promising results in metastatic or locally advanced BCC. This paper summarizes the current understanding of BCC carcinogenesis and describes the current “mechanism-based” therapeutic strategies.

  8. Targeted therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma with aptamer-functionalized biodegradable nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigum, Shannon; McIvor, Elizabeth; Munoz, Christopher; Feng, Richard; Cantu, Travis; Walsh, Kyle; Betancourt, Tania

    2016-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer, occurring primarily in regions where viral hepatitis infections are common. Unfortunately, most HCC cases remain undiagnosed until late stages of the disease when patient outcome is poor, typically limiting survival from a few months to a year after initial diagnosis. In order to better care for HCC patients, new target-specific approaches are needed to improve early detection and therapeutic intervention. In this work, polymeric nanoparticles functionalized with a HCC-specific aptamer were examined as potential targeted drug delivery vehicles. Specifically, doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles were prepared via nanoprecipitation of blends of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)- b-poly(ethylene glycol). These particles were further functionalized with the HCC-specific TLS11a aptamer. The in vitro interaction and therapeutic efficacy of the aptamer and aptamer-functionalized nanoparticles were characterized in a hepatoma cell line. Nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, roughly 100-125 nm in diameter, with a low polydispersity (≤0.2) and slightly negative surface potential. Doxorubicin was encapsulated within the particles at 40 % efficiency. Drug release was found to occur through anomalous transport influenced by diffusion and polymer relaxation, releasing 50 % doxorubicin in the first 10 h and full release occurring within 36 h. Confocal microscopy confirmed binding and attachment of aptamer-targeted nanoparticles to the cell surface of cultured HCC cells. Efficacy studies demonstrated a significant improvement in doxorubicin delivery and cell-killing capacity using the aptamer-functionalized, drug-loaded nanoparticles versus controls further supporting use of aptamer nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for HCC tumors.

  9. Combined anti-angiogenic therapy targeting PDGF and VEGF receptors lowers the interstitial fluid pressure in a murine experimental carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kłosowska-Wardega

    Full Text Available Elevation of the interstitial fluid pressure (IFP of carcinoma is an obstacle in treatment of tumors by chemotherapy and correlates with poor drug uptake. Previous studies have shown that treatment with inhibitors of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling lowers the IFP of tumors and improve chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of PDGFR and VEGFR inhibitors could further reduce the IFP of KAT-4 human carcinoma tumors. The tumor IFP was measured using the wick-in-needle technique. The combination of STI571 and PTK/ZK gave an additive effect on the lowering of the IFP of KAT-4 tumors, but the timing of the treatment was crucial. The lowering of IFP following combination therapy was accompanied by vascular remodeling and decreased vascular leakiness. The effects of the inhibitors on the therapeutic efficiency of Taxol were investigated. Whereas the anti-PDGF and anti-VEGF treatment did not significantly inhibit tumor growth, the inhibitors enhanced the effect of chemotherapy. Despite having an additive effect in decreasing tumor IFP, the combination therapy did not further enhance the effect of chemotherapy. Simultaneous targeting of VEGFR and PDGFR kinase activity may be a useful strategy to decrease tumor IFP, but the timing of the inhibitors should be carefully determined.

  10. Efficacy of Second-line Targeted Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma According to Change from Baseline in International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium Prognostic Category

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Ian D; Xie, Wanling; Pezaro, Carmel;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that changes in International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) prognostic category at start of second-line therapy (2L) for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) might predict response. OBJECTIVE: To assess outcomes of 2L according to type....... PATIENT SUMMARY: The pattern of treatment failure might help to predict what the next treatment should be for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma....

  11. Differential response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies in patient-derived tumor tissue xenograft models of colon carcinoma and related metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ketao; Lan, Huanrong; Cao, Feilin; Han, Na; Xu, Zhenzhen; Li, Guangliang; He, Kuifeng; Teng, Lisong

    2012-08-01

    Heterogeneity in primary tumors and related metastases may result in failure of antitumor therapies, particularly in targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases were used to evaluate the response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies. Our results showed that primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases have a different response rate to anti-EGFR (cetuximab) and anti-VEGF (bevacizumab) therapies. However, the underlying mechanism of these types of phenomenon is still unclear. To investigate whether such phenomena may result from the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and related metastases, we compared the expression levels of cell signaling pathway proteins using immunohistochemical staining and western blotting, and the gene status of KRAS using pyrosequencing in the same primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastatic tissues which were used for establishing the PDTT xenograft models. Our results showed that the expression levels of EGFR, VEGF, Akt/pAkt, ERK/pERK, MAPK/pMAPK, and mTOR/pmTOR were different in primary colon carcinoma and matched lymphatic and hepatic metastases although the KRAS gene status in all cases was wild-type. Our results indicate that the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases may result in differences in the response to dual-inhibition of EGFR and VEGF.

  12. Changes in peripheral blood immune cells: their prognostic significance in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients treated with molecular targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Minoru; Kubo, Taro; Komatsu, Kenji; Fujisaki, Akira; Terauchi, Fumihito; Natsui, Shinsuke; Nukui, Akinori; Kurokawa, Shinsuke; Morita, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    Recently, novel molecular targeted agents markedly changed the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with promising results. However, there is little understanding of how these agents affect immune cell populations in RCC, an immunogenic tumor. Therefore, we investigated the changes in the peripheral blood immune cells in 58 RCC patients during the first 4 weeks of treatment with sorafenib, sunitinib, everolimus, or temsirolimus and evaluated whether these changes were associated with clinical outcomes. The immunological parameters were the proportion of type-1 (Th1) and type-2 (Th2) T cells, regulatory T cells (Treg), mature dendritic cells, and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). The changes in these immune cells varied with the agents and the clinical response, dichotomized by the median progression-free survival (PFS) time (PFS-short or PFS-long). A significant decrease in the Th1/Th2 ratio was seen after sunitinib treatment only in the PFS-short group, suggesting a shift toward Th2 that down-regulates host immunity. The NLRs indicative of the balance between host immunity and cancer-related inflammation were consistently lower in the PFS-long group than in the PFS-short group, suggesting that lower NLR is associated with better clinical response. Only sunitinib decreased NLR remarkably regardless of PFS status, which may favor anti-tumor immunity. When patients were dichotomized by the cutoff values, Th1/Th2 ratio was not associated with PFS in any targeted therapy, while lower pre-treatment NLR was associated with longer PFS in each targeted therapy. In addition, in RCC patients given sequential targeted therapy, those with a lower baseline NLR survived significantly longer compared with the counterparts. Moreover, those whose baseline NLR was sustained low during the initial therapy survived the longest. Our results suggest the diverse changes in host immune cells in RCC patients during targeted therapy. The changes in NLR during the early phase of

  13. Cellular Signaling Pathway Alterations and Potential Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Giunti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parafollicular C-cell-derived medullary thyroid cancer (MTC comprises 3% to 4% of all thyroid cancers. While cytotoxic treatments have been shown to have limited efficacy, targeted molecular therapies that inhibit rearranged during transfection (RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors that are mainly involved in angiogenesis have shown great promise in the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced MTC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as vandetanib, which is already approved for the treatment of progressive MTC, and cabozantinib have shown distinct advantages with regard to rates of disease response and control. However, these types of tyrosine kinase inhibitor compounds are able to concurrently block several types of targets, which limits the understanding of RET as a specific target. Moreover, important resistances to tyrosine kinase inhibitors can occur, which limit the long-term efficacy of these treatments. Deregulated cellular signaling pathways and genetic alterations in MTC, particularly the activation of the RAS/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR cascades and RET crosstalk signaling, are now emerging as novel and potentially promising therapeutic treatments for aggressive MTC.

  14. Targeted Therapies: Bevacizumab and interferon-alpha in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-01

    Rini and colleagues provide additional data on bevacizumab and interferon-alpha in clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney; a comparison of these results with the findings from contemporary trials suggests that bevacizumab and interferon-alpha is another clinically useful treatment option for patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.

  15. Construction of a regulable gene therapy vector targeting for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Ying Lu; Yan-Fang Sui; Zeng-Shan Li; Cheng-En Pan; Jing Ye; Wen-Yong Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a gene modified hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specific EGFP expression vector regulated by abbreviated cis-acting element of AFP gene.METHODS: The minimal essential DNA segments of AFP gene enhancer and promoter were synthesized through PCR from Genome DNA of HepG2 cells. Gene fragments were then cloned into the multiple cloning site of non-promoter EGFP vector pEGFP-t. Recombinant plasmid was transferred into positive or negative AFP cell lines by means of lipofectamine. The expression of EGFP was tested by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on the expression of EGFP was tested in different concentrations.RESULTS: By the methods of restriction digestion and sequence analyses we confirmed that the length, position and orientation of inserted genes of cis-acting element of AFP were all correct. The transcription of EGFP was under the control of AFP cis-acting element. The expressing EGFP can only been detected in AFP producing hepatoma cells.The expression rate of EGFP in G418 screened cell line was 34.9±4.1%. 48 h after adding 1×10-7M retinoic acid, EGFP expression rate was 14.7±3.5%. The activity of AFP gene promoter was significantly suppressed by addition of 1×10-7M retinoic acid (P<0.05, P=0.003, t=6.488).CONCLUSION: This recombinant expression vector can be used as a gene therapy vector for HCC. The expression of tumor killing gene will be confined within the site of tumor and the activity of which can be regulated by retinoic acid.

  16. Mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinoma and challengesand opportunities for molecular targeted therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) have fallen dramatically in China and elsewhereover the past several decades. Nonetheless, HCC remainsa major public health issue as one of the mostcommon malignant tumors worldwide and one of theleading causes of death caused by cancer in China.Hepatocarcinogenesis is a very complex biologicalprocess associated with many environmental risk factorsand factors in heredity, including abnormal activation ofcellular and molecular signaling pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin, hedgehog, MAPK, AKT, and ERK signalingpathways, and the balance between the activationand inactivation of the proto-oncogenes and anti-oncogenes,and the differentiation of liver cancer stem cells.Molecule-targeted therapy, a new approach for thetreatment of liver cancer, blocks the growth of cancercells by interfering with the molecules required forcarcinogenesis and tumor growth, making it both specificand selective. However, there is no one drug completelydesigned for liver cancer, and further developmentin the research of liver cancer targeted drugs is nowalmost stagnant. The purpose of this review is to discussrecent advances in our understanding of the molecularmechanisms underlying the development of HCC andin the development of novel strategies for cancertherapeutics.

  17. RNAI-based gene therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma: targeting ABC transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borel, F.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary cancer of the liver, and HCC patients have an average survival of only 5% at 5-year post-diagnosis. This low survival has several identified causes, among which multidrug resistance i.e. resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment. These issues need be addres

  18. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant small-molecule targeted therapy in high-risk renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, A.; Gharajeh, A.; Sheikh, A; Pinthus, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Non-localized renal cell carcinoma (rcc) carries a poor prognosis with a significant risk of mortality for patients. Traditionally, interleukin-2 and interferon alfa have been administered in this setting, with high toxicity and limited improvement in cancer-specific survival. However, newer agents such as sunitinib, sorafenib, bevacizumab, and temsirolimus have demonstrated great potential and provide a new frontier in the management of high-risk rcc. Methods We queried PubMed and...

  19. Change in Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte Ratio in Response to Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma as a Prognosticator and Biomarker of Efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Templeton, Arnoud J; Knox, Jennifer J; Lin, Xun

    2016-01-01

    at baseline and 6 (± 2) wk later. A landmark analysis at 8 wk was conducted to explore the prognostic value of relative NLR change on overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and objective response rate using Cox or logistic regression models, adjusted for variables in IMDC score and NLR values......BACKGROUND: Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), if elevated, is associated with worse outcomes in several malignancies. OBJECTIVE: Investigation of NLR at baseline and during therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective analysis of 1199 patients...... from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC cohort) and 4350 patients from 12 prospective randomized trials (validation cohort). INTERVENTION: Targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: NLR was examined...

  20. The 2008 Okuda lecture: Management of hepatocellular carcinoma: from surveillance to molecular targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Masatoshi

    2010-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is responsible for approximately 600,000-700,000 deaths worldwide. It is highly prevalent in the Asia-Pacific region and Africa, and is increasing in Western countries. Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) alone is insufficient for HCC screening. A combination with other tumor markers, such as PIVKA-II and AFP-L3, and periodical ultrasound surveillance is necessary. Sensitivity of AFP in depicting HCC is highest, followed by PIVKA-II and AFP-L3, but the order of the specificity is inverse, AFP-L3, PIVKA-II, and AFP. Sonazoid-enhanced ultrasound (US) is extremely useful to characterize hepatic tumors equal to or more than multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT). Sonazoid-enhanced US with defect re-perfusion imaging is a breakthrough technique in the treatment of HCC. Defect re-perfusion imaging will markedly change the therapeutic strategy for liver cancer. Gd-EOB-DTPA-magnetic resonance imaging is a newly developed imaging technique in the detection and diagnosis of HCC. It is the most sensitive tool in the differentiation of early HCC from dysplastic nodules. Regarding the treatment strategy, there has been no established systemic chemotherapy for advanced HCC, except for Sorafenib. Empirically, intrahepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy using implanted reservoir port is known to be effective in response rate and overall survival for advanced HCC with vascular invasion. Sorafenib in combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization or adjuvant use after ablation or resection will significantly prolong the life expectancy if ongoing clinical trials provide positive results. In conclusion, it is expected that readers will gain deeper insight into the latest progress and updated diagnosis and treatment of HCC described in this review.

  1. Clinical and Pathological Complete Remission in a Patient With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC Treated With Sunitinib: Is mRCC Curable With Targeted Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amishi Y. Shah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (mRCC who presented with primary tumor in situ in the left kidney and metastases to bone, liver, lungs, and brain. After over 5 years of sunitinib therapy and subsequent cytoreductive left nephrectomy, the patient achieved radiographic complete response (CR and had pathologic CR in the nephrectomy specimen. Durable clinical and pathological CRs are possible with targeted agents, even with primary tumor in situ and widely disseminated metastases. Ongoing research will define the optimal duration of systemic therapy in exceptional responders and identify the molecular determinants of response and resistance.

  2. Targeted therapy in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Smalley, Keiran S M; Glass, L Frank; Trimble, James S; Sondak, Vernon K

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. We review the latest developments in our understanding of the role of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling in melanoma, and the development of inhibitors of this pathway. We also explore alternative mutations seen in melanoma, such as NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, and the drug development that is ongoing based on this biology. Strategies for the management of the vexing clinical problem of BRAF inhibitor resistance, primarily via combination therapy, are outlined. With the recent approval of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib for stage IV metastatic melanoma, use of this agent is expanding in the United States. Thus, management of the skin toxicities of this agent, such as squamous cell carcinomas, "acneiform" eruptions, hand-foot syndrome, and panniculitis, will be a growing problem facing dermatologists today. We discuss the toxicities of targeted agents in use for melanoma, in particular the dermatologic effects and the management of these skin toxicities.

  3. Hedgehog signaling pathway: A novel target for cancer therapy: Vismodegib, a promising therapeutic option in treatment of basal cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afroz Abidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog signaling pathway is one of the major regulators of cell growth and differentiation during embryogenesis and early development. It is mostly quiescent in adults but inappropriate mutation or deregulation of the pathway is involved in the development of cancers. Therefore; recently it has been recognized as a novel therapeutic target in cancers. Basal cell carcinomas (BCC and medulloblastomas are the two most common cancers identified with mutations in components of the hedgehog pathway. The discovery of targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibitors has shown promising results in clinical trials, several of which are still undergoing clinical evaluation. Vismodegib (GDC-0449, an oral hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor has reached the farthest in clinical development. Initial clinical trials in basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma have shown good efficacy and safety and hence were approved by U.S. FDA for use in advanced basal cell carcinomas. This review highlights the molecular basis and the current knowledge of hedgehog pathway activation in different types of human cancers as well as the present and future prospects of the novel drug vismodegib.

  4. Hedgehog signaling pathway: a novel target for cancer therapy: vismodegib, a promising therapeutic option in treatment of basal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Afroz

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway is one of the major regulators of cell growth and differentiation during embryogenesis and early development. It is mostly quiescent in adults but inappropriate mutation or deregulation of the pathway is involved in the development of cancers. Therefore; recently it has been recognized as a novel therapeutic target in cancers. Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and medulloblastomas are the two most common cancers identified with mutations in components of the hedgehog pathway. The discovery of targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibitors has shown promising results in clinical trials, several of which are still undergoing clinical evaluation. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), an oral hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor has reached the farthest in clinical development. Initial clinical trials in basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma have shown good efficacy and safety and hence were approved by U.S. FDA for use in advanced basal cell carcinomas. This review highlights the molecular basis and the current knowledge of hedgehog pathway activation in different types of human cancers as well as the present and future prospects of the novel drug vismodegib.

  5. Targeted Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... targeted therapies are directed against HER-2, including trastuzumab (Herceptin®), which is approved to treat certain breast and ... traditional chemotherapy drugs. For example, the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin®) has been used in combination with docetaxel , ...

  6. Short-term and long-term efficacy of 7 targeted therapies for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a network meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Meng; Hong, Duo; Ma, Teng-Chuang; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Han, Jin-Hang; Sun, Jun; Xu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A variety of targeted drug therapies in clinical trials have been proven to be effective for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our study aims to compare the short-term and long-term efficacies of different targeted drugs in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (AHCC) treatment using a network meta-analysis approach. Methods: PubMed, Embase, Ovid, EBSCO, and Cochrane central register of controlled trials were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of different targeted therapies implemented to patients with AHCC. And the retrieval resulted in 7 targeted drugs, namely, sorafenib, ramucirumab, everolimus, brivanib, tivantinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib+erlotinib. Direct and indirect evidence were combined to evaluate stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD), complete response (CR), partial response (PR), disease control rate (DCR), overall response ratio (ORR), overall survival (OS), and surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) of patients with AHCC. Results: A total of 11 RCTs were incorporated into our analysis, including 6594 patients with AHCC, among which 1619 patients received placebo treatment and 4975 cases had targeted therapies. The results revealed that in comparison with placebo, sorafenib, and ramucirumab displayed better short-term efficacy in terms of PR and ORR, and brivanib was better in ORR. Regarding long-term efficacy, sorafenib and sorafenib+erlotinib treatments exhibited longer OS. The data of cluster analysis showed that ramucirumab or sorafenib+erlotinib presented relatively better short-term efficacy for the treatment of AHCC. Conclusion: This network meta-analysis shows that ramucirumab and sorafenib+erlotinib may be the better targeted drugs for AHCC patients, and sorafenib+erlotinib achieved a better long-term efficacy. PMID:27930578

  7. Health Economic Changes as a Result of Implementation of Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: National Results from DARENCA Study 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne V; Donskov, Frede; Kjellberg, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on the economic consequences of implementing targeted therapy (TT) for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a real-world setting. OBJECTIVE: To analyze health care and productivity costs for TT implementation in a national cohort of patients. DESIGN, SETTING...... information on all contacts with primary and secondary health sector). Health care and productivity costs were retrieved from the Danish case-mix system and Coherent Social Statistics, respectively. Drug costs were calculated separately from procedure codes and retail prices. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS...... in the pattern of health care costs for patients with metastatic kidney cancer after implementation of targeted therapy compared to an immunotherapy control period; however, total health care costs and income from employment were without significant changes....

  8. Improved overall survival after implementation of targeted therapy for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Results from the Danish Renal Cancer Group (DARENCA) study-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne V.; Donskov, Frede; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2014-01-01

    in second line treatment (20% versus 40%, P = 0.0104), a significant increased median OS (11.5 versus 17.2 months, P = 0.0435) whereas survival for untreated patients remained unchanged. Multivariate analysis validated known prognostic factors. Moreover, treatment start years 2008 (HR 0.74, 95% CI, 0......AbstractAim To evaluate the implementation of targeted therapy on overall survival (OS) in a complete national cohort of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods All Danish patients with mRCC referred for first line treatment with immunotherapy, TKIs or mTOR-inhibitors between.......06–0.60; P = 0.0051) were significantly associated with longer OS. Conclusion This retrospective study documents that the implementation of targeted therapy has resulted in significantly improved treatment rates and overall survival in a complete national cohort of treated mRCC patients....

  9. Chemoradiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: focus on targeted therapies; La chimioradiotherapie des carcinomes epidermoides des voies aerodigestives superieures: point sur les therapeutiques ciblees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozec, A. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Dept. de Chirurgie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France); Thariat, J.; Bensadoun, R.J. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Dept. de Radiotherapie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France); Milano, G. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Unite d' Oncopharmacologie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France)

    2008-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential treatment for many patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Its association with molecular targeted therapies represents a real progress. Among the recent advances in the molecular targeted therapy of cancer, the applications centred on E.G.F.R. are currently the most promising and the most advanced at clinical level. Considering the set of therapeutic tools targeting E.G.F.R., there are at present two well-identified emerging categories of drugs with monoclonal antibodies, on the one hand, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, on the other. In many preclinical studies, the combination of anti-E.G.F.R. drugs with irradiation has led to additive or supra-additive cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, anti-angiogenic agents have shown promising results in association with anti-E.G.F.R. drugs and radiotherapy. This research effort has recently produced encouraging clinical results in advanced head and neck cancer with combination of cetuximab (an anti-E.G.F.R. monoclonal antibody) with irradiation with a significant impact on patient survival. Active and efficient clinical research is currently ongoing to determine the place of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of head and neck cancer, particularly in association with radiotherapy. (authors)

  10. Cellular Adaptation to VEGF-Targeted Antiangiogenic Therapy Induces Evasive Resistance by Overproduction of Alternative Endothelial Cell Growth Factors in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Seok; Raven, Peter A; Frees, Sebastian; Gust, Kilian; Fazli, Ladan; Ettinger, Susan; Hong, Sung Joon; Kollmannsberger, Cristian; Gleave, Martin E; So, Alan I

    2015-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted antiangiogenic therapy significantly inhibits the growth of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Eventually, therapy resistance develops in even the most responsive cases, but the mechanisms of resistance remain unclear. Herein, we developed two tumor models derived from an RCC cell line by conditioning the parental cells to two different stresses caused by VEGF-targeted therapy (sunitinib exposure and hypoxia) to investigate the mechanism of resistance to such therapy in RCC. Sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells in vitro did not show resistance to sunitinib compared with parental cells, but when tested in vivo, these cells appeared to be highly resistant to sunitinib treatment. Hypoxia-conditioned Caki-1 cells are more resistant to hypoxia and have increased vascularity due to the upregulation of VEGF production; however, they did not develop sunitinib resistance either in vitro or in vivo. Human endothelial cells were more proliferative and showed increased tube formation in conditioned media from sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells compared with parental cells. Gene expression profiling using RNA microarrays revealed that several genes related to tissue development and remodeling, including the development and migration of endothelial cells, were upregulated in sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells compared with parental and hypoxia-conditioned cells. These findings suggest that evasive resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy is acquired by activation of VEGF-independent angiogenesis pathways induced through interactions with VEGF-targeted drugs, but not by hypoxia. These results emphasize that increased inhibition of tumor angiogenesis is required to delay the development of resistance to antiangiogenic therapy and maintain the therapeutic response in RCC.

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Therapy and prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hubert E Blum

    2005-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. The major etiologies and risk factors for the development of HCC are well defined and some of the multiple steps involved in hepatocarcinogenesis have been elucidated in recent years. Despite these scientific advances and the implementation of measures for the early detection of HCC in patients at risk, patient survival has not improved during the last three decades. This is due to the advanced stage of the disease at the time of clinical presentation and limited therapeutic options. The therapeutic options fall into five main categories: surgical interventions including tumor resection and liver transplantation, percutaneous interventions including ethanol injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation, transarterial interventions including embolization and chemoembolization, radiation therapy and drugs as well as gene and immune therapies. These therapeutic strategies have been evaluated in part in randomized controlled clinical trials that are the basis for therapeutic recommendations. Though surgery, percutaneous and transarterial interventions are effective in patients with limited disease (1-3 lesions, <5 cm in diameter) and compensated underlying liver disease (cirrhosis Child A), at the time of diagnosis more than 80% patients present with multicentric HCC and advanced liver disease or comorbidities that restrict the therapeutic measures to best supportive care. In order to reduce the morbidity and mortality of HCC, early diagnosis and the development of novel systemic therapies for advanced disease, including drugs, gene and immune therapies as well as primary HCC prevention are of paramount importance. Furthermore, secondary HCC prevention after successful therapeutic interventions needs to be improved in order to make an impact on the survival of patients with HCC. New technologies, including gene expression profiling and proteomic analyses, should allow to further

  12. Clinical outcome of advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with targeted therapy: is there a difference between young and old patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang G

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Guiming Zhang,1,2,* Yao Zhu,1,2,* Dahai Dong,3 Weijie Gu,1,2 Hailiang Zhang,1,2 Lijiang Sun,3 Dingwei Ye1,2 1Department of Urology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Urology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: To assess whether the clinical outcome of advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC treated with targeted therapy differs between young and old patients. Patients and methods: A total of 327 patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma and mRCC who received targeted therapy in two Chinese clinical centers were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were stratified into three groups: young (aged <45 years, middle-aged (aged 45–64 years, and old (aged ≥65 years. Overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS curves were drawn using the Kaplan–Meier method, and Cox's proportional hazard regression model was used to compare OS and PFS within age groups. Results: There were no significant differences among young, middle-aged, and old groups in terms of OS (P=0.087, whereas PFS in the old group was significantly better than in the young and middle-aged groups (P=0.043. Both OS and PFS in the younger groups (aged <65 years were significantly worse than in the old group (age ≥65 years; median OS, 28.1 vs 28.7 months [P=0.029]; median PFS, 11.4 vs 14 months [P=0.015]. No difference in OS or PFS was found between the young and middle-aged groups. After adjusting for sex, body mass index, smoking status, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score, history of cytokines, and Fuhrman grade, old age was an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS and PFS compared with younger age (<65 years (OS, hazard ratio, 0.552 [95

  13. HepatomiRNoma: The proposal of a new network of targets for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Fabrizio; Bronte, Giuseppe; Fanale, Daniele; Caruso, Stefano; Bronte, Enrico; Bavetta, Maria Grazia; Fiorentino, Eugenio; Rolfo, Christian; Bazan, Viviana; Di Marco, Vito; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) underwent a huge advancement in the last years. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been also studied to provide a new tool for early diagnosis of high risk patients, for prognostic classification to identify those patients who benefit cancer treatment and for predictive definition to select the right targeted drug. In this review we revised all the available data obtained to explore the role of miRNAs in HCC. This analysis led to identification of miRNAs which could gain a diagnostic, prognostic or predictive role. The results of studies on miRNAs involved in HCC are initial and far from providing scientific evidences to translate into clinical practice. We propose a classification of these miRNAs, that we could name HepatomiRNoma as a whole. Anyway prospective studies have to be designed to clarify the real clinical impact of this new tool.

  14. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  15. Targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Neal Rosen; Carlos Arteaga

    2011-01-01

    With unprecedented understanding of molecular events underlying human cancer in this genomic era, a large number of drugs specifically targeting hypothesized oncogenic drivers to which tumors are potentially addicted to have been developed and continue to be developed. These targeted cancer therapies are being actively tested in clinical trials with mixed successes. This editorial provides an overview on successful targeted cancer drugs on the market and those drugs that are in late clinical development stages. Importantly, the article lays out main challenges in developing molecular targeted therapies and potential path forward to overcome these challenges, as well as opportunities for China in this new era of targeted agents. The editorial serves as an introduction to the Targeted Cancer Therapies serias that will review in depth of major pathways and drugs targeting these pathways to be published in the coming issues of the Chinese Journal of Cancer.

  16. [Hadron therapy in carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, Slavenka; Dalagija, Faruk

    2002-01-01

    According to some statistics, in the developed countries of west Europe, one in three of population will have an encounter with cancer and, only one in eight of this will have treated by use a linear accelerator. Conventional accelerator-based treatments use photon or electron or proton beams collimated to the tumour place. However, some tumors are resistant on this therapy, while others have complex shapes or are located around vital radiosensitive organs. In those cases it is necessary higher radiobiological efficiency and higher precision. New generation of hadron therapy accelerators are arming with light ions. This therapy is characterized with high precision, in millimeter range over complex volumes. That is also good example how particle physics can benefit medical treatments.

  17. Radionuclide targeting with particular emphasis on urinary bladder carcinoma

    CERN Document Server

    Sjöström, A

    2001-01-01

    primary bladder carcinoma tumours was investigated. Both receptors were expressed in the majority of metastases and primary tumours. Targeting the EGF receptor and/or HER-2 in urinary bladder carcinoma is an exciting new concept The incidence of urinary bladder carcinoma is increasing and many patients die every year of this disease despite assumed radical therapy. Thus, there is a need for improved methods of diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide targeting is based on achieving specific delivery of radioactive nuclides to tumour cells with minimal damage to surrounding normal tissues. Two possible target structures are the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and the related receptor HER-2. Cellular binding and retention of sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 I-EGF-dextran conjugates was investigated in two bladder carcinoma cell lines. The conjugate bound specifically to the EGF receptor with delayed maximum binding, limited intracellular degradation and prolonged cellular retention compared to sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 I-EGF. EGF w...

  18. α-Fetoprotein promoter-driven Cre/LoxP-switched RNA interference for hepatocellular carcinoma tissue-specific target therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Fei Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA interference (RNAi has recently emerged as a potential treatment modality for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC therapy, but the lack of cellular targets and sustained efficacy limits its application. The purpose of this study is to develop an HCC tissue-specific RNAi system and investigate its possibility for HCC treatment. METHODS: Two different HCC-specific RNAi systems in which therapeutic miRNA or shRNA against target gene (Beclin 1 was directly or indirectly driven by alpha-fetoprotein promoter (AFP-miRNA and AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA were constructed. Human HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B and HCCLM3 and non-HCC cell lines (L-02, Hela and SW1116 were infected with the systems. The effectiveness and tissue-specificity of the systems were examined by Q-PCR and western blot analysis. The efficacy of the systems was further tested in mouse model of HCC by intravenous or intratumoral administration. The feasibility of the system for HCC treatment was evaluated by applying the system as adjuvant therapy to enhance sorafenib treatment. An AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA system targeting Atg5 gene (AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA-Atg5 was constructed and its efficacy in sensitizing HCC cells (MHCC97L/PLC to sorafenib treatment was examined by apoptosis assay in vitro and tumorigenesis assay in vivo. RESULTS: The AFP-miRNA system could silence target gene (Beclin 1 but required a high titer which was lethal to target cells. The AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA system could efficiently knockdown target gene while maintain high HCC specificity. Intratumoral injection of the AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA system could efficiently silence target gene (Beclin 1 in vivo while intravenous administration could not. The AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA system target Atg5 gene could significantly sensitize MHCC97L/PLC cells to sorafenib-induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor growth suppression in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: An efficient HCC tissue-specific RNAi system (AFP-Cre/LoxP-shRNA was successfully established. The system

  19. SM5-1-conjugated PLA nanoparticles loaded with 5-fluorouracil for targeted hepatocellular carcinoma imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xibo; Cheng, Zhen; Jin, Yushen; Liang, Xiaolong; Yang, Xin; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie

    2014-03-01

    SM5-1 is a humanized mouse antibody which has a high binding specificity for a membrane protein of about 230 kDa overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), melanoma and breast cancer. In this study, SM5-1-conjugated poly D, L (lactide-coglycolide) (PLA) PLA containing Cy7 (PLA-Cy7-SM5-1) was prepared to study the targeting specificity of the bioconjugate to HCC-LM3-fLuc cell. Then, SM5-1-conjugated PLA containing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (PLA-5FU-SM5-1) and PLA containing 5-FU (PLA-5FU) were prepared for treatment of subcutaneous HCC-LM3-fLuc tumor mice. The results showed that PLA-5FU-SM5-1, PLA-5FU and 5-FU induced a 45.07%, 23.56% and 19.05% tumor growth inhibition rate, respectively, on day 31 post-treatment as determined by bioluminescent intensity. In addition, in order to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of PLA-5FU-SM5-1, HCC-LM3-fLuc cells were injected into the liver to establish the experimental orthotopic liver tumor models. The experiments showed that PLA-5FU-SM5-1, PLA-5FU and 5-FU induced a 53.24%, 31.00%, and 18.11% tumor growth inhibition rate, respectively, on day 31 post-treatment determined by the bioluminescent intensity of the abdomen in tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, we have calculated the three-dimensional location of the liver cancer in mice using a multilevel adaptive finite element algorithm based on bioluminescent intensity decay calibration. The reconstruction results demonstrated that PLA-5FU-SM5-1 inhibited the tumor rapid progression, which were consistent with the results of subcutaneous tumor mice experiments and in vitro cell experiment results.

  20. Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Early evaluation of response to targeted therapy and prognostic value of Perfusion CT and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Ultrasound. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frampas, Eric, E-mail: eric.frampas@chu-nantes.fr [Central Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Hôtel-Dieu, 1 Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes Cedex 1 (France); Lassau, Nathalie, E-mail: Nathalie.LASSAU@igr.fr [IR4M UMR 8081, Université Paris Sud 11, Institut Gustave Roussy, 114 Av. Edouard Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Zappa, Magaly, E-mail: magaly.zappa@bjn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, APHP Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Beaujon, 100 Bd du général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Vullierme, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.vullierme@bjn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, APHP Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Beaujon, 100 Bd du général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Koscielny, Serge, E-mail: serge.koscielny@igr.fr [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Gustave Roussy, 114 Av. Edouard Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Vilgrain, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.vilgrain@bjn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, APHP Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Beaujon, 100 Bd du général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, INSERM CRB3 U773, 75018 Paris (France)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether there is any correlation between standard endpoints and tumor perfusion measurements with Perfusion CT and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography (DCE-US) in patients with advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with targeted therapy. Materials and methods: Nineteen patients were evaluated during targeted therapy (sorafenib n = 16, sunitinib n = 3). Changes in tumor perfusion measurements between baseline and month 1 were assessed and compared using RECIST progression criteria at month 2. Results: Median time to progression according to RECIST was 117 days and median time to death was 208 days. Perfusion CT values before treatment were significantly increased in HCC compared to the surrounding liver (n = 17, P < .02). Eleven patients received complete examinations with both techniques at baseline and month 1. A non-significant decrease was found in all Perfusion CT values between RECIST nonprogressors (n = 7) and progressors (n = 4): mean Blood Volume: −27.9 vs. −11.1% and mean Blood Flow: −25.0 vs. −11.7% respectively. With DCE-US, opposite changes were found (mean Area Under the Curve AUC: −38.3 vs. 436.3%). RECIST progression at month 2 was significantly correlated with a threshold 40% decrease in AUC (P = .015). None of the patients with a decrease in AUC ≥ 40% was a progressor at month 2. Conclusion: Despite perfusion changes with both Perfusion CT and DCE-US in patients receiving treatment, only DCE-US at month 1 (with a decrease in the AUC of more than 40%) predicted non-progression at month 2 and may be a potential surrogate marker of tumor response during targeted therapy.

  1. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Song; Jing Huang; Ling Shan; Hong-Tu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC),but biomarkers of activity are lacking.The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene status,vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) or stem cell factor receptor (KIT) expression,and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC.Methods:A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute,Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012.Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry.Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS) and ovcrall survival (OS) were calculated and then compared based on expression status.The Chi-square test,the KaplanMeier method,and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses.Results:Of 59 patients,objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%).The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months.There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features:Male gender,number of metastatic sites 2 or less,VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive.Eleven patients (18.6%) had evidence of VHL mutation,with an objective response rate of 45.5%,which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%).VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P =0.938) or PFS (P =0.277).The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients,respectively,which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P =0.026 and P =0.043).Conclusion:VHL mutation status could not predict

  2. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, but biomarkers of activity are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene status, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR or stem cell factor receptor (KIT expression, and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC. Methods: A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry. Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were calculated and then compared based on expression status. The Chi-square test, the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses. Results: Of 59 patients, objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%. The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months. There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features: Male gender, number of metastatic sites 2 or less, VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive. Eleven patients (18.6% had evidence of VHL mutation, with an objective response rate of 45.5%, which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%. VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P = 0.938 or PFS (P = 0.277. The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients, respectively, which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P = 0.026 and P = 0.043. Conclusion

  3. Transarterial Therapies for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Ezio; Donadon, Matteo; Poretti, Dario; Pedicini, Vittorio; Tramarin, Marco; Roncalli, Massimo; Rhee, Hyungjin; Park, Young Nyun; Torzilli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still a major health issue because of its increasing incidence and because of the complexity of its management. Transarterial embolization (TAE) and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) are two widely used locoregional therapies in the treatment of HCC, especially for unresectable intermediate and advanced HCCs. Summary The modern use of TAE and TACE opens new scenarios for the treatment of unresectable HCC and has yielded interesting results. The present work describes the role of transarterial therapies for HCC and focuses on the different Western and Eastern approaches to the study of response predictors. Key Messages Recent refinements in interventional radiology techniques and in HCC patient selection have facilitated better local control of the disease. The molecular profiling of HCC to predict the response to TACE and TAE will greatly help clinicians identify the optimum therapy. PMID:27995085

  4. Changes in the planning target volume and liver volume dose based on the selected respiratory phase in respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Baek, Seong-Min

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the changes in the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume dose based on the respiratory phase to identify the optimal respiratory phase for respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on the standardized procedure for respiratory-gated radiation therapy, we performed a 4-dimensional computed tomography simulation for 0 ˜ 90%, 30 ˜ 70%, and 40 ˜ 60% respiratory phases to assess the respiratory stability (S R ) and the defined PTV i for each respiratory phase i. A treatment plan was established, and the changes in the PTV i and dose volume of the liver were quantitatively analyzed. Most patients (91.5%) passed the respiratory stability test (S R = 0.111 ± 0.015). With standardized respiration training exercises, we were able to minimize the overall systematic error caused by irregular respiration. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis to identify the optimal respiratory phase revealed that when a short respiratory phase (40 ˜ 60%) was used, the changes in the PTV were concentrated inside the center line; thus, we were able to obtain both a PTV margin accounting for respiration and a uniform radiation dose within the PTV.

  5. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT: differences in target volumes and improvement in clinically relevant doses to small bowel in rectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delclos Marc E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong dose-volume relationship exists between the amount of small bowel receiving low- to intermediate-doses of radiation and the rates of acute, severe gastrointestinal toxicity, principally diarrhea. There is considerable interest in the application of highly conformal treatment approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, to reduce dose to adjacent organs-at-risk in the treatment of carcinoma of the rectum. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive dosimetric evaluation of IMRT compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in standard, preoperative treatment for rectal cancer. Methods Using RTOG consensus anorectal contouring guidelines, treatment volumes were generated for ten patients treated preoperatively at our institution for rectal carcinoma, with IMRT plans compared to plans derived from classic anatomic landmarks, as well as 3DCRT plans treating the RTOG consensus volume. The patients were all T3, were node-negative (N = 1 or node-positive (N = 9, and were planned to a total dose of 45-Gy. Pairwise comparisons were made between IMRT and 3DCRT plans with respect to dose-volume histogram parameters. Results IMRT plans had superior PTV coverage, dose homogeneity, and conformality in treatment of the gross disease and at-risk nodal volume, in comparison to 3DCRT. Additionally, in comparison to the 3DCRT plans, IMRT achieved a concomitant reduction in doses to the bowel (small bowel mean dose: 18.6-Gy IMRT versus 25.2-Gy 3DCRT; p = 0.005, bladder (V40Gy: 56.8% IMRT versus 75.4% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, pelvic bones (V40Gy: 47.0% IMRT versus 56.9% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, and femoral heads (V40Gy: 3.4% IMRT versus 9.1% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, with an improvement in absolute volumes of small bowel receiving dose levels known to induce clinically-relevant acute toxicity (small bowel V15Gy: 138-cc IMRT versus 157-cc 3DCRT; p = 0.005. We found that the IMRT treatment volumes were typically larger than that

  6. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  7. 头颈部鳞癌分子靶向治疗进展%Advancement of molecular targeted therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李正才

    2010-01-01

    Current reseach of molecular targeted therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck(SCCHN) is particularly active.As epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) signaling pathway and angiogenesis play a key role in the growth of SCCHN,EGFR with its downstream effectors and molecular factors implicated in the angiogenesis process,such as vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors,represent the main targets of new therapeutic agents now.%当前分子靶向治疗头颈部鳞状细胞癌(SCCHN)的进展非常快.由于表皮生长因子受体(EGFR)信号传导和血管发生在SCCHN的生长中起关键作用,因此EGFR及其下游效应器与血管发生过程相关的分子及其受体就成为目前SCCHN分子靶向治疗的主要靶点.

  8. Targets for molecular therapy of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-02-01

    Cancers of the skin encompass the first and second most common neoplasms in the United States, epidermal basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively, as well as the melanocytic malignancy, malignant melanoma (MM). Recently identified alterations in the function of specific genes in these cancers provide new potential therapeutic targets. These alterations affect conserved regulators of cellular proliferation and viability, including the Sonic Hedgehog, Ras/Raf, ARF/p53, p16(INK4A)/CDK4/Rb and NF-kappaB pathways. New modalities designed to target these specific proteins may represent promising approaches to therapy of human skin cancers.

  9. [Targeted therapies for melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, U; Meier, F; Garbe, C

    2014-07-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene and also stimulation of immune mediated antitumor response in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. This article addresses the latest developments of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling. In addition, the development of drugs to attack alternative mutations in melanoma, such as NRAS and KIT is described. Strategies for the management of BRAF inhibitor resistance, such as with combination therapy, are outlined. Antitumor immune therapies with monoclonal antibodies such as ipilimumab which acts by promoting T-cell activation or antibody blockade of programmed death-1 (PD-1) led to a long term response in metastatic melanoma. Results of latest clinical studies including the toxicity profile are described. Due to selective kinase inhibitors and immune checkpoint blockade, the therapy of unresectable metastatic melanoma has greatly improved and long-term survival of patients with metastatic melanoma seems a real possibility.

  10. What role do combinations of interferon and targeted agents play in the first-line therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2008-12-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a class of cytokines with pleotropic actions that regulate a variety of cellular activities. Clinical trials with recombinant IFNs (IFN-alpha2a and IFN-alpha2b) have demonstrated clinical activity in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Their efficacy is characterized by a low overall tumor regression rate of < 15%, progression-free survival of 4-5 months, and overall median survival of 10-18 months. This cytokine became the standard of care for patients with metastatic RCC and was then used as the comparator arm in a series of phase II and III clinical trials that have defined a new treatment paradigm for patients with advanced RCC. This paradigm uses the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) sorafenib and sunitinib, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor temsirolimus, and the vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody bevacizumab. These 3 categories of agents were then investigated in combination with IFN-alpha in a series of preclinical and clinical studies. The collective data from these reports suggest the combination of IFN-alpha and bevacizumab is active and has a role in RCC therapy, whereas combinations with the TKIs or mTOR inhibitors have limited efficacy and/or excessive toxicity. The clinical and preclinical studies leading to these conclusions are reviewed herein.

  11. Mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy; Diagnostik und Therapie des Mammakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann (eds.) [Diagnostisches Brustzentrum Goettingen BZG, Goettingen(Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The book on mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy covers the following issues: development, anatomy and physiology of the mammary glands, pathology of benign and malign mammary gland changes, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography; ultrasonic mammography; magnetic resonance tomography of the mammary glands; imaging diagnostics findings; mammary interventions; examination concepts; operative therapy of the mammary carcinoma; chemotherapy of the mammary carcinoma; radio-oncological therapy of the mammary carcinoma; logistics in a medical center for mammary gland diseases; logistics in an interdisciplinary center for mammary diseases; dialogue conduction and psycho-social attendance.

  12. Targeted Therapy for Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Thomas [Alphamed, Jackson, TN (United States); Moore, Herbert [Alphamed, Jackson, TN (United States)

    2016-12-05

    The research project entitled,” Targeted Therapy for Melanoma,” was focused on investigating the use of kidney protection measures to lower the non-specific kidney uptake of the radiolabeled Pb-DOTA-ReCCMSH peptide. Previous published work demonstrated that the kidney exhibited the highest non-target tissue uptake of the 212Pb/203Pb radiolabeled melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-ReCCMSH. The radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptide analog DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH, which binds the melanocortin-1 receptor over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells, has shown promise as a PRRT agent in pre-clinical studies. High tumor uptake of 212Pb labeled DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH resulted in tumor reduction or eradication in melanoma therapy studies. Of particular note was the 20-50% cure rate observed when melanoma mice were treated with alpha particle emitter 212Pb. However, as with most PRRT agents, high radiation doses to the kidneys where observed. To optimize tumor treatment efficacy and reduce nephrotoxicity, the tumor to kidney uptake ratio must be improved. Strategies to reduce kidney retention of the radiolabeled peptide, while not effecting tumor uptake and retention, can be broken into several categories including modification of the targeting peptide sequence and reducing proximal tubule reabsorption.

  13. Targeting influenza virosomes to ovarian carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrobattista, E; Schoen, P; Wilschut, J; Crommelin, DJA; Storm, G

    2001-01-01

    Reconstituted influenza virus envelopes (virosomes) containing the viral hemagglutinin (HA) have attracted attention as delivery vesicles for cytosolic drug delivery as they possess membrane fusion activity. Here, we show that influenza virosomes can be targeted towards ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCA

  14. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kim, Tae K. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women' s College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shyn, Paul [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Cheng, Jason C. [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Feng, Mary U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Stephans, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital/McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Crane, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27 cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment

  15. Comparative Effectiveness of Second-Line Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Real-World Observational Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y Heng

    Full Text Available The optimal sequencing of targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC is unknown. Observational studies with a variety of designs have reported differing results. The objective of this study is to systematically summarize and interpret the published real-world evidence comparing sequential treatment for mRCC.A search was conducted in Medline and Embase (2009-2013, and conference proceedings from American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium (ASCO-GU, and European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO (2011-2013. We systematically reviewed observational studies comparing second-line mRCC treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi versus vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI. Studies were evaluated for 1 use of a retrospective cohort design after initiation of second-line therapy, 2 adjustment for patient characteristics, and 3 use of data from multiple centers. Meta-analyses were conducted for comparisons of overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS.Ten studies reported OS and exhibited significant heterogeneity in estimated second-line treatment effects (I2 = 68%; P = 0.001. Four of these were adjusted, multicenter, retrospective cohort studies, and these showed no evidence of heterogeneity (I2 = 0%; P = 0.61 and a significant association between second-line mTORi (>75% everolimus and longer OS compared to VEGF TKI (>60% sorafenib (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.98 in a meta-analysis. Seven studies comparing PFS showed significant heterogeneity overall and among the adjusted, multicenter, retrospective cohort studies. Real-world observational data for axitinib outcomes was limited at the time of this study.Real-world studies employed different designs and reported heterogeneous results comparing the effectiveness of second-line mTORi and VEGF TKI in the treatment of mRCC. Within the subset of adjusted

  16. Photodynamic therapy as adjunctive therapy for morpheaform basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, T; Fernandes, I; Costa, V; Selores, M

    2011-01-01

    The authors decided to evaluate the possible use of methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) as adjunctive therapy for morpheaform basal cell carcinoma prior to standard surgical excision in order to reduce tumor size and volume and to facilitate surgical treatment. It was observed that MAL-PDT may be an option as an adjunctive therapy prior to standard surgical excision of morpheaform basal cell carcinoma, leading to less invasive surgery.

  17. Photodynamic therapy as adjunctive therapy for morpheaform basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, T.; I. Fernandes; Costa, V.; Selores, M

    2011-01-01

    The authors decided to evaluate the possible use of methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) as adjunctive therapy for morpheaform basal cell carcinoma prior to standard surgical excision in order to reduce tumor size and volume and to facilitate surgical treatment. It was observed that MAL-PDT may be an option as an adjunctive therapy prior to standard surgical excision of morpheaform basal cell carcinoma, leading to less invasive surgery.

  18. Optimal combination of antiangiogenic therapy forhepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The success of sorafenib in prolonging survival of patientswith hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes therapeuticinhibition of angiogenesis a component of treatmentfor HCC. To enhance therapeutic efficacy, overcome drug resistance and reduce toxicity, combination ofantiangiogenic agents with chemotherapy,radiotherapyor other targeted agents were evaluated. Nevertheless,the use of antiangiogenic therapy remains suboptimalregarding dosage, schedule and duration of therapy.The issue is further complicated by combinationantiangiogenesis to other cytotoxic or biologic agents.There is no way to determine which patients are mostlikely respond to a given form of antiangiogenic therapy.Activation of alternative pathways associated with diseaseprogression in patients undergoing antiangiogenictherapy has also been recognized. There is increasingimportance in identifying, validating and standardizingpotential response biomarkers for antiangiogenesistherapy for HCC patients. In this review, biomarkers forantiangiogenesis therapy including systemic, circulating,tissue and imaging ones are summarized. The strengthand deficit of circulating and imaging biomarkerswere further demonstrated by a series of studies inHCC patients receiving radiotherapy with or withoutthalidomide.

  19. Trastuzumab therapy in metastatic bladder carcinoma: The proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussaid Y

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available About 10% of metastatic urothelial carcinoma overexpress oncogenic HER2/neu receptor. Recent preliminary data suggest that patients with this particular molecular subset could benefit from trastuzumab therapy, which specifically targets the receptor and thus inhibits downstream activation pathway. Here we report a case illustrating this clinical benefit, with complete response reported as third line therapy in a heavily pretreated patient with diffuse metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. It also highlights the usefulness of 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18-FDG PET as a biomarker for response to trastuzumab.

  20. Quantification of activity by alpha-camera imaging and small-scale dosimetry within ovarian carcinoma micrometastases treated with targeted alpha therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chouin, N; Lindegren, S; Jensen, Holger;

    2012-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) a promising treatment for small, residual, and micrometastatic diseases has questionable efficacy against malignant lesions larger than the α-particle range, and likely requires favorable intratumoral activity distribution. Here, we characterized and quantified...

  1. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  2. [Vismodegib Therapy for Periocular Basal Cell Carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keserü, M; Green, S; Dulz, S

    2017-01-01

    Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the commonest periorbital tumour. Mohs' micrographic surgery and secondary reconstruction is the therapeutic gold standard for periorbital BCC. In cases of inoperability for any reason, therapeutic alternatives are needed. Since the approval of vismodegib, an orally administered, targeted BCC therapy is available. Nevertheless there is little information on the use of vismodegib for periorbital BCC. Patients and Methods In a retrospective study, we analysed the data of 4 patients treated with vismodegib since 2014. The patients' mean age before starting therapy was 87 years. The mean maximum tumour diameter was 22.0 mm. Results The median follow-up was 17 months. The median treatment duration was 7.5 months. In 75 % of patients, complete clinical remission of BCC was achieved. In 25 % of patients, interim stabilisation of tumour growth was possible. The most common side effect of therapy was muscle spasm. Conclusion Vismodegib is an effective treatment option for patients with periorbital BCC, in whom surgical treatment is not possible for any reason.

  3. Targeted therapy for pediatric glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K. Olow

    2015-01-01

    This thesis assesses molecular underpinnings of responses to promising targeted agents for pediatric tumors of Central Nervous System (CNS), incorporating preclinical testing of novel and translatable combination therapies to define the best therapy for each tumor cell specific molecular aberration.

  4. Targeting molecular aberrations in urothelial carcinoma: are we almost there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, Andrea B; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2013-01-01

    Advances in tumor biology and cancer genetics have led to the development of effective targeted therapies in oncology over the past decade. However, targeted drug development for urothelial carcinoma has been slower than for some other malignancies. The path forward in drug development is through a better understanding of the aberrant pathways driving urothelial tumor development. Steady progress has been made in the characterization of genomic alterations in urothelial carcinoma. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project is well underway in the analysis of a large set of urothelial cancer specimens using multiple approaches and technologies. In addition, there are already many well-established mutations and genetic alterations in urothelial carcinoma that likely contribute in an important way to tumor development. In addition, urothelial cancer genome-wide association studies have identified common variants associated with urothelial cancer risk and protein expression that can potentially be therapeutically targeted. Furthermore, the MET pathway has emerged as an exciting target in multiple tumors, including urothelial carcinoma. Our knowledge of how to clinically target many emerging molecular aberrations in urothelial cancer is still in the early stages of development. However, there is much promise in the ongoing research being conducted in urothelial cancer molecular pathogenesis.

  5. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Spallone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC, representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC. The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  6. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spallone, Giulia; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.costanzo@uniroma2.it [Department of Dermatology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier 1, 00199, Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-03

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC), representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC). The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  7. HpD Photobiology And Photodynamic Therapy Of Bladder Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Wei

    1988-02-01

    Bladder carcinoma is considered one of the most favorable targets for the application of photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to the accessibility of the bladder for light delivery. Examination of the bladder and surgical procedures are routinely performed by the insertion of an optical instrument called cystoscope through the urethra. Thus, the treatment of bladder cancer by PDT can be conducted through the cystoscope with minimal invasion. However, to achieve optimal results from this treatment, one must consider both the structure of the bladder and the nature of the carcinoma.

  8. Adverse Reactions and Management of Targeted Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma%肾细胞癌新辅助靶向治疗的不良反应及其防治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王清海; 石冰冰; 李永强

    2013-01-01

      肾细胞癌靶向药物主要有索拉菲尼、舒尼替尼、帕唑帕尼、贝伐珠单抗(联合IFN-α)、替西罗莫司、依维莫司及最近批准的阿西替尼,肾癌术前新辅助治疗和术后辅助治疗极大改善了进展期或转移性肾癌患者的预后。与此同时,靶向治疗药物也会引起手足皮肤反应、高血压、乏力、消化道反应等药物相关性不良反应。因此临床中及时发现并采取有效干预措施,对改善患者生活质量和提高靶向治疗效果尤为重要。%The targeted agents for the treatment of renal cel carcinoma include sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib, bevacizumab (in combination with interferon alpha), temsirolimus, everolimus and recently approved axitinib. As the neoadjuvant therapy in renal cel carcinoma before surgery and adjuvant therapy greatly improved the prognosis of patients with advanced or metastatic renal cel carcinoma . At the same time, the adverse reactions caused by the targeted therapy can result in hand–foot skin reaction (HFSR),hypertension, fatigue, gastrointestinal reactions, et al. It is very important to manage the adverse events not only to improve the therapeutic efficacy but also to improve the quality of life for patientsl.

  9. Targeted Thrombolytic Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡豫

    2004-01-01

    @@ Venous and arterial thrombosis are closely related to many severe diseases, especially to cardiovascular and cerebrovasular disorders. Thrombolytic therapy has been proven to be an effective method to treat such disease, which decreased the mortality and morbidity greatly.

  10. Targeted therapy: tailoring cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yan; Quentin Qiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapies include small-molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies,have made treatment more tumor-specific and less toxic,and have opened new possibilities for tailoring cancer treatment.Nevertheless,there remain several challenges to targeted therapies,including molecular identification,drug resistance,and exploring reliable biomarkers.Here,we present several selected signaling pathways and molecular targets involved in human cancers including Aurora kinases,PI3K/mTOR signaling,FOXO-FOXM1 axis,and MDM2/MDM4-p53 interaction.Understanding the molecular mechanisms for tumorigenesis and development of drug resistance will provide new insights into drug discovery and design of therapeutic strategies for targeted therapies.

  11. 超声联合微泡介导肝癌靶向治疗的研究进展%Progresses of liver carcinoma targeted therapy mediated by ultrasound and microbubbles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁璐

    2012-01-01

    With the development of imaging technology and ultrasound contrast agents, ultrasound microbubbles are not only used for diagnosis, but also for therapy,Recently, more attention has been paid to use microbubbles as a new carrier of drug or gene. Meanwhile, ultrasound mediated microbubbles destruction can release the therapeutic drug or gene locally and suggest a certain advantage for target therapy. The application and development of ultrasound and microbubbles in liver carcinoma targeted therapy were reviewed in this article.%随着超声影像技术的不断发展和造影剂制备工艺的不断改进,超声造影剂正在从诊断领域向治疗领域拓展.作为一种新的药物和基因载体,造影剂受到广泛关注,同时其在增强超声介导疾病治疗方面也显示出一定优势.本文就造影剂联合超声辐照介导肝癌靶向治疗的研究进展进行综述.

  12. Radiation therapy in cholangiocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma can arise in all parts of the biliary tract and this has implications for therapy. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy however local relapse is a major problem. Therefore, adjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy was tested in trials. The SWOG-S0809 trial regimen of chemoradiotherapy which was tested in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and in gallbladder cancer can currently be regarded as highest level of evidence for this indication. In contrast to adjuvant therapy where only conventionally fractionated radiotherapy plays a role, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) today has become a powerful alternative to chemoradiotherapy for definitive treatment due to the ability to administer higher doses of radiotherapy to improve local control. Sequential combinations with chemotherapy are also frequently employed. Nevertheless, in general cholangiocarcinoma is an orphan disease and future clinical trials will have to improve the available level of evidence.

  13. Health Economic Changes as a Result of Implementation of Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: National Results from DARENCA Study 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne V; Donskov, Frede; Kjellberg, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    , AND PARTICIPANTS: Costs were measured per patient per year during a 2-yr follow-up during 2002-2005 (immunotherapy only) and 2006-2009 (TT implementation). All Danish patients with a diagnosis code for RCC and a procedure code for TT or immunotherapy were linked to the Danish National Patient Registry (contains...... in the pattern of health care costs for patients with metastatic kidney cancer after implementation of targeted therapy compared to an immunotherapy control period; however, total health care costs and income from employment were without significant changes....

  14. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forscher C

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Charles Forscher,1 Monica Mita,2 Robert Figlin3 1Sarcoma Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Experimental Therapeutics Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Academic Development Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and Division of Hematology/Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing's sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing's sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. Keywords: sarcoma, targeted agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mTor inhibition

  15. Gene therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, T R; Kavitha, B; Vijayashree Priyadharsini, J

    2007-01-01

    A potential approach to the treatment of genetic disorders is gene therapy. The goal of gene therapy is to introduce therapeutic genetic material into the target cell to exert the intended therapeutic effect. Gene therapy has already shown promising results for the treatment of monogenic disorders such as severe combined immunodeficiency and haemophilia. Now the procedure has been extended to the level of treating malignant conditions such as cancer of the lungs, breast, colon etc. The prevalence of tumours of the larynx and oral cavity has increased in both developed and developing countries. This increase underscores the need for a novel therapeutic modality that would decrease or completely terminate the proliferation of malignant cells. This review highlights various types of gene therapy procedures with respect to oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  16. Gene therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathi T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential approach to the treatment of genetic disorders is gene therapy. The goal of gene therapy is to introduce therapeutic genetic material into the target cell to exert the intended therapeutic effect. Gene therapy has already shown promising results for the treatment of monogenic disorders such as severe combined immunodeficiency and haemophilia. Now the procedure has been extended to the level of treating malignant conditions such as cancer of the lungs, breast, colon etc. The prevalence of tumours of the larynx and oral cavity has increased in both developed and developing countries. This increase underscores the need for a novel therapeutic modality that would decrease or completely terminate the proliferation of malignant cells. This review highlights various types of gene therapy procedures with respect to oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  17. Combined interventional therapies of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Qian; Gan-Sheng Feng; Thomas Vogl

    2003-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonmalignancies in the world, responsible for an estimated one million deaths annually. It has a poor prognosis due to its rapid infiltrating growth and complicating liver cirrhosis.Surgical resection, liver transplantation and cryosurgery are considered the best curative options, achieving a high rate of complete response, especially in patients with small HCC and good residual liver function. In nonsurgery, regional interventional therapies have led to a major breakthrough in the management of unresectable HCC, which include transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave coagulation therapy (MCT), laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), etc. As a result of the technical development of locoregional approaches for HCC during the recent decades,the range of combined interventional therapies has been continuously extended. Most combined multimodal interventional therapies reveal their enormous advantages as compared with any single therapeutic regimen alone,and play more important roles in treating unresectable HCC.

  18. Targeted therapies for cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Damien; McArthur, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is resistant to cytotoxic therapy, and treatment options for advanced disease have been limited historically. However, improved understanding of melanoma driver mutations, particularly those involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has led to the development of targeted therapies that are effective in this previously treatment-refractory disease. In cutaneous melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations the selective RAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, have demonstrated survival benefits. Early signals of efficacy have also been demonstrated with MEK inhibitors in melanomas with NRAS mutations, and KIT inhibitors offer promise in melanomas driven through activation of their target receptor.

  19. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Are a Promising Therapeutic Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, Shinsaku, E-mail: shinsaku@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Polanska, Urszula M. [CR-UK Stromal-Tumour Interaction Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, The University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Horimoto, Yoshiya [Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Atopy Research Centre, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Department of Breast Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Orimo, Akira, E-mail: shinsaku@juntendo.ac.jp [CR-UK Stromal-Tumour Interaction Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, The University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Atopy Research Centre, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan)

    2013-01-31

    Human carcinomas frequently exhibit significant stromal reactions such as the so-called “desmoplastic stroma” or “reactive stroma”, which is characterised by the existence of large numbers of stromal cells and extracellular matrix proteins. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which are rich in activated fibroblast populations exemplified by myofibroblasts, are among the predominant cell types present within the tumour-associated stroma. Increased numbers of stromal myofibroblasts are often associated with high-grade malignancies with poor prognoses in humans. CAF myofibroblasts possess abilities to promote primary tumour development, growth and progression by stimulating the processes of neoangiogenesis as well as tumour cell proliferation, survival, migration and invasion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that CAFs serve as a niche supporting the metastatic colonisation of disseminated carcinoma cells in distant organs. Their contribution to primary and secondary malignancies makes these fibroblasts a potential therapeutic target and they also appear to be relevant to the development of drug resistance and tumour recurrence. This review summarises our current knowledge of tumour-promoting CAFs and discusses the therapeutic feasibility of targeting these cells as well as disrupting heterotypic interactions with other cell types in tumours that may improve the efficacy of current anti-tumour therapies.

  20. Targeting the hedgehog pathway for gallbladder cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Balraj; Yadav, Saurabh

    2016-02-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is a fatal malignancy of hepatobiliary tract that is generally diagnosed at advanced stages of cancer because of its asymptomatic nature. Advanced GBC tumors are unresectable with poor prognosis. Improvement in GBC patient care requires better understanding of the biological signaling pathways and application of newly discovered drugs for cancer therapy. Herein, we discuss the possibilities and challenges in targeting the hedgehog pathway in gallbladder cancer therapy based on recent developments in the area.

  1. Exploring targeted therapies in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mom, Constantijne Helene

    2007-01-01

    Targeted therapy in oncology is treatment directed at specific biological pathways and processes that play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Increased knowledge regarding the molecular changes underlying tumor progression and metastatis has resulted in the development of agents that are designed to

  2. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin Hai; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy.

  3. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin Hai

    2016-01-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy. PMID:27689027

  4. Targeted Therapies in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Dogan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common genital cancer in developed world. It is generally diagnosed in early stage and it has a favorable prognosis. However, advanced staged disease and recurrences are difficult to manage. There are some common genetic alterations related to endometrial carcinogenesis in similar fashion to other cancers. Personalized medicine, which means selection of best suited treatment for an individual, has gain attention in clinical care of patients in recent years. Targeted therapies were developed as a part of personalized or %u201Ctailored%u201D medicine and specifically acts on a target or biologic pathway. There are quite a number of molecular alteration points in endometrial cancer such as PTEN tumor suppressor genes, DNA mismatch repair genes, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and p53 oncogene which all might be potential candidates for tailored targeted therapy. In recent years targeted therapies has clinical application in ovarian cancer patients and in near future with the advent of new agents these %u201Ctailored%u201D drugs will be in market for routine clinical practice in endometrial cancer patients, in primary disease and recurrences as well.

  5. Salvage therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with thalidomide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsang-En Wang; Chin-Roa Kao; Shee-Chan Lin; Wen-Hsiung Chang; Cheng-Hsin Chu; Johson Lin; Ruey-Kuen Hsieh

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical benefit of thalidomide in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatoma).METHODS: From March 2000 to July 2002, patients who had advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and failed to or were unsuited for aggressive treatment, were enrolled and took thalidomide 150 to 300 mg/d. All cases were followed till April 2003. Data collection included viral hepatitis, grade of cirrhosis, total dosage of thalidomide, side effect, stage of hepatoma by Okuda and CLIP classification, and prognosis.The subjects were divided into A and B groups, depending on 5 000 mg dosage of thalidomide. Survival time of all cases and in the two subgroups was evaluated.RESULTS: Ninety-nine patients with hepatoma were enrolled,81 men and 18 females with median age 58±14.1 years.Eighty-six percent had viral hepatitis and one case was alcoholism. Hepatoma was diagnosed with histology, alphafetoprotein (aFP) >400 ng/mL, or image examination, there were 30, 33 and 36 cases respectively. At the time of thalidomide therapy, more than 81% had cirrhotic status.Twenty-two patients were in group A (<5 000 mg) with median survival time about 25 days, for 77 cases in group B (≥5 000 mg) the median survival time was about 109 days.Six subjects had partial response. Most adverse effects were skin rush, neuropathy, somnolence, and constipation.CONCLUSION: Several patients responded to thalidomide therapy. As a single drug therapy, thalidomide might not have good therapeutic effect for all cases, but a small ratio of patients had exciting response, the resistance or tumor escape would develop after long-term use. Up to now, no defined facts could be used to predict response. The effect of thalidomide on hepatoma might be associated with the dosage. As salvage therapy, thalidomide has its value.Combination or adjuvant therapy will be the next trial.

  6. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-xiang Yuan; Jingxin Mo; Guixian Zhao; Gang Shu; Hua-lin Fu; Wei Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rati...

  7. Carcinoma hepatocelular: parte 2. Tratamento Hepatocelular carcinoma: part 2. Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinício Paride CONTE

    2000-04-01

    alternative in the treatment of inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. The potential role of intersticial laser coagulation for patients with irresectable hepatic tumors was investigated, and in terms of experience, it has now been developed sufficiently to study its effect on these patients survival. The homeostatic control of angiogenesis and its influences on the tumor growth and for migration of metastatic cells, was focused in this concise review, given that hepatocytes are the source of much of the precursor pool, regulation of angiogenesis may be regarded as a new liver function with important consequences for tissue repair and cancer. Early hepatocellular carcinoma and its recognition in routine clinical pratice contributes to improved patients survival. Recombinant-Interferon-alpha therapy surely prevents, the development of cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma in about one-third of patients, with chronic hepatitis C, with sustained response. Finally, in individuals with life-threatening liver disease, such as those with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, the liver transplantation, must be considered, besides controversial, however, with increasing experience the results of the procedure in these patients have improved, and may offer a better long-term survival than liver resection.

  8. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norain, Abdullah; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 60,000 individuals in the United States and 132,000 worldwide are yearly diagnosed with melanoma. Until recently, treatment options for patients with stages III-IV metastatic disease were limited and offered marginal, if any, improvement in overall survival. The situation changed with the introduction of B-RAF inhibitors and anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 immunotherapies into the clinical practice. With only some patients responding well to the immune therapies and with very serious side effects and high costs of immunotherapy, there is still room for other approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma could be divided into the domains of radioimmunotherapy (RIT), radiolabeled peptides, and radiolabeled small molecules. RIT of melanoma is currently experiencing a renaissance with the clinical trials of alpha-emitter (213)Bi-labeled and beta-emitter (188)Rhenium-labeled monoclonal antibodies in patients with metastatic melanoma producing encouraging results. The investigation of the mechanism of efficacy of melanoma RIT points at killing of melanoma stem cells by RIT and involvement of immune system such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The domain of radiolabeled peptides for targeted melanoma therapy has been preclinical so far, with work concentrated on radiolabeled peptide analogues of melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor and on melanin-binding peptides. The field of radiolabeled small molecule produced radioiodinated benzamides that cross the cellular membrane and bind to the intracellular melanin. The recent clinical trial demonstrated measurable antitumor effects and no acute or midterm toxicities. We are hopeful that the targeted radionuclide therapy of metastatic melanoma would become a clinical reality as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with the immunotherapies such as anti-PD1 programmed cell death protein 1 monoclonal antibodies

  9. Renal Toxicities of Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Anum; Mirza, Mohsin M; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Tendulkar, Ketki

    2015-12-01

    With the incorporation of targeted therapies in routine cancer therapy, it is imperative that the array of toxicities associated with these agents be well-recognized and managed, especially since these toxicities are distinct from those seen with conventional cytotoxic agents. This review will focus on these renal toxicities from commonly used targeted agents. This review discusses the mechanisms of these side effects and management strategies. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents including the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, aflibercept (VEGF trap), and anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) all cause hypertension, whereas some of them result in proteinuria. Monoclonal antibodies against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family of receptors, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, cause electrolyte imbalances including hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia due to the direct nephrotoxic effect of the drug on renal tubules. Cetuximab may also result in renal tubular acidosis. The TKIs, imatinib and dasatinib, can result in acute or chronic renal failure. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, can cause acute renal failure following initiation of therapy because of the onset of acute tumor lysis syndrome. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, can result in proteinuria. Discerning the renal adverse effects resulting from these agents is essential for safe treatment strategies, particularly in those with pre-existing renal disease.

  10. Improved renal function in advanced renal cell carcinoma patient by targeted therapy%多靶点药物治疗晚期肾癌肾功能改善的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣明; 沈周俊; 何威; 邵琨; 王浩飞; 赵菊平; 戴军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To report and analyze the renal function improvement in a case with ad-vanced bilateral renal cell carcinoma after targeted therapy. Methods The patient was a 60-year-old man who complained of lower back pain for 1 month. Ultrasound and CT scan detected bilateral renal masses, left lesion was 11.0 cm×9.4 cm×8.5 cm, and the right one was 3.5 cm×4.3 cm×4.1 cm. X-ray examination showed metastatic lesions in liver and lower right lung. GFR was 20.39 ml/min of left kidney, 25.40 ml/min of right kidney. The renal biopsy confirmed renal clear cell carcinoma. Sorafenib was administrated 400 mg twice or once daily for 12 weeks. Results After the targeted therapy, the decreased bilateral kidney tumor sizes were identified by CT scan. There was liquid nec-rosis in the tumor, and no new metastatic lesion detected. The kidney function was improved as well. The total GFR increased to 71.38 ml/min. Left kidney GFR increased to 31.57 ml/min, right kidney GFR increased to 39.81 ml/min, respectively. Conclusion Targeted therapy could improve renal function in advanced renal cell carcinoma cases by controlling tumor development.%目的 总结多靶点药物治疗1例晚期双肾癌患者肾功能改善的效果. 方法 晚期双肾癌患者1例,男,60岁.腰痛1个月.B超及CT检查提示双肾癌.左肾肿瘤11.0 cm×9.4 cm×8.5 cm,右肾肿瘤3.5 cm×4.3 cm×4.1 cm,肾穿刺活检诊断为肾透明细胞癌.X线检查示肝及右下肺转移灶.实验室检查:左肾肾小球滤过率(GFR)20.39 ml/min,右肾25.40 ml/min.予多靶点药物索拉非尼400 mg,1~2次/d口服,共治疗12周. 结果 经索拉非尼治疗12周后.CT检查示左肾肿瘤缩小至9.0 cm×8.5 cm×7.4 cm,右肾肿瘤缩小至3.0 cm×3.6 cm×4.0 cm,病灶内部见液化坏死,未见新的转移灶.总肾GFR由治疗前45.79 ml/min升至71.38 ml/min,左肾GFR 31.57ml/min,较治疗前提高11.18 ml/min,右肾GFR 39.81 ml/min,较治疗前提高14.41 ml/min. 结论 多靶点药物治疗晚期肾

  11. Carcinoma of an unknown primary: are EGF receptor, Her-2/neu, and c-Kit tyrosine kinases potential targets for therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Massard, C; Voigt, J-J; Laplanche, A; Culine, S; Lortholary, A; Bugat, R; Theodore, C.; Priou, F; Kaminsky, M-C; Lesimple, T; Pivot, X; B. Coudert; Douillard, J-Y; Merrouche, Y; Fizazi, K

    2007-01-01

    Carcinomas of an unknown primary site (CUP) are heterogeneous tumours with a median survival of only 8 months. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are promising new drugs. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of EGF-receptor, Her-2/neu, and c-Kit tyrosine kinases in CUP. Paraffin-embedded specimens were obtained from 54 patients with a CUP who were included in the GEFCAPI 01 randomised phase II trial. Immunohistochemistry was performed using the Dako autostainer with antibodies direct...

  12. Therapy of murine squamous cell carcinomas with 2-difluoromethylornithine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Targeted overexpression of an ornithine decarboxylase (ODC transgene to mouse skin (the K6/ODC mouse significantly enhances susceptibility to carcinogenesis. While in most strain backgrounds the predominant tumor type resulting from initiation-promotion protocols is benign squamous papilloma, K6/ODC mice on a FVB/N background develop malignant squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs rapidly and in high multiplicity after carcinogen treatment. We have investigated the utility of polyamine-based therapy against SCCs in this model using the ODC inhibitor 2-difluoromethylornithine delivered orally. At a 2% concentration in drinking water, DFMO caused rapid tumor regression, but in most cases, tumors eventually regrew rapidly even in the presence of DFMO. The tumors that regrew were spindle cell carcinomas, an aggressive undifferentiated variant of SCC. At 1% DFMO in the drinking water, tumors also responded rapidly, but tumor regrowth did not occur. The majority of DFMO-treated SCCs were classified as complete responses, and in some cases, apparent tumor cures were achieved. The enzymatic activity of ODC, the target of DFMO, was substantially reduced after treatment with 1% DFMO and the high SCC polyamine levels, especially putrescine, were also significantly lowered. Based on the results of BrdUrd labeling and TUNEL assays, the effect of DFMO on SCC growth was accompanied by a significant reduction in tumor proliferation with no increase in the apoptotic index. These results demonstrate that SCCs, at least in the mouse, are particularly sensitive to polyamine-based therapy.

  13. Systemic Therapy for Merkel Cell Carcinoma: What’s on the Horizon?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowits, Guilherme [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Department of Medical Oncology, Center for Head and Neck Oncology, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-05-16

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer that usually affects elderly patients. Despite being uncommon, incidence has been steadily increasing over the last two decades, likely due to increased awareness, better diagnostic methods and aging of the population. It is currently one of the most lethal cutaneous malignancies, with a five-year overall survival of approximately 50%. With the better understanding of the molecular pathways that lead to the development of Merkel cell carcinoma, there has been an increasing excitement and optimism surrounding novel targeted therapies, in particular to immunotherapy. Some of the concepts surrounding the novel targeted therapies and currently ongoing clinical trials are reviewed here.

  14. Comprehensive sequential interventional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang; FAN Wei-jun; HUANG Jin-hua; LI Chuan-xing; ZHAO Ming; WANG Li-gang; TANG Tian

    2009-01-01

    Background Since the 1980s, various approaches to interventional therapy have been developed, with the development and achievement of medical imaging technology. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of comprehensive sequential interventional therapy especially personal therapeutic plan in 53 radical cure patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Methods From January 2003 to January 2005, a total of 203 patients with HCC received sequential interventional treatment in our hospital. Fifty-three patients achieved radical cure outcomes. Those patients were treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), or high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), sequentially and in combination depending on their clinical and pathological features. PET-CT was used to evaluate, assess, and guide treatment.Results Based on the imaging and serological data, all the patients had a personal therapeutic plan. The longest follow-up time was 24 months, the shortest was 6 months, and mean survival time was 16.5 months.Conclusion Comprehensive sequential interventional therapy especially personal therapeutic plan for HCC play roles in interventional treatment of HCC in middle or advanced stage.

  15. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy for larynx carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukatch, Erwin V.; Latyshevska, Galina; Fekeshgazi, Ishtvan V.

    1995-05-01

    We made an experimental and clinical researches to examine Intraoperative Photodynamic Therapy (IPT) as a method to prevent the recidives of tumors. In experimental researches on models with radio-inducated fibrosarcomas and Erlich carcinomas of mice the best method of IPT was worked out. The therapeutic effect was studied also on patients with laryngeal cancer. In researches on C3H mice the antirecidive effect of IPT established with local administration of methylene blue and Ar-laser. We found that IPT (He-Ne laser combined with methylene blue administration) was endured by patients with laryngeal cancers without problems. We got good results of treatment 42 patients with laryngeal cancers with middle localization during three years with using IPT method. This can show the perspectives of using this method in treatment of other ENT-oncological diseases.

  16. Targeted Molecular Therapies for SBMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Malik, Bilal; Greensmith, Linda

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset neuromuscular disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor gene which results in progressive spinal and bulbar motor neuron degeneration, and muscle atrophy. Although the causative genetic defect is known, until recently, the molecular pathogenesis of the disease was unclear, resulting in few, if any, targets for therapy development. However, over the past decade, our understanding of the pathomechanisms that play a role in SBMA has increased dramatically, and several of these pathways and mechanisms have now been investigated as possible therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss some of the key pathomechanisms implicated in SBMA and describe some of the therapeutic strategies that have been tested in SBMA to date, which fall into four main categories: (i) gene silencing; (ii) protein quality control and/or increased protein degradation; (iii) androgen deprivation; and (iv) modulation of AR function. Finally, it is also now clear that in addition to a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie disease, the development of an effective disease modifying therapy for SBMA will require the coordinated, collaborative effort of research teams with diverse areas of expertise, clinicians, pharmaceutical companies as well as patient groups.

  17. Targeted Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Baron

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies use an understanding of the pathophysiology of a disease in an individual patient. Although targeted therapy for systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma has not yet reached the level of patient-specific treatments, recent developments in the understanding of the global pathophysiology of the disease have led to new treatments based on the cells and pathways that have been shown to be involved in the disease pathogenesis. The presence of a B cell signature in skin biopsies has led to the trial of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, in SSc. The well-known properties of transforming growth factor (TGF-β in promoting collagen synthesis and secretion has led to a small trial of fresolimumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody capable of neutralizing TGF-β. Evidence supporting important roles for interleukin-6 in the pathogenesis of SSc have led to a large trial of tocilizumab in SSc. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP upon binding of nitric oxide (NO to the sGC molecule. Processes such as cell growth and proliferation are regulated by cGMP. Evidence that sGC may play a role in SSc has led to a trial of riociguat, a molecule that sensitizes sGC to endogenous NO. Tyrosine kinases (TKs are involved in a wide variety of physiologic and pathological processes including vascular remodeling and fibrogenesis such as occurs in SSc. This has led to a trial of nintedanib, a next-generation tyrosine-kinase (TK inhibitor which targets multiple TKs, in SSc.

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma : Dutch guideline for surveillance, diagnosis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskens, F. A. L. M.; van Erpecum, K. J.; de Jong, K. P.; van Delden, O. M.; Klumpen, H. J.; Verhoef, C.; Jansen, P. L. M.; van den Bosch, M. A. A. J.; Romero, A. Mendez; Verheij, J.; Bloemena, E.; de Man, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is rare in the Netherlands, even though the incidence has increased quite sharply in recent years. Standard treatment options consist of surgery, orthotopic liver transplantation, radiofrequency ablation, transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) and systemic therapy with

  19. Percutaneous local therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma impair gastric function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fumihiko Kinekawa; Shigeki Kuriyama; Kazuya Matsuda; Tsutomu Masaki; Kazutaka Kurokohchi; Hirohito Yoneyama; Hideyuki Inoue; Hirohide Kurata; Yoshihito Uchida; Seishiro Watanabe

    2006-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Percutaneous local therapies, such as percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), microwave coagulation and radiofrequency ablation (RFA), are frequently used worldwide for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) because of their high effectiveness.

  20. Targeted therapies in gastroesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stefan; Schuler, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Gastroesophageal cancers comprising gastric cancer (GC), and cancers of the distal oesophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) are a global health threat. In Western populations the incidence of GC is declining which has been attributed to effective strategies of eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection. To the contrary, GEJ cancers are on the rise, with obesity and reflux disease being viewed as major risk factors. During the past decade perioperative chemotherapy, pre- or postoperative radio-chemotherapy, and, in Asian populations, adjuvant chemotherapy have been shown to improve the outcome of patients with advanced GC and GEJ cancers suited for surgery. Less progress has been made in the treatment of metastatic disease. The introduction of trastuzumab in combination with platinum/fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy for patients with HER2-positive disease has marked a turning point. Recently, several novel agents targeting growth factor receptors, angiogenic pathways, adhesion molecules and mediators of intracellular signal transduction have been clinically explored. Here we summarise the current status and future developments of molecularly targeted therapies in GC and GEJ cancer.

  1. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery: a "targeted" therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zeng; Liang-Fu Han

    2012-01-01

    The developments of medicine always follow innovations in science and technology.In the past decade,such innovations have made cancer-related targeted therapies possible.In general,the term "targeted therapy" has been used in reference to cellular and molecular level oriented therapies.However,improvements in the delivery and planning of traditional radiation therapy have also provided cancer patients more options for "targeted" treatment,notably stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).In this review,the progress and controversies of SRS and SBRT are discussed to show the role of stereotactic radiation therapy in the ever evolving multidisciplinary care of cancer patients.

  3. Targeted therapy in biliary tract cancer: 2009 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Giuseppe; Virzì, Vladimir; Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Vincenzi, Bruno; Santini, Daniele

    2009-12-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) include cholangiocarcinoma (intrahepatic, perihilar and extrahepatic), carcinoma of the gall bladder and ampullary carcinoma. In patients with advanced disease the prognosis is poor. There is not a consensus regarding treatment strategy. Chemotherapy has only limited efficacy. This review summarizes the new approaches for BTC patients and the rationale for targeted therapies. The prognostic factors and the molecular features of BTC are analyzed. The clinical trials evaluating the targeted agents are accurately described, especially those assessing the role of anti-EGFR and antiangiogenic drugs. The ongoing trials are also analyzed. In fact, only the results of these trials will establish which is the most effective agent or combination for this setting.

  4. Status of Intraductal Therapy for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Meghan; Love, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The intraductal approach is particularly appealing in the setting of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a preinvasive breast neoplasm that is thought to be entirely intraductal in its extent. Based on an emerging understanding of the anatomy of the ductal system as well as novel techniques to leverage the access accorded by the intraductal approach, researchers are actively exploring how ductal lavage, ductoscopy, and intraductal infusion of therapeutic agents may enhance breast cancer treatment. Both cytologic and molecular diagnostics continue to improve, and work is ongoing to identify the most effective diagnostic biomarkers for DCIS and cancer, although optimal targeting of the diseased duct remains an important consideration. Ductoscopy holds potential in detection of occult intraductal lesions, and ductoscopically guided lumpectomy could increase the likelihood of a more comprehensive surgical excision. Exciting pilot studies are in progress to determine the safety and feasibility of intraductal chemotherapy infusion. These studies are an important starting point for future investigations of intraductal ablative therapy for DCIS, because as our knowledge and techniques evolve, it is likely that DCIS may be the target most amenable to treatment by intraductal therapy. If such studies are successful, these approaches will allow an important and meaningful transformation in treatment options for women diagnosed with DCIS. PMID:21124756

  5. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  6. Oncolytic vaccinia therapy of squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel therapies are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC of the head and neck. Historically, vaccinia virus was administered widely to humans as a vaccine and led to the eradication of smallpox. We examined the therapeutic effects of an attenuated, replication-competent vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68 as an oncolytic agent against a panel of six human head and neck SCC cell lines. Results All six cell lines supported viral transgene expression (β-galactosidase, green fluorescent protein, and luciferase as early as 6 hours after viral exposure. Efficient transgene expression and viral replication (>150-fold titer increase over 72 hrs were observed in four of the cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1, GLV-1h68 was highly cytotoxic to the four cell lines, resulting in ≥ 90% cytotoxicity over 6 days, and the remaining two cell lines exhibited >45% cytotoxicity. Even at a very low MOI of 0.01, three cell lines still demonstrated >60% cell death over 6 days. A single injection of GLV-1h68 (5 × 106 pfu intratumorally into MSKQLL2 xenografts in mice exhibited localized intratumoral luciferase activity peaking at days 2–4, with gradual resolution over 10 days and no evidence of spread to normal organs. Treated animals exhibited near-complete tumor regression over a 24-day period without any observed toxicity, while control animals demonstrated rapid tumor progression. Conclusion These results demonstrate significant oncolytic efficacy by an attenuated vaccinia virus for infecting and lysing head and neck SCC both in vitro and in vivo, and support its continued investigation in future clinical trials.

  7. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Barry J [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Raja, Chand [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Rizvi, Syed [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Li Yong [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Tsui, Wendy [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Zhang, David [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Song, Emma [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Qu, C F [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Kearsley, John [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Graham, Peter [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Thompson, John [Sydney Melanoma Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown 2050 NSW (Australia)

    2004-08-21

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The {sup 213}Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 {mu

  8. Liposomes for targeting hepatocellular carcinoma: use of conjugated arabinogalactan as targeting ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanket M; Goel, Peeyush N; Jain, Ankitkumar S; Pathak, Pankaj O; Padhye, Sameer G; Govindarajan, Srinath; Ghosh, Sandipto S; Chaudhari, Pradip R; Gude, Rajiv P; Gopal, Vijaya; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2014-12-30

    Present study investigates the potential of chemically modified (Shah et al., 2013) palmitoylated arabinogalactan (PAG) in guiding liposomal delivery system and targeting asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) which are expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PAG was incorporated in liposomes during preparation and doxorubicin hydrochloride was actively loaded in preformed liposomes with and without PAG. The liposomal systems with or without PAG were evaluated for in vitro release, in vitro cytotoxicity, in vitro cell uptake on ASGPR(+) cells, in vivo pharmacokinetic study, in vivo biodistribution study, and in vivo efficacy study in immunocompromised mice. The particle size for all the liposomal systems was below 200 nm with a negative zeta potential. Doxorubicin loaded PAG liposomes released significantly higher amount of doxorubicin at pH 5.5 as compared to pH 7.4, providing advantage for targeted tumor therapy. Doxorubicin in PAG liposomes showed superior cytotoxicity on ASGPR(+) HepG2 cells as compared to ASGPR(-), MCF7, A549, and HT29 cells. Superior uptake of doxorubicin loaded PAG liposomes as compared to doxorubicin loaded conventional liposomes was evident in confocal microscopy studies. Higher AUC in pharmacokinetic study and higher deposition in liver was observed for PAG liposomes compared to conventional liposomes. Significantly higher tumor suppression was noted in immunocompromised mice for mice treated with PAG liposomes as compared to the conventional liposomes. Targeting ability and superior activity of PAG liposomes is established pre-clinically suggesting potential of targeted delivery system for improved treatment of HCC.

  9. Metastasis in renal cell carcinoma: Biology and implications for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although multiple advances have been made in systemic therapy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC, metastatic RCC remains incurable. In the current review, we focus on the underlying biology of RCC and plausible mechanisms of metastasis. We further outline evolving strategies to combat metastasis through adjuvant therapy. Finally, we discuss clinical patterns of metastasis in RCC and how distinct systemic therapy approaches may be considered based on the anatomic location of metastasis.

  10. Basic evidence of molecular targeted therapy for oral cancer and salivary gland cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamakawa, H.; Nakashiro, K.; Sumida, T.; Shintani, S.; Myers, J.N.; Takes, R.P.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, attention has been focused on molecular targeted cancer therapy in various tumors. Although there is no single consistent molecular target specific for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and salivary gland cancer (SGC), there are a number of promising candidate proteins. The a

  11. Antiviral therapy for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Dahl, Emilie Kristine; Gluud, Lise Lotte;

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether antiviral therapy reduces the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis C.......To determine whether antiviral therapy reduces the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis C....

  12. Radioactive Iodine Therapy of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Redesigning the Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Stanley J.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy has evolved over the past 70 years from treatment of known metastatic thyroid carcinoma to include adjuvant use to decrease the incidence of recurrent disease and to ablation of normal remnant tissue following thyroidectomy, even for minimal tumor involvement. Advances in laboratory testing, development of drugs useful in radioiodine treatment, as well as advances in radiation detection and imaging instrumentation, have progressively improved the utility of radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Guidelines have proliferated and they have become more detailed and complex. This trend is likely to continue as the science and technology involved increases in sophistication and efficacy. PMID:28117291

  13. Radioactive Iodine Therapy of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Redesigning the Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley J. Goldsmith

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive iodine therapy has evolved over the past 70 years from treatment of known metastatic thyroid carcinoma to include adjuvant use to decrease the incidence of recurrent disease and to ablation of normal remnant tissue following thyroidectomy, even for minimal tumor involvement. Advances in laboratory testing, development of drugs useful in radioiodine treatment, as well as advances in radiation detection and imaging instrumentation, have progressively improved the utility of radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Guidelines have proliferated and they have become more detailed and complex. This trend is likely to continue as the science and technology involved increases in sophistication and efficacy.

  14. Targeted therapies in upper gastrointestinal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordes, S.

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, as esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancer, are still highly lethal diseases, in spite of advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and specific targeted therapy. Especially when patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastasized disease, upper

  15. Ocular toxicity of targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Daniel J; Velazquez-Martin, Juan P; Simpson, Rand; Siu, Lillian L; Bedard, Philippe L

    2012-09-10

    Molecularly targeted agents are commonly used in oncology practice, and many new targeted agents are currently being tested in clinical trials. Although these agents are thought to be more specific and less toxic then traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, they are associated with a variety of toxicities, including ocular toxicity. Many of the molecules targeted by anticancer agents are also expressed in ocular tissues. We reviewed the literature for described ocular toxicities associated with both approved and investigational molecularly targeted agents. Ocular toxicity has been described with numerous approved targeted agents and also seems to be associated with several classes of agents currently being tested in early-phase clinical trials. We discuss the proposed pathogenesis, monitoring guidelines, and management recommendations. It is important for oncologists to be aware of the potential for ocular toxicity, with prompt recognition of symptoms that require referral to an ophthalmologist. Ongoing collaboration between oncologists and ocular disease specialists is critical as the use of molecularly targeted agents continues to expand and novel targeted drug combinations are developed.

  16. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  17. Uterine papillary serous carcinoma following radiation therapy for carcinoma of cervix: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M. H.; Cho, S. H.; Kang, H. J.; Kim, S. R.; Hwang, Y. Y.

    2000-05-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a clinically aggressive and morphologically distinctive variant of endometrial carcinoma that has been recognized recently as a distinct entity. The association between radiation therapy (RT) and UPSC is rarely described in the literature. We describe the clinicopathologic features of a 71-year-old patient with UPSC that developed 15 years after radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of cervix, stage IIB. In the subtotal hysterectomy specimen the endometrium was irregular with multifocally raised masses. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of high-grade papillary serous carcinoma focally admixed with solid transitional cell carcinomatous areas and multifocal intraepithelial carcinoma in adjacent atrophic endometrium. The tumor exhibited diffuse infiltrative growth with frequent lymphatic tumor emboli in the myometrium. Immunohistochemical staining for p53 and c-erbB-2 were positive in about 70% of the tumor cells. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was focally positive. Ki-67 positive cells were present in about 60% of the tumor cells. The tumor directly extended to the cervix and perirectal soft tissue and metastasized to the omentum. Intraoperative pelvic washing cytology was positive for papillary adenocarinoma cells. The possible etiologic role of radiation is discussed, and the literature on endometrial carcinomas developing after RT is reviewed.

  18. Pregnancy after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browde, S; Friedman, M; Nissenbaum, M

    1986-01-01

    A successful pregnancy after intracavitary radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix is described. An additional 13 similar cases from the literature are reviewed. The possible reasons for the occurrence of these pregnancies despite irradiation to the ovaries, cervical canal and endometrium are discussed. The fact is emphasized that no genetic damage to the child was expected.

  19. [Successful therapy of metastatic basal cell carcinoma with vismodegib].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutt, M; Mazur, F; Bergmann, M; Lemke, A J; Kaune, K M

    2014-11-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with giant basal cell carcinoma on the abdomen which had metastasized. He was treated with oral vismodegib. Both the primary ulcerated tumor on the abdomen and the metastases responded. Vismodegib was well tolerated without significant side effects. The tumor recurred promptly after vismodegib was discontinued, and then was resistant to therapy when vismodegib was re-administered.

  20. The rationale for targeted therapies in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Tobey J; Aguilera, Dolly; Castellino, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant brain tumor in children. Patients with MB who are classified as having high-risk disease or those with recurrent disease respond poorly to current therapies and have an increased risk of MB-related mortality. Preclinical studies and molecular profiling of MB tumors have revealed upregulation or activation of several key signaling pathways such as the sonic hedgehog and WNT pathways. Although the exact mechanisms underlying MB tumorigenesis remain poorly understood, inhibiting these key pathways with molecularly targeted therapies represents an important approach to improving MB outcomes. Several molecularly targeted therapies are already under clinical investigation in MB patients. We discuss current preclinical and clinical data, as well as data from clinical trials of targeted therapies that are either ongoing or in development for MB.

  1. Targeted therapy using alpha emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1996-10-01

    Radionuclides such as and which decay by the emission of -particles are attractive for certain applications of targeted radiotherapy. The tissue penetration of and -particles is equivalent to only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of combining cell-specific targeting with radiation of similar range. Unlike the -particles emitted by radionuclides such as and , -particles are radiation of high linear energy transfer and thus greater biological effectiveness. Several approaches have been explored for targeted radiotherapy with - and -labelled substances including colloids, monoclonal antibodies, metabolic precursors, receptor-avid ligands and other lower molecular weight molecules. An additional agent which exemplifies the promise of -emitting radiopharmaceuticals is meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine. The toxicity of this compound under single-cell conditions, determined both by []thymidine incorporation and by limiting dilution clonogenic assays, for human neuroblastoma cells is of the order of 1000 times higher than that of meta-[]iodobenzylguanidine. For meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine, the value was equivalent to only atoms bound per cell. These results suggest that meta-[]astatobenzylguanidine might be valuable for the targeted radiotherapy of micrometastatic neuroblastomas.

  2. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The most common side effects seen with this drug include fatigue, rash, diarrhea, increases in blood pressure, and redness, pain, swelling, ... other targets that help cancer cells grow. This drug is taken as a ... effects are nausea, diarrhea, changes in skin or hair color, mouth sores, ...

  3. Update on the targeted therapy of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Douglas B; Sosman, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive of the cutaneous malignancies, causing more than 9,000 deaths in the past year in the United States. Historically, systemic therapies have been largely ineffective, because melanoma is usually resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, during the past few years, several targeted therapies have proved effective in this challenging disease. These recent advances have been facilitated by an improved understanding of the driving genetic aberrations of melanoma, particularly mutations in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, demonstrated an overall survival advantage in phase III trials and is an appropriate option for first-line therapy in metastatic BRAF mutant melanoma. Dabrafenib, another BRAF inhibitor, and trametinib, a MEK inhibitor, also have been shown to be effective in phase III trials for BRAF mutant melanoma and may be additional treatment options as monotherapy or in combination pending regulatory approval. Additionally, imatinib is a promising targeted therapy for patients whose tumors harbor a KIT mutation in exons 11 and 13. Although these targeted agents cause objective responses and clinical benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma, resistance invariably develops. New targets and strategies to overcome acquired resistance are urgently needed. Furthermore, no effective targeted therapy has been developed for NRAS mutant tumors or in melanomas with as yet unknown driver mutations. In this review, we discuss current molecular targeted treatment options and promising ongoing research to develop new strategies to treat melanoma.

  4. Elevating the Horizon: Emerging Molecular and Genomic Targets in the Treatment of Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtoglu, Metin; Davarpanah, Nicole N; Qin, Rui; Powles, Thomas; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Apolo, Andrea B

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent advances in the identification of genomic alterations that lead to urothelial oncogenesis in vitro, patients with advanced urothelial carcinomas continue to have poor clinical outcomes. In the present review, we focus on targeted therapies that have yielded the most promising results alone or combined with traditional chemotherapy, including the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab, the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 antibody trastuzumab, and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib. We also describe ongoing and developing clinical trials that use innovative approaches, including dose-dense scheduling of singular chemotherapy combinations, prospective screening of tumor tissues for mutational targets and biomarkers to predict chemosensitivity before the determination of the therapeutic regimen, and novel agents that target proteins in the immune checkpoint regulation pathway (programmed cell death protein 1 [PD-1] and anti-PD-ligand 1) that have shown significant potential in preclinical models and early clinical trials. New agents and targeted therapies, alone or combined with traditional chemotherapy, will only be validated through accrual to developing clinical trials that aim to translate these therapies into individualized treatments and improved survival rates in urothelial carcinoma.

  5. Antihyperlipidemic therapies targeting PCSK9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, Michael; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major cause of cardiovascular disease despite the availability of first-line cholesterol-lowering agents such as statins. A new therapeutic approach to lowering low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) acts by blocking LDL-receptor degradation by serum proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9). Human monoclonal antibodies that target PCSK9 and its interaction with the LDL receptor are now in clinical trials (REGN727/SAR23653, AMG145, and RN316). These agents are administered by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, and have been shown to have major LDL-C and apolipoprotein B effects when combined with statins. A phase III clinical trial program evaluating clinical endpoints is now in progress. Other PCSK9-targeted approaches are in early stages of investigation, including natural inhibitors of PCSK9, RNA interference, and antisense inhibitors.

  6. Liver regeneration microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma for prevention and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanmin; Zhang, Lisheng

    2017-01-01

    Research on liver cancer prevention and treatment has mainly focused on the liver cancer cells themselves. Currently, liver cancers are no longer viewed as only collections of genetically altered cells but as aberrant organs with a plastic stroma, matrix, and vasculature. Improving the microenvironment of the liver to promote liver regeneration and repair by affecting immune function, inflammation and vasculature can regulate the dynamic imbalance between normal liver regeneration and repair and abnormal liver regeneration, thus improving the microenvironment of liver regeneration for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer. This review addresses the basic theory of the liver regeneration microenvironment, including the latest findings on immunity, inflammation and vasculature. Attention is given to the potential design of molecular targets in the microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In an effort to improve the liver regeneration microenvironment of HCC, researchers have extensively utilized the enhancement of immunity, anti-inflammation and the vasculature niche, which are discussed in detail in this review. In addition, the authors summarize the latest pro-fibrotic transition characteristics of the vascular niche and review potential cell therapies for liver disease. PMID:27655683

  7. Genomic portfolio of Merkel cell carcinoma as determined by comprehensive genomic profiling: implications for targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R; Tomson, Brett N; Elkin, Sheryl K; Marchlik, Erica; Carter, Jennifer L; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-04-26

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an ultra-rare cutaneous neuroendocrine cancer for which approved treatment options are lacking. To better understand potential actionability, the genomic landscape of Merkel cell cancers was assessed. The molecular aberrations in 17 patients with Merkel cell carcinoma were, on physician request, tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratory (Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA) using next-generation sequencing (182 or 236 genes) and analyzed by N-of-One, Inc. (Lexington, MA). There were 30 genes harboring aberrations and 60 distinct molecular alterations identified in this patient population. The most common abnormalities involved the TP53 gene (12/17 [71% of patients]) and the cell cycle pathway (CDKN2A/B, CDKN2C or RB1) (12/17 [71%]). Abnormalities also were observed in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway (AKT2, FBXW7, NF1, PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN or RICTOR) (9/17 [53%]) and DNA repair genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, CHEK2, FANCA or MLH1) (5/17 [29%]). Possible cognate targeted therapies, including FDA-approved drugs, could be identified in most of the patients (16/17 [94%]). In summary, Merkel cell carcinomas were characterized by multiple distinct aberrations that were unique in the majority of analyzed cases. Most patients had theoretically actionable alterations. These results provide a framework for investigating tailored combinations of matched therapies in Merkel cell carcinoma patients.

  8. New targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andrada; Petrusel, Livia; Seicean, Radu

    2015-05-28

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor prognosis with a median survival of 4-6 mo and a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Despite therapy with gemcitabine, patient survival does not exceed 6 mo, likely due to natural resistance to gemcitabine. Therefore, it is hoped that more favorable results can be obtained by using guided immunotherapy against molecular targets. This review summarizes the new leading targeted therapies in pancreatic cancers, focusing on passive and specific immunotherapies. Passive immunotherapy may have a role for treatment in combination with radiochemotherapy, which otherwise destroys the immune system along with tumor cells. It includes mainly therapies targeting against kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor, Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, insulin growth factor-1 receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR and hepatocyte growth factor receptor. Therapies against DNA repair genes, histone deacetylases, microRNA, and pancreatic tumor tissue stromal elements (stromal extracellular matric and stromal pathways) are also discussed. Specific immunotherapies, such as vaccines (whole cell recombinant, peptide, and dendritic cell vaccines), adoptive cell therapy and immunotherapy targeting tumor stem cells, have the role of activating antitumor immune responses. In the future, treatments will likely include personalized medicine, tailored for numerous molecular therapeutic targets of multiple pathogenetic pathways.

  9. Antagonism between gene therapy and epigenetic therapy on human laryngeal carcinoma tumor-bearing mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN Meng; WANG Qi; FANG Ju-gao; WANG Hong; FAN Er-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene therapy and epigenetic therapy have gained more attention in cancer treatment.However,the effect of a combined treatment of gene therapy and epigenetic therapy on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma have not been studied yet.To study the mechanism and clinical application,human laryngeal carcinoma cell (Hep-2) tumor-bearing mice were used.Methods A xenograft tumor model was established by the subcutaneous inoculation of Hep-2 cells in the right armpit of BALB/c nu/nu mice.The mice with well-formed tumor were randomly divided into six groups.Multisite injections of rAd-p53 and/or 5-aza-dC were used to treat tumor.Tumor growth was monitored by measuring tumor volume and growth rate.p53 and E-cadherin protein levels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining.The mRNA levels were monitored with FQ-PCR.Results Gene therapy was much more effective than single epigenetic therapy and combined therapy.The gene therapy group has the lowest tumor growth rate and the highest expression levels of p53 and E-cadherin.Conclusions The combined treatment of gene and epigenetic therapy is not suggested for treating head and neck carcinoma,because gene therapy shows an antagonistic effect to epigenetic therapy.However,the mechanisms of action are still unclear.

  10. Advances in liver-directed gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by non-viral delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Buyun; Li, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Lixia; Zhai, Guangxi

    2012-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignancy with a high mortality. Gene therapy provides a promising way for the treatment of HCC. Efficient gene delivery system, suitable gene target and appropriate way of administration together determine the effect of gene therapy for HCC. In recent years, employing non-viral gene delivery systems in gene therapy for HCC has attracted a lot of attention. Compared with viral vectors, non-viral gene delivery systems are nearly non-immunogenic, relatively safer, less expensive to produce and can carry a good many of genetic materials. But the transfection efficiency of these vectors still needs to be improved. And the liver targeting is another problem that needs to be solved. Attaching ligands to the non-viral vectors to enhance the targeting ability to the specific receptor and targeting to molecular targets of HCC are the effective strategies. Adopting suitable ways of administration is also a factor that plays an important role to achieve liver targeting. This review introduced the advances in liver-targeted gene therapy by non-viral vectors including the efforts to overcome the low transfection efficiency and enhance the liver targeting effect.

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ashworth, René E; Wu, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. It is associated with a poor prognosis and has limited treatment options. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only available systemic agent for treatment of HCC that improves overall survival for patients with advanced stage disease; unfortunately, an effective second-line agent for the treatment of progressive or sorafenib-resistant HCC has yet to be identified. This review focuses...

  12. Hepatocarcinoma: from pathogenic mechanisms to target therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Manzione

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is among the most prevalent and lethal cancers worldwide. It is currently estimated that there are 14,000–18,000 new cases of hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States each year. It is often difficult to identify individuals at risk for HCC. The main associated diseases are chronic hepatitis B and chronic hepatitis C viral infections. While a significant number of potential mutations have been generated including p53 and Insulin-like Growth Factor, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving the genesis and progression of HCC remain limited. HCC screening is recommended in high-risk patients. High-risk patients include virtually all patients with cirrhosis and some HBV-infected patients irrespective of cirrhosis (>40 years in men and >50 years in women. A diagnostic approach to HCC has been developed incorporating serology, cytohistology, and radiological characteristics. A precise staging of the disease may help decide on prognosis as well as choice of therapy with the greatest survival potential. Liver transplantation, in theory, is the optimal therapeutic option for HCC; it simultaneously removes the tumor and underlying cirrhosis thus minimizing the risk of HCC recurrence. When it is impossible for this to be performed, percutaneous ablation, chemoembolization, chemotherapy and the newer molecular therapies can be used. Sorafenib is the only drug registered today for the treatment of advanced HCC.

  13. Systemic sclerosis: from pathogenesis to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) leads to morbidity and mortality through a combination of inflammation, fibrosis and vascular damage leading to internal organ complications affecting the heart, lung, kidneys and bowel. More than half of those diagnosed ultimately die from the disease. Current treatments focus on broad spectrum immunosuppression or organ-based therapy for complication such as lung fibrosis, pulmonary or systemic hypertension. Targeting peptide mediators such as endothelin-1 have already led to licensed effective therapies for SSc vasculopathy. Outcomes are improving but as well as providing a major clinical challenge there are great opportunities for research translation that can be expected to improve understanding of the pathogenesis of SSc and also develop better and more targeted therapy. Key pathways and mediators can be identified within the skin and blood vessels and these are now being examined in early stage clinical trials. Promising results are emerging from targeting cytokine signalling, including IL-6, and from other immune-inflammatory therapies including lipid mediators such as LPA1. Other approaches to modulate TGFbeta and other profibrotic pathways also have potential although safety and toxicity remain to be determined. Since many profibrotic pathways have important physiological roles the assessment of safety and toxicity will be paramount. Nevertheless, advances in understanding the interplay between different pathological processes and progress in clinical trial design and patients stratification mean that targeted therapies are emerging and likely to be further developed and refined to have application in other important clinical contexts such as lung fibrosis.

  14. Antiepidermal Growth Factor Receptor Therapy in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Shaib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is the most common neoplasm of the upper aerodigestive tract. In this paper, we attempt to summarize the role and applications of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors monoclonal antibodies (moAbs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs locally advanced as well as metastatic SCCHN. Targeted therapy in SCCHN is now incorporated in the first-line regimes for advanced disease. Novel targeted agents, including the EGFR antibody, cetuximab, have been approved for use as single agents or in combination with radiation therapy or chemotherapy in treatment of recurrent metastatic or locally advanced SCCHN. Refractory mechanisms that bypass the pathway of EGFR inhibitors activity are identified explaining resistance to targeted therapy. Strategies of cotargeting EGFR and other pathways are under investigation. Examples of targeted therapy being used include mammalian target of rapamycin (mtor inhibitors, antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF moAb, and other inhibitors. We will be focusing our paper on the preclinical and clinical aspects of EGFR inhibition in SCCHN and touch upon other targeted therapies in application.

  15. Target marketing strategies for occupational therapy entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzmann, L N; Kautzmann, F N; Navarro, F H

    1989-01-01

    Understanding marketing techniques is one of the skills needed by successful entre renews. Target marketing is an effective method for occupational therapy entrepreneurs to use in determining when and where to enter the marketplace. The two components of target marketing, market segmentation and the development of marketing mix strategies for each identified market segment, are described. The Profife of Attitudes Toward Health Care (PATH) method of psychographic market segmentation of health care consumers is presented. Occupational therapy marketing mix strategies for each PATH consumer group are delineated and compatible groupings of market segments are suggested.

  16. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mostafa Elbadawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis.

  17. Recent progress in target therapy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetto, Lara Maria; Bortolami, Alberto; Falci, Cristina; Sinigaglia, Giulietta; Monfardini, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are a new class of agents targeting at specific receptors on cancer cells. In addition to having direct cellular effects, antibodies can cany substances, such as radioactive isotopes, toxins and antineoplastic agents, to the targeted cells. Two of them, cetuximab (Erbitux) and bevacizumab (Avastin), seem to have acquired a significant role in the management of patients with radically resected and advanced colorectal carcinoma. Cetuximab plus irinotecan has been approved as second-line therapy in irinotecan-resistant colorectal cancer patients; bevacizumab plus 5FU/LV has resulted in higher response and longer survival than 5FU/LV alone in first line metastatic colorectal cancer; its combination with oxaliplatin has recently doubled results. The superior therapeutic efficacy of these molecular targeting agents over traditional chemotherapy has been shown by the survival benefit achieved by patients with advanced or recurrent cancers. Although the precise molecular mechanism by which these agents produce or enhance an antitumour effect, alone or in combination with anticancer drugs, is unknown, the specific inhibition of target genes critically involved in tumour progression and metastasis is clear. Further studies to determine which patient groups and anticancer drugs are more appropriate for combination therapy with these agents are needed. All the most important data obtained through recent studies are discussed, emphasizing their mechanisms of action, safety profiles and clinical applications.

  18. Prodrug applications for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Irene; Boland, Erin L; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-09-01

    Prodrugs are widely used in the targeted delivery of cytotoxic compounds to cancer cells. To date, targeted prodrugs for cancer therapy have achieved great diversity in terms of target selection, activation chemistry, as well as size and physicochemical nature of the prodrug. Macromolecular prodrugs such as antibody-drug conjugates, targeted polymer-drug conjugates and other conjugates that self-assemble to form liposomal and micellar nanoparticles currently represent a major trend in prodrug development for cancer therapy. In this review, we explore a unified view of cancer-targeted prodrugs and highlight several examples from recombinant technology that exemplify the prodrug concept but are not identified as such. Recombinant "prodrugs" such as engineered anthrax toxin show promise in biological specificity through the conditionally targeting of multiple cellular markers. Conditional targeting is achieved by structural complementation, the spontaneous assembly of engineered inactive subunits or fragments to reconstitute functional activity. These complementing systems can be readily adapted to achieve conditionally bispecific targeting of enzymes that are used to activate low-molecular weight prodrugs. By leveraging strengths from medicinal chemistry, polymer science, and recombinant technology, prodrugs are poised to remain a core component of highly focused and tailored strategies aimed at conditionally attacking complex molecular phenotypes in clinically relevant cancer.

  19. Targeted Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grüll, H.; Robillard, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular Imaging allows the visualization of biological processesin vivo, offering new chances for healthcare with respect to early diagnosis and improved therapy. The new field of molecular imaging isboosted by more sensitive imaging systems and the emergence of targeted imaging agents that hom

  20. Current gene therapy for stomach carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Tai Xu; Lian-Tian Huang; Bo-Rong Pan

    2001-01-01

    astric cancer is common in China [1-42],and its early diagnosis and treatment in advanced stage are difficult [31-50].In recent years ,gene study in cancer is a hotspot ,and great progress has been achieved [41-80] .Cancer gene therapy has shifted from the imagination into the laboratory and clinical trials.

  1. Radiation therapy of lung carcinoma; Strahlentherapie des Bronchialkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, S.; Debus, J.; Hof, H.; Bischof, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    At first presentation and primary diagnosis approximately 50% of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and 25% of patients with small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) have a potentially curable tumor stage. Definitive, adjuvant and neoadjuvant radio- (chemo-)therapy play an important role as part of multimodal treatment approaches. High radiation doses can be achieved in tumor areas with modern radiotherapy planning and treatment techniques without an increase of side-effects. The 3 year overall survival after primary radiotherapy is approximately 50% for patients with NSCLC in stage I and 20% in stage IIIA. Radiotherapy can be used in patients with progressive metastatic disease after insufficient response to systemic therapy with threatening thoracic symptoms and for palliative treatment of cerebral, lymphatic and osseous metastases. (orig.) [German] Etwa 50% der Patienten mit einem nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC, ''non-small cell lung carcinoma'') und 25% der Patienten mit einem kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (SCLC, ''small cell lung carcinoma'') befinden sich zum Zeitpunkt der Primaerdiagnose in einem potenziell heilbaren Tumorstadium. Die definitive, adjuvante und neoadjuvante Radio- (chemo-)therapie hat im Rahmen der multimodalen Behandlungskonzepte einen festen Stellenwert. Durch den Einsatz modernster Techniken bei der Bestrahlungsplanung und -therapie koennen hohe Strahlendosen bei gleichzeitiger Schonung des gesunden Gewebes appliziert werden. Die 3-Jahres-Ueberlebensraten fuer Patienten mit NSCLC betragen nach primaerer Bestrahlung {approx}50% im Stadium I und {approx}20% im Stadium IIIA. Im metastasierten Stadium wird eine Radiotherapie bei unzureichendem Ansprechen der systemischen Behandlung mit drohender thorakaler Symptomatik sowie zur palliativen Behandlung zerebraler, lymphogener oder ossaerer Metastasen eingesetzt. (orig.)

  2. Combined modality therapy for locally advanced penile squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrick, T J; Wheeler, W; Riemenschneider, H

    1993-12-01

    We report here a patient who presented with locally advanced Jackson Stage IV penile squamous cell carcinoma who was managed with preoperative 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C chemotherapy, and concurrent radiation therapy. He experienced an excellent partial response which allowed more limited surgery than would otherwise be indicated. He is still alive and well 5 years after completion of his treatment without side effects, local recurrence, or distant metastatic disease.

  3. Targeting the EGFR pathway for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, JB; Navaratnam, S; Pitz, MW

    2006-01-01

    provided the rationale for the targeting of the components of the EGFR signaling pathways for cancer therapy. Below we discuss various aspects of EGFR-targeted therapies mainly in hematologic malignancies, lung cancer and breast cancer. Beside novel therapeutic approaches, we also discuss specific side......Clinical studies have shown that HER-2/Neu is over-expressed in up to one-third of patients with a variety of cancers, including B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), breast cancer and lung cancer, and that these patients are frequently resistant to conventional chemo-therapies. Additionally...... effects associated with the therapeutic inhibition of components of the EGFR-pathways. Alongside small inhibitors, such as Lapatinib (Tykerb, GW572016), Gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839), and Erlotinib (Tarceva, OSI-774), a significant part of the review is also dedicated to therapeutic antibodies (e...

  4. Novel Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iams, Wade T; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Chandra, Sunandana

    Oncogene-targeted therapy is a major component of precision oncology, and although patients with metastatic melanoma have experienced improved outcomes with this strategy, there are a number of potential therapeutic targets currently under study that may further increase the drug armamentarium for this patient population. In this review, we discuss the landscape of targeted therapies for patients with advanced melanoma, focusing on oncogene mutation-specific targets. In patients with typical BRAF V600-mutant melanoma, combination BRAF and MEK inhibition has surpassed outcomes compared with monotherapy with BRAF or MEK inhibition alone, and current strategies seek to address inevitable resistance mechanisms. For patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma, MEK inhibitor monotherapy and combined MEK and CDK4/6 inhibition are burgeoning strategies; for patients with KIT-mutant melanoma, tyrosine kinase inhibition is being leveraged, and for NF-1-mutant melanoma, mTOR and MEK inhibition is being actively evaluated. In patients with atypical, non-V600 BRAF-mutant melanoma, MEK inhibitor monotherapy is the potential novel targeted approach on the horizon. For advanced uveal melanoma, novel targets such as IMCgp100 and glembatumumab have shown activity in early studies. We review additional strategies that remain in the preclinical and early clinical pipeline, so there is much hope for the future of targeted agents for distinct molecular cohorts of patients with advanced melanoma.

  5. Evolution of systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Yau; Pierre Chan; Richard Epstein; Ronnie T Poon

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) commonly occurs in hepatitis B endemic areas, especially in Asian countries. HCC is highly refractory to cytotoxic chemotherapy. This resistance is partly related to its tumor biology, pharmacokinetic properties, and both intrinsic and acquired drug resistance. There is no convincing evidence thus far that systemic chemotherapy improves overall survival in advanced HCC patients.Other systemic approaches, such as hormonal therapy and immunotherapy, have also disappointing results. Recently, encouraging results have been shown in using sorafenib in the treatment of advanced HCC patients. In this review, we concisely summarize the evolution of developments in the systemic therapy of advanced HCC.

  6. [Non oncologic applications of molecular targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Wassef; de la Motte Rouge, Thibault; Amirault, Jean-Christophe; Vignot, Stéphane

    2012-10-01

    Significant improvements in the knowledge of cancer biology have permitted the development of new molecular targeted therapies. Meanwhile, a better understanding of the physiology of various non-cancerous diseases has allowed developing these agents in other areas. This review intends to illustrate these perspectives through examples corresponding to different strategies of molecular-targeted therapies : use of a monoclonal antibody binding a receptor (rituximab and rheumatoid arthritis) or a ligand (bevacizumab and age-related macular degeneration), tyrosine kinase inhibitor (imatinib and systemic sclerosis) or inhibitor of cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways (immunosuppressive and antiproliferative effects of mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] inhibitors). Clinical results can draw today what could become molecular medicine of tomorrow.

  7. Alcoholic liver disease: pathogenesis and new targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, José; Bataller, Ramón

    2011-08-09

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The spectrum of disease ranges from fatty liver to hepatic inflammation, necrosis, progressive fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In developed countries, ALD is a major cause of end-stage liver disease that requires transplantation. The most effective therapy for ALD is alcohol abstinence. However, for patients with severe forms of ALD (that is, alcoholic hepatitis) and for those who do not achieve abstinence from alcohol, targeted therapies are urgently needed. The development of new drugs for ALD is hampered by the scarcity of studies and the drawbacks of existing animal models, which do not reflect all the features of the human disease. However, translational research using liver samples from patients with ALD has identified new potential therapeutic targets, such as CXC chemokines, osteopontin and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 12A. The pathogenetic roles of these targets, however, remain to be confirmed in animal models. This Review summarizes the epidemiology, natural history, risk factors and current knowledge of the pathogenetic mechanisms of ALD. In addition, this article provides a detailed description of the findings of these translational studies and of the animal models used to study ALD.

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Mirzaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer.

  9. Targeting the TGFβ pathway for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Cohen, Romain; Cros, Jérôme; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; de Gramont, Armand

    2015-03-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway has pleiotropic functions regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, motility and invasion, extracellular matrix production, angiogenesis, and immune response. TGFβ signaling deregulation is frequent in tumors and has crucial roles in tumor initiation, development and metastasis. TGFβ signaling inhibition is an emerging strategy for cancer therapy. The role of the TGFβ pathway as a tumor-promoter or suppressor at the cancer cell level is still a matter of debate, due to its differential effects at the early and late stages of carcinogenesis. In contrast, at the microenvironment level, the TGFβ pathway contributes to generate a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth and metastasis throughout all the steps of carcinogenesis. Then, targeting the TGFβ pathway in cancer may be considered primarily as a microenvironment-targeted strategy. In this review, we focus on the TGFβ pathway as a target for cancer therapy. In the first part, we provide a comprehensive overview of the roles played by this pathway and its deregulation in cancer, at the cancer cell and microenvironment levels. We go on to describe the preclinical and clinical results of pharmacological strategies to target the TGFβ pathway, with a highlight on the effects on tumor microenvironment. We then explore the perspectives to optimize TGFβ inhibition therapy in different tumor settings.

  10. Bacteriolytic therapy of experimental pancreatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia; Maletzki; Michael; Gock; Ulrike; Klier; Ernst; Klar; Michael; Linnebacher

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effectiveness of Clostridium novyi(C.novyi)-NT spores for the treatment of established subcutaneous pancreatic tumor in the syngeneic,immunocompetent Panc02/C57Bl/6 model. METHODS:C.novyi-NT spores were applied intravenously to animals carrying established pancreatic tumors of three different sizes.Systemic immune responses in peripheral blood and spleen were examined by flow cytometry.Supplementary,cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes against syngeneic tumor targets was analyzed. RESULT...

  11. Notch信号转导通路与肿瘤分子靶向治疗研究进展%Molecular targeted therapy for carcinoma based on Notch signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张辉; 叶颖江; 王杉

    2010-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway represents control cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis during development.Aberrant activation of this pathway contributes to tumorigenesis and genes in the Notch signaling pathway could be potential therapeutic targets.This review involves regulation of Notch pathway and molecular targeted therapy.%Notch信号转导通路与细胞增生、分化、凋亡密切相关,与肿瘤的关系日益受到关注,以Notch通路为靶点的肿瘤治疗策略显示了其广阔的应用前景.本文将从肿瘤中Notch通路的调控、分子靶向治疗机制及应用进展方面做一综述.

  12. Indications for radiation therapy in hypopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, Teruki; Chatani, Masashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Sato, Takeo (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)); Miyahara, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    With the aim of determining indications for radiotherapy in hypopharyngeal carcinoma, a retrospective analysis was made on 79 patients treated between 1977 and 1985. The patients were followed up for a median of 6 yr. and 2 mo. with a range of 3 yr. and 2 mo. to 8 yr. and 11 mo.. According to the UICC TNM classification system (1987), 11 patients were T1, 31 T2, 23 T3, and 14 T4; and 23 patients were N0, 18 N1, 9 N2a, 15 N2b, 7 N2c, and 7 N3. Radiotherapy was administered with radical intent (n=14), with palliative intent (n=11), preoperatively (n=32), and postoperatively (n=22). The 5-year survival rate was 23% in the radically treated group, 0% in the palliatively treated group, 31% in the preoperatively treated group, and 49% in the postoperatively treated group. It also depended significantly on N staging: 55% for N0 patients vs 28% for N1 patients and 29% for N2a-b patients. The most common recurrence or relapse occurred in the cervical lymph nodes, followed by distant and local sites. For N1-3 patients, local control was significantly better in the group treated with combined radiotherapy and surgery (36% for neck dissection and 70% for radical neck dissection), as compared with 9% for radiation alone. Patients receiving 50 Gy or more had significantly higher local control than those receiving less than 50 Gy (55% vs 22%). Patients of stage NO had lymph node metastases in the area irradiated with less than 50 Gy. The results revealed the following indications: (1) lesions of early T stage and N0 confined to the posterior wall or the upper half of the piriform recess for radical radiotherapy (less than 10% of all cases); (2) potentially curable lesions of N0-N2b, regardless of T stages, for pre- or post-operative radiotherapy; (3) the other advanced lesions for palliative radiotherapy. Radiation of 50 Gy or more combined with neck dissection was proposed in local control for N1-3 patients. (N.K.).

  13. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong Hospital, Geelong, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  14. Trimodal therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matuschek C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with ESCC (squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus are most commonly diagnosed with locally advanced tumor stages. Early metastatic disease and late diagnosis are common reasons responsible for this tumor's poor clinical outcome. The prognosis of esophageal cancer is very poor because patients usually do not have symptoms in early disease stages. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus frequently complicates patients with multiple co-morbidities and these patients often require interdisciplinary diagnosis and treatment procedures. At present time, neoadjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy followed by surgery are regarded as the international standard of care. Meta-analyses have confirmed that this approach provides the patient with better local tumor control and an increased overall survival rate. It is recommended that patients with positive tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and who are poor surgical candidates should consider definitive radiochemotherapy without surgery as a treatment option. In future, EGFR antibodies may also be administered to patients during therapy to improve the current treatment effectiveness. Positron-emission tomography proves to be an early response-imaging tool used to evaluate the effect of the neoadjuvant therapy and could be used as a predictive factor for the survival rate in ESCC. The percentage proportions of residual tumor cells in the histopathological analyses represent a gold standard for evaluating the response rate to radiochemotherapy. In the future, early response evaluation and molecular biological tests could be important diagnostic tools in influencing the treatment decisions of ESCC patients.

  15. Introduction to radiobiology of targeted radionuclide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre ePOUGET

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRT are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure and low absorbed dose rate differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure and high absorbed dose rate, and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose-effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main

  16. Network systems biology for targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The era of targeted cancer therapies has arrived.However,due to the complexity of biological systems,the current progress is far from enough.From biological network modeling to structural/dynamic network analysis,network systems biology provides unique insight into the potential mechanisms underlying the growth and progression of cancer cells.It has also introduced great changes into the research paradigm of cancer-associated drug discovery and drug resistance.

  17. Microtubule-Targeting Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Cancer1828 Mol Cancer Ther 2005;4(12). December 2005 22. Sambrook J, Fritsch EF, Maniatis T. Molecular cloning : a laboratory manual. 2nd ed. Cold Spring...Harbor (NY): Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; 1989. 23. Zhu XX, Kozarsky K, Strahler JR, et al. Molecular cloning of a novel human leukemia-associated...of Cancer Research, Abstract #4940, 2005. 3. Mistry, SJ, Atweh, GF. Microtubule targeting therapy: Anti-stathmin based molecular cancer

  18. Validation and target gene screening of hsa-miR-205 in lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Wei; Jin Yi; Yuan Yunfeng; Bai Chunxue; Wu Ying; Zhu Hongguang; Lu Shaohua

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung cancers are classified as squamous cell carcinoma (SQ),adenocarcinoma (AC) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC).SQ is the major subtype of lung cancer.Currently,there are no targeted therapies for SQ due to lack of understanding its driving oncogenes.In this study,we validated an SQ specific biomarker hsa-miR-205 in Chinese patients with lung cancer and screened its candidate target genes for further functional studies to enrich knowledge in SQ target therapies.Methods Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (quantitative RT-PCR)was performed on 197 macro-dissected (cancerous cells >75%) surgical lung tissues (45 SQ,44 AC,54 SCLC and 54 adjacent normal tissues) to validate the expression profiles of miR-205.Furthermore,the targets of this microRNA were predicted through the gateway miRecords and mapped to lung cancer-associated pathways using the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) database.Then quantitative RT-PCR was performed on an independent cohort of 44 snap-frozen surgical lung tissues to concurrently assess the expression profiles of miR-205 and its 52 putative targeted genes.Results MicroRNA-205 yielded high diagnostic accuracy in discriminating SQ from AC with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.985,and discriminating SQ from SCLC with an AUC of 0.978 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE)surgical lung tissues.Predicted targets of miR-205 were associated with 52 key members of lung cancer signaling pathways.Ten target genes (ACSL1,AXIN2,CACNA2D2,FOXO3,PPP1R3A,PRKAG3,RUNX1,SMAD4,STK3 and TBL1XR1) were significantly down-regulated in SQ and had a strong negative correlation with miR-205,while one target gene (CDH3) was up-regulated in SQ and exhibited a strong positive correlation with miR-205.Conclusions We confirmed the high diagnostic accuracy of miR-205 in discriminating SQ from AC and SCLC in Chinese patients.Moreover,we identified 11 significant target genes of miR-205 which could be used for further functional studies

  19. 肝癌分子靶向药物治疗的研究进展%Research progress of molecular-targeted agents in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敏山; 张耀军; 徐立

    2009-01-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy is a new method and tendency in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To date, sorafinib, a multi-targeted gent, is the only one proved to be effective in improving the survival of patients with advanced HCC. Sorafinib is also the first line systemic agent for advanced HCC. Other multi-targeted agents, such as sunitinib, are also proved to be effective. Erlotinib, gefitinib and eetuximab, which target epidermal growth factor receptor, show effectiveness but still need further investigation. Bevacizumab, which targets vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, shows excellent results and deserves more clinical trials. The effects of bortezomib, sirolimus and imatinib, which target other pathways, are still under investigation. The future studies of molecular-targeted therapy for HCC should be focused on the combination of different targeted medicine, and combination of molecular-targeted therapy and chemotherapy, as well as individualized therapy.

  20. [Molecular alterations in melanoma and targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourah, Samia; Lebbé, Céleste

    2014-12-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer whose incidence is increasing steadily. The recent discovery of frequent and recurrent genetic alterations in cutaneous melanoma allowed a molecular classification of tumors into distinct subgroups, and paved the way for targeted therapy. Several signaling pathways are involved in the progression of this disease with oncogenic mutations affecting signaling pathways: MAPK, PI3K, cAMP and cyclin D1/CDK4. In each of these pathways, several potential therapeutic targets have been identified and specific inhibitors have already been developed and have shown clinical efficacy. The use of these inhibitors is often conditioned by tumors genotyping. In France, melanomas genotyping is supported by the platforms of the National Cancer Institute (INCA), which implemented a national program ensuring access to innovation for personalized medicine. The identification of new targets in melanoma supplies a very active dynamic development of innovative molecules contributing to changing the therapeutic landscape of this pathology.

  1. Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte therapy for ovarian cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Donia, Marco; Westergaard, Marie Christine Wulff

    2015-01-01

    Personalized cancer immunotherapy based on infusion of T cells holds the promise to specifically target a patient's individual tumor. Accumulating evidence indicates that the T cells mediating these tumor regressions after cancer immunotherapies may primarily target patient-specific mutations...... therapy in solid tumors other than melanoma have shown limited success, however none of these early trials used current preparative chemotherapy regimens, and the methods for in vitro lymphocyte expansion have changed considerably. New advances and understandings in T cell based immunotherapies have...... stimulated the interest in developing this approach for other indications. Here, we summarize the early clinical data in the field of adoptive cell transfer therapy (ACT) using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and ovarian cancer (OC). In addition we describe...

  2. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08 mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical

  3. [Advances in research on radioiodine therapy of carcinoma mediated by gene transfer technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Da; Kuang, Anren

    2010-10-01

    Radioiodine therapy of carcinoma could be mediated by transferring the genes which participate in the process of iodine metabolism in thyroid. The correlative genes are sodium/iodine symporter gene, thyroid peroxidase gene and the specific thyroid transcription factors, and others. The objective gene can specifically express in carcinoma by inserting the tissue-specific promoter/enhancer upstream of them, so radioiodine could be used to treat varied carcinomas. The radioiodine uptake in carcinoma cells was obviously increased and the radioiodine therapy of carcinoma was effective after those genes had expressed in carcinoma cells. The main problem was that the effective half-time of radioiodine in cells was too short to produce the ideal effect of radioiodine therapy. Moreover, 211At and 188Re could be transferred by sodium/iodine symporter and they could be used to treat the carcinoma that is capable of radioiodine uptake.

  4. A case report of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid gland developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Cuevas, S.; Baena Ocampo, L. [Hospital de Oncologia (Mexico). Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1995-12-01

    This a report on a 19-year-old female who developed a low grade T2 N0 M0 mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the right parotid gland 3 years and 5 months after the post-operative treatment of 100 mCi of radioactive iodine ({sup 131}I) for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. The parotid tumour appeared during the patient`s pregnancy. There are few reports of salivary gland cancer developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma and it is hoped that this report may stimulate others to investigate this association further in order to clarify the risk of secondary malignancies after radioiodine therapy. (author).

  5. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashish Jakhetiya; Pankaj Kumar Garg; Gaurav Prakash; Jyoti Sharma; Rambha Pandey; Durgatosh Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours(GISTs) are mesen-chymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majo-rity of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117(KIT) and discovered on GIST-1(DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy(tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs.

  6. Targeting RNA splicing for disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Mallory A; Duelli, Dominik M; Hastings, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for the expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicing is a logical approach to therapy. Splicing is a favorable intervention point for disease therapeutics, because it is an early step in gene expression and does not alter the genome. Significant advances have been made in the development of approaches to manipulate splicing for therapy. Splicing can be manipulated with a number of tools including antisense oligonucleotides, modified small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), trans-splicing, and small molecule compounds, all of which have been used to increase specific alternatively spliced isoforms or to correct aberrant gene expression resulting from gene mutations that alter splicing. Here we describe clinically relevant splicing defects in disease states, the current tools used to target and alter splicing, specific mutations and diseases that are being targeted using splice-modulating approaches, and emerging therapeutics.

  7. Targeting FGFR4 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma in preclinical mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy M French

    Full Text Available The fibroblast growth factor (FGF-FGF receptor (FGFR signaling system plays critical roles in a variety of normal developmental and physiological processes. It is also well documented that dysregulation of FGF-FGFR signaling may have important roles in tumor development and progression. The FGFR4-FGF19 signaling axis has been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs in mice, and potentially in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that FGFR4 is required for hepatocarcinogenesis; the progeny of FGF19 transgenic mice, which have previously been shown to develop HCCs, bred with FGFR4 knockout mice fail to develop liver tumors. To further test the importance of FGFR4 in HCC, we developed a blocking anti-FGFR4 monoclonal antibody (LD1. LD1 inhibited: 1 FGF1 and FGF19 binding to FGFR4, 2 FGFR4-mediated signaling, colony formation, and proliferation in vitro, and 3 tumor growth in a preclinical model of liver cancer in vivo. Finally, we show that FGFR4 expression is elevated in several types of cancer, including liver cancer, as compared to normal tissues. These findings suggest a modulatory role for FGFR4 in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma and that FGFR4 may be an important and novel therapeutic target in treating this disease.

  8. Targeting FGFR4 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma in preclinical mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dorothy M; Lin, Benjamin C; Wang, Manping; Adams, Camellia; Shek, Theresa; Hötzel, Kathy; Bolon, Brad; Ferrando, Ronald; Blackmore, Craig; Schroeder, Kurt; Rodriguez, Luis A; Hristopoulos, Maria; Venook, Rayna; Ashkenazi, Avi; Desnoyers, Luc R

    2012-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling system plays critical roles in a variety of normal developmental and physiological processes. It is also well documented that dysregulation of FGF-FGFR signaling may have important roles in tumor development and progression. The FGFR4-FGF19 signaling axis has been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) in mice, and potentially in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that FGFR4 is required for hepatocarcinogenesis; the progeny of FGF19 transgenic mice, which have previously been shown to develop HCCs, bred with FGFR4 knockout mice fail to develop liver tumors. To further test the importance of FGFR4 in HCC, we developed a blocking anti-FGFR4 monoclonal antibody (LD1). LD1 inhibited: 1) FGF1 and FGF19 binding to FGFR4, 2) FGFR4-mediated signaling, colony formation, and proliferation in vitro, and 3) tumor growth in a preclinical model of liver cancer in vivo. Finally, we show that FGFR4 expression is elevated in several types of cancer, including liver cancer, as compared to normal tissues. These findings suggest a modulatory role for FGFR4 in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma and that FGFR4 may be an important and novel therapeutic target in treating this disease.

  9. [Current strategies in the treatment of renal-cell cancer: targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, José Manuel; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2008-03-22

    Renal-cell carcinoma represents 95% of all renal tumours. The Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene is mutated or silenced in most clear cell renal carcinomas. pVHL loss results in the stabilization of the heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and enhanced transactivation of HIF target genes. HIF itself has been difficult to inhibit with drug-like molecules although a number of agents that indirectly inhibit HIF, including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitors, have been identified. Moreover, a number of drugs have been developed that target HIF-responsive gene products, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), implicated in tumor angiogenesis. Many of these targeted therapies, especially sunitinib, have demonstrated significant activity in kidney cancer clinical trials and represent a substantive advance in the treatment of this disease.

  10. Advances in target therapy in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Sculier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we have reviewed and analysed recent literature, published in 2013 and early 2014, in the context of pre-existing data. Considered target therapies were tyrosine kinase inhibitors of active epidermal growth factor receptor mutations (e.g. erlotinib, gefinitib and afatinib, anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements (e.g. crizotinib or angiogenesis (drugs under development, or monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (e.g. bevacizumab or epidermal growth factor receptors (e.g. cetuximab. The therapeutic project has to consider tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the case of nonsmall cell lung cancer with active epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement. However, these drugs should not be used in the absence of the targeted genetic abnormalities.

  11. Targeting hepatocellular carcinoma with aptamer-functionalized PLGA/PLA-PEG nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigum, Shannon E.; Sutton, Melissa; Barnes, Eugenia; Miller, Sarah; Betancourt, Tania

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide, particularly in regions where chronic Hepatitis B and C infections are common. Nanoparticle assemblies that incorporate high-affinity aptamers which specifically bind malignant hepatocellular carcinoma cells could be useful for targeted drug delivery or enhancing contrast with existing ablation therapies. The in vitro interactions of a tumor-specific aptamer, TLS11a, were characterized in a hepatoma cell line via live-cell fluorescence imaging, SDS-PAGE and Western Blotting techniques. Cell surface binding of the aptamer-AlexaFluor®546 conjugate was found to occur within 20 minutes of initial exposure, followed by internalization and localization to late endosomes or lysosomes using a pH-sensitive LysoSensor™ Green dye and confocal microscopy. Aptamer-functionalized polymer nanoparticles containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(lactide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) were then prepared by nanoprecipitation and passively loaded with the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, yielding spherical nanoparticles approximately 50 nm in diameter. Targeted drug delivery and cytotoxicity was assessed using live/dead fluorescent dyes and a MTT colorimetric viability assay with elevated levels of cell death found in cultures treated with either the aptamer-coated and uncoated polymer nanoparticles. Identification and characterization of the cell surface protein epitope(s) recognized by the TLS11a aptamer are ongoing along with nanoparticle optimization, but these preliminary studies support continued investigation of this aptamer and functionalized nanoparticle conjugates for targeted labeling and drug delivery within malignant hepatocellular carcinomas.

  12. Advances in the targeted therapy of liposarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Z

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhonghai Guan,1 Xiongfei Yu,1 Haohao Wang,1 Haiyong Wang,1 Jing Zhang,1 Guangliang Li,2 Jiang Cao,3 Lisong Teng1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 2Department of Medicine Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, 3Clinical Research Center, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Liposarcoma (LPS is the most common type of soft-tissue sarcoma. Complete surgical resection is the only curative means for localized disease; however, both radiation and conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy remain controversial for metastatic or unresectable disease. An increasing number of trials with novel targeted therapy of LPS have provided encouraging data during recent years. This review will provide an overview of the advances in our understanding of LPS and summarize the results of recent trials with novel therapies targeting different genetic and molecular aberrations for different subtypes of LPS. Keywords: well-/dedifferentiated, myxoid/round cell, pleomorphic, soft-tissue sarcoma

  13. AAV-Based Targeting Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfang Shi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first parvovirus serotype AAV2 was isolated from human and used as a vector for gene therapy application, there have been significant progresses in AAV vector development. AAV vectors have been extensively investigated in gene therapy for a broad application. AAV vectors have been considered as the first choice of vector due to efficient infectivity, stable expression and non-pathogenicity. However, the untoward events in AAV mediated in vivo gene therapy studies proposed the new challenges for their further applications. Deep understanding of the viral life cycle, viral structure and replication, infection mechanism and efficiency of AAV DNA integration, in terms of contributing viral, host-cell factors and circumstances would promote to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages and provide more insightful information for the possible clinical applications. In this review, main effort will be focused on the recent progresses in gene delivery to the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction and DNA specific integration regulation. Furthermore AAV receptor and virus particle intracellular trafficking are also discussed.

  14. Targeting Prostate Cancer for Gene Therapy Utilizing Lentivirus and Oncolytic VSV Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    not yet published. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non- skin carcinoma and o ne o f the...surgery or radiotherapy . Presently there are no therapies available for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, thus the emergence of new targeted...aque a ssay w hich s howed a hi gher concentration of replicating vi rus in prostates of PTEN -/- mice while sparing normal cells in control mice

  15. Gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) form a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by dysfunction of one of the lysosomal proteins, resulting in the accumulation of certain compounds. Although these disorders are among first genetic diseases for which specific treatments were proposed, there are still serious unsolved problems that require development of novel therapeutic procedures. An example is neuronopathy, which develops in most of LSD and cannot be treated efficiently by currently approved therapies. Recently, a new potential therapy, called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy (GET IT), has been proposed for a group of LSD named mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), in which storage of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in severe symptoms of virtually all tissues and organs, including central nervous system. The idea of this therapy is to inhibit synthesis of GAGs by modulating expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in synthesis of these compounds. Such a modulation is possible by using isoflavones, particularly genistein, which interfere with a signal transduction process necessary for stimulation of expression of certain genes. Results of in vitro experiments and studies on animal models indicated a high efficiency of GET IT, including correction of behavior of affected mice. However, clinical trials, performed with soy isoflavone extracts, revealed only limited efficacy. This caused a controversy about GET IT as a potential, effective treatment of patients suffering from MPS, especially neuronopathic forms of these diseases. It this critical review, I present possible molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action of isoflavones (particularly genistein) and suggest that efficacy of GET IT might be sufficiently high when using relatively high doses of synthetic genistein (which was employed in experiments on cell cultures and mouse models) rather than low doses of soy isoflavone extracts (which were used in clinical trials). This

  16. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Developing After Restart of Sunitinib Therapy for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Fukui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old Japanese man had started molecular-targeted therapy with sunitinib for lymph node metastasis 5 years after nephrectomy for left renal cell carcinoma (clear cell carcinoma, G2, pT2N0M0. He was transported to our emergency department because of generalized tonic-clonic seizure, vision loss, and impaired consciousness with acute hypertension after 8 cycles of treatment (2 years after the initiation of sunitinib therapy, including a drug withdrawal period for one year. MRI of the brain (FLAIR images showed multiple high-intensity lesions in the white matter of the occipital and cerebellar lobes, dorsal brain stem, and left thalamus. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome caused by sunitinib was suspected. In addition to the immediate discontinuation of sunitinib therapy, the administration of antihypertensive agents and anticonvulsants improved the clinical symptoms without neurological damage. Physicians should be aware that sunitinib causes reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. The early recognition of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is critical to avoid irreversible neurological damage.

  17. The function of CD147 and CD147-targeted therapy for hepatocelluar carcinoma%癌相关分子CD147与肝癌靶向治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐旭; 景晓红; 苟兴春

    2012-01-01

    CD147是一种在肝癌细胞膜表面高表达的跨膜糖蛋白,能够调节肝癌细胞生长、诱导基质金属蛋白酶(matrix metalloprotei-nase,MMP)分泌、促进肝癌细胞侵袭和转移,并且参与肝癌血管生长和耐药性形成.以CD147为靶点的单克隆抗体治疗肝癌具有显著疗效.本文就肝癌细胞CD147的分子特点、功能与机理以及针对CD147的靶向治疗等方面研究进展作较全面的综述.%CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein highly expressed by HCC cells, modulates HCC growth, promotes invasion and metastasis of HCC cells through stimulating adjacent fibroblasts and HCC cells to produce elevated levels of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in HCC microenvironment, and involves in HCC angiogenesis and multidrug resistance (MDR). Clinical progress has been made in HCC treatment using CD147-directed monoclonal antibodies. In this paper, we review the molecular features, expression and the putative roles of CD 147 in human HCC, and summarize the CD 147-targeted therapy for HCC.

  18. Successful treatment of hypovascular advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with lipiodol-targetting intervention radiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of hypovascular advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) successfully treated with a novel combination therapy of percutaneous ethanollipiodol injection (PELI) and intervention radiology (IVR),lipiodol-targetting IVR (Lipi-IVR). The present case had a hypovascular HCC (3 cm in diameter) located in the S6 region of the liver. Although the tumor was not detectable at all by both of early and late phase of helical dynamic computed tomography (CT), it could be detected by ultrasonography (US) as a low echoic space occupying lesion (SOL) beside the gallbladder and right kidney. Serum levels of alpha fetoprotein (AFP)and AFP-L3 were extremely high. Combination therapy of PELI, firstly reported in our department, and IVR (PELI and IVR, lipiodol-targetting IVR) was performed twice for the treatment. PELI could effectively visualize the location of the tumor for IVR treatment and show the presence of a thin blood vessel branching from the right hepatic artery flowing into the lipiodol deposit.After treatment, the serum levels of AFP and AFP-L3 were rapidly decreased to normal and maintained for more than eight months. Thus, this case expressing the tremendous effect might give us insight into the effectiveness of the novel combination therapy of PELI and IVR for the treatment of hypovascular HCC.

  19. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  20. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dai, Qun; Park, Dongkyoo; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR) mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress. PMID:27548226

  1. Leptin signaling molecular actions and drug target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang N

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nan Jiang,1,* Rongtong Sun,2,* Qing Sun3 1Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Weihai Municipal Hospital, Weihai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pathology, QianFoShan Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Previous reports indicate that over 13 different tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, are related to obesity. Obesity-associated inflammatory, metabolic, and endocrine mediators, as well as the functioning of the gut microbiota, are suspected to contribute to tumorigenesis. In obese people, proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-1 and IL-6, insulin and insulin-like growth factors, adipokines, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, adiponectin, and leptin are found to play crucial roles in the initiation and development of cancer. The cytokines induced by leptin in adipose tissue or tumor cells have been intensely studied. Leptin-induced signaling pathways are critical for biological functions such as adiposity, energy balance, endocrine function, immune reaction, and angiogenesis as well as oncogenesis. Leptin is an activator of cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis in several cell types, and an inducer of cancer stem cells; its critical roles in tumorigenesis are based on its oncogenic, mitogenic, proinflammatory, and pro-angiogenic actions. This review provides an update of the pathological effects of leptin signaling with special emphasis on potential molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targeting, which could potentially be used in future clinical settings. In addition, leptin-induced angiogenic ability and molecular mechanisms in HCC are discussed. The stringent binding affinity of leptin and its receptor Ob-R, as well as the highly upregulated expression of both

  2. Novel targeted therapies in chordoma: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Maio S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Di Maio,1 Stephen Yip,2 Gmaan A Al Zhrani,3,4 Fahad E Alotaibi,3,4 Abdulrahman Al Turki,3,4 Esther Kong,2 Robert C Rostomily5 1Division of Neurosurgery, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Neuroscience Institute, Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada; 5Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Chordomas are rare, locally aggressive skull base neoplasms known for local recurrence and not-infrequent treatment failure. Current evidence supports the role of maximal safe surgical resection. In addition to open skull-base approaches, the endoscopic endonasal approach to clival chordomas has been reported with favorable albeit early results. Adjuvant radiation is prescribed following complete resection, alternatively for gross residual disease or at the time of recurrence. The modalities of adjuvant radiation therapy reported vary widely and include proton-beam, carbon-ion, fractionated photon radiotherapy, and photon and gamma-knife radiosurgery. As of now, no direct comparison is available, and high-level evidence demonstrating superiority of one modality over another is lacking. While systemic therapies have yet to form part of any first-line therapy for chordomas, a number of targeted agents have been evaluated to date that inhibit specific molecules and their respective pathways known to be implicated in chordomas. These include EGFR (erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib, PDGFR (imatinib, mTOR (rapamycin, and VEGF (bevacizumab. This article provides an update of the current multimodality treatment of cranial base

  3. Molecular targeted therapy in the treatment of advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarakulasinghe, Nesaretnam Barr; van Zanwijk, Nico; Soo, Ross A

    2015-04-01

    Historically, patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with chemotherapy alone, but a therapeutic plateau has been reached. Advances in the understanding of molecular genetics have led to the recognition of multiple molecularly distinct subsets of NSCLC. This in turn has led to the development of rationally directed molecular targeted therapy, leading to improved clinical outcomes. Tumour genotyping for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement has meant chemotherapy is no longer given automatically as first-line treatment but reserved for when patients do not have a 'druggable' driver oncogene. In this review, we will address the current status of clinically relevant driver mutations and emerging new molecular subsets in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and the role of targeted therapy and mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapy.

  4. Temozolomide therapy in patients with aggressive pituitary adenomas or carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Marco; Bogazzi, Fausto; Cannavo, Salvo; Ceccato, Filippo; Curtò, Lorenzo; De Marinis, Laura; Iacovazzo, Donato; Lombardi, Giuseppe; Mantovani, Giovanna; Mazza, Elena; Minniti, Giuseppe; Nizzoli, Maurizio; Reni, Michele; Scaroni, Carla

    2016-02-01

    Temozolomide is effective in some patients with progressive pituitary adenoma or carcinoma. We report a survey study of Italian patients treated with Temozolomide because of aggressive pituitary adenoma or carcinoma resistant to standard therapies. Italian endocrinologists were surveyed and asked to participate into the study. A questionnaire was sent to all those who agreed and had used Temozolomide in at least one patient with pituitary tumor. Database was closed in December 2013. A literature review was also performed. Thirty-one patients were included into the analysis. Mean age at start of Temozolomide treatment was 58.3 ± 1.9 years (± standard error). Six of the 31 (19.4%) Italian patients had a pituitary carcinoma. Twenty-five patients (80.6%) had disease control during Temozolomide treatment, while 6 patients (19.4%) had disease progression. Median follow-up after beginning Temozolomide was 43 months. Thirteen patients had tumor growth after stopping Temozolomide. The 2-year progression-free survival was 47.7% (95% CI 29.5-65.9%), while the 2-year disease control duration was 59.1% (95% CI 39.1-79.1%). Eleven patients died of progressive disease and other two patients of unrelated causes. The 2-year and 4-year overall survival rates were 83.9% (95% CI 70.7-97.1%) and 59.6% (95% CI 40.0-79.2%), respectively. Temozolomide is an additional effective therapeutic option for the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors. The drug is well tolerated and causes few severe adverse effects. Recurrence of the tumor can occur after an initial positive response and usually portends a grim outcome.

  5. Targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway: an emerging treatment strategy for squamous cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joseph Thaddeus; Ismail, Amen; Tolomeo, Christina

    2014-09-01

    Squamous cell lung carcinoma accounts for approximately 30% of all non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Despite progress in the understanding of the biology of cancer, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the standard of care for patients with squamous cell lung carcinoma, but the prognosis is generally poor. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is one of the most commonly activated signaling pathways in cancer, leading to cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. It has therefore become a major focus of clinical research. Various alterations in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway have been identified in squamous cell lung carcinoma and a number of agents targeting these alterations are in clinical development for use as single agents and in combination with other targeted and conventional treatments. These include pan-PI3K inhibitors, isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors, AKT inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, and dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors. These agents have demonstrated antitumor activity in preclinical models of NSCLC and preliminary clinical evidence is also available for some agents. This review will discuss the role of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in cancer and how the discovery of genetic alterations in this pathway in patients with squamous cell lung carcinoma can inform the development of targeted therapies for this disease. An overview of ongoing clinical trials investigating PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors in squamous cell lung carcinoma will also be included.

  6. Resistance to HER2-targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Valadan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Production and approval of trastuzumab (Herceptin® for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC was a millstone in antibody-based targeted therapy in the cancer treatment. However, despite the early success in the clinical trials, trastuzumab failed to appreciate the initial attraction due to development of resistance to the drug. The majority of patients who benefit from the drug acquire resistance to it and experience tumor recurrence within 1 year. Several molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the resistance to trastuzumab have been proposed. In this review, first, we provide a brief history leading to production of trastuzumab. Also we consider the cellular and molecular antitumor effects of trastuzumab and then, we discuss the mechanisms underlying trastuzumab resistance in four levels.

  7. Targeting hypoxic response for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Elisa; Gemignani, Federica; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Dedhar, Shoukat; Mutti, Luciano; Landi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironment (HTM) is considered to promote metabolic changes, oncogene activation and epithelial mesenchymal transition, and resistance to chemo- and radio-therapy, all of which are hallmarks of aggressive tumor behavior. Cancer cells within the HTM acquire phenotypic properties that allow them to overcome the lack of energy and nutrients supply within this niche. These phenotypic properties include activation of genes regulating glycolysis, glucose transport, acidosis regulators, angiogenesis, all of which are orchestrated through the activation of the transcription factor, HIF1A, which is an independent marker of poor prognosis. Moreover, during the adaptation to a HTM cancer cells undergo deep changes in mitochondrial functions such as “Warburg effect” and the “reverse Warburg effect”. This review aims to provide an overview of the characteristics of the HTM, with particular focus on novel therapeutic strategies currently in clinical trials, targeting the adaptive response to hypoxia of cancer cells. PMID:26859576

  8. The prospect of precision therapy for renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Brunelli, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Heng, Daniel; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The therapeutic landscape of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has greatly expanded in the last decade. From being a malignancy orphan of effective therapies, kidney cancer has become today a tumor with several treatment options. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). In this complex scenario it is important to find prognostic and predictive factors that can help in decision making in the treatment of mRCC.

  9. Targeted therapies and radiation therapy in non-small cell lung cancer; Therapies ciblees et radiotherapie dans les cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, S.; Quero, L.; Wong Hee Kam, S.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C. [Service de cancerologie radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75010 Paris (France); Deutsch, E. [UMR 1030 ' radiosensibilite des tumeurs et tissus sains ' , Inserm, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. Between 80-85% of lung cancers are non-small cell lung carcinomas. One third of the patients are diagnosed with locally advanced stage. In this condition, concomitant radio-chemotherapy is the standard treatment for patients with good performance status. Despite important improvements in the last years, non-small cell lung carcinoma prognosis remains poor, with high rates of both local recurrences and metastases. The heterogeneity of molecular characteristics of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells and a better knowledge of potential targets offer promising developments for new pharmacologic agents. Hereafter we will review the currently most studied pathways and the most promising ones for the treatment of locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung carcinoma. Two of the most attractive pathways where new agents have been developed and assessed in combination with thoracic radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy are the EGFR pathway (either with the use of monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors) and the angiogenesis inhibition. The development of targeted agents could lead to individualized therapeutic combinations taking into account the intrinsic characteristics of tumor cells. Pharmacological modulation of tumour cells radiosensitivity by targeted therapies is only starting, but yet offers promising perspectives. (authors)

  10. TARGETED NANOPARTICLES FOR PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyaz eBasha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The two major forms of leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML account for about one third of the malignancies diagnosed in children. Despite the marked successes in ALL and AML treatment, concerns remain regarding the occurrence of resistant disease in subsets of patients the residual effects of therapy that often persist for decades beyond the cessation of treatment. Therefore, new approaches are needed to reduce or to avoid off target toxicities, associated with chemotherapy and their long term residual effects. Recently, nanotechnology has been employed to enhance cancer therapy, via improving the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of anti-cancer agents. While in the last several years, numerous review articles appeared detailing the size, composition, assembly and performance evaluation of different types of drug carrying nanoparticles, the description and evaluation of lipoprotein based drug carriers have been conspicuously absent from most of these major reviews. The current review focuses on such information regarding nanoparticles with an emphasis on high density lipoprotein (HDL-based drug delivery systems to examine their potential role(s in the enhanced treatment of children with leukemia.

  11. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called “tumor microenvironment (TME”, in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  12. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  13. Screening and characterization of novel specific peptides targeting MDA-MB-231 claudin-low breast carcinoma by computer-aided phage display methodologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nobrega, Franklin L.; Ferreira, Débora; Martins, Ivone M.; Suarez-Diez, Maria; Azeredo, Joana; Kluskens, L.D.; Rodrigues, Lígia R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Claudin-low breast carcinoma represents 19% of all breast cancer cases and is characterized by an aggressive progression with metastatic nature and high rates of relapse. Due to a lack of known specific molecular biomarkers for this breast cancer subtype, there are no targeted therapi

  14. Stromal targeted therapy in bone metastatic prostate cancer: promise delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor; William Goeckeler; Oyvind Bruland

    2011-01-01

    The ability of epithelial neoplasms to evade both hormonal and cytotoxic therapies is self-evident as the common carcinomas (lung,stomach,breast,colon and prostate) at their metastatic stage are rarely curable with current therapies.Though the precise reasons for incurability are debated,virtually all agree that tumor genetic heterogeneity makes eradication of the tumor difficult given ‘Darwinian' selection processes that are associated with the emergence of drug-resistant cellular clones.

  15. Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma with 2-Stage Total en bloc Spondylectomy after Marked Response to Molecular Target Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Inoue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the bone occurs at a high rate, and the prognosis is poor. In general, total en bloc spondylectomy is considered when there is only one vertebral metastasis and the primary disease is treated. However, palliative surgery is selected when the primary disease is not being treated or metastasis occurs to an important organ. We encountered a patient in whom lung and vertebra metastases were already present at the time of the first examination at our department and the prognosis was considered poor. However, molecular targeted therapy was markedly effective and enabled 2-stage total en bloc spondylectomy. As of one year after total en bloc spondylectomy, the condition has improved to cane gait, and surgery for lung metastasis is planned. Molecular target drugs might markedly change the current therapeutic strategy for renal cell carcinoma.

  16. Review of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound guidance in ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasunori Minami; Masatoshi Kudo

    2011-01-01

    Local ablative techniques-percutaneous ethanol injection, microwave coagulation therapy and radiofrequency ablation (RFA)-have been developed to treat unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The success rate of percutaneous ablation therapy for HCC depends on correct targeting of the tumor via an imaging technique. However, probe insertion often is not completely accurate for small HCC nodules, which are poorly defined on conventional B-mode ultrasound (US) alone. Thus, multiple sessions of ablation therapy are frequently required in difficult cases. By means of two breakthroughs in US technology, harmonic imaging and the development of second-generation contrast agents, dynamic contrast-enhanced harmonic US imaging with an intravenous contrast agent can depict tumor vascularity sensitively and accurately, and is able to evaluate small hypervascular HCCs even when B-mode US cannot adequately characterize the tumors. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced US can facilitate RFA electrode placement in hypervascular HCC, which is poorly depicted by B-mode US. The use of dynamic contrast-enhanced US guidance in ablation therapy for liver cancer is an efficient approach. Here, we present an overview of the current status of dynamic contrast-enhanced US-guided ablation therapy, and summarize the current indications and outcomes of reported clinical use in comparison with that of other modalities.

  17. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, René E; Wu, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. It is associated with a poor prognosis and has limited treatment options. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only available systemic agent for treatment of HCC that improves overall survival for patients with advanced stage disease; unfortunately, an effective second-line agent for the treatment of progressive or sorafenib-resistant HCC has yet to be identified. This review focuses on components of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, its role in HCC pathogenesis, and dual mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic option with potential efficacy in advanced HCC. There are several important upstream and downstream signals in the mTOR pathway, and alternative tumor-promoting pathways are known to exist beyond mTORC1 inhibition in HCC. This review analyzes the relationships of the upstream and downstream regulators of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling; it also provides a comprehensive global picture of the interaction between mTORC1 and mTORC2 which demonstrates the pre-clinical relevance of the mTOR pathway in HCC pathogenesis and progression. Finally, it provides scientific rationale for dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibition in the treatment of HCC. Clinical trials utilizing mTORC1 inhibitors and dual mTOR inhibitors in HCC are discussed as well. The mTOR pathway is comprised of two main components, mTORC1 and mTORC2; each has a unique role in the pathogenesis and progression of HCC. In phase III studies, mTORC1 inhibitors demonstrate anti-tumor activity in advanced HCC, but dual mTOR (mTORC1 and mTORC2) inhibition has greater therapeutic potential in HCC treatment which warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:25429315

  18. Efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy with γ-knife combined with targeted drug sorafenib in treatment of recurrent and metastatic renal cell carcinoma%立体定向放射治疗配合靶向药物索拉非尼治疗复发及转移性肾细胞癌的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康静波; 聂青; 张丽萍; 张军; 李启亮; 朱奇

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the efficacy of stereotactic radiation therapy with gamma - knife (y - SBRT) combined with targeted drug sorafenib in treatment of recurrent and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Methods From May 2007 to May 2009, 45 patients with recurrent and metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients were admitted. 26 of them were treated with y - SBRT alone and 19 cases treated with y - SBRT with Sorafenib treatment. Results The total effective rate after three - month treatment was 80. 0% (36/ 45 ) . The local control rate at 1, 2 years was 42. 3% (11/26 ) , 19. 2% (5/26) ,median survival 12 months, and the cumulative survival rate at 1, 2 years was 46. 2 % , 19. 2% , respectively in y - SBRT group. The local control rate at 1 , 2 years was 47. 3% (18/ 19) and 21.1% (4/19) ,median survival 18 months, and the cumulative survival rate at 1, 2 years was 57. 9% and 26. 3% , respectively in-y - SBRT + sorafenib group. Conclusions The combination of stereotactic gamma - body radiation therapy with targeted drug sorafenib for treatment of recurrent and metastatic renal cell carcinoma is an effective treatment. Adverse reactions are mild, and most patients can tolerate the treatment.%目的 探讨γ-体部立体定向放射治疗(stereotactic body radiation therapy with γ-knife,γ-SBRT)配合靶向药物索拉非尼(sorafenib)治疗复发及转移性肾癌的效果.方法 2007-05至2009-05收治的肾癌术后复发及转移患者45例中,26例单纯行γ-SBRT,19例行γ-SBRT配合Sorafenib治疗,比较两组的有效率、局部控制率、生存率及生存质量改善情况.结果 治疗后3个月总有效率为80.0%(36/45).单纯γ-SBRT组的1年、2年局部控制率分别为42.3%(11/26)、19.2%(5/26);中位生存12个月;1年、2年生存率分别为46.2%、19.2%.γ-SBRT+Sorafenib组的1年、2年局部控制率分别为47.3%(18/19)、21.1%(4/19),中位生存18个月;1年、2年生存率分别为57.9%、26.3%.结论 采用γ-体部立体定向放疗结合靶向

  19. Endothelin receptors as novel targets in tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagnato Anna

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The endotelin (ET axis, that includes ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and the ET receptors, ETA and ETB, plays an important physiological role, as modulator of vasomotor tone, tissue differentiation and development, cell proliferation, and hormone production. Recently, investigations into the role of the ET axis in mitogenesis, apoptosis inhibition, invasiveness, angiogenesis and bone remodeling have provided evidence of the importance of the ET-1 axis in cancer. Data suggest that ET-1 participates in the growth and progression of a variety of tumors such as prostatic, ovarian, renal, pulmonary, colorectal, cervical, breast carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, brain tumors, melanoma, and bone metastases. ET-1 receptor antagonists beside providing ideal tools for dissecting the ET axis at molecular level have demonstrated their potential in developing novel therapeutic opportunity. The major relevance of ETA receptor in tumor development has led to an extensive search of highly selective antagonists. Atrasentan, one of such antagonists, is orally bioavailable, has suitable pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles for clinical use. Preliminary data from clinical trials investigating atrasentan in patients with prostate cancer are encouraging. This large body of evidence demonstrates the antitumor activity of endothelin receptor antagonists and provides a rationale for the clinical evaluation of these molecules alone and in combination with cytotoxic drugs or molecular inhibitors leading to a new generation of anticancer therapies targeting endothelin receptors.

  20. Association Between Menopausal Estrogen-Only Therapy and Ovarian Carcinoma Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alice W; Ness, Roberta B; Roman, Lynda D;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the association between postmenopausal estrogen-only therapy use and risk of ovarian carcinoma, specifically with regard to disease histotype and duration and timing of use. METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of 906 women with ovarian carcinoma and 1,220 women in a con...

  1. Skin carcinomas in organ-transplant recipients : from early oncogenic events to therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, Ymke Grete Leontien de

    2008-01-01

    Skin carcinomas develop at a high rate in organ-transplant recipients who are kept on immune suppressive drugs to prevent graft rejection. The present study dealt with a broad range of aspects of this elevated carcinoma risk, starting from the earliest oncogenic events to the ultimate therapy. Advan

  2. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma : treatment and clinical consequences of therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoftijzer, Hendrieke Catherijn

    2011-01-01

    The first chapters of this thesis describe the treatment of radioiodine non-avid thyroid carcinoma with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib. The remainder of the thesis describes the clinical consequences of the treatment of thyroid carcinoma.

  3. A dosimetric evaluation of flattening filter-free volumetric modulated arc therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guishan Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore the dosimetric effects of flattening filter-free (FFF beams in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT of nasopharyngeal carcinoma via a retrospective planning study. Materials and Methods: A linear accelerator (LINAC was prepared to operate in FFF mode and the beam data were collected and used to build a model in TPS. For 10 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC cases, VMAT plans of FFF beams and normal flattened (FF beams were designed. Differences of plan quality and delivery efficiency between FFF-VMAT plans and filter filtered VMAT (FF-VMAT plans were analyzed using two-tailed paired t-tests. Results: Removal of the flattening filter increased the dose rate. Averaged beam on time (BOT of FFF-VMAT plans was decreased by 24.2%. Differences of target dose coverage between plans with flattened and unflattened beams were statistically insignificant. For dose to normal organs, up to 4.9% decrease in V35 of parotid grand and 4.5% decrease in averaged normal tissue (NT dose was observed. Conclusions: The TPS used in our study was able to handle FFF beams. The FFF beam prone to improve the normal tissue sparing while achieving similar target dose distribution. Decreasing of BOT in NPC cases was valuable in terms of patient′s comfort.

  4. Does radioiodine therapy have disadvantageous effects in non-iodine accumulating differentiated thyroid carcinoma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, J; Eustatia-Rutten, CFA; Stokkel, M; Links, TP; Diamant, M; Romijn, JA; Smit, JWA; van der Velde, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma without radioiodine accumulation has not been considered harmful, increased thyrotrophin levels during thyroxine withdrawal without the benefit of radiotoxicity as well as the selection of de-differentiated cells may have di

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple following radiation therapy for ductal carcinoma in situ: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yajue

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Radiation-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer was first reported seven years after the discovery of X-rays, but has received relatively little consideration in the literature. Specifically, nonmelanoma skin cancer after conservative surgery and radiation for early stage breast cancer has not been well studied. We report the case of a woman who developed squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple nine years after conservative surgery and radiation for ductal carcinoma in situ of the ipsilateral breast. We also review the relevant literature available to date. Case presentation A 66-year-old African-American woman presented to the hospital with a non-healing ulcer of the right nipple. Her past medical history was significant for right breast ductal carcinoma in situ for which she had undergone lumpectomy and whole breast radiation therapy nine years previously. Mammography and magnetic resonance imaging studies were negative for recurrent breast cancer. However, the latter demonstrated abnormal enhancement in the nipple-areolar region. An incisional biopsy of the lesion demonstrated invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision of the nipple-areolar complex. Sentinel lymph-node biopsy was offered but our patient declined. She was considered to have local disease and hence no further treatment was recommended. Conclusion This case represents the first reported occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple to follow conservative surgery and radiation for ductal carcinoma in situ of the ipsilateral breast. It is likely that radiation overexposure resulted in a radiation burn and subsequent radiodermatitis, placing it at risk for squamous cell carcinoma. A diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma should be considered in a patient with a nipple lesion following radiation therapy for breast cancer.

  6. Successful imiquimod treatment of multiple basal cell carcinomas after radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyeler, Mirjam; Urosevic, Mirjana; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Dummer, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of a 55-year-old male patient who developed five basal cell carcinomas 23 years after radiation therapy of Hodgkin's disease. In 1980 he received radiation therapy twice. Due to relapses, he was treated with aggressive polychemotherapy and underwent autologous stem cell transplantation, which then led to complete remission. Until now he is in complete remission. However, multiple superficial basal cell carcinomas have developed on irradiation fields that have been successfully treated by imiquimod.

  7. Comparison of two peptide radiotracers for prostate carcinoma targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bluma Linkowski Faintuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Scintigraphy is generally not the first choice treatment for prostate cancer, although successful studies using bombesin analog radiopeptides have been performed. Recently, a novel peptide obtained using a phage display library demonstrated an affinity for prostate tumor cells. The aim of this study was to compare the use of a bombesin analog to that of a phage display library peptide (DUP-1 radiolabeled with technetium-99m for the treatment of prostate carcinoma. The peptides were first conjugated to S-acetyl-MAG3 with a 6-carbon spacer, namely aminohexanoic acid. METHODS: The technetium-99m labeling required a sodium tartrate buffer. Radiochemical evaluation was performed using ITLC and was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The coefficient partition was determined, and in vitro studies were performed using human prostate tumor cells. Biodistribution was evaluated in healthy animals at various time points and also in mice bearing tumors. RESULTS: The radiochemical purity of both radiotracers was greater than 95%. The DUP-1 tracer was more hydrophilic (log P = -2.41 than the bombesin tracer (log P = -0.39. The biodistribution evaluation confirmed this hydrophilicity by revealing the greater kidney uptake of DUP-1. The bombesin concentration in the pancreas was greater than that of DUP-1 due to specific gastrin-releasing peptide receptors. Bombesin internalization occurred for 78.32% of the total binding in tumor cells. The DUP-1 tracer showed very low binding to tumor cells during the in vitro evaluation, although tumor uptake for both tracers was similar. The tumors were primarily blocked by DUP1 and the bombesin radiotracer primarily targeted the pancreas. CONCLUSION: Further studies with the radiolabeled DUP-1 peptide are recommended. With further structural changes, this molecule could become an efficient alternative tracer for prostate tumor diagnosis.

  8. Lactoferrin-modified PEGylated liposomes loaded with doxorubicin for targeting delivery to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Minyan; Guo, Xiucai; Tu, Liuxiao; Zou, Qi; Li, Qi; Tang, Chenyi; Chen, Bao; Xu, Yuehong; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a potential-targeting ligand for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells because of its specific binding with asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). In this present work, a doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded, Lf-modified, polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated liposome (Lf-PLS) system was developed, and its targeting effect and antitumor efficacy to HCC was also explored. The DOX-loaded Lf-PLS system had spherical or oval vesicles, with mean particle size approximately 100 nm, and had an encapsulation efficiency of 97%. The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry indicated that the cellular uptake of Lf-PLS was significantly higher than that of PEGylated liposome (PLS) in ASGPR-positive cells (PASGPR-negative cells (P>0.05). Cytotoxicity assay by MTT demonstrated that DOX-loaded Lf-PLS showed significantly stronger antiproliferative effects on ASGPR-positive HCC cells than did PLS without the Lf modification (P<0.05). The in vivo antitumor studies on male BALB/c nude mice bearing HepG2 xenografts demonstrated that DOX-loaded Lf-PLS had significantly stronger antitumor efficacy compared with PLS (P<0.05) and free DOX (P<0.05). All these results demonstrated that a DOX-loaded Lf-PLS might have great potential application for HCC-targeting therapy.

  9. More than 10 years survival with sequential therapy in a patient with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, J.L.; Wang, F.L.; Yi, X.M.; Qin, W.J.; Wu, G.J. [Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Huan, Y. [Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, L.J.; Zhang, G.; Yu, L.; Zhang, Y.T.; Qin, R.L.; Tian, C.J. [Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-10-31

    Although radical nephrectomy alone is widely accepted as the standard of care in localized treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), it is not sufficient for the treatment of metastatic RCC (mRCC), which invariably leads to an unfavorable outcome despite the use of multiple therapies. Currently, sequential targeted agents are recommended for the management of mRCC, but the optimal drug sequence is still debated. This case was a 57-year-old man with clear-cell mRCC who received multiple therapies following his first operation in 2003 and has survived for over 10 years with a satisfactory quality of life. The treatments given included several surgeries, immunotherapy, and sequentially administered sorafenib, sunitinib, and everolimus regimens. In the course of mRCC treatment, well-planned surgeries, effective sequential targeted therapies and close follow-up are all of great importance for optimal management and a satisfactory outcome.

  10. Radiation therapy for primary carcinoma of the eyelid. Tumor control and visual function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Kasuya, T.; Minagawa, Y.; Kaizu, H.; Mukai, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Maegawa, J. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan). Dept. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; Kaneko, A. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan). Dept. of Ophthalmology

    2012-12-15

    Background and purpose: Surgical excision remains the standard and most reliable curative treatment for eyelid carcinoma, but frequently causes functional and cosmetic impairment of the eyelid. We therefore investigated the efficacy and safety of radiation therapy in eyelid carcinoma. Patients and methods: Twenty-three patients with primary carcinoma of the eyelid underwent radiation therapy. Sebaceous carcinoma was histologically confirmed in 16 patients, squamous cell carcinoma in 6, and basal cell carcinoma in 1. A total dose of 50-66.6 Gy (median, 60 Gy) was delivered to tumor sites in 18-37 fractions (median, 30 fractions). Results: All but 3 of the 23 patients had survived at a median follow-up period of 49 months. The overall survival and local progression-free rates were 87% and 93% at 2 years, and 80% and 93% at 5 years, respectively. Although radiation-induced cataracts developed in 3 patients, visual acuity in the other patients was relatively well preserved. There were no other therapy-related toxicities of grade 3 or greater. Conclusion: Radiation therapy is safe and effective for patients with primary carcinoma of the eyelid. It appears to contribute to prolonged survival as a result of good tumor control, and it also facilitates functional and cosmetic preservation of the eyelid. (orig.)

  11. Radiation therapy for portal venous invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiichi Nakagawa; Masatoshi Makuuchi; Kuni Ohtomo; Hideomi Yamashita; Kenshiro Shiraishi; Naoki Nakamura; Masao Tago; Hiroshi Igaki; Yoshio Hosoi; Shuichiro Shiina; Masao Omata

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the efficacy and safety of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT) for this disease and to specify patient subgroups suitable for this treatment.METHODS: Fifty-two patients with HCC received PVI-targeted radiation therapy from January 1995 through December 2003. Portal venous invasion (PVI) was found in the second or lower order branches of the portal vein in 6 patients, in the first branch in 24 patients and in the main trunk in 22 patients. Child classifications of liver function before radiation therapy were A, B, and C for 19, 24 and 2 patients, respectively. All patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a total dose ranging from 39 to 60 Gy (57.0 Gy in average).RESULTS: Overall survival rates at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 45.1%, 25.3%, 15.2%, 10.1%, and 5.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that Child status, the number of tumor foci, tumor type,transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) after radiation therapy were statistically significant prognostic factors.Multivariate analysis showed that the number of tumor foci and TAE after radiation therapy were statistically significant.CONCLUSION: The results of this study strongly suggest the efficacy of 3-D CRT as treatment for PVI in HCC. 3-D CRT is recommended in combination with postradiation TAE for PVI of HCC with 5 tumor foci or less in the liver and with Child A liver function.

  12. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Théberge, Valérie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Hôpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  13. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    and whether this difference changed the outcome for palliative patients, 6) use of the Calypso system, and other advanced radiation therapy equipment...use of advanced technology radiation therapy techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, in treating palliative patients. The main obstacle to overcome in...treating low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an electromagnetic localization system. IMRT

  14. Results of radiation therapy in extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Cho, Keiichi; Okamoto, Moriyo (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-06-01

    From January 1975 to August 1988, 40 patients with extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma were treated by external irradiation at Chiba University Hospital and the National Medical Center Hospital. Thirty-four patients (male: 20, female: 14) were evaluable. Eighteen patients were postoperative cases because the surgical margin was positive for tumor cells in the postoperative pathological examination; the other 16 were inoperable cases. Survival in postoperative and inoperable cases was not significantly different, with median survival times of 13.8 and 8.1 months, respectively. Survival in the recanalization-positive and negative-groups was significantly different (p<0.05) after irradiation, with median survival times of 13.5 and 6.0 months, respectively. Complications of therapy were recognized in 68% of all cases. They were mainly gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, erosive gastritis and loss of appetite, but they were not severe. Distant metastasis was recognized in only 4 patients (10%): three had bony metastasis and one had supraclavicular and pulmonary hilar lymph node metastasis. Ninety percent of all cases died from hepatic failure or peritonitis carcinomatosa due to failure to obtain local control by external irradiation. A more effective modality of treatment is necessary to cure these patients. (author).

  15. Anti EGFR therapy in the treatment of non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: The current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony Benson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC accounts for a large oncologic burden in the developing countries. In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer multimodality treatment is warranted. Radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy has long been considered the standard for patients with disease involving the oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. However, addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy increases treatment related toxicity by many folds and compliance rates decrease. In this context a systemic therapy, which when used concurrent with radiation with favorable toxicity profile is of great importance for improving disease control in locally advanced HNSCC. Anti-epithelial growth factor receptor targeted therapy emerged as a potential treatment option. In recent years many trials were conducted to find the optimum treatment option with the combination of these targeted agents. The initial trials showed excellent results with minimal morbidity and led to great enthusiasm across the globe to incorporate these regimens as a standard of care. However, subsequently many trials failed to maintain such results and now there is little agreement to the initial results achieved with these drugs. Based on the current evidence we cannot recommend the replacement of cisplatin with targeted therapy in concurrent setting. It may be considered in patients with altered renal parameters, hypersensitivity or intolerance to cisplatin. The addition of targeted therapy in addition to chemotherapy in the concurrent setting can’t also be recommended as the benefit is doubtful and is associated with a significant increase in toxicity.

  16. Changes in c-Kit expression levels during the course of radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Bicheng; Xu, Jing; Shui, Yongjie; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Ren, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Xiaozhong; Shen, Li; Wei, Qichun

    2016-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy, distant metastasis is currently the main cause of treatment failure for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Additional therapeutic strategies are required to control the metastasis and improve survival. One strategy is targeted therapy, for example against c-Kit. In the current study, the frequency of c-Kit expression was determined immunohistochemically in 106 NPC patients. c-Kit expression changes during the course of radiation therapy were detected in 41 cases via weekly biopsy. Twelve cases (11.3%) had c-Kit expression scores of 3+ and 16 (15.1%) had scores of 2+. Thus, c-Kit overexpression (2+ or 3+) was observed in 28 (26.4%) patients. There were 35 (33.0%) and 43 (40.6%) patients with c-Kit expression scores of 1+ and 0, respectively. Furthermore, a trend of decreased c-Kit expression was observed after commencing radiotherapy according to the 41 NPC patients who were biopsied weekly. Therefore, c-Kit overexpression was identified to be common in NPC, and evaluating c-Kit as a therapeutic target for metastatic NPC via c-Kit overexpression subsequent to first line treatment may be of interest. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate a trend of decreased c-Kit expression during the course of radiotherapy. PMID:27699010

  17. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction to deliver siRNA cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Andrew R; McTiernan, Charles F; Lavery, Linda; Grata, Michelle; Leng, Xiaoping; Wang, Jianjun; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2012-12-01

    Microbubble contrast agents can specifically deliver nucleic acids to target tissues when exposed to ultrasound treatment parameters that mediate microbubble destruction. In this study, we evaluated whether microbubbles and ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) could be used to enhance delivery of EGF receptor (EGFR)-directed siRNA to murine squamous cell carcinomas. Custom-designed microbubbles efficiently bound siRNA and mediated RNAse protection. UTMD-mediated delivery of microbubbles loaded with EGFR-directed siRNA to murine squamous carcinoma cells in vitro reduced EGFR expression and EGF-dependent growth, relative to delivery of control siRNA. Similarly, serial UTMD-mediated delivery of EGFR siRNA to squamous cell carcinoma in vivo decreased EGFR expression and increased tumor doubling time, relative to controls receiving EGFR siRNA-loaded microbubbles but not ultrasound or control siRNA-loaded microbubbles and UTMD. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof-of-concept for customized microbubbles and UTMD to deliver gene-targeted siRNA for cancer therapy.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Affibody Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a highly aggressive and lethal cancer. It is typically asymptomatic at the early stage, with only 10%–20% of HCC patients being diagnosed early enough for appropriate surgical treatment. The delayed diagnosis of HCC is associated with limited treatment options and much lower survival rates. Therefore, the early and accurate detection of HCC is crucial to improve its currently dismal prognosis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has been reported to be involved in HCC tumorigenesis and to represent an attractive target for HCC imaging and therapy. In this study, an affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907, targeting the extracellular domain of EGFR, was used for the first time to assess its potential to detect HCC xenografts. By evaluating radio- or fluorescent-labeled Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 as a probe for positron emission tomography (PET or optical imaging of HCC, subcutaneous EGFR-positive HCC xenografts were found to be successfully imaged by the PET probe. Thus, affibody-based PET imaging of EGFR provides a promising approach for detecting HCC in vivo.

  19. 多西紫杉醇载药纳米粒子对小鼠肝癌移植瘤的靶向治疗作用%Targeting therapy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles for mouse hepatic carcinoma xenografts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文君; 刘芹

    2012-01-01

    目的 考察以两亲嵌段共聚物mPEG - PCL所制备的多西紫杉醇(Doc)载药纳米粒子的靶向抗肿瘤作用,并对其机理进行探讨.方法 采用丙酮-纳米沉淀法制备负载Doc的纳米粒子,动态光散射测定纳米粒子载药前后的粒径及多分散性.采用荧光标记粒子细胞摄取实验,探讨Doe纳米粒子抗肿瘤作用不同于裸药的机制.建立小鼠肝癌细胞H22皮下移植瘤模型,研究尾静脉注射载药纳米粒子的体内抗肿瘤作用.结果 通过纳米沉淀法制备的空白粒子平均粒径为75.7 nm,多西紫杉醇载药粒子的平均粒径为78.0 nm.体内实验结果显示单次尾静脉给药,多西紫杉醇纳米粒子的抗肿瘤效果明显优于临床上常用的泰素帝(P<0.01).结论 高分子多西紫杉醇载药纳米粒子可以提高多西紫杉醇的体内抗肿瘤效果,显示出良好的临床应用前景.%Objective To study the curative effects and possible mechanism of docetaxel (Doc) - loaded nanoparticles with bi - block copolymers mPEG - PCL against hepatic carcinoma. Methods mPEG - PCL was synthesized by ring - opening polymerization method and the nanodrug was prepared by acetone nano - precipated method. The diameters and polydispersity of the nanoparticles were evaluated by dynamic light scattering ( DLS). The in vivo antitumor effect of Doc - loaded nanoparticles was investigated on hepatic H22 tumor model via intravenous administration. Results The diameters of blank nanoparticles and Doc - loaded nanoparticle were 75. 5 and 78. 0 nm respectively. Vivo and - tumor effect showed the tumor growth inhibition of Doc - loaded nanoparticles was markedly smaller than commercial taxotere (P < 0. 01). Conclusion DOC - loaded nanoparticles could enhance the antitumor effect of taxotere and has potential for future clinical application.

  20. Photodynamic therapy as a treatment for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, T M; Rosen, G M

    2000-01-01

    Intrathoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed by endoscopy in an 11-year-old, castrated male Labrador retriever with signs of regurgitation and weight loss. Photodynamic therapy with photofrin was administered three times under endoscopic guidance over a two-month period. A partial response to photodynamic therapy was supported by a reduction in tumor size (noted on serial endoscopic examinations) and by a return to oral alimentation. The dog was euthanized due to recurrent regurgitation and aspiration pneumonia nine months after the onset of therapy. Necropsy revealed marked local invasiveness and regional lymph node metastasis of the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in addition to pneumonia. The application of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of canine esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is discussed and compared with the human literature.

  1. Lactoferrin-modified PEGylated liposomes loaded with doxorubicin for targeting delivery to hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei MY

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Minyan Wei,1,2 Xiucai Guo,1,3 Liuxiao Tu,1 Qi Zou,1 Qi Li,1 Chenyi Tang,1 Bao Chen,1 Yuehong Xu,1 Chuanbin Wu1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, 3Department of Pharmacy, 12th People’s Hospital of Guangzhou City, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lactoferrin (Lf is a potential-targeting ligand for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells because of its specific binding with asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR. In this present work, a doxorubicin (DOX-loaded, Lf-modified, polyethylene glycol (PEGylated liposome (Lf-PLS system was developed, and its targeting effect and antitumor efficacy to HCC was also explored. The DOX-loaded Lf-PLS system had spherical or oval vesicles, with mean particle size approximately 100 nm, and had an encapsulation efficiency of 97%. The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry indicated that the cellular uptake of Lf-PLS was significantly higher than that of PEGylated liposome (PLS in ASGPR-positive cells (P<0.05 but not in ASGPR-negative cells (P>0.05. Cytotoxicity assay by MTT demonstrated that DOX-loaded Lf-PLS showed significantly stronger antiproliferative effects on ASGPR-positive HCC cells than did PLS without the Lf modification (P<0.05. The in vivo antitumor studies on male BALB/c nude mice bearing HepG2 xenografts demonstrated that DOX-loaded Lf-PLS had significantly stronger antitumor efficacy compared with PLS (P<0.05 and free DOX (P<0.05. All these results demonstrated that a DOX-loaded Lf-PLS might have great potential application for HCC-targeting therapy. Keywords: asialoglycoprotein receptor, immunoliposome, PEGylated modification, post-insertion, hepatic cancer, active targeting

  2. Development of systemic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma at 2013: Updates and insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen L; Yeo, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has undergone testing for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately, this enthusiasm has recently been discouraged by a number of negative phase III studies on several anti-angiogenic TKIs in HCC. Several postulations have been made to account for this phenomenon, namely the plateau effects of anti-angiogenesis approach, the heterogeneity of HCC in terms of background hepatitis/cirrhosis and tumor biology, as well as the way how clinical trials are designed. Regardless of the underlying reasons, these results suggested that alternative strategies are necessary to further develop systemic therapy for HCC. Several new strategies are currently evaluated: for examples, molecular agents with activities against targets other than vascular endothelial growth factor receptor are being evaluated in on-going clinical trials. In addition, different approaches of targeted agents in combination with various treatment modalities, such as concurrently with another molecular agent, cytotoxic chemotherapy or transarterial chemoembolization, are being developed. This review aims to give a summary on the results of recently released clinical trials on TKIs, followed by discussion on some of the potential novel agents and combinational approaches. Future directions for testing innovative systemic agents for HCC will also be discussed. PMID:24696599

  3. Autophagy- An emerging target for melanoma therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoye, Abibatou; Weeraratna, Ashani T.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma accounts for only 5% of all cancers but is the leading cause of skin cancer death due to its high metastatic potential. Patients with metastatic melanoma have a 10-year survival rate of less than 10%. While the clinical landscape for melanoma is evolving rapidly, lack of response to therapies, as well as resistance to therapy remain critical obstacles for treatment of this disease. In recent years, a myriad of therapy resistance mechanisms have been unravelled, one of which is autophagy, the focus of this review. In advanced stages of malignancy, melanoma cells hijack the autophagy machinery in order to alleviate drug-induced and metabolic stress in the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting resistance to multiple therapies, tumor cell survival, and progression.  Autophagy is an essential cellular process that maintains cellular homeostasis through the recycling of intracellular constituents. Early studies on the role of autophagy in cancer generated controversy as to whether autophagy was pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Currently, there is a consensus that autophagy is tumor-suppressive in the early stages of cancer and tumor-promoting in established tumors.  This review aims to highlight current understandings on the role of autophagy in melanoma malignancy, and specifically therapy resistance; as well as to evaluate recent strategies for therapeutic autophagy modulation. PMID:27583134

  4. Dysregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in chromophobe renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Albadine, Roula; Schultz, Luciana; Hicks, Jessica; Carducci, Michael A; Argani, Pedram; Allaf, Mohamad; Netto, George J

    2013-10-01

    Targeted therapy in advanced clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCC) is now an established modality. The latter is in stark contrast to non-clear cell subtypes. We explored the translational support for the use of antagonists of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor pathways in chromophobe RCC. The immunoexpression of PTEN, phos-AKT, phosphorylated S6 (phos-S6), 4EBP1, p27, c-MYC, and HIF-1α was evaluated in 33 patients with chromophobe RCC who were treated by partial/radical nephrectomy without adjuvant therapy. PTEN was lower in tumor than in normal kidney (P<.001), and loss of PTEN expression was found in 67% of the tumors. In tumor tissues, phos-S6 and 4EBP1 were higher than in normal kidney (P≤.005). Conversely, scores of p27 were lower in tumor than in normal kidney (P<.001). Finally, scores of phos-AKT, c-MYC, and HIF-1α were not significantly different in tumor and in normal kidney. Overall mortality and cancer-specific mortality were 9% and 0%, respectively. Multifocal tumors had higher levels of PTEN, phos-AKT, and HIF-1α (P≤.01). None of the clinicopathologic variables (age, ethnicity, gender, pT stage, tumor size, multifocality, and positive surgical margins) was associated with outcome. Similarly, none of the tested biomarkers predicted overall mortality, either in unadjusted or adjusted Cox regression models. In summary, our study provides new evidence of dysregulation of the mTOR pathway in chromophobe RCC. Immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway and hypoxia-induced pathway members lacked prognostic significance in our cohort.

  5. Outcome of Patients With Metastatic Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results From the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriakopoulos, Christos E; Chittoria, Namita; Choueiri, Toni K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis. Data regarding outcome in the targeted therapy era are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical, prognostic, and treatment parameters in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients with and without sarcomatoid histology t...

  6. Novel targeted therapies for eosinophilic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Michael E.; Fulkerson, Patricia C.; Bochner, Bruce S.; Gauvreau, Gail M.; Gleich, Gerald J.; Henkel, Tim; Kolbeck, Roland; Mathur, Sameer K.; Ortega, Hector; Patel, Jatin; Prussin, Calman; Renzi, Paolo; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Roufosse, Florence; Simon, Dagmar; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Wardlaw, Andrew; Weller, Peter F.; Klion, Amy D.

    2013-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HESs) are a diverse group of conditions characterized by clinical manifestations attributable to eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of tissues. HESs are chronic disorders with significant morbidity and mortality. Although the availability of targeted chemotherapeutic agents, including imatinib, has improved quality of life and survival in some patients with HESs, additional agents with increased efficacy and decreased toxicity are sorely needed. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of eosinophil biology with an emphasis on potential targets of pharmacotherapy and to provide a summary of potential eosinophil-targeting agents, including those in development, in clinical trials, or approved for other disorders. PMID:22935585

  7. Radium contact therapy of vocal cord carcinomas: Is it still indicated today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chilla, R.; Hoelscher, U.; Krefting, E.; Eysholdt, U.

    1981-12-01

    In 148 patients treated between 1965 and 1975 by irradiation therapy because of a carcinoma of the vocal cords, the course of the disease could be elucidated. Irradiation was performed predominantly by radium contact therapy (105 patients) and less by conventional X-ray therapy (21 patients) or telecobalt irradiation (22 patients). A comparison between the tumors of the T/sub 1/ stage shows that the determinate survival rates are much more favorable (97,7% after 5, and 93,3% after 10 years) in patients receiving radium contact therapy than after telecobalt irradiation (75% after 5 and 10 years) or orthovolt therapy (81.8% after 5, and 80% after 10 years). As judged by the extent of severe paraphonia and laryngeal edema, function of the larynx is much better after radium contact therapy than after application of the other two forms of irradiation therapy. Of a total of 71 patients, only one patient who had received radium contact therapy according to the 'classical indication' developed a tumor recurrence. In comparison the rate of recurrence observed in 'extended indication' (30 patients) is 36,6% and thus reaches similar values as after telecobalt (31.8%) and orthovolt irradiation (33.3%). The undifferentiated carcinoma type is found in higher numbers among the recurrent carcinomas. Four late recurrences were detected after radium contact therapy, and two after orthovolt irradiation. The 4 late recurrences after radium contact therapy were exclusively observed after a previous 'extended indication' for this type of therapy; they were located at places where the primary tumor had gone beyond the range for 'classical indication'. Based on these results an attempt is made to establish guidelines for the application of radium contact therapy to carcinomas of the vocal cords.

  8. Urticaria after methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher M; Green, W Harris; Hatfield, H Keith; Cognetta, Armand B

    2012-11-01

    Methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) is utilized in several countries for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma, but allergic sensitization has been reported by the manufacturer. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of urticaria following MAL-PDT in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Prophylactic use of antihistamines may allow continued use of MAL-PDT in this setting.

  9. Hitting the target with antithrombotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsma, Margaret G; Rodak, Bernadette F

    2007-05-01

    Thrombus treatment and prevention can be regulated by a number of intravenous or subcutaneous drugs, as well as oral warfarin. Many therapies require laboratory monitoring for efficacy and for detection of dangerous sequelae, such as bleeding, thrombosis, or heparin induced thrombocytopenia.

  10. Targeting FGFR4 Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Preclinical Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    French, Dorothy M.; Benjamin C Lin; Manping Wang; Camellia Adams; Theresa Shek; Kathy Hötzel; Brad Bolon; Ronald Ferrando; Craig Blackmore; Kurt Schroeder; Rodriguez, Luis A.; Maria Hristopoulos; Rayna Venook; Avi Ashkenazi; Desnoyers, Luc R.

    2012-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling system plays critical roles in a variety of normal developmental and physiological processes. It is also well documented that dysregulation of FGF-FGFR signaling may have important roles in tumor development and progression. The FGFR4-FGF19 signaling axis has been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) in mice, and potentially in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that FGFR4 is required for hepatoca...

  11. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials.

  12. Targeted treatments in advanced renal cell carcinoma: focus on axitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzoni E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elena Verzoni, Paolo Grassi, Isabella Testa, Roberto Iacovelli, Pamela Biondani, Enrico Garanzini , Filippo De Braud, Giuseppe ProcopioDepartment of Medical Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Antiangiogenesis options have evolved rapidly in the last few years, with an increasing number of agents currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer cell. Axitinib is a third-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and is currently being developed for the treatment of various malignancies. The pharmacokinetic properties of axitinib may have a selective therapeutic effect, with minimal adverse reactions and enhanced safety. In a large Phase III study of previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib achieved a longer progression-free survival than sorafenib with an acceptable safety profile and good quality of life. This review focuses on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of axitinib in the current treatment of renal cell carcinoma. The role of axitinib in the adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant setting needs to be evaluated in further clinical trials.Keywords: axitinib, renal cell carcinoma, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, angiogenesis

  13. Photoacoustic tomography of vascular therapy in a preclinical mouse model of colorectal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S. P.; Ogunlade, O.; Zhang, E.; Laufer, J.; Rajkumar, V.; Pedley, R. B.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    Vascular therapy in oncology exploits the differences between normal blood vessels and abnormal tumour neoangiogenesis to selectively target cancer. For optimal treatment efficacy, and translation of novel compounds, the response of the tumour vasculature needs to be assessed. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is capable of this as it provides highly spatially resolved 3D images of vascular networks in biological tissue to cm depths. In preclinical models of cancer this is sufficient to encompass entire subcutaneous tumours, and can therefore be used to evaluate pharmacological intervention directed at the vasculature. In this study the vascular disrupting agent OXi4503 was used to treat subcutaneous tumour mouse models of two human colorectal carcinoma tumour types (SW1222, LS174T) at a range of concentrations (40mg/kg, 10mg/kg, 1mg/kg and sham dose control). The characteristic destruction of tumour vasculature caused by OXi4503 was observed by PAT and confirmed ex vivo via histology. Differences observed between the two tumour types assessed demonstrate the importance of tumour microenvironment and pathophysiology on response to therapy. Differential response to different doses of OXi4503 was observed, with outward tumour growth only seen once entire tumour viability had been re-established; this demonstrates the potential of PAT to act as a biomarker of response for the translation of novel anti-vascular compounds and also within the clinic. This study shows clearly that PAT can accurately assess the time course of drug action and relapse of pharmacodynamic effect in preclinical models of cancer and the important translational prospects for vascular targeted tumour therapies.

  14. Erlotinib pretreatment improves photodynamic therapy of non-small cell lung carcinoma xenografts via multiple mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M.; Miller, Joann; Cengel, Keith A.; Putt, Mary E.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a common characteristic of many cancers including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and ovarian cancer. While EGFR is currently a favorite molecular target for treatment of these cancers, inhibition of the receptor with small molecule inhibitors (i.e.- erlotinib) or monoclonal antibodies (i.e.- cetuximab) does not provide long-term therapeutic benefit as standalone treatment. Interestingly, we have found that addition of erlotinib to photodynamic therapy (PDT) can improve treatment response in typically erlotinib-resistant NSCLC tumor xenografts. Ninety-day complete response rates of 63% are achieved when erlotinib is administered in three doses before PDT of H460 human tumor xenografts, compared to 16% after PDT-alone. Similar benefit is found when erlotinib is added to PDT of A549 NCSLC xenografts. Improved response is accompanied by increased vascular shutdown, and erlotinib increases the in vitro cytotoxicity of PDT to endothelial cells. Tumor uptake of the photosensitizer (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A; BPD) is increased by the in vivo administration of erlotinib; nevertheless, this elevation of BPD levels only partially accounts for the benefit of erlotinib to PDT. Thus, pretreatment with erlotinib augments multiple mechanisms of PDT effect that collectively lead to large improvements in therapeutic efficacy. These data demonstrate that short-duration administration of erlotinib before PDT can greatly improve the responsiveness of even erlotinib-resistant tumors to treatment. Results will inform clinical investigation of EGFR-targeting therapeutics in conjunction with PDT. PMID:26054596

  15. Erlotinib Pretreatment Improves Photodynamic Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Xenografts via Multiple Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M; Miller, Joann; Cengel, Keith A; Putt, Mary E; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Busch, Theresa M

    2015-08-01

    Aberrant expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a common characteristic of many cancers, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and ovarian cancer. Although EGFR is currently a favorite molecular target for the treatment of these cancers, inhibition of the receptor with small-molecule inhibitors (i.e., erlotinib) or monoclonal antibodies (i.e., cetuximab) does not provide long-term therapeutic benefit as standalone treatment. Interestingly, we have found that addition of erlotinib to photodynamic therapy (PDT) can improve treatment response in typically erlotinib-resistant NSCLC tumor xenografts. Ninety-day complete response rates of 63% are achieved when erlotinib is administered in three doses before PDT of H460 human tumor xenografts, compared with 16% after PDT-alone. Similar benefit is found when erlotinib is added to PDT of A549 NCSLC xenografts. Improved response is accompanied by increased vascular shutdown, and erlotinib increases the in vitro cytotoxicity of PDT to endothelial cells. Tumor uptake of the photosensitizer (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A; BPD) is increased by the in vivo administration of erlotinib; nevertheless, this elevation of BPD levels only partially accounts for the benefit of erlotinib to PDT. Thus, pretreatment with erlotinib augments multiple mechanisms of PDT effect that collectively lead to large improvements in therapeutic efficacy. These data demonstrate that short-duration administration of erlotinib before PDT can greatly improve the responsiveness of even erlotinib-resistant tumors to treatment. Results will inform clinical investigation of EGFR-targeting therapeutics in conjunction with PDT.

  16. Mitochondria-targeting for improved photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngen, Ethel J.

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapeutic modality, with great potential to selectively treat surface cancers, thus minimizing systemic side effects. In this dissertation, two approaches to deliver photosensitizers to mitochondria were investigated: 1) Reducing photosensitizer sizes to improve endocytosis and lysosomal localization. Upon irradiation the photosensitizers would then produce singlet oxygen which could rupture the lysosomal membrane releasing the lysosomally trapped photosensitizers to the cytosol, from where they could relocalize to mitochondria by passive diffusion (photochemical internalization). 2) Using delocalized lipophilic cationic dyes (DLCs) to exploit membrane potential differences between the cytoplasm and mitochondria in delivering photosensitizers to mitochondria. To investigate the effects of steric hindrance on mitochondrial localization and photodynamic response, a series of eight thiaporphyrins were studied. Two new thiaporphyrin analogues 6 and 8 with reduced steric hindrance at the 10- and 15- meso positions were studied in comparison to 5,20-diphenyl-10,15-bis[4 (carboxymethyleneoxy)-phenyl]-21,23-dithiaporphyrin 1, previously validated as a potential second generation photosensitizer. Although 6 showed an extraordinarily high uptake (7.6 times higher than 1), it was less potent than 1 (IC 50 = 0.18 muM versus 0.13 muM) even though they both showed similar sub-cellular localization patterns. This low potency was attributed to its high aggregation tendency in aqueous media (4 times higher than 1), which might have affected its ability to generate singlet oxygen in vitro . 8 on the other hand showed an even lower potency than 6 (2.28 vs 0.18 muM). However this was attributed to its low cellular uptake (20 times less than 6) and inefficient generation of singlet oxygen. Overall, although the structural modifications did improve the cellular uptake of 6, 6 was still less potent than the lead photosensitizers 1. Thus

  17. Targeting medullary thyroid carcinomas with bispecific antibodies and bivalent haptens. Results and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvier, E; Gautherot, E; Meyer, P; Barbet, J

    1997-01-01

    The present article reviews the clinical trials that have been performed in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma patients with the Affinity Enhancement System. This technique uses bispecific antibodies to target radiolabelled bivalent haptens to tumour cells. Its sensitivity in the detection of known tumour sites is high (90%) and this technique also achieves good sensitivity (61%) in the detection of occult disease as revealed by abnormal thyrocalcitonin blood levels. Due to its high targeting capacity, this technique is now considered for use as a therapeutic agent in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients.

  18. Death receptors: Targets for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, Zafar [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Shukla, Yogeshwer, E-mail: yogeshwer_shukla@hotmail.com [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis is the cell's intrinsic program to death, which plays an important role in physiologic growth control and homeostasis. Apoptosis can be triggered by death receptors (DRs), without any adverse effects. DRs are the members of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, known to be involved in apoptosis signaling, independent of p53 tumor-supressor gene. Selective triggering of DR-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells is a novel approach in cancer therapy. So far, the best characterized DRs are CD95 (Fas/Apo1), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAILR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Among these, TRAILR is emerging as most promising agent for cancer therapy, because it induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor and transformed cells without any toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL treatment in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy enhances TRAIL sensitivity or reverses TRAIL resistance by regulating downstream effectors. This review covers the current knowledge about the DRs, summarizes main signaling in DRs and also summarizes the preclinical approaches of these DRs in cancer therapy.

  19. Setting the target for pemphigus vulgaris therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellebrecht, Christoph T.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the rising incidence of autoimmunity, therapeutic options for patients with autoimmune disease still rely on decades-old immunosuppressive strategies that risk severe and potentially fatal complications. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches for autoimmune diseases are greatly needed in order to minimize treatment-related toxicity. Such strategies would ideally target only the autoreactive immune components to preserve beneficial immunity. Here, we review how several decades of basic, translational, and clinical research on the immunology of pemphigus vulgaris (PV), an autoantibody-mediated skin disease, have enabled the development of targeted immunotherapeutic strategies. We discuss research to elucidate the pathophysiology of PV and how the knowledge afforded by these studies has led to the preclinical and clinical testing of targeted approaches to neutralize autoantibodies, to induce antigen-specific tolerance, and to specifically eliminate autoreactive B cells in PV. PMID:28289723

  20. Usefulness of Photodynamic Therapy as a Possible Therapeutic Alternative in the Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Savoia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer in individuals with fair skin type (I–II and steadily increasing in incidence (70% of skin malignancy. It is locally invasive but metastasis is usually very rare, with an estimated incidence of 0.0028%–0.55%. Conventional therapy is surgery, especially for the H region of the face and infiltrative lesions; in case of inoperable tumors, radiotherapy is a valid option. Recently, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT has become an effective treatment in the management of superficial and small nodular BCC. PDT is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the administration of a photo-sensibilizing agent followed by irradiation at a pre-defined wavelength; this determines the creation of reactive oxygen species that specifically destroy target cells. The only major side effect is pain, reported by some patients during the irradiation. The high cure rate and excellent cosmetic outcome requires considering this possibility for the management of patients with both sporadic and hereditary BCC. In this article, an extensive review of the recent literature was made, in order to clarify the role of PDT as a possible alternative therapeutic option in the treatment of BCC.

  1. Development of targeted therapies in treatment of glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Xu; Pei Gao; Ying Sun; You-Rong Duan

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a type of tumor that is highly lethal despite maximal therapy. Standard therapeutic approaches provide modest improvement in progression-free and overall survival, necessitating the investigation of novel therapies. Oncologic therapy has recently experienced a rapid evolution toward “targeted therapy”, with drugs directed against speciifc targets which play essential roles in the proliferation, survival, and invasiveness of GBM cells, including numerous molecules involved in signal transduction pathways. Inhibitors of these molecules have already entered or are undergoing clinical trials. However, signiifcant challenges in their development remain because several preclinical and clinical studies present conlficting results. In this article, we will provide an up-to-date review of the current targeted therapies in GBM.

  2. Understanding Resistance to Targeted Anticancer Therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, C.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapeutic regimens are gradually changing from using relatively unspecific cytotoxic agents to selective, pathway-centered approaches. The mechanistic rationale of targeted approaches is to destruct the tumor by blocking aberrant cell signaling, crucial for tumor maintenance and growth, but

  3. Bacterial proteases: targets for diagnostics and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Hays, J.P.; Endtz, H.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are essential for the proliferation and growth of bacteria, and are also known to contribute to bacterial virulence. This makes them interesting candidates as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases. In this review, the authors discuss the most recent developments and po

  4. Targeted inhibition of the FGF19-FGFR4 pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma; translational safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Howard R

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death and new therapies are urgently required to treat this disease. Recent data suggest that the FGF19-FGFR4 axis may be a key driver in certain forms of HCC, making the pathway an interesting, emerging molecular target for potential therapeutic intervention. A complication is that, outside of malignant disease, FGFR4 plays an important physiological role in the regulation of hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. FGF19 signalling via FGFR4 suppresses de novo BA production in the liver, tightly maintaining hepatic and systemic levels of these detergent-like molecules at a physiological threshold and preventing pathological complications of raised BA levels, such as cholestatic liver injury and bile acid diarrhoea. In some cases of HCC, the malignant disease causes bile duct obstruction, preventing BA secretion from the liver and resulting in cholestasis. Here, the role of FGFR4 signalling in both HCC and BA homoeostasis is discussed. The potential effects of therapeutic FGF19-FGFR4 inhibition on human hepatobiliary/gastrointestinal physiology are considered along with the potential safety implications of FGF19-FGFR4 blockade in patients with HCC.

  5. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma after surgery: A comment for moving forward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hong; Zhong; Tian; Yang; Bang-De; Xiang; Le-Qun; Li; Liang; Ma

    2016-01-01

    Recurrence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma remains quite high even after surgery,and no postoperative therapies have been definitively shown to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence.A previous study showed that therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues given to such patients after surgery significantly improved survival.However,many questions still exist about the usage of nucleos(t)ide analogues for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after surgery.

  6. Loco-regional therapies for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation: Selecting an optimal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Thomas J; Rakela, Jorge

    2016-06-24

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common, increasingly prevalent malignancy. For all but the smallest lesions, surgical removal of cancer via resection or liver transplantation (LT) is considered the most feasible pathway to cure. Resection - even with favorable survival - is associated with a fairly high rate of recurrence, perhaps since most HCCs occur in the setting of cirrhosis. LT offers the advantage of removing not only the cancer but the diseased liver from which the cancer has arisen, and LT outperforms resection for survival with selected patients. Since time waiting for LT is time during which HCC can progress, loco-regional therapy (LRT) is widely employed by transplant centers. The purpose of LRT is either to bridge patients to LT by preventing progression and waitlist dropout, or to downstage patients who slightly exceed standard eligibility criteria initially but can fall within it after treatment. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation have been the most widely utilized LRTs to date, with favorable efficacy and safety as a bridge to LT (and for the former, as a downstaging modality). The list of potentially effective LRTs has expanded in recent years, and includes transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads, radioembolization and novel forms of extracorporal therapy. Herein we appraise the various LRT modalities for HCC, and their potential roles in specific clinical scenarios in patients awaiting LT.

  7. Drug therapy of renal cell carcinoma%肾癌的药物治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康马飞

    2008-01-01

    肾癌的药物治疗目前仍以免疫化学治疗为主,单纯化疗也有效,吉西他滨联合顺铂是目前的标准化疗方案.靶向治疗药物的出现使肾癌的治疗发生了改变,多靶点受体酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(如舒尼替尼和索拉非尼)、哺乳动物雷帕霉素靶蛋白抑制剂(temsirolimus)和抗肿瘤单克隆抗体(如贝伐单抗)等已成为肾癌的一线治疗选择.%Immunochemotherapy is still the primary drug therapy of renal cell carcinoma(RCC), and chemotherapy is effective too. The combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin is the standard regimen now. How-ever, emerge of targeted therapeutic agents has altered the treatment of RCC. Multitargeted tyrosine kinase in-hibitor, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, and mammalian target of rapamycin (roTOR) inhibitors( temsiroll-mus), and anti-tumor monoclonal antibody, such as bevacizumab, have already become the first line election.

  8. Targeted anticancer therapy: overexpressed receptors and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-09-25

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues is a promising field due to its potential to spare unaffected cells and tissues, but it has been a major challenge to achieve success in these therapeutic approaches. Several innovative approaches to targeted drug delivery have been devised based on available knowledge in cancer biology and on technological advancements. To achieve the desired selectivity of drug delivery, nanotechnology has enabled researchers to design nanoparticles (NPs) to incorporate anticancer drugs and act as nanocarriers. Recently, many receptor molecules known to be overexpressed in cancer have been explored as docking sites for the targeting of anticancer drugs. In principle, anticancer drugs can be concentrated specifically in cancer cells and tissues by conjugating drug-containing nanocarriers with ligands against these receptors. Several mechanisms can be employed to induce triggered drug release in response to either endogenous trigger or exogenous trigger so that the anticancer drug is only released upon reaching and preferentially accumulating in the tumor tissue. This review focuses on overexpressed receptors exploited in targeting drugs to cancerous tissues and the tumor microenvironment. We briefly evaluate the structure and function of these receptor molecules, emphasizing the elegant mechanisms by which certain characteristics of cancer can be exploited in cancer treatment. After this discussion of receptors, we review their respective ligands and then the anticancer drugs delivered by nanotechnology in preclinical models of cancer. Ligand-functionalized nanocarriers have delivered significantly higher amounts of anticancer drugs in many in vitro and in vivo models of cancer compared to cancer models lacking such receptors or drug carrying nanocarriers devoid of ligand. This increased concentration of anticancer drug in the tumor site enabled by nanotechnology could have a major impact on the efficiency of cancer

  9. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    technique for treating left-sided breast cancer, which allows sparing of the heart. The Calypso system provides a previously unavailable level of...from both centers. Task 6. Post-prostatectomy Daily Target Guided Radiotherapy Using Real-Time, State-of-the-Art Motion Tracking with the Calypso...the skin surface to track breathing motion during a breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer treatment. Analysis would reveal the

  10. FGFR gene alterations in lung squamous cell carcinoma are potential targets for the multikinase inhibitor nintedanib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Masaaki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Tanizaki, Junko; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Terashima, Masato; De Velasco, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Banno, Eri; Nakamura, Yu; Takeda, Masayuki; Ito, Akihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto

    2016-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) gene alterations are relatively frequent in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and are a potential targets for therapy with FGFR inhibitors. However, little is known regarding the clinicopathologic features associated with FGFR alterations. The angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib has shown promising activity in clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer. We have now applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize FGFR alterations in LSCC patients as well as examined the antitumor activity of nintedanib in LSCC cell lines positive for FGFR1 copy number gain (CNG). The effects of nintedanib on the proliferation of and FGFR signaling in LSCC cell lines were examined in vitro, and its effects on tumor formation were examined in vivo. A total of 75 clinical LSCC specimens were screened for FGFR alterations by NGS. Nintedanib inhibited the proliferation of FGFR1 CNG-positive LSCC cell lines in association with attenuation of the FGFR1-ERK signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. FGFR1 CNG (10.7%), FGFR1 mutation (2.7%), FGFR2 mutation (2.7%), FGFR4 mutation (5.3%), and FGFR3 fusion (1.3%) were detected in LSCC specimens by NGS. Clinicopathologic features did not differ between LSCC patients positive or negative for FGFR alterations. However, among the 36 patients with disease recurrence after surgery, prognosis was significantly worse for those harboring FGFR alterations. Screening for FGFR alterations by NGS warrants further study as a means to identify patients with LSCC recurrence after surgery who might benefit from nintedanib therapy.

  11. CXCR4 and CCR7: Two eligible targets in targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishan, Mohammad Amir; Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is one of the most common cause of death in the world with high negative emotional, economic, and social impacts. Conventional therapeutic methods, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, have not proven satisfactory and relapse is common in most cases. Recent studies have focused on targeted therapy with more precise identification and targeted attacks to the cancer cells. For this purpose, chemokine receptors are proper targets and among them, CXCR4 and CCR7, with a crucial role in cancer metastasis, are being considered as desired candidates for investigation. In this review paper, the most important experimental results are highlighted on the potential targeted therapies based on CXCR4 and CCR7 chemokine receptors.

  12. Phosphotyrosine profiling identifies ephrin receptor A2 as a potential therapeutic target in esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Pinto, Sneha M; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Renuse, Santosh; Datta, Keshava K; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Prasad, T S Keshava; Kumar, M Vijaya; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common malignancies in Asia. Currently, surgical resection of early-stage tumor is the best available treatment. However, most patients present late when surgery is not an option. Data suggest that chemotherapy regimens are inadequate for clinical management of advanced cancer. Targeted therapy has emerged as one of the most promising approaches to treat several malignancies. A prerequisite for developing targeted therapy is prior knowledge of proteins and pathways that drive proliferation in malignancies. We carried out phosphotyrosine profiling across four different ESCC cell lines and compared it to non-neoplastic Het-1A cell line to identify activated tyrosine kinase signaling pathways in ESCC. A total of 278 unique phosphopeptides were identified across these cell lines. This included several tyrosine kinases and their substrates that were hyperphosphorylated in ESCC. Ephrin receptor A2 (EPHA2), a receptor tyrosine kinase, was hyperphosphorylated in all the ESCC cell lines used in the study. EPHA2 is reported to be oncogenic in several cancers and is also known to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry-based studies have revealed EPHA2 is overexpressed in nearly 50% of ESCC. We demonstrated EPHA2 as a potential therapeutic target in ESCC by carrying out siRNA-based knockdown studies. Knockdown of EPHA2 in ESCC cell line TE8 resulted in significant decrease in cell proliferation and invasion, suggesting it is a promising therapeutic target in ESCC that warrants further evaluation.

  13. Survivin: Potential role in diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Wang; Xiao-Ping Qian; Bao-Rui Liu

    2007-01-01

    Survivin is a protein that is highly expressed in a vast number of malignancies, but is minimally expressed in normal tissues. It plays a role as an inhibitor of cell death in cancer cells, thus facilitating the growth of these cells.Tn the case of gastric cancer, survivin is over-expressed in tumor cells and plays a role in the carcinogenesis process. Several studies on gastric cancer have indicated that there is a relationship between survivin expression and the ultimate behavior of the carcinoma. Since the expression pattern of survivin is selective to cancer cells,it has been described as an "ideal target" for cancer therapy. Currently, several pre-clinical and clinical trials are on-going to investigate the effects of interfering with survivin function in cancer cells as a biologic therapy. Survivin is a potentially significant protein in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of gastric tumors.

  14. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Childhood Choroid Plexus Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    http://www.broad.mit.edu/igv/) ● Normalization of all data was then performed with SNP 6.0 files created for the third phase of the International... Mitosis (normalized enrichment score=2.61, FDR pɘ.001) o Spindle organization (normalized enrichment score=2.48, FDR pɘ.001) o Kinetochore

  15. 立体定向放疗联合热疗及索拉非尼治疗复发及转移性肝癌的疗效分析%Efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy with γ-knife combined with hyperthermia and targeted drug sorafenib for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康静波; 赵向飞; 聂青; 张丽萍; 朱奇; 李启亮; 王仁秋

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨γ-体部立体定向放疗(stereotactic body radiation therapy withγ-knife,γ-SBRT)联合热疗及靶向药物索拉非尼(sorafenib)治疗复发及转移性肝癌的效果。方法:自2007年8月至2009年12月,收治71例肝癌治疗后复发及转移患者。39例行γ-SBRT联合热疗,32例γ-SBRT联合热疗及索拉非尼治疗。结果:治疗后3个月总有效率为83.1%(59/71)。γ-SBRT+热疗组的1、3年局部控制率分别为41.0%(16/39)、18.0%(7/39));γ-SBRT+热疗+索拉非尼组的1、3年局部控制率分别为56.3%(18/32)、28.1%(9/32)。γ-SBRT+热疗组的1、3年OS分别为41.2%(16/39)、17.9%(7/39),1、3年PFS分别为38.5%(15/39)、15.4%(6/39);γ-SBRT+热疗+索拉非尼组的1、3年OS分别为62.5%(20/32)、28.1%(9/32),1、3年PFS分别为59.4%(19/32)、25.0%(9/32),经Log-rank检验两组的OS、PFS差异无显著性。结论:采用γ-SBRT联合热疗及索拉非尼对转移及复发性肝癌进行治疗是较有效的治疗方法。治疗过程安全,多数患者能耐受治疗。%Objective:To investigate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy with gamma-knife (γ-SBRT) combined with targeted drug sorafenib and hyperthermia for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods:A total of 71 patients with recurrent and metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma were admitted from August 2007 to December 2009. Among these patients, 39 were treated with γ-SBRT and hyperthermia (group 1); 19 were treated with γ-SBRT combined with sorafenib and hyperthermia (group 2). Results: The total efficacy rate after a three-month treatment was 83.1% (59/71). In group 1, the following results were obtained:one-and three-year local control rates of 41.0%(16/39) and 18%(7/39), respectively;one-and three-year overall survival (OS) rates of 41.2% and 17.9%, respectively; and one- and three-year progression-free survival

  16. Biliverdin Reductase: a Target for Cancer Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eGibbs

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biliverdin reductase (BVR is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1 and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation.

  17. Targeted therapy in the treatment of malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimas V Lukas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Rimas V Lukas1, Adrienne Boire2, M Kelly Nicholas1,2 1Department of Neurology; 2Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas are invasive tumors with the potential to progress through current available therapies. These tumors are characterized by a number of abnormalities in molecular signaling that play roles in tumorigenesis, spread, and survival. These pathways are being actively investigated in both the pre-clinical and clinical settings as potential targets in the treatment of malignant gliomas. We will review many of the therapies that target the cancer cell, including the epidermal growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, histone deacetylase, and farnesyl transferase. In addition, we will discuss strategies that target the extracellular matrix in which these cells reside as well as angiogenesis, a process emerging as central to tumor development and growth. Finally, we will briefly touch on the role of neural stem cells as both potential targets as well as delivery vectors for other therapies. Interdependence between these varied pathways, both in maintaining health and in causing disease, is clear. Thus, attempts to easily classify some targeted therapies are problematic.Keywords: glioma, EGFR, mTOR, HDAC, Ras, angiogenesis

  18. Symptomatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients following radiation therapy: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, K.S.; Ho, J.H.; Lee, A.W.; Tse, V.K.; Chan, P.K.; Wang, C.; Ma, J.T.; Yeung, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Endocrine assessment was performed in 32 relapse-free southern Chinese patients 5-17 years following radiation therapy (RT) alone for early nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Initial screening was done using questionnaires emphasizing impaired sexual function and menstrual disturbance plus measurement of serum levels of thyroxine, free thyroxine index, thyrotropic hormone, prolactin, and additionally testosterone for males only. Those showing abnormalities were subjected to detailed pituitary function tests. Hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction was found in 7 female patients and only 1 male patient. A delayed TSH response to thyrotropin releasing hormone suggesting a hypothalamic disorder was seen in 6 of the affected female patients, and hyperprolactinaemia in also 6. None of the patients had evidence of diabetes insipidus. Hypopituitarism became symptomatic 2-5 years after RT with a mean latent interval of 3.8 years. A practical protocol for regular endocrine assessment for NPC patients after RT has been proposed. Multiple linear regression analysis of the radiotherapeutic data from the 11 female patients indicates that the likelihood of late occurrence of symptomatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction following RT is dependent on the TDF of the target dose to the nasopharyngeal region and the height of the upper margin of the opposed lateral facial fields above the diaphragma sellae (coefficient of multiple correlation = 0.9025). Except when the sphenoid sinus or the middle cranial fossa is involved, it is advisable to set the height of the upper margin of the lateral facial field at a level no higher than the diaphragma sellae. The hypothalamus and possibly the pituitary stalk as well may sustain permanent damage by doses of radiation within the conventional radiotherapeutic range for carcinomas.

  19. HER-2 Targeted Nanoparticle-Affibody Bioconjugates for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexis, Frank; Basto, Pamela; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Zhang, Liangfang; Pridgen, Eric; Wang, Adrew Z.; Marein, Shawn L.; Westerhof, Katrina; Molnar, Linda K.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2010-01-01

    Affibodies are a class of polypeptide ligands that are potential candidates for cell- or tissue-specific targeting of drug-encapsulated controlled release polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). Here we report the development of drug delivery vehicles comprised of polymeric NPs that are surface modified with Affibody ligands that bind to the extracellular domain of the trans-membrane human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) for targeted delivery to cells which over express the HER-2 antigen. NPs lacking the anti-HER-2 Affibody did not show significant uptake by these cells. Using paclitaxel encapsulated NP-Affibody (1 wt% drug loading), we demonstrated increased cytotoxicity of these bioconjugates in SK-BR-3 and SKOV-3 cell lines. These targeted, drug encapsulated NPAffibody bioconjugates may be efficacious in treating HER-2 expressing carcinoma. PMID:19012296

  20. Eccentric pericardial effusion after radiation therapy of left breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, B.; Zornoza, J.; Ricks, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Pericardial damage is one of the consequences of cardiac radiation and may lead to chronic pericarditis and/or tamponade. In three patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the left breast, the effusions were loculated on the right side of the pericardium resulting in a peculiar cardiac silhouette. The importance of recognizing this entity and possible treatment is stressed.

  1. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Beylergil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several molecular imaging modalities have been evaluated in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a rare and aggressive tumor with a high tendency to metastasize. Continuous progress in the field of molecular imaging might improve management in these patients. The authors review the current modalities and their impact on MCC in this brief review article.

  2. Glutathione transferases as targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzza, Paolo; Rosato, Antonio; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Floreani, Maura; Quintieri, Luigi

    2009-09-01

    Besides catalyzing the inactivation of various electrophile-producing anticancer agents via conjugation to the tripeptide glutathione, some cytosolic proteins belonging to the glutathione transferase (formerly glutatione-S-transferase; GST) superfamily are emerging as negative modulators of stress/drug-induced cell apoptosis through the interaction with specific signaling kinases. In addition, several data link the overexpression of some GSTs, in particular GSTP1-1, to both natural and acquired resistance to various structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. Tumor overexpression of these proteins has provided a rationale for the search of GST inhibitors and GST-activated cytotoxic prodrugs. In the present review we discuss the current structural and pharmacological knowledge of both types of GST-targeting compounds.

  3. Individualized therapies in colorectal cancer: KRAS as a marker for response to EGFR-targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kuiyuan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Individualized therapies that are tailored to a patient's genetic composition will be of tremendous value for treatment of cancer. Recently, Kirsten ras (KRAS status has emerged as a predictor of response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeted therapies. In this article, we will discuss targeted therapies for colorectal cancers (CRC based on EGFR signaling pathway and review published data about the potential usefulness of KRAS as a biological marker for response to these therapies. Results from relevant studies published since 2005 and unpublished results presented at national meetings were retrieved and summarized. These studies reflected response (or lack of response to EGFR-targeted therapies in patients with metastatic CRC as a function of KRAS status. It has become clear that patients with colorectal cancer whose tumor has an activating mutation in KRAS do not respond to monoclonal antibody therapies targeting EGFR. It should now become a standard practice that any patients being considered for EGFR targeted therapies have their tumors tested for KRAS status and only those with wild-type KRAS being offered such therapies.

  4. Review of photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica B Ericson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Marica B Ericson1,2, Ann-Marie Wennberg1, Olle Larkö11Department of Dermatology; 2Department of Physics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, SwedenAbstract: The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide, and so also the demand for effective treatment modalities. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT using aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester has recently become good treatment options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma; especielly when treating large areas and areas with field cancerization. The cure rates are usually good, and the cosmetic outcomes excellent. The only major side effect reported is the pain experienced by the patients during treatment. This review covers the fundamental aspects of topical PDT and its application for treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. Both potentials and limitations will be reviewed, as well as some recent development within the field.Keywords: photodynamic therapy, actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma

  5. Predictive Diagnostic Pathology in the Target Therapy Era in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchio, Caterina; Balmativola, Davide; Castiglione, Roberta; Annaratone, Laura; Sapino, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Treatment strategies in oncology are nowadays largely based on the "target therapy model", which allows to personalize the cure of each patient depending on distinctive host and disease features. As a general concept "targeted drugs" are effective only when the tumor exhibits the "target", which in breast cancer pathology may correspond to the expression of estrogen receptors and/or of HER2. These biomarkers are evaluated on breast cancer tissues by companion diagnostic tests, however, evidence suggests that the first step in breast cancer predictive pathology is still represented by morphology. For instance, histological types, such as tubular and cribriform carcinomas, define patients who may not need any treatments other than surgical excision. Neoadjuvant studies have shown that patients affected by lobular carcinomas are not likely to have any beneficial effects from chemotherapy. The second step in prediction is represented by immunophenotyping. If the immunohistochemical evaluation of four markers (estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 and Ki67) remains the best practice for breast cancer predictive pathology, molecular pathology has certainly reshaped the way we approach breast cancer diagnosis. The aim of this review is to discuss current knowledge in predictive pathology for the management of breast cancer patients, focusing on the benefits and drawbacks of traditional tools and of novel improvements of molecular biology.

  6. Targeted and shielded adenovectors for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Susan J; Chen, Jian; Mountz, John D; Li, Jing; Curiel, David T; Korokhov, Nikolay; Kovesdi, Imre

    2006-11-01

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are novel vectors with utility as virotherapy agents for alternative cancer therapies. These vectors have already established a broad safety record in humans and overcome some of the limitations of non-replicative adenovirus (Ad) vectors. In addition, one potential problem with these vectors, attainment of tumor or tissue selectivity has widely been addressed. However, two confounding problems limiting efficacy of these drug candidates remains. The paucity of the native Ad receptor on tumor tissues, and host humoral response due to pre-existing titers of neutralizing antibodies against the vector itself in humans have been highlighted in the clinical context. The well-characterized CRAd, AdDelta24-RGD, is infectivity enhanced, thus overcoming the lack of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), and this agent is already rapidly progressing towards clinical translation. However, the perceived host humoral response potentially will limit gains seen from the infectivity enhancement and therefore a strategy to blunt immunity against the vector is required. On the basis of this caveat a novel strategy, termed shielding, has been developed in which the genetic modification of a virion capsid protein would provide uniformly shielded Ad vectors. The identification of the pIX capsid protein as an ideal locale for genetic incorporation of shielding ligands to conceal the Ad vector from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies is a major progression in the development of shielded CRAds. Preliminary data utilizing an Ad vector with HSV-TK fused to the pIX protein indicates that a shield against neutralizing antibodies can be achieved. The utility of various proteins as shielding molecules is currently being addressed. The creation of AdDelta24S-RGD, an infectivity enhanced and shielded Ad vector will provide the next step in the development of clinically and commercially feasible CRAds that can be dosed multiple times for

  7. The efficacy of voice therapy in patients after treatment for early glottic carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gogh, CDL; Leeuw, IMV; Boon-Kamma, BA; Rinkel, RNPM; de Bruin, MD; Langendijk, JA; Kuik, DJ; Mahieu, HF

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND. After treatment for early glottic carcinoma, a considerable]lumber of patients end tip with voice problems that interfere with daily life activities. The objective of this randomized and controlled study was to assess the efficacy of voice therapy in these patients. METHODS. Of 177 patie

  8. Antiviral therapy for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma and mortality in chronic hepatitis B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Maja; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dahl, Emilie K;

    2013-01-01

    The effect of antiviral therapy on clinical outcomes in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) is not established. We aimed to assess the effects of interferon and/or nucleos(t)ide analogues versus placebo or no intervention on prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and mortality in chronic HBV....

  9. Preparation of folic acid-conjugated CDDP nanomedicine for targeted therapy on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells%叶酸-顺铂纳米药物的制备及其对人鼻咽癌细胞的靶向治疗作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏征; 谢民强; 张涛; 陈帅君

    2011-01-01

    Objective To preparation folic acid-conjugated cis-platin nanomedicine that can transport cisplatin by folate receptor-mediated endocytosis,and to investigate the therapy effect of this medicine for nasopharyngeal carcinoma ( NPC) cells. Methods Cis-platin loaded nanomedicine was prepared by co-precipitation method using sodium alginate as modification material. Folic acid linked nanoparticles (FA-MNP-CDDP) was synthesized through PEG (NH2)2. Capacity of FA-MNP-CDDP for targeted drug delivery and inhibitory effects on human NPC cells was evaluated hy Prussian Staining and MTT assay. Results CDDP content in CDDP-MNP-FA suspension was ( 1.6 ± 0.1 )mg/mL. An average core size of ( 10.1 ± 1.5)nm was found by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). By comparing with CNE-2 cells, HNE-1 cells had a higher uptake for FA-MNP-CDDP. This nanomedicine had strong inhibitory effects on HNE-1 cells . the IC5o of it [ ( 1.300 ± 0.10) μg/mL] was 40% lower than CDDP [ (2.161± .085) μg/mL]. Conclusion FA-MNP-CDDP nanomedicine show promise for targeted drug delivery and therapy effect in folate receptor over-expressing NPC cells.%目的:制备连接叶酸分子的顺铂纳米药物,并研究该药物对人鼻咽癌细胞的体外靶向治疗作用.方法:采用化学共沉淀法制备顺铂纳米药物并通过聚乙二醇二胺连接叶酸分子合成叶酸-顺铂纳米药物(FA-MNP-CDDP)并对其进行表征.将人鼻咽癌细胞HNE-1和CNE-2与FA-MNP-CDDP体外共培养,采用普鲁士蓝染色法测定细胞摄取纳米药物的情况,采用MTT法测定纳米药物的细胞毒性.结果:合成FA-MNPCDDP纳米药物顺铂含量为(1.6 ±0.1)mg/mL,药物粒子平均直径为(10.1 ±1.5)nm.表达叶酸受体的HNE-1细胞对该纳米药物摄取能力显著强于不表达叶酸受体的CNE-2细胞.FA-MNP-CDDP对HNE-1细胞的体外抑制效果明显,IC50[(1.300±0.10)μg/mL]较单纯顺铂[(2.161±0.85)μg/mL]降低约40%.结论:叶酸-顺铂纳米药物具有针对鼻咽

  10. Targeting MACC1 by RNA interference inhibits proliferation and invasion of bladder urothelial carcinoma in T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song-Tao; Ding, Xiang; Ni, Qing-Feng; Jin, Shao-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to research on whether MACC1 can serve as a potential target for gene therapy of human bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC). In this study, the expression of MACC1 gene was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi) in the T24 cell (human BUC cell). The transcription level of MACC1 was detected by RT-PCR. Activities of MACC1, caspase-3, caspase-8, Bax and Met (mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor) protein were measured by Western blot. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by MTT and flow cytometry. The cell's invasion ability was performed on Matrigel transwell assay. We also detect MMP2 (metalloproteinase-2) proteins by ELISA. The results showed that the level of MACC1 mRNA and protein was significantly reduced after RNAi. MTT assay showed that the proliferation of T24 cell was decreased due to RNA interference. Apoptosis studies also showed that MACC1 gene interference in T24 loses its anti-apoptotic effects. The expression of apoptosis proteins (Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Bax) increased significantly due to the MACC1 RNAi. The level of Met protein was down-regulated obviously due to RNAi. Transwell assay showed that invasion abilities of T24 cells were reduced obviously due to MACC1 RNAi. Further studies showed that the secretion of MMP-2 was reduced by RNAi. It can conclude that the ability of proliferation and invasion in T24 cells can be inhibited by RNAi-targeting MACC1. As a result, MACC1 can serve as a potential target for gene therapy of human bladder urothelial carcinoma.

  11. Targeting synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, Robert; Pignatelli, Marco; Piccinin, Sonia; Mercuri, Nicola B; Collingridge, Graham

    2012-12-01

    In the past years, major efforts have been made to understand the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which has been translated into extensive experimental approaches aimed at slowing down or halting disease progression. Advances in transgenic (Tg) technologies allowed the engineering of different mouse models of AD recapitulating a range of AD-like features. These Tg models provided excellent opportunities to analyze the bases for the temporal evolution of the disease. Several lines of evidence point to synaptic dysfunction as a cause of AD and that synapse loss is a pathological correlate associated with cognitive decline. Therefore, the phenotypic characterization of these animals has included electrophysiological studies to analyze hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation, a widely recognized cellular model for learning and memory. Transgenic mice, along with non-Tg models derived mainly from exogenous application of Aβ, have also been useful experimental tools to test the various therapeutic approaches. As a result, numerous pharmacological interventions have been reported to attenuate synaptic dysfunction and improve behavior in the different AD models. To date, however, very few of these findings have resulted in target validation or successful translation into disease-modifying compounds in humans. Here, we will briefly review the synaptic alterations across the different animal models and we will recapitulate the pharmacological strategies aimed at rescuing hippocampal plasticity phenotypes. Finally, we will highlight intrinsic limitations in the use of experimental systems and related challenges in translating preclinical studies into human clinical trials.

  12. Drug targeting systems for cancer therapy: nanotechnological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigli Aydin, R Seda

    2015-01-01

    Progress in cancer treatment remains challenging because of the great nature of tumor cells to be drug resistant. However, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled the delivery of drugs for cancer treatment by passively and actively targeting to tumor cells with nanoparticles. Dramatic improvements in nanotherapeutics, as applied to cancer, have rapidly accelerated clinical investigations. In this review, drug-targeting systems using nanotechnology and approved and clinically investigated nanoparticles for cancer therapy are discussed. In addition, the rationale for a nanotechnological approach to cancer therapy is emphasized because of its promising advances in the treatment of cancer patients.

  13. The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Domashenko, A; Cotsarelis, G

    2001-01-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells for continued hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be targeted by topical gene delivery to mouse skin. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrated the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts as well. We defined liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection occurred only during anagen onset. Considerations and obstacles for using gene therapy to treat alopecias and skin disease are discussed. A theoretical framework for future gene therapy treatments for cutaneous and systemic disorders is presented.

  14. Targeting cellular and molecular drivers of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: current options and emerging perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausoni, Simonetta; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina; Spinato, Giacomo; Tirelli, Giancarlo; Spinato, Roberto; Azzarello, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Despite improvements in functional outcomes attributable to advances in radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and imaging techniques, survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients has improved only marginally during the last couple of decades, and optimal therapy has yet to be devised. Genomic complexity and intratumoral genetic heterogeneity may contribute to treatment resistance and the propensity for locoregional recurrence. Countering this, it demands a significant effort from both basic and clinical scientists in the search for more effective targeted therapies. Recent genomewide studies have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of HNSCC, uncovering potential new therapeutic opportunities. In addition, several studies have elucidated how inflammatory, immune, and stromal cells contribute to the particular properties of these neoplasms. In the present review, we introduce recent findings on genomic aberrations resulting from whole-genome sequencing of HNSCC, we discuss how the particular microenvironment affects the pathogenesis of this disease, and we describe clinical trials exploring new perspectives on the use of combined genetic and cellular targeted therapies.

  15. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium database has the largest series of patients evaluating the impact of body mass index (BMI on outcomes in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy. Overall survival was significantly improved in overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, and this observation was externally validated in patients who participated in Pfizer trials. In contrast, sarcopenia is consistently associated with increased toxicity to inhibitors of angiogenesis and mTOR. Strengthening patients with mRCC and sarcopenia, through a structured exercise program and dietary intervention, may improve outcomes in mRCC treated with targeted therapies. At the same time, the paradox of obesity being a risk factor for RCC while offering a better overall survival in response to targeted therapy needs to be further evaluated.

  16. Transcriptionally regulated, prostate-targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi

    2009-07-02

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American males today. Novel and effective treatment such as gene therapy is greatly desired. The early viral based gene therapy uses tissue-nonspecific promoters, which causes unintended toxicity to other normal tissues. In this chapter, we will review the transcriptionally regulated gene therapy strategy for prostate cancer treatment. We will describe the development of transcriptionally regulated prostate cancer gene therapy in the following areas: (1) Comparison of different routes for best viral delivery to the prostate; (2) Study of transcriptionally regulated, prostate-targeted viral vectors: specificity and activity of the transgene under several different prostate-specific promoters were compared in vitro and in vivo; (3) Selection of therapeutic transgenes and strategies for prostate cancer gene therapy (4) Oncolytic virotherapy for prostate cancer. In addition, the current challenges and future directions in this field are also discussed.

  17. Metastatic gastric cancer – focus on targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Junco J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Judith Meza-Junco, Michael B SawyerDepartment of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gastric cancer (GC is currently the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide; unfortunately, most patients will present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Despite recent progress in diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, prognosis remains poor. A better understanding of GC biology and signaling pathways is expected to improve GC therapy, and the integration of targeted therapies has recently become possible and appears to be promising. This article focuses on anti-Her-2 therapy, specifically trastuzumab, as well as other epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists such as cetuximab, panitumub, matuzumab, nimotzumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib. Additionally, drugs that target angiogenesis pathways are also under investigation, particulary bevacizumab, ramucirumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, and cediranib. Other targeted agents in preclinical or early clinical development include mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors, anti-insulin-like growth factor, anti-heat shock proteins, and small molecules targeting Hedgehog signaling.Keywords: gastric cancer, targeted therapy, antiangiogenesis drugs, anti-EGFR drugs

  18. Planning study of flattening filter free beams for volumetric modulated arc therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youqun Lai

    Full Text Available Flattening filter free (FFF beams show the potential for a higher dose rate and lower peripheral dose. We investigated the planning study of FFF beams with their role for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT in squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp.One patient with squamous cell carcinoma which had involvement of entire scalp was subjected to VMAT using TrueBeam linear accelerator. As it was a rare skin malignancy, CT data of 7 patients with brain tumors were also included in this study, and their entire scalps were outlined as target volumes. Three VMAT plans were employed with RapidArc form: two half-field full-arcs VMAT using 6 MV standard beams (HFF-VMAT-FF, eight half-field quarter-arcs VMAT using 6 MV standard beams (HFQ-VMAT-FF, and HFQ-VMAT using FFF beams (HFQ-VMAT-FFF. Prescribed dose was 25 × 2 Gy (50 Gy. Plan quality and efficiency were assessed for all plans.There were no statistically significant differences among the three VMAT plans in target volume coverage, conformity, and homogeneity. For HFQ-VMAT-FF plans, there was a significant decrease by 12.6% in the mean dose to the brain compared with HFF-VMAT-FF. By the use of FFF beams, the mean dose to brain in HFQ-VMAT-FFF plans was further decreased by 7.4% compared with HFQ-VMAT-FF. Beam delivery times were similar for each technique.The HFQ-VMAT-FF plans showed the superiority in dose distributions compared with HFF-VMAT-FF. HFQ-VMAT-FFF plans might provide further normal tissue sparing, particularly in the brain, showing their potential for radiation therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp.

  19. True 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma by FISH and aCGH molecular analysis: impact on targeted drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Brunelli

    Full Text Available Squamous lung carcinoma lacks specific "ad hoc" therapies. Amplification of chromosome 3q is the most common genomic aberration and this region harbours genes having role as novel targets for therapeutics. There is no standard definition on how to score and report 3q amplification. False versus true 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma may have tremendous impact on trials involving drugs which target DNA zones mapping on 3q. Forty squamous lung carcinomas were analyzed by FISH to assess chromosome 3q amplification. aCGH was performed as gold-standard to avoid false positive amplifications. Three clustered patterns of fluorescent signals were observed. Eight cases out of 40 (20% showed ≥8 3q signals. Twenty out of 40 (50% showed from 3 to 7 signals. The remaining showed two fluorescent signals (30%. When corrected by whole chromosome 3 signals, only cases with ≥8 signals maintained a LSI 3q/CEP3 ratio >2. Only the cases showing 3q amplification by aCGH (+3q25.3-3q27.3 showed ≥8 fluorescent signals at FISH evidencing a 3q/3 ratio >2. The remaining cases showed flat genomic portrait at aCGH on chromosome 3. We concluded that: 1 absolute copy number of 3q chromosomal region may harbour false positive interpretation of 3q amplification in squamous cell carcinoma; 2 a case results truly "amplified for chromosome 3q" when showing ≥8 fluorescent 3q signals; 3 trials involving drugs targeting loci on chromosome 3q in squamous lung carcinoma therapy have to consider false versus true 3q chromosomal amplification.

  20. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ (Leave blank) Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Innovative reporter gene systems are designed to mark quiescent or proliferating lung cancer cells (Aim 1) and then used to track and trace the dynamics of

  1. Gold Nanorod Bioconjugates for Active Tumor Targeting and Photothermal Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Hadiyah N; Martyshkin, Dmitry V; Rodenburg, Cynthia M.; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Mirov, Sergey B.

    2011-01-01

    The mastery of active tumor targeting is a great challenge in near infrared photothermal therapy (NIRPTT). To improve efficiency for targeted treatment of malignant tumors, we modify the technique of conjugating gold nanoparticles to tumor-specific antibodies. Polyethylene glycol-coated (PEGylated) gold nanorods (GNRs) were fabricated and conjugated to an anti-EGFR antibody. We characterized the conjugation efficiency of the GNRs by comparing the efficiency of antibody binding and the phototh...

  2. Targeting EGFR in bilio-pancreatic and liver carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Santini, Daniele; Vincenzi, Bruno; Silvestris, Nicola; Azzariti, Amalia; Tommasi, Stefania; Zoccoli, Alice; Galluzzo, Sara; Maiello, Evaristo; Colucci, Giuseppe; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The key role of epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) in tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in several cancer types, so recent clinical trials have investigated their activity/efficacy in different settings. Two different types of EGFR-targeted agents were developed: monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab and panitumumab, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib. In this review, we summarize the preclinical rational of potential activity and the most important clinical trials evaluated anti-EGFR targeted agents in non-colorectal digestive cancer, both in monotherapy and in combination with other chemotherapeutic or targeted agents. Patient selection by use of biologic markers will identify which patients are more likely to respond, contributing to the successful use of these agents.

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Diagnosis and Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ungureanu, Bogdan Silviu; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary tumor of the liver, ranking as the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used so far in tumor diagnosis and treatment, demonstrating great potential and promising results. In princ......Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary tumor of the liver, ranking as the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used so far in tumor diagnosis and treatment, demonstrating great potential and promising results...... and treatment of liver cancer and offers a walkthrough from the MNPs imaging applicability to further therapeutic options, including their potential flaws. The MNP unique physical and biochemical properties will be mentioned in close relationship to their subsequent effects on the human body, and, also......, their toxic potential will be noted. A presentation of what barriers the MNPs should overcome to be more successful will conclude this review....

  4. Systemic delivery of microRNA-101 potently inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo by repressing multiple targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy based on adjustment of microRNA (miRNAs activity takes great promise due to the ability of these small RNAs to modulate cellular behavior. However, the efficacy of miR-101 replacement therapy to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains unclear. In the current study, we first observed that plasma levels of miR-101 were significantly lower in distant metastatic HCC patients than in HCCs without distant metastasis, and down-regulation of plasma miR-101 predicted a worse disease-free survival (DFS, P<0.05. In an animal model of HCC, we demonstrated that systemic delivery of lentivirus-mediated miR-101 abrogated HCC growth in the liver, intrahepatic metastasis and distant metastasis to the lung and to the mediastinum, resulting in a dramatic suppression of HCC development and metastasis in mice without toxicity and extending life expectancy. Furthermore, enforced overexpression of miR-101 in HCC cells not only decreased EZH2, COX2 and STMN1, but also directly down-regulated a novel target ROCK2, inhibited Rho/Rac GTPase activation, and blocked HCC cells epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and angiogenesis, inducing a strong abrogation of HCC tumorigenesis and aggressiveness both in vitro and in vivo. These results provide proof-of-concept support for systemic delivery of lentivirus-mediated miR-101 as a powerful anti-HCC therapeutic modality by repressing multiple molecular targets.

  5. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma; Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, S.C.S.; Corgozinho, K.B.; Holguin, P.G.; Ferreira, A.M.R., E-mail: simonecsc@gmail.co [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, L.A.V. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Canary, P.C.; Reisner, M. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, A.N.; Souza, H.J.M. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The efficacy of hypofractionated radiation protocol for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. Hypofractionated radiation therapy was applied to five cats showing single or multiple facial squamous cell carcinomas, in a total of ten histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Of the lesions, two were staged as T{sub 1}, four as T{sub 2}, two as T{sub 3}, and two as T{sub 4}. The animals were submitted to four radiation fractions from 7.6 to 10 grays each, with one week intervals. The equipment was a linear accelerator with electrons beam. The cats were evaluated weekly during the treatment and 30 and 60 days after the end of the radiation therapy. In this study, 40% of the lesions had complete remission, 40% partial remission, and 20% did not respond to the treatment. Response rates were lower as compared to other protocols previously used. However, hypofractionated radiation protocol was considered safe for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  6. Metastatic ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: description of a case and search for actionable targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilien J. Rappaport

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC is an exceedingly rare malignant tumor on the spectrum of already uncommon odontogenic or dentinogenic tumors. We describe here the case of metastatic GCOC in a patient with a history of recurrent dentinogenic ghost cell tumor of the mandible, now presenting with bilateral pleural effusions. We will discuss typical histopathologic and histochemical features of GCOC, along with results of genomic testing and their role in directing therapy.

  7. The clinicalapplication of interleukin-2therapy in patients withmetastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Wen Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical application of interleukin-2 therapy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.Methods:From January 2010 to July 2014 of 108 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients in our hospital as research subjects were randomly divided into the experimental group and the control group. The experimental group received IL-2 combined with Nexavar therapy, and the control group only received Nexavar treatment, clinical efficacy and incidence of adverse reactions between the two groups of patients were compared.Results:Compared with the control group, clinical efficacy in the experimental group was significantly higher, the difference was statistically significant. The incidence of adverse events was higher in patients than that in the experimental group, the difference was statistically significant, but IL-2 had no new adverse reactions and side effects.Conclusions:Interleukin-2 combined with Nexavar treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma can improve the clinical efficacy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in patients, and ease the patient's condition from worsening and promote the quality of life. However, adverse reactions caused by drugs were inevitable; we should pay attention to treatment and prevention of adverse reactions in order to improve the quality of life of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  8. Concomitant cetuximab and radiation therapy: A possible promising strategy for locally advanced inoperable non-melanoma skin carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    DELLA VITTORIA SCARPATI, GIUSEPPINA; PERRI, FRANCESCO; PISCONTI, SALVATORE; COSTA, GIUSEPPE; RICCIARDIELLO, FILIPPO; DEL PRETE, SALVATORE; NAPOLITANO, ALBERTO; CARRATURO, MARCO; MAZZONE, SALVATORE; ADDEO, RAFFAELE

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) include a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from the epidermis, comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), Merkel cell carcinoma and more rare entities, including malignant pilomatrixoma and sebaceous gland tumours. The treatment of early disease depends primarily on surgery. In addition, certain patients present with extensive local invasion or metastasis, which renders these tumours surgically unresectable. Improving the outcome of radiotherapy through the use of concurrent systemic therapy has been demonstrated in several locally advanced cancer-treatment paradigms. Recently, agents targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have exhibited a consolidated activity in phase II clinical trials and case series reports. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to and completely inhibits the EGFR, which has been revealed to be up-regulated in a variety of SCCs, including NMSCs. The present review aimed to summarize the role of anti-EGFR agents in the predominant types of NMSC, including SCC and BCC, and focuses on the cetuximab-based studies, highlighting the biological rationale of this therapeutic option. In addition, the importance of the association between cetuximab and radiotherapy for locally advanced NMSC is discussed. PMID:27073643

  9. Comparison of coplanar and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Hung-Chi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the differences in dose-volume data among coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, noncoplanar IMRT, and helical tomotherapy (HT among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and portal vein thrombosis (PVT. Methods Nine patients with unresectable HCC and PVT underwent step and shoot coplanar IMRT with intent to deliver 46 - 54 Gy to the tumor and portal vein. The volume of liver received 30Gy was set to keep less than 30% of whole normal liver (V30 Results HT provided better uniformity for the planning-target volume dose coverage than both IMRT techniques. The noncoplanar IMRT technique reduces the V10 to normal liver with a statistically significant level as compared to HT. The constraints for the liver in the V30 for coplanar IMRT vs. noncoplanar IMRT vs. HT could be reconsidered as 21% vs. 17% vs. 17%, respectively. When delivering 50 Gy and 60-66 Gy to the tumor bed, the constraints of mean dose to the normal liver could be less than 20 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. Conclusion Noncoplanar IMRT and HT are potential techniques of radiation therapy for HCC patients with PVT. Constraints for the liver in IMRT and HT could be stricter than for 3DCRT.

  10. Radiolabeled Cetuximab Conjugates for EGFR Targeted Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Sihver

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has evolved over years into a main molecular target for the treatment of different cancer entities. In this regard, the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab has been approved alone or in combination with: (a chemotherapy for treatment of colorectal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and (b with external radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The conjugation of radionuclides to cetuximab in combination with the specific targeting properties of this antibody might increase its therapeutic efficiency. This review article gives an overview of the preclinical studies that have been performed with radiolabeled cetuximab for imaging and/or treatment of different tumor models. A particularly promising approach seems to be the treatment with therapeutic radionuclide-labeled cetuximab in combination with external radiotherapy. Present data support an important impact of the tumor micromilieu on treatment response that needs to be further validated in patients. Another important challenge is the reduction of nonspecific uptake of the radioactive substance in metabolic organs like liver and radiosensitive organs like bone marrow and kidneys. Overall, the integration of diagnosis, treatment and monitoring as a theranostic approach appears to be a promising strategy for improvement of individualized cancer treatment.

  11. Photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging of hypericin-treated squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercarz Joel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cancer therapy including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy often are physically debilitating and largely ineffective in previously treated patients with recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. A natural photochemical, hypericin, could be a less invasive method for laser photodynamic therapy (PDT of these recurrent head and neck malignancies. Hypericin has powerful photo-oxidizing ability, tumor localization properties, and fluorescent imaging capabilities as well as minimal dark toxicity. The current study defined hypericin PDT in vitro with human SCC cells before the cells were grown as tumor transplants in nude mice and tested as a model for hypericin induced tumor fluorescence and PDT via laser fiberoptics. Methods SNU squamous carcinoma cells were grown in tissue culture, detached from monolayers with trypsin, and incubated with 0.1 μg to 10 μg/ml of hypericin before exposure to laser light at 514, 550, or 593 nm to define optimal dose, time, and wavelength for PDT of tumor cells. The SCC cells also were injected subcutaneously in nude mice and grown for 6–8 weeks to form tumors before hypericin injection and insertion of fiberoptics from a KTP532 surgical laser to assess the feasibility of this operating room instrument in stimulating fluorescence and PDT of tumors. Results In vitro testing revealed a hypericin dose of 0.2–0.5 μg/ml was needed for PDT of the SCC cells with an optimal tumoricidal response seen at the 593 nm light absorption maximum. In vivo tumor retention of injected hypericin was seen for 7 to10 days using KTP532 laser induced fluorescence and biweekly PDT via laser fiberoptics led to regression of SCC tumor transplants under 0.4 cm2 diameter, but resulted in progression of larger size tumors in the nude mice. Conclusion In this preclinical study, hypericin was tested for 514–593 nm dye laser PDT of human SCC cells in vitro and for KTP532 surgical laser targeting

  12. Prospects in folate receptor-targeted radionuclide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eMüller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is based on systemic application of particle-emitting radiopharmaceuticals which are directed towards a specific tumor-associated target. Accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical in targeted cancer cells results in high doses of absorbed radiation energy whereas toxicity to non-targeted healthy tissue is limited. This strategy has found widespread application in the palliative treatment of neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin-based radiopeptides. The folate receptor (FR has been identified as a target associated with a variety of frequent tumor types (e.g. ovarian, lung, brain, renal and colorectal cancer. In healthy organs and tissue FR-expression is restricted to only a few sites such as for instance the kidneys. This demonstrates why FR-targeting is an attractive strategy for the development of new therapy concepts. Due to its high FR-binding affinity (KD < 10-9 M the vitamin folic acid has emerged as an almost ideal targeting agent. Therefore, a variety of folic acid radioconjugates for nuclear imaging have been developed. However, in spite of the large number of cancer patients who could benefit of a folate-based radionuclide therapy, a therapeutic concept with folate radioconjugates has not yet been envisaged for clinical application. The reason is the generally high accumulation of folate radioconjugates in the kidneys where emission of particle-radiation may result in damage to the renal tissue. Therefore, the design of more sophisticated folate radioconjugates providing improved tissue distribution profiles are needed.This review article summarizes recent developments with regard to a therapeutic application of folate radioconjugates. A new construct of a folate radioconjugate and an application protocol which makes use of a pharmacological interaction allowed the first preclinical therapy experiments with radiofolates. These results raise hope for future application of such new concepts also in the

  13. Nanobody-photosensitizer conjugates for targeted photodynamic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heukers, Raimond; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P; Santos Oliveira, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) induces cell death through light activation of a photosensitizer (PS). Targeted delivery of PS via monoclonal antibodies has improved tumor selectivity. However, these conjugates have long half-lives, leading to relatively long photosensitivity in patients. In an attempt t

  14. Targeted therapies for malignant gliomas: novel agents, same barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, F.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are common and devastating brain malignancies. Despite this extensive treatment the mean overall survival is still only 14.6 months and more effective treatments are urgently needed. Targeted therapy holds the promise for the new generation of chemotherapy due to the selectively ta

  15. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK cell therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yue

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer (CIK cell therapy in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and methods Randomized phase II and III trials on CIK cell-based therapy were identified by electronic searches using a combination of "hepatocellular carcinoma" and "cytokine-induced killer cells". Results The analysis showed significant survival benefit (one-year survival, p p p p p p +, CD4+, CD4+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells significantly increased in the CIK group, compared with the non-CIK group (p Conclusions CIK cell therapy demonstrated a significant superiority in prolonging the median overall survival, PFS, DCR, ORR and QoL of HCC patients. These results support further larger scale randomized controlled trials for HCC patients with or without the combination of other therapeutic methods.

  16. Targeted therapies in the treatment of urothelial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Trump, Donald L

    2017-03-30

    Progress has been slow in systemic management of locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer over the past 20 years. However, the recent approval of immunotherapy with atezolizumab and nivolumab for second-line salvage therapy may usher in an era of more rapid improvement. Systemic treatment is suboptimal and is an area of substantial unmet medical need. The recent findings from The Cancer Genome Atlas project revealed promising pathways that may be amenable to targeted therapies. Promising results with treatment using vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors such as ramucirumab, sunitinib or bevacizumab, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 targeted therapies, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, and fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors, are undergoing clinical trials and are discussed later.

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  18. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem Cells with Alpha-Particle Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceder, Jens; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    Modern molecular and radiopharmaceutical development has brought the promise of tumor-selective delivery of antibody–drug conjugates to tumor cells for the diagnosis and treatment of primary and disseminated tumor disease. The classical mode of discourse regarding targeted therapy has been that the antigen targeted must be highly and homogenously expressed in the tumor cell population, and at the same time exhibit low expression in healthy tissue. However, there is increasing evidence that the reason cancer patients are not cured by current protocols is that there exist subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional therapy including radioresistance and that these cells express other target antigens than the bulk of the tumor cells. These types of cells are often referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSCs are tumorigenic and have the ability to give rise to all types of cells found in a cancerous disease through the processes of self-renewal and differentiation. If the CSCs are not eradicated, the cancer is likely to recur after therapy. Due to some of the characteristics of alpha particles, such as short path length and high density of energy depositions per distance traveled in tissue, they are especially well suited for use in targeted therapies against microscopic cancerous disease. The characteristics of alpha particles further make it possible to minimize the irradiation of non-targeted surrounding healthy tissue, but most importantly, make it possible to deliver high-absorbed doses locally and therefore eradicating small tumor cell clusters on the submillimeter level, or even single tumor cells. When alpha particles pass through a cell, they cause severe damage to the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus, including double-strand breaks of DNA that are very difficult to repair for the cell. This means that very few hits to a cell by alpha particles are needed in order to cause cell death, enabling killing of cells, such as CSCs

  19. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  20. Locoregional extension patterns of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and suggestions for clinical target volume delineation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Fei Li; Jun Ma; Ying Sun; Mo Chen; Ling-Long Tang; Li-Zhi Liu; Yan-Ping Mao; Lei Chen; Guan-Qun Zhou; Li Li

    2012-01-01

    Clinical target volume (CTV) delineation is crucial for tumor control and normal tissue protection.This study aimed to define the Iocoregional extension patterns of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to improve CTV delineation.Magnetic resonance imaging scans of 2366 newly diagnosed NPC patients were reviewed.According to incidence rates of tumor invasion,the anatomic sites surrounding the nasopharynx were classified into high-risk (>30%),medium-risk (5%-30%),and low-risk (<5%) groups.The lymph node (LN) level was determined according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group guidelines,which were further categorized into the upper neck (retropharyngeal region and level Ⅱ),middle neck (levels Ⅲ and Va),and lower neck (levels IV and Vb and the supraclavicular fossa).The high-risk anatomic sites were adjacent to the nasopharynx,whereas those at medium-or low-risk were separated from the nasopharynx.If the high-risk anatomic sites were involved,the rates of tumor invasion into the adjacent medium-risk sites increased; if not,the rates were significantly lower (P < 0.01).Among the 1920 (81.1%) patients with positive LN,the incidence rates of LN metastasis in the upper,middle,and lower neck were 99.6%,30.2%,and 7.2%,respectively,and skip metastasis happened in only 1.2% of patients.In the 929 patients who had unilateral upper neck involvement,the rates of contralateral middle neck and lower neck involvement were 1.8% and 0.4%,respectively.Thus,local disease spreads stepwise from proximal sites to distal sites,and LN metastasis spreads from the upper neck to the lower neck.Individualized CTV delineation for NPC may be feasible.

  1. Secondary prevention of recurrence by interferon therapy after ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis C patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toru Ishikawa

    2008-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is a leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide. Interferon (IFN) ther-apy decreases the incidence of HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Prevention of chronic-hepatitis-C-related HCC is one of the most important issues in current hepatology. We have previously reported that male gender and high titer of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA are predictive factors for the development of HCC in HCV-related cirrhosis. Clinical efforts at eradicat-ing or reducing the viral load may reduce the risk for HCC. Furthermore, because HCC often recurs after ablation therapy, we performed a trial of IFN in pa-tients with chronic liver disease caused by HCV to see whether IFN therapy decreases recurrence after abla-tion therapy of HCV-related HCC. By using IFN therapy as a secondary prevention, patients with HCC who had received complete tumor ablation showed better sur-vival, primarily as a result of the preservation of liver function and also probably prevention of recurrence. Postoperative IFN therapy appears to decrease recur-fence after ablation therapy such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapy of HCV-related HCC. We believe that there is a survival benefit in secondary prevention using IFN therapy. However, a controlled study is es-sential to obtain conclusive evidence of the efficacy of this strategy.

  2. Targeting the insulin-like growth factor pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mónica; Enguita-Germán; Puri; Fortes

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Only 30%-40% of the patients with HCC are eligible for curative treatments, which include surgical resection as the first option, liver transplantation and percutaneous ablation. Unfortunately, there is a high frequency of tumor recurrence after surgical resection and most HCC seem resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Sorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the only chemotherapeutic option for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients treated with Sorafenib have a significant increase in overall survival of about three months. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop alternative treatments. Due to its role in cell growth and development, the insulin-like growth factor system is commonly deregulated in many cancers. Indeed, the insulin-like growth factor(IGF) axis has recently emerged as a potential target for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. To this aim, several inhibitors of the pathway have been developed suchas monoclonal antibodies, small molecules, antisense oligonucleotides or small interfering RNAs. However recent studies suggest that, unlike most tumors, HCC development requires increased signaling through insulin growth factor Ⅱ rather than insulin growth factor Ⅰ. This may have great implications in the future treatment of HCC. This review summarizes the role of the IGF axis in liver carcinogenesis and the current status of the strategies designed to target the IGF-Ⅰ signaling pathway for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

  3. ShRNA-targeted COMMD7 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: COMMD7 is a newly identified gene overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis. We aim to examine the biological function of COMMD7 in HCC by shRNA silencing. METHODS: COMMD7 expressions were examined in human HCC cell lines HepG2, Huh7, Hep3B, HLE, HLF, SK-Hep-1 and PLC/PRF/5 cells. Recombinant pGenesil-COMMD7-shRNA was transfected into COMMD7-abundant HepG2 cells to silence COMMD7 expression. The effects of COMMD7 silencing on HepG2 cell proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo were evaluated. Flow cytometry profiling was used to detect the presence of apoptosis in COMMD7-silenced HepG2 cells and to differentiate cell cycle distribution. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assays to examine the activities of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB signaling pathways in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in COMMD7-silenced HepG2 cells. RESULTS: COMMD7 expression level was abundance in HepG2 and SK-Hep-1 cells. COMMD7 was aberrantly overexpressed in HepG2 cells, whilst pGenesil-COMMD7-shRNA exhibited a maximal inhibition rate of 75%. COMMD7 silencing significantly reduced HepG2 cell proliferation and colony formation. The knockdown of COMMD7 resulted in an increased apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S-phase. COMMD7 knockdown also exhibited an antineoplastic effect in vivo, which manifested as tumor xenograft growth retardation. COMMD7 silencing also suppressed the responsiveness of NF-κB signaling pathway to the stimulation with TNF-α in vitro. Moreover, the similar suppressive effects of COMMD7 silence on SK-Hep-1 cells were also observed. CONCLUSIONS: COMMD7 contributes to HCC progression by reducing cell apoptosis and overcoming cell cycle arrest. The proliferative and antiapoptotic effects of COMMD7 may be mediated by NF-κB signaling pathway.

  4. Targeting Strategies for Multifunctional Nanoparticles in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Yu, Jinho Park, Sangyong Jon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials offer new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticles harboring various functions including targeting, imaging, therapy, and etc have been intensively studied aiming to overcome limitations associated with conventional cancer diagnosis and therapy. Of various nanoparticles, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with superparamagnetic property have shown potential as multifunctional nanoparticles for clinical translation because they have been used asmagnetic resonance imaging (MRI constrast agents in clinic and their features could be easily tailored by including targeting moieties, fluorescence dyes, or therapeutic agents. This review summarizes targeting strategies for construction of multifunctional nanoparticles including magnetic nanoparticles-based theranostic systems, and the various surface engineering strategies of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  5. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  6. Role of anti-angiogenesis therapy in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma: The jury is still out

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong; Sun; Man-Sheng; Zhu; Wen-Rui; Wu; Xiang-De; Shi; Lei-Bo; Xu

    2014-01-01

    As the leading cause of disease-related deaths,cancer is a major public health threat worldwide.Surgical resection is still the first-line therapy for patients with early-stage cancers.However,postoperative relapse and metastasis remain the cause of 90%of deaths of patients with solid organ malignancies,including hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC).With the rapid development of molecular biology techniques in recent years,molecularly targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies,small molecules,and vaccines have become a milestone in cancer therapeutic by significantly improv-ing the survival of cancer patients,and have opened a window of hope for patients with advanced cancer.Hypervascularization is a major characteristic of HCC.It has been reported that anti-angiogenic treatments,which inhibit blood vessel formation,are highly effective for treating HCC.However,the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenesis therapies remain controversial.Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor with antiproliferative and anti-angiogenic effects and is the first molecular target drug approved for the treatment of advanced HCC.While sorafenib has shown promising therapeutic effects,substantial evidence of primary and acquired resistance to sorafenib has been reported.Numerous clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate a large number of molecularly targeted drugs for treating HCC,but most drugs exhibited less efficacy and/or higher toxicity compared to sorafenib.Therefore,understanding the mechanism(s)underlying sorafenib resistance of cancer cells is highlighted for efficiently treating HCC.This concise review aims to provide an overview of anti-angiogenesis therapy in the management of HCC and to discuss the common mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  7. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantril, S.T. (Children' s Hospital of San Francisco, CA); Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.

  8. Targeting FGF19/FGFR4 Pathway: A Novel Therapeutic Strategy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Repana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a lethal cancer with limited systemic therapeutic options. Liver carcinogenesis is a complex procedure and various pathways have been found to be deregulated which are potential targets for novel treatments. Aberrant signalling through FGF19 and its receptor FGFR4 seems to be the oncogenic driver for a subset of HCCs and is associated with poor prognosis. Inhibition of the pathway in preclinical models has shown antitumour activity and has triggered further evaluation of this strategy to in vivo models. This review aims to describe the role of the FGF19/FGFR4 pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma and its role as a potential predictive biomarker for novel targeted agents against FGF19/FGFR4 signalling.

  9. Targeted cytotoxic therapy kills persisting HIV infected cells during ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Paul W; Long, Julie M; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Sykes, Craig; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Snyder, Olivia D; Perkey, Katherine; Archin, Nancie M; Choudhary, Shailesh K; Yang, Kuo; Hudgens, Michael G; Pastan, Ira; Haase, Ashley T; Kashuba, Angela D; Berger, Edward A; Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce HIV levels in plasma to undetectable levels, but rather little is known about the effects of ART outside of the peripheral blood regarding persistent virus production in tissue reservoirs. Understanding the dynamics of ART-induced reductions in viral RNA (vRNA) levels throughout the body is important for the development of strategies to eradicate infectious HIV from patients. Essential to a successful eradication therapy is a component capable of killing persisting HIV infected cells during ART. Therefore, we determined the in vivo efficacy of a targeted cytotoxic therapy to kill infected cells that persist despite long-term ART. For this purpose, we first characterized the impact of ART on HIV RNA levels in multiple organs of bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT) humanized mice and found that antiretroviral drug penetration and activity was sufficient to reduce, but not eliminate, HIV production in each tissue tested. For targeted cytotoxic killing of these persistent vRNA(+) cells, we treated BLT mice undergoing ART with an HIV-specific immunotoxin. We found that compared to ART alone, this agent profoundly depleted productively infected cells systemically. These results offer proof-of-concept that targeted cytotoxic therapies can be effective components of HIV eradication strategies.

  10. Emerging targeted therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eAdamo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few therapeutic options were available for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Since 2010, four new molecules with a demonstrated benefit (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone and denosumab have been approved in this setting, and to-date several other agents are under investigation in clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to present an update of targeted therapies for CRPC. Presented data are obtained from literature and congress reports updated until December 2011. Targeted therapies in advanced phases of clinical development include novel hormone-therapeutic, intracellular molecular pathways inhibiting, anti-angiogenic, bone microenvironment targeting and immunotherapeutic agents. Radium-223 and MDV3100 demonstrated a survival advantage in phase III trials and the road for their introduction in clinical practice is rapidly ongoing. Results are also awaited for phase III studies currently underway or planned with new drugs given as monotherapy (TAK-700, cabozantinib, tasquinimod, PROSTVAC-VF, ipilimumab or in combination with docetaxel (custirsen, aflibercept, dasatinib, zibotentan. Optimal timing, right combination and/or sequencing of emerging therapies as well as use of more sensitive biological markers to individualize therapies for CRPC remain challenging and studies to investigate these aspects are needed.

  11. Chromosome aberrations induced in patients treated with telecobalt therapy for mammary carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine, J.L. (CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium); Gerber, G.B.; Leonard, A.; Richard, F.; Wambersie, A.

    1981-04-01

    The yields of dicentric and ring chromosomes were recorded during telecobalt therapy for mammary carcinoma. The data were fitted to a power or a quadratic function and were compared with those obtained in patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis and nuclear dockyard workers as well as with the results of an in vitro blood irradiation. As expected, the aberration yield for the same absorbed dose level is much greater after irradiation of ankylosing spondylitis than after irradiation for mammary carcinoma; lymphocytes exposed in vitro display the highest rate of aberration. A deviation of the aberrations observed in cells of the mammary carcinoma patients from the theoretical Poisson distribution also indicates that not all lymphocytes in the body has been exposed under these conditions.

  12. Practical considerations for therapies targeting the prostacyclin pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison W. Farber

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapies that target the prostacyclin pathway play a key role in the treatment of both early- and late-stage pulmonary arterial hypertension, and provide significant clinical benefits for patients. A number of agents have been approved, which are administered via intravenous, subcutaneous, inhaled or oral routes. The use of these therapies is associated with practical challenges, relating to the need for up-titration and their routes of administration. We discuss here a number of measures that can be taken to support patients and healthcare professionals in order to address the complexities of using these therapies and to encourage compliance. Providing patients with timely information and education, together with practical advice on managing their medication and associated equipment, assists patients with day-to-day management of therapy. Referral to patient associations and support groups can be of further benefit. With an effective management plan and an experienced multidisciplinary team, the use of therapies that target the prostacyclin pathway can be optimised.

  13. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  14. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Chiu Liu; Zan Shen; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Marie CM Lin

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971,scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of antiangiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has Received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy.

  15. Particle therapy of moving targets-the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called "cyclinacs", are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs.

  16. Skin reactions and quality of life after x-ray therapy of Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiveren, Jette; Mikkelsen, Maria Rudkjaer; Daugbjerg, Helle

    2012-01-01

    controls (P = 0.819). Three months after X-ray therapy eight patients had no skin reactions, 11 had slight atrophy, pigmentation change, and/or some hair loss, four had patch atrophy, moderate telangiectasia, and/or total hair loss. Conclusions. BCC has a negative effect on patients' quality of life......-ray therapy compared with matched healthy controls. Materials. Twenty-five patients (mean age 69) with BCC completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) before and two weeks and three months after X-ray therapy and their results were compared with the DLQI scores for 25 matched controls. Results......Background. Advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is often treated by surgery or X-ray therapy. The consequences of X-ray therapy on the patients' health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) have so far not been described. Objectives. To quantify quality of life in BCC patients before and after X...

  17. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Lei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC.

  18. Targeted Alpha Therapy Approach to the Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross C. Smith

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for the efficacy of targeted alpha therapy for the control of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models is reviewed. Results are given for in vitro pancreatic cancer cells and clusters and micro-metastatic cancer lesions in vivo. Two complementary targeting vectors are examined. These are the C595 monoclonal antibody that targets the MUC1 antigen and the PAI2 ligand that targets the uPA receptor. The expression of the tumor-associated antigen MUC-1 and the uPA receptor on three pancreatic cancer cell lines is reported for cell clusters, human mouse xenografts and lymph node metastases, as well as for human pancreatic cancer tissues, using immuno-histochemistry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The targeting vectors C595 and PAI2 were labeled with the alpha emitting radioisotope 213Bi using the chelators cDTPA and CHX-A″ to form the alpha-conjugates (AC. Cell clusters were incubated with the AC and examined at 48 hours. Apoptosis was documented using the TUNEL assay. In vivo, the anti-proliferative effect for tumors was tested at two days post-subcutaneous cell inoculation. Mice were injected with different concentrations of AC by local or systemic administration. Changes in tumor progression were assessed by tumor size. MUC-1 and uPA are strongly expressed on CFPAC-1, PANC-1 and moderate expression was found CAPAN-1 cell clusters and tumor xenografts. The ACs can target pancreatic cells and regress cell clusters (~100 µm diameter, causing apoptosis in some 70–90 % of cells. At two days post-cell inoculation in mice, a single local injection of 74 MBq/kg of AC causes complete inhibition of tumor growth. Systemic injections of 111, 222 and 333 MBq/kg of alpha-conjugate caused significant tumor growth delay in a dose dependent manner after 16 weeks, compared with the non-specific control at 333 MBq/kg. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the MTS and TUNEL assays. The C595 and PAI2-alpha conjugates are indicated for the treatment of

  19. Targeting Serglycin Prevents Metastasis in Murine Mammary Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Roy

    Full Text Available In hematopoietic cells, serglycin proteoglycans mainly contribute to proper storage and secretion of inflammatory mediators via their negatively charged glycosaminoglycans. Serglycin proteoglycans are also expressed in cancer cells where increased expression has been linked to poor prognosis. However, the serglycin-dependent mediators promoting cancer progression remain to be determined. In the present study we report that genetic ablation of serglycin proteoglycan completely blocks lung metastasis in the MMTV-PyMT-driven mouse breast cancer model, while serglycin-deficiency did not affect primary tumour growth or number of mammary tumours. Although E-cadherin expression was higher in the serglycin-deficient primary tumour tissue, indicating reduced invasiveness, serglycin-deficient tumour cells were still detected in the circulation. These data suggest that serglycin proteoglycans play a role in extravasation as well as colonization and growth of metastatic cells. A microarray expression analysis and functional annotation of differentially expressed genes identified several biological pathways where serglycin may be important. Our results suggest that serglycin and serglycin-dependent mediators are potential drug targets to prevent metastatic disease/dissemination of cancer.

  20. Soft X-ray therapy of basal cell carcinomas of the eye lids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landthaler, M.; Hendel, B.; Schiele-Luftmann, K.; Braun-Falco, O.

    1983-03-01

    Reported are the results of soft X-ray therapy of 237 patients with 245 basal cell carcinomas of the eye lids. The medial angle of the eye and the lower eye lid were mostly affected. Histologically in 62% solid basal cell carcinomas and in 14% sclerodermiform basal cell carcinomas could be diagnostized. By soft X-ray therapy 92% of all basal cell carcinomas could be healed. All recurrences were observed in the first 2 years following radiotherapy. They were relatively more frequent at the lateral angle of the eye. Recurrences occured in 4.9% of female patients, and in 13.0% of male patients. In two thirds they may be due to elected conditions of radiotherapy; in one third the cause of recurrences are not known. The cosmetic result was good or excellent in 95% of patients during the first 2 years following radiotherapy. After more than 5 years this rate declined to 65%. A good functional result could be obtained in 88% of the patients.

  1. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in triple negative feline mammary carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Maniscalco, Lorella; Millán, Yolanda; Iussich, Selina; Denina, Mauro; Sánchez-Céspedes, Raquel; Gattino, Francesca; Biolatti, Bartolomeo; SASAKI, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; De Maria, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Background Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in humans is defined by the absence of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 overexpression. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is overexpressed in TNBC and it represents a potential target for the treatment of this aggressive tumour. Feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is considered to be a model for hormone-independent human breast cancer. This study investigated mTOR and p-mTOR expression in FMC in relation to triple negat...

  2. Cyclotron production of Ac-225 for targeted alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolidis, C; Molinet, R; McGinley, J; Abbas, K; Möllenbeck, J; Morgenstern, A

    2005-03-01

    The feasibility of producing Ac-225 by proton irradiation of Ra-226 in a cyclotron through the reaction Ra-226(p,2n)Ac-225 has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Proton energies were varied from 8.8 to 24.8 MeV and cross-sections were determined by radiochemical analysis of reaction yields. Maximum yields were reached at incident proton energies of 16.8 MeV. Radiochemical separation of Ac-225 from the irradiated target yielded a product suitable for targeted alpha therapy of cancer.

  3. Cancer nanomedicine: from targeted delivery to combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-04-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles (NPs), such as large surface-to-volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate various drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, give them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make NPs a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This review highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using NPs as drug delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy.

  4. Epithelioid Sarcoma: Opportunities for Biology-driven Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNoujaim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelioid sarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of children and young adults for which the preferred treatment for localised disease is wide surgical resection. Medical management is to a great extent undefined, and therefore for patients with regional and distal metastases, the development of targeted therapies is greatly desired. In this review we will summarize clinically-relevant biomarkers (e.g., SMARCB1, CA125, dysadherin and others with respect to targeted therapeutic opportunities. We will also examine the role of EGFR, mTOR and polykinase inhibitors (e.g., sunitinib in the management of local and disseminated disease. Towards building a consortium of pharmaceutical, academic and non-profit collaborators, we will discuss the state of resources for investigating epithelioid sarcoma with respect to cell line resources, tissue banks, and registries so that a roadmap can be developed towards effective biology-driven therapies.

  5. [The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotsarelis, G

    2002-05-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells required for continuous hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be the target of topical gene delivery in the skin of the mouse. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrate the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts. We consider liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection is possible only during the early anagen phase. Factors and obstacles for the use of gene therapy in treating alopecia and skin diseases are discussed. A theoretical framework for future treatment of cutaneous and systemic disorders using gene therapy is presented.

  6. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  7. Pharmacokinetic targets of antiretroviral therapy in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael N. Neely

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Large populations of HIV-infected and exposed infants, children and adolescents are increasingly exposed to antiretroviral therapy throughout dramatic changes of the body composition and maturation process in utero, perinatally and during the later growth and development throughout childhood and puberty. The majority of HIV-infected children live in the resource-limited setting where the presence of other significant co-morbidities such as malnutrition, tuberculosis and malaria complicates the selection of the most effective, safe and least toxic combination of antiretroviral drug therapy. This review focuses on the role of the pharmacokinetic factors including clinically important drug-drug interactions on the therapeutic targets of antiretroviral therapy throughout childhood and adolescence. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  8. Immunotherapy and lung cancer: current developments and novel targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Duarte; Turner, Alice; Silva, Maria Dília; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Mellidez, Juan Carlos; Wannesson, Luciano; Mountzios, Giannis; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a highly prevalent and aggressive disease. In the metastatic setting, major advances include the incorporation of immunotherapy and targeted therapies into the clinician's therapeutic armamentarium. Standard chemotherapeutic regimens have long been reported to interfere with the immune response to the tumor; conversely, antitumor immunity may add to the effects of those therapies. The aim of immunotherapy is to specifically enhance the immune response directed to the tumor. Recently, many trials addressed the role of such therapies for metastatic NSCLC treatment: ipilimumab, tremelimumab, nivolumab and lambrolizumab are immunotherapeutic agents of main interest in this field. In addition, anti-tumor vaccines, such as MAGE-A3, Tecetomide, TG4010, CIMAvax, ganglioside vaccines, tumor cell vaccines and dendritic cell vaccines, emerged as potent inducers of immune response against the tumor. The current work aims to address the most recent developments regarding these innovative immunotherapies and their implementation in the treatment of metastatic NSCLC.

  9. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous....... This review describes and discusses the current status of the application of gene therapy in relation to SCLC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...... DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA...

  10. Noninvasive and Curative Radiation Therapy for Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Eyelid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Masaharu, E-mail: mhata@syd.odn.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Koike, Izumi; Omura, Motoko [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Maegawa, Jiro [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid is a rare malignancy. Surgical excision remains the standard and most reliable curative treatment. However, surgery is sometimes not possible because many patients are elderly, and it frequently causes functional and cosmetic impairment of the eyelid. We therefore carried out a study to determine the role of radiation therapy in relation to sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid underwent radiation therapy with curative intent. There were 6 men and 7 women, and their ages at irradiation ranged from 60 to 85 years (median, 78 years). Only 1 patient had cervical lymph node metastasis, and none of the patients had distant metastasis. A total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy (median, 60 Gy) was delivered to tumor sites in 22 to 37 fractions. Results: All irradiated tumors were controlled at a median follow-up period of 55 months. Only 1 patient had recurrence of cervical lymph node metastasis outside the radiation field, at 22 months after irradiation. The 5-year local progression-free and disease-free rates were 100% and 89%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 89%, respectively. Although acute and transient therapy-related reactions of Grade 2 or less were observed, there were no severe toxicities of Grade 3 or greater. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid. It appears to contribute to prolonged survival as a result of good tumor control, and it also facilitates functional and cosmetic preservation of the eyelid.

  11. Targeting Signaling to YAP for the Therapy of NF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    targeted therapy in the same way Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia is cured by Gleevec. The prospect of resistance is minimal, as Schwannoma cells do not seem to...luciferase construct and several clones of each derivative were isolated. TEAD-dependent expression of Firefly luciferase and background expression of...Renilla luciferase was monitored by bioluminescence to identify clones expressing low levels of Renilla luciferase and high levels of Firefly

  12. Molecular Targeted Approaches to Cancer Therapy and Prevention Using Chalcones

    OpenAIRE

    Jandial, Danielle D.; Blair, Christopher A.; Zhang, Saiyang; Krill, Lauren S; Zhang, Yan-Bing; Zi, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging paradigm shift in oncology that seeks to emphasize molecularly targeted approaches for cancer prevention and therapy. Chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones), naturally-occurring compounds with widespread distribution in spices, tea, beer, fruits and vegetables, consist of open-chain flavonoids in which the two aromatic rings are joined by a three-carbon α, β-unsaturated carbonyl system. Due to their structural diversity, relative ease of chemical manipulation and reacti...

  13. Beta therapy with 90strontium as single modality therapy for canine squamous cell carcinoma in third eyelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lima de Andrade

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of beta-radiation with strontium-90 as single modality treatment of canine third eyelid squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Nine dogs diagnosed with third eyelid SCC were treated with strontium-90. Radiation therapy was administered in four fractions of 100cGy per site every four days and at a depth of 0.2cm (Strontium-90 build' up in each fraction. Radiation with beta therapy was well tolerated in all animals with no occurrence of radiation induced cataracts. In all cases, there were increased signs of conjunctival inflammation around the mass, which subsided with topical anti-inflammatory. Two dogs required surgical treatment for local tumor recurrence at 150 days and 352 days. In the remaining seven cases, disease free interval ranged from 1239 days to 2555 days. Beta therapy using 90Sr may be a valid alternative for the treatment of third eyelid SCC in dogs

  14. New perspectives on targeted therapy in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coward JIG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jermaine IG Coward,1–3 Kathryn Middleton,1 Felicity Murphy1 1Mater Health Services, Raymond Terrace, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Inflammtion and Cancer Therapeutics Group, Mater Research, University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Abstract: Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. During the last 15 years, there has been only marginal improvement in 5 year overall survival. These daunting statistics are compounded by the fact that despite all subtypes exhibiting striking heterogeneity, their systemic management remains identical. Although changes to the scheduling and administration of chemotherapy have improved outcomes to a degree, a therapeutic ceiling is being reached with this approach, resulting in a number of trials investigating the efficacy of targeted therapies alongside standard treatment algorithms. Furthermore, there is an urge to develop subtype-specific studies in an attempt to improve outcomes, which currently remain poor. This review summarizes the key studies with antiangiogenic agents, poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose inhibitors, and epidermal growth factor receptor/human epidermal growth factor receptor family targeting, in addition to folate receptor antagonists and insulin growth factor receptor inhibitors. The efficacy of treatment paradigms used in non-ovarian malignancies for type I tumors is also highlighted, in addition to recent advances in appropriate patient stratification for targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer. Keywords: antiangiogenic therapy, high-grade serous, low grade ovarian cancer, PARP inhibition, cancer-related inflammation

  15. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  16. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate signal pathway in targeted therapy of lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Ai-xia; WANG Xin

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal pathway in the pathogenesis oflymphoma and explore a potential lymphoma therapy targeted on this signaling pathway.Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles listed in Medline and PubMed,published from January 1995 to June 2009. The search terms were "cAMP" and "lymphoma".Study selection Articles regarding the role of the cAMP pathway in apoptosis of lymphoma and associated cells and itspotential role in targeted therapy of lymphoma.Results In the transformation of lymphocytic malignancies, several signal pathways are involved. Among of them, thecAMP pathway has attracted increasing attention because of its apoptosis-inducing role in several lymphoma cells. cAMPpathway impairment is found to influence the prognosis of lymphoma. Targeted therapy to the cAMP pathway seems tobe a new direction for lymphoma treatment, aiming at restoring the cAMP function.Conclusions cAMP signal pathway has different effects on various lymphoma cells. cAMP analogues andphosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) inhibitors have potential clinical significance. However, many challenges remain inunderstanding the various roles of such agents.

  17. Occurrence of BOOP outside radiation field after tangential radiation therapy for breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamanishi, Tohru; Gohma, Iwao; Oida, Kazukiyo [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)] (and others)

    2000-07-01

    We report three cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) that occurred outside the radiation field after radiation therapy using tangential fields for breast carcinoma. All patients complained of a cough between 14 and 20 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Fever also developed in two of the three. Chest radiography and computed tomography demonstrated peripheral alveolar opacities outside the radiation field on the same side as the radiation therapy. Laboratory data showed an increased level of C-reactive protein and an increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed an elevated total cell count with a very high percentage of lymphocytes. Transbronchial lung biopsy revealed a histologic pattern consistent with BOOP. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in rapid clinical improvement and complete resolution of the radiographic abnormalities. This pulmonary disorder appears to be induced by radiation, especially when a tangential field is employed for breast carcinoma, though the etiology has not been fully investigated. It is important to be aware of this type of pulmonary complication in patients given radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. (author)

  18. Clinical Analysis of Xerostomia in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma after Radiation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXuekui; ZENGZongyuan; HONGMinghuang; ZHANGAllan; CUINianji; CHENFujing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the severity of xerostomia and its impact on the quality of life in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after conventional radiation therapy. Methods: One hundred and thirty-six patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, treated by conventional radiation therapy in Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, were surveyed by interview at the outpatient department. A questionnaire and a visual analog scale (VAS) were used to analyze xerostomia and xerostomia-related problems. Results:Of 136 patints, 73.5% experienced a moderate to severe degree of xerostomia; 82.4% had to sip water to facilitate speech; 92.6% had to sip water to facilitate chewing and swallowing; 91.2% changed their feeding pattern (eating only mashed food); 61.3% had to wake up to drink water because of dry mouth; 75.0% had dental lesions to varying degrees. Conclusion: 73.5% of the patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after conventional radiation therapy experienced a moderate to severe degree of xerostomia. Xerostomia has a significant impact on the patient's speech, deglutition, and sleep, and can increase the morbidity of the dental diseases.

  19. Bispecific antibody complex pre-targeting and targeted delivery of polymer drug conjugates for imaging and therapy in dual human mammary cancer xenografts. Targeted polymer drug conjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaw, Ban-An; Gada, Keyur S.; Patil, Vishwesh; Panwar, Rajiv; Mandapati, Savitri [Northeastern University, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Bouve College of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Boston, MA (United States); Hatefi, Arash [Rutgers University, Department of Pharmaceutics, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Majewski, Stan [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Morgantown, WV (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Doxorubicin, a frontline chemotherapeutic agent, limited by its cardiotoxicity and other tissue toxicities, was conjugated to N-terminal DTPA-modified polyglutamic acid (D-Dox-PGA) to produce polymer pro-drug conjugates. D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m labeled DTPA-succinyl-polylysine polymers (DSPL) were targeted to HER2-positive human mammary carcinoma (BT-474) in a double xenografted SCID mouse model also hosting HER2-negative human mammary carcinoma (BT-20). After pretargeting with bispecific anti-HER2-affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab complexes (BAAC), anti-DTPA-Fab or only phosphate buffered saline, D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m DSPL were administered. Positive therapeutic control mice were injected with Dox alone at maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Only BT-474 lesions were visualized by gamma imaging with Tc-99 m-DSPL; BT-20 lesions were not. Therapeutic efficacy was equivalent in mice pretargeted with BAAC/targeted with D-Dox-PGA to mice treated only with doxorubicin. There was no total body weight (TBW) loss at three times the doxorubicin equivalent MTD with D-Dox-PGA, whereas mice treated with doxorubicin lost 10 % of TBW at 2 weeks and 16 % after the second MTD injection leading to death of all mice. Our cancer imaging and pretargeted therapeutic approaches are highly target specific, delivering very high specific activity reagents that may result in the development of a novel theranostic application. HER/2 neu specific affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab bispecific antibody pretargeting of HER2 positive human mammary xenografts enabled exquisite targeting of polymers loaded with radioisotopes for molecular imaging and doxorubicin for effective therapy without the associating non-tumor normal tissue toxicities. (orig.)

  20. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Nikolaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT. The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC.

  1. Peptide-Conjugated Quantum Dots Act as the Target Marker for Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-ling Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In the present study, we describe a novel and straightforward approach to produce a cyclic- arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD-peptide-conjugated quantum dot (QD probe as an ideal target tumor biomarker. Due to its specific structure, the probe can be used for targeted imaging of pancreatic carcinoma cells. Methods: Pancreatic carcinoma cells were routinely cultured and marked with QD-RGD probe. The QD-RGD probe on the fluorescence-labeled cancer cell was observed by fluorescence microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. Cancer cell viability was detected by MTT assay after culturing with QD-RGD probe. Results: Fluorescence microscopy and laser confocal microscopy displayed that 10nmol/L QD-RGD probe was able to effectively mark pancreatic carcinoma cells. In comparison with organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, the quantum dot-RGD probe had unique optical and electronic properties. Conclusion: QD-RGD probe has a low cytotoxicity with an excellent optical property and biocompatibility. These findings support further evaluation of QD-RGD probes for the early detection of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Gene Therapy In Squamous Cell Carcinoma – A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Susan Varghese

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer remains one of the leading causes of death world wide. Various means to destroy tumor cells preferentially have been developed; gene therapy is one among them with less treatment morbidity. Gene therapy involves the transfer of therapeutic or working copy of genes into a specific cell of an individual in order to repair a faulty copy of gene. The alteration can be accomplished by repairing or replacing the damaged DNA by various strategies and vectors. To date genetically altered viruses are commonly used as gene delivery vehicle (vector which has an advantage of evolutionary selection of host-virus relation. Non viral vectors which include the physical transfection of genes can be accomplished by electrophoration, microinjection, or use of ballistic particles and chemical transfection by forming liposomes.

  3. Novel 2DG-based harmine derivatives for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aqin; Chen, Yuqi; Chen, Wei R.; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    Harmine is a beta-carboline alkaloid from the plant Peganum harmala. These alkaloids were stimulated by their promising antitumor activities in the recent years. In this study, we designed and synthesized two harmine derivatives #1and #2 modified at position-9 of harmine with ethyl and phenylpropyl, respectively. To improve the tumor targeting capability, #1' and #2' were synthesized by conjugating 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) to the derivatives #1 and #2, respectively. The MTT assays of all these compounds in vitro against L02, HepG2 showed all compounds had low toxicity to normal cells (L02) and significantly enhanced carcinoma cell inhibitory rate compared to harmine. Cytotoxicity against liver cancer cell lines of compound #1' #2' is higher than #1 #2, and even the compound #2' is better than positive drug 5-FU. The compound #2', a novel 2DG-based harmine derivatives, could become a promising drug for targeted cancer therapy and combination therapy with other antitumor drugs.

  4. Non-transplant therapies for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Child-Pugh-Turcotte class B cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Alessandro; Bolondi, Luigi

    2017-02-01

    Underlying liver cirrhosis is present in most patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation is the only treatment strategy to cure both diseases. All other hepatocellular carcinoma treatment strategies have to take into account residual liver function that concurs with the patient's prognosis and might limit their feasibility. In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Child-Pugh-Turcotte class B (CPT-B), owing to borderline liver function, any intervention might be offset by liver function deterioration. In this setting, the decision for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment requires a comprehensive assessment of liver function, not restricted to the CPT classification, in addition to a careful evaluation of the prognostic effect of hepatocellular carcinoma compared with cirrhosis. In this Review, we provide an overview of the literature regarding the benefits and harms of non-transplant therapies in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and CPT-B cirrhosis.

  5. MicroRNA-125a-5p modulates human cervical carcinoma proliferation and migration by targeting ABL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xian Qin,1 Yajun Wan,1 Saiying Wang,2 Min Xue1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Background: In this study, we intended to understand the regulatory mechanisms of microRNA-125a-5p (miR-125a-5p in human cervical carcinoma.Methods: The gene expressions of miR-125a-5p in seven cervical carcinoma cell lines and 12 human cervical carcinoma samples were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Ca-Ski and HeLa cells were transduced with lentivirus carrying miR-125a-5p mimics, and the effects of lentivirus-induced miR-125a-5p upregulation on cervical carcinoma proliferation and migration were examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and transwell assays, respectively. In additional, HeLa cells were inoculated into null mice to evaluate the effect of miR-125a-5p upregulation on in vivo cervical carcinoma growth. The direct regulation of miR-125a-5p on its target gene, ABL proto-oncogene 2 (ABL2, in cervical carcinoma was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and luciferase reporter assays, respectively. ABL2 was then downregulated by small interfering RNA to examine its effect on cervical carcinoma proliferation and migration.Results: miR-125a-5p was downregulated in both cervical carcinoma cell lines and human cervical carcinomas. In Ca-Ski and HeLa cells, lentivirus-mediated miR-125a-5p upregulation inhibited cancer proliferation and migration in vitro and cervical carcinoma transplantation in vivo. ABL2 was shown to be directly targeted by miR-125a-5p. In cervical carcinoma, ABL2 gene and protein levels were both downregulated by miR-125a-5p. Small interfering RNA-mediated ABL2 downregulation also had tumor-suppressive effects on cervical carcinoma proliferation and migration

  6. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  7. Pathobiology of ovarian carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojgan Devouassoux-Shisheboran; Catherine Genestie

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian tumors comprise a heterogeneous group of lesions, displaying distinct tumor pathology and oncogenic potentiel. These tumors are subdivided into three main categories: epithelial, germ cell, and sex-cord stromal tumors. We report herein the newly described molecular abnormalities in epithelial ovarian cancers (carcinomas). Immunohistochemistry and molecular testing help pathologists to decipher the significant heterogeneity of this disease. Our better understanding of the molecular basis of ovarian carcinomas represents the first step in the development of targeted therapies in the near future.

  8. Emerging Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Castration Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesal C. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with medical or surgical castration is the mainstay of therapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. However, despite initial responses, almost all men eventually develop castration refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC and die of their disease. Over the last decade, it has been recognized that despite the failure of ADT, most prostate cancers maintain some dependence on androgen and/or androgen receptor (AR signaling for proliferation. Furthermore, androgen independent molecular pathways have been identified as drivers of continued progression of CRPC. Subsequently, drugs have been developed targeting these pathways, many of which have received regulatory approval. Agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, orteronel (TAK-700, and ARN-509 target androgen signaling. Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, and tasquinimod augment immune-mediated tumor killing. Agents targeting classic tumorogenesis pathways including vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, insulin like growth factor-1, tumor suppressor, and those which regulate apoptosis and cell cycles are currently being developed. This paper aims to focus on emerging molecular pathways underlying progression of CRPC, and the drugs targeting these pathways, which have recently been approved or have reached advanced stages of development in either phase II or phase III clinical trials.

  9. Targeted delivery of chemically modified anti-miR-221 to hepatocellular carcinoma with negatively charged liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wendian Zhang,1 Fangqi Peng,1 Taotao Zhou,1 Yifei Huang,2 Li Zhang,3 Peng Ye,4 Miao Lu,1 Guang Yang,5 Yongkang Gai,1 Tan Yang,1 Xiang Ma,1 Guangya Xiang1 1School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, 2Department of Pharmacy, 3Department of Ultrasound, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 4Department of Pharmacy, Wuhan University, Renmin Hospital, 5School of Medicine, Jianghan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Gene therapy was established as a new strategy for treating HCC. To explore the potential delivery system to support the gene therapy of HCC, negatively charged liposomal delivery system was used to deliver miR-221 antisense oligonucleotide (anti-miR-221 to the transferrin (Tf receptor over expressed HepG2 cells. The liposome exhibited a mean particle size of 122.5 nm, zeta potential of -15.74 mV, anti-miR-221 encapsulation efficiency of 70%, and excellent colloidal stability at 4°C. Anti-miR-221-encapsulated Tf-targeted liposome demonstrated a 15-fold higher delivery efficiency compared to nontargeted liposome in HepG2 cells in vitro. Anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome effectively delivered anti-miR-221 to HepG2 cells, upregulated miR-221 target genes PTEN, P27kip1, and TIMP3, and exhibited greater silencing efficiency over nontargeted anti-miR-221 liposome. After intravenous injection into HepG2 tumor-bearing xenografted mice with Cy3-labeled anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome, Cy3-anti-miR-221 was successfully delivered to the tumor site and increased the expressions of PTEN, P27kip1, and TIMP3. Our results demonstrate that the Tf-targeted negatively charged liposome could be a potential therapeutic modality in the gene therapy of human HCC. Keywords: transferrin, gene, HCC, target delivery system, anionic liposome 

  10. Targeting SR-BI for cancer diagnostics, imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesha Amrita Rajora

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI plays an important role in trafficking cholesteryl esters between the core of high density lipoprotein and the liver. Interestingly, this integral membrane protein receptor is also implicated in the metabolism of cholesterol by cancer cells, whereby overexpression of SR-BI has been observed in a number of tumours and cancer cell lines, including breast and prostate cancers. Consequently, SR-BI has recently gained attention as a cancer biomarker and exciting target for the direct cytosolic delivery of therapeutic agents. This brief review highlights these key developments in SR-BI-targeted cancer therapies and imaging probes. Special attention is given to the exploration of high density lipoprotein nanomimetic platforms that take advantage of upregulated SR-BI expression to facilitate targeted drug-delivery and cancer diagnostics, and promising future directions in the development of these agents.

  11. [Molecular-targeted therapy for hormone-refractory prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazuo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Masashi; Nonomura, Norio; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2006-06-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy is to treat pathologic pathways specifically in tumor cell or tumor microenvironment. Specific molecular-targeted therapeutic agents for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) include endothelin-A receptor antagonist, EGF receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor, nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor, and active form of Vitamin D. These agents have been investigated in clinical trials. So far, none of the above-mentioned agent has shown a sufficient clinical efficacy alone. However, docetaxel-based combinations with thalidomide or calcitriol have promising clinical activities. Further investigations are needed to optimize the molecular-targeted agents in the combinations with chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of HRPC.

  12. Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. During the past years, the development of new effective treatment options has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. The advent of agents such as capecitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab and bevacizumab has translated into median survival times in the range of 2 years. Intense efforts have focused on identifying novel agents targeting specific growth factor receptors, critical signal transduction pathways or mediators of angiogenesis. In addition, several clinical trials have suggested that some of these molecularly targeted drugs can be safely and effectively used in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this article we review various treatment options combining cytotoxic and targeted therapies currently available for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  13. Nuclisome: a novel concept for radionuclide therapy using targeting liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondell, Amelie; Carlsson, Joergen [Uppsala University, Department of Oncology, Radiology, and Clinical Immunology, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Edwards, Katarina; Ickenstein, Ludger M. [Uppsala University, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Box 579, Uppsala (Sweden); Sjoeberg, Stefan [Uppsala University, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Box 599, Uppsala (Sweden); Gedda, Lars [Uppsala University, Department of Oncology, Radiology, and Clinical Immunology, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-01-15

    For the treatment of cancer, the therapeutic potential of short-range, low-energy Auger-electron emitters, such as {sup 125}I, is getting progressively wider recognition. The potency of Auger-electron emitters is strongly dependent on their location in close vicinity to DNA. We have developed a new two-step targeting strategy to transport {sup 125}I into cancer-cell nuclei using PEG-stabilized tumour-cell targeting liposomes named ''Nuclisome-particles''. In the present study, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was used as a tumour-cell-specific agent to target the EGF-receptor (EGFR) and the liposomes were loaded with {sup 125}I-Comp1, a recently synthesized daunorubicin derivative. As analysed with cryo-TEM, the derivative precipitates inside liposomes at a drug-to-lipid molar ratio of 0.05:1. Receptor-specific uptake in cultured U-343MGaCl2:6 tumour cells of EGFR-targeting liposomes increased with time while non-specific and receptor-blocked uptake remained low. Nuclisome-particles were able to target single U-343MGaCl2:6 cells circulating in human blood during 4 h, with low uptake in white blood cells, as demonstrated in an ex vivo system using a Chandler loop. Autoradiography of targeted cells indicates that the grains from the radiolabelled drug are mainly co-localized with the cell nuclei. The successful targeting of the nucleus is shown to provide high-potency cell killing of cultured U-343MGaCl2:6 cells. At the concentration used, Nuclisome-particles were up to five orders of magnitude more effective in cell killing than EGFR-targeting liposomes loaded with doxorubicin. The results thus provide encouraging evidence that our two-step targeting strategy for tumour cell DNA has the potential to become an effective therapy against metastasizing cancer cells in the bloodstream. (orig.)

  14. Pathophysiology of hemophilic arthropathy and potential targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulles, Astrid E; Mastbergen, Simon C; Schutgens, Roger E G; Lafeber, Floris P J G; van Vulpen, Lize F D

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia is a congenital clotting factor deficiency characterized by spontaneous and trauma-related bleeding. Spontaneous bleeding shows a predilection for joints, and repeated hemarthroses lead to a disabling condition called hemophilic arthropathy. Treatment of this condition consists of preventing joint bleeding on the one hand and orthopedic surgery as a last resort on the other. Up till now, there is no disease modifying therapy available to fill the gap between these extremes. This review provides an overview of the pathogenesis of hemophilic arthropathy in order to identify potential targets for therapy. Joint bleeding induces synovial inflammation, cartilage degeneration and bone damage. These processes interact with each other and result in a vicious circle. Hemarthrosis promotes synovial hypertrophy and neoangiogenesis, increasing the susceptibility to mechanical damage and subsequent bleeding. The inflamed synovium affects the cartilage, while cartilage is also directly affected by blood via the release of cytokines and metalloproteinases, and via hydroxyl radical formation inducing chondrocyte apoptosis. Apart from the inflammatory pathways, iron plays a pivotal role in this process, as does the fibrinolytic system. Considering its pathogenesis, potential targets for disease modifying therapy in hemophilic arthropathy are iron, inflammation, vascular remodeling, hyperfibrinolysis, bone remodeling and cartilage regeneration. So far, iron chelators, anti-inflammatory therapy, anti-fibrinolytics and bone remodeling agents have demonstrated beneficial effects, predominantly in a preclinical setting. There is still a long way to go before these interventions will translate into clinical practice. The most important challenges are: establishing a universal outcome measure to predict efficacy in humans, and determination of the optimal route and timing to administer disease modifying therapy.

  15. Transarterial therapy: An evolving treatment modality of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A Jazieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men, the seventh most common in women, and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Only 30-40% of liver cancer patients present early enough to undergo curative treatments such as surgery or liver transplantation. Local treatment with radiofrequency ablation or ethanol injection is often reserved for non-surgical candidates with early stages of disease. Transarterial embolization has become a widely accepted treatment for asymptomatic patients with unresectable lesions. This review discusses in details the three major forms of transarterial therapies: Bland embolization, chemoembolization, and radioembolization.

  16. Targeted alpha anticancer therapies: update and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen BJ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Barry J Allen,1,2 Chen-Yu Huang,3 Raymond A Clarke2 1Faculty of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Faculty of Medicine, Ingham Institute, University of Western Sydney, Liverpool, NSW, Australia; 3Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Targeted alpha therapy (TAT is an emerging option for local and systemic cancer treatment. Preclinical research and clinical trials show that alpha-emitting radionuclides can kill targeted cancer cells while sparing normal cells, thus reducing toxicity. 223RaCl2 (Xofigo® is the first alpha emitting radioisotope to gain registration in the US for palliative therapy of prostate cancer bone metastases by indirect physiological targeting. The alpha emitting radioisotopes 211At, 213Bi, 225Ac and 227Th are being used to label targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies for specific cancer therapy indications. In this review, safety and tolerance aspects are considered with respect to microdosimetry, specific energy, Monte Carlo model calculations, biodosimetry, equivalent dose and mutagenesis. The clinical efficacy of TAT for solid tumors may also be enhanced by its capacity for tumor anti-vascular (TAVAT effects. This review emphasizes key aspects of TAT research with respect to the PAI2-uPAR complex and the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, C595 and J591. Clinical trial outcomes are reviewed for neuroendocrine tumors, leukemia, glioma, melanoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and prostate bone metastases. Recommendations and future directions are proposed.Keywords: biodosimetry, microdosimetry, mutagenesis, PAI2, bevacizumab, C595, J591, tumors, cancer, metastases

  17. Preparation of human hepatocellular carcinoma-targeted liposome microbubbles and their immunological properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Na Bian; Yun-Hua Gao; Kai-Bin Tan; Ping Liu; Gong-Jun Zeng; Xin Zhang; Zheng Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To prepare the human hepatocellular carcinoma.(HCC)-targeted liposome microbubbles and to investigate their immunological properties.METHODS: Human hepatocarcinoma specific monoclonal antibody HAb18 was attached to the surface of home-made liposome microbubbles by static attraction to prepare the targeted liposome microbubbles. The combination of HAb18 with liposome microbubbles was confirmed by the slide agglutination test and immunofluorescent assay. Their immunological activity was measured by ELISA. Rosette formation test, rosette formation blocking test and immunofluorescent assay were used to identify the specific binding of targeted liposome microbubbles to SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells, and cytotoxicity assay was used to detect their effect on human hepatocytes.RESULTS: The targeted liposome microbubbles were positive in the slide agglutination test and immunofluorescent assay. ELISA indicated that the immunological activity of HAb18 on the liposome microbubbles was similar to that of free HAb18. SMMC-7721 cells were surrounded by the targeting liposome microbubbles to form rosettes, while the control SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells were not. Proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells and normal human hepatocytes was not influenced by the targeted liposome microbubbles.CONCLUSION: The targeted liposome microbubbles with a high specific biological activity have been successfully prepared, which specifically bind to human hepatocarcinoma cells, and are non-cytotoxic to hepatocytes. These results indicate that the liposome microbubbles can be used as a HCC-targeted ultrasound contrast agent that may enhance ultrasound images and thus improve the diagnosis of HCC,especially at the early stage.

  18. Inhibition of Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression by in vivo Targeting of Hyaluronan Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savani Rashmin C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oesophageal cancer is a highly aggressive tumour entity with at present poor prognosis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed. Hyaluronan (HA is a polysaccharide present in the matrix of human oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Importantly, in vitro ESCC cells critically depend on HA synthesis to maintain the proliferative phenotype. The aim of the present study is (1 to study HA-synthase (HAS expression and regulation in human ESCC, and (2 to translate the in vitro results into a mouse xenograft model of human ESCC to study the effects of systemic versus tumour targeted HAS inhibition on proliferation and distribution of tumour-bound and stromal hyaluronan. Methods mRNA expression was investigated in human ESCC biopsies by semiquantitative real-time RT PCR. Furthermore, human ESCC were xenografted into NMRI nu/nu mice. The effects on tumour progression and morphology of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU, an inhibitor of HA-synthesis, and of lentiviral knock down of HA-synthase 3 (HAS3, the main HAS isoform in the human ESCC tissues and the human ESCC cell line used in this study, were determined. Tumour progression was monitored by calliper measurements and by flat-panel detector volume computed tomography (fpVCT. HA content, cellular composition and proliferation (Ki67 were determined histologically. Results mRNA of HAS isoform 3 (HAS3 was upregulated in human ESCC biopsies and HAS3 mRNA was positively correlated to expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor. EGF was also proven to be a strong inductor of HAS3 mRNA expression in vitro. During the course of seven weeks, 4-MU inhibited progression of xenograft tumours. Interestingly, remodelling of the tumour into a more differentiated phenotype and inhibition of cell proliferation were observed. Lentiviral knockdown of HAS3 in human ESCC cells prior to xenografting mimicked all effects of 4-MU treatment suggesting that hyaluronan produced by

  19. Bacterial targeted tumour therapy-dawn of a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming Q; Mengesha, Asferd; Good, David; Anné, Jozef

    2008-01-18

    Original observation of patients' spontaneous recovery from advanced tumours after an infection or a "fever" inspired extensive research. As a result, Coley's toxin for the therapy of sarcomas and live Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) for bladder cancer were born. In addition, three genera of anaerobic bacteria have been shown to specifically and preferentially target solid tumours and cause significant tumour lyses. Initial research had focused on determining the best tumour colonizing bacteria, and assessing the therapeutic efficacy of different strategies either as a single or combination treatment modalities. However, although clinical trials were carried out as early as the 1960s, lack of complete tumour lyses with injection of Clostridial spores had limited their further use. Recent progress in the field has highlighted the rapid development of new tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridia which have otherwise been a hurdle for a long time, such as plasmid transformation using electroporation that bore the problems of inefficiency, instability and plasmid loss. A new Clostridium strain, C. novyi-NT made apathogenic by genetic modification, is under clinical trials. New genetic engineering tools, such as the group II intron has shown promise for genetic manipulation of bacteria and forecast the dawn of a new era for a tumour-targeted bacterial vector system for gene therapy of solid tumours. In this review we will discuss the potential of genetically manipulated bacteria that will usher in the new era of bacterial therapy for solid tumours, and highlight strategies and tools used to improve the bacterial oncolytic capability.

  20. Current Trends in Targeted Therapies for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiharu Ohka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most frequently occurring tumors in the central nervous system and the most malignant tumor among gliomas. Despite aggressive treatment including surgery, adjuvant TMZ-based chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, GBM still has a dismal prognosis: the median survival is 14.6 months from diagnosis. To date, many studies report several determinants of resistance to this aggressive therapy: (1 O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, (2 the complexity of several altered signaling pathways in GBM, (3 the existence of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs, and (4 the blood-brain barrier. Many studies aim to overcome these determinants of resistance to conventional therapy by using various approaches to improve the dismal prognosis of GBM such as modifying TMZ administration and combining TMZ with other agents, developing novel molecular-targeting agents, and novel strategies targeting GSCs. In this paper, we review up-to-date clinical trials of GBM treatments in order to overcome these 4 hurdles and to aim at more therapeutical effect than conventional therapies that are ongoing or are about to launch in clinical settings and discuss future perspectives.

  1. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Maliandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  3. Photodynamic therapy-induced programmed cell death in carcinoma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Yan; Sikes, Robert A.; Thomsen, Sharon L.; Chung, L.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1993-06-01

    The mode of cell death following photodynamic therapy (PDT) was investigated from the perspective of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Human prostate carcinoma cells (PC3), human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H322a), and rat mammary carcinoma (MTF7) were treated by PDT following sensitization with dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE). The response of these carcinoma cell lines to PDT was variable. An examination of extracted cellular DNA by gel electrophoresis showed the characteristic DNA ladder pattern indicative of internucleosomal cleavage of DNA during apoptosis. MTF7 and PC3 responded to PDT by inducing apoptosis while H322a had no apoptotic response. The magnitude of the response and the PDT dosage required to induce the effect were different in PC3 and MTF7. MTF7 cells responded with rapid apoptosis at the dose of light and drug that yielded 50% cell death (LD50). In contrast, PC3 showed only marginal apoptosis at the LD50 but had a marked response at the LD85. Furthermore, the onset of apoptosis followed slower kinetics in PC3 (2 hr - 4 hr) than in MTF7 (cells were killed by PDT but failed to exhibit any apoptotic response. This study indicates that apoptosis may occur during PDT induced cell death, but this pathway is not universal for all cancer cell lines.

  4. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Moon, Hye Seong; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Chong Il; Ahn, Jung Ja [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy, and to investigate the prognostic factors for FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer patients who were treated with simple hysterectomy, or who had high-risk factors following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Between March 1986 and December 1998, 58 patients, with FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer were included in this study, The indications for postoperative radiation therapy were based on the pathological findings, including lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin, parametrial extension, Iymphovascular invasion, invasion of more than half the cervical stroma, uterine extension and the incidental finding of cervix cancer following simple hysterectomy. All patients received external pelvic radiotherapy, and 5 patients, received an additional intracavitary radiation therapy. The radiation dose from the external beam to the whole pelvis was 45 - 50 Gy. Vagina cuff irradiation was performed, after completion of the external beam irradiation, al a low-dose rate of CS-137, with the total dose of 4488-4932 chy (median: 4500 chy) at 5 mm depth from the vagina surface. The median follow-up period was 44 months (15-108 months), The 5-yr actuarial local control rate, distant free survival and disease-free survival rate were 98%, 95% and 94%, respectively. A univariate analysis of the clinical and pathological parameters revealed that the clinical stage (p=0.0145), status of vaginal resection margin (p=0.0002) and parametrial extension (p=0.0001) affected the disease-free survival. From a multivariate analysis, only a parametrial extension independently influenced the disease-free survival. Five patients (9%) experienced Grade 2 late treatment-related complications, such as radiation proctitis (1 patient), cystitis (3 patients) and lymphedema of the leg (1 patient). No patient had grade 3 or 4 complications. Our results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy can

  5. Albumin-Folate Conjugates for Drug-targeting in Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzbach, Kathrin; Rasse-Suriani, Federico A O; Gonzalez, M Micaela; Cabrerizo, Franco M; Epe, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the cytotoxicity of photosensitizers in the presence of light. Increased selectivity and effectivity of the treatment is expected if a specific uptake of the photosensitizers into the target cells, often tumor cells, can be achieved. An attractive transporter for that purpose is the folic acid receptor α (FRα), which is overexpressed on the surface of many tumor cells and mediates an endocytotic uptake. Here, we describe the synthesis and photobiological characterization of polar β-carboline derivatives as photosensitizers covalently linked to folate-tagged albumin as the carrier system. The particles were taken up by KB (human carcinoma) cells within albumin-β-carbolinium conjugate proved to be phototoxic, while the corresponding albumin-β-carbolinium conjugates without FA were nontoxic, both with and without irradiation. An excess of free folate as competitor for the FRα-mediated uptake completely inhibited the photocytotoxicity. Interestingly, the albumin conjugates are devoid of photodynamic activity under cell-free conditions, as shown for DNA as a target. Thus, phototoxicity requires cellular uptake and lysosomal degradation of the conjugates. In conclusion, albumin-folate conjugates appear to be promising vehicles for a tumor cell targeted PDT.

  6. The Future of HCV Therapy: NS4B as an Antiviral Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadas Dvory-Sobol

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major worldwide cause of liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It is estimated that more than 170 million individuals are infected with HCV, with three to four million new cases each year. The current standard of care, combination treatment with interferon and ribavirin, eradicates the virus in only about 50% of chronically infected patients. Notably, neither of these drugs directly target HCV. Many new antiviral therapies that specifically target hepatitis C (e.g. NS3 protease or NS5B polymerase inhibitors are therefore in development, with a significant number having advanced into clinical trials. The nonstructural 4B (NS4B protein, is among the least characterized of the HCV structural and nonstructural proteins and has been subjected to few pharmacological studies. NS4B is an integral membrane protein with at least four predicted transmembrane (TM domains. A variety of functions have been postulated for NS4B, such as the ability to induce the membranous web replication platform, RNA binding and NTPase activity. This review summarizes potential targets within the nonstructural protein NS4B, with a focus on novel classes of NS4B inhibitors.

  7. Development of systemic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma at 2013: Updates and insights

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has undergone testing for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately, this enthusiasm has recently been discouraged by a number of negative phase III studies on several anti-angiogenic TKIs in HCC. Several postulations have been made to account for this phenomenon, namely the plateau effects of anti-angiogenesis approach, the heterogeneity of HCC in terms of background hepatitis/cirrhosis and tumor biology, as well as the w...

  8. Aptamers: active targeting ligands for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment.

  9. Combination Gene Therapy for Liver Metastasis of Colon Carcinoma in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Hsai; Chen, X. H. Li; Wang, Yibin; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Finegold, Milton J.; Rich, Susan S.

    1995-03-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8^+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver.

  10. A Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Inhibiting the Response to Intravitreal Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Therapy in Wet Age-Related Macular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel S. Falcão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD is an ocular disorder that can be successfully treated with intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy. We report a case of incomplete response to intravitreal therapy associated with a clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC. Methods: A 72-year-old male with wet AMD responded poorly to intravitreal bevacizumab and ranibizumab injections. The removal of a ccRCC led to the spontaneous stabilization of the choroidal neovascular lesion. The renal carcinoma was examined for Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene alterations. Immunohistochemical profiling of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathway addressing the marker HIF-1α and its downstream targets VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and carbonic anhydrase IX was performed. Results: Genotyping of the ccRCC revealed the presence of a truncating VHL mutation (p.E134fs*25. Immunohistochemistry displayed HIF pathway target activation and VEGF expression in the ccRCC tumour cells. Following tumour removal, the neovascular lesion remained stable for 6 months without any further anti-VEGF therapy. Conclusion: The somatic VHL mutation correlates with persistent high levels of HIF-1α pathway targets and VEGF expression in the ccRCC. We postulate that this increased VEGF in the tumour and subsequently in the plasma levels could have caused the incomplete response to intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy. Stabilization of the wet AMD following tumour removal indicates that the angiogenic secreting tumour (ccRCC abrogates the response to VEGF inhibitor therapy. Thus, in cases of poor response to intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy, systemic evaluation including plasma levels of VEGF and/or systemic screening for VEGF-producing tumours should be considered.

  11. FGFR Signaling as a Target for Lung Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Arpita; Adjei, Alex A

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. Recently, molecular targeted therapies have shown promising results in the management of lung cancer. These therapies require a clear understanding of the relevant pathways that drive carcinogenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling axis is one such pathway that plays a central role in normal cellular function. Alterations in this pathway have been found in many cancers. In this review article, we focus on the role of this pathway in lung cancer. We present the molecular structure of FGFR, the interaction of the receptor with its ligands (the fibroblast growth factors), its downstream signaling, and aberrations in the FGFR pathway. We also discuss clinical trials involving selective and multikinase FGFR inhibitors in lung cancer treatment.

  12. Prostate cancer heterogeneity: Discovering novel molecular targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Massari, Francesco; Iacovelli, Roberto; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Di Nunno, Vincenzo; Giunchi, Francesca; Brunelli, Matteo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) shows a broad spectrum of biological and clinical behavior, which represents the epiphenomenon of an extreme genetic heterogeneity. Recent genomic profiling studies have deeply improved the knowledge of the genomic landscape of localized and metastatic PCa. The AR and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways are the two most frequently altered, representing therefore interestingly targets for therapy. Moreover, somatic or germline aberrations of DNA repair genes (DRGs) have been observed at high frequency, supporting the potential role of platinum derivatives and PARP inhibitors as effective therapeutic strategies. In the future, the identification of driver mutations present at a specific stage of the disease, the classification PCa based on specific molecular alterations, and the selection of the most appropriate therapy based on biomarkers predictors of response represent the foundations for an increasingly more accurate personalized medicine.

  13. The necessity of nuclear reactors for targeted radionuclide therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijger, Gerard C; Ponsard, Bernard; Harfensteller, Mark; Wolterbeek, Hubert T; Nijsen, Johannes W F

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine has been contributing towards personalized therapies. Nuclear reactors are required for the working horses of both diagnosis and treatment, i.e., Tc-99m and I-131. In fact, reactors will remain necessary to fulfill the demand for a variety of radionuclides and are essential in the expanding field of targeted radionuclide therapies for cancer. However, the main reactors involved in the global supply are ageing and expected to shut down before 2025. Therefore, the fields of (nuclear) medicine, nuclear industry and politics share a global responsibility, faced with the task to secure future access to suitable nuclear reactors. At the same time, alternative production routes should be industrialized. For this, a coordinating entity should be put into place.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONFORMAL RADIATION THERAPY FOR LOCALLY RECURRENT NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Xiao-kang

    2001-01-01

    nasopharyngeal carcinomas [J]. Laryngoscope 1999; 109:805.[12]Zheng XK, Chen LH, Xu ZX, et al. The advantages of stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma [J]. Chin J Cancer 1999; 18:596.[13]International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements. Prescribing Recording and Reporting Photons Beam Therapy [R]. ICRU Report No. 50, 1992;[14]Gong QY, Zheng GL, Zhu HY. MRI differentiation of recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma from postradiation fibrosis [J]. Comput Med Imaging Graph 1991; 15:422.[15]Zhang XK, Chen LH, Xu YL, et al. Quality assure of thermoplastic immobilization for 3-\\d CTR [J]. Chin J Cancer 2001; 20:553.

  15. Exploring targeted therapy of osteosarcoma using proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiyawat P

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Parunya Chaiyawat,1 Jongkolnee Settakorn,2 Apiruk Sangsin,1 Pimpisa Teeyakasem,1 Jeerawan Klangjorhor,1 Aungsumalee Soongkhaw,2 Dumnoensun Pruksakorn1,3 1Orthopedic Laboratory and Research Netting Center, Department of Orthopedics, 2Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, 3Excellence Center in Osteology Research and Training Center, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Abstract: Despite multimodal therapeutic treatments of osteosarcoma (OS, some patients develop resistance to currently available regimens and eventually end up with recurrent or metastatic outcomes. Many attempts have been made to discover effective drugs for improving outcome; however, due to the heterogeneity of the disease, new therapeutic options have not yet been identified. This study aims to explore potential targeted therapy related to protein profiles of OS. In this review of proteomics studies, we extracted data on differentially expressed proteins (DEPs from archived literature in PubMed and our in-house repository. The data were divided into three experimental groups, DEPs in 1 OS/OB: OS vs osteoblastic (OB cells, 2 metastasis: metastatic vs non-metastatic sublines plus fresh tissues from primary OS with and without pulmonary metastasis, and 3 chemoresistance: spheroid (higher chemoresistance vs monolayer cells plus fresh tissues from biopsies from good and poor responders. All up-regulated protein entities in the list of DEPs were sorted and cross-referenced with identifiers of targets of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved agents and chemical inhibitors. We found that many targets of FDA-approved antineoplastic agents, mainly a group of epigenetic regulators, kinases, and proteasomes, were highly expressed in OS cells. Additionally, some overexpressed proteins were targets of FDA-approved non-cancer drugs, including immunosuppressive and antiarrhythmic drugs. The resulting list of chemical agents showed that some transferase enzyme inhibitors

  16. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Siwen Li,1,* Song Feng,1,* Li Ding,1 Yuxi Liu,1 Qiuyun Zhu,1 Zhiyu Qian,2 Yueqing Gu1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, China Pharmaceutical University, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Automation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation

  17. Exploring targeted therapy of osteosarcoma using proteomics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyawat, Parunya; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Sangsin, Apiruk; Teeyakasem, Pimpisa; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Soongkhaw, Aungsumalee; Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun

    2017-01-01

    Despite multimodal therapeutic treatments of osteosarcoma (OS), some patients develop resistance to currently available regimens and eventually end up with recurrent or metastatic outcomes. Many attempts have been made to discover effective drugs for improving outcome; however, due to the heterogeneity of the disease, new therapeutic options have not yet been identified. This study aims to explore potential targeted therapy related to protein profiles of OS. In this review of proteomics studies, we extracted data on differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) from archived literature in PubMed and our in-house repository. The data were divided into three experimental groups, DEPs in 1) OS/OB: OS vs osteoblastic (OB) cells, 2) metastasis: metastatic vs non-metastatic sublines plus fresh tissues from primary OS with and without pulmonary metastasis, and 3) chemoresistance: spheroid (higher chemoresistance) vs monolayer cells plus fresh tissues from biopsies from good and poor responders. All up-regulated protein entities in the list of DEPs were sorted and cross-referenced with identifiers of targets of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved agents and chemical inhibitors. We found that many targets of FDA-approved antineoplastic agents, mainly a group of epigenetic regulators, kinases, and proteasomes, were highly expressed in OS cells. Additionally, some overexpressed proteins were targets of FDA-approved non-cancer drugs, including immunosuppressive and antiarrhythmic drugs. The resulting list of chemical agents showed that some transferase enzyme inhibitors might have anticancer activity. We also explored common targets of OS/OB and metastasis groups, including amidophosphoribosyltransferase (PPAT), l-lactate dehydrogenase B chain (LDHB), and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as well as the common target of all categories, cathepsin D (CTSD). This study demonstrates the benefits of a text mining approach to exploring therapeutic targets related to protein expression

  18. Unidimensional Measurement May Evaluate Target Lymph Nodal Response After Induction Chemotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanben; Zhang, Mingwei; Xu, Yuanji; Yue, Qiuyuan; Bai, Penggang; Zhou, Lin; Xiao, Youping; Zheng, Dechun; Lin, Kongqi; Qiu, Sufang; Chen, Yunbin; Pan, Jianji

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether short axis and long axis on axial and coronal magnetic resonance imaging planes would reflect the tumor burden or alteration in size after induction chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Patients with pathologically confirmed nasopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 37) with at least 1 positive cervical lymph node (axial short axis ≥15 mm) were consecutively enrolled in this prospective study. Lymph nodal measurements were performed along its short axis and long axis in both axial and coronal magnetic resonance imaging planes at diagnosis and after 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy. In addition, lymph nodal volumes were automatically calculated in 3D treatment-planning system, which were used as reference standard. Student's t test or nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the continuous quantitative variables. Meanwhile, the κ statistic and McNemar's test were used to evaluate the degree of agreement and discordance in response categorization among different measurements. Axial short axis was significantly associated with volumes at diagnosis (P unidimensional measurements to assess tumor response, coronal short-axis showed the best concordance (κ=0.792) to the volumes. Axial short axis may effectively reflect tumor burden or change in tumor size in the assessment of target lymph nodal response after induction chemotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. However, it should be noted that axial short axis may amplify the therapeutic response. In addition, the role of coronal short axis in the assessment of tumor response needs further evaluation.

  19. Targeting increased copper levels in diethylnitrosamine induced hepatocellular carcinoma cells in rats by epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Mohd; Rizvi, Asim; Naseem, Imrana; Hadi, S M; Ahmad, Aamir

    2015-11-01

    We have earlier elucidated a pathway for the anticancer action of plant polyphenolic compounds against malignant cells involving mobilisation of endogenous copper ions and the consequent prooxidant action. To further confirm our hypothesis in vivo, we induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats by diethylnitrosamine (DEN). We show that in such carcinoma cells, there is a progressive elevation in copper levels at various intervals after DEN administration. Concurrently with increasing copper levels, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG; a potent anticancer plant polyphenol found in green tea) mediated DNA breakage in malignant cells is also increased. The cell membrane permeable copper chelator neocuproine inhibited the EGCG-mediated cellular DNA degradation, whereas the membrane impermeable chelator bathocuproine was ineffective. Iron and zinc specific chelators desferoxamine mesylate and histidine, respectively, were also ineffective in inhibiting EGCG mediated DNA breakage. Through the use of specific scavengers, the mechanism of DNA breakage was determined to be mediated by reactive oxygen species. In summary, we provide an in vivo evidence of accumulating copper in hepatocellular carcinoma that is targeted by EGCG, leading to its anticancer role in a prooxidant manner. Our findings confirm a novel mechanism of anticancer activity of EGCG in particular and plant derived nutraceuticals in general.

  20. Overcoming sorafenib evasion in hepatocellular carcinoma using CXCR4-targeted nanoparticles to co-deliver MEK-inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunching; Liu, Ya-Chi; Sung, Yun-Chieh; Ramjiawan, Rakesh R.; Lin, Ts-Ting; Chang, Chih-Chun; Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Chang, Chiung-Fang; Liu, Chun-Hung; Gao, Dong-Yu; Hsu, Fu-Fei; Duyverman, Annique M.; Kitahara, Shuji; Huang, Peigen; Dima, Simona; Popescu, Irinel; Flaherty, Keith T.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Jain, Rakesh K.; Benes, Cyril H.; Duda, Dan G.

    2017-01-01

    Sorafenib is a RAF inhibitor approved for several cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Inhibition of RAF kinases can induce a dose-dependent “paradoxical” upregulation of the downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in cancer cells. It is unknown whether “paradoxical” ERK activation occurs after sorafenib therapy in HCC, and if so, if it impacts the therapeutic efficacy. Here, we demonstrate that RAF inhibition by sorafenib rapidly leads to RAF dimerization and ERK activation in HCCs, which contributes to treatment evasion. The transactivation of RAF dimers and ERK signaling promotes HCC cell survival, prevents apoptosis via downregulation of BIM and achieves immunosuppression by MAPK/NF-kB-dependent activation of PD-L1 gene expression. To overcome treatment evasion and reduce systemic effects, we developed CXCR4-targeted nanoparticles to co-deliver sorafenib with the MEK inhibitor AZD6244 in HCC. Using this approach, we preferentially and efficiently inactivated RAF/ERK, upregulated BIM and down-regulated PD-L1 expression in HCC, and facilitated intra-tumoral infiltration of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. These effects resulted in a profound delay in tumor growth. Thus, this nano-delivery strategy to selectively target tumors and prevent the paradoxical ERK activation could increase the feasibility of dual RAF/MEK inhibition to overcome sorafenib treatment escape in HCC. PMID:28276530

  1. A dual specificity kinase, DYRK1A, as a potential therapeutic target for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raja, Remya; Sathe, Gajanan; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Jain, Ankit P.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Balaji, Sai A.; Chavan, Sandip; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Mathur, Premendu P.; Kumar, Mahesh M.; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Santosh, Vani; Sukumar, Geethanjali; Califano, Joseph A.; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Sidransky, David; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in clinical management, 5-year survival rate in patients with late-stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not improved significantly over the past decade. Targeted therapies have emerged as one of the most promising approaches to treat several malignancies. Though tyrosine phosphorylation accounts for a minority of total phosphorylation, it is critical for activation of signaling pathways and plays a significant role in driving cancers. To identify activated tyrosine kinase signaling pathways in HNSCC, we compared the phosphotyrosine profiles of a panel of HNSCC cell lines to a normal oral keratinocyte cell line. Dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) was one of the kinases hyperphosphorylated at Tyr-321 in all HNSCC cell lines. Inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in an increased apoptosis and decrease in invasion and colony formation ability of HNSCC cell lines. Further, administration of the small molecular inhibitor against DYRK1A in mice bearing HNSCC xenograft tumors induced regression of tumor growth. Immunohistochemical labeling of DYRK1A in primary tumor tissues using tissue microarrays revealed strong to moderate staining of DYRK1A in 97.5% (39/40) of HNSCC tissues analyzed. Taken together our results suggest that DYRK1A could be a novel therapeutic target in HNSCC. PMID:27796319

  2. Research progress of gene target therapy for refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-hua TANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the strategies of gene therapy for the treatment of refractory epilepsy (RE mainly include modulating neurotransmitter systems, neuropeptide Y (NPY and neurotrophic factors. Among them, the hot target spots include γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and its receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and its receptor, galanin, NPY and neurotrophic factors. This paper reviews the chief research results, and advantages and disadvantages of studies, and provides evidence for the treatment of refractory epilepsy. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.12.004

  3. Histone lysine demethylases as targets for anticancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Agger, Karl; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that the genes controlling the epigenetic programmes that are required for maintaining chromatin structure and cell identity include genes that drive human cancer. This observation has led to an increased awareness of chromatin-associated proteins as potentially...... interesting drug targets. The successful introduction of DNA methylation and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for the treatment of specific subtypes of cancer has paved the way for the use of epigenetic therapy. Here, we highlight key biological findings demonstrating the roles of members of the histone...

  4. Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to develop novel therapies for HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, R K; Burgener, A; Klatt, N R

    2015-10-01

    Despite the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which delays and/or prevents AIDS pathogenesis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals continue to face increased morbidities and mortality rates compared with uninfected individuals. Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal dysfunction is a key feature of HIV infection, and is associated with mortality. In this study, we review current knowledge about mucosal dysfunction in HIV infection, and describe potential avenues for therapeutic targets to enhance mucosal function and decrease morbidities and mortalities in HIV-infected individuals.

  5. Radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients ineligible for surgery or ablative treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P.M.; Chung, N.N.; Chang, F.L. [Cheng-Ching General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hsu, W.C. [Cheng-Ching General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Asia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Healthcare Administration; Fogliata, A.; Cozzi, L. [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this article is to report the dosimetric and clinical findings in the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT, RapidArc). A total of 138 patients were investigated. Dose prescription ranged from 45-66 Gy. Most patients (88.4 %) presented AJCC stage III or IV and 83 % were N0-M0. All were classified as Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage A-C. All patients were treated using 10 MV photons with single or multiple, coplanar or non-coplanar arcs, and cone-down technique in case of early response of tumors. The patients' median age was 66 years (range 27-87 years), 83 % were treated with 60 Gy (12 % at 45 Gy, 6 % at 66 Gy), 62 % with cone-down, 98 % with multiple arcs. The mean initial planning target volume (PTV) was 777 {+-} 632 cm{sup 3}; the mean final PTV (after the cone-down) was 583 {+-} 548 cm{sup 3}. High target coverage was achieved. The final PTV was V{sub 98%} > 98 %. Kidneys received on average 5 and 8 Gy (left and right), while the maximum dose to the spinal cord was 22 Gy; mean doses to esophagus and stomach were 23 Gy and 15 Gy, respectively. The average volume of healthy liver receiving more than 30 Gy was 294 {+-} 145 cm{sup 3}. Overall survival at 12 months was 45 %; median survival was 10.3 months (95 % confidence interval 7.2-13.3 months). Actuarial local control at 6 months was 95 % and 93.7 % at 12 months. The median follow-up was 9 months and a maximum of 28 months. This study showed from the dosimetric point of view the feasibility and technical appropriateness of RapidArc for the treatment of HCC. Clinical results were positive and might suggest, with appropriate care, to consider RapidArc as an additional therapeutic opportunity for these patients. (orig.)

  6. Dosimetry for 125I radioactive seed implantation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Lü; Xiufeng Cao

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy. Early lesions respond well to hepatic resection or liver transplantation.However, only a few of HCC patients are suitable for surgical intervention. External beam radiation and chemotherapy is poorly efficacious.In the last 20 years, HCCs belonging to the radiosensitive tumor group has been confirmed. Along with the development of new radiotherapy technology and facilities, the research about brachytherapy(especially 125I seed implantation therapy) has provoked more interests in the world. Radioactive seed implantation therapy is a form of interstitial brachytherapy, with the property of local "conformal radiotherapy" and the advantages of minimal invasion, convenience, high performance, and minimal adverse effects. It is a promising therapy for HCC, however the dosimetry hasn't yet been identified and lacks verification in prospective research. This report aims to further explore the best prescription dose and radioactivity for 125I interstitial implantation brachytherapy for HCC.

  7. Zinc phthalocyanine-conjugated with bovine serum albumin mediated photodynamic therapy of human larynx carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E. P. O.; Santos, E. D.; Gonçalves, C. S.; Cardoso, M. A. G.; Soares, C. P.; Beltrame, M., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    Phthalocyanines, which are classified as second-generation photosensitizers, have advantageous photophysical properties, and extensive studies have demonstrated their potential applications in photodynamic therapy. The present work describes the preparation of a new zinc phthalocyanine conjugated to bovine serum albumin (compound 4a) and its photodynamic efficiency in human larynx-carcinoma cells (HEp-2 cells). The unconjugated precursor (compound 4) was also studied. Compounds 4 and 4a penetrated efficiently into the cell, exhibiting cytoplasmic localization, and showed no cytotoxicity in the dark. However, high photodynamic activities were observed in HEp-2 cells after treatments with 5 µM photosensitizers and 4.5 J cm-2 light. These conditions were sufficient to decrease the cell viability to 57.93% and 32.75% for compounds 4 and 4a, respectively. The present results demonstrated high photodynamic efficiency of zinc phthalocyanine conjugated with bovine serum albumin in destroying the larynx-carcinoma cells.

  8. Targeting ryanodine receptors for anti-arrhythmic therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark D McCAULEY; Xander H T WEHRENS

    2011-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic drugs are a group of pharmaceuticals that suppress or prevent abnormal heart rhythms, which are often associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Current antiarrhythmic drugs that typically target plasma membrane ion channels have limited clinical success and in some cases have been described as being pro-arrhythmic. However, recent studies suggest that pathological release of calcium (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2) could represent a promising target for antiarrhythmic therapy. Diastolic SR Ca2+ release has been linked to arrhythmogenesis in both the inherited arrhythmia synSeveral classes of pharmaceuticals have been shown to reduce abnormal RyR2 activity and may confer protection against triggered arrhythmias through reduction of SR Ca2+ leak. In this review, we will evaluate the current pharmacological methods for stabilizing RyR2 and suggest treatment modalities based on current evidence of molecular mechanisms.

  9. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Enrico; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Faraj, Sheila; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Hicks, Jessica; Meeker, Alan; Nonomura, Norio; Netto, George J

    2013-12-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) accounts for 5% to 10% of all urothelial carcinomas. Despite many shared features, key clinical and molecular genetic differences between upper tract and bladder urothelial carcinomas are becoming apparent. We have previously demonstrated alterations of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in bladder carcinoma with a potential impact on biological behavior. In the current study, we evaluated the expression status and prognostic significance of mTOR pathway members in UTUC. Archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues from 99 primary UTUCs were retrieved from one of the authors' institution. Tissue microarrays were constructed with triplicate tumor samples and paired nonneoplastic urothelium. Tissue microarrays were analyzed using immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway members: PTEN, phos-AKT, phos-mTOR, phos-S6, phos-4EBP1, and related markers p27 and c-MYC; correlation with clinicopathologic parameters and outcome was performed. We found significantly lower expression of PTEN, phos-AKT, phos-mTOR, phos-S6, phos-4EBP1, p27, and c-MYC in UTUC compared with paired benign urothelium (P < .0005). We found a strong positive correlation between PTEN and phos-AKT. Moderate correlation was observed between phos-mTOR and phos-S6, PTEN and p27, phos-AKT and p27, phos-S6 and p27, phos-mTOR and c-MYC, phos-S6 and c-MYC, and p27 and c-MYC. None of the evaluated biomarkers were associated with increased hazard ratios for tumor recurrence or for cancer-specific mortality, when adjusting for relevant clinicopathologic variables. Dysregulation of the mTOR pathway was observed in UTUC compared with normal urothelium, implicating a potential pathogenic role in tumor development. In our cohort, expression of the evaluated biomarkers had no prognostic value.

  10. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavroudi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The grim statistics speak for themselves with reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem guided gene therapy. Stem cells have the unique potential for self-renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for therapeutic use of stem cells is their cancerous transformation. Therefore, we

  11. Alpha-fetoprotein before and after pegylated interferon therapy for predicting hepatocellular carcinoma development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuto; Takeuchi; Fusao; Ikeda; Toshiya; Osawa; Yasuyuki; Araki; Kouichi; Takaguchi; Youichi; Morimoto; Noriaki; Hashimoto; Kousaku; Sakaguchi; Tatsuro; Sakata; Masaharu; Ando; Yasuhiro; Makino; Shuji; Matsumura; Hiroki; Takayama; Hiroyuki; Seki; Shintarou; Nanba; Yuki; Moritou; Tetsuya; Yasunaka; Hideki; Ohnishi; Akinobu; Takaki; Kazuhiro; Nouso; Yoshiaki; Iwasaki; Kazuhide; Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate factors that accurately predict hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) development after antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C(CHC) patients. METHODS: CHC patients who received pegylated interferon and ribavirin were enrolled in this cohort study that investigated the ability of alpha-fetoprotein(AFP) to predict HCC development after interferon(IFN) therapy. RESULTS: Of 1255 patients enrolled, 665 developed sustained virological response(SVR) during mean follow-up period of 5.4 years. HCC was occurred in 89 patients, and 20 SVR patients were included. Proportional hazard models showed that HCC occurred in SVR patients showing AFP ≥ 5 ng/m L before therapy and in non-SVR patients showing AFP ≥ 5 ng/m L before and 1 year after therapy besides older age, and low platelet counts. SVR patients showing AFP ≥ 5 ng/m L before therapy and no decrease in AFP to < 5 ng/m L 1 year after therapy had significantly higher HCC incidence than non-SVR patients showing AFP ≥ 5 ng/m L before therapy and decreased AFP(P = 0.043). AFP ≥ 5 ng/m L before therapy was significantly associated with low platelet counts and high values of alanine aminotransferase(ALT) in stepwise logistic regression analysis. After age, gender, platelet count, and ALT was matched by propensity score, significantly lower HCC incidence was shown in SVR patients showing AFP < 5 ng/m L before therapy than in those showing AFP ≥ 5 ng/m L.CONCLUSION: The criteria of AFP < 5 ng/m L before and 1 year after IFN therapy is a benefical predictor for HCC development in CHC patients.

  12. WJH 6th Anniversary Special Issues(2): Hepatocellular carcinoma Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    René; E; Ashworth; Jennifer; Wu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. It is associated with a poor prognosis and has limited treatment options. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only available systemic agent for treatment of HCC that improves overall survival for patients with advanced stage disease; unfortunately, an effective second-line agent for the treatment of progressive or sorafenib-resistant HCC has yet to be identified. This review focuses on components of the mammalian target of rapamycin(mTOR) pathway, its role in HCC pathogenesis, and dual mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic option with potential efficacy in advanced HCC. There are several important upstream and downstream signals in the mTOR pathway, and alternative tumor-promoting pathways are known to exist beyond mTORC1 inhibition in HCC. This review analyzes the relationships of the upstream and downstream regulators of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling; it also provides a comprehensive global picture of the interaction between mTORC1 and mTORC2 which demonstrates the pre-clinical relevance of the mTOR pathway in HCC pathogenesis and progression. Finally, it provides scientific rationale for dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibition in the treatment of HCC. Clinical trials utilizing mTORC1 inhibitors and dual mTOR inhibitors in HCC are discussed as well. The mTOR pathway is comprised of two main components, mTORC1 and mTORC2; each has a unique role in the pathogenesis and progression of HCC. In phase Ⅲ studies, mTORC1 inhibitors demonstrate anti-tumor ac-tivity in advanced HCC, but dual mTOR(mTORC1 and mTORC2) inhibition has greater therapeutic potential in HCC treatment which warrants further clinical investigation.

  13. Clinical study on the changes of the tumor target volume and organs at risk in helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Na; FENG Lin-chun; CAI Bo-ning; HOU Jun; WANG Yun-lai; XIE Chuan-bin

    2012-01-01

    Background Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the target volume and organs at risk (OARs) of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) during helical tomotherapy.Methods Forty-three patients with NPC and treated via HT from March 2008 to January 2010 were reviewed retrospectively.Repeated CT scanning and plan adaptation were conducted at the 20th fraction during radiotherapy.The volumetric differences between the two scans were evaluated for nasopharyngeal tumor and retro- pharyngeal lymph nodes (GTVnx),neck lymph nodes (GTVnd),and parotid glands,as well as the axial diameter of the head.Results The median interval between the two scans was 25 days (23-28 days).The volumetric decrease in GTVnx was 30.1% (median,29.8%) and in GTVnd 41.6% (median,45.9%).The variation in the GTVnd volume was correlated with the weight loss of the patient.The volume of the left parotid gland decreased by 35.5% (median,33.4%) and of the right parotid glands decreased by 36.8% (median,33.5%).The axial diameter of the head decreased by 9.39% (median,9.1%).Conclusions The target volume and OARs of patients with NPC varied considerably during HT.These changes may have potential dosimetric effects on the target volume and/or OARs and influence the clinical outcome.Repeated CT scanning and replanning during the HT for NPC patients with a large target volume or an obvious weight loss are recommended.

  14. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

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    Vyshak Alva Venur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6 pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%–30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways.

  15. Malignant Cardiac Tamponade from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Case Series from the Era of Molecular Targeted Therapy

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    Bob T. Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tamponade complicating malignant pericardial effusion from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is generally associated with extremely poor prognosis. With improved systemic chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy for NSCLC in recent years, the prognosis of such patients and the value of invasive cardiothoracic surgery in this setting have not been adequately examined. We report outcomes from a contemporary case series of eight patients who presented with malignant cardiac tamponade due to NSCLC to an Australian academic medical institution over an 18 months period. Two cases of cardiac tamponade were de novo presentations of NSCLC and six cases were presentations following previous therapy for NSCLC. The median survival was 4.5 months with a range between 9 days to alive beyond 17 months. The two longest survivors are still receiving active therapy at 17 and 15 months after invasive surgical pericardial window respectively. One survivor had a histological subtype of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and the other received targeted therapy for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation. These results support the consideration of active surgical palliation to treating this oncological emergency complicating NSCLC, including the use of urgent drainage, surgical creation of pericardial window followed by appropriate systemic therapy in suitably fit patients.

  16. Dual drug loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Singh, Abhalaxmi; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2010-05-01

    The primary inadequacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is their relative non-specificity and potential side effects to the healthy tissues. To overcome this, drug loaded multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles are conceptualized. We report here an aqueous based formulation of glycerol monooleate coated magnetic nanoparticles (GMO-MNPs) devoid of any surfactant capable of carrying high payload hydrophobic anticancer drugs. The biocompatibility was confirmed by tumor necrosis factor alpha assay, confocal microscopy. High entrapment efficiency approximately 95% and sustained release of encapsulated drugs for more than two weeks under in vitro conditions was achieved for different anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, rapamycin, alone or combination). Drug loaded GMO-MNPs did not affect the magnetization properties of the iron oxide core as confirmed by magnetization study. Additionally the MNPs were functionalized with carboxylic groups by coating with DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic acid) for the supplementary conjugation of amines. For targeted therapy, HER2 antibody was conjugated to GMO-MNPs and showed enhanced uptake in human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The IC(50) doses revealed potential antiproliferative effect in MCF-7. Therefore, antibody conjugated GMO-MNPs could be used as potential drug carrier for the active therapeutic aspects in cancer therapy.

  17. Targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy

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    Xiang-Hong Peng

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Hong Peng1,4, Ximei Qian2,4, Hui Mao3,4, Andrew Y Wang5, Zhuo (Georgia Chen1,4, Shuming Nie2,4, Dong M Shin1,4*1Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering; 3Department of Radiology; 4Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Ocean Nanotech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR, USAAbstract: Magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles with a long blood retention time, biodegradability and low toxicity have emerged as one of the primary nanomaterials for biomedical applications in vitro and in vivo. IO nanoparticles have a large surface area and can be engineered to provide a large number of functional groups for cross-linking to tumor-targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules for diagnostic imaging or delivery of therapeutic agents. IO nanoparticles possess unique paramagnetic properties, which generate significant susceptibility effects resulting in strong T2 and T*2 contrast, as well as T1 effects at very low concentrations for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which is widely used for clinical oncology imaging. We review recent advances in the development of targeted IO nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy.Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, tumor imaging, MRI, therapy

  18. Coupled cellular therapy and magnetic targeting for airway regeneration.

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    Ordidge, Katherine L; Gregori, Maria; Kalber, Tammy L; Lythgoe, Mark F; Janes, Sam M; Giangreco, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Airway diseases including COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), cystic fibrosis and lung cancer are leading causes of worldwide morbidity and mortality, with annual healthcare costs of billions of pounds. True regeneration of damaged airways offers the possibility of restoring lung function and protecting against airway transformation. Recently, advances in tissue engineering have allowed the development of cadaveric and biosynthetic airway grafts. Although these have produced encouraging results, the ability to achieve long-term functional airway regeneration remains a major challenge. To promote regeneration, exogenously delivered stem and progenitor cells are being trialled as cellular therapies. Unfortunately, current evidence suggests that only small numbers of exogenously delivered stem cells engraft within lungs, thereby limiting their utility for airway repair. In other organ systems, magnetic targeting has shown promise for improving long-term robust cell engraftment. This technique involves in vitro cell expansion, magnetic actuation and magnetically guided cell engraftment to sites of tissue damage. In the present paper, we discuss the utility of coupling stem cell-mediated cellular therapy with magnetic targeting for improving airway regeneration.

  19. Liver-targeted gene therapy: Approaches and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N; Belcher, John D; Steer, Clifford J

    2015-06-01

    The liver plays a major role in many inherited and acquired genetic disorders. It is also the site for the treatment of certain inborn errors of metabolism that do not directly cause injury to the liver. The advancement of nucleic acid-based therapies for liver maladies has been severely limited because of the myriad untoward side effects and methodological limitations. To address these issues, research efforts in recent years have been intensified toward the development of targeted gene approaches using novel genetic tools, such as zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats as well as various nonviral vectors such as Sleeping Beauty transposons, PiggyBac transposons, and PhiC31 integrase. Although each of these methods uses a distinct mechanism of gene modification, all of them are dependent on the efficient delivery of DNA and RNA molecules into the cell. This review provides an overview of current and emerging therapeutic strategies for liver-targeted gene therapy and gene repair.

  20. Apoptosis as a target for gene therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

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    Gabriel Adrián Rabinovich

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints resulting from hyperplasia of synovial fibroblasts and infiltration of lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells, all of which manifest signs of activation. All these cells proliferate abnormally, invade bone and cartilage, produce an elevated amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines, metalloproteinases and trigger osteoclast formation and activation. Some of the pathophysiological consequences of the disease may be explained by the inadequate apoptosis, which may promote the survival of autoreactive T cells, macrophages or synovial fibroblasts. Although RA does not result from single genetic mutations, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms implicated in joint destruction has revealed novel targets for gene therapy. Gene transfer strategies include inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, blockade of cartilage-degrading metalloproteinases, inhibition of synovial cell activation and manipulation of the Th1-Th2 cytokine balance. Recent findings have iluminated the idea that induction of apoptosis in the rheumatoid joint can be also used to gain therapeutic advantage in the disease. In the present review we will discuss different strategies used for gene transfer in RA and chronic inflammation. Particularly, we will highlight the importance of programmed cell death as a novel target for gene therapy using endogenous biological mediators, such as galectin-1, a beta-galactoside-binding protein that induces apoptosis of activated T cells and immature thymocytes.

  1. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  2. Factor XI and contact activation as targets for antithrombotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailani, D; Bane, C E; Gruber, A

    2015-08-01

    The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa (FXa) or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and FX. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on FXII, the zymogen of a protease (FXIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces, and FXI, the zymogen of the protease FXIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of FXI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of FXI may be more effective than low molecular weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here, we review data on the role of FXI and FXII in thrombosis and results of preclinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins.

  3. Specifically targeted antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects 180 million people worldwide with the predominant prevalence being infection with genotype 1, followed by genotypes 2 and 3. Standard anti-HCV therapy currently aims to enhance natural immune responses to the virus, whereas new therapeutic concepts directly target HCV RNA and viral enzymes or influence host-virus interactions. Novel treatment options now in development are focused on inhibitors of HCV-specific enzymes, NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase.These agents acting in concert represent the concept of specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C).STAT-C is an attractive strategy in which the main goal is to increase the effectiveness of antiviral responses across all genotypes, with shorter treatment duration and better tolerability. However, the emergence of resistant mutations that limit the use of these compounds in monotherapy complicates the regimens. Thus, a predictable scenario for HCV treatment in the future will be combinations of drugs with distinct mechanisms of action. For now, it seems that interferon will remain a fundamental component of any new anti-HCV therapeutic regimens in the near future;therefore, there is pressure to develop forms of interferon that are more effective, less toxic, and more convenient than pegylated interferon.

  4. c-MET receptor tyrosine kinase as a molecular target in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Granito A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Granito,1 Elena Guidetti,1 Laura Gramantieri2,3 1Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 2Dipartimento dell'Apparato Digerente, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 3Centro di Ricerca Biomedica Applicata (CRBA, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico S Orsola-Malpighi e Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy Abstract: c-MET is the membrane receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor or tumor cytotoxic factor, a mitogenic growth factor for hepatocytes. HGF is mainly produced by cells of mesenchymal origin and it mainly acts on neighboring epidermal and endothelial cells, regulating epithelial growth and morphogenesis. HGF/MET signaling has been identified among the drivers of tumorigenesis in human cancers. As such, c-MET is a recognized druggable target, and against it, targeted agents are currently under clinical investigation. c-MET overexpression is a common event in a wide range of human malignancies, including gastric, lung, breast, ovary, colon, kidney, thyroid, and liver carcinomas. Despite c-MET overexpression being reported by a large majority of studies, no evidence for a c-MET oncogenic addiction exists in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In particular, c-MET amplification is a rare event, accounting for 4%–5% of cases while no mutation has been identified in c-MET oncogene in HCC. Thus, the selection of patient subgroups more likely to benefit from c-MET inhibition is challenging. Notwithstanding, c-MET overexpression was reported to be associated with increased metastatic potential and poor prognosis in patients with HCC, providing a rationale for its therapeutic inhibition. Here we summarize the role of activated HGF/MET signaling in HCC, its prognostic relevance, and the implications for therapeutic approaches in HCC. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, c-MET, clinical trials

  5. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

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    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  6. Targeted therapy of bronchitis in obstructive airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Angira; Neighbour, Helen; Nair, Parameswaran

    2013-12-01

    Guidelines for the management of obstructive airway diseases do not emphasize the measurement of bronchitis to indicate appropriate treatments or monitor response to treatment. Bronchitis is the central component of airway diseases and contributes to symptoms, physiological and structural abnormalities. It can be measured directly and reliably by quantitative assay of spontaneous or induced sputum. The measurement is reproducible, valid, and responsive to treatment and to changes in disease status. Bronchitis may be eosinophilic, neutrophilic, mixed, or paucigranulocytic (eosinophils and neutrophils not elevated). Eosinophilic bronchitis is usually a Th2 driven process and therefore a sputum eosinophilia of greater than 3% usually indicates a response to treatment with corticosteroids or novel therapies directed against Th2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. Neutrophilic bronchitis which is a non-Th2 driven disease is generally a predictor of response to antibiotics and may be a predictor to therapies targeted at pathways that lead to neutrophil recruitment such as IL-8 (eg anti-CXCR2), IL-17 (eg anti-IL17) etc. Paucigranulocytic disease may not warrant anti-inflammatory therapy. Several novel monoclonals and small molecule antagonists have been evaluated in clinical trials with variable results and several more are likely to be discovered in the near future. The success of these agents will depend on appropriate patient selection by accurate phenotyping or characterization of bronchitis.

  7. Photodynamic therapy combined with distant gamma-ray therapy in the patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the skin

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    V. L. Filinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of clinical follow-up of the patient with squamous cell skin carcinoma of the nasal dorsum are represented. The patient underwent a course of combined photodynamic therapy (PDT with distant gamma-ray therapy. Distant gamma-ray therapy was performed daily during 12 days (single dose of 3 Gy, total dose of 36 Gy with the first session 24 h after injection of the photosensitization. For PDT the photosensitizer photosens at dose of 0,3 mg/kg was used. The method of prolonged PDT was applied, sessions of laser irradiation were performed daily during 7 days. The PDT sessions were carried out 2 h after session of gamma-ray therapy using distant (150 J/cm2, 40 mW/cm2 and contact (500 J/cm2, 100 mW/cm2 modalities. According to multiple cytological studies after treatment there were no signs of tumor, but inflammation. Four months after treatment according to cytological data continued tumor growth was detected. The patient underwent an additional course of PDT. Currently the patient is under follow-up: no recurrence during 8 months after repeated treatment. 

  8. Novel epigenetic target therapy for prostate cancer: a preclinical study.

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    Ilaria Naldi

    Full Text Available Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine, hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap and hormone refractory (DU145 prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs drug delivery system (DDS carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours.

  9. Radiation therapy for the treatment of feline advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma; A utilizacao da radioterapia no tratamento do carcinoma de celulas escamosas cutaneo felino avancado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, S.C.S.; Corgozinho, K.B.; Ferreira, A.M.R, E-mail: simonecsc@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, L.A.V. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Holguin, P.G.

    2014-02-15

    The efficacy of radiation therapy for feline advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. A full course radiation therapy protocol was applied to six cats showing single or multiple facial squamous cell carcinomas, in a total of seven histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Of the lesions, one was staged as T{sub 1}, and six as T{sub 4} according to WHO staging system of epidermal tumors. The animals were submitted to twelve radiation fractions of 4 Gy each, on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule, and the equipment used was an orthovoltage unit. Energy used was 120 kV, 15 mA and 2 mm aluminum filter. The cats were evaluated during the treatment and 30 and 60 days after the end of the radiation therapy. In this study, 87% of the lesions had complete remission and 13% partial remission to the treatment. Side effects were considered mild according to Veterinary Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Toxicity criteria, and included erythema, epilation and rhinitis. Radiation Therapy was considered safe for feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, leading to mild side effects and can represent a good therapeutic option. (author)

  10. Potential clinical insights into microRNAs and their target genes in esophageal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su Q; Wang, He M; Cao, Xiu F

    2011-12-01

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) are characterized by dysregulation of microRNAs, which play an important roles as a posttranscriptional regulators in protein synthesis, and are involved in cellular processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Recently, altered miRNAs expression has been comprehensively studied in EC by high-throughput technology. Increased understanding of miRNAs target genes and their potential regulatory mechanisms have clarified the miRNAs activities and may provide exciting opportunities for cancer diagnosis and miRNA-based genetherapy. Here, we reviewed the most recently discovered miRNA target genes, with particular emphasis on the deciphering of their possible mechanisms and the potential roles in miRNAs-based tumour therapeutics.

  11. Targeted treatment of head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma: potential of lapatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi MD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitul D Gandhi, Mark Agulnik Division of Hematology and Oncology, Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck is a heterogeneous malignancy with treatment predicated on a multimodality therapy involving surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. However, this approach results in durable responses in only a subset of patients, and is associated with significant toxicity. In advanced disease, multi-agent platinum-based chemotherapy produces only modest improvements in survival. Increased insight into tumor biology has demonstrated several critical oncogenic pathways offering prospects for targeted therapy that may improve upon the existing treatment strategies. The epidermal growth factor receptor is one such target, and directed therapy with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab has been extensively studied. Lapatinib is an oral agent that targets multiple transmembrane receptors within the epidermal growth factor receptor family, and offers a promising new approach to treatment. This paper reviews the rationale for and clinical activity of lapatinib in squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck. Keywords: epidermal growth factor receptor, targeted therapy, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx

  12. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for gingival carcinoma

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    Mukai, Y.; Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Mitsudo, K.; Koizumi, T.; Oguri, S.; Kioi, M.; Tohnai, I. [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Omura, M. [Shonankamakura General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kamakura, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this study was to review the efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. In all, 34 patients (21 men and 13 women) with squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva underwent radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of daily external irradiation and concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion with cisplatin and docetaxel. A median total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was delivered to tumors. Of the 34 patients, 29 (85 %) achieved a complete response (CR) and 5 had residual tumors. Of the 29 patients with a CR, 2 had local recurrences and 1 had distant metastasis 1-15 months after treatment. Twenty-six of the 36 patients had survived at a median follow-up time of 36 months (range 12-79 months); 4 died of cancer and 4 died of non-cancer-related causes. At both 3 and 5 years after treatment, the overall survival rates were 79 % and the cause-specific survival rates were 85 %. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandibular bone only developed in 1 patient after treatment. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy was effective and safe in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. This treatment may be a promising curative and organ-preserving treatment option for gingival carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie war die Ueberpruefung der Effizienz und Toxizitaet einer Strahlenbehandlung des Gingivakarzinoms mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Chemotherapie. Insgesamt 34 Patienten (21 Maenner und 13 Frauen) mit Zahnfleischplattenzellkarzinom erhielten eine Strahlenbehandlung mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Chemotherapie. Die Behandlung umfasste eine taegliche externe Bestrahlung mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Infusion von Cisplatin und

  13. Ductal carcinoma In-Situ in turner syndrome patient undergoing hormone replacement therapy: A case report

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    Rashmi Bawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Turner’s syndrome is a rare congenital disease which affects about 1 in every 2500-3000 live-born females. This happens due to chromosomal abnormalities in a phenotypic female, causing increased gonadotropin concentrations and low concentrations of estrogens from infancy. As a result, hormone replacement therapy is started in most adolescent Turner syndrome patients to initiate and sustain sexual maturation. Accordingly, most Turner’s syndrome patients undergo several decades of estrogen replacement therapy, from puberty to post-menopausal age. The highly publicized findings of the Women’s Health Initiative have called into question the appropriateness of hormone replacement therapy in adolescents with Turner’s syndrome. Those concerns were mostly theoretical extrapolations, as few prospective studies of cancer occurrence in women with Turner syndrome have been reported. Consequently, several recent publications have challenged those extrapolations, based on the assertion that the levels of hormone replacement in Turner syndrome patients are well below the physiologic levels observed in normal menstruating women, as well as the fact that these women are significantly younger than those studied by the Women’s Health Initiative. In discord to those reports, we present a case of ductal carcinoma in-situ in a 40-year-old Turner patient, who had undergone over two decades of combined hormone replacement therapy. The patient underwent an elective excisional biopsy for a palpable mass, with histopathology revealing a complex fibroadenoma with a nidus of ductal carcinoma in-situ. The lesion was noted to be estrogen receptor positive and progesterone receptor negative, with heavy staining for HER-2/Neu receptor. The patient was treated with tamoxifen. While a rare case, it is imperative for the astute clinician to keep in mind the consequences of long-term hormone replacement therapy in Turner’s syndrome patients in order to avoid missed

  14. Potential molecular targets for Ewing′s sarcoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Jully

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing′s sarcoma (ES is a highly malignant tumor of children and young adults. Modern therapy for Ewing′s sarcoma combines high-dose chemotherapy for systemic control of disease, with advanced surgical and/or radiation therapeutic approaches for local control. Despite optimal management, the cure rate for localized disease is only approximately 70%, whereas the cure rate for metastatic disease at presentation is less than 30%. Patients who experience long-term disease-free survival are at risk for significant side-effects of therapy, including infertility, limb dysfunction and an increased risk for second malignancies. The identification of new targets for innovative therapeutic approaches is, therefore, strongly needed for its treatment. Many new pharmaceutical agents have been tested in early phases of clinical trials in ES patients who have recurrent disease. While some agents led to partial response or stable disease, the percentages of drugs eliciting responses or causing an overall effect have been minimal. Furthermore, of the new pharmaceuticals being introduced to clinical practice, the most effective agents also have dose-limiting toxicities. Novel approaches are needed to minimize non-specific toxicity, both for patients with recurrence and at diagnosis. This report presents an overview of the potential molecular targets in ES and highlights the possibility that they may serve as therapeutic targets for the disease. Although additional investigations are required before most of these approaches can be assessed in the clinic, they provide a great deal of hope for patients with Ewing′s sarcoma.

  15. Inhibition of human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas by targeted silencing of tumor enhancer genes: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Baradaran, Behzad

    2014-06-01

    Esophageal cancer has been reported as the ninth most common malignancy and ranks as the sixth most frequent cause of death worldwide. Esophageal cancer treatment involves surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or combination therapy. Novel strategies are needed to boost the oncologic outcome. Recent advances in the molecular biology of esophageal cancer have documented the role of genetic alterations in tumorigenesis. Oncogenes serve a pivotal function in tumorigenesis. Targeted therapies are directed at the unique molecular signature of cancer cells for enhanced efficacy with low toxicity. RNA interference (RNAi) technology is a powerful tool for silencing endogenous or exogenous genes in mammalian cells. Related results have shown that targeting oncogenes with siRNAs, specifically the mRNA, effectively reduces tumor cell proliferation and induces apoptotic cell death. This article will briefly review studies on silencing tumor enhancer genes related to the induction of esophageal cancer.

  16. Yttrium-90 Selective Internal Radiation Therapy with Glass Microspheres for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Current and Updated Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Alanis, Lourdes [Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cho, Sung-Ki [Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351 (Korea, Republic of); Saab, Sammy [Division of Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Pfleger Liver Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary liver cancer and it represents the majority of cancer-related deaths in the world. More than 70% of patients present at an advanced stage, beyond potentially curative options. Ytrrium-90 selective internal radiation therapy (Y90-SIRT) with glass microspheres is rapidly gaining acceptance as a potential therapy for intermediate and advanced stage primary hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases. The technique involves delivery of Y90 infused glass microspheres via the hepatic arterial blood flow to the appropriate tumor. The liver tumor receives a highly concentrated radiation dose while sparing the healthy liver parenchyma due to its preferential blood supply from portal venous blood. There are two commercially available devices: TheraSphere® and SIR-Spheres®. Although, Y90-SIRT with glass microspheres improves median survival in patients with intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and has the potential to downstage hepatocellular carcinoma so that the selected candidates meet the transplantable criteria, it has not gained widespread acceptance due to the lack of large randomized controlled trials. Currently, there are various clinical trials investigating the use of Y90-SIRT with glass microspheres for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and the outcomes of these trials may result in the incorporation of Y90-SIRT with glass microspheres into the treatment guidelines as a standard therapy option for patients with intermediate and advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Yttrium-90 selective internal radiation therapy with glass microspheres for hepatocellular carcinoma: Current and updated literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Alanic, Lourdes [Div. of Interventional Radiology, Dept. of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles (United States); Cho, Sung Ki [Div. of Interventional Radiology, Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Saab, Sammy [Div. of Hepatology, Dept. of Medicine, Pfleger Liver Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary liver cancer and it represents the majority of cancer-related deaths in the world. More than 70% of patients present at an advanced stage, beyond potentially curative options. Ytrrium-90 selective internal radiation therapy (Y90-SIRT) with glass microspheres is rapidly gaining acceptance as a potential therapy for intermediate and advanced stage primary hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases. The technique involves delivery of Y90 infused glass microspheres via the hepatic arterial blood flow to the appropriate tumor. The liver tumor receives a highly concentrated radiation dose while sparing the healthy liver parenchyma due to its preferential blood supply from portal venous blood. There are two commercially available devices: TheraSphere® and SIR-Spheres®. Although, Y90-SIRT with glass microspheres improves median survival in patients with intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and has the potential to downstage hepatocellular carcinoma so that the selected candidates meet the transplantable criteria, it has not gained widespread acceptance due to the lack of large randomized controlled trials. Currently, there are various clinical trials investigating the use of Y90-SIRT with glass microspheres for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and the outcomes of these trials may result in the incorporation of Y90-SIRT with glass microspheres into the treatment guidelines as a standard therapy option for patients with intermediate and advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiorean EG

    2015-07-01

    this deadly disease. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, immunotherapies, signaling pathway inhibitors, targeted therapies

  19. From molecular classification to targeted therapeutics: the changing face of systemic therapy in metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrian; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-01-01

    Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1) or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician's therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  20. From Molecular Classification to Targeted Therapeutics: The Changing Face of Systemic Therapy in Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1 or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician’s therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  1. Inhibition of MNK pathways enhances cancer cell response to chemotherapy with temozolomide and targeted radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzmil, Michal; Seebacher, Jan; Hess, Daniel; Behe, Martin; Schibli, Roger; Moncayo, Gerald; Frank, Stephan; Hemmings, Brian A

    2016-09-01

    Current standard-of-care treatment for malignant cancers includes radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Here, we report increased MAP kinase-interacting kinase (MNK)-regulated phosphorylation of translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in glioma cells upon temozolomide (TMZ) treatment and in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cells in response to targeted radionuclide therapy. Depletion of MNK activity by using two MNK inhibitors, CGP57380 or cercosporamide, as well as by MNK1-specific knockdown sensitized glioblastoma (GBM) cells and GBM-derived spheres to TMZ. Furthermore, CGP57380 treatment enhanced response of MTC cells to (177)Lu-labeled gastrin analogue. In order to understand how MNK signaling pathways support glioma survival we analyzed putative MNK substrates by quantitative phosphoproteomics in normal condition and in the presence of TMZ. We identified MNK inhibitor-sensitive phosphorylation sites on eIF4G1, mutations of which either influenced eIF4E phosphorylation or glioma cell response to TMZ, pointing to altered regulation of translation initiation as a resistance mechanism. Pharmacological inhibition of overexpressed MNK1 by CGP57380 reduced eIF4E phosphorylation and induced association of inactive MNK1 with eIF4G1. Taken together, our data show an activation of MNK-mediated survival mechanisms in response to either glioma chemotherapy or MTC targeted radiation and suggest that inhibition of MNK activity represents an attractive sensitizing strategy for cancer treatments.

  2. 肺癌的靶向治疗%Target therapy in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王孟昭; 张紫萱

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) , as a standard target therapy in lung cancer, has been developed as a chemotherapy drug. Many clinical trials with EGFR-TKIs as third line, second line and first line treatment for lung cancer patients were carried out. Only EGFR gene mutations could predict benefit from EGFR-TKIs treatment for patients with lung cancer. Based on the experiences from the development of EGFR-TKIs, Crizotinib (Xalkori, Pfizer) is quickly approved for treatment in some patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) harboring ALK gene rearrangement in every line. We believe that many other target drugs would be used in clinical practice to treat lung cancer patients. Identification of driver mutations in tumor specimens from Chinese patients is very important. Basic research and drug development in China will be promoted from the discovery of new driver mutations, especially in squamous cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer. Based on the results of driver mutations tests, Chinese patients will be benefited from global research findings.

  3. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance.

  4. Nanoassemblies from amphiphilic cytarabine prodrug for leukemia targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Dujuan; He, Wenxiu; Zhang, Huiyuan; Li, Zhonghao; Luan, Yuxia

    2017-02-01

    The anti-leukemia effect of cytarabine (Ara-C) is severely restricted by its high hydrophilic properties and rapid plasma degradation. Herein, a novel amphiphilic small molecular prodrug of Ara-C was developed by coupling a short aliphatic chain, hexanoic acid (HA) to 4-NH2 of the parent drug. Based on the amphiphilic nature, the resulting bioconjugate (HA-Ara) could spontaneously self-assemble into stable spherical nanoassemblies (NAs) with an extremely high drug loading (∼71wt%). Moreover, folate receptor (FR)-targeting NAs with high grafting efficient folic acid - bovine serum albumin (FA-BSA) conjugate immobilized on the surface (NAs/FA-BSA) was prepared. The results of MTT assays on FR-positive K562 cells and FR-negative A549 cells demonstrated higher cytotoxicity of HA-Ara NAs than the native drug. Especially, the IC50 values revealed that NAs/FA-BSA was 3 and 2-fold effective than non-targeted NAs after 24 and 48h treatment with K562 cells, respectively indicating FR-mediated enhanced anti-tumor efficacy. In vitro cellular uptake, larger accumulation of HA-Ara NAs were observed in comparative with the free FITC and the results further confirmed the selective uptake of NAs/FA-BSA in folate receptor enriched cancer cells. Above all, self-assembled HA-Ara NAs exhibited potential superiority for Ara-C delivery and FA-modified NAs would be an excellent candidate for targeting leukemia therapy.

  5. [Chemo- and endocrino-therapy of breast carcinoma xenografts in the dormant or exponential growth phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T

    1995-06-01

    In case of concerning about recurrence case after operative treatment of breast cancer, we must suppose existence of dormant breast cancer cell. To elucidate a rational treatment of the breast cancer in the dormant stage, we have developed a new treatment model using human breast carcinoma xenografts (MCF-7, R-27 and Br-10) in nude mice. After the sc inoculation of the tumors, the treatment was initiated with or without the previous estradiol (E2) stimulation. While MCF-7 was sensitive to mitomycin C (6 mg/kg i.p.) and and tamoxifen pellet (2.5 mg/mouse s.c.) in the dormant and exponential growth phase, R-27 and Br-10 were sensitive to the drugs only in the exponential growth phase but not in the dormant stage. These results suggested that the sensitivity of human breast carcinoma cells in the dormant stage is rather low, however some strain would be also sensitive to the treatment. This model seems to be useful in evaluating the adjuvant therapy of breast carcinoma after surgery.

  6. The study of external dose rate and retained body activity of patients receiving 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiying; Jiao, Ling; Cui, Songye; Wang, Liang; Tan, Jian; Zhang, Guizhi; He, Yajing; Ruan, Shuzhou; Fan, Saijun; Zhang, Wenyi

    2014-10-21

    Radiation safety is an integral part of targeted radionuclide therapy. The aim of this work was to study the external dose rate and retained body activity as functions of time in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients receiving 131I therapy. Seventy patients were stratified into two groups: the ablation group (A) and the follow-up group (FU). The patients' external dose rate was measured, and simultaneously, their retained body radiation activity was monitored at various time points. The equations of the external dose rate and the retained body activity, described as a function of hours post administration, were fitted. Additionally, the release time for patients was calculated. The reduction in activity in the group receiving a second or subsequent treatment was more rapid than the group receiving only the initial treatment. Most important, an expeditious method was established to indirectly evaluate the retained body activity of patients by measuring the external dose rate with a portable radiation survey meter. By this method, the calculated external dose rate limits are 19.2, 8.85, 5.08 and 2.32 μSv·h-1 at 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 m, respectively, according to a patient's released threshold level of retained body activity <400 MBq. This study is beneficial for radiation safety decision-making.

  7. The Study of External Dose Rate and Retained Body Activity of Patients Receiving 131I Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiying Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiation safety is an integral part of targeted radionuclide therapy. The aim of this work was to study the external dose rate and retained body activity as functions of time in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients receiving 131I therapy. Seventy patients were stratified into two groups: the ablation group (A and the follow-up group (FU. The patients’ external dose rate was measured, and simultaneously, their retained body radiation activity was monitored at various time points. The equations of the external dose rate and the retained body activity, described as a function of hours post administration, were fitted. Additionally, the release time for patients was calculated. The reduction in activity in the group receiving a second or subsequent treatment was more rapid than the group receiving only the initial treatment. Most important, an expeditious method was established to indirectly evaluate the retained body activity of patients by measuring the external dose rate with a portable radiation survey meter. By this method, the calculated external dose rate limits are 19.2, 8.85, 5.08 and 2.32 μSv·h−1 at 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 m, respectively, according to a patient’s released threshold level of retained body activity <400 MBq. This study is beneficial for radiation safety decision-making.

  8. Therapy effects of gold nanorods on the CNE-1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Jinyan Shao,1 Jianguo Tang,1 Jian Ji,2 Wenbo Zhou21Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 2Department of Polymer Science, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The use of nanocarriers to deliver drugs to tumor tissue is one of the most important strategies in cancer therapeutics. Recently, gold nanorods (GNRs have begun to be used in cancer therapy because of their unique properties. The purpose of this study was to show the potential that GNRs have against human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-1 cells, using near-infrared (NIR laser light. Transmission electron microscopic and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopic investigations confirmed the efficient uptake of the GNRs by CNE-1 and human rhinal epithelia cells. The in vitro NIR photothermal therapy for the CNE-1 and rhinal epithelia cells was designed in three groups: (1 control, (2 laser alone, and (3 GNRs with laser. Fluorescence microscopy images indicated that, at some GNR concentrations and some intensities of NIR laser, GNRs with laser therapy could induce cell death for CNE-1 cells while keeping the rhinal epithelia cells healthy. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that using GNRs with NIR laser therapy can selectively destruct CNE-1 cells while having no effect on normal (rhinal epithelia cells.Keywords: photothermal therapy, near-infrared laser, rhinal epithelia cells, cell uptake

  9. Photodynamic therapy of nodular basal cell carcinoma with multifiber contact light delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Marcelo Soto; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Sune; Johansson, T; Palsson, Sara; Bendsoe, Niels; Derjabo, A; Kapostins, J; Stenram, Unne; Spigulis, J; Svanberg, Katarina

    2006-01-01

    To overcome the limited treatment depth of superficial photodynamic therapy we investigate interstitial light delivery. In the present work the treatment light was delivered using a system in which three or six clear-cut fibers were placed in direct contact with the tumor area. This placement was thought to represent a step toward general purpose interstitial PDT. Twelve nodular basal cell carcinomas were treated employing delta-aminolevulinic acid and 635 nm laser irradiation. Fluorescence measurements were performed monitoring the buildup and subsequent bleaching of the produced sensitizer protoporphyrin IX. The treatment efficacy, judged at a 28-month follow-up, showed a 100% complete response. Two punch excisions at 7 months converted two partial responses to complete responses. One patient failed to appear at all follow-up sessions. The outcome of the treatments was comparable to superficial photodynamic therapy in terms of histological, clinical, and cosmetic results.

  10. Membrane testosterone binding sites in prostate carcinoma as a potential new marker and therapeutic target: Study in paraffin tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoropoulos Panayiotis A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroid action is mediated, in addition to classical intracellular receptors, by recently identified membrane sites, that generate rapid non-genomic effects. We have recently identified a membrane androgen receptor site on prostate carcinoma cells, mediating testosterone rapid effects on the cytoskeleton and secretion within minutes. Methods The aim of this study was to investigate whether membrane androgen receptors are differentially expressed in prostate carcinomas, and their relationship to the tumor grade. We examined the expression of membrane androgen receptors in archival material of 109 prostate carcinomas and 103 benign prostate hyperplasias, using fluorescein-labeled BSA-coupled testosterone. Results We report that membrane androgen receptors are preferentially expressed in prostate carcinomas, and they correlate to their grade using the Gleason's microscopic grading score system. Conclusion We conclude that membrane androgen receptors may represent an index of tumor aggressiveness and possibly specific targets for new therapeutic regimens.

  11. MicroRNA-124 suppresses growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting STAT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yanxin [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Research Institute, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Biomedical Research Institute, Shenzhen-PKU-HKUST Medical Center, Guangdong Province, Shenzhen 518036 (China); Yue, Xupeng [Biomedical Research Institute, Shenzhen-PKU-HKUST Medical Center, Guangdong Province, Shenzhen 518036 (China); Cui, Yuanyuan [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Research Institute, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Jufeng, E-mail: jfzhang111@163.com [Biomedical Research Institute, Shenzhen-PKU-HKUST Medical Center, Guangdong Province, Shenzhen 518036 (China); Wang, KeWei, E-mail: wangkw@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Research Institute, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Biomedical Research Institute, Shenzhen-PKU-HKUST Medical Center, Guangdong Province, Shenzhen 518036 (China); Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Peking University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •miR-124 is down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. •Over-expression of miR-124 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells. •miR-124 inhibits xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. •STATs function as a novel target of miR-124 in HCC HepG2 cells. -- Abstract: The aberrant expression of microRNAs is associated with development and progression of cancers. Down-regulation of miR-124 has been demonstrated in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying mechanism by which miR-124 suppresses tumorigenesis in HCC remains elusive. In this study, we found that miR-124 suppresses the tumor growth of HCC through targeting the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). Overexpression of miR-124 suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in HepG-2 cells. Luciferase assay confirmed that miR-124 binding to the 3′-UTR region of STAT3 inhibited the expression of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 proteins in HepG-2 cells. Knockdown of STAT3 by siRNA in HepG-2 cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-124. Overexpression of STAT3 in miR-124-transfected HepG-2 cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation caused by miR-124. Furthermore, miR-124 suppressed xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG-2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. Taken together, our findings show that miR-124 functions as tumor suppressor in HCC by targeting STAT3, and miR-124 may therefore serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutics in HCC.

  12. A Synchronous Pancreatic Metastasis from Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma, with Unusual CT Characteristics, Completely Regressed after Therapy with Sunitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lauro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report of a 75-years-old woman affected by renal clear cell carcinoma with a synchronous pancreatic metastasis and a metachronous lung metastasis. This case has two peculiarities. First the pancreatic metastasis was treated just with medical therapy, that is, Sunitinib, instead of the surgical therapy that is mostly considered. Secondly, the pancreatic lesion showed different characteristics on the computed tomography scan compared to the usual pancreatic metastases from renal clear cell carcinoma. The pancreatic metastasis totally regressed after medical treatment and nowadays, four years after the diagnosis, the patient is disease-free.

  13. The nucleolus: an emerging target for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Nadine; Hannan, Katherine M; George, Amee J; Sanij, Elaine; Hannan, Ross D

    2013-11-01

    For over 100 years, pathologists have utilised an increase in size and number of nucleoli, the subnuclear site of ribosome synthesis, as a marker of aggressive tumours. Despite this, the contribution of the nucleolus and ribosomal RNA synthesis to cancer has been largely overlooked. This concept has recently changed with the demonstration that the nucleolus indirectly controls numerous other cellular functions, in particular, the cellular activity of the critical tumour suppressor protein, p53. Moreover, selective inhibition of ribosomal gene transcription in the nucleolus has been shown to be an effective therapeutic strategy to promote cancer-specific activation of p53. This article reviews the largely untapped potential of the nucleolus and ribosomal gene transcription as exciting new targets for cancer therapy.

  14. [Chronic myeloid leukemia: "archetype" of the impact of targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, R; Bazarbachi, A

    2012-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a chronic blood disorder characterized by a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, leading to the creation of a chimeric gene encoding the BCR-ABL fusion protein with a constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Although long known as a disease with an inexorable progression to acute leukemia, CML history has been significantly improved by the use of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of CML by transforming it from an invariably fatal disease to a chronic but manageable condition. In fact, the discovery of this class of targeted therapy had an impact not only on the survival of CML patients but also on other scientific and medical fields. This review illustrates the impact of imatinib, the first example of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the treatment of CML, on the treatment of other cancers, the impact on health systems and on the scientific research in general.

  15. [Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and helpfulness of targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaysse, Thibaut; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-06-01

    The neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are rare tumors, but their incidence is constantly rising. Even if the management of these tumors has to be surgical as soon as possible, the disease is most often metastatic at the stage of the diagnostic. The prognostic and the therapeutic options differ from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Available treatments have evolved over the last years with recent publications of studies that bring to light the benefits of targeted therapies in this pathology. This has resulted in modifications of both practices and either French and international guidelines. Therefore, we focus on the management of the grade 1 and grade 2 well-differentiated neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors as classified in new WHO classification of neuroendocrine neoplasms published in 2010.

  16. Physics at the biomolecular interface fundamentals for molecular targeted therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses primarily on the role of interfacial forces in understanding biological phenomena at the molecular scale. By providing a suitable statistical mechanical apparatus to handle the biomolecular interface, the book becomes uniquely positioned to address core problems in molecular biophysics. It highlights the importance of interfacial tension in delineating a solution to the protein folding problem, in unravelling the physico-chemical basis of enzyme catalysis and protein associations, and in rationally designing molecular targeted therapies. Thus grounded in fundamental science, the book develops a powerful technological platform for drug discovery, while it is set to inspire scientists at any level in their careers determined to address the major challenges in molecular biophysics. The acknowledgment of how exquisitely the structure and dynamics of proteins and their aqueous environment are related attests to the overdue recognition that biomolecular phenomena cannot be effectively understood w...

  17. The future of osteoarthritis therapeutics: targeted pharmacological therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasheri, A

    2013-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common forms of degenerative joint disease and a major cause of pain and disability affecting the aging population. It is estimated that more than 20 million Americans and 35 to 40 million Europeans suffer from OA. Analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the only therapeutic treatment options for OA. Effective pharmacotherapy for OA, capable of restoring the original structure and function of damaged cartilage and other synovial tissue, is urgently needed, and research into such disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs) is in progress. This is the first of three reviews focusing on OA therapeutics. This paper provides an overview of current research into potential structure-modifying drugs and more appropriately targeted pharmacological therapy. The challenges and opportunities in this area of research and development are reviewed, covering the most up-to-date initiatives, trends, and topics.

  18. Retrospective analysis of multidisciplinary therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Seo, Yuji; Nakajima, Kaori; Miyano, Takashi [Asahikawa Medical Univ., Hokkaido (Japan); Kikuchi, Yuzou [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the efficacy of multidisciplinary therapy (concomitant radiotherapy and intra-arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) followed by maxillectomy) in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. We reviewed 71 patient records with locally advanced but respectable carcinoma of the maxillary sinus treated by means of multidisciplinary therapy between 1978 through 1997. The clinical T factor for these patients, according to the UICC definitions (1997), was 12 for T2, 46 for T3, and 13 for T4. Twelve patients were diagnosed as node-positive at initial presentation. Intra-arterial 5-FU was delivered via a superficial temporal artery in accordance with radiotherapy, and the cumulative 5-FU dose ranged from 2,900 mg to 5,250 mg (median 5,000 mg). The total radiotherapy dose ranged from 29 Gy to 48 Gy (median 48 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Patients underwent radical maxillectomy thereafter. The 5-year overall survival rate and disease-specific survival rate of all the patients were 58% and 68%, respectively. There was no significant correlation of clinical T factor or N factor with disease-specific survival on univariate and multivariate analysis. The overall treatment-related mortality rate was 3.7%. Radiation cataract later developed in all evaluable patients whose lenses were within the treatment volume. About a half of the operable T4 patients survived over 5 years by means of the above-mentioned multidisciplinary therapy. This multidisciplinary therapy should be compared to treatment with a combination of surgery and postoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  19. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-01

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  20. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-06

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  1. Over-expression of GAPDH in human colorectal carcinoma as a preferred target of 3-bromopyruvate propyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shuqiang; Hu, Yumin; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Wenjing; Zeng, Zhaolei; Yang, Jing; Yun, Jingping; Xu, Ruihua; Huang, Peng

    2012-02-01

    It has long been observed that many cancer cells exhibit increased aerobic glycolysis and rely more on this pathway to generate ATP and metabolic intermediates for cell proliferation. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a key enzyme in glycolysis and has been known as a housekeeping molecule. In the present study, we found that GAPDH expression was significantly up-regulated in human colorectal carcinoma tissues compared to the adjacent normal tissues, and also increased in colon cancer cell lines compared to the non-tumor colon mucosa cells in culture. The expression of GAPDH was further elevated in the liver metastatic tissues compared to the original colon cancer tissue of the same patients, suggesting that high expression of GAPDH might play an important role in colon cancer development and metastasis. Importantly, we found that 3-bromopyruvate propyl ester (3-BrOP) preferentially inhibited GAPDH and exhibited potent activity in inducing colon cancer cell death by causing severe depletion of ATP. 3-BrOP at low concentrations (1-10 μM) inhibited GAPDH and a much higher concentration (300 μM) was required to inhibit hexokinase-2. The cytotoxic effect of 3-BrOP was associated with its inhibition of GAPDH, and colon cancer cells with loss of p53 were more sensitive to this compound. Our study suggests that GAPDH may be a potential target for colon cancer therapy.

  2. Polo-like kinase 1 as target for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiß Lily

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1 is an interesting molecule both as a biomarker and as a target for highly specific cancer therapy for several reasons. Firstly, it is over-expressed in many cancers and can serve as a biomarker to monitor treatment efficacy of Plk1 inhibitors. Furthermore, the Plk1 enzyme is expressed only in dividing cells and is a major regulator of the cell cycle. It controls entry into mitosis and regulates the spindle checkpoint. The expression of Plk1 in normal cells is not nearly as strong as that in cancer cells, which makes Plk1 a discriminating tartget for the development of cancer-specific small molecule drugs. RNA interference experiments in vitro and in vivo have indicated that downregulation of Plk1 expression represents an attractive concept for cancer therapy. Over the years, a number of Plk1 inhibitors have been discovered. Many of these inhibitors are substances that compete with ATP for the substrate binding site. The ATP-competitive inhibitor BI 6727 is currently being clinically tested in cancer patients. Another drug in development, poloxin, is the first Polo-box domain inhibitor of Plk1. This compound is a derivative of the natural product, thymoquinone, derived from Nigella sativa. A novel and promising strategy is to synthesize bifunctional inhibitors that combine the high binding affinity of ATP inhibitors with the specificity of competitive inhibitors.

  3. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  4. Mitochondrial Peroxiredoxin III is a Potential Target for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung Doo Rhee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved either directly or indirectly in oncogenesis and the alteration of metabolism in cancer cells. Cancer cells contain large numbers of abnormal mitochondria and produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of ROS and the antioxidant capacity of the cell. Several cancer therapies, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation, disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis and release cytochrome c, leading to apoptosome formation, which activates the intrinsic pathway. This is modulated by the extent of mitochondrial oxidative stress. The peroxiredoxin (Prx system is a cellular defense system against oxidative stress, and mitochondria in cancer cells are known to contain high levels of Prx III. Here, we review accumulating evidence suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress is involved in cancer, and discuss the role of the mitochondrial Prx III antioxidant system as a potential target for cancer therapy. We hope that this review will provide the basis for new strategic approaches in the development of effective cancer treatments.

  5. Simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Sang Soo; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Chang-Min [National Cancer Center, Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 53 patients with inoperable HCC underwent SIB-IMRT using two dose-fractionation schemes, depending on the proximity of gastrointestinal structures. The 41 patients in the low dose-fractionation (LD) group, with internal target volume (ITV) < 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 55 and 44 Gy in 22 fractions to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 2 (PTV2), respectively. The 12 patients in the high dose-fractionation (HD) group, with ITV ≥ 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 66 and 55 Gy in 22 fractions to the PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Overall, treatment was well tolerated, with no grade > 3 toxicity. The LD group had larger sized tumors (median: 6 vs. 3.4 cm) and greater frequencies of vascular invasion (80.6 vs. 16.7 %) than patients in the HD group (p < 0.05 each). The median overall survival (OS) was 25.1 months and the actuarial 2-year local progression-free survival (LPFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and OS rates were 67.3, 14.7, and 54.7 %, respectively. The HD group tended to show better tumor response (100 vs. 62.2 %, p = 0.039) and 2-year LPFS (85.7 vs. 59 %, p = 0.119), RFS (38.1 vs. 7.3 %, p = 0.063), and OS (83.3 vs. 44.3 %, p = 0.037) rates than the LD group. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor response was significantly associated with OS. SIB-IMRT is feasible and safe for patients with inoperable HCC. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, die klinische Wirksamkeit und die Sicherheit der intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie mit simultanem integriertem Boost (SIB-IMRT) fuer Patienten mit einem inoperablen hepatozellulaeren Karzinom (HCC) zu evaluieren. Bei 53 Patienten mit inoperablem HCC wurden zwei unterschiedliche Dosierungskonzepte je nach Lagebeziehung des

  6. Broad targeting of angiogenesis for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongwei; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Yin, Xin; Fuster, Mark M; Arreola, Alexandra; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Generali, Daniele; Nagaraju, Ganji P; El-Rayes, Bassel; Ribatti, Domenico; Chen, Yi Charlie; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Nowsheen, Somaira; Amedei, Amedeo; Niccolai, Elena; Amin, Amr; Ashraf, S Salman; Helferich, Bill; Yang, Xujuan; Guha, Gunjan; Bhakta, Dipita; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Aquilano, Katia; Chen, Sophie; Halicka, Dorota; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bilsland, Alan; Keith, W Nicol; Jensen, Lasse D

    2015-12-01

    Deregulation of angiogenesis--the growth of new blood vessels from an existing vasculature--is a main driving force in many severe human diseases including cancer. As such, tumor angiogenesis is important for delivering oxygen and nutrients to growing tumors, and therefore considered an essential pathologic feature of cancer, while also playing a key role in enabling other aspects of tumor pathology such as metabolic deregulation and tumor dissemination/metastasis. Recently, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become a clinical anti-cancer strategy in line with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, which underscore the critical importance of the angiogenic switch during early tumor development. Unfortunately the clinically approved anti-angiogenic drugs in use today are only effective in a subset of the patients, and many who initially respond develop resistance over time. Also, some of the anti-angiogenic drugs are toxic and it would be of great importance to identify alternative compounds, which could overcome these drawbacks and limitations of the currently available therapy. Finding "the most important target" may, however, prove a very challenging approach as the tumor environment is highly diverse, consisting of many different cell types, all of which may contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, the tumor cells themselves are genetically unstable, leading to a progressive increase in the number of different angiogenic factors produced as the cancer progresses to advanced stages. As an alternative approach to targeted therapy, options to broadly interfere with angiogenic signals by a mixture of non-toxic natural compound with pleiotropic actions were viewed by this team as an opportunity to develop a complementary anti-angiogenesis treatment option. As a part of the "Halifax Project" within the "Getting to know cancer" framework, we have here, based on a thorough review of the literature, identified 10 important aspects of tumor angiogenesis and the

  7. A New Era for Cancer Target Therapies: Applying Systems Biology and Computer-Aided Drug Design to Cancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yung-Hao; Chiu, Chia-Chiun; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chen, Ting-Shou; Jheng, Bo-Ren; Lee, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jeremy; Chen, Bor-Sen

    In recent years, many systems biology approaches have been used with various cancers. The materials described here can be used to build bases to discover novel cancer therapy targets in connection with computer-aided drug design (CADD). A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of cancer will provide more choices and correct strategies in the development of multiple target drug therapies, which is quite different from the traditional cancer single target therapy. Targeted therapy is one of the most powerful strategies against cancer and can also be applied to other diseases. Due to the large amount of progress in computer hardware and the theories of computational chemistry and physics, CADD has been the main strategy for developing novel drugs for cancer therapy. In contrast to traditional single target therapies, in this review we will emphasize the future direction of the field, i.e., multiple target therapies. Structure-based and ligand-based drug designs are the two main topics of CADD. The former needs both 3D protein structures and ligand structures, while the latter only needs ligand structures. Ordinarily it is estimated to take more than 14 years and 800 million dollars to develop a new drug. Many new CADD software programs and techniques have been developed in recent decades. We conclude with an example where we combined and applied systems biology and CADD to the core networks of four cancers and successfully developed a novel cocktail for drug therapy that treats multiple targets.

  8. Identification of novel targets for antiangiogenic therapy by comparing the gene expressions of tumor and normal endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Tsuguteru; Hida, Yasuhiro; Ohga, Noritaka; Sato, Hideshi; Kai, Toshihiro; Matsuki, Yasushi; Takasu, Hideo; Akiyama, Kosuke; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya; Hida, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Targeting tumor angiogenesis is an established strategy for cancer therapy. Because angiogenesis is not limited to pathological conditions such as cancer, molecular markers that can distinguish between physiological and pathological angiogenesis are required to develop more effective and safer approaches for cancer treatment. To identify such molecules, we determined the gene expression profiles of murine tumor endothelial cells (mTEC) and murine normal endothelial cells using DNA microarray analysis followed by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis. We identified 131 genes that were differentially upregulated in mTEC. Functional analysis using siRNA-mediated gene silencing revealed five novel tumor endothelial cell markers that were involved in the proliferation or migration of mTEC. The expression of DEF6 and TMEM176B was upregulated in tumor vessels of human renal cell carcinoma specimens, suggesting that they are potential targets for antiangiogenic intervention for renal cell carcinoma. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed molecular differences between tumor endothelial cells and normal endothelial cells and identified novel tumor endothelial cell markers that may be exploited to target tumor angiogenesis for cancer treatment. PMID:24602018

  9. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Zhongli [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhang, Wencheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xiao, Zefen, E-mail: xiaozefen@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan, Wen, E-mail: tanwen@cicams.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  10. New Targeted Molecular Therapies for Dedifferentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Antonelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiated thyroid cancer (DeTC derived from follicular epithelium is often incurable because it does not respond to radioiodine, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy. In cases, RET/PTC rearrangements are found in 30%–40%, RAS mutations in about 10%, and BRAF mutations in around 40%–50%, with no overlap between these mutations results in papillary thyroid cancer, while a higher prevalence of BRAF mutations (up to 70% has been observed in DeTC. The identification of these activating mutations in DeTC makes this malignancy an excellent model to examine the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Clinical trials with several TKIs targeting RET, and to a lesser extent BRAF, and other TKRs have shown positive results, with about one-third of DeTC showing a reduction in tumor size up to 50%, with the longest treatment duration of approximately three-four years. Angiogenesis inhibitors have also shown promising activity in DeTC. Progress is being made toward effective targeted DeTC therapy. The possibility of testing the sensitivity of primary DeTC cells from each subject to different TKIs could increase the effectiveness of the treatment.

  11. Gold Nanorod Bioconjugates for Active Tumor Targeting and Photothermal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiyah N. Green

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mastery of active tumor targeting is a great challenge in near infrared photothermal therapy (NIRPTT. To improve efficiency for targeted treatment of malignant tumors, we modify the technique of conjugating gold nanoparticles to tumor-specific antibodies. Polyethylene glycol-coated (PEGylated gold nanorods (GNRs were fabricated and conjugated to an anti-EGFR antibody. We characterized the conjugation efficiency of the GNRs by comparing the efficiency of antibody binding and the photothermal effect of the GNRs before and after conjugation. We demonstrate that the binding efficiency of the antibodies conjugated to the PEGylated GNRs is comparable to the binding efficiency of the unmodified antibodies and 33.9% greater than PEGylated antibody-GNR conjugates as reported by Liao and Hafner (2005. In addition, cell death by NIRPTT was sufficient to kill nearly 90% of tumor cells, which is comparable to NIRPTT with GNRs alone confirming that NIRPTT using GNRs is not compromised by conjugation of GNRs to antibodies.

  12. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Bradley S; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-03-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70,000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development.

  13. Aptamer-loaded Gold Nanoconstructs for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Duncan Hieu Minh

    Traditional cancer treatments, including chemotherapy, often cause severe side effects in patients. Targeted therapy where tumor cells are targeted via biomarkers overexpressed on the cell surface has been shown to reduce such adverse effects. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently the most common chemotherapeutic agents that bind with high affinity to these cancer markers. However, poor intratumoral uptake of mAb and release of drugs from mAb carriers have been the biggest challenge for this delivery method. As a result, recent work has focused on other strategies to improve the efficacy of drug delivery in targeted therapy. Among potential carriers for drug delivery, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have emerged as one of the most promising vehicles. This thesis describes the development of a drug delivery nanoconstruct that can both target cancer cells and induce therapeutic effects. The nanoconstructs are composed of gold nanostars (AuNS) as delivery vehicles loaded with the DNA aptamer AS1411 that can target the ubiquitous shuttle protein nucleolin (NCL) in various cancer cell types. The gold nanocarrier stabilizes the oligonucleotides for intracellular delivery and promotes high loading densities of the oligonucleotide drugs. We have investigated the interactions of the nanoconstruct with different subcellular compartments of the cancer cells. This physical phenomenon has shown to correlate with the biological activities such as apoptosis and cell death that happen in the cancer cells after incubation with the nanoconstructs. A thorough screening of the nanoconstructs in 13 different cancer cell lines is conducted to narrow down the potential targets for in vivo study. Before testing the in vivo efficacy, we evaluate the toxicity of the nanoconstructs in non-tumor animals, which confirms its safety for further in vivo applications. The accumulation of the nanoconstructs in two different cancerous tumors, however, suggests that further optimization of the design

  14. Triple-negative breast cancer: new perspectives for targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomao F

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Federica Tomao,1 Anselmo Papa,2 Eleonora Zaccarelli,2 Luigi Rossi,2 Davide Caruso,2 Marina Minozzi,2 Patrizia Vici,3 Luigi Frati,4 Silverio Tomao21Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Policlinico “Umberto I”, Rome, 2Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Oncology Unit, Istituto Chirurgico Ortopedico Traumatologico, Latina, 3Division of Medical Oncology B, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Molecular Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Policlinico “Umberto I”, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, encompassing a large number of entities showing different morphological features and having clinical behaviors. It has became apparent that this diversity may be justified by distinct patterns of genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic aberrations. The identification of gene-expression microarray-based characteristics has led to the identification of at least five breast cancer subgroups: luminal A, luminal B, normal breast-like, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and basal-like. Triple-negative breast cancer is a complex disease diagnosed by immunohistochemistry, and it is characterized by malignant cells not expressing estrogen receptors or progesterone receptors at all, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Along with this knowledge, recent data show that triple-negative breast cancer has specific molecular features that could be possible targets for new biological targeted drugs. The aim of this article is to explore the use of new drugs in this particular setting, which is still associated with poor prognosis and high risk of distant recurrence and death.Keywords: basal-like breast cancer, estrogen–progesterone receptors, gene-expression microarray, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, chemotherapy, target therapy

  15. NY-BR-1 protein expression in breast carcinoma: a mammary gland differentiation antigen as target for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Zürrer-Härdi, Ursina; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Storz, Martina; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Seifert, Burkhardt; Fehr, Mathias K; Fink, Daniel; Ferrone, Soldano; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Jungbluth, Achim A; Chen, Yao-Tseng; Jäger, Dirk; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger

    2007-11-01

    NY-BR-1 is a recently identified differentiation antigen of the mammary gland. To use NY-BR-1 for T-cell-based immunotherapy, analysis of its co-expression with HLA class I antigens is required. In the present tissue microarray study, primary breast cancers (n = 1,444), recurrences (n = 88), lymph node (n = 525) and distant metastases (n = 91) were studied for NY-BR-1 expression using a novel monoclonal antibody. NY-BR-1 expression was compared with prognosis, estrogen receptor, HER2-status, EGFR and HLA class I antigen expression. NY-BR-1 was more frequently expressed in grade 1 (82%) than in grade 2 (69%) and grade 3 (46%) carcinomas (P < 0.0001). Moreover, NY-BR-1 expression correlated directly with estrogen receptor expression (P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with HER2-status and EGFR expression (P < 0.0001 for both). Considering high expression level of co-expression, 198/1,321 (15%) primary breast carcinomas and 4/65 (6%) distant metastases expressed NY-BR-1 and HLA class I, suggesting that active immunotherapy can be applied to about 10% of breast cancer patients. Survival analysis showed an association of NY-BR-1 expression with better patient outcome (P = 0.015). No difference between NY-BR-1 expression of primary tumors and metastases could be found, indicating that the presence of NY-BR-1 in metastases can be deduced from their corresponding primary. Forty-three paired biopsies taken from patients before and after chemotherapy suggest that NY-BR-1 expression is not influenced by preceding chemotherapy (kappa = 0.89, P < 0.0001). In summary, the co-expression of NY-BR-1 with HLA class I antigens and its expression in metastases without modification by chemotherapy suggest that NY-BR-1 targeted immunotherapy represents a viable strategy in addition to other targeted cancer drug therapies of breast cancer.

  16. MiR-30a-5p suppresses tumor growth in colon carcinoma by targeting DTL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid;

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are involved in different biological processes by suppressing target gene expression. Altered expression of miR-30a-5p has been reported in colon carcinoma. To elucidate its potential biological role in colon cancer, miR-30a-5p was overexpressed via...... were screened for DTL expression and DTL was found to be overexpressed in 95.8% of human colorectal cancers compared with normal colon mucosa. In conclusion, our data identified miR-30a-5p as a tumor-suppressing miRNA in colon cancer cells exerting its function via modulation of DTL expression, which...... is frequently overexpressed in colorectal cancer. Thus, our data suggest that restoring miR-30a-5p function may prove useful as therapeutic strategy for tumors with reduced miR-30a-5p expression....

  17. Targeting DNA repair by coDbait enhances melanoma targeted radionuclide therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallard, Claire; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Mishellany, Florence; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle; Pereira, Bruno; Herbette, Aurélie; Besse, Sophie; Boudhraa, Zied; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Cayre, Anne; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Dutreix, Marie; Degoul, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Radiolabelled melanin ligands offer an interesting strategy for the treatment of disseminated pigmented melanoma. One of these molecules, ICF01012 labelled with iodine 131, induced a significant slowing of melanoma growth. Here, we have explored the combination of [131I]ICF01012 with coDbait, a DNA repair inhibitor, to overcome melanoma radioresistance and increase targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) efficacy. In human SK-Mel 3 melanoma xenograft, the addition of coDbait had a synergistic effect on tumor growth and median survival. The anti-tumor effect was additive in murine syngeneic B16Bl6 model whereas coDbait combination with [131I]ICF01012 did not increase TRT side effects in secondary pigmented tissues (e.g. hair follicles, eyes). Our results confirm that DNA lesions induced by TRT were not enhanced with coDbait association but, the presence of micronuclei and cell cycle blockade in tumor shows that coDbait acts by interrupting or delaying DNA repair. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time, the usefulness of DNA repair traps in the context of targeted radionuclide therapy. PMID:26887045

  18. A Therapeutic Approach to Nasopharyngeal Carcinomas by DNAzymes Targeting EBV LMP-1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-Quan Sun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 has been known to have oncogenic properties during latent infection in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Genetic manipulation of LMP1 expression may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of NPC. DNAzymes are synthetic, single-stranded DNA catalysts that can be engineered to bind and cleave the target mRNA of a disease-causing gene. By targeting the LMP1 mRNA, we successfully obtained a phosphorothioate-modified ‘‘10–23’’ DNAzyme namely DZ1, through screening a series of DNAzymes. DZ1 could significantly down-regulate the expression of LMP1 in NPC cells, inhibit cell proliferation, metastasis, promote apoptosis and enhance radiosensitivity of NPC through interfering signal pathways which are abnormally activated by LMP1, including NF-κB, AP-1 and STAT3 signal pathways. Together, interfering LMP1 signaling pathway could be a promising strategy to target the malignant phenotypes of NPC.

  19. NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase as a novel target of tributyltin in human embryonic carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2014-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is known to cause developmental defects as endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs). At nanomoler concentrations, TBT actions were mediated by genomic pathways via PPAR/RXR. However, non-genomic target of TBT has not been elucidated. To investigate non-genomic TBT targets, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses using human embryonic carcinoma NT2/D1 cells. We found that 100 nM TBT reduced the amounts of α-ketoglutarate, succinate and malate. We further found that TBT decreased the activity of NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the TCA cycle. In addition, TBT inhibited cell growth and enhanced neuronal differentiation through NAD-IDH inhibition. Furthermore, studies using bacterially expressed human NAD-IDH and in silico simulations suggest that TBT inhibits NAD-IDH due to a possible interaction. These results suggest that NAD-IDH is a novel non-genomic target of TBT at nanomolar levels. Thus, a metabolomic approach may provide new insights into the mechanism of EDC action.

  20. Targeted disruption of fibrinogen like protein-1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamed; Desai, Anal; Demchev, Valeriy; Bronson, Roderick T.; Hornick, Jason L.; Cohen, David E.; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinogen like protein-1 (Fgl1) is a predominantly liver expressed protein that has been implicated as both a hepatoprotectant and a hepatocyte mitogen. Fgl1 expression is decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its loss correlates with a poorly differentiated phenotype. To better elucidate the role of Fgl1 in hepatocarcinogenesis, we treated mice wild type or null for Fgl1 with diethyl nitrosamine and monitored for incidence of hepatocellular cancer. We find that mice lacking Fgl1 develop HCC at more than twice the rate of wild type mice. We show that hepatocellular cancers from Fgl1 null mice are molecularly distinct from those of the wild type mice. In tumors from Fgl1 null mice there is enhanced activation of Akt and downstream targets of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In addition, there is paradoxical up regulation of putative hepatocellular cancer tumor suppressors; tripartite motif-containing protein 35 (Trim35) and tumor necrosis factor super family 10b (Tnfrsf10b). Taken together, these findings suggest that Fgl1 acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular cancer through an Akt dependent mechanism and supports its role as a potential therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:26225745

  1. Adenanthin targets peroxiredoxin I/II to kill hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J-K; Huang, Y; He, W; Yan, Z-W; Fan, L; Liu, M-H; Xiao, W-L; Sun, H-D; Chen, G-Q

    2014-09-04

    Adenanthin, a natural diterpenoid isolated from the leaves of Isodon adenanthus, has recently been reported to induce leukemic cell differentiation by targeting peroxiredoxins (Prx) I and II. On the other hand, increasing lines of evidence propose that these Prx proteins would become potential targets to screen drugs for the prevention and treatment of solid tumors. Therefore, it is of significance to explore the potential activities of adenanthin on solid tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate that Prx I protein is essential for the survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, and adenanthin can kill these malignant liver cells in vitro and xenografts. We also show that the cell death-inducing activity of adenanthin on HCC cells is mediated by the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Furthermore, the silencing of Prx I or Prx II significantly enhances the cytotoxic activity of adenanthin on HCC, whereas the ectopic expression of Prx I and Prx II but not their mutants of adenanthin-bound cysteines can rescue adenanthin-induced cytotoxicity in Prxs-silenced HCC cells. Taken together, our results propose that adenanthin targets Prx I/II to kill HCC cells and its therapeutic significance warrants to be further explored in HCC patients.

  2. FGFR1 is a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Koos; Brunen, Diede; Van Kempen, Pauline M W; Noorlag, Rob; De Bree, Remco; Lieftink, Cor; Van Es, Robert J J; Bernards, Rene; Willems, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: FGFR1 is a promising therapeutic target in multiple types of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). FGFR inhibitors have shown great therapeutic value in preclinical models. However, resistance remains a major setback. In this study, we have investigated the

  3. Use of the EGP-2/Ep-CAM promoter for targeted expression of heterologous genes in carcinoma derived cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaughlin, PMJ; Trzpis, M; Kroesen, BJ; Helfrich, W; Terpstra, P; Dokter, WHA; Ruiters, MHJ; de Leij, LF; Harmsen, MC

    2004-01-01

    EGP-2, also known as Ep-CAM, is expressed at high levels on the surface of most carcinomas and is therefore considered an attractive target for anticancer strategies. To explore the mechanisms regulating the expression of EGP-2, sequences 3.4 kb upstream of the transcription start site were isolated