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Sample records for carcinoma stem cells

  1. Stem cell research in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyi SUN; Shi ZUO

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that adult human liver tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), arise from mature cell types has been challenged in recent dec-ades. The results of several studies suggest that HCC can be derived from liver stem cells. There are four levels of cells in the liver stem cell lineage: hepatocytes, hepatic stem cells/oval cells, bone marrow stem cells and hepato-pancreas stem cells. However, whether HCC is resulted from the differentiation block of stem cells and, moreover, which liver stem cell lineage is the source cell of hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. In this review, we focus on the current status of liver stem cell research and their roles in carcinogenesis of HCC, in order to explore new approaches for stem cell therapy of HCC.

  2. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  3. Chemoresistance of CD133+ cancer stem cells in laryngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-pu; LIU Yan; ZHONG Wei; YU Dan; WEN Lian-ji; JIN Chun-shun

    2011-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence suggests that tumors are histologically heterogeneous and are maintained by a small population of tumor cells termed cancer stem cells. CD133 has been identified as a candidate marker of cancer stem cells in laryngeal carcinoma. This study aimed to analyze the chemoresistance of CD133+ cancer stem cells.Methods The response of Hep-2 cells to different chemotherapeutic agents was investigated and the expression of CD133 was studied. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was used to identify CD133,and the CD133+ subset of cells was separated and analyzed in colony formation assays,cell invasion assays,chemotherapy resistance studies,and analyzed for the expression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2.Results About 1%-2% of Hep-2 cells were CD133+ cells,and the CD133+ proportion was enriched by chemotherapy.CD133+ cancer stem cells exhibited higher potential for clonogenicity and invasion,and were more resistant to chemotherapy. This resistance was correlated with higher expression of ABCG2.Conclusions This study suggested that CD133+ cancer stem cells are more resistant to chemotherapy. The expression of ABCG2 could be partially responsible for this. Targeting this small population of CD133+ cancer stem cells could be a strategy to develop more effective treatments for laryngeal carcinoma.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes facilitate nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Si; Zhang, Qicheng; Xia, Yunfei; You, Bo; Shan, Ying; Bao, Lili; Li, Li; You, Yiwen; Gu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are capable of differentiating into multiple cell types, are reported to exert multiple effects on tumor development. However, the relationship between MSCs and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells remains unclear. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles that can be released by several cell types, including MSCs. Exosomes, which can carry membrane and cytoplasmic constituents, have been described as participants in a novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communicat...

  5. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    MISHRA, LOPA

    2014-01-01

    Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the fun...

  6. Mapping the stem cell state: eight novel human embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cell antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, A; Andrews, N; Bardsley, K;

    2011-01-01

    The antigenic profile of human embryonic stem (ES) and embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells has served as a key element of their characterization, with a common panel of surface and intracellular markers now widely used. Such markers have been used to identify cells within the 'undifferentiated state...... of reactivity for all antibodies against both ES and EC cells, suggesting that these markers will afford recognition of unique sub-states within the undifferentiated stem cell compartment.......', yet it appears that this categorization may be an oversimplification, because a number of sub-states appear to exist within this state. To increase the resolution of the undifferentiated state, we have generated eight novel monoclonal antibodies, all capable of recognizing undifferentiated human ES...

  7. Silencing stem cell factor attenuates stemness and inhibits migration of cancer stem cells derived from Lewis lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Wang, JianTao; Li, Zhixi; Liu, YanYang; Jiang, Ming; Li, Yan; Cao, Dan; Zhao, Maoyuan; Wang, Feng; Luo, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the function of SCF in regulating stemness and migration of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains largely undefined. Here, we report that non-adhesive culture system can enrich and expand CSCs derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and that the expression level of SCF in CSCs was higher than those in LLC cells. Silencing SCF via short hairpin (sh) RNA lentivirus transduction attenuated sphere formation and inhibited expressions of stemness genes, ALDH1, Sox2, and Oct4 of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SCF-silenced CSCs inhibited the migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, with decreased expression of N-cadherin, Vimentin, and increased expression of E-cadherin in vitro and in vivo. Finally, SCF-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus transduction suppressed tumorigenicity of CSCs. Taken together, our findings unraveled an important role of SCF in CSCs derived from LLC cells. SCF might serve as a novel target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26666817

  8. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felthaus, O. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Brockhoff, G. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reck, A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Zeitler, K. [Institute of Pathology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Hautmann, M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reichert, T.E. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Schmalz, G. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Morsczeck, C., E-mail: christian.morsczeck@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  9. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). → Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. → Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. → In situ CD133+ cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. → CD133+ and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133+ cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  10. Isolation of Cancer Stem Like Cells from Human Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the Lung Supports a Monoclonal Origin from a Multipotential Tissue Stem Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Mather, Jennie P.; Roberts, Penelope E.; Pan, Zhuangyu; Chen, Francine; Hooley, Jeffrey; Young, Peter; Xu, Xiaolin; Smith, Douglas H.; Easton, Ann; Li, Panjing; Bonvini, Ezio; Koenig, Scott; Moore, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many solid tumors are hierarchically organized with the bulk tumor cells having limited replication potential, but are sustained by a stem-like cell that perpetuates the tumor. These cancer stem cells have been hypothesized to originate from transformation of adult tissue stem cells, or through re-acquisition of stem-like properties by progenitor cells. Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer that contains a mixture of cells with sq...

  11. Cancer Stem Cells Accountability in Progression of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: The Most Recent Trends!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samapika Routray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs play a major role in local recurrence and metastatic spread in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC. Evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are resistant to conventional therapy. So the emerging concepts of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of HNSCC should be understood carefully to be able to create new paradigms in treatment plans.

  12. Characterization of CD133+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells as cancer stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CD133 antigen, identified as a hematopoietic stem cell marker, appears in various human embryonic epithelia including the neural tube, gut, and kidney. We herein investigated whether CD133+ cells isolated from human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines possess cancer stem/progenitor cell-like properties. Among the three cell lines studied, the CD133 antigen was found to be expressed only on the surface of Huh-7 cells. CD133+ cells from Huh-7 performed a higher in vitro proliferative potential and lower mRNA expressions of mature hepatocyte markers, glutamine synthetase and cytochrome P450 3A4, than CD133- population of Huh-7 cells. When either CD133+ or CD133- cells were subcutaneously injected into SCID mice, CD133+ cells formed tumors, whereas CD133- cells induced either a very small number of tumors or none at all. Taken together, the identification of CD133+ cells could thus be a potentially powerful tool to investigate the tumorigenic process in the hepatoma system and to also develop effective therapies targeted against hepatocellular carcinoma

  13. Fusion with stem cell makes the hepatocellular carcinoma cells similar to liver tumor-initiating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ran; Chen, Shuxun; Li, Changxian; Ng, Kevin Tak Pan; Kong, Chi-Wing; Cheng, Jinping; Cheng, Shuk Han; Li, Ronald A.; Lo, Chung Mau; Man, Kwan; Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background Cell fusion is a fast and highly efficient technique for cells to acquire new properties. The fusion of somatic cells with stem cells can reprogram somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Our research on the fusion of stem cells and cancer cells demonstrates that the fused cells can exhibit stemness and cancer cell-like characteristics. Thus, tumor-initiating cell-like cells are generated. Methods We employed laser-induced single-cell fusion technique to fuse the hepatocellular carci...

  14. Selective tropism of liver stem cells to hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the selective tropism of liver stem cells to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in an animal model and its feasibility as a vector to deliver therapeutic genes for targeted therapy of HCC.METHODS: WB-F344, a kind of rat liver stem cell,was infected with recombinant virus to establish a cell line with stable, high-level expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). An animal model of HCC in Wistar rats was established by implanting HCC cells (CBRH7919) combined with an immunosuppressive drug.EGFP labeled liver stem cells were injected into caudal veins of the animals and distribution was observed at different time points after injection. SDF-1 and c-kit expression in non-tumor liver and tumor tissue were analysed by immunohistochemistry for the relationshiop between the expression and migration of liver stem cells.Furthermore, hepatic stem cells were injected via the portal vein, hepatic artery, caudal vein, or directly into the pericancerous liver tissue, respectively, and effects on migration, localization, and proliferation of the hepatic stem cells within the tumor tissue were observed and analyzed.RESULTS: Recombinant adenovirus could deliver the EGFP gene to hepatic stem cells. A new stem cell line,named WB-EGFP, was established that stably expressed EGFP. WB-EGFP cells still showed selective tropism towards HCC and EGFP expression was stable in vivo.According to immunohistochemistry results, SDF-1 may not be related to the mechanisms of tropism of hepatic stem cells. Different application sites affected the distribution of liver stem cells. Injection via the portal vein was superior with regard to selective migration,localization, and proliferation of the hepatic stem cells within the tumor tissue.CONCLUSION: Liver stem cells have the biological behavior of selective migration to HCC in vivo and they could localize and proliferate within HCC tissue stably expressing the target gene. Liver stem cells are a potential tool for a targeted

  15. Identification and characterization of cancer stem cells in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current evidence suggests that initiation, growth, and invasion of cancer are driven by a small population of cancer stem cells (CSC). Previous studies have identified CD44+ cells as cancer stem cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, CD44 is widely expressed in most cells in HNSCC tumor samples and several cell lines tested. We previously identified a small population of CD24+/CD44+ cells in HNSCC. In this study, we examined whether this population of cells may represent CSC in HNSCC. CD24+/CD44+ cells from HNSCC cell lines were sorted by flow cytometry, and their phenotype was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Their self-renewal and differentiation properties, clonogenicity in collagen gels, and response to anticancer drugs were tested in vitro. The tumorigenicity potential of CD24+/CD44+ cells was tested in athymic nude mice in vivo. Our results show that CD24+/CD44+ cells possessed stemness characteristics of self-renewal and differentiation. CD24+/CD44+ cells showed higher cell invasion in vitro and made higher number of colonies in collagen gels compared to CD24-/CD44+ HNSCC cells. In addition, the CD24+/CD44+ cells were more chemo-resistant to gemcitabine and cisplatin compared to CD24-/CD44+ cells. In vivo, CD24+/CD44+ cells showed a tendency to generate larger tumors in nude mice compared to CD24-/CD44+ cell population. Our study clearly demonstrates that a distinct small population of CD24+/CD44+ cells is present in HNSCC that shows stem cell-like properties. This distinct small population of cells should be further characterized and may provide an opportunity to target HNSCC CSC for therapy

  16. The Progress and Prospects of Putative Biomarkers for Liver Cancer Stem Cells in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yan; Yang, Ting; Pang, Bing-Yao; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Yong-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is organized by liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs), which are a subset of cells with "stem-like" characteristics. Identification of the LCSCs is a fundamental and important problem in HCC research. LCSCs have been investigated by various stem cell biomarkers. There is still lack of consensus regarding the existence of a "global" marker for LCSCs in HCC. In this review article, we summarize the progress and prospects of putative biomarkers for LCSCs in the past decades, which is essential to develop future therapies targeting CSCs and to predict prognosis and curative effect of these therapies. PMID:27610139

  17. Cancer Stem Cell Markers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan G. Major

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is one of the world’s top ten most common cancers. Current survival rates are poor with only 50% of patients expected to survive five years after diagnosis. The poor survival rate of HNSCC is partly attributable to the tendency for diagnosis at the late stage of the disease. One of the reasons for treatment failure is thought to be related to the presence of a subpopulation of cells within the tumour called cancer stem cells (CSCs. CSCs display stem cell-like characteristics that impart resistance to conventional treatment modalities and promote tumour initiation, progression, and metastasis. Specific markers for this population have been investigated in the hope of developing a deeper understanding of their role in the pathogenesis of HNSCC and elucidating novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. ALDH/CD44 identifies uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells in salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Pearson, Alexander T; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Kim, Hong Sun; Mochizuki, Daiki; Basura, Gregory; Helman, Joseph; Mantesso, Andrea; Castilho, Rogério M; Wicha, Max S; Nör, Jacques E

    2015-09-29

    A small sub-population of cells characterized by increased tumorigenic potential, ability to self-renew and to differentiate into cells that make up the tumor bulk, has been characterized in some (but not all) tumor types. These unique cells, namedcancer stem cells, are considered drivers of tumor progression in these tumors. The purpose of this work is to understand if cancer stem cells play a functional role in the tumorigenesis of salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas. Here, we investigated the expression of putative cancer stem cell markers (ALDH, CD10, CD24, CD44) in primary human mucoepidermoid carcinomas by immunofluorescence, in vitro salisphere assays, and in vivo tumorigenicity assays in immunodeficient mice. Human mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (UM-HMC-1, UM-HMC-3A, UM-HMC-3B) sorted for high levels of ALDH activity and CD44 expression (ALDHhighCD44high) consistently formed primary and secondary salispheres in vitro, and showed enhanced tumorigenic potential in vivo (defined as time to tumor palpability, tumor growth after palpability), when compared to ALDHlowCD44low cells. Cells sorted for CD10/CD24, and CD10/CD44 showed varying trends of salisphere formation, but consistently low in vivo tumorigenic potential. And finally, cells sorted for CD44/CD24 showed inconsistent results in salisphere formation and tumorigenic potential assays when different cell lines were evaluated. Collectively, these data demonstrate that salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas contain a small population of cancer stem cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and that are characterized by high ALDH activity and CD44 expression. These results suggest that patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma might benefit from therapies that ablate these highly tumorigenic cells.

  19. ICAM1 Is a Potential Cancer Stem Cell Marker of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Ta Tsai

    Full Text Available Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC accounts for about 90% of esophageal cancer diagnosed in Asian countries, with its incidence on the rise. Cancer stem cell (CSC; also known as tumor-initiating cells, TIC is inherently resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation and associates with poor prognosis and therapy failure. Targeting therapy against cancer stem cell has emerged as a potential therapeutic approach to develop effective regimens. However, the suitable CSC marker of ESCC for identification and targeting is still limited. In this study, we screened the novel CSC membrane protein markers using two distinct stemness characteristics of cancer cell lines by a comparative approach. After the validation of RT-PCR, qPCR and western blot analyses, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1 was identified as a potential CSC marker of ESCC. ICAM1 promotes cancer cell migration, invasion as well as increasing mesenchymal marker expression and attenuating epithelial marker expression. In addition, ICAM1 contributes to CSC properties, including sphere formation, drug resistance, and tumorigenesis in mouse xenotransplantation model. Based on the analysis of ICAM1-regulated proteins, we speculated that ICAM1 regulates CSC properties partly through an ICAM1-PTTG1IP-p53-DNMT1 pathway. Moreover, we observed that ICAM1 and CD44 could have a compensation effect on maintaining the stemness characteristics of ESCC, suggesting that the combination of multi-targeting therapies should be under serious consideration to acquire a more potent therapeutic effect on CSC of ESCC.

  20. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D' Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), Piazza Borgo Pila, 16129, Genova (Italy); Thellung, Stefano [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Daga, Antonio [Laboratory of Translational Oncology, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino - IST- Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, L.go R. Benzi, 10, 16132 Genova Italy (Italy); Cilli, Michele [Animal Facility, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino - IST- Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, L.go R. Benzi, 10, 16132 Genova Italy (Italy); Ferrari, Angelo [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D' Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), Piazza Borgo Pila, 16129, Genova (Italy); Florio, Tullio, E-mail: tullio.florio@unige.it [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell-like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-{alpha} and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor Black

  1. Pluripotent stem cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Junying; Thomson, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The derivation of human embryonic stem cells 10 years ago ignited an explosion of public interest in stem cells, yet this achievement depended on prior decades of research on mouse embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic stem cells. In turn, the recent derivation of mouse and human induced pluripotent stem cells depended on the prior studies on mouse and human embryonic stem cells. Both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells can self-renew indefinitely in vitro while ma...

  2. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell–like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-α and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: ► Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 ► These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew ► Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice ► Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor ► Upon differentiation, cells grow as monolayers, loosing the tumorigenic potential

  3. Inactivation of TGFβ receptors in stem cells drives cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammareri, Patrizia; Rose, Aidan M.; Vincent, David F.; Wang, Jun; Nagano, Ai; Libertini, Silvana; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Coates, Philip J.; McHugh, Angela; Pourreyron, Celine; Dayal, Jasbani H. S.; Larsson, Jonas; Weidlich, Simone; Spender, Lindsay C.; Sapkota, Gopal P.; Purdie, Karin J.; Proby, Charlotte M.; Harwood, Catherine A.; Leigh, Irene M.; Clevers, Hans; Barker, Nick; Karlsson, Stefan; Pritchard, Catrin; Marais, Richard; Chelala, Claude; South, Andrew P.; Sansom, Owen J.; Inman, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma patients treated with oncogenic BRAF inhibitors can develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) within weeks of treatment, driven by paradoxical RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway activation. Here we identify frequent TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 mutations in human vemurafenib-induced skin lesions and in sporadic cSCC. Functional analysis reveals these mutations ablate canonical TGFβ Smad signalling, which is localized to bulge stem cells in both normal human and murine skin. MAPK pathway hyperactivation (through BrafV600E or KrasG12D knockin) and TGFβ signalling ablation (through Tgfbr1 deletion) in LGR5+ve stem cells enables rapid cSCC development in the mouse. Mutation of Tp53 (which is commonly mutated in sporadic cSCC) coupled with Tgfbr1 deletion in LGR5+ve cells also results in cSCC development. These findings indicate that LGR5+ve stem cells may act as cells of origin for cSCC, and that RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway hyperactivation or Tp53 mutation, coupled with loss of TGFβ signalling, are driving events of skin tumorigenesis. PMID:27558455

  4. Inactivation of TGFβ receptors in stem cells drives cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammareri, Patrizia; Rose, Aidan M; Vincent, David F; Wang, Jun; Nagano, Ai; Libertini, Silvana; Ridgway, Rachel A; Athineos, Dimitris; Coates, Philip J; McHugh, Angela; Pourreyron, Celine; Dayal, Jasbani H S; Larsson, Jonas; Weidlich, Simone; Spender, Lindsay C; Sapkota, Gopal P; Purdie, Karin J; Proby, Charlotte M; Harwood, Catherine A; Leigh, Irene M; Clevers, Hans; Barker, Nick; Karlsson, Stefan; Pritchard, Catrin; Marais, Richard; Chelala, Claude; South, Andrew P; Sansom, Owen J; Inman, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma patients treated with oncogenic BRAF inhibitors can develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) within weeks of treatment, driven by paradoxical RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway activation. Here we identify frequent TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 mutations in human vemurafenib-induced skin lesions and in sporadic cSCC. Functional analysis reveals these mutations ablate canonical TGFβ Smad signalling, which is localized to bulge stem cells in both normal human and murine skin. MAPK pathway hyperactivation (through Braf(V600E) or Kras(G12D) knockin) and TGFβ signalling ablation (through Tgfbr1 deletion) in LGR5(+ve) stem cells enables rapid cSCC development in the mouse. Mutation of Tp53 (which is commonly mutated in sporadic cSCC) coupled with Tgfbr1 deletion in LGR5(+ve) cells also results in cSCC development. These findings indicate that LGR5(+ve) stem cells may act as cells of origin for cSCC, and that RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway hyperactivation or Tp53 mutation, coupled with loss of TGFβ signalling, are driving events of skin tumorigenesis. PMID:27558455

  5. Human embryonic stem cells and embryonal carcinoma cells have overlapping and distinct metabolic signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Abu Dawud

    Full Text Available While human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs have been studied extensively at the levels of the genome, transcriptome, proteome and epigenome our knowledge of their corresponding metabolomes is limited. Here, we present the metabolic signatures of hESCs and hESCs obtained by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Whilst some metabolites are common to both cell types, representing the self-renewal and house-keeping signatures, others were either higher (e.g., octadecenoic acid, glycerol-3-phosphate, 4-hydroxyproline or lower (e.g., glutamic acid, mannitol, malic acid, GABA in hESCs (H9 compared to hECCs (NTERA2, these represent cell type specific signatures. Further, our combined results of GC-MS and microarray based gene expression profiling of undifferentiated and OCT4-depleted hESCs are consistent with the Warburg effect which is increased glycolysis in embryonic cells and tumor cells in the presence of O(2 while oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS is impaired or even shut down. RNAi-based OCT4 knock down mediated differentiation resulted in the activation of the poised OXPHOS machinery by expressing missing key proteins such as NDUFC1, UQCRB and COX, increase in TCA cycle activity and decreased lactate metabolism. These results shed light on the metabolite layer of pluripotent stem cells and could potentially establish novel metabolic markers of self renewal and pluripotency.

  6. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. They serve as a repair ... body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  7. Ginsenoside Rh2 Inhibits Cancer Stem-Like Cells in Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunli Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Treatments targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs are most effective cancer therapy, whereas determination of CSCs is challenging. We have recently reported that Lgr5-positive cells are cancer stem cells (CSCs in human skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Ginsenoside Rh2 (GRh2 has been shown to significantly inhibit growth of some types of cancers, whereas its effects on the SCC have not been examined. Methods: Here, we transduced human SCC cells with lentivirus carrying GFP reporter under Lgr5 promoter. The transduced SCC cells were treated with different doses of GRh2, and then analyzed cell viability by CCK-8 assay and MTT assay. The effects of GRh2 on Lgr5-positive CSCs were determined by fow cytometry and by tumor sphere formation. Autophagy-associated protein and β-catenin were measured by Western blot. Expression of short hairpin small interfering RNA (shRNA for Atg7 and β-catenin were used to inhibit autophagy and β-catenin signaling pathway, respectively, as loss-of-function experiments. Results: We found that GRh2 dose-dependently reduced SCC viability, possibly through reduced the number of Lgr5-positive CSCs. GRh2 increased autophagy and reduced β-catenin signaling in SCC cells. Inhibition of autophagy abolished the effects of GRh2 on β-catenin and cell viability, while increasing β-catenin abolished the effects of GRh2 on autophagy and cell viability. Conclusion: Taken together, our data suggest that GRh2 inhibited SCC growth, possibly through reduced the number of Lgr5-positive CSCs. This may be conducted through an interaction between autophagy and β-catenin signaling.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Shed Amphiregulin at the Surface of Lung Carcinoma Cells in a Juxtacrine Manner

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    Oriane Carnet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors comprise cancer cells and different supportive stromal cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have recently been shown to enhance tumor growth and metastasis. We provide new mechanistic insights into how bone marrow (BM–derived MSCs co-injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells promote tumor growth and metastasis in mice. The proinvasive effect of BM-MSCs exerted on tumor cells relies on an unprecedented juxtacrine action of BM-MSC, leading to the trans-shedding of amphiregulin (AREG from the tumor cell membrane by tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme carried by the BM-MSC plasma membrane. The released soluble AREG activates cancer cells and promotes their invasiveness. This novel concept is supported by the exploitation of different 2D and 3D culture systems and by pharmacological approaches using a tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme inhibitor and AREG-blocking antibodies. Altogether, we here assign a new function to BM-MSC in tumor progression and establish an uncovered link between AREG and BM-MSC.

  9. ISG15 predicts poor prognosis and promotes cancer stem cell phenotype in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ping; Wang, Hong-Bo; Liang, Fa-Ya; Feng, Guo-Kai; Zhou, Ai-Jun; Cai, Mu-Yan; Zhong, Qian; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), the first identified ubiquitin-like protein, is known for its anti-viral capacity. However, its role in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, using RNA-seq profiling analysis, we identified ISG15 as a differentially expressed gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and validated its overexpression in NPC samples and cells. High ISG15 levels in NPC tissues were correlated with more frequent local recurrence and shorter overall survival and disease-free survival. ISG15 overexpression promoted a cancer stem cell phenotype in NPC cells, including increased colony and tumorsphere formation abilities, pluripotency-associated genes expression, and in vivo tumorigenicity. By contrast, knockdown of ISG15 attenuated stemness characteristics in NPC cells. Furthermore, overexpression of ISG15 increased NPC cell resistance to radiation and cisplatin (DDP) treatment. Our study demonstrates a protumor role of ISG15, and suggests that ISG15 is a prognostic predictor and a potential therapeutic target for NPC. PMID:26919245

  10. Isolation of cancer stem like cells from human adenosquamous carcinoma of the lung supports a monoclonal origin from a multipotential tissue stem cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie P Mather

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that many solid tumors are hierarchically organized with the bulk tumor cells having limited replication potential, but are sustained by a stem-like cell that perpetuates the tumor. These cancer stem cells have been hypothesized to originate from transformation of adult tissue stem cells, or through re-acquisition of stem-like properties by progenitor cells. Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC is an aggressive type of lung cancer that contains a mixture of cells with squamous (cytokeratin 5+ and adenocarcinoma (cytokeratin 7+ phenotypes. The origin of these mixtures is unclear as squamous carcinomas are thought to arise from basal cells in the upper respiratory tract while adenocarcinomas are believed to form from stem cells in the bronchial alveolar junction. We have isolated and characterized cancer stem-like populations from ASC through application of selective defined culture medium initially used to grow human lung stem cells. Homogeneous cells selected from ASC tumor specimens were stably expanded in vitro. Primary xenografts and metastatic lesions derived from these cells in NSG mice fully recapitulate both the adenocarcinoma and squamous features of the patient tumor. Interestingly, while the CSLC all co-expressed cytokeratins 5 and 7, most xenograft cells expressed either one, or neither, with <10% remaining double positive. We also demonstrated the potential of the CSLC to differentiate to multi-lineage structures with branching lung morphology expressing bronchial, alveolar and neuroendocrine markers in vitro. Taken together the properties of these ASC-derived CSLC suggests that ASC may arise from a primitive lung stem cell distinct from the bronchial-alveolar or basal stem cells.

  11. GLI1 is involved in cell cycle regulation and proliferation of NT2 embryonal carcinoma stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Janni; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Pedersen, Mikkel W.;

    2008-01-01

    of altered HH signaling are interpreted by specific cell types. We have investigated the role of the HH transcription factor glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) in the human Ntera2=D1 (NT2) embryonal carcinoma stem cell line. The study revealed that expression of GLI1 and its direct transcriptional......1 phase cyclins. In conclusion, our results suggest that GLI1 is involved in cell cycle and proliferation control in the embryonal carcinoma stem cell line NT2....... target Patched (PTCH) is downregulated in the early stages of retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of NT2 cells. To identify transcriptional targets of the HH transcription factor GLI1 in NT2 cells, we performed global expression profiling following GLI1 RNA interference (RNAi). Of the similar...

  12. Type I collagen inhibits differentiation and promotes a stem cell-like phenotype in human colorectal carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkland, S. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human colorectal cancer is caused by mutations and is thought to be maintained by a population of cancer stem cells. Further phenotypic changes occurring at the invasive edge suggest that colon cancer cells are also regulated by their microenvironment. Type I collagen, a promoter of the malignant phenotype in pancreatic carcinoma cells, is highly expressed at the invasive front of human colorectal cancer. Methods: This study investigates the role of type I collagen in specifying t...

  13. Stem cell pluripotency factor NANOG is expressed in human fetal gonocytes, testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Almstrup, K; Nielsen, J E;

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: NANOG is a key regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and pluripotency. Our recent genome-wide gene expression profiling study of the precursor of testicular germ cell tumours, carcinoma in situ testis (CIS), showed close similarity between ESC and CIS, including high NANOG...... earlier than for OCT-4. We detected no expression at the protein level in normal testis. CONCLUSIONS: NANOG is a new marker for testicular CIS and germ cell tumours and the high level of NANOG along with OCT-4 are determinants of the stem cell-like pluripotency of the preinvasive CIS cell. Timing of NANOG......; seminoma and embryonal carcinoma were strongly positive, differentiated somatic elements of teratoma were negative. We provide evidence for the fetal origin of testicular cancer as we detected strong expression of NANOG in fetal gonocytes up to gestational week 20, with subsequent down-regulation occurring...

  14. EGFR kinase promotes acquisition of stem cell-like properties: a potential therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L Abhold

    Full Text Available Members of the EGFR/ErbB family of tyrosine kinases are found to be highly expressed and deregulated in many cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. The ErbB family, including EGFR, has been demonstrated to play key roles in metastasis, tumorigenesis, cell proliferation, and drug resistance. Recently, these characteristics have been linked to a small subpopulation of cells classified as cancer stem cells (CSCs which are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. In this study, we investigated the possible role of EGFR as a regulator of "stemness" in HNSCC cells. Activation of EGFR by the addition of EGF ligand or ectopic expression of EGFR in two established HNSCC cell lines (UMSCC-22B and HN-1 resulted in the induction of CD44, BMI-1, Oct-4, NANOG, CXCR4, and SDF-1. Activation of EGFR also resulted in increased tumorsphere formation, a characteristic ability of cancer stem cells. Conversely, treatment with the EGFR kinase inhibitor, Gefinitib (Iressa, resulted in decreased expression of the aforementioned genes, and loss of tumorsphere-forming ability. Similar trends were observed in a 99.9% CD44 positive stem cell culture derived from a fresh HNSCC tumor, confirming our findings for the cell lines. Additionally, we found that these putative cancer stem cells, when treated with Gefitinib, possessed a lower capacity to invade and became more sensitive to cisplatin-induced death in vitro. These results suggest that EGFR plays critical roles in the survival, maintenance, and function of cancer stem cells. Drugs that target EGFR, perhaps administered in combination with conventional chemotherapy, might be an effective treatment for HNSCC.

  15. Cancer stem-like cells in Epstein-Barr virus-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samantha Wei-Man Lun; Siu-Tim Cheung; Kwok-Wai Lo

    2014-01-01

    Although the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has spread to all populations in the world, EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is prevalent only in South China and Southeast Asia. The role of EBV in the malignant transformation of nasopharyngeal epithelium is the main focus of current researches. Radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy have been successful in treating early stage NPC, but the recurrence rates remain high. Unfortunately, local relapse and metastasis are commonly unresponsive to conventional treatments. These recurrent and metastatic lesions are believed to arise from residual or surviving cells that have the properties of cancer stem cels. These cancer stem-like cels (CSCs) have the ability to self-renew, differentiate, and sustain propagation. They are also chemo-resistant and can form spheres in anchorage-independent environments. This review summarizes recent researches on the CSCs in EBV-associated NPC, including the findings regarding cell surface markers, stem cell-related transcription factors, and various signaling pathways. In particular, the review focuses on the roles of EBV latent genes [latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A)], cellular microRNAs, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette chemodrug transporters in contributing to the properties of CSCs, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem-like transition, and chemo-resistance. Novel therapeutics that enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy and inhibitors that suppress the properties of CSCs are also discussed.

  16. Calmidazolium chloride inhibits growth of murine embryonal carcinoma cells, a model of cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jina; Kim, Min Seong; Kim, Min Aeh; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Calmidazolium chloride (CMZ) is widely used as a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist, but is also known to induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. However, in spite of the importance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in cancer therapy, the effects of CMZ on CSCs are not yet well understood. We investigated the effects of CMZ on the F9 embryonal carcinoma cell (ECC) line as a surrogate model of CSCs. To avoid bias due to culture conditions, F9 ECCs and E14 embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were grown in the same culture medium. Results obtained using a cell-counting kit showed that CMZ significantly inhibited growth in F9 ECCs compared with growth in E14 ESCs. CMZ also induced apoptosis of F9 ECCs, but not of E14 ESCs, which was associated with caspase-3 activation and an increased fraction of the sub-G1 cell population. In addition, our data revealed that the expression of stemness-related genes including c-Myc was selectively down regulated in CMZ-treated F9 ECCs. Our results suggest that CMZ can inhibit the growth of ECCs by inducing apoptosis and down regulating stemness-related genes, without causing any harm to normal stem cells. These findings indicate a potential application of CMZ in the development of anti-CSC therapeutics. PMID:27247146

  17. Expression of the embryonic stem cell marker SOX2 in early-stage breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallwiener Diethelm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SRY-related HMG-box family of transcription factors member SOX2 has been mainly studied in embryonic stem cells as well as early foregut and neural development. More recently, SOX2 was shown to participate in reprogramming of adult somatic cells to a pluripotent stem cell state and implicated in tumorigenesis in various organs. In breast cancer, SOX2 expression was reported as a feature of basal-like tumors. In this study, we assessed SOX2 expression in 95 primary tumors of postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Methods Samples from 95 patients diagnosed and treated at the University of Tuebingen Institute of Pathology and Women's Hospital were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for SOX2 expression in the primary tumor samples and in corresponding lymph node metastasis, where present. Furthermore, SOX2 amplification status was assessed by FISH in representative samples. In addition, eighteen fresh frozen samples were analyzed for SOX2, NANOG and OCT4 gene expression by real-time PCR. Results SOX2 expression was detected in 28% of invasive breast carcinoma as well as in 44% of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS lesions. A score of SOX2 expression (score 0 to 3 was defined in order to distinguish SOX2 negative (score 0 from SOX2 positive samples (score 1-3 and among latter the subgroup of SOX2 high expressors (score 3 > 50% positive cells. Overall, the incidence of SOX2 expression (score 1-3 was higher than previously reported in a cohort of lymph node negative patients (28% versus 16.7%. SOX2 expression was detected across different breast cancer subtypes and did not correlate with tumor grading. However, high SOX2 expression (score 3 was associated with larger tumor size (p = 0.047 and positive lymph node status (0.018. Corresponding metastatic lymph nodes showed higher SOX2 expression and were significantly more often SOX2 positive than primary tumors (p = 0.0432. Conclusions In this report, we show that the embryonic stem

  18. Survivin Modulates Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Derived Stem-Like Cell Proliferation, Viability and Tumor Formation in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lotti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous Cell Carcinoma-derived Stem-like Cells (SCC-SC originate from alterations in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC gene expression and sustain tumor development, invasion and recurrence. Since survivin, a KSC marker, is highly expressed in SCC-SC, we evaluate its role in SCC-SC cell growth and SCC models. Survivin silencing by siRNA decreases clonal growth of SCC keratinocytes and viability of total, rapidly adhering (RAD and non-RAD (NRAD cells from primary SCC. Similarly, survivin silencing reduces the expression of stem cell markers (OCT4, NOTCH1, CD133, β1-integrin, while it increases the level of differentiation markers (K10, involucrin. Moreover, survivin silencing improves the malignant phenotype of SCC 3D-reconstruct, as demonstrated by reduced epidermal thickness, lower Ki-67 positive cell number, and decreased expression of MMP9 and psoriasin. Furthermore, survivin depletion by siRNA in RasG12V-IκBα-derived tumors leads to smaller tumor formation characterized by lower mitotic index and reduced expression of the tumor-associated marker HIF1α, VEGF and CD51. Therefore, our results indicate survivin as a key gene in regulating SCC cancer stem cell formation and cSCC development.

  19. Survivin Modulates Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Derived Stem-Like Cell Proliferation, Viability and Tumor Formation in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Roberta; Palazzo, Elisabetta; Petrachi, Tiziana; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Saltari, Annalisa; Truzzi, Francesca; Quadri, Marika; Puviani, Mario; Maiorana, Antonino; Marconi, Alessandra; Pincelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma-derived Stem-like Cells (SCC-SC) originate from alterations in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC) gene expression and sustain tumor development, invasion and recurrence. Since survivin, a KSC marker, is highly expressed in SCC-SC, we evaluate its role in SCC-SC cell growth and SCC models. Survivin silencing by siRNA decreases clonal growth of SCC keratinocytes and viability of total, rapidly adhering (RAD) and non-RAD (NRAD) cells from primary SCC. Similarly, survivin silencing reduces the expression of stem cell markers (OCT4, NOTCH1, CD133, β₁-integrin), while it increases the level of differentiation markers (K10, involucrin). Moreover, survivin silencing improves the malignant phenotype of SCC 3D-reconstruct, as demonstrated by reduced epidermal thickness, lower Ki-67 positive cell number, and decreased expression of MMP9 and psoriasin. Furthermore, survivin depletion by siRNA in Ras(G12V)-IκBα-derived tumors leads to smaller tumor formation characterized by lower mitotic index and reduced expression of the tumor-associated marker HIF1α, VEGF and CD51. Therefore, our results indicate survivin as a key gene in regulating SCC cancer stem cell formation and cSCC development.

  20. The usefulness of three-dimensional cell culture in induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Spheroids were created from esophageal carcinoma cells using NanoCulture® Plates. •The proportion of strongly ALDH-positive cells increased in 3-D culture. •Expression of cancer stem cell-related genes was enhanced in 3-D culture. •CA-9 expression was enhanced, suggesting hypoxia had been induced in 3-D culture. •Drug resistance was increased. 3-D culture is useful for inducing cancer stem cells. -- Abstract: In recent years, research on resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in cancer treatment has come under the spotlight, and researchers have also begun investigating the relationship between resistance and cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are assumed to be present in esophageal cancer, but experimental methods for identification and culture of these cells have not yet been established. To solve this problem, we created spheroids using a NanoCulture® Plate (NCP) for 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture, which was designed as a means for experimentally reproducing the 3-D structures found in the body. We investigated the potential for induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal cancer cells. Using flow cytometry we analyzed the expression of surface antigen markers CD44, CD133, CD338 (ABCG2), CD318 (CDCP1), and CD326 (EpCAM), which are known cancer stem cell markers. None of these surface antigen markers showed enhanced expression in 3-D cultured cells. We then analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activity using the ALDEFLUOR reagent, which can identify immature cells such as stem cells and precursor cells. 3-D-cultured cells were strongly positive for ALDH enzyme activity. We also analyzed the expression of the stem cell-related genes Sox-2, Nanog, Oct3/4, and Lin28 using RT-PCR. Expression of Sox-2, Nanog, and Lin28 was enhanced. Analysis of expression of the hypoxic surface antigen marker carbonic anhydrase-9 (CA-9), which is an indicator of cancer stem cell induction and maintenance, revealed that CA-9 expression

  1. The usefulness of three-dimensional cell culture in induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Daisuke [Department of Esophageal and Gastroenterological Surgery, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Kato, Kazunori, E-mail: kzkatou@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Department of Atopy Research Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nohara, Shigeo; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki [Department of Esophageal and Gastroenterological Surgery, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Spheroids were created from esophageal carcinoma cells using NanoCulture® Plates. •The proportion of strongly ALDH-positive cells increased in 3-D culture. •Expression of cancer stem cell-related genes was enhanced in 3-D culture. •CA-9 expression was enhanced, suggesting hypoxia had been induced in 3-D culture. •Drug resistance was increased. 3-D culture is useful for inducing cancer stem cells. -- Abstract: In recent years, research on resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in cancer treatment has come under the spotlight, and researchers have also begun investigating the relationship between resistance and cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are assumed to be present in esophageal cancer, but experimental methods for identification and culture of these cells have not yet been established. To solve this problem, we created spheroids using a NanoCulture® Plate (NCP) for 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture, which was designed as a means for experimentally reproducing the 3-D structures found in the body. We investigated the potential for induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal cancer cells. Using flow cytometry we analyzed the expression of surface antigen markers CD44, CD133, CD338 (ABCG2), CD318 (CDCP1), and CD326 (EpCAM), which are known cancer stem cell markers. None of these surface antigen markers showed enhanced expression in 3-D cultured cells. We then analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activity using the ALDEFLUOR reagent, which can identify immature cells such as stem cells and precursor cells. 3-D-cultured cells were strongly positive for ALDH enzyme activity. We also analyzed the expression of the stem cell-related genes Sox-2, Nanog, Oct3/4, and Lin28 using RT-PCR. Expression of Sox-2, Nanog, and Lin28 was enhanced. Analysis of expression of the hypoxic surface antigen marker carbonic anhydrase-9 (CA-9), which is an indicator of cancer stem cell induction and maintenance, revealed that CA-9 expression

  2. Inactivation of TGFβ receptors in stem cells drives cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cammareri, Patrizia; Rose, Aidan M; Vincent, David F; Wang, Jun; Nagano, Ai; Libertini, Silvana; Ridgway, Rachel A; Athineos, Dimitris; Coates, Philip J; McHugh, Angela; Pourreyron, Celine; Dayal, Jasbani H S; Larsson, Jonas; Weidlich, Simone; Spender, Lindsay C; Sapkota, Gopal P; Purdie, Karin J; Proby, Charlotte M; Harwood, Catherine A; Leigh, Irene M; Clevers, Hans; Barker, Nick; Karlsson, Stefan; Pritchard, Catrin; Marais, Richard; Chelala, Claude; South, Andrew P; Sansom, Owen J; Inman, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma patients treated with oncogenic BRAF inhibitors can develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) within weeks of treatment, driven by paradoxical RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway activation. Here we identify frequent TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 mutations in human vemurafenib-induced skin lesions and in spora

  3. Altered cell cycle regulation helps stem-like carcinoma cells resist apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton Stephen; Chappell James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Reemergence of carcinomas following chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy is not well understood, but a recent study in BMC Cancer suggests that resistance to apoptosis resulting from altered cell cycle regulation is crucial. See research article: http://biomedcentral.com/1471-2407/10/166

  4. SOX9 is a novel cancer stem cell marker surrogated by osteopontin in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takayuki; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Ishii, Takamichi; Miyauchi, Yuya; Kojima, Hidenobu; Yamaoka, Ryoya; Katayama, Hokahiro; Yoshitoshi, Elena Yukie; Ogiso, Satoshi; Kita, Sadahiko; Yasuda, Katsutaro; Fukumitsu, Ken; Komori, Junji; Hatano, Etsuro; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The current lack of cancer stem cell (CSC) markers that are easily evaluated by blood samples prevents the establishment of new therapeutic strategies in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Herein, we examined whether sex determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) represents a new CSC marker, and whether osteopontin (OPN) can be used as a surrogate marker of SOX9 in HCC. In HCC cell lines transfected with a SOX9 promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein gene, FACS-isolated SOX9+ cells were capable of self-renewal and differentiation into SOX9− cells, and displayed high proliferation capacity in vitro. Xenotransplantation experiments revealed that SOX9+ cells reproduced, differentiated into SOX9− cells, and generated tumors at a high frequency in vivo. Moreover, SOX9+ cells were found to be involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and activation of TGFb/Smad signaling. Gain/loss of function experiments showed that SOX9 regulates Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, including cyclin D1 and OPN. Immunohistochemistry of 166 HCC surgical specimens and serum OPN measurements showed that compared to SOX9− patients, SOX9+ patients had significantly poorer recurrence-free survival, stronger venous invasion, and higher serum OPN levels. In conclusion, SOX9 is a novel HCC-CSC marker regulating the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and its downstream target, OPN. OPN is a useful surrogate marker of SOX9 in HCC. PMID:27457505

  5. Embryonic stem cell-like features of testicular carcinoma in situ revealed by genome-wide gene expression profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Wirkner, Ute;

    2004-01-01

    in their stoichiometry on progression into embryonic carcinoma. We compared the CIS expression profile with patterns reported in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which revealed a substantial overlap that may be as high as 50%. We also demonstrated an over-representation of expressed genes in regions of 17q and 12, reported......Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is the common precursor of histologically heterogeneous testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), which in recent decades have markedly increased and now are the most common malignancy of young men. Using genome-wide gene expression profiling, we identified >200 genes highly...

  6. Targeting gallbladder carcinoma: bone marrow-derived stem cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles of myxoma virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weng Mingzhe; Zhang Mingdi; Qin Yiyu; Gong Wei; Tang Zhaohui; Quan Zhiwei; Wu Kejin

    2014-01-01

    Background Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) has a high mortality rate,requiring synergistic anti-tumor management for effective treatment.The myxoma virus (MYXV) exhibits a modest clinical value through its oncolytic potential and narrow host tropism.Methods We performed viral replication assays,cell viability assays,migration assays,and xenograft tumor models to demonstrate that bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) may enhance efficiency of intravenous MYXV delivery.Results We examined the permissiveness of various GBC cell lines towards MYXV infection and found two supported single and multiple rounds of MYXV replication,leading to an oncolytic effect.Furthermore,we found that BMSCs exhibited tropism for GBC cells within a Matrigel migration system.BMSCs failed to affect the growth of GBC cells,in terms of tumor volume and survival time.Finally,we demonstrated in vivo that intravenous injection of MYXV-infected BMSCs significantly improves the oncolytic effect of MYXV alone,almost to the same extent as intratumoral injection of MYXV.Conclusion This study indicates that BMSCs are a promising novel vehicle for MYXV to clinically address gallbladder tumors.

  7. In vitro identification and characterization of CD133(pos cancer stem-like cells in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Zito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent publications suggest that neoplastic initiation and growth are dependent on a small subset of cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma (ATC is a very aggressive solid tumor with poor prognosis, characterized by high dedifferentiation. The existence of CSCs might account for the heterogeneity of ATC lesions. CD133 has been identified as a stem cell marker for normal and cancerous tissues, although its biological function remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ATC cell lines ARO, KAT-4, KAT-18 and FRO were analyzed for CD133 expression. Flow cytometry showed CD133(pos cells only in ARO and KAT-4 (64+/-9% and 57+/-12%, respectively. These data were confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. ARO and KAT-4 were also positive for fetal marker oncofetal fibronectin and negative for thyrocyte-specific differentiating markers thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase and sodium/iodide symporter. Sorted ARO/CD133(pos cells exhibited higher proliferation, self-renewal, colony-forming ability in comparison with ARO/CD133(neg. Furthermore, ARO/CD133(pos showed levels of thyroid transcription factor TTF-1 similar to the fetal thyroid cell line TAD-2, while the expression in ARO/CD133(neg was negligible. The expression of the stem cell marker OCT-4 detected by RT-PCR and flow cytometry was markedly higher in ARO/CD133(pos in comparison to ARO/CD133(neg cells. The stem cell markers c-KIT and THY-1 were negative. Sensitivity to chemotherapy agents was investigated, showing remarkable resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in ARO/CD133(pos when compared with ARO/CD133(neg cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We describe CD133(pos cells in ATC cell lines. ARO/CD133(pos cells exhibit stem cell-like features--such as high proliferation, self-renewal ability, expression of OCT-4--and are characterized by higher resistance to chemotherapy. The simultaneous positivity for thyroid specific factor TTF-1 and onfFN suggest

  8. The biology of cancer stem cells and its clinical implication in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung Kew

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly malignant tumor with limited treatment options in its advanced state. The molecular mechanisms underlying HCC remain unclear because of the complexity of its multi-step development process. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are defined as a small population of cells within a tumor that possess the capability for self-renewal and the generation of heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. To date, there have been two theories concerning the mechanism of carcinogenesis, i.e., the stochastic (clonal evolution) model and the hierarchical (cancer stem cell-driven) model. The concept of the CSC has been established over the past decade, and the roles of CSCs in the carcinogenic processes of various cancers, including HCC, have been emphasized. Previous experimental and clinical evidence indicated the existence of liver CSCs; however, the potential mechanistic links between liver CSCs and the development of HCC in humans are not fully understood. Although definitive cell surface markers for liver CSCs have not yet been found, several putative markers have been identified, which allow the prospective isolation of CSCs from HCC. The identification and characterization of CSCs in HCC is essential for a better understanding of tumor initiation or progression in relation to signaling pathways. These markers could be used along with clinical parameters for the prediction of chemoresistance, radioresistance, metastasis and survival and may represent potential targets for the development of new molecular therapies against HCC. This review describes the current evidence for the existence and function of liver CSCs and discuss the clinical implications of CSCs in patients demonstrating resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies, as well as clinical outcomes. Such data may provide a future perspective for targeted therapy in HCC.

  9. Positive feedback loop between cancer stem cells and angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Liu, Nianli; Lin, Marie C; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-09-01

    Anti-angiogenesis-related therapies have become the standard care for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as HCC is a highly vascularized solid tumor. Unfortunately, only modest and limited efficacies are observed. Emerging evidence have attributed to the limited efficacy to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the tumor. CSCs predominantly drives angiogenesis via releasing proangiogenic factors and exosomes. They have the ability to resistant intratumoral hypoxia via autophagy or by directly forming the tubular structure to obtain blood. On the other hand, the vascular niche in tumor microenvironment also releases growth factors via juxtacrine and paracrine mechanisms to support the growth of CSCs and maintain its stemness features. This positive feedback loop between angiogenesis and CSCs exists in liver tumor microenvironment that is responsible for the development and poor prognosis of HCC. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the crosstalks between angiogenesis and CSCs, and their interactions in liver tumor microenvironment and their purpose that an effective anti-angiogenic therapy should also target CSCs for HCC treatment. PMID:27108065

  10. Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Madhukar Thakur

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in ...

  11. Salinomycin induces cell death and differentiation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma stem cells despite activation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and Akt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to play a crucial role in cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and capacity for self-renewal. Recent studies have reported that salinomycin, a livestock antibiotic, selectively targets breast cancer stem cells 100-fold more effectively than paclitaxel. In our study we sought to determine the effects of salinomycin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stem cells. MTS and TUNEL assays were used to study cell proliferation and apoptosis as a function of salinomycin exposure in JLO-1, a putative HNSCC stem cell culture. MTS and trypan blue dye exclusion assays were performed to investigate potential drug interactions between salinomycin and cisplatin or paclitaxel. Stem cell-like phenotype was measured by mRNA expression of stem cell markers, sphere-forming capacity, and matrigel invasion assays. Immunoblotting was also used to determine expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and Akt phosphorylation. Arrays by Illumina, Inc. were used to profile microRNA expression as a function of salinomycin dose. In putative HNSCC stem cells, salinomycin was found to significantly inhibit cell viability, induce a 71.5% increase in levels of apoptosis, elevate the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and work synergistically with cisplatin and paclitaxel in inducing cell death. It was observed that salinomycin significantly inhibited sphere forming-capability and repressed the expression of CD44 and BMI-1 by 3.2-fold and 6.2-fold, respectively. Furthermore, salinomycin reduced invasion of HNSCC stem cells by 2.1 fold. Contrary to expectations, salinomycin induced the expression of EMT markers Snail, vimentin, and Zeb-1, decreased expression of E-cadherin, and also induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream targets GSK3-β and mTOR. These results demonstrate that in HNSCC cancer stem cells, salinomycin can cause cell death and decrease stem cell properties despite activation of both EMT and

  12. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities

  13. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, S.; Tanaka, J.; Okada, S.; Isobe, T.; Yamamoto, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Irie, T.; Akiyama, C.; Kohno, Y.; Tachikawa, T.; Mishima, K., E-mail: mishima-k@dent.showa-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities.

  14. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... stem cells blog from the International Society for Stem Cell Research. Learn About Stem Cells From Lab to You ...

  15. Differentiation of P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells into insulin-producing cells promoted by pancreas-conditioned medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Akram; Esmaeili, Fariba; Nejatpour, Azadeh; Houshmand, Fariba; Shabani, Leila; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2016-07-01

    The ability of embryonal carcinoma )EC (stem cells to generate insulin-producing cells (IPCs) is still unknown. We examined the trophic effects of pancreas-conditioned medium (PCM) on in vitro production of IPCs. Initially, P19 EC cells were characterized by the expression of stem cell markers, Oct3/4, Sox-2 and Nanog. To direct differentiation, P19-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) were induced by selection of nestin-positive cells and treatment with different concentrations of PCM. Morphological studies documented the presence of islet-like cell IPCs clusters. The differentiated cells were immunoreactive for β cell-specific proteins, including insulin, proinsulin, C-peptide and insulin receptor-β. The expression of genes related to pancreatic β cell development and function (PDX-1, INS1, INS2, EP300 and CREB1) was confirmed by qPCR. During differentiation, the expression of EP300 and CREB1 increased by 2.5 and 3.1 times, respectively. In contrast, a sharp decrease in the expression of Oct3/4, Sox-2 and Nanog by 4, 1.5 and 1.5 times, respectively, was observed. The differentiated cells were functionally active, synthesizing and secreting insulin in a glucose-regulated manner. Network prediction highlighted crosstalk between PDX-1 transcription factor and INS2 ligand in IPC generation and revealed positive regulatory effects of EP300, CREB1, PPARA, EGR, KIT, GLP1R, and PKT2 on activation of PDX-1 and INS2. This is the first report of the induction of IPC differentiation from EC cells by using neonate mouse PCM. Since P19 EC cells are widely available, easily cultured without feeders and do not require special growth conditions, they would provide a valuable tool for studying pancreatic β cell differentiation and development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25044225

  16. RBP2 induces stem-like cancer cells by promoting EMT and is a prognostic marker for renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dahai; Kannappan, Vinodh; Chen, Xiang; Li, Jingqin; Leng, Xuefeng; Zhang, Jinping; Xuan, Shiying

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), one of the most common kidney cancers, has a poor prognosis. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a hallmark of carcinoma invasion and metastasis. Several studies have examined the molecular regulation of EMT, but the relationship between histone demethylases and EMT is little understood. In this study, we investigated the role of retinoblastoma-binding protein-2 (RBP2), a histone demethylase that is highly expressed in RCC and is positively correlated with poor RCC prognosis in the regulation of EMT. We found that ectopic overexpression of RBP2 can induce cancer stem cell-like (CSC) phenotypes through EMT in RCC cells by converting them to a more mesenchymal phenotype. This results in increased resistance to apoptosis, which leads to enhanced tumor growth in xenograft models. Together, our data show that RBP2 is an epigenetic regulator that has an important role in the initiation of CSC phenotypes through EMT, leading to tumor progression. RBP2 is also a novel biomolecule for RCC diagnosis, and prognosis and may be a therapeutic target. PMID:27282106

  17. CD163+ Tumor-Associated Macrophages Correlated with Poor Prognosis and Cancer Stem Cells in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Fei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs play an important role in the progression and prognostication of numerous cancers. However, the role and clinical significance of TAM markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC has not been elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the correlation between the expression of TAM markers and pathological features in OSCC by tissue microarray. Tissue microarrays containing 16 normal oral mucosa, 6 oral epithelial dysplasia, and 43 OSCC specimens were studied by immunohistochemistry. We observed that the protein expression of the TAM markers CD68 and CD163 as well as the cancer stem cell (CSC markers ALDH1, CD44, and SOX2 increased successively from the normal oral mucosa to OSCC. The expressions of CD68 and CD163 were significantly associated with lymph node status, and SOX2 was significantly correlated with pathological grade and lymph node status, whereas ALDH1 was correlated with tumor stage. Furthermore, CD68 was significantly correlated with CD163, SOX2, and ALDH1 (P<0.05. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that OSCC patients overexpressing CD163 had significantly worse overall survival (P<0.05. TAM markers are associated with cancer stem cell marker and OSCC overall survival, suggesting their potential prognostic value in OSCC.

  18. Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar Thakur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in the body. Often called as Magic Seeds, stem cells are produced in bone marrow and circulate in blood, albeit at a relatively low concentration. These virtues together with the ability of stem cells to grow in tissue culture have paved the way for their applications to generate new and healthy tissues and to replace diseased or injured human organs. Although possibilities of stem cell applications are many, much remains yet to be understood of these remarkable magic seeds. Conclusion: This presentation shall briefly cover the origin of stem cells, the pros and cons of their growth and division, their potential application, and shall outline some examples of the contributions of radiolabeled stem cells, in this rapidly growing branch of biomedical science

  19. Oral squamous cell carcinoma arising in a patient after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Paolo G; Scully, Crispian; Chiusa, Luigi; Broccoletti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with a history of acute myeloid leukaemia treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and with a 5-year history of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws, following 12 cycles of intravenous zoledronic acid therapy, presented in December 2009 with a history of increasingly severe unilateral lower jaw pain. Oral examination revealed, as previously, exposed bone in the left mandible, but also a new exophytic mass on the lower-left buccal mucosa. Biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an oral squamous cell carcinoma that appeared adjacent to an area of osteochemonecrosis.

  20. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epithelioma, is the most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially ... other health issues. Infiltrating or morpheaform basal cell carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive ...

  1. Resveratrol Impedes the Stemness, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, and Metabolic Reprogramming of Cancer Stem Cells in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma through p53 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-An Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are able to self-renew and are refractory to cancer treatment. To investigate the effects of resveratrol on CSCs of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, we employed a behavior selection strategy to isolate CSCs based on radioresistance, chemoresistance, and tumor sphere formation ability. These NPC CSCs displayed stem cell properties and underwent metabolic shift to predominately rely on glycolysis for energy supply. Intriguingly, we found that resveratrol turned off the metabolic switch, increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS level, and depolarized mitochondrial membranes. These alterations in metabolism occurred concomitantly with the suppression of CSC properties including resistance to therapy, self-renewal capacity, tumor initiation capacity, and metastatic potential in NPC CSCs. We found that resveratrol impeded CSC properties through the activation of p53 and this effect could be reversed by knockdown of p53. Furthermore, resveratrol suppressed the stemness and EMT through reactivating p53 and inducing miR-145 and miR-200c, which were downregulated in NPC CSCs. In conclusion, we demonstrated that resveratrol employed the p53 pathway in regulating stemness, EMT, and metabolic reprogramming. Further investigation of the molecular mechanism of p53 activation by resveratrol may provide useful information for the development of novel therapies for cancer treatment through targeting to CSCs.

  2. Expression and Significance of Stem Cell Markers CK19, Notch3, CD133, P75NTR, STRO-1 and ABCG2 in Pulmonary Squamous Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Xuyong LIN, , , , ,; Liu, Shuli; Liu, Nan; Yang, Xiaoshi; Xu, Hongtao; WANG, ENHUA

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective Increasing reports showed that some tumor stem cells were selfrenewal and multi-lineage differentiated in tumors, similar to the normal stem cells in human body. The aim of this study is to observe the expression of stem cell markers in lung squamous carcinoma tissues. Methods Fifty-four lung cancer specimens from surgery were analyzed for CK19, Notch3, CD133, P75NTR, STRO-1 and ABCG2 expression by using S-P immunohistochemistry. In addition, ten normal lung tissue sa...

  3. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... ISSCR Get Involved Media © 2015 International Society for Stem Cell Research Terms of Use Disclaimer Privacy Policy

  4. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Stem Cell Basics Stem Cell Basics: Introduction Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current Research Policy Glossary Site Map Stem Cell Basics Introduction: What are stem cells, and why ...

  5. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  6. Inhibition of AQP1 Hampers Osteosarcoma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Progression Mediated by Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagalli, Alessandra; Nardelli, Anna; Fontanella, Raffaela; Zannetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The complex cross-talk between tumor cells and their surrounding stromal environment plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Among several cell types that constitute the tumor stroma, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) selectively migrate toward the tumor microenvironment and contribute to the active formation of tumor-associated stroma. Therefore, here we elucidate the involvement of BM-MSCs to promote osteosarcoma (OS) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells migration and invasion and deepening the role of specific pathways. We analyzed the function of aquaporin 1 (AQP1), a water channel known to promote metastasis and neoangiogenes. AQP1 protein levels were analyzed in OS (U2OS) and HCC (SNU-398) cells exposed to conditioned medium from BM-MSCs. Tumor cell migration and invasion in response to BM-MSC conditioned medium were evaluated through a wound healing assay and Boyden chamber, respectively. The results showed that the AQP1 level was increased in both tumor cell lines after treatment with BM-MSC conditioned medium. Moreover, BM-MSCs-mediated tumor cell migration and invasion were hampered after treatment with AQP1 inhibitor. These data suggest that the recruitment of human BM-MSCs into the tumor microenvironment might cause OS and HCC cell migration and invasion through involvement of AQP1. PMID:27409610

  7. Sphere-forming-like cells (squamospheres) with cancer stem-like cell traits from VX2 rabbit buccal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuk-Kwan Chen; Anderson Hsien-Cheng Huang; Li-Min Lin

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that spheroid type cells grown under suspension culture conditions have cancer stem cell (CSC) traits in a number of cancers, but this phenomenon has not yet been reported in the VX2 rabbit oral cancer model. Hence, this study aimed to study the spheroid cells from VX2 rabbit buccal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and assess their CSC characteristics. Five adult male New Zealand white outbred rabbits were used to generate VX2 rabbit buccal SCC. Sphere-forming cell culture was performed for the VX2 rabbit buccal SCC specimens. The self-renewal capability;cluster of designation (CD) 44, CD133, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1), Nestin, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and reduced expression protein-1 (Rex-1) expression with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR);chemoresistance to cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil;and in vivo tumorigenicity of spheroid cell transplantation in nude mice were evaluated to determine the CSC characteristics of the resulting spheroid cells. We successfully obtained spheroid cells from the VX2 rabbit OSCC tissues. The spheroid cells exhibited CSC traits, including the expression of CSC and stem cell markers (CD44, Bmi-1, Nestin, Oct4 and Rex-1), capacity to generate new spheroid colonies within 1 week of reseeding from single-dissociated spheroid cells, chemoresistance capacity and generation of tumour xenografts (with histological features resembling those of the original VX2 rabbit buccal SCC) from the transplantation of 103 undifferentiated spheroid cells into nude mice. In summary, we demonstrated that spheroid cells with CSC cell traits can be derived from VX2 rabbit buccal SCCs, indicating that this animal cancer model is applicable for studying CSCs in human oral cancers.

  8. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells derived from a side population of a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin-xing [Division of General Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Wang, Jian, E-mail: dr_wangjian@yahoo.com.cn [Division of General Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Wang, Hao-lu; Wang, Wei; Yin, Xiao-bin; Li, Qi-wei [Division of General Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Chen, Yu-ying; Yi, Jing [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Key Laboratory of the Education Ministry for Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis, Institutes of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We sorted SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell lines, SGC-996. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells displayed higher proliferation and stronger clonal-generating capability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells showed more migratory and invasive abilities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells were more resistant and tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABCG2 might be a candidate as a marker for SP cells. -- Abstract: The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes that CSCs, which can renew themselves proliferate infinitely, and escape chemotherapy, become the root of recurrence and metastasis. Previous studies have verified that side population (SP) cells, characterized by their ability to efflux lipophilic substrate Hoechst 33342, to share many characteristics of CSCs in multiplying solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to sort SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996 and to preliminarily identify the biological characteristics of SP cells from the cell line. Using flow cytometry we effectively sorted SP cells from the cell line SGC-996. SP cells not only displayed higher proliferative, stronger clonal-generating, more migratory and more invasive capacities, but showed stronger resistance. Furthermore, our experiments demonstrated that SP cells were more tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was significantly higher in SP cells. Hence, these results collectively suggest that SP cells are progenitor/stem-like cells and ABCG2 might be a candidate marker for SP cells in human gallbladder cancer.

  9. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells derived from a side population of a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We sorted SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell lines, SGC-996. ► SP cells displayed higher proliferation and stronger clonal-generating capability. ► SP cells showed more migratory and invasive abilities. ► SP cells were more resistant and tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts. ► ABCG2 might be a candidate as a marker for SP cells. -- Abstract: The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes that CSCs, which can renew themselves proliferate infinitely, and escape chemotherapy, become the root of recurrence and metastasis. Previous studies have verified that side population (SP) cells, characterized by their ability to efflux lipophilic substrate Hoechst 33342, to share many characteristics of CSCs in multiplying solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to sort SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996 and to preliminarily identify the biological characteristics of SP cells from the cell line. Using flow cytometry we effectively sorted SP cells from the cell line SGC-996. SP cells not only displayed higher proliferative, stronger clonal-generating, more migratory and more invasive capacities, but showed stronger resistance. Furthermore, our experiments demonstrated that SP cells were more tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was significantly higher in SP cells. Hence, these results collectively suggest that SP cells are progenitor/stem-like cells and ABCG2 might be a candidate marker for SP cells in human gallbladder cancer.

  10. A novel antagonist of CXCR4 prevents bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell-mediated osteosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, Raffaela; Pelagalli, Alessandra; Nardelli, Anna; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Ieranò, Caterina; Cerchia, Laura; Lucarelli, Enrico; Scala, Stefania; Zannetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are recruited into the microenvironment of developing tumors, where they contribute to metastatic processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BM-MSCs in promoting osteosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cell progression in vitro and the possible mechanisms involved in these processes. U2OS and SNU-398 are osteosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, respectively, that can be induced to proliferate when cultured in the presence of BM-MSCs. To determine the effect of BM-MSCs on U2OS and SNU-398 cells, the AKT and ERK signaling pathways were investigated, and increases were observed in active P-Akt and P-Erk forms. Moreover, BM-MSCs caused an increase in tumor cell migration and invasion that was derived from the enhancement of CXCR4 levels. Thus, when tumor cells were treated with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, a reduction in their migration and invasion was observed. Furthermore, a new CXCR4 inhibitor, Peptide R, which was recently developed as an anticancer agent, was used to inhibit BM-MSC-mediated tumor invasion and to overcome AMD3100 toxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibiting CXCR4 impairs the cross-talk between tumor cells and BM-MSCs, resulting in reduced metastatic potential in osteosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cells. PMID:26517945

  11. Regional differentiation of retinoic acid-induced human pluripotent embryonic carcinoma stem cell neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis E Coyle

    Full Text Available The NTERA2 cl D1 (NT2 cell line, derived from human teratocarcinoma, exhibits similar properties as embryonic stem (ES cells or very early neuroepithelial progenitors. NT2 cells can be induced to become postmitotic central nervous system neurons (NT2N with retinoic acid. Although neurons derived from pluripotent cells, such as NT2N, have been characterized for their neurotransmitter phenotypes, their potential suitability as a donor source for neural transplantation also depends on their ability to respond to localized environmental cues from a specific region of the CNS. Therefore, our study aimed to characterize the regional transcription factors that define the rostocaudal and dorsoventral identity of NT2N derived from a monolayer differentiation paradigm using quantitative PCR (qPCR. Purified NT2N mainly expressed both GABAergic and glutamatergic phenotypes and were electrically active but did not form functional synapses. The presence of immature astrocytes and possible radial glial cells was noted. The NT2N expressed a regional transcription factor code consistent with forebrain, hindbrain and spinal cord neural progenitors but showed minimal expression of midbrain phenotypes. In the dorsoventral plane NT2N expressed both dorsal and ventral neural progenitors. Of major interest was that even under the influence of retinoic acid, a known caudalization factor, the NT2N population maintained a rostral phenotype subpopulation which expressed cortical regional transcription factors. It is proposed that understanding the regional differentiation bias of neurons derived from pluripotent stem cells will facilitate their successful integration into existing neuronal networks within the CNS.

  12. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    In his influential essay on markets, An essay on framing and overflowing (1998), Michel Callon writes that `the growing complexity of industrialized societies [is] due in large part to the movements of the technosciences, which are causing connections and interdependencies to proliferate'. This p...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products.......'. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...

  13. [High dosage therapy and autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation in breast carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier, P; Ruckser, R; Buxhofer, V; Habertheuer, K H; Zelenka, P; Tatzreiter, G; Hübl, G; Kittl, E; Hauser, A; Sebesta, C; Hinterberger, W

    2000-01-01

    42 breast cancer patients were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous peripheral stem-cell transplantation (ASTx) in the Donauspital between 1992 and 1999. 24 patients had stage II/III breast cancer with high risk for relapse. The other 18 patients underwent HDC and ASTx in chemosensitive stage IV. After previous conventional chemotherapy peripheral stem-cells were harvested by one cycle of mobilisation chemotherapy (epirubicin/taxol, FEC 120 or cyclophosphamide) followed by cytokine stimulation. 16 patients were treated by a tandem transplantation (conditioning protocol for 1st ASTx was melphalan 200 mg/m2 and for 2nd transplant it was CTC: cyclophosphamide 6 g/m2; thiotepa 500 mg/m2; carboplatin 800 mg/m2). The other 26 patients received one HDC with CTC as conditioning protocol. The HDC was well tolerated by all patients, there was no transplant-related mortality. The median survival and the progression-free survival (PFS) after HDC and ASTx in stage IV breast cancer patients were 28 and 11 months, respectively. The median survival and PFS were not yet reached in stage II/III patients after 55 months. The actuarial survival and PFS in that patient group were 70% after 55 months. Our data confirm the low risk and good efficacy of HDC and ASTx in breast cancer patients. Nevertheless randomised studies are necessary to evaluate the importance of HDC compared to intensified conventional protocols without ASTx. PMID:11261276

  14. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  15. Residual dormant cancer stem-cell foci are responsible for tumor relapse after antiangiogenic metronomic therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Padura, Ines; Marighetti, Paola; Agliano, Alice; Colombo, Federico; Larzabal, Leyre; Redrado, Miriam; Bleau, Anne-Marie; Prior, Celia; Bertolini, Francesco; Calvo, Alfonso

    2012-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid tumor and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Currently available chemotherapeutic options are not curative due in part to tumor resistance to conventional therapies. We generated orthotopic HCC mouse models in immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2rγ null mice by injection of human alpha-feto protein (hAFP)- and/or luciferase-expressing HCC cell lines and primary cells from patients, where tumor growth and spread can be accurately monitored in a non-invasive way. In this model, low-dose metronomic administration of cyclophosphamide (LDM-CTX) caused complete regression of the tumor mass. A significant increase in survival (P<0.0001), reduced aberrant angiogenesis and hyperproliferation, and decrease in the number of circulating tumor cells were found in LDM-CTX-treated animals, in comparison with untreated mice. Co-administration of LDM-CTX with anti-VEGF therapy further improved the therapeutic efficacy. However, the presence of residual circulating hAFP levels suggested that some tumor cells were still present in livers of treated mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed that those cells had a hAFP+/CD13+/PCNA- phenotype, suggesting that they were dormant cancer stem cells (CSC). Indeed, discontinuation of therapy resulted in tumor regrowth. Moreover, in-vitro LDM-CTX treatment reduced hepatosphere formation in both number and size, and the resulting spheres were enriched in CD13+ cells indicating that these cells were particularly resistant to therapy. Co-treatment of the CD13-targeting drug, bestatin, with LDM-CTX leads to slower tumor growth and a decreased tumor volume. Therefore, combining a CD13 inhibitor, which targets the CSC-like population, with LDM-CTX chemotherapy may be used to eradicate minimal residual disease and improve the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:22546866

  16. Stem cells and the Planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, somatic stem cells have been heralded as potential therapeutic agents to address a large number of degenerative diseases. Yet, in order to rationally utilize these cells as effective therapeutic agents, and/or improve treatment of stem-cell-associated malignancies such as leukemias and carcinomas, a better understanding of the basic biological properties of stem cells needs to be acquired. A major limitation in the study of somatic stem cells lies in the difficulty of accessi...

  17. Protein Kinase Cε, Which Is Linked to Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Development of Squamous Cell Carcinomas, Stimulates Rapid Turnover of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To find clues about the mechanism by which kinase C epsilon (PKCε may impart susceptibility to ultraviolet radiation (UVR-induced development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC, we compared PKCε transgenic (TG mice and their wild-type (WT littermates for (1 the effects of UVR exposures on percent of putative hair follicle stem cells (HSCs and (2 HSCs proliferation. The percent of double HSCs (CD34+ and α6-integrin or CD34+/CD49f+ in the isolated keratinocytes were determined by flow cytometric analysis. Both single and chronic UVR treatments (1.8 kJ/m2 resulted in an increase in the frequency of double positive HSCs in PKCε TG mice as compared to their WT littermates. To determine the rate of proliferation of bulge region stem cells, a 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine labeling (BrdU experiment was performed. In the WT mice, the percent of double positive HSCs retaining BrdU label was 28.4±0.6% compared to 4.0±0.06% for the TG mice, an approximately 7-fold decrease. A comparison of gene expression profiles of FACS sorted double positive HSCs showed increased expression of Pes1, Rad21, Tfdp1 and Cks1b genes in TG mice compared to WT mice. Also, PKCε over expression in mice increased the clonogenicity of isolated keratinocytes, a property commonly ascribed to stem cells.

  18. Impact of stem cell marker expression on recurrence of TACE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma post liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Zhen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver transplantation is the most effective therapy for cirrhosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC but its utility is limited by post-transplant tumor recurrence. Use of the Milan, size-based criteria, has reduced recurrence rate to less than 10% but many patients remain ineligible. Reduction of tumor size with local therapies has been used to “downstage” patients to allow them to qualify for transplantation, but the optimal criteria to predict tumor recurrence in these latter patients has not been established. The existence of a progenitor cell population, sometimes called cancer stem cells (CSCs, has been proposed to be one mechanism accounting for the chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to determine if transcatheter arterial chemoemolization (TACE treated tumors have increased CSC marker expression and whether these markers could be used to predict tumor recurrence. Methods Formalin fixed specimens were obtained from 39 HCC liver explants (23 with no treatment and 16 after TACE. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for EpCAM, CD44, CD90, and CD133. Staining for each marker was scored 0–3 by evaluating the number and intensity of positive tumor cells in 5 hpf of tumor in each specimen. Results TACE treated tumors displayed greater necrosis and fibrosis than non-TACE treated samples but there were no differences in morphology between the viable tumor cells of both groups. In TACE treated specimens, the staining of both EpCAM and CD133 was greater than in non-TACE specimens but CD44 and CD90 were the same. In the TACE group, the presence of high EpCAM staining was associated with tumor recurrence. Four of ten EpCAM high patients recurred while 0 of 6 EpCAM low patients recurred (P = 0.040. None of the other markers predicted recurrence. Conclusion High pre-transplant EpCAM staining predicted HCC recurrence. This suggests that the abundance of

  19. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  20. Metformin represses self-renewal of the human breast carcinoma stem cells via inhibition of estrogen receptor-mediated OCT4 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Won Jung

    Full Text Available Metformin, a Type II diabetic treatment drug, which inhibits transcription of gluconeogenesis genes, has recently been shown to lower the risk of some diabetes-related tumors, including breast cancer. Recently, "cancer stem cells" have been demonstrated to sustain the growth of tumors and are resistant to therapy. To test the hypothesis that metformin might be reducing the risk to breast cancers, the human breast carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, grown in 3-dimensional mammospheres which represent human breast cancer stem cell population, were treated with various known and suspected breast cancer chemicals with and without non-cytotoxic concentrations of metformin. Using OCT4 expression as a marker for the cancer stem cells, the number and size were measured in these cells. Results demonstrated that TCDD (100 nM and bisphenol A (10 µM increased the number and size of the mammospheres, as did estrogen (10 nM E2. By monitoring a cancer stem cell marker, OCT4, the stimulation by these chemicals was correlated with the increased expression of OCT4. On the other hand, metformin at 1 and 10 mM concentration dramatically reduced the size and number of mammospheres. Results also demonstrated the metformin reduced the expression of OCT4 in E2 & TCDD mammospheres but not in the bisphenol A mammospheres, suggesting different mechanisms of action of the bisphenol A on human breast carcinoma cells. In addition, these results support the use of 3-dimensional human breast cancer stem cells as a means to screen for potential human breast tumor promoters and breast chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Epidermal stem cell dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Wong and Reiter have explored the possibility that hair follicle stem cells can give rise to basal cell carcinoma (BCC). They expressed in mice an inducible human BCC-derived oncogenic allele of Smoothened, SmoM2, under the control of either the cytokeratin 14 (K14) or cytokeratin 15 (K15) promoter. Smoothened encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor protein in the hedgehog pathway, the misregulation of which is implicated in BCC and other human cancers. Chronic injury is thought to be a contribu...

  2. Efficient and simple production of insulin-producing cells from embryonal carcinoma stem cells using mouse neonate pancreas extract, as a natural inducer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Ebrahimie

    Full Text Available An attractive approach to replace the destroyed insulin-producing cells (IPCs is the generation of functional β cells from stem cells. Embryonal carcinoma (EC stem cells are pluripotent cells which can differentiate into all cell types. The present study was carried out to establish a simple nonselective inductive culture system for generation of IPCs from P19 EC cells by 1-2 weeks old mouse pancreas extract (MPE. Since, mouse pancreatic islets undergo further remodeling and maturation for 2-3 weeks after birth, we hypothesized that the mouse neonatal MPE contains essential factors to induce in vitro differentiation of pancreatic lineages. Pluripotency of P19 cells were first confirmed by expression analysis of stem cell markers, Oct3/4, Sox-2 and Nanog. In order to induce differentiation, the cells were cultured in a medium supplemented by different concentrations of MPE (50, 100, 200 and 300 µg/ml. The results showed that P19 cells could differentiate into IPCs and form dithizone-positive cell clusters. The generated P19-derived IPCs were immunoreactive to proinsulin, insulin and insulin receptor beta. The expression of pancreatic β cell genes including, PDX-1, INS1 and INS2 were also confirmed. The peak response at the 100 µg/ml MPE used for investigation of EP300 and CREB1 gene expression. When stimulated with glucose, these cells synthesized and secreted insulin. Network analysis of the key transcription factors (PDX-1, EP300, CREB1 during the generation of IPCs resulted in introduction of novel regulatory candidates such as MIR17, and VEZF1 transcription factors, as well as MORN1, DKFZp761P0212, and WAC proteins. Altogether, we demonstrated the possibility of generating IPCs from undifferentiated EC cells, with the characteristics of pancreatic β cells. The derivation of pancreatic cells from EC cells which are ES cell siblings would provide a valuable experimental tool in study of pancreatic development and function as well as rapid

  3. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... understood. The mouse is a widely used model of mammary gland development, both directly by studying the mouse mammary epithelial cells themselves and indirectly, by studying development, morphogenesis, differentiation and carcinogenesis of xenotransplanted human breast epithelium in vivo. While in early...... studies, human or mouse epithelium was implanted as fragments into the mouse gland, more recent technical progress has allowed the self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential of distinct cell populations or even individual cells to be interrogated. Here, we review and discuss similarities...

  4. Expression and Significance of Stem Cell Markers CK19, Notch3, CD133, P75NTR, STRO-1 and ABCG2 in Pulmonary Squamous Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyong LIN, , , , ,

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Increasing reports showed that some tumor stem cells were selfrenewal and multi-lineage differentiated in tumors, similar to the normal stem cells in human body. The aim of this study is to observe the expression of stem cell markers in lung squamous carcinoma tissues. Methods Fifty-four lung cancer specimens from surgery were analyzed for CK19, Notch3, CD133, P75NTR, STRO-1 and ABCG2 expression by using S-P immunohistochemistry. In addition, ten normal lung tissue samples were included as control. Results CK19, Notch3, CD133 and ABCG2 were expressed in 54 Lung cancer tissues, without expression of P75NTR and STRO-1. The expressionrate of CK19, Notch3, CD133 and ABCG2 was 66.67% (36/54, 87.04% (47/54, 50% (27/54, and 61.11% (33/54 respectively. The levels of expression of Notch3, CD133 and ABCG2 were significantly lower in high differentiation group than those in moderate and low differentiation group (P <0.05. The levels of expression of CK19, CD133 and ABCG2 were significantly higher in lymph node metastasis group than those in non-metastasis group (P <0.05. The percentage of total positive cells of four stem cell markers in serial tissue sections was lower than 2%. Conclusion There was expression ofsome stem cell markers in pulmonary squamous carcinomas, and there was relationship between expression degree withdifferentiation degree and lymph node metastasis.

  5. Identification of cancer stem cell subpopulations of CD34(+) PLC/PRF/5 that result in three types of human liver carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su Cheol; Nguyen, Ngoc Tue; Eun, Jong Ryeol; Zhang, Yanling; Jung, Yong Jin; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Trotsyuk, Artem; Lam, Alexander; Ramsamooj, Rajendra; Zhang, Yanghong; Theise, Neil D; Zern, Mark A; Duan, Yuyou

    2015-04-15

    CD34(+) stem cells play an important role during liver development and regeneration. Thus, we hypothesized that some human liver carcinomas (HLCs) might be derived from transformed CD34(+) stem cells. Here, we determined that a population of CD34(+) cells isolated from PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells (PLC) appears to function as liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) by forming HLCs in immunodeficient mice with as few as 100 cells. Moreover, the CD34(+) PLC subpopulation cells had an advantage over CD34(-) PLCs at initiating tumors. Three types of HLCs were generated from CD34(+) PLC: hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs); cholangiocarcinomas (CC); and combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinomas (CHCs). Tumors formed in mice transplanted with 12 subpopulations and 6 progeny subpopulations of CD34(+) PLC cells. Interestingly, progenies with certain surface antigens (CD133, CD44, CD90, or EPCAM) predominantly yielded HCCs. CD34(+) PLCs that also expressed OV6 and their progeny OV6(+) cells primarily produced CHC and CC. This represents the first experiment to demonstrate that the OV6(+) antigen is associated with human CHC and CC. CD34(+) PLCs that also expressed CD31 and their progeny CD31(+) cells formed CHCs. Gene expression patterns and tumor cell populations from all xenografts exhibited diverse patterns, indicating that tumor-initiating cells (TICs) with distinct antigenic profiles contribute to cancer cell heterogeneity. Therefore, we identified CD34(+) PLC cells functioning as LCSCs generating three types of HLCs. Eighteen subpopulations from one origin had the capacity independently to initiate tumors, thus functioning as TICs. This finding has broad implications for better understanding of the multistep model of tumor initiation and progression. Our finding also indicates that CD34(+) PLCs that also express OV6 or CD31 result in types of HLCs. This is the first report that PLC/PRF/5 subpopulations expressing CD34 in combination with particular antigens defines categories of

  6. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signalin...

  7. Investigation of extracellular microRNAs in oral squamous cell carcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) refer to cell-free miRNAs that are protected by extracellular vesicles (EVs) and protein complexes from degradation. Extracellular miRNAs are also known as circulating miRNAs that can circulate in bodily fluids. Studies have reported that extracellular miRNAs can...... serve as biomarkers for human diseases and can also act as mediators in cell-cell communication. In cancer, the abnormal expression of miRNAs in plasma has been observed. However, there is no report on the association of plasma miRNA expression with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) recurrence after...... surgery to date. In the first project, miR-486-5p, miR-375 and miR-92b-3p were validated to be highly associated with OSCC recurrence using next generation sequencing (NGS) and qRT-PCR. In cell-cell communication, bioactive information, including miRNAs, can be transferred by EVs. Studies have shown...

  8. Urothelial Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Dimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence supporting the idea that tumors, similar to normal adult tissues, arise from a specific stem-like cell population, the cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are considered as the real driving force behind tumor growth, the ability to metastasize, as well as resistance to conventional antitumor therapy. The concept that cancer growth recapitulates normal proliferative and/or regenerative processes, even though in very dysfunctional ways, has tremendous implications for cancer therapy. The rapid development of the CSC field, shoulder to shoulder with powerful genome-wide screening techniques, has provided cause for optimism for the development of more reliable therapies in the future. However, several important issues still lie ahead. Recent identification of a highly tumorigenic stem-like compartment and existence of urothelial differentiation programs in urothelial cell carcinomas (UCCs raised important questions about UCC initiation and development. This review examines the present knowledge on CSCs in UCCs regarding the similarities between CSCs and the adult urothelial stem cells, potential origin of urothelial CSCs, main regulatory pathways, surface markers expression, and the current state of CSC-targeting therapeutic strategies.

  9. Research progress of cervical carcinoma associated stem cells%宫颈癌相关干细胞的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路春华; 盛修贵

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To summarize the progress in study of cervical carcinoma associated stem cells. METHODS:Relative articles between Jan. 2000 to May. 2012 were searched in Medline and CNKI journal with "Uterine cervical carci noma, stem cells and stem cell signaling pathway" as key words,and finally 31 articles were collected. Inclusion criteria:stem cells in normal cervix;cancer stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells isolated from cervical carcinoma;stem cell signa ling pathway associated with treatment resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in cervical carcinoma. RESULTS:The reserved cells isolated from the basal layer in normal cervical tissue showed the capability of cervical stem cells. Cancer stem cells could be separated from cervical cancer cell lines and fresh tissue specimens. These cells showed clear molecular phenotype.such as aldehyde dehydrogenase.some studies suggested that side population cells represented cervical cancer stem cells,which were ABCG2/BCRP1 positive. Enriched as spheroids,cervical cancer stem cells expressed embryonic and adult sternness-related genes (Nanog,Oct-4 and Sox-2) and were capable of generating reproducible tumor phenotypes in nude mice with enhanced tumorigenicity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) constitute a rare non-hematopoietic population which could be defined according to its ability to self-renew and differentiate into adipose,cartilage,and bone,but contro versy exised regarding their presence and role in solid tumors. MSCs with normal karyotype and multipotential differentia tion were identified and confirmed in cervical cancer tissues. Activation of genes of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation could induce cancer stem cell phenotype. Stem cells signaling pathways contributed to the occurrence,the progression and metastasis,even treatment resistance of cervical cancer, such as the Hedgehog pathway, TGF-β pathway. Modulation or inhibition corresponding pathway might inhibit tumor growth and reduce chemotherapy and

  10. Valproic acid inhibits irradiation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell-like characteristics in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamoto, Ayako; Ninomiya, Itasu; Harada, Shinichi; Tsukada, Tomoya; Okamoto, Koichi; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Kinoshita, Jun; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Fushida, Sachio; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, and is characterized by poor response to current therapy and a dismal survival rate. In this study we investigated whether irradiation induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) TE9 cells and whether the classic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) suppresses these changes. First, we showed that 2 Gy irradiation induced spindle cell-like morphologic changes, decreased expression of membranous E-cadherin, upregulated vimentin expression, and altered the localization of β-catenin from its usual membrane-bound location to cytoplasm in TE9 cells. Irradiation induced upregulation of transcription factors including Slug, Snail, and Twist, which regulate EMT. Stimulation by irradiation resulted in increased TGF-β1 and HIF-1α expression and induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, irradiation enhanced CD44 expression, indicating acquisition of cancer stem-like cell properties. In addition, irradiation enhanced invasion and migration ability with upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases. These findings indicate that single-dose irradiation can induce EMT in ESCC cells. Second, we found that treatment with 1 mM VPA induced reversal of EMT caused by irradiation in TE9 cells, resulting in attenuated cell invasion and migration abilities. These results suggest that VPA might have clinical value to suppress irradiation-induced EMT. The reversal of EMT by HDAC inhibitors may be a new therapeutic strategy to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy in ESCC by inhibiting the enhancement of invasion and metastasis.

  11. Oncogenic signaling pathways and origins of tumor-initiating stem-like cells of hepatocellular carcinomas induced by hepatitis C virus, alcohol and/or obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Machida, Keigo

    2014-07-01

    This review article discusses the importance and oncogenic signaling pathways of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in several etiologies of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) induced by hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcohol, obesity and/or chemicals. Stem cells may be present in cancer tissue, and a hierarchy of cells is formed, as is the case for normal tissue. Tumor formation, growth and propagation are maintained by a small proportion of cells with stem cell-like properties. TICs are present in alcohol-fed HCV transgenic mice, diethylnitrosamine/phenobarbital-treated mice (chemical carcinogenesis) and Spnb2 +/- mice (defective TGF-β signal). Alcohol/obesity-associated endotoxemia induces the stem cell marker Nanog through TLR4 signaling to generate TICs and liver tumors in several HCC models. The oncogenic pathway (such as the STAT3 and TLR4-NANOG pathway) and mechanism of generation of TICs of HCCs associated with HCV, alcohol and obesity are discussed. Understanding the molecular stemness signaling and cellular hierarchy and defining key TIC-specific genes will accelerate the development of novel biomarkers and treatment strategies. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of liver TICs and discusses unanswered questions about the concept of liver TICs. (This project was supported by NIH grants 1R01AA018857 and P50AA11999).

  12. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neurons Oligodendrocyte Parthenogenesis Passage Pluripotent Polar body Preimplantation Proliferation Regenerative medicine Reproductive cloning Signals Somatic cell Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) Somatic (adult) stem cell Stem cells Stromal cells Subculturing Surface markers ...

  13. Chemical Induction of Cardiac Differentiation in P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmin,; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia

    2010-01-01

    P19 cells, a pluripotent cell line derived from a teratocarcinoma induced in C3H/HeHa mice, have been widely used as a model system to study cardiac differentiation. We have used these cells to evaluate the extent to which exposure to DMSO and/or cardiogenol C for 4 days in suspension culture enhanced their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Cardiac differentiation was assessed by observing beating clusters and further confirmed using immunocytochemical, biochemical, and pharmacological app...

  14. The T-box transcription factor Brachyury regulates epithelial–mesenchymal transition in association with cancer stem-like cells in adenoid cystic carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high frequencies of recurrence and distant metastasis of adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) emphasize the need to better understand the biological factors associated with these outcomes. To analyze the mechanisms of AdCC metastasis, we established the green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transfected subline ACCS-GFP from the AdCC parental cell line and the metastatic ACCS-M GFP line from an in vivo metastasis model. Using these cell lines, we investigated the involvement of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cell (CSCs) in AdCC metastasis by real-time RT-PCR for EMT related genes and stem cell markers. Characteristics of CSCs were also analyzed by sphere-forming ability and tumorigenicity. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) silencing of target gene was also performed. ACCS-M GFP demonstrated characteristics of EMT and additionally displayed sphere-forming ability and high expression of EMT-related genes (Snail, Twist1, Twist2, Slug, zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 and 2 [Zeb1 and Zeb2], glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta [Gsk3β and transforming growth factor beta 2 [Tgf-β2]), stem cell markers (Nodal, Lefty, Oct-4, Pax6, Rex1, and Nanog), and differentiation markers (sex determining region Y [Sox2], Brachyury, and alpha fetoprotein [Afp]). These observations suggest that ACCS-M GFP shows the characteristics of CSCs and CSCs may be involved in the EMT of AdCC. Surprisingly, shRNA silencing of the T-box transcription factor Brachyury (also a differentiation marker) resulted in downregulation of the EMT and stem cell markers. In addition, sphere-forming ability, EMT characteristics, and tumorigenicity were simultaneously lost. Brachyury expression in clinical samples of AdCC was extremely high and closely related to EMT. This finding suggests that regulation of EMT by Brachyury in clinical AdCC may parallel that observed in vitro in this study. The use of a single cell line is a limitation of this study. However, parallel data from in vitro and

  15. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is th...

  16. Stem Cell Separation Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Beili; Murthy, Shashi K

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and translational stem cell research require large-scale supply of stem cells at high purity and viability, thus leading to the development of stem cell separation technologies. This review covers key technologies being applied to stem cell separation, and also highlights exciting new approaches in this field. First, we will cover conventional separation methods that are commercially available and have been widely adapted. These methods include Fluorescence-activated cell so...

  17. The targeted inhibitory effects of human amniotic fluid stem cells carrying CXCR4 promoter and DAL-1 on non-small cell lung carcinoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Li, S; Cai, T; Wang, H; Xie, X; Liu, Z; Zhang, Y

    2016-02-01

    The differentially expressed in adenocarcinoma of the lung-1 (DAL-1) protein has been demonstrated to be suppressive to various types of tumors including lung cancer. This study aimed to determine the targeted effects of human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFS cells) carrying CXCR4 promoter driven conditionally replicable adenovirus vector overexpressing DAL-1 (Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1) on non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) growth. The apoptotic effects of virus vectors were assessed using flow cytometry, and the cytotoxicity analyzed by CCK-8 assay. In vivo imaging system was used to determine the homing capability of hAFS cells. A549 cell xenograft mouse model was created to assess the in vivo effect of DAL-1 overexpression on NSCLC growth. We found that infection of Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 increased the apoptosis of A549 NSCLC cells but not 16HBE normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 administered via intratumoral injection led to significant reduced growth and greater necrosis of A549 xenograft tumors comparing to null vector treated animals. When infused via tail vein, hAFS cells carrying Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 homed to lung cancer xenografts, caused virus replication and DAL-1 overexpression, and led to significant lower growth and greater necrosis of A549 cell xenografts comparing to non-treatment control. In conclusion, hAFS cells are capable of carrying Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 vectors, specifically targeting to lung cancer, and causing oncolytic effects when administered in vivo.

  18. Stem Cell Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a general computational theory of stem cell networks and their developmental dynamics. Stem cell networks are special cases of developmental control networks. Our theory generates a natural classification of all possible stem cell networks based on their network architecture. Each stem cell network has a unique topology and semantics and developmental dynamics that result in distinct phenotypes. We show that the ideal growth dynamics of multicellular systems generated by stem cell ...

  19. Limbal stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes Merle; Sangwan Virender; Rao Srinivas; Basti Surendra; Sridhar Mittanamalli; Bansal Aashish; Dua Harminder

    2004-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in limbal stem cell transplantation. In addition to harvesting stem cells from a cadaver or a live related donor, it is now possible to cultivate limbal stem cells in vitro and then transplant them onto the recipient bed. A clear understanding of the basic disease pathology and a correct assessment of the extent of stem cell deficiency are essential. A holistic approach towards management of limbal stem cell deficiency is needed. This ...

  20. What are Stem Cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadshah Farhat; Ashraf Mohammadzadeh; M. Rezaie

    2014-01-01

      Stem cells are undifferentiated self regenerating multi potential cells. There are three types of stem cells categories by the ability to form after cells and correlated with the body’s development process. Totipotent: these stem cells can form an entire organism such as fertilized egg. Ploripotent: ploripotent cells are those that can form any cell in the body but cannot form an entire organism such as developing embryo’s totipotent cells become ploripotent  Multipotent: Multi potent stem ...

  1. NAC1, a potential stem cell pluripotency factor expression in normal endometrium, endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masako; Nakayama, Kentaro; Yeasmin, Shamima; Katagiri, Atsuko; Iida, Kouji; Nakayama, Naomi; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of NAC1 in the development of endometrial cancer. NAC1 expression and localization were assessed with immunohistochemistry in the normal cyclic human endometrium, hyperplastic endometrium, and endometrial cancer. Expression of NAC1 in the glandular cells was significantly higher in the early and mid proliferative phases than in the other menstrual phases, endometrial hyperplasia, and endometrial carcinoma. NAC1 expression was down-regulated during endometrial carcinogenesis. There were significant correlations between positive NAC1 expression and pathological grade (P=0.037). No significant associations were found between NAC1 expression and the other clinicopathological characteristics including patient age, FIGO staging, depth of myometrial invasion, pelvic lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular space invasion, menopause, or body mass index. NAC1 gene knockdown inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in Ishikawa, HHUA, and JHEM2 cell lines, all of which overexpressed NAC1. Ectopic overexpression of the NAC1 gene stimulated cell proliferation in the HEC1B, and JHEM1 endometrial cancer cell lines, which have lower endogenous NAC1 expression. Endometrial carcinomas with NAC1 overexpression are clinically aggressive, high-grade carcinomas. Therefore, detection of NAC1 overexpression in endometrial cancers may identify patients who will benefit from NAC1 targeted therapy.

  2. A Study on the Mechanism of Low-Expressed Cancer Stem Cell Marker Lgr5 in Inhibition of the Proliferation and Invasion of Colorectal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Houjun; Xiang, Lin; Wang, Ziwei; Zhou, Qipeng

    2015-11-01

    The present study intends to explore the influence of Lgr5 as a marker of tumor stem cells after siRNA interference on the proliferation and invasion of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and its mechanism. The tissue samples were taken for biopsy from 32 cases of patients and 32 cases of normal subjects by colonoscopy. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect the differential expression of Lgr5. After siRNA interference of Lgr5 in CRC cell line CT-26 cells, RT-PCR method was used to detect the mRNA expression level of Lgr5 after interference of CT-26 cells. CCK8 method was used to observe the influence of Lgr5 interference on the proliferation, colony formation, and invasion of CT-26 cells. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels in CT-26 cells. Lgr5 expression level in CRC tissue was significantly higher than that in the corresponding para-carcinoma tissue and the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Lgr5 mRNA expression level in tissue with lymph node metastasis was significantly higher than that in the tissue without lymph node metastasis, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Compared with the control group, CT-26 cell proliferation, colony formation, and migration capability after Lgr5 siRNA transfection were all significantly reduced, and the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). CT-26 cells after Lgr5 interference were found with significantly reduced E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels. Lgr5 facilitates the cell proliferation, colony formation, and migration of colorectal carcinoma, which may be closely related to the expression level of E-cadherin. PMID:27352328

  3. SHBG is an important factor in stemness induction of cells by DHT in vitro and associated with poor clinical features of prostate carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Ma

    Full Text Available Androgen plays a vital role in prostate cancer development. However, it is not clear whether androgens influence stem-like properties of prostate cancer, a feature important for prostate cancer progression. In this study, we show that upon DHT treatment in vitro, prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were revealed with higher clonogenic potential and higher expression levels of stemness related factors CD44, CD90, Oct3/4 and Nanog. Moreover, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG was also simultaneously upregulated in these cells. When the SHBG gene was blocked by SHBG siRNA knock-down, the induction of Oct3/4, Nanog, CD44 and CD90 by DHT was also correspondingly blocked in these cells. Immunohistochemical evaluation of clinical samples disclosed weakly positive, and areas negative for SHBG expression in the benign prostate tissues, while most of the prostate carcinomas were strongly positive for SHBG. In addition, higher levels of SHBG expression were significantly associated with higher Gleason score, more seminal vesicle invasions and lymph node metastases. Collectively, our results show a role of SHBG in upregulating stemness of prostate cancer cells upon DHT exposure in vitro, and SHBG expression in prostate cancer samples is significantly associated with poor clinicopathological features, indicating a role of SHBG in prostate cancer progression.

  4. Effect of proton and gamma irradiation on human lung carcinoma cells: Gene expression, cell cycle, cell death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer-stem cell trait as biological end points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Himanshi; Kumar, Amit; Bhat, Nagesh; Pandey, Badri N; Ghosh, Anu

    2015-10-01

    Proton beam therapy is a cutting edge modality over conventional gamma radiotherapy because of its physical dose deposition advantage. However, not much is known about its biological effects vis-a-vis gamma irradiation. Here we investigated the effect of proton- and gamma- irradiation on cell cycle, death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and "stemness" in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549). Proton beam (3MeV) was two times more cytotoxic than gamma radiation and induced higher and longer cell cycle arrest. At equivalent doses, numbers of genes responsive to proton irradiation were ten times higher than those responsive to gamma irradiation. At equitoxic doses, the proton-irradiated cells had reduced cell adhesion and migration ability as compared to the gamma-irradiated cells. It was also more effective in reducing population of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) like cells as revealed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and surface phenotyping by CD44(+), a CSC marker. These results can have significant implications for proton therapy in the context of suppression of molecular and cellular processes that are fundamental to tumor expansion. PMID:26278043

  5. Artificial Stem Cell Niches

    OpenAIRE

    Lutolf, Matthias P.; Blau, Helen M.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their dual ability to reproduce themselves (self-renew) and specialize (differentiate), yielding a plethora of daughter cells that maintain and regenerate tissues. In contrast to their embryonic counterparts, adult stem cells retain their unique functions only if they are in intimate contact with an instructive microenvironment, termed stem cell niche. In these niches, stem cells integrate a complex array of molecular signals that, in concert with induced cell-...

  6. Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Year Award Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award Diversity Mentorship Program Eugene Van ... 300 PUVA treatments. What causes Merkel cell carcinoma? Scientists are still studying what causes this skin cancer. ...

  7. Regulation of microRNA biosynthesis and expression in 2102Ep embryonal carcinoma stem cells is mirrored in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Michael F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumours with high proportions of differentiated cells are considered to be of a lower grade to those containing high proportions of undifferentiated cells. This property may be linked to the differentiation properties of stem cell-like populations within malignancies. We aim to identify molecular mechanism associated with the generation of tumours with differing grades from malignant stem cell populations with different differentiation potentials. In this study we assessed microRNA (miRNA regulation in two populations of malignant Embryonal Carcinoma (EC stem cell, which differentiate (NTera2 or remain undifferentiated (2102Ep during tumourigenesis, and compared this to miRNA regulation in ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC patient samples. Methods miRNA expression was assessed in NTera2 and 2102Ep cells in the undifferentiated and differentiated states and compared to that of OSC samples using miRNA qPCR. Results Our analysis reveals a substantial overlap between miRNA regulation in 2102Ep cells and OSC samples in terms of miRNA biosynthesis and expression of mature miRNAs, particularly those of the miR-17/92 family and clustering to chromosomes 14 and 19. In the undifferentiated state 2102Ep cells expressed mature miRNAs at up to 15,000 fold increased levels despite decreased expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes Drosha and Dicer. 2102Ep cells avoid differentiation, which we show is associated with consistent levels of expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes and mature miRNAs while expression of miRNAs clustering to chromosomes 14 and 19 is deemphasised. OSC patient samples displayed decreased expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes, decreased expression of mature miRNAs and prominent clustering to chromosome 14 but not 19. This indicates that miRNA biosynthesis and levels of miRNA expression, particularly from chromosome 14, are tightly regulated both in progenitor cells and in tumour samples. Conclusion miRNA biosynthesis and

  8. [Merkel cell skin carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejcí, K; Zadrazil, J; Tichý, T; Horák, P; Ciferská, H; Hodulová, M; Zezulová, M; Zlevorová, M

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare tumour of the skin. It affects predominantly elderly Caucasian males on sun-exposed areas of the skin. Distinctively more frequent and at significantly lower age, its incidence is higher in immunocompromised patients. In these patients we often observe the highly aggressive course of Merkel cell carcinoma and a fatal outcome. The incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma has been rising in recent years and is more dramatic than the increased incidence of cutaneous melanoma. More than one-third of Merkel cell carcinoma patients will die from this cancer, making it twice as lethal as melanoma. The malignant transformation of Merkel cells is currently thought to be related to an infection with Merkel cell polyomavirus. In the early stage the discreet clinical picture may be contrary to extensive microscopic invasion and this seemingly benign appearance can delay diagnosis or increase the risk of insufficient tumour excision. The diagnosis is definitely confirmed by histological evaluation and immunohistochemical tests. A typical feature is the tendency of Merkel cell carcinoma to frequent local recurrence and early metastasizing into regional lymph nodes with subsequent tumour generalization. The mainstay of therapy is radical excision of the tumour and adjuvant radiotherapy targeted at the site of primary incidence and local draining lymph nodes. The efficacy of different chemotherapy protocols in Merkel cell carcinoma is limited and the median survival rate is measured in months. In the future, prophylaxis with vaccination against Merkel cell polyomavirus will hopefully be possible in high-risk patients, as well as therapeutic usage of antisense oligonucleotides or microRNAs, eventually complete Merkel cell carcinoma elimination by affecting the tumour suppressor gene Atonal homolog 1 expression. The staging of the tumour at time of diagnosis is the most important prognostic factor. In this respect, the importance of preventative skin

  9. Hepatic stem cell niches

    OpenAIRE

    Kordes, Claus; Häussinger, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell niches are special microenvironments that maintain stem cells and control their behavior to ensure tissue homeostasis and regeneration throughout life. The liver has a high regenerative capacity that involves stem/progenitor cells when the proliferation of hepatocytes is impaired. In recent years progress has been made in the identification of potential hepatic stem cell niches. There is evidence that hepatic progenitor cells can originate from niches in the canals...

  10. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the poten...

  11. p21-activated kinase 1 determines stem-like phenotype and sunitinib resistance via NF-κB/IL-6 activation in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Liu, H; Xu, L; An, H; Liu, W; Liu, Y; Lin, Z; Xu, J

    2015-02-12

    The p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), a serine/threonine kinase that orchestrates cytoskeletal remodeling and cell motility, has been shown to function as downstream node for various oncogenic signaling pathways to promote cell proliferation, regulate apoptosis and accelerate mitotic abnormalities, resulting in tumor formation and invasiveness. Although alterations in PAK1 expression and activity have been detected in various human malignancies, its potential biological and clinical significance in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains obscure. In this study, we found increased PAK1 and phosphorylated PAK1 levels in tumor tissues according to TNM stage progression. Elevated phosphorylated PAK1 levels associated with progressive features and indicated unfavorable overall survival (OS) as an independent adverse prognosticator for patients with RCC. Moreover, PAK1 kinase activation with constitutive active PAK1 mutant T423E promoted growth, colony formation, migration, invasion and stem-like phenotype of RCC cells, and vice versa, in PAK1 inhibition by PAK1 kinase inactivation with specific PAK1 shRNA, dead kinase PAK1 mutant K299R or allosteric inhibitor IPA3. Stem-like phenotype due to sunitinib administration via increased PAK1 kinase activation could be ameliorated by PAK1 shRNA, PAK1 mutant K299R and IPA3. Furthermore, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/interleukin-6 (IL-6) activation was found to be responsible for PAK1-mediated stem-like phenotype following sunitinib treatment. Both IL-6 neutralizing antibody and IPA3 administration enhanced tumor growth inhibition effect of sunitinib treatment on RCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results unraveled that oncogenic activation of PAK1 defines an important mechanism for maintaining stem-like phenotype and sunitinib resistance through NF-κB/IL-6 activation in RCC, lending PAK1-mediated NF-κB/IL-6 activation considerable appeal as novel pharmacological therapeutic targets against sunitinib resistance.

  12. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-01-01

    International audience Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such a...

  13. Information on Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Information on Stem Cell Research Research @ NINDS Stem Cell Highlights Submit a hESC ... found here: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells NINDS Stem Cell Research on Campus The Intramural Research Program of NINDS ...

  14. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  15. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  16. Toward 'SMART' stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T

    2008-01-01

    Stem cell research is at the heart of regenerative medicine, which holds great promise for the treatment of many devastating disorders. However, in addition to hurdles posed by well-publicized ethical issues, this emerging field presents many biological challenges. What is a stem cell? How are embryonic stem cells different from adult stem cells? What are the physiological bases for therapeutically acceptable stem cells? In this editorial review, I will briefly discuss these superficially simple but actually rather complex issues that surround this fascinating cell type. The goal of this special issue on stem cells in Gene Therapy is to review some fundamental and critical aspects of current stem cell research that have translational potential. PMID:18046429

  17. Head and neck cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, S; Nör, J E

    2012-04-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the "drivers" of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  18. The leukemic stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Craig T.

    2007-01-01

    Malignant stem cells have recently been described as the source of several types of human cancer. These unique cell types are typically rare and possess properties that are distinct from most other tumor cells. The properties of leukemic stem cells indicate that current chemotherapy drugs will not be effective. The use of current cytotoxic agents is not effective in leukemia because the agents target both the leukemic and normal stem cell populations. Consequently, new strategies are required...

  19. Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Wieczorek; Jolanta Niewiarowska

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory gains increasingly greater significance in the world of medicine. Numerous findings of scientific research in vivo and in vitro indicate that it is the population of undifferentiated, self-renewing cells which is responsible for recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Similarly to normal stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) function in the environment of the other cells of the organism, called the niche, where they receive signals for differentiation and proliferation proc...

  20. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-11-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness, and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindbergh's plane. PMID:20803548

  1. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded LMP2A induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition and increases the number of side population stem-like cancer cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Li Kong

    Full Text Available It has been recently reported that a side population of cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC displayed characteristics of stem-like cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of such stem-like cell populations in NPC remain unclear. Epstein-Barr virus was the first identified human tumor virus to be associated with various malignancies, most notably NPC. LMP2A, the Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent protein, has been reported to play roles in oncogenic processes. We report by immunostaining in our current study that LMP2A is overexpressed in 57.6% of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma tumors sampled and is mainly localized at the tumor invasive front. We found also in NPC cells that the exogenous expression of LMP2A greatly increases their invasive/migratory ability, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT-like cellular marker alterations, and stimulates stem cell side populations and the expression of stem cell markers. In addition, LMP2A enhances the transforming ability of cancer cells in both colony formation and soft agar assays, as well as the self-renewal ability of stem-like cancer cells in a spherical culture assay. Additionally, LMP2A increases the number of cancer initiating cells in a xenograft tumor formation assay. More importantly, the endogenous expression of LMP2A positively correlates with the expression of ABCG2 in NPC samples. Finally, we demonstrate that Akt inhibitor (V greatly decreases the size of the stem cell side populations in LMP2A-expressing cells. Taken together, our data indicate that LMP2A induces EMT and stem-like cell self-renewal in NPC, suggesting a novel mechanism by which Epstein-Barr virus induces the initiation, metastasis and recurrence of NPC.

  2. STEM CELLS AND PROTEOMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-ming; GUO Tian-nan; HUANG Shi-ang

    2006-01-01

    The distinctive features of proteomics are large-scale and high throughput. The key techniques of proteomics are two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Stem cell can differentiate into all kinds of cells, tissues and organs. There are many proteins and cytokines involved in the process of differentiation. Applying proteomics techniques to the research of the complex process of stem cell differentiation is of great importance to study the mechanism and applications of stem cell differentiation.

  3. Prostate cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate glandular formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative AR− status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade ther...

  4. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pine, Sharon R.; Blair Marshall; Lyuba Varticovski

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation p...

  5. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  6. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  7. Stem cells in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony

    2008-11-01

    The shortage of donors for organ transplantation has stimulated research on stem cells as a potential resource for cell-based therapy in all human tissues. Stem cells have been used for regenerative medicine applications in many organ systems, including the genitourinary system. The potential applications for stem cell therapy have, however, been restricted by the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cell research. Instead, scientists have explored other cell sources, including progenitor and stem cells derived from adult tissues and stem cells derived from the amniotic fluid and placenta. In addition, novel techniques for generating stem cells in the laboratory are being developed. These techniques include somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which the nucleus of an adult somatic cell is placed into an oocyte, and reprogramming of adult cells to induce stem-cell-like behavior. Such techniques are now being used in tissue engineering applications, and some of the most successful experiments have been in the field of urology. Techniques to regenerate bladder tissue have reached the clinic, and exciting progress is being made in other areas, such as regeneration of the kidney and urethra. Cell therapy as a treatment for incontinence and infertility might soon become a reality. Physicians should be optimistic that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will one day provide mainstream treatment options for urologic disorders.

  8. Epidermal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Osman Köse

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of the human skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. There are many origins of stem cells in the skin and skin appendages. These stem cells are localized in different part of the pilosebaseous units and also express many different genes. Epidermal stem cells in the pilosebaseous units not only ensure the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis and ...

  9. Chiaroscuro hematopoietic stem cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Quesenberry, P.; Habibian, M. (PhD); Dooner, M; Zhong, S.; Reilly, J; Peters, S.; De Becker, P; Grimaldi, C.; Carlson, J; REDDY, P; Nilsson, S.; Stewart, F. M.

    1998-01-01

    These observations suggest several immediate clinical strategies. In gene therapy, approaches could be targeted to obtain cycling of hematopoietic stem cells and gene-carrying retrovirus vector integration followed by engraftment at an appropriate time interval which favors engraftment. The same type of approach can be utilized for stem cell expansion approaches. Alternatively marrow or peripheral stem cell engraftment can be obtained with minimal to no toxicity in allochimeric strategies in ...

  10. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Pestell, Richard G.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now viewed as a stem cell disease. There is still no consensus on the metabolic characteristics of cancer stem cells, with several studies indicating that they are mainly glycolytic and others pointing instead to mitochondrial metabolism as their principal source of energy. Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes. Deter...

  11. Lung Stem cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Ardhanareeswaran, Karthikeyan; Mirotsou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few years new insights have been added to the study of stem cells in the adult lung. The exploration of the endogenous lung progenitors as well as the study of exogenously delivered stem cell populations holds promise for advancing our understanding of the biology of lung repair mechanisms. Moreover, it opens new possibilities for the use of stem cell therapy for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for the treatment of lung disease. Here, we discuss the main type...

  12. Gastric Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Okumura, Tomoyuki; Timothy C Wang

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are defined as the unique subpopulation in the tumors that possess the ability to initiate tumor growth and sustain self-renewal as well as metastatic potential. Accumulating evidence in recent years strongly indicate the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors of a wide variety of organs. In this review, we will discuss the possible existence of a gastric cancer stem cell. Our recent data suggest that a subpopulation with a defined marker shows spheroid colony format...

  13. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to real

  14. Dazlin' pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocyst embryos and differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro. However, despite their similar origin, mouse embryonic stem cells represent a more naïve ICM-like pluripotent state whereas human embryo

  15. Many facets of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiarui Wu

    2011-01-01

    @@ Research area on stem cells is one of frontiers in biology.The collection of five research articles in this issue aims to cover timely developments in stem cell biology, ranging from generating and identifying stem cell line to manipulating stem cells, and from basic mechanism analysis to applied medical potential.These papers reflect the various research tasks in stem cell biology.

  16. CD133/CD166/Ki-67 triple immunofluorescence assessment for putative cancer stem cells in colon carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mărgaritescu, Claudiu; Pirici, Daniel; Cherciu, Irina;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colorectal cancer represents the third most common malignancy and the fourth most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The existence of drug-resistant colon cancer stem cells is thought to be one of the most important reasons behind treatment failure in colon cancer...... adenocarcinoma cases were investigated by enzymatic and multiple fluorescence immunohistochemistry for their CD133 and CD166 expression and colocalization. RESULTS: Both CD133 and CD166 were expressed to different extents in all cancer specimens, with a predominant cytoplasmic pattern for CD133 and a more......, with the highest coefficients recorded for patients with high grade dysplasia, followed by well differentiated tumours. Thus, we consider that the coexpression of these two markers could be useful for further prognostic and therapeutically stratification of patients with colon cancer....

  17. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human mesenchymal stem cells of parotid gland origin

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xing; Xu, Nuo; Meng, Cen; Wang, Bianhong; Yuan, Jinghong; Wang, Caiyun; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The technology to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent state allows the generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and holds a great promise for regenerative medicine and autologous transplantation. Here we, for the first time, identified mesenchymal stem cells isolated from parotid gland (hPMSCs) as a suitable candidate for iPSC production. In the present study, hPMSCs were isolated from parotid gland specimens in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of th...

  18. Epidermal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Köse

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is the outermost layer of the human skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. There are many origins of stem cells in the skin and skin appendages. These stem cells are localized in different part of the pilosebaseous units and also express many different genes. Epidermal stem cells in the pilosebaseous units not only ensure the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis and hair regeneration, but also contribute to repair of the epidermis after injury. In recent years, human induced pluripotent skin stem cells are produced from the epidermal cells such as keratinocytes, fibroblasts and melanocytes. These cells can be transdifferentiated to embriyonic stem cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cells have potential applications in cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. These cells provide a means to create valuable tools for basic research and may also produce a source of patient-matched cells for regenerative therapies. In this review, we aimed an overview of epidermal stem cells for better understanding their functions in the skin. Skin will be main organ for using the epidermal cells for regenerative medicine in near future.

  19. Stem cell mechanobiology

    OpenAIRE

    David A. Lee; Knight, Martin M.; Jonathan J Campbell; Bader, Dan L.

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that are capable of proliferation, self-maintenance and differentiation towards specific cell phenotypes. These processes are controlled by a variety of cues including physicochemical factors associated with the specific mechanical environment in which the cells reside. The control of stem cell biology through mechanical factors remains poorly understood and is the focus of the developing field of mechanobiology. This review provides an insight into the c...

  20. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  1. Fish stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  2. What are Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadshah Farhat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are undifferentiated self regenerating multi potential cells. There are three types of stem cells categories by the ability to form after cells and correlated with the body’s development process. Totipotent: these stem cells can form an entire organism such as fertilized egg. Ploripotent: ploripotent cells are those that can form any cell in the body but cannot form an entire organism such as developing embryo’s totipotent cells become ploripotent  Multipotent: Multi potent stem cells are those that can only form specific cells in the body such as blood cells based. Based on the sources of stem cells we have three types of these cells: Autologous: Sources of the patient own cells are (Autologous either the cells from patient own body or his or her cord blood. For this type of transplant the physician now usually collects the periphery rather than morrow because the procedure is easier on like a bane morrow harvest it take place outside of an operating room, and the patient does not to be under general unsetting . Allogenic: Sources of stem cells from another donore are primarily relatives (familial allogenic or completely unrelated donors. Xenogenic: In these stem cells from different species are transplanted e .g striatal porcine fetal mesan cephalic (FVM xenotransplants for Parkinson’s disease. On sites of isolation such as embryo, umbilical cord and other body tissues stem cells are named embnyonic, cord blood, and adult stem cells. The scope of results and clinical application of stem cells are such as: Neurodegenerative conditions (MS,ALS, Parkinson’s, Stroke, Ocular disorders- Glaucoma, retinitis Pigmentosa (RP, Auto Immune Conditions (Lupus, MS,R. arthritis, Diabetes, etc, Viral Conditions (Hepatitis C and AIDS, Heart Disease, Adrenal Disorders, Injury(Nerve, Brain, etc, Anti aging (hair, skin, weight control, overall well being/preventive, Emotional disorders, Organ / Tissue Cancers, Blood cancers, Blood diseases

  3. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor Hernández Piñero; José Luis Rodríguez López; María de Lourdes Menéndez Villa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagn...

  4. Stem cells in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogliari, Karolyn Sassi; Marinowic, Daniel; Brum, Dario Eduardo; Loth, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical research have shown that stem cell therapy could be a promising therapeutic option for many diseases in which current medical treatments do not achieve satisfying results or cure. This article describes stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications in dermatology today.

  5. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  6. c-Kit Expression is Rate-Limiting for Stem Cell Factor-Mediated Disease Progression in Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Salivary Glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janyaporn Phuchareon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC is an aggressive malignant neoplasm of the salivary glands in which c-Kit is overexpressed and activated, although the mechanism for this is as yet unclear. We analyzed 27 sporadic ACC tumor specimens to examine the biologic and clinical significance of c-Kit activation. Mutational analysis revealed expression of wild-type c-Kit in all, eliminating gene mutation as a cause of activation. Because stem cell factor (SCF is c-Kit's sole ligand, we analyzed its expression in the tumor cells and their environment. Immunohistochemistry revealed its presence in c-Kit–positive tumor cells, suggesting an activation of autocrine signaling. We observed a significant induction of ERK1/2 in the cells. SCF staining was also found in other types of non-cancerous cells adjacent to tumors within salivary glands, including stromal fibroblasts, neutrophils, peripheral nerve, skeletal muscle, vascular endothelial cells, mucous acinar cells, and intercalated ducts. Quantitative PCR showed that the top quartile of c-Kit mRNA expression distinguished ACCs from normal salivary tissues and was cross-correlated with short-term poor prognosis. Expression levels of SCF and c-Kit were highly correlated in the cases with perineural invasion. These observations suggest that c-Kit is potentially activated by receptor dimerization upon stimulation by SCF in ACC, and that the highest quartile of c-Kit mRNA expression could be a predictor of poor prognosis. Our findings may support an avenue for c-Kit-targeted therapy to improve disease control in ACC patients harboring the top quartile of c-Kit mRNA expression.

  7. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  8. Immunology of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Yang

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of pluri-potent stem cells to repair the tissues in which stem cells reside holds great promise in development of novel cell replacement therapeutics for treating chronic and degenerative diseases. However,numerous reports show that stem cell therapy, even in an autologous setting, triggers lymphocyte infiltration and inflammation. Therefore, an important question to be answered is how the host immune system responds to engrafted autologous stem cells or allogeneous stem cells. In this brief review, we summarize the progress in several related areas in this field, including some of our data, in four sections: (1) immunogenicity of stem cells; (2)strategies to inhibit immune rejection to allograft stem cells; (3) immune responses to cancer stem cells; and (4)mesenchymal stem cells in immune regulation. Improvement of our understanding on these and other aspects of immune system-stem cell interplay would greatly facilitate the development of stem cell-based therapeutics for regenerative purposes.

  9. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid;

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  10. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to reality. However, as somatic cells might have accumulated various chromosomal abnormalities, including aneuploidies throughout their lives, the resulting IPSCs might no longer carry the perfect bluepri...

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have two features: the ability to differentiate along different lineages and the ability of self-renewal. Two major types of stem cells have been described, namely, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are obtained from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and are associated with tumorigenesis, and the use of human ESCs involves ethical and legal considerations. The use of adult mesenchymal stem cells is less problematic with regard to these issues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation. MSCs can be isolated from a variety of tissues, such as umbilical cord, endometrial polyps, menses blood, bone marrow, adipose tissue, etc. This is because the ease of harvest and quantity obtained make these sources most practical for experimental and possible clinical applications. Recently, MSCs have been found in new sources, such as menstrual blood and endometrium. There are likely more sources of MSCs waiting to be discovered, and MSCs may be a good candidate for future experimental or clinical applications. One of the major challenges is to elucidate the mechanisms of differentiation, mobilization, and homing of MSCs, which are highly complex. The multipotent properties of MSCs make them an attractive choice for possible development of clinical applications. Future studies should explore the role of MSCs in differentiation, transplantation, and immune response in various diseases. PMID:21396235

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddhartha Bhowmik; LI Yong

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a recent development which has brought a promise of great therapeutic values. The previous technique of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been ineffective in humans. Recent discoveries show that human fibroblasts can be reprogrammed by a transient over expression of a small number of genes; they can undergo induced pluripotency. iPS were first produced in 2006. By 2008, work was underway to remove the potential oncogenes from their structure. In 2009, protein iPS (piPS) cells were discovered. Surface markers and reporter genes play an important role in stem cell research. Clinical applications include generation of self renewing stem cells, tissue replacement and many more. Stem cell therapy has the ability to dramatically change the treatment of human diseases.

  13. Stem cell myths

    OpenAIRE

    Magnus, Tim; Liu, Ying; Parker, Graham C.; Rao, Mahendra S.

    2007-01-01

    Stem cells, although difficult to define, hold great promise as tools for understanding development and as therapeutic agents. However, as with any new field, uncritical enthusiasm can outstrip reality. In this review, we have listed nine common myths that we believe affect our approach to evaluating stem cells for therapy. We suggest that careful consideration needs to be given to each of these issues when evaluating a particular cell for its use in therapy. Data need to be collected and rep...

  14. Stem Cells and Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  15. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  16. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Hernández Piñero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagnosed belatedly. Partial amputation of the penis was considered to be performed, but there was no consent on behalf of his family. The patient’s general condition was getting worse until he died.

  17. 人肝癌细胞系SMMC-7721肿瘤干细胞筛选及鉴定%A new method for purification and identification of hepatocellular carcinoma stem cell of SMMC-7721

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涌; 刘雅辉; 姜建帅; 崔翰斌

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore a new efficient purification method of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) stem cells and identify their features.Methods Human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 was cultured in sphere-culture system of polyhema-treated dish and tumor stem cell specific medium.Upon the formation of cellular sphere,the cells were inoculated subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice and received the interventions of different concentrations of cisplatin.Then the drug-resistant cells were purified and re-cultured in TSC medium.Finally the stem cell markers and tumor stem cell markers were determined through real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR),immunofluorescence method and flow cytometry.Results Through the double filter of TSC medium and cisplatin-resistance,SMMC-7721 stem cells could be grown in a suspended form and formed spheres in TSC medium.The stem cell markers (NANOG,OCT-4,SOX-2 and Notch) and tumor stem cell markers (CD24,90.0% ; CD133,6.1% ;CD90,4.8%) were all over-expressed in purified cancer stem cells as compared with ordinary cells.And the over-expression of CD24 was the most obvious.Conclusions The combination of in vitro cell culture with TSC medium,in vivo proliferation and cisplatin resistance test is a new efficient method of purifying hepatocellular carcinoma stem cells.Tumor stem cell with stem cell characteristics and an over-expression of CD24 may be cloned from SMMC-7721.%目的 探讨采用一种新型高效的肝癌干细胞分离方法,并对获得的肝癌干细胞进行鉴定.方法 应用无血清肿瘤干细胞培养基,悬浮培养SMMC-7721形成克隆,将悬浮细胞收集后裸鼠皮下接种,并予顺铂干预,取耐药细胞继续悬浮培养获得克隆,分别采用定量PCR、免疫荧光法和流式细胞法检测干细胞和肿瘤干细胞标志的表达情况.结果 在肿瘤干细胞培养基和顺铂的双重筛选下,SMMC-7721能有效形成悬浮生长的细胞克隆.检测结果提示,与普通肝癌

  18. Role of cancer stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bo; Jacob, Samson T.

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in cancer stem cells (CSCs) among cancer biologists and clinicians, most likely because of their role in the heterogeneity of cancer and their potential application in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies suggest that CSCs play a key role in liver carcinogenesis. A small subpopulation of cancer cells with CSC properties has been identified and characterized from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, animal models and human primary HCCs. Considering the...

  19. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  20. Introduction to Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Biehl, Jesse K.; Russell, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into specific cell types. The two defining characteristics of a stem cell are perpetual self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into a specialized adult cell type. There are two major classes of stem cells: pluripotent that can become any cell in the adult body, and multipotent that are restricted to becoming a more limited population of cells. Cell sources, characteristics, differentiation and therapeutic applications are discussed. Stem cel...

  1. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Lan Ma; Liang Li; Wenxiu Zhao; Xiang Ji; Fangfang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other type...

  2. The new stem cell biology.

    OpenAIRE

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Colvin, Gerald A; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Frimberger, Angela E.; Dooner, Mark S.; Mcauliffe, Christina I.; Miller, Caroline; Becker, Pamela; Badiavas, Evangelis; Falanga, Vincent J.; Elfenbein, Gerald; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating muscle, cardiac, hepatic, renal, and bone cells. Purified hematopoietic stem cells have generated cardiac and hepatic cells and reversed disease manifestations in these tissues. Hematopoietic stem cells also alter phenotype with cell cycle transit or circadian phase. During a cytokine stimulated cell cycle transit, reversible alterations of differentiation and engraftment occur. Primitive hematopoietic stem ce...

  3. Limbal Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kringlegarden, Hilde Grane

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted today that stem cells in the adult corneal epithelium is located to the limbus. No specific marker of limbal epithelial cells (LESCs) has been identified, yet many have been suggested, including ΔNp63α, ABCG2, vimentin and notch 1. Negative markers include amongst others the differentiation markers Ck3 and Ck12. The lack of an identified specific marker elucidates the need for establishment of more exact molecular markers of LESCs. Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) may ...

  4. Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minokadeh, Ardalan; Wulkan, Adam J; Beer, Kenneth; Waibel, Jill S

    2014-01-01

    A 92-year-old man presented for evaluation with a 1-month history of a rapidly growing asymptomatic pink nodule on his forearm. Biopsy results of the lesion demonstrated pathology consistent with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Immunohistochemical studies displayed positive cytoplasmic staining for cytokeratin AE1/AE3, positive dot-like perinuclear staining for cytokeratin-20, diffuse cytoplasmic staining for neuron specific enolase, and no significant staining for S-100. Subsequent positron emission tomography did not reveal evidence of metastatic disease. Wide excision of the lesion was performed along with a sentinel node biopsy of his left axilla. The sentinel nodes were negative for MCC. Adjuvant radiation treatment of the tumor site was provided because the pathologist noted MCC within 2 mm of the deep margin. PMID:24933855

  5. Limbal stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Merle

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in limbal stem cell transplantation. In addition to harvesting stem cells from a cadaver or a live related donor, it is now possible to cultivate limbal stem cells in vitro and then transplant them onto the recipient bed. A clear understanding of the basic disease pathology and a correct assessment of the extent of stem cell deficiency are essential. A holistic approach towards management of limbal stem cell deficiency is needed. This also includes management of the underlying systemic disease, ocular adnexal pathology and dry eye. Conjunctival limbal autografts from the healthy contralateral eye are performed for unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, tissue may be harvested from a cadaver or a living related donor; prolonged immunosuppression is needed to avoid allograft rejection in such cases. This review describes the surgical techniques, postoperative treatment regimes (including immunosuppression for allografts, the complications and their management. The short and long-term outcomes of the various modalities reported in the literature are also described.

  6. Patterning Stem Cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cell differentiation and assembly remains a fundamental question in developmental biology. Now, a report from the Chen laboratory (Ruiz and Chen, 2008) describes an approach that represents a major step toward a more profound understanding of the geometric-force control of stem cell differentiation.

  7. Stemness is derived from thyroid cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng eMa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs. Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre. This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells which do not express TPO.Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15 and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6 week old BRAFV600E mice. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a derived cancer thyroid cell line in which overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of vimentin expression and up regulation of stemness markers Oct4, Rex1, CD15 with enhanced migration ability of the cells. Conclusions: Our findings support our earlier hypothesis that stemness in thyroid cancer is derived via EMT rather than from resident thyroid stem cells. In mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre the neoplastic changes were dependent on thyroid cell differentiation and the onset of stemness must have been derived from differentiated thyroid epithelial cells.

  8. Comparative study of the effects of PEGylated interferon-α2a versus 5-fluorouracil on cancer stem cells in a rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawi, Tarek Kamal; El-Boghdady, Noha Ahmed; El-Sayed, Abeer Mostafa; Helmy, Hebatullah Samy

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) possess tumor-initiating, metastatic, and drug resistance properties. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of PEGylated interferon-α2a (PEG-IFN-α2a) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on the expression of CSC markers and on specific pathways that contribute to the propagation of CSCs in HCC. HCC was initiated in rats using a single intraperitoneal dose of diethylnitrosamine (DENA) (200 mg/kg) and promoted by weekly subcutaneous injections of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 6 weeks. After the appearance of dysplastic nodules, the animals received PEG-IFN-α2a or 5-FU for 8 weeks. CSC markers (OV6, CD90) and molecules related to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and other signaling pathways were assessed in hepatic tissues. The PEG-IFN-α2a treatment effectively suppressed the hepatic expression of OV6 and CD90, ameliorated the diminished hepatic expression of TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) and β2-spectrin (β2SP), and significantly reduced the elevated hepatic expression of TGF-β1, interleukin6 (IL6), signal transducer and activator of transcription3 (STAT3), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In contrast, the 5-FU treatment failed to reduce the overexpression of CSC markers and barely affected the disrupted TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, it had no effect on angiogenesis or nitrosative stress. PEG-IFN-α2a, but not 5-FU, could reduce the propagation of CSCs during the progression of HCC by upregulating the disrupted TGF-β signaling, suppressing the IL6/STAT3 pathway and reducing angiogenesis. PMID:26304505

  9. Simultaneous determination of the repertoire of classical neurotransmitters released from embryonal carcinoma stem cells using online microdialysis coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ya-Bin [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Sun, Fan [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Teng, Lin [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Department of Cardiology and Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, The First College of Clinical Medical Sciences, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443000, Hubei (China); Li, Wen-Bin; An, Shi-Min [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Chun; Yang, Xin-Jie; Lv, Hao-Yu; Ding, Xu-Ping [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhu, Liang, E-mail: zhuliang17@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); and others

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • An online MD-HILIC–MS/MS method for simultaneously measuring the repertoire of classical transmitters was developed and validated. • Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) was successfully employed to online system. • Stable isotope labeled internal standards and authentic matrix have been applied to guarantee reliable results. • The method features simple procedure (no sample preparation), high recovery (≥73%), high accuracy (89.36% ≤ RE ≤ 116.89%), good reproducibility (2.18% ≤ RSD ≤ 14.56%), and sensitive limits of detection (2 pg for acetylcholine, serotonin, and glutamate, 10 pg for dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, and glycine). - Abstract: Dynamic, continuous, and simultaneous multi-analysis of transmitters is important for the delineation of the complex interactions between the neuronal and intercellular communications. But the analysis of the whole repertoire of classical transmitters of diverse structure is challenging due to their different physico-chemical properties and to their high polarity feature which leads to poor retention in traditional reversed-phase columns during LC–MS analysis. Here, an online microdialysis coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (online MD-HILIC–MS/MS) detection method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of the repertoire of classical transmitters (acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, GABA, and glycine). Stable isotope labeled internal standards and authentic matrix have been applied to guarantee reliable results. The method was successfully employed to reveal the characteristics of transmitter release from embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The method features simple procedure (no sample preparation), high recovery (≥73%), high accuracy (89.36% ≤ RE ≤ 116.89%), good reproducibility (2.18% ≤ RSD ≤ 14.56%), and sensitive limits of detection (2 pg for acetylcholine, serotonin, and glutamate, 10 pg

  10. Advancing Stem Cell Biology toward Stem Cell Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Scadden, David; Srivastava, Alok

    2012-01-01

    Here, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Clinical Translation Committee introduces a series of articles outlining the current status, opportunities, and challenges surrounding the clinical translation of stem cell therapeutics for specific medical conditions.

  11. The Stem Cell Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ At the beginning of this year, Kelly Reynolds,a US-national diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), became the one of the latest overseas patient to undergo stem cell treatment at the Nanshan Hospital in Shenzhen.Confined to a wheelchair and with limited use of his hands,the 39-year old received four fetal stem cell injections over a three-week period. So far,the results have been positive and Reynolds, acording to his personal blog page, is upbeat about the long-term benefits.

  12. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, K. O.; Gan, S U; Calne, R Y

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced plu...

  13. Stem cell organization in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wendrich, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of plant tissues and organs depends on continuous production of new cells, by niches of stem cells. Stem cells typically divide to give rise to one differentiating daughter and one non-differentiating daughter. This constant process of self-renewal ensures that the niches of stem cells or meristems stay active throughout plant-life. Specification of stem cells occurs very early during development of the emrbyo and they are maintained during later stages. The Arabidopsis embryo is a hig...

  14. Stem cell organization in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of plant tissues and organs depends on continuous production of new cells, by niches of stem cells. Stem cells typically divide to give rise to one differentiating daughter and one non-differentiating daughter. This constant process of self-renewal ensures that the niches of stem cells or mer

  15. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants Print A A A Text Size What's ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  16. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-01

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  17. Engineering stem cell niches in bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and amniotic fluid stem cells have the potential to be expanded and differentiated into various cell types in the body. Efficient differentiation of stem cells with the desired tissue-specific function is critical for stem cell-based cell therapy, tissue engineering, drug discovery and disease modeling. Bioreactors provide a great platform to regulate the stem cell microenvironment, known as “ni...

  18. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K O Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future.

  19. Laser biomodulation on stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Li, Yan; Li, Xue-Feng; Tan, Li-Ling; Liu, Songhao

    2001-08-01

    Stem cells are views from the perspectives of their function, evolution, development, and cause. Counterintuitively, most stem cells may arise late in development, to act principally in tissue renewal, thus ensuring an organisms long-term survival. Surprisingly, recent reports suggest that tissue-specific adult stem cells have the potential to contribute to replenishment of multiple adult tissues. Stem cells are currently in the news for two reasons: the successful cultivation of human embryonic stem cell lines and reports that adult stem cells can differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve cells into blood cells. The spotlight on stem cells has revealed gaps in our knowledge that must be filled if we are to take advantage of their full potential for treating devastating degenerative diseases such as Parkinsons's disease and muscular dystrophy. We need to know more about the intrinsic controls that keep stem cells as stem cells or direct them along particular differentiation pathways. Such intrinsic regulators are, in turn, sensitive to the influences of the microenvironment, or niche, where stem cells normally reside. Both intrinsic and extrinsic signals regular stem cell fate and some of these signals have now been identified. Vacek et al and Wang et al have studied the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro. There experiments show there is indeed the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro, and the present effect is the promotion of haemopoietic stem cells proliferation. In other words, low intensity laser irradiation can act as an extrinsic signal regulating stem cell fate. In this paper, we study how low intensity laser can be used to regulate stem cell fate from the viewpoint of collective phototransduction.

  20. Synchronous thyroid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seo [Chonnam National Univ. School of Dentistry, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Thyroid carcinoma occurring as a second primary associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is unusual. This report presents a synchronous thyroid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the anterior palate region of a 41-year-old man. The clinical, radiologic, and histologic features are described. At 10-month follow-up after operation, no evidence of recurrence ana metastasis was present.

  1. Hepatic stem cells in different histopathologic types of primary hepatic carcinoma%原发性肝癌不同病理组织类型中肝干细胞的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈川; 王红中; 李增鹏; 王东; 王阁; 索金友; 郑继军; 张志敏; 李琼; 许文; 雒喜中; 邓婧

    2008-01-01

    背景:近年来,有观点认为原发性肝癌的发生机制可能为肝干细胞分化不全或分化异常所致.目前,肝干细胞研究正处于起步阶段,对人原发性肝癌的"干细胞起源"学说尚需进一步验证.目的:观察原发性肝癌不同病理组织类型中肝干细胞的活化、分布、来源和免疫表达特征.设计:观察对比实验.单位:解放军第三军医大学大坪医院野战外科研究所肿瘤中心.对象: 实验于2003-09/2004-07在解放军第三军医大学大坪医院野战外科研究所肿瘤中心完成,选用94例肝细胞癌和12例肝内胆管细胞癌和10例混合型肝癌石蜡包埋组织,同时选用5例肝硬化和4例正常肝组织作为实验对照,均取自病理科存档资料.肝癌组织均为患者首次肝癌切除手术时采取,包括肿瘤组织和癌旁组织,患者均无化疗和放射治疗史,并对受检项目知情同意.实验主要抗体均购自Santa Cruz公司.方法: 采用苏木精-伊红染色、免疫组织化学SP方法(检测的免疫标志有鼠抗人细胞角蛋白19单克隆抗体、鼠抗人细胞角蛋白7单克隆抗体、鼠抗人细胞角蛋白8&18单克隆抗体、鼠抗人c-kit单克隆抗体、鼠抗人Thy-1单克隆抗体、鼠抗人甲胎蛋白单克隆抗体)观察各病变类型肝干细胞免疫标志表达情况.主要观察指标:各病变类型肝干细胞免疫标志表达情况.结果:在原发性肝癌不同病理组织类型中干细胞免疫标志均有不同程度的表达,均可观察到肝干细胞向肝癌细胞的转化,以混合型肝细胞癌中肝干细胞免疫表型表达率最高(P < 0.05).正常组和肝硬化组干细胞免疫表型特征为阴性. 结论:不同病理组织类型的肝癌组织中均存在不同分化状态和不同来源的肝干细胞.%BACKGROUND: Recently, some people believed that the mechanisms of primary hepatic carcinoma might be caused by poor differentiation or disdifferentiation of hepatic stem cells

  2. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000839.htm Bone marrow (stem cell) donation To use the sharing ... stem cells from a donor's blood. Types of Bone Marrow Donation There are two types of bone ...

  3. Pulmonary Metastasis of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sang-Hee; Shim, Woo-Haing; SHIN, DONG-HOON; Kim, Yun-Seong; Sung, Hyun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Although basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, it rarely metastasizes. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma may, therefore, initially elude diagnosis and management. We describe the case of a patient with a metastatic basal cell carcinoma present in the lungs. The differential diagnosis of suspected metastatic lesions should include metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, in addition to those from more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, especially in patients with a histor...

  4. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  5. Stem cell research in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Lianming; Li, Lingsong; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2007-01-01

    In the past 5 years, China has increased its efforts in the field of stem cell research and practice. Basic research mainly focuses on bone marrow and embryonic stem cells. Clinical applications of stem cells in the treatment of acute heart failure, acute liver failure and lower limb ischaemia have been reported by many hospitals. China enacted its ‘Ethical Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research’ in 2003. At present, China has the most liberal and favourable environments for human ...

  6. Materials as stem cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

  7. The intestinal stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Nick; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The epithelium of the adult mammalian intestine is in a constant dialog with its underlying mesenchyme to direct progenitor proliferation, lineage commitment, terminal differentiation, and, ultimately, cell death. The epithelium is shaped into spatially distinct compartments that are dedicated to each of these events. While the intestinal epithelium represents the most vigorously renewing adult tissue in mammals, the stem cells that fuel this self-renewal process have been identified only rec...

  8. Stem cells and genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we have discussed a role of stem cells in the treatment of genetic diseases including cochlear and retinal regeneration. The most perceptive use of stem cells at the genetic diseases is cellular repair of tissues affected by a genetic mutation when stem cells without such mutation are transplanted to restore normal tissue function.

  9. Advances in stem cell research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@In 1998, biologists Thomson and Gearhart successfully derived stem cells from human embryos. One year later, several researchers discovered that adult stem cells still retain the ability to be differentiated into unrelated types of cells. Advances in stem cell research open a promising direction for applied medical science. Moreover, it may also force scientists to reconsider the fundamental theory about how cells grow up. Stem cell research was considered by Science as the top of the ten breakthroughs of science of the year[1]. This paper gives a survey of recent advances in stem cell research. 1 Overview In the 1980s, embryonic stem cell and/or embryonic germ cell line (ES cell line, EG cell line) of multifarious mammalian animals, especially those of non-human pri-mates, had been established. In 1998, Thomson and Shamblott obtained ES, EG cell lines from human blasto-cysts and gonad ridges of early human embryos, respec-tively. Their research brought up an ethical debate about whether human embryos can be used as experimental materials. It was not appeased until 1999 when research-ers discovered that stem cells from adults still retain the ability to become different kinds of tissue cells. For in-stance, brain cells can become blood cells[2], and cells from bone marrow can become cells in liver. Scientists believe, for a long time, that cells can only be developed from early pluripotent embryo cells; the differentiation potential of stem cells from mature tissues is restricted to only one of the cell types of the tissue where stem cells are obtained. Recent stem cell researches, however, sub-verted the traditional view of stem cells. These discoveries made scientists speed ahead with the work on adult stem cells, hoping to discover whether their promise will rival that of ES cells.

  10. Epidermal stem cells - role in normal, wounded and pathological psoriatic and cancer skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M.; Faurschou, A.; Gniadecki, R.;

    2008-01-01

    In this review we focus on epidermal stem cells in the normal regeneration of the skin as well as in wounded and psoriatic skin. Furthermore, we discuss current data supporting the idea of cancer stem cells in the pathogenesis of skin carcinoma and malignant melanoma. Epidermal stem cells present...... or transit amplifying cells constitute a primary pathogenetic factor in the epidermal hyperproliferation seen in psoriasis. In cutaneous malignancies mounting evidence supports a stem cell origin in skin carcinoma and malignant melanoma and a possible existence of cancer stem cells Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  11. Stem cell migration after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival rate of irradiated rodents could be significantly improved by shielding only the small parts of hemopoietic tissues during the course of irradiation. The populations of circulating stem cells in adult organisms are considered to be of some importance for the homeostasis between the many sites of blood cell formation and for the necessary flexibility of hemopoietic response in the face of fluctuating demands. Pluripotent stem cells are migrating through peripheral blood as has been shown for several mammalian species. Under steady state conditions, the exchange of stem cells between the different sites of blood cell formation appears to be restricted. Their presence in blood and the fact that they are in balance with the extravascular stem cell pool may well be of significance for the surveilance of the integrity of local stem cell populations. Any decrease of stem cell population in blood below a critical size results in the rapid immigration of circulating stem cells in order to restore local stem cell pool size. Blood stem cells are involved in the regeneration after whole-body irradiation if the stem cell population in bone marrows is reduced to less than 10% of the normal state. In the animals subjected to partial-body irradiation, the circulating stem cells appear to be the only source for the repopulation of the heavily irradiated, aplastic sites of hemopoietic organs. (Yamashita, S.)

  12. Simultaneous Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bighan Khademi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The association of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx with thyroid papillary carcinoma is an unusual finding. From 2004 to 2011, approximately 250 patients underwent laryngectomies due to squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx at the Otolaryngology Department of Khalili Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. In three patients, synchronous occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma and thyroid papillary carcinoma was found. Histopathologic study of the lymph nodes revealed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. We report three cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma incidentally found on histological examinations of resected thyroid lobes, as a procedure required for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In comparison, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma needs more aggressive treatment than well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The prevalence of thyroid papillary carcinoma, as an incidental finding in our study was 0.01%. Therefore, preoperative evaluation of the thyroid gland by ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspicious lesions is recommended in patients who are candidates for open laryngectomy.

  13. NIH Stem Cell Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄亚明

    2009-01-01

    该网站是美国国立卫生研究所的干细胞信息门户网站。对于内科学临床和科研人员来说,该门户中如下信息值得关注。“StemCellRegistry”中提供如下信息:(1)“NationalStemCellBank”为可获取的人类胚胎干细胞库;(2)通过认证的研发干细胞系的实验室和公司名单;(3)一种以上干细胞系(可空运)的提供者并附有通信方式;(4)其他文档如各类标准等。

  14. Mimicking Stem Cell Niches to Increase Stem Cell Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Dellatore, Shara M.; Garcia, A. Sofia; Miller, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Niches regulate lineage-specific stem cell self-renewal vs. differentiation in vivo and are comprised of supportive cells and extracellular matrix components arranged in a 3-dimensional topography of controlled stiffness in the presence of oxygen and growth factor gradients. Mimicking stem cell niches in a defined manner will facilitate production of the large numbers of stem cells needed to realize the promise of regenerative medicine and gene therapy. Progress has been made in mimicking com...

  15. Breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Thomas W.; Naylor, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumors are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to th...

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Eleftheria Hatzimichael; Mark Tuthill

    2010-01-01

    Eleftheria Hatzimichael1, Mark Tuthill21Department of Haematology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College National Health Service Trust, London, UKAbstract: More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and mye...

  17. Stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Hajdu, K; Golbus, M S

    2000-01-01

    Modern physicians desire not only to treat but to cure congenital diseases. In a wide variety of diseases, bone marrow transplantation can be the tool of final cure. The limitations and risks of this procedure have motivated researchers to search for an earlier and safer method of treatment. Special features of fetal immune systems make it possible to perform the transplantation during fetal life using fetal hematopoietic stem cells, thus avoiding many of the side effects of bone marrow trans...

  18. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differentiation is practically very rare.

  19. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Divvya; Rehana; Viswanathan; Krishnaswamy; Anvar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differen...

  20. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  1. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  2. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne - case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis.......Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis....

  3. Oncogenic micro-RNAs and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eGrange

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor formation is a complex process that occurs in different steps and involves many cell types, including tumor cells, endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells, which interact to promote growth of the tumor mass and metastasization. Epigenetic alterations occurring in transformed cells result in de-regulation of miRNA expression (a class of small non-coding RNA that regulates multiple functions which contributes to tumorigenesis. The specific miRNAs, which have an aberrant expression in tumors, are defined as oncomiRNAs, and may be either over- or under-expressed, but down-regulation is most commonly observed.Renal cell carcinoma is a frequent form of urologic tumor, associated with an alteration of multiple signaling pathways. Many molecules involved in the progression of renal cell carcinomas, such as HIF, VEGF or mTOR, are possible targets of deregulated miRNAs. Within tumor mass, the cancer stem cell population is a fundamental component that promotes tumor growth. The cancer stem cell hypothesis postulates that cancer stem cells have the unique ability to self-renew and to maintain tumor growth and metastasis. Cancer stem cells present in renal cell carcinoma were shown to express the mesenchymal stem cell marker CD105 and to exhibit self-renewal and clonogenic properties, as well as the ability to generate serially transplantable tumors. The phenotype of cancer stem cell has been related to the potential to undergo the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which has been linked to the expression pattern of tumorigenic miRNAs or down-regulation of anti-tumor miRNAs. In addition, the pattern of circulating miRNAs may allow discrimination between healthy and tumor patients. Therefore, a miRNA signature may be used as a tumor biomarker for cancer diagnosis, as well as to classify the risk of relapse and metastasis, and for a guide for therapy.

  4. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto...

  5. 脐血造血干细胞对原发性肝细胞癌的抑制作用%Inhibitory effects of umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells on primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈奕明; 李立; 冉江华

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary hepatocellular carcinoma is a common malignant tumor in clinic. Although various treatment measures such as surgery, radio frequency ablation, selective arterial embolization have made progresses, these treatments are not suitable for a few patients who suffered from advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Under such circumstances, more researchers are concerned with the therapeutical or inhibitory effects of stem cells on malignant tumors.OBJECTIVE: To review incidence, immunoediting process, microenvironment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma and suppressive effect of hematopoietic stem cells on it or other solid malignant tumors.METHODS: Computer-based online search of Wanfang database and Foreign Medical Journal full-text Service database was performed for literatures concerning incidence, immune microenvironment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma and suppressive effect of hematopoietic stem cells on solid malignant tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma published between January 2000and September 2010. The key words were "hepatocellular carcinoma, hematopoietic stem cell, microenvironment". Finally, 33literatures were included.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Occurrence and development of the tumor closely associated with changes in the body immune system. In the body with a tumor, the immune system is under inhibitory state, and has no response or low response to malignant tumor cells. Umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells were characterized by low immunogenicity, strong fission ability and wide differentiation lineage. Umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells can differentiate into various lineages of cells in the body following transplantation, including many immune cells, which can supplement the defects of the immune system, and kill tumor cells, and inhibit tumor growth. However, its action mechanism, indication and adverse effect need more explorations.%背景:原发性肝细胞癌是一种临床常见的恶性肿瘤,虽然近

  6. [The Dutch guideline 'Renal cell carcinoma'].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osanto, S.; Bex, A.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Soetekouw, P.M.M.B.; Stemkens, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch guideline 'Renal Cell Carcinoma' has been revised on the basis of new literature. With the assistance of the Netherlands Cancer Registry an assessment was made of the current care for patients with renal cell carcinoma. Renal cell carcinoma is a type of cancer for which knowledge of the ge

  7. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  8. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur S; Thami G; Kanwar A

    2003-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  9. Simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein stem cell markers in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Gang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological studies and medical application of stem cells often require the isolation of stem cells from a mixed cell population, including the detection of cancer stem cells in tumor tissue, and isolation of induced pluripotent stem cells after eliciting the expression of specific genes in adult cells. Here we report the detection of Oct-4 mRNA and SSEA-1 protein in live carcinoma stem cells using respectively molecular beacon and dye-labeled antibody, aiming to establish a new method for stem cells detection and isolation. Results Quantification of Oct-4 mRNA and protein in P19 mouse carcinoma stem cells using respectively RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry confirmed that their levels drastically decreased after differentiation. To visualize Oct-4 mRNA in live stem cells, molecular beacons were designed, synthesized and validated, and the detection specificity was confirmed using control studies. We found that the fluorescence signal from Oct-4-targeting molecular beacons provides a clear discrimination between undifferentiated and retinoic acid-induced differentiated cells. Using deconvolution fluorescence microscopy, Oct-4 mRNAs were found to reside on one side of the cytosol. We demonstrated that, using a combination of Oct-4 mRNA-targeting molecular beacon with SSEA-1 antibody in flow cytometric analysis, undifferentiated stem cells can be clearly distinguished from differentiated cells. We revealed that Oct-4 targeting molecular beacons do not seem to affect stem cell biology. Conclusion Molecular beacons have the potential to provide a powerful tool for highly specific detection and isolation of stem cells, including cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells without disturbing cell physiology. It is advantageous to perform simultaneous detection of intracellular (mRNA and cell-surface (protein stem cell markers in flow cytometric analysis, which may lead to high detection sensitivity and efficiency.

  10. Stem cells: A new paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Sachin; Singh N

    2006-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is emerging as a potentially revolutionary new way to treat disease and injury, with wide-ranging medical benefits. It aims to repair damaged and diseased body-parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplants. Disease and disorders with no therapies or at best, partially effective ones, are the lure of the pursuit of stem cell research. Recently a plethora of work has been done in this field in world around including India. However, Stem cell research presents ...

  11. Germline stem cells: stems of the next generation

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Hebao; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2010-01-01

    Germline stem cells (GSCs) sustain gametogenesis during the life of organisms. Recent progress has substantially extended our understanding of GSC behavior, including the mechanisms of stem cell self-renewal, asymmetric stem cell division, stem cell niches, dedifferentiation, and tissue aging. GSCs typically are highly proliferative, due to organismal requirement to produce large number of differentiated cells. While many somatic stem cells are multipotent, with potentially multiple different...

  12. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, LingLing; Hong, Tao

    2008-04-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the development of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. However, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegenerative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington' disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig's disease.

  13. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU LingLing; HONG Tao

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the development of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. However, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegenerative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells,including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig's disease.

  14. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the de-velopment of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. How-ever, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegen-erative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Hunt-ington’s disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig’s disease.

  15. Reprogrammed Pluripotent Stem Cells from Somatic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, can differentiate into all cell types. So, these cells can be a biological resource for regenerative medicine. However, ES cells known as standard pluripotent cells have problem to be used for cell therapy because of ethical issue of the origin and immune response on the graft. Hence, recently reprogrammed pluripotent cells have been suggested as an alternative source for regenerative medicine. Somatic cells can acquire the ES cell-li...

  16. Isolation and Identification of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells from HumanEpithelial Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Line 3AO%人卵巢肿瘤细胞系3AO中肿瘤干细胞的分离鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青; 唐良萏; 汪艳; 张曦; 朱慧芬

    2012-01-01

    Objective To isolate and identify cancer stem cells-like cells(CSC-LCs)from the human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell line 3AO and define their biological characteristics through accessing the activity of the anti-apoptosis and drug resistance. Methods CD133 cells were isolated from 3AO by immunomagnetic beads(miniMACS). Cell counting was taken to reflect the proliferation ability. The self-renew capacity of CD133+ cells was detected by using flow cytometry(FCM). No more than 10' CD133+ cells were inoculated subcutaneously. Formation of xenografts in nude mice was taken to demonstrate the tu-morigenesis of these cells. MTT assay was also taken to characterize the sensitivity of CD133 cells against chemotherapeutic drug. Results CD133+ cancer stem cells were obtained from the human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell line 3AO, which could self-renew, proliferate and differentiate to a number of CD133 cells. Tumors transplanted into nude mice showed that the tumor formation rate of CD133+ cells was 10/10 and the average tumor formation time was (58 + 6) days, and in CD133- group, tumor formation rate was 4/10 and the average tumor formation time was (145i8) days,suggesting the tumor formation ability of CD133+ cells was significantly stronger than CD133‐ cells. MTT results revealed that IC5q value of CD133+ was 2. 5 times higher than CD133‐ suggesting that CD133+ cells were not sensitive to cisplatin. Staining of cisplatin-treated cells with acridine orange displayed that a large number of CD133 cells showed apoptotic state, while most of the CD133 represented normal form. Further Annexin V-FITC and PI double staining results showed that CD133+ cells had stronger anti-apoptotic ability than CD133‐ cells after treatment with cisplatin. Conclusion CD133 could be further studied as a molecular marker for identification of ovary cancer stem cells, which also provides the basis for the isolation,culture and identification of cancer stem cells in epithelial ovarian

  17. 子宫内膜癌中肿瘤干细胞的研究进展%Research Progress on Tumor Stem Cells in Endometrial Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭斐斐

    2012-01-01

    子宫内膜癌是妇科常见的三大恶性肿瘤之一,严重影响女性的生活和健康.现行的治疗手段主要包括手术、放射治疗(放疗)和化学治疗(化疗),但对放疗或化疗后复发病例的治疗,仍是极大的挑战.肿瘤干细胞是一类存在于肿瘤组织中具有自我更新能力和多向分化潜能的肿瘤细胞亚群,目前肿瘤干细胞的研究方兴未艾.在子宫内膜癌发病机制的研究中,大量研究证实具有干细胞潜能的稀有的子宫内膜癌肿瘤细胞在疾病发生、发展、转移和复发中起关键作用.就肿瘤干细胞的性质、来源做一总结,并对子宫内膜癌中肿瘤干细胞存在的证据及其标记物的研究进展作一综述.%Endometrial cancer is one of the most common gynaecological malignancies afflicting the lives and health of the women.Surgery .chemotherapy, and radiation protocols have been established for the treatment of endometrial cancer, however, the treatment for the recurrent patients that have acquired radio-or chemoresistance poses a major challenge for us. Tumor stem cells are defined as a subset of tumour cells with the potential to self-renew and give rise to the differentiated cells that comprise the bulk of the tumour. And the researches about tumor stem cells are just in the ascendant. Emerging evidence indicates that the rare tumor cells with the potentiality of endomrtrial cancer tumor stem cell are likely responsible for the development,progression,metastisis and recurrence of endometrial cancer in the researches about the mechanism of the endometrial cancer. This review is a conclution of the characters and sources of the tumor stem cells, and the research progress on tumor stem cells and its markers in endometrial cancer.

  18. Spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin predominantly affecting elderly Caucasians. It has a high rate of local recurrence and regional lymph node metastases. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Complete spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported but is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here we present a case of complete spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma demonstrating a markedly different pattern of events from those previously published.

  19. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu; Tatiana Maron-Gutierrez; Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez Garcia; Marcelo Marcos Morales; Patricia Rieken Macedo Rocco

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions ne...

  20. GPCRs in Stem Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Doze, Van A.; PEREZ, DIANNE M.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissues of the body cannot only repair themselves, but also self-renew, a property mainly due to stem cells and the various mechanisms that regulate their behavior. Stem cell biology is a relatively new field. While advances are slowly being realized, stem cells possess huge potential to ameliorate disease and counteract the aging process, causing its speculation as the next panacea. Amidst public pressure to advance rapidly to clinical trials, there is a need to understand the biology o...

  1. Regulating the leukemia stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are responsible for sustaining and propagating malignant disease, and, as such, are promising targets for therapy. Studies of human LSCs have served an important role in defining the major tenets of the cancer stem cell model, which center on the frequencies of cancer stem cells, their potential hierarchical organization, and their degree of maturation. LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have recently been studied using mouse syngeneic models of leukemia induced b...

  2. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...... in porcine pre-implantation development compared to the mouse and human. Expression of oct4, nanog and sox2 differs in the zona-enclosed porcine blastocyst compared to its mouse and human counterparts, which may suggest that other factors may be responsible for maintaining porcine pluripotency in the early...

  3. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Brad B Swelstad; Kerr, Candace L.

    2009-01-01

    Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs) are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs), embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs), and germ-line stem cells (GSC) are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluri...

  4. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjimichael, Christiana; Chanoumidou, Konstantina; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Kretsovali, Androniki

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal transducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors (cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research framework for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we h...

  5. Epidermal stem cells response to radiative genotoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skin is the first organ exposed to various environmental stresses, which requires the development by skin stem cells of specific mechanisms to protect themselves and to ensure tissue homeostasis. As stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of epidermis during individual lifetime, the preservation of genomic integrity in these cells is essential. My PhD aimed at exploring the mechanisms set up by epidermal stem cells in order to protect themselves from two genotoxic stresses, ionizing radiation (Gamma Rays) and ultraviolet radiation (UVB). To begin my PhD, I have taken part of the demonstration of protective mechanisms used by keratinocyte stem cells after ionizing radiation. It has been shown that these cells are able to rapidly repair most types of radiation-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this repair is activated by the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In order to know if this protective mechanism is also operating in cutaneous carcinoma stem cells, we investigated the response to gamma Rays of carcinoma stem cells isolated from a human carcinoma cell line. As in normal keratinocyte stem cells, we demonstrated that cancer stem cells could rapidly repair radio-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor 2 also mediates this repair, notably thanks to its nuclear isoforms. The second project of my PhD was to study human epidermal stem cells and progenitors responses to UVB radiation. Once cytometry and irradiation conditions were set up, the toxicity of UVB radiation has been evaluate in the primary cell model. We then characterized UVB photons effects on cell viability, proliferation and repair of DNA damage. This study allowed us to bring out that responses of stem cells and their progeny to UVB are different, notably at the level of part of their repair activity of DNA damage. Moreover, progenitors and stem cells transcriptomic responses after UVB irradiation have been study in order to analyze the global

  6. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  7. Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-wei; YUAN Lin; Hu Hong-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma is a special type of tumor which is usually found in the lungs. However, it is very rare in extra pulmonary tissues, especially in epididymis. One case of small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the right epididymis, with partial differentiation to adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma is reported as follows.

  8. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research.

  9. The many faces of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most easily cured carcinoma, but because of the many forms it can take, and because it grows so slowly, it can be misdiagnosed or neglected. The author discusses its more common forms and etiologic considerations.

  10. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  11. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May;

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  12. Metastasis and stem cell pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Barnhart, Bryan C.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have described a small population of self-renewing and multipotent cells within tumors termed “cancer stem cells.” These cells share many traits with somatic and embryonic stem cells and are thought to be responsible for driving tumor progression in a growing list of neoplastic diseases. Cells within solid tumors encounter hypoxia due to poor vascular function. Both long-standing and emerging data describe hypoxic effects on somatic and embryonic stem cells, and it is likely th...

  13. Stem cells for spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-26

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer's disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion. PMID:25621119

  14. Stem cells for spine surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua Schroeder; Janina Kueper; Kaplan Leon; Meir Liebergall

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focusof research by regenerative medicine professionals andtissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capableof differentiating into cell lineages of all three germlayers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues.In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequenttransplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow,adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilizedin the treatment of a wide variety of diseases rangingfrom myocardial infarction to Alzheimer's disease. Thephysiologic consequences of stem cell transplantationand its impact on functional recovery have been studiedin countless animal models and select clinical trials.Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of thisresearch has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapyhas received the attention of spinal surgeons due to itspotential benefits in the treatment of neural damage,muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potentialcontribution to bone fusion.

  15. Stem cells in gastroenterology and hepatology

    OpenAIRE

    Quante, Michael; Timothy C Wang

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract and liver depends on stem cells with properties of longevity, self-renewal and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential esophageal, gastric, intestinal, colonic, hepatic and pancreatic stem cells provides hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the potential to give rise to any cell type ...

  16. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  17. Stem cells in infantile hemangioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao TAO; Xiao-dong HE; Jia-Ren LIU; Qian LIU

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Background:Infantile hemangioma (IH)is the most common tumor of infancy and the pathogenesis is still unclear.Recent new evidences have been shown that IH arises from stem cells.Data sources:Based on recent origi-nal publications from Pub Med,Elsevier and Google Scholar,a large number of articles about pathogenesis and treatment of IH were selected by their titles and abstracts.Results:The hemangioma-derived stem cells expressed stem cell-specif-ic marker CD133 and mesenchymal markers CD29,CD44,and comprised between 0.1%and 1%of the cells in prolifer-ating-phase IH.During the proliferative phase,stem cells differentiated into large amounts of endothelial cells and peri-cytes;while during the involuting phase,stem cells became less and predominantly differentiated toward adipocytes.Sig-naling pathways like VEGF/VEGFR,Notch signaling,were found to be related to these processes.Corticosteroids,Ra-pamycin and propranolol had a significant effect on stem cells by inhibiting the cell growth or differentiation,or participat-ing in maintaining the cell stability.Conclusions:Stem cells derived from hemangioma play an important role in the pathogenesis of IH,and may be important targets of therapy.

  18. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... blood-forming system. back to top Regulation of Stem Cells FDA regulates stem cells in the U.S. to ...

  19. Stem cells in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Rama Kumar M, Madhu Varma K, Kalyan Satish R, Manikya kumar Nanduri.R, Murali Krishnam Raju S, Mohan rao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. However, progress in stem cell biology and tissue engineering may present new options for replacing heavily damaged or lost teeth, or even individual tooth structures. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells on regenerative endodontics.

  20. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  1. LncRNAs in Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shanshan Hu; Ge Shan

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are critical regulatory factors in essentially all forms of life. Stem cells occupy a special position in cell biology and Biomedicine, and emerging results show that multiple ncRNAs play essential roles in stem cells. We discuss some of the known ncRNAs in stem cells such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, adult stem cells, and cancer stem cells with a focus on long ncRNAs. Roles and functional mechanisms of these lncRNAs are summa...

  2. Immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, R M

    1999-06-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma continue to present a therapeutic challenge. Current therapeutic approaches involve surgery and various types of immunotherapy. The rationale for this latter form of therapy include the observations of spontaneous tumor regression, the presence of a T-cell-mediated immune response, and the tumor responses observed in patients receiving cytokine therapy. Analysis of prognostic factors in these patients demonstrates that clinical responses occur most frequently in individuals with good performance status. The cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2, aldesleukin [Proleukin], interferon-alfa (Intron A, Roferon-A), or the combination produce responses in 15% to 20% of patients. Randomized trials suggest that administration of interferon-alfa may result in a modest improvement in median survival. Investigation of the molecular genetics of renal cell carcinoma and the presence of T-lymphocyte immune dysregulation have suggested new therapeutic strategies. Further preclinical and clinical studies investigating inhibitors of angiogenesis or pharmacologic methods to reverse immune dysregulation are ongoing. Therapeutic results in patients with renal cell carcinoma remain limited, and investigational approaches are warranted. PMID:10378218

  3. Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Alekshun, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Case: A 63-year-old male presented with unintentional weight loss of 20 pounds over a 4-month duration. He reported loss of appetite, intermittent post-prandial nausea, bloating and early satiety. He also complained of dyspepsia and had been treated for reflux during the previous 2 years. He denied vomiting, dysphagia, odynophagia, abdominal pain, melena, hematochezia, or alterations in bowel habits. Additionally, he denied fevers, night sweats, cough, or dyspnea. He quit smoking 25 years ago, and denied alcohol use. His past medical history was significant for basal cell carcinoma treated with local curative therapy and he was without recurrence on surveillance. Pertinent family history included a paternal uncle with lung cancer at the age of 74. Physical examination was unremarkable except for occult heme-positive stools. Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated liver enzymes (ALT-112, AST-81, AlkPhos-364). CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis showed diffuse heterogeneous liver with extensive nodularity, raising the concern for metastases. Serum tumor-markers: PSA, CEA, CA 19-9, and AFP were all within normal limits. Screening colonoscopy was normal, but esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a malignant-appearing ulcerative lesion involving the gastro-esophageal junction and gastric cardia. Pathology confirmed an invasive gastric large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of a hepatic lesion revealed malignant cells with cytologic features consistent with large-cell type carcinoma and positive immunostaining for synaptophysin favoring neuroendocrine differentiation. A PET-CT demonstrated intense diffuse FDG uptake of the liver, suggesting diffuse hepatic parenchymal infiltration by tumor. There were multiple foci of intense osseous FDG uptake with corresponding osteolytic lesions seen on CT scan. The remaining intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic structures were unremarkable. The patient will receive palliative systemic therapy

  4. Stem cell therapy independent of stemness

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Techung

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is entering a new era shifting the focus from initial feasibility study to optimization of therapeutic efficacy. However, how MSC therapy facilitates tissue regeneration remains incompletely characterized. Consistent with the emerging notion that secretion of multiple growth factors/cytokines (trophic factors) by MSC provides the underlying tissue regenerative mechanism, the recent study by Bai et al demonstrated a critical therapeutic role of MSC-derived h...

  5. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  6. What makes cancer stem cell markers different?

    OpenAIRE

    Karsten, Uwe; Goletz, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Since the cancer stem cell concept has been widely accepted, several strategies have been proposed to attack cancer stem cells (CSC). Accordingly, stem cell markers are now preferred therapeutic targets. However, the problem of tumor specificity has not disappeared but shifted to another question: how can cancer stem cells be distinguished from normal stem cells, or more specifically, how do CSC markers differ from normal stem cell markers? A hypothesis is proposed which might help to solve t...

  7. Neural stem cell derived tumourigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Froldi; Milán Szuperák; Cheng, Louise Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the developing Drosophila CNS, two pools of neural stem cells, the symmetrically dividing progenitors in the neuroepithelium (NE) and the asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts (NBs) generate the majority of the neurons that make up the adult central nervous system (CNS). The generation of a correct sized brain depends on maintaining the fine balance between neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, which are regulated by cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic cues. In this review, we wil...

  8. Modeling Stem Cell Induction Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe Grácio; Joaquim Cabral; Bruce Tidor

    2012-01-01

    Technology for converting human cells to pluripotent stem cell using induction processes has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However, the production of these so called iPS cells is still quite inefficient and may be dominated by stochastic effects. In this work we build mass-action models of the core regulatory elements controlling stem cell induction and maintenance. The models include not only the network of transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, but also important e...

  9. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A;

    2011-01-01

    This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and fetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem...... cells, use of platelet rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed....

  10. Chromatin, epigenetics and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Tim C; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2005-03-01

    Epigenetics is a term that has changed its meaning with the increasing biological knowledge on developmental processes. However, its current application to stem cell biology is often imprecise and is conceptually problematic. This article addresses two different subjects, the definition of epigenetics and chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. We describe mechanisms that regulate chromatin changes and provide an overview of chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. Moreover, a modification of the current epigenetics definition is proposed that is not restricted by the heritability of gene expression throughout cell divisions and excludes translational gene expression control. PMID:15819395

  11. Characterization of normal and cancer stem cells: One experimental paradigm for two kinds of stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mayol, Jean-François; Loeuillet, Corinne; Hérodin, Francis; Wion, Didier

    2009-01-01

    The characterization of normal stem cells and cancer stem cells uses the same paradigm. These cells are isolated by a Fluorescent-Activated Cell Sorting step and their stemness is assayed following implantation into animals. However, differences exist between these two kinds of stem cells. Therefore, the translation of the experimental procedures used for normal stem cell isolation into the cancer stem cell research field is a potential source of artefacts. In addition, normal stem cell thera...

  12. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H;

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  13. Articular cartilage stem cell signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Camilla; Lindahl, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The view of articular cartilage as a non-regeneration organ has been challenged in recent years. The articular cartilage consists of distinct zones with different cellular and molecular phenotypes, and the superficial zone has been hypothesized to harbour stem cells. Furthermore, the articular cartilage demonstrates a distinct pattern regarding stem cell markers (that is, Notch-1, Stro-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). These results, in combination with the positive identification of...

  14. Stem cells - biological update and cell therapy progress

    OpenAIRE

    GIRLOVANU, MIHAI; Susman, Sergiu; Soritau, Olga; RUS-CIUCA, DAN; MELINCOVICI, CARMEN; CONSTANTIN, ANNE-MARIE; Carmen Mihaela MIHU

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the advances in stem cell research have suggested that the human body may have a higher plasticity than it was originally expected. Until now, four categories of stem cells were isolated and cultured in vivo: embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Although multiple studies were published, several issues concerning the stem cells are still debated, such as: the molecular mechanisms of differentiation, the methods t...

  15. Scalp squamous cell carcinoma in xeroderma pigmentosum

    OpenAIRE

    Awan, Basim A; Hanadi Alzanbagi; Osama A Samargandi; Hossam Ammar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder that appears in early childhood. Squamous cell carcinoma is not uncommon in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and mostly involving the face, head, neck, and scalp. However, squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp may exhibit an aggressive course. Case Report: Here, we present a huge squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp in a three-years-old child with xeroderma pigmentosum. In addition, we illustrate the challenges of a child...

  16. Synchronous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Multiple Digits

    OpenAIRE

    Abner, Sabra; Redstone, Jeremiah; Chowdhry, Saeed; Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2011-01-01

    Cancers of the perionychium are relatively rare occurrences and are often related to chronic inflammation associated with trauma, infection, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or other carcinogens. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common tumor reported of the nail bed. Synchronous squamous cell carcinomas of the perionychium have been rarely reported. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with synchronous squamous cell carcinomas involving both hands and multiple digits. Treatment modal...

  17. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Concurrent with Bowen's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Chul; Kang, Ho Song; Park, Kyoung Tae; Oh, Young Ha; Yu, Hee Joon; Kim, Joung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy of the elderly and immunocompromised patients. It is occasionally found coexisting with other diseases, such as squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, miscellaneous adnexal tumors, and rarely Bowen disease. A 75-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of an irregularly shaped erythematous patch on the left mandibular angle. Three months later, a 1.5×1.0 cm sized painless and rapidly growi...

  18. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD; Waseem-Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi, MD; Julie Gehl, MD, PhD; Christen Krag, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstruct...

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Karthiga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  20. p53 in stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeriya; Solozobova; Christine; Blattner

    2011-01-01

    p53 is well known as a "guardian of the genome" for differentiated cells,in which it induces cell cycle arrest and cell death after DNA damage and thus contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability.In addition to this tumor suppressor function for differentiated cells,p53 also plays an important role in stem cells.In this cell type,p53 not only ensures genomic integrity after genotoxic insults but also controls their proliferation and differentiation.Additionally,p53 provides an effective barrier for the generation of pluripotent stem celllike cells from terminally differentiated cells.In this review,we summarize our current knowledge about p53 activities in embryonic,adult and induced pluripotent stem cells.

  1. Myocardial infarction and stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ananda Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Permanent loss of cardiomyocytes and scar tissue formation after myocardial infarction (MI results in an irreversible damage to the cardiac function. Cardiac repair (replacement, restoration, and regeneration is, therefore, essential to restore function of the heart following MI. Existing therapies lower early mortality rates, prevent additional damage to the heart muscle, and reduce the risk of further heart attacks. However, there is need for treatment to improve the infarcted area by replacing the damaged cells after MI. Thus, the cardiac tissue regeneration with the application of stem cells may be an effective therapeutic option. Recently, interest is more inclined toward myocardial regeneration with the application of stem cells. However, the potential benefits and the ability to improve cardiac function with the stem cell-based therapy need to be further addressed. In this review, we focus on the clinical applications of stem cells in the cardiac repair.

  2. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Fujimaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment.

  3. Diabetes and stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment.

  4. Multipotent adult progenitor cell and stem cell plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Jahagirdar, Balkrishna N; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by their biological function. A stem cell is an undifferentiated cell that self-renews to maintain the stem cell pool and at the single-cell level differentiates into more than one mature, functional cell. In addition, when transplanted, a stem cell should be capable of replacing a damaged organ or tissue for the lifetime of the recipient. Some would argue that stem cells should also be capable of functionally integrating into nondamaged tissues. Stem cells are critical...

  5. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne - case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis. PMID:27398205

  6. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne – case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment‐resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis.

  7. The expression of cancer stem cell markers in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines%肿瘤干细胞标志物在鼻咽癌细胞株中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘观成; 何晓松; 宣广旭; 王文华; 陈文文

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression of cancer stem cells(CSC) markers named ABCG2,CD44,CD34 in hu man nasopharyngeal carcinoma(NPC) CNE-2,5-8F and 6-10B cell lines to provide the basis of CSC markers research of NPC. Methods The NPC cell lines of CNE2,5-8F and 6-10B were cultivated regularly,of which,ABCG2,CD44,CD34 cell ratio was detected with flow cytometry. Results ABCG2 positive cells accounted about 0.1%,18.6%and 19.9%in the CNE-2,5-8F,6-10B cell lines. CD44 positive cells accounted 99.5%,93.2%and 99.1%in the CNE-2,5-8F and 6-10B cell lines. CD34 positive cells accounted 0,3.0%and 0.1%in the CNE2,5-8F,and 6-10B cell lines. ABCG2+CD44+cell interation accounted about 11.6%and ABCG2+CD44+cell interation accounted about 0 in 5-8F cell lines. Conclusion The expression proportion of CD34+in the 5-8F and 6-10B cell lines confirms to CSC markers of the CSC theory. CD34 may be deemed as a candidate marker of nasopharyn-geal neoplas.%目的探索肿瘤干细胞(CSC)标志物ABCG2、CD44、CD34在鼻咽癌细胞株CNE2、5-8F和6-10B中的表达情况,为选择CSC标志物进行鼻咽癌CSC样研究奠定基础。方法常规培养CNE2、5-8F和6-10B这3种鼻咽癌细胞株,用流式细胞仪检测3种鼻咽癌细胞株中ABCG2、CD44、CD34细胞比例及其交互情况。结果 ABCG2在CNE2、5-8F和6-10B这3种鼻咽癌细胞株中表达率分别为0.1%、18.6%、19.9%;CD44在CNE2、5-8F和6-10B中表达率分别为99.5%、93.2%、99.1%;CD34在CNE2、5-8F和6-10B 中表达率分别为0、3.0%、0.1%。在5-8F 中,ABCG2+CD44+细胞交互比例为11.6%,ABCG2+CD34+细胞交互比例为0。结论5-8F和6-10B中CD34+细胞比例与CSC理论中CSC的比例相符。CD34可以作为鼻咽癌CSC的候选标志物。

  8. [Therapeutic use of stem cells. II. Adult stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-30

    Many degenerative diseases are not curable by means of classical medicine. The long term objective of cell therapy is to treat the patients with their own stem cells that could be either purified from the diseased organ or from "reservoirs" of stem cells such as that constituted by the bone marrow. The existence of stem cells in the organs or reservoirs is now established in vitro and in some cases, in animal models. Numbers of technical problems linked to the scarcity of these cells still delay the clinical use of purified stem cells. However, clinical protocols using heterogeneous cell populations have already started to treat a growing number of diseases. In some case, autologous cells can be used, as it is the case for bone marrow transplantation in blood diseases. Mesenchymal cells, also purified from the bone marrow are currently used in orthopaedic diseases. Because these cells reveal a broad differentiation potential, active research programs explore their possible use for treatment of other diseases. Bone marrow also contains vascular stem cells that could be active in reappearing defective vessels responsible for ischaemic diseases. Indeed, clinical trials in which bone marrow cells are injected in the cardiac muscle of patients with myocardial infarction or in the leg muscle (gastrocnemius) of patients with hind limb ischaemia have already started. Artificial skin prepared from skin biopsies is used for the reconstitution of the derma of severely burned patients. Clinical trials have also started, using allogenic cells. The patients must be treated by immunosuppressive drugs. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson have been successfully treated by intra-cerebral injection of foetal neurones. Pancreatic islets implanted in the liver have shown to re-establish a normal glycaemia in diabetic patients. However, all these clinical trials use differentiated cells or at least progenitors which display differentiation potential and lifetime much more

  9. Genotoxic therapy stimulates error-prone DNA repair in dormant hepatocellular cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, Shimpei; Ishii, Hideshi; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; Kano, Yoshihiro; FUKUSUMI, TAKAHITO; OHTA, KATSUYA; OZAKI, MIYUKI; Sakai, Daisuke; SATOH, TAROH; Nagano, Hiroaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described distinct dormant and proliferating populations of cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma. The CD13 protein is involved in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species through the glutathione reductase pathway and is associated with resistance to chemotherapy. Whereas CD13− proliferating cancer stem cells are sensitive to chemotherapy, CD13+ dormant cancer stem cells are associated with the development of resistance to chemotherapy. CD13+ cells in hypoxic ar...

  10. Stem cell therapy independent of stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Techung

    2012-12-26

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is entering a new era shifting the focus from initial feasibility study to optimization of therapeutic efficacy. However, how MSC therapy facilitates tissue regeneration remains incompletely characterized. Consistent with the emerging notion that secretion of multiple growth factors/cytokines (trophic factors) by MSC provides the underlying tissue regenerative mechanism, the recent study by Bai et al demonstrated a critical therapeutic role of MSC-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in two animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a progressive autoimmune disorder caused by damage to the myelin sheath and loss of oligodendrocytes. Although current MS therapies are directed toward attenuation of the immune response, robust repair of myelin sheath likely requires a regenerative approach focusing on long-term replacement of the lost oligodendrocytes. This approach appears feasible because adult organs contain various populations of multipotent resident stem/progenitor cells that may be activated by MSC trophic factors as demonstrated by Bai et al This commentary highlights and discusses the major findings of their studies, emphasizing the anti-inflammatory function and trophic cross-talk mechanisms mediated by HGF and other MSC-derived trophic factors in sustaining the treatment benefits. Identification of multiple functionally synergistic trophic factors, such as HGF and vascular endothelial growth factor, can eventually lead to the development of efficacious cell-free therapeutic regimens targeting a broad spectrum of degenerative conditions. PMID:23516128

  11. Carcinoma in situ testis, the progenitor of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Daugaard, G;

    2005-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT), including seminomas, embryonal carcinomas, teratomas and yolk sac tumours, have a common precursor, the carcinoma in situ (CIS) cell. Recent gene expression studies displaying close similarity of CIS cells to embryonic stem cells support the longstanding theory...... CIS; therefore, contralateral biopsy is recommended at the time of orchidectomy. Further research is warranted to identify causal factors explaining the increasing incidence of TGCT and to obtain a method of non-invasive CIS detection....

  12. Merkel cell carcinoma versus metastatic small cell primary bronchogenic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Lisette Velasquez Cantillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC of the skin is a rare, aggressive, malignant neuroendocrine neoplasm. The tumor classically demonstrates positive immunohistochemistry (IHC staining for chromogranin A(ChrA, cytokeratin 20 (CK20, neuron specific enolase (NSE and/or achaete-acute complex-like 1 (MASH1. The newly identified Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has been found to be associated with most MCC cases. The primary histologic differential diagnoses of cutaneous MCC is small cell primary bronchogenic carcinoma (SCLC; moreover, both are of neuroendocrine origin. SCLC accounts for approximately 10-15% of all primary lung cancer cases; this histologic subtype is a distinct entity with biological and oncological features distinct from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. In contradistinction to MCC, SCLC is classically IHC positive for cytokeratin 7 (CK7 and transcription factor (TTF-1. Similar to SCLC, MCC cell lines may be classified into two different biochemical subgroups designated as Classic and Variant. In our review and case report, we aim to emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the approach to this difficult differential diagnosis. We also aim to comment about features of the cells of origin of MCC and SCLC; to summarize the microscopic features of both tumors; and to review their respective epidemiologic, clinical, prognostic and treatment features. We want to emphasize the initial workup study of the differential diagnosis patient, including evaluating clinical lymph nodes, a clinical history of any respiratory abnormality, and chest radiogram. If a diagnosis of primary cutaneous MCC is confirmed, classic treatment includes excision of the primary tumor with wide margins, excision of a sentinel lymph node, and computed tomography, positron emission tomography and/or Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan studies

  13. Uses of mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    M. Delgado; González-Rey, Elena; Büscher, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treating systemic infiammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in a subject. The invention provides compositions, uses and methods for the treatment of SIRS.

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tooth Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng; Ling Ye; Xue-dong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss compromises human oral health. Although several prosthetic methods, such as artificial denture and dental implants, are clinical therapies to tooth loss problems, they are thought to have safety and usage time issues. Recently, tooth tissue engineering has attracted more and more attention. Stem cell based tissue engineering is thought to be a promising way to replace the missing tooth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells which can differentiate into a variety of cell types. The potential MSCs for tooth regeneration mainly include stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from the apical part of the papilla (SCAPs), stem cells from the dental follicle (DFSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review outlines the recent progress in the mesenchymal stem cells used in tooth regeneration.

  15. Endothelial cell-initiated signaling promotes the survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Sudha; Dong, Zhihong; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Imai, Atsushi; Helman, Joseph I.; Prince, Mark E.; Wicha, Max S.; Jacques E Nör

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cancer stem cells play an important role in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, little is known about functional interactions between head and neck cancer stem-like cells (CSC) and surrounding stromal cells. Here, we used Aldehyde Dehydrogenase activity and CD44 expression to sort putative stem cells from primary human HNSCC. Implantation of 1,000 CSC (ALDH+CD44+Lin−) led to tumors in 13 (out of 15) mice, while 10,...

  16. Expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Almeida, Maria Carolina Leal; Costa, Alessandra Scorse; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Serrano, Rodrigo Lorenzetti; Machado Filho, Carlos D'Apparecida Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background Heparanase is an enzyme that cleaves heparan sulfate chains. Oligosaccharides generated by heparanase induce tumor progression. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma comprise types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Objectives Evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and expression of heparanase in two human cell lines established in culture, immortalized skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) and squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and also investigate the expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and eyelid skin of individuals not affected by the disease (control). Methods Glycosaminoglycans were quantified by electrophoresis and indirect ELISA method. The heparanase expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRTPCR). Results The A431 strain showed significant increase in the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, increased heparanase expression and decreased hyaluronic acid, comparing to the HaCaT lineage. The mRNA expression of heparanase was significantly higher in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma compared with control skin samples. It was also observed increased heparanase expression in squamous cell carcinoma compared to the Basal cell carcinoma. Conclusion The glycosaminoglycans profile, as well as heparanase expression are different between HaCaT and A431 cell lines. The increased expression of heparanase in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggests that this enzyme could be a marker for the diagnosis of such types of non-melanoma cancers, and may be useful as a target molecule for future alternative treatment.

  17. Stem cell transplantation for neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, JD; Grupp, SA

    2007-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma is a childhood malignancy with a poor prognosis. Gradual improvements in survival have correlated with therapeutic intensity, and the ability to harvest, process and store autologous hematopoietic stem cells has allowed for dose intensification beyond marrow tolerance. The use of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue in consolidation has resulted in improvements in survival, although further advances are still needed. Newer approaches to...

  18. Stem Cells in Regenerative Endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Forghani

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, clinical endodontics includes procedures that are based on the ability of stem cells to accomplish repair (eg, direct pulp capping, apexogenesis, apexification, and even pulpal regeneration). An attempt is made to critically assess the current status in pulp regeneration therapy. Methods: Systematically, 2 distinctly different strategies exist involving stem cells for the repair and/or regeneration of damaged tissues: first, the acellular approach with in situ s...

  19. Cell adhesion in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells inevitably communicate with their cellular neighbors within the tissues they sustain. Indeed, such communication, particularly with components of the stem cell niche, is essential for many aspects of stem cell behavior, including the maintenance of stem cell identity and asymmetric cell division. Cell adhesion mediates this communication by placing stem cells in close proximity to the signaling source and by providing a polarity cue that orients stem cells. Here, I review the...

  20. Pancreatic Stem Cells Remain Unresolved

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet β cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient β cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including β cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripo...

  1. A rare bladder cancer - small cell carcinoma: review and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB is rare, highly aggressive and diagnosed mainly at advanced stages. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy. The origin of the disease is unknown; however the multipotent stem cell theory applies best to this case. Histology and immunohistochemistry shows a tumour which is indistinguishable from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. Coexistence of SCCB with other types of carcinoma is common. The staging system used is the TNM-staging of bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The treatment is extrapolated from that of SCLC. However, many patients with SCCB undergo radical resection which is rarely performed in SCLC. Patients with surgically resectable disease ( or = cT4bN+M+ should be managed with palliative chemotherapy based on neuroendocrine type regimens comprising a platinum drug (cisplatin in fit patients. The prognosis of the disease is poor mainly in the case of pure small cell carcinoma. Other research programs are needed to improve the outcome of SCCB.

  2. CD133 promotes gallbladder carcinoma cell migration through activating Akt phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jiaojiao; Ai, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is the fifth most common malignancy of gastrointestinal tract. The prognosis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely terrible partially due to metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying gallbladder carcinoma metastasis remain largely unknown. CD133 is a widely used cancer stem cell marker including in gallbladder carcinoma. Here, we found that CD133 was highly expressed in gallbladder carcinoma as compared to normal tissues. CD133 was located in the invasive areas in gallbladder carcinoma. Down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited migration and invasion of gallbladder carcinoma cell without obviously reducing cell proliferation. Mechanism analysis revealed that down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited Akt phosphorylation and increased PTEN protein level. The inhibitory effect of CD133 down-regulation on gallbladder carcinoma cell migration could be rescued by Akt activation. Consistent with this, addition of Akt inhibitor Wortmannin markedly inhibited the migration ability of CD133-overexpressing cells. Thus, down-regulation of CD133 inhibits migration of gallbladder carcinoma cells through reducing Akt phosphorylation. These findings explore the fundamental biological aspect of CD133 in gallbladder carcinoma progression, providing insights into gallbladder carcinoma cell migration. PMID:26910892

  3. Pancreatic stem cells remain unresolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet β cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient β cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including β cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are ideally placed as cell sources for a diabetic transplantation therapy. Unfortunately, the inability to generate functional differentiated islet cells from pluripotent stem cells and the poor availability of donor islets have severely restricted the broad clinical use of the replacement therapy. Therefore, endogenous sources that can be directed to becoming insulin-secreting cells are actively sought after. In particular, any cell types in the developing or adult pancreas that may act as pancreatic stem cells (PSC) would provide an alternative renewable source for endogenous regeneration. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress and knowledge of such PSC, and discuss ways that facilitate the future development of this often controversial, but crucial research.

  4. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental ...

  5. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luiz De Souza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We previously published our and Johns Hopkins data titled: "Platinum-based therapy in adenosquamous pancreatic cancer: experience at two institutions” [1]. We will here like to submit a related case report as a letter to the editor to JOP in reference to the above paper. Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas has various reported incidence rates, ranging from 0.5% to as high as 5% of pancreatic ductal carcinomas [2, 3]. Of the 1300 cases of pancreatic cancers observed at autopsy in a survey in Japan in 1992, 0.7% were squamous cell carcinoma [4]. A Mayo clinic review of very rare exocrine tumors showed an even rarer incidence of squamous cell carcinoma when compared to acinar and small cell carcinoma of the pancreas [5]. This discrepancy in the reported incidence rates related to the fact that some of the cases represent adenosquamous carcinoma rather than pure squamous cell carcinoma of pancreas. In an analysis of 25 patients, mean age at diagnosis of pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma was 62 years (range: 33–80 years and there was no gender difference [6]. There is no study about the molecular profile of squamous carcinoma of the pancreas. There are no retrospective or prospective studies about the best therapy for these tumors

  6. Conversion of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Carcinoma-Like by Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Gisely T; Vêncio, Eneida F; Quek, Sue-Ing; Chen, Adeline; Salvanha, Diego M; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-09-01

    The lineage relationship between prostate adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma was studied by using the LuCaP family of xenografts established from primary neoplasm to metastasis. Expression of four stem cell transcription factor (TF) genes, LIN28A, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, were analyzed in the LuCaP lines. These genes, when force expressed in differentiated cells, can reprogram the recipients into stem-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Most LuCaP lines expressed POU5F1, while LuCaP 145.1, representative of small cell carcinoma, expressed all four. Through transcriptome database query, many small cell carcinoma genes were also found in stem cells. To test the hypothesis that prostate cancer progression from "differentiated" adenocarcinoma to "undifferentiated" small cell carcinoma could involve re-expression of stem cell genes, the four TF genes were transduced via lentiviral vectors into five adenocarcinoma LuCaP lines-70CR, 73CR, 86.2, 92, 105CR-as done in iPS cell reprogramming. The resultant cells from these five transductions displayed a morphology of small size and dark appearing unlike the parentals. Transcriptome analysis of LuCaP 70CR* ("*" to denote transfected progeny) revealed a unique gene expression close to that of LuCaP 145.1. In a prostate principal components analysis space based on cell-type transcriptomes, the different LuCaP transcriptome datapoints were aligned to suggest a possible ordered sequence of expression changes from the differentiated luminal-like adenocarcinoma cell types to the less differentiated, more stem-like small cell carcinoma types, and LuCaP 70CR*. Prostate cancer progression can thus be molecularly characterized by loss of differentiation with re-expression of stem cell genes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2040-2047, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Conversion of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Carcinoma-Like by Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Gisely T; Vêncio, Eneida F; Quek, Sue-Ing; Chen, Adeline; Salvanha, Diego M; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-09-01

    The lineage relationship between prostate adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma was studied by using the LuCaP family of xenografts established from primary neoplasm to metastasis. Expression of four stem cell transcription factor (TF) genes, LIN28A, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, were analyzed in the LuCaP lines. These genes, when force expressed in differentiated cells, can reprogram the recipients into stem-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Most LuCaP lines expressed POU5F1, while LuCaP 145.1, representative of small cell carcinoma, expressed all four. Through transcriptome database query, many small cell carcinoma genes were also found in stem cells. To test the hypothesis that prostate cancer progression from "differentiated" adenocarcinoma to "undifferentiated" small cell carcinoma could involve re-expression of stem cell genes, the four TF genes were transduced via lentiviral vectors into five adenocarcinoma LuCaP lines-70CR, 73CR, 86.2, 92, 105CR-as done in iPS cell reprogramming. The resultant cells from these five transductions displayed a morphology of small size and dark appearing unlike the parentals. Transcriptome analysis of LuCaP 70CR* ("*" to denote transfected progeny) revealed a unique gene expression close to that of LuCaP 145.1. In a prostate principal components analysis space based on cell-type transcriptomes, the different LuCaP transcriptome datapoints were aligned to suggest a possible ordered sequence of expression changes from the differentiated luminal-like adenocarcinoma cell types to the less differentiated, more stem-like small cell carcinoma types, and LuCaP 70CR*. Prostate cancer progression can thus be molecularly characterized by loss of differentiation with re-expression of stem cell genes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2040-2047, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773436

  8. Stem cell applications in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a devastating disease and the World Health Organization (WHO) expects that the number of diabetic patients will increase to 300 million by the year 2025. Patients with diabetes experience decreased insulin secretion that is linked to a significant reduction in the number of islet cells. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the selective destruction of pancreatic β cells caused by an autoimmune attack. Type 2 diabetes is a more complex pathology that, in addition to β cell loss caused by apoptotic programs, includes β cell de-differentiation and peripheric insulin resistance. The success achieved over the last few years with islet transplantation suggests that diabetes can be cured by the replenishment of deficient β cells. These observations are proof of the concept and have intensified interest in treating diabetes or other diseases not only by cell transplantation but also by stem cells. An increasing body of evidence indicates that, in addition to embryonic stem cells, several potential adult stem/progenitor cells derived from the pancreas, liver, spleen, and bone marrow could differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro or in vivo. However, significant controversy currently exists in this field. Pharmacological approaches aimed at stimulating the in vivo/ex vivo regeneration of β cells have been proposed as a way of augmenting islet cell mass. Overexpression of embryonic transcription factors in stem cells could efficiently induce their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. A new technology, known as protein transduction, facilitates the differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells. Recent progress in the search for new sources of β cells has opened up several possibilities for the development of new treatments for diabetes.

  9. Reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2011-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, can differentiate into all cell types. So, these cells can be a biological resource for regenerative medicine. However, ES cells known as standard pluripotent cells have problem to be used for cell therapy because of ethical issue of the origin and immune response on the graft. Hence, recently reprogrammed pluripotent cells have been suggested as an alternative source for regenerative medicine. Somatic cells can acquire the ES cell-like pluripotency by transferring somatic cell nuclei into oocytes, by cell fusion with pluripotent cells. Retroviral-mediated introduction of four factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can successfully reprogram somatic cells into ES cell-like pluripotent stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These cells closely resemble ES cells in gene expression pattern, cell biologic and phenotypic characteristics. However, to reach the eventual goal of clinical application, it is necessary to overcome the major drawbacks such as low reprogramming efficiency and genomic alterations due to viral integration. In this review, we discuss the current reprogramming techniques and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming induced by transcription factor transduction. PMID:24298328

  10. Cancer Stem Cells in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fumitaka Takeshita; Tomohiro Fujiwara; Takahiro Ochiya; Makiko Ono; Ryou-u Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is generally acknowledged as an important field of cancer research, not only as an academic matter but also as a crucial aspect of clinical practice. CSCs share a variety of biological properties with normal somatic stem cells in self-renewal, the propagation of differentiated progeny, the expression of specific cell markers and stem cell genes, and the utilization of common signaling pathways and the stem cell niche. However, CSCs differ from normal stem cel...

  11. 25 YEARS OF EPIDERMAL STEM CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadially, Ruby

    2011-01-01

    This is a chronicle of concepts in the field of epidermal stem cell biology and a historic look at their development over time. The last 25 years have seen the evolution of epidermal stem cell science, from first fundamental studies to a sophisticated science. The study of epithelial stem cell biology was aided by the ability to visualize the distribution of stem cells and their progeny through lineage analysis studies. The excellent progress we have made in understanding epidermal stem cell ...

  12. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN; Selda SEÇKİN

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostainin...

  13. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Li; Qiang Li

    2008-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor which is defined as a carcinoma that exhibits pancreatic enzyme production by neoplastic cells. This review includes re-cent developments in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ACC, imaging and pathological diagnosis and ap-proaches to treatment with reference to the literature.

  14. Basal Cell Carcinoma in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Flohil (Sophie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere are many different cutaneous malignancies, but malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represent approximately 98% of all skin cancers.In literature, these three skin cancers are often divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC

  15. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models......There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...

  16. Xenotransplanted human prostate carcinoma (DU145) cells develop into carcinomas and cribriform carcinomas: ultrastructural aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilloteaux, Jacques; Jamison, James M; Neal, Deborah R; Summers, Jack L; Taper, Henryk S

    2012-10-01

    Androgen-independent, human prostate carcinoma cells (DU145) develop into solid, carcinomatous xenotransplants on the diaphragm of nu/nu mice. Tumors encompass at least two poorly differentiated cell types: a rapidly dividing, eosinophilic cell comprises the main cell population and a few, but large basophilic cells able to invade the peritoneal stroma, the muscular tissue, lymph vessels. Poor cell contacts, intracytoplasmic lumina, and signet cells are noted. Lysosomal activities are reflected by entoses and programmed cell deaths forming cribriform carcinomas. In large tumors, degraded cells may align with others to facilitate formation of blood supply routes. Malignant cells would spread via ascites and through lymphatics.

  17. Involvement of Plant Stem Cells or Stem Cell-Like Cells in Dedifferentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Fangwei; Feng, Zhenhua; Liu, Hailiang; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to pro...

  18. Mouse models for cancer stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Le; Ramesh, Anirudh V.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Choi, Jinhyang; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cell concept assumes that cancers are mainly sustained by a small pool of neoplastic cells, known as cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells, which are able to reproduce themselves and produce phenotypically heterogeneous cells with lesser tumorigenic potential. Cancer stem cells represent an appealing target for development of more selective and efficient therapies. However, direct testing of the cancer stem cell concept and assessment of its therapeutic implications in human...

  19. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  20. Development and application of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI Guo-zhen; SHAN Li-dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Stem cells are defined by two important characteristics: the ability to proliferate by a process of self-renewal and the potential to form at least one specialized cell type. Transient population of pluripotent or multipotent stem cells first appear during the development at the first days post coitum. The cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst, of which embryonic stem cells (ES) are the in vitro counterpart, can give rise to any differentiated cell type in the three primary germ layers of the embryo (endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm).1-3 These cells gradually mature into committed, organ- and tissue-specific stem cells or adult stem cells, such as neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, etc. Over the past years, studies have focused on two aspects: molecular level and application, and some new methods and technology have been used.

  1. Dominant B-cell epitopes from cancer/stem cell antigen SOX2 recognized by serum samples from cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Julia; Rahman, Munira; Luong, Quang T; Lomeli, Shirley H.; Riss, Joseph; Prins, Robert M.; Gure, Ali O.; Zeng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Human sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2) is an important transcriptional factor involved in the pluripotency and stemness of human embryonic stem cells. SOX2 plays important roles in maintaining cancer stem cell activities of melanoma and cancers of the brain, prostate, breast, and lung. SOX2 is also a lineage survival oncogene for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung and esophagus. Spontaneous cellular and humoral immune responses against SOX2 present in cancer patients classify it as a tu...

  2. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  3. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Štefková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells.

  4. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Quaade, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan;

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells. Many different therapies for chronic wounds exist with varying success rates. The capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to promote angiogenesis, secrete growth factors......, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types makes them a potential ideal therapy for chronic wounds. The aim of this article was to review all preclinical trials using ASCs in problem wound models. A systematic search was performed and 12 studies were found where different...

  5. Understanding the cancer stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Bomken, S; Fišer, K; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J

    2010-01-01

    The last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in the cancer stem cell (CSC). Although it was initially believed that only a rare population of stem cells are able to undergo self-renewing divisions and differentiate to form all populations within a malignancy, a recent work has shown that these cells may not be as rare as thought first, at least in some malignancies. Improved experimental models are beginning to uncover a less rigid structure to CSC biology, in which the concepts of fun...

  6. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Cell Therapy & ISSCR to Present Latest in Stem Cell Research, Gene Editing and Gene Therapy 18-21 Oct., ... share and discuss developments in the field of stem cell research and gene editing and therapies at the ESGCT/ ...

  7. Advances in Stem Cell Mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    Hopman, Rusudan K.; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)–mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) has largely replaced bone marrow (BM) as a source of stem cells for both autologous and allogeneic cell transplantation. With G-CSF alone, up to 35% of patients are unable to mobilize sufficient numbers of CD34 cells/kg to ensure successful and consistent multi-lineage engraftment and sustained hematopoietic recovery. To this end, research is ongoing to identify new agents or c...

  8. Extinction Models for Cancer Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sehl, Mary; Zhou, Hua; Sinsheimer, Janet ,; Lange, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Cells with stem cell-like properties are now viewed as initiating and sustaining many cancers. This suggests that cancer can be cured by driving these cancer stem cells to extinction. The problem with this strategy is that ordinary stem cells are apt to be killed in the process. This paper sets bounds on the killing differential (difference between death rates of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells) that must exist for the survival of an adequate number of normal stem cells. Our main tool...

  9. Stem cells: sources and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Manuela; Perotti, Cesare; Del Fante, Claudia; Cervio, Marila; Redi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The historical, lexical and conceptual issues embedded in stem cell biology are reviewed from technical, ethical, philosophical, judicial, clinical, economic and biopolitical perspectives. The mechanisms assigning the simultaneous capacity to self-renew and to differentiate to stem cells (immortal template DNA and asymmetric division) are evaluated in the light of the niche hypothesis for the stemness state. The induction of cell pluripotency and the different stem cells sources are presented (embryonic, adult and cord blood). We highlight the embryonic and adult stem cell properties and possible therapies while we emphasize the particular scientific and social values of cord blood donation to set up cord blood banks. The current scientific and legal frameworks of cord blood banks are reviewed at an international level as well as allogenic, dedicated and autologous donations. The expectations and the challenges in relation to present-day targeted diseases like diabetes mellitus type I, Parkinson's disease and myocardial infarction are evaluated in the light of the cellular therapies for regenerative medicine. PMID:23283430

  10. The spermatogonial stem cell niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.G. de Rooij

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs; A(s) spermatogonia) and their direct descendants (A(pr) and A(al) spermatogonia) are preferentially located in those areas of the seminiferous tubules that border on the interstitial tissue. Fewer of these cells are present in tubule areas directly bordering on anoth

  11. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christiana; Hadjimichael; Konstantina; Chanoumidou; Natalia; Papadopoulou; Panagiota; Arampatzi; Joseph; Papamatheakis; Androniki; Kretsovali

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells(ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal trans-ducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors(cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research frame-work for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies.

  12. Stem cell-based bone repair

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, Yurong; Xu, Ren-He; Hurley, Marja M.

    2012-01-01

    To accelerate bone repair, one strategy is to deliver the cells that make bone. The current review focuses on stem cell-based bone repair. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can self-renew unlimitedly and differentiate into the bone forming cells – osteoblasts. Scientists have been actively investigating culture conditions to stably and efficiently induce differentiation of these stem cells into osteoblasts. However, ESCs have the issues of ethnics, immune ...

  13. Stem cells in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Oliveira, Lucinei; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Ribeiro Silva, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing data support cancer as a stem cell-based disease. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have beenfound in different human cancers, and recent evidenceindicates that breast cancer originates from and ismaintained by its own CSCs, as well as the normalmammary gland. Mammary stem cells and breast CSCshave been identified and purified in in vitroculturesystems, transplantation assays and/or by cell surfaceantigen identification. Cell surface markers enable thefunctional isolation of stem cells that...

  14. Tubulocystic carcinoma of kidney associated with papillary renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Deshmukh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRCC is a rare variant of renal cell carcinoma, which has distinct histology but there is some controversy about its association with papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC and cell of origin in literature. We report an 18-year-old girl with the rare TCRCC of kidney associated with PRCC with metastases to the para-aortic nodes. The patient presented with hematuria and a right renal mass with enlarged regional nodes for which a radical nephrectomy with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection was done. On gross examination, a solid cystic lesion involving the lower pole and middle pole of the kidney measuring 12x9x9 cm was seen along with an additional cystic lesion in upper pole of kidney. Microscopically the main tumor showed the typical histology of a tubulocystic carcinoma with multiple cysts filled with secretions lined by variably flattened epithelium with hobnailing of cells. The mass in the upper pole was a high-grade PRCC and the nodal metastases had morphology similar to this component. To conclude, at least a small but definite subset of TCRCC is associated with PRCC, and cases associated with PRCC do seem to have a higher propensity for nodal metastasis as in the case we report.

  15. Polarity in Stem Cell Division: Asymmetric Stem Cell Division in Tissue Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Yukiko M; Yuan, Hebao; Cheng, Jun; Hunt, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Many adult stem cells divide asymmetrically to balance self-renewal and differentiation, thereby maintaining tissue homeostasis. Asymmetric stem cell divisions depend on asymmetric cell architecture (i.e., cell polarity) within the cell and/or the cellular environment. In particular, as residents of the tissues they sustain, stem cells are inevitably placed in the context of the tissue architecture. Indeed, many stem cells are polarized within their microenvironment, or the stem cell niche, a...

  16. Chemical approaches to studying stem cell biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenlin Li; Kai Jiang; Wanguo Wei; Yan Shi; Sheng Ding

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells,including both pluripotent stem cells and multipotent somatic stem cells,hold great potential for interrogating the mechanisms of tissue development,homeostasis and pathology,and for treating numerous devastating diseases.Establishment of in vitro platforms to faithfully maintain and precisely manipulate stem cell fates is essential to understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology,and to translate stem cells into regenerative medicine.Chemical approaches have recently provided a number of small molecules that can be used to control cell selfrenewal,lineage differentiation,reprogramming and regeneration.These chemical modulators have been proven to be versatile tools for probing stem cell biology and manipulating cell fates toward desired outcomes.Ultimately,this strategy is promising to be a new frontier for drug development aimed at endogenous stem cell modulation.

  17. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  18. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration.

  19. Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yeliz Bilir; Erkan Gokce; Banu Ozturk; Faik Alev Deresoy; Ruken Yuksekkaya; Emel Yaman

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity...

  1. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  2. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  3. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continue...

  4. New Insights into Thyroid Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2007-01-01

    Stem cells exhibit an extraordinary ability for self-renewal. They also give rise to many specialized cells. The potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and drug discovery has been well documented. Although advances in stem cell science have raised broad ethical concerns, it is clear that stem cell technology has revolutionized our thinking in modern biology and medicine and provided the basis for understanding many of the mechanisms controlling basic biologic...

  5. European stem cell research in legal shackles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.G.; de Vries, S.A.; Geijsen, N.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised legal challenges to the patentability of stem cells and any derived technologies and processes. In 1999, Oliver Brustle was granted a patent for the generation and therapeutic use of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The patent wa

  6. Manipulating Midbrain Stem Cell Self-Renewal

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph J LoTurco; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2008-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Falk and colleagues (Falk et al., 2008) demonstrate that differential responsiveness to TGF-b signaling selectively modulates self-renewal of dorsal midbrain stem cells. This observation may lead to strategies for expanding specific neural stem cell subtypes.

  7. The regulatory niche of intestinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailaja, Badi Sri; He, Xi C; Li, Linheng

    2016-09-01

    The niche constitutes a unique category of cells that support the microenvironment for the maintenance and self-renewal of stem cells. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of the crypt, which contains adjacent epithelial cells, stromal cells and smooth muscle cells, and soluble and cell-associated growth and differentiation factors. We summarize here recent advances in our understanding of the crucial role of the niche in regulating stem cells. The stem cell niche maintains a balance among quiescence, proliferation and regeneration of intestinal stem cells after injury. Mesenchymal cells, Paneth cells, immune cells, endothelial cells and neural cells are important regulatory components that secrete niche ligands, growth factors and cytokines. Intestinal homeostasis is regulated by niche signalling pathways, specifically Wnt, bone morphogenetic protein, Notch and epidermal growth factor. These insights into the regulatory stem cell niche during homeostasis and post-injury regeneration offer the potential to accelerate development of therapies for intestine-related disorders.

  8. Distinct population of highly malignant cells in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line established by xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Chia-Ing

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The progression and metastasis of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, have been related to the behavior of a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells. Here, we have established a highly malignant HNSCC cell line, SASVO3, from primary tumors using three sequential rounds of xenotransplantation. SASVO3 possesses enhanced tumorigenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SASVO3 exhibits properties of cancer stem cells, including that increased the abilities of sphere-forming, the number of side population cells, the potential of transplanted tumor growth and elevated expression of the stem cell marker Bmi1. Injection of SASVO3 into the tail vein of nude mice resulted in lung metastases. These results are consistent with the postulate that the malignant and/or metastasis potential of HNSCC cells may reside in a stem-like subpopulation.

  9. Liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells Are Relatively Resistant to the Reported Anti-Cancer Stem Cell Drug Metformin

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Miller, Tyler C.; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Anderson, Andrew J.; Ray, Satyajit; Mullinax, John E.; Hari, Danielle M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Godbout, Jessica D.; Goldsmith, Paul K.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Recently, we reported that liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells (LRCC) can initiate tumors with only 10 cells and are relatively resistant to the targeted drug Sorafenib, a standard of practice in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). LRCC are the only cancer stem cells (CSC) isolated alive according to a stem cell fundamental function, asymmetric cell division. Metformin has been reported to preferentially target many other types of CSC of different organs, including live...

  10. nduced pluripotent stem cells and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-stage embryo. They hold a huge promise for cell therapy with their self-renewing ability and pluripotency, which is known as the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from three embryonic germ layers. However, their unique pluripotent feature could not be utilised for therapeutic purposes due to the ethical and legal problems during derivation. Recently, it was shown that the cells from adult tissues could be reverted into embryonic state, thereby restoring their pluripotent feature. This has strenghtened the possiblity of directed differentition of the reprogrammed somatic cells into the desired cell types in vitro and their use in regenerative medicine. Although these cells were termed as induced pluripotent cells, the mechanism of pluripotency has yet to be understood. Still, induced pluripotent stem cell technology is considered to be significant by proposing novel approaches in disease modelling, drug screening and cell therapy. Besides their self-renewing ability and their potential to differentiate into all cell types in a human body, they arouse a great interest in scientific world by being far from the ethical concerns regarding their embryonic counterparts and their unique feature of being patient-specific in prospective cell therapies. In this review, induced pluripotent stem cell technology and its role in cell-based therapies from past to present will be discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 550-561

  11. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar; Ashish Chauhan; Subhash Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition ...

  12. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 351 351 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  13. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 351 351 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  14. Stem cell technology for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, J Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to investigate and treat neurodegenerative diseases. In the current review, we discuss the process of extending basic stem cell research into translational therapies for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We begin with a discussion of the burden of these diseases on society, emphasizing the need for increased attention toward advancing stem cell therapies. We then explain the various types of stem cells utilized in neurodegenerative disease research, and outline important issues to consider in the transition of stem cell therapy from bench to bedside. Finally, we detail the current progress regarding the applications of stem cell therapies to specific neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. With a greater understanding of the capacity of stem cell technologies, there is growing public hope that stem cell therapies will continue to progress into realistic and efficacious treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Stem cells: a plant biology perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    A recent meeting at the Juan March Foundation in Madrid, Spain brought together plant biologists to discuss the characteristics of plant stem cells that are unique and those that are shared by stem cells from the animal kingdom

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 352 352 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation ( ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell ...

  19. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 361 361 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 350 350 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  2. Dental Tissue — New Source for Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Petrovic; Vladisav Stefanovic

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have been isolated from many tissues and organs, including dental tissue. Five types of dental stem cells have been established: dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. The main characteristics of dental stem cells are their potential for multilineage differentiation and self-renewal capacity. Dental stem cells can differentiate into odontoblasts, adipo...

  3. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, WA; Türktas, Z; Duckers, HJ

    2015-01-01

    Until recently bone marrow was perceived to be the only significant reservoir of stem cells in the body. However, it is now recognized that there are other and perhaps even more abundant sources, which include adipose tissue. Subcutaneous fat is readily available in most patients, and can easily be

  4. Paraneoplastic Cough and Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A case of patient with intractable cough due to renal cell carcinoma is reported. The discussion reviews the literature regarding this unusual paraneoplastic manifestation of renal malignancy. PMID:27445553

  5. Sunitinib benefits patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findings from clinical trial patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, a common kidney cancer, show they did not have accelerated tumor growth after treatment with sunitinib, in contrast to some study results in animals.

  6. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma accompanying gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  7. Adult Stem Cells and Diabetes Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ilgun, Handenur; Kim, Joseph William; Luo, LuGuang

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that diabetes will be the fourth most prevalent disease by 2050. Developing a new therapy for diabetes is a challenge for researchers and clinicians in field. Many medications are being used for treatment of diabetes however with no conclusive and effective results therefore alternative therapies are required. Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for diabetes therapy, and it has involved embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and pluripotent stem cell...

  8. Cancer stem cells and brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Castillo, Ana; Aguilar Morante, Diana; Morales-García, José A.; Dorado, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Besides the role of normal stem cells in organogenesis, cancer stem cells are thought to be crucial for tumorigenesis. Most current research on human tumors is focused on molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, evidence in leukemia and, more recently, in solid tumors suggests that the tumor cell population is heterogeneous. In recent years, several groups have described the existence of a cancer stem cell population in different brain tumors. These neural cancer stem ...

  9. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jae Jung; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong Hee [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst is uncommon. The diagnosis of carcinoma arising in a cyst requires that there must be an area of microscopic transition from the benign epithelial cyst lining to the invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We report a histopathologically proven case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in a residual mandibular cyst in a 54-year-old woman.

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cells, new tools for drug discovery and new hope for stem cell therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yanhong

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer or therapeutic cloning has provided great hope for stem cell-based therapies. However therapeutic cloning has been experiencing both ethical and technical difficulties. Recent breakthrough studies using a combination of four factors to reprogram human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells without using embryos or eggs led to an important revolution in stem cell research. Comparative analysis of human induced pluripotent stem cells and human embryonic stem cel...

  11. Cancer Stem Cells Converted from Pluripotent Stem Cells and the Cancerous Niche

    OpenAIRE

    Kasai, T; Chen, L.; Mizutani, AZ; Kudoh, T.; Murakami, H; Fu, L.; Seno, M

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the cancer stem cells are considered to be significantly responsible for growth, metastasis, invasion and recurrence of all cancer. Cancer stem cells are typically characterized by continuous proliferation and self-renewal as well as by differentiation potential, while stem cells are considered to differentiate into tissue- specific phenotype of mature cells under the influence of micro-environment. Cancer stem cells should be traced to the stem cells under the influence of a micro-...

  12. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  13. Medaka fish stem cells and their applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are present in developing embryos and adult tissues of multicellular organisms. Owing to their unique features, stem cells provide excellent opportunities for experimental analyses of basic developmental processes such as pluripotency control and cell fate decision and for regenerative medicine by stem cell-based therapy. Stem cell cultures have been best studied in 3 vertebrate organisms. These are the mouse, human and a small laboratory fish called medaka. Specifically, medaka has given rise to the first embryonic stem (ES) cells besides the mouse, the first adult testis-derived male stem cells spermatogonia capable of test-tube sperm production, and most recently, even haploid ES cells capable of producing Holly, a semi-cloned fertile female medaka from a mosaic oocyte created by microinjecting a haploid ES cell nucleus directly into a normal oocyte. These breakthroughs make medaka a favoring vertebrate model for stem cell research, the topic of this review.

  14. 脐血间充质干细胞靶向胃癌移植瘤的实验研究%Experimental study on the tropism of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells for gastric carcinoma xenografts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宝成; 王振军; 毛伟征; 安岗

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the possibility of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells' migrating to the gastric carcinoma xenografts. Methods Gastric cancer cells SGC-7901 were injected subcutaneously into one side of the inguinal groove in the hairless mice to establish the animal model.Gastric cancer-bearing mice were divided randomly into two groups and five in each group (n =5). Then mesenchymal stem cells and the fibroblast HFL-Ⅰ labeled with fluorescent dye SP-DiI were injected at the opposite side. Ten days later, the mice were put to death, and the gastric carcinoma xenografts, liver, spleen,lung and the tissue of injected point were obtained. Cryosections from frozen tissues were processed for fluorescent microscopy and the distribution of MSC and fibroblasts in different organs were observed. Adjacent sections were stained with HE. Results Human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells were mainly distributed in gastric carcinoma xenografts (0.0150±0.0079), but were found only a little in liver (0.0010±0.0005), spleen (0.0015±0.0012), lung (0.0014±0.0008) and injected point (0.0043±0.0039). Fibroblasts were mainly observed in the tissue of injected point, but none in other tissues (P <0.01). Conclusion Human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells have the tendency of migrating to tumor sites, suggesting that it can be hopefully used in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer.%目的 探讨脐血间充质干细胞靶向胃癌的可能性.方法 将胃癌细胞SGC-7901注射到裸鼠腹股沟皮下,建立胃癌裸鼠模型,荷胃癌小鼠随机分为脐血间充质干细胞组与成纤维细胞组,每组5只(n=5).荧光染料SP-DiI染色人类脐血间充质干细胞及成纤维细胞,分组注射到对侧腹股沟皮下.10 d后处死裸鼠,取出肿瘤、注射部位、肝脏、脾脏和肺脏组织,连续切片分别制成冷冻切片和常规HE染色,荧光显微镜下观察冷冻切片中间充质干细胞和成纤维细

  15. Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval, Mark Anthony S; Paz-Pacheco, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    A 63-year-old man consulted for a non-toxic thyroid nodule of 2 years’ duration. Fine needle aspiration revealed cell findings consistent with papillary thyroid carcinoma. He eventually underwent total thyroidectomy. Microscopic examination revealed histologic features of Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid. He received radioactive iodine therapy and suppressive levothyroxine treatment. Post-therapy whole body iodine-131 scan revealed thyroid tissue remnants limited to the anterior neck. Fo...

  16. Stem cell therapy vs. ethics and religion

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Paula Melo Paulon; Sloth, Stine Hesselholt

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are somatic cells that can go through two different kinds of divisions. Symmetric division allows them to divide into undifferentiated cells, whilst asymmetric division produces one undifferentiated cell and a sister cell that will differentiate later on. Human stem cell therapy (HSCT) is a controversial theme in the religious, political, legal, ethical and scientific worlds. Although it is believed by many scientists that stem cell therapy will be able to cure life-threatening dis...

  17. Human embryonic stem cells and lung regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Varanou, A.; Page, C P; Minger, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation stage embryos. Their unique potential to give rise to all differentiated cell types has generated great interest in stem cell research and the potential that it may have in developmental biology, medicine and pharmacology. The main focus of stem cell research has been on cell therapy for pathological conditions with no current methods of treatment, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac p...

  18. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  19. Prostate cancer stem cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chunyan; Yao, Zhi; Jiang, Yuan; Keller, Evan T.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides insights into pathophysiology of cancers and their therapeutic response. The CSC model has been both controversial, yet provides a foundation to explore cancer biology. In this review, we provide an overview of CSC concepts, biology and potential therapeutic avenues. We then focus on prostate CSC including (1) their purported origin as either basal-derived or luminal-derived cells; (2) markers used for prostate CSC identification; (3) alterations of s...

  20. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by recapitu

  1. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  2. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... are evaluating BMT and PBSCT in clinical trials (research studies) for the treatment ... are the donor’s stem cells matched to the patient’s stem cells in allogeneic ...

  3. Lgr proteins in epithelial stem cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Tan, S.; Clevers, H.

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate success of global efforts to exploit adult stem cells for regenerative medicine will depend heavily on the availability of robust, highly selective stem cell surface markers that facilitate the isolation of stem cells from human tissues. Any subsequent expansion or manipulation of isola

  4. STEM CELLS: Differentiated cells in a back-up role

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Tushar J.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Two independent studies show that, if push comes to shove, differentiated cells of the stomach and lung can act as adult stem cells generating various cell types of the tissue, including a pool of stem cells.

  5. From embryonic stem cells to testicular germ cell cancer-- should we be concerned?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Sonne, Si Brask; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E;

    2006-01-01

    that initial hypothesis but also indicating that CIS cells have a striking phenotypic similarity to embryonic stem cells (ESC). Many cancers have been proposed to originate from tissue-specific stem cells [so-called 'cancer stem cells' (CSC)] and we argue that CIS may be a very good example of a CSC......, but with exceptional features due to the retention of embryonic pluripotency. In addition, considering the fact that pre-invasive CIS cells are transformed from early fetal cells, possibly due to environmentally induced alterations of the niche, we discuss potential risks linked to the uncontrolled therapeutic use......Since the discovery of testicular carcinoma in situ (CIS) -- the precursor cell for the vast majority of germ cell tumours -- it has been proposed that CIS cells could be derived from transformed primordial germ cells or gonocytes. Here, we review recent discoveries not only substantiating...

  6. The role of the hedgehog/patched signaling pathway in epithelial stem cell proliferation:from fly to human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PARISIMICHAELJ; HAIFANLIN

    1998-01-01

    The hedgehog-patched(hh-ptc)intercellular signaling pathway has recently been shown to control the proliferation of epithelial stem cells in both Drosophila and Vertebrated.Mutant and ectopic expression analyses in Drosophila suggest that the HH protein diffuses from the signaling cells to promote the proliferation of nearby ovarian somatic stem cells by antagonizing the suppression of its receptor PTC towards the CI transcription factor in the stem cells.Consequently,the transcription of CIdependent genes leads to stem cell proliferation.This regulatory pathway appears to function also in vertebrates, where defects in ptc cause basal cell carcinoma,tumors of epidermal stem cell origin.Basal cell carcinoma can also be induced by ectopic expression of Sonic hedgehog (shh) or Glil,the vertebrate homolog of ci.These studies suggest the conservation of the hh signaling pathway in controlling epithelial stem cell divisions among different organisma.

  7. Endothelial Interleukin-6 defines the tumorigenic potential of primary human cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Sudha; Warner, Kristy A.; Dong, Zhihong; Imai, Atsushi; Nör, Carolina; Ward, Brent B.; Helman, Joseph I.; Taichman, Russell S.; Bellile, Emily L.; McCauley, Laurie K.; Polverini, Peter J.; Prince, Mark E.; Wicha, Max S.; Jacques E Nör

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) contain a small sub-population of stem cells endowed with unique capacity to generate tumors. These cancer stem cells (CSC) are localized in perivascular niches and rely on crosstalk with endothelial cells for survival and self-renewal, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here, we report that stromal interleukin (IL)-6 defines the tumorigenic capacity of CSC sorted from primary human HNSCC and transplanted into mice. In search for the cellul...

  8. Present state and future perspectives of using pluripotent stem cells in toxicology research

    OpenAIRE

    Wobus, Anna M.; Löser, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The use of novel drugs and chemicals requires reliable data on their potential toxic effects on humans. Current test systems are mainly based on animals or in vitro–cultured animal-derived cells and do not or not sufficiently mirror the situation in humans. Therefore, in vitro models based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have become an attractive alternative. The article summarizes the characteristics of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic carcinoma and embryonic germ cells, a...

  9. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasized to Pagetic Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ashley; Liu, Bo; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michelle; Valente, Michael; Burt, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of the bone, historically known as osteitis deformans, is an uncommon disease typically affecting individuals of European descent. Patients with Paget's disease of the bone are at increased risk for primary bone neoplasms, particularly osteosarcoma. Many cases of metastatic disease to pagetic bone have been reported. However, renal cell carcinoma metastasized to pagetic bone is extremely rare. A 94-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the right kidney compatible with renal cell carcinoma. The patient was also noted to have Paget's disease of the pelvic bones and sacrum. Within the pagetic bone of the sacrum, there was an enhancing mass compatible with renal cell carcinoma. A subsequent biopsy of the renal lesion confirmed renal cell carcinoma. Paget's disease of the bone places the patient at an increased risk for bone neoplasms. The most commonly reported sites for malignant transformation are the femur, pelvis, and humerus. In cases of malignant transformation, osteosarcoma is the most common diagnosis. Breast, lung, and prostate carcinomas are the most common to metastasize to pagetic bone. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Paget's disease of the bone is very rare, with only one prior reported case. Malignancy in Paget's disease of the bone is uncommon with metastatic disease to pagetic bone being extremely rare. We report a patient diagnosed with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and metastatic disease within Paget's disease of the sacrum. Further research is needed to assess the true incidence of renal cell carcinoma associated with pagetic bone.

  10. 28. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningson, Carl T; Stanislaus, Marisha A; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2003-02-01

    Stem cells are characterized by the ability to remain undifferentiated and to self-renew. Embryonic stem cells derived from blastocysts are pluripotent (able to differentiate into many cell types). Adult stem cells, which were traditionally thought to be monopotent multipotent, or tissue restricted, have recently also been shown to have pluripotent properties. Adult bone marrow stem cells have been shown to be capable of differentiating into skeletal muscle, brain microglia and astroglia, and hepatocytes. Stem cell lines derived from both embryonic stem and embryonic germ cells (from the embryonic gonadal ridge) are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal for long periods. Therefore embryonic stem and germ cells have been widely investigated for their potential to cure diseases by repairing or replacing damaged cells and tissues. Studies in animal models have shown that transplantation of fetal, embryonic stem, or embryonic germ cells may be able to treat some chronic diseases. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the use of stem cells as therapeutic agents for three such diseases: Diabetes, Parkinson disease, and congestive heart failure. We also discuss the potential use of stem cells as gene therapy delivery cells and the scientific and ethical issues that arise with the use of human stem cells. PMID:12592319

  11. Methods for Stem Cell Production and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo (Inventor); Valluri, Jagan V. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for rapidly expanding a stem cell population with or without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention relates to methods for rapidly increasing the life span of stem cell populations without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention also relates to methods for increasing the sensitivity of cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions and in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The methods of the present invention can also be used to proliferate cancer cells by culturing them in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The present invention also relates to methods for testing the sensitivity of cancer cells and cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer cells and cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce tissue for use in transplantation by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors to promote differentiation of cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions.

  12. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  13. Brain tumor stem cell dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Aims. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Results. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. Conclusions. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  14. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad B Swelstad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs, embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs, and germ-line stem cells (GSC are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluripotent stem cell lines established from adult testicular tumors while EGCs are generated in vitro from primordial germ cells (PGCs isolated in late embryonic development. More recently, studies have also demonstrated the ability to produce GSCs from adult germ cells, known as spermatogonial stem cells. Unlike ECCs, the source of GSCs are normal, non-cancerous adult tissue. The study of these unique cell lines has provided information that has led to the ability to reprogram somatic cells into an ESC-like state. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, have been derived from a number of human fetal and adult origins. With the promises pluripotent stem cells bring to cell-based therapies there remain several considerations that need to be carefully studied prior to their clinical use. Many of these issues involve understanding key factors regulating their generation, including those which define pluripotency. In this regard, the following article discusses critical aspects of pluripotent stem cell derivation and current issues about their therapeutic potential.Keywords: pluripotency, stem cells, derivation, human

  15. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  16. Stem-cell therapy for neurologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of research on stem cell therapy for various diseases, an important need was felt in the field of neurological diseases. While congenital lesion may not be amenable to stem cell therapy completely, there is a scope of partial improvement in the lesions and halt in further progression. Neuro degenerative lesions like Parkinson′s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown improvement with stem cell therapy. This article reviews the available literature and summarizes the current evidence in the various neurologic diseases amenable to stem cell therapy, the plausible mechanism of action, ethical concerns with insights into the future of stem cell therapy.

  17. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  18. Small cell carcinoma of the lung and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma interobserver variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Bakker, Michael A.; Willemsen, Sten; Gruenberg, Katrien; Noorduijn, L. Arnold; van Oosterhout, Matthijs F. M.; van Suylen, Robert J.; Timens, Wim; Vrugt, Bart; Wiersma-van Tilburg, Anne; Thunnissen, Frederik B. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To test the hypothesis that the published morphological criteria permit reliable segregation of small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC) and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) cases by determining the interobserver variation. Methods and results: One hundred and seventy cases of SCLC,

  19. Stem cell test: A practical tool in toxicogenomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During early embryonic development, at blastocyst stage, the embryo has an outer coat of cells and an inner cell mass (ICM). ICM is the reservoir of embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are pluripotent, i.e., have the potential to differentiate into all cell types of the body. Cell lines have been developed from ES cells. In addition, there are embryonic germ (EG) cell lines developed from progenitor germ cells, and embryonic carcinoma (EC) cell lines developed from teratomas. These cell lines are being used for the study of basic and applied aspects in medical therapeutics, and disease management. Another potential of these cell lines is in the field of environmental mutagenesis. In addition to ES cells, there are adult stem cells in and around different organs and tissues of the body. It is now possible to grow pure populations of specific cell types from these adult stem cells. Treating specific cell types with chemical or physical agents and measuring their response offers a shortcut to test the toxicity in various organ systems in the adult organism. For example, to evaluate the genotoxicity of a chemical (e.g., drug or pesticide) or a physical agent (e.g., ionizing radiation or non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation) during embryonic development, a large number of animals are being used. As an alternative, use of stem cell lines would be a feasible proposition. Using stem cell lines, efforts are being made to standardize the protocols, which will not only be useful in testing the toxicity of a chemical or a physical agent, but also in the field of drug development, environmental mutagenesis, biomonitoring and other studies

  20. The intestinal stem cell.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; van de Wetering, M.L.; Clevers, H.

    2008-01-01

    The epithelium of the adult mammalian intestine is in a constant dialog with its underlying mesenchyme to direct progenitor proliferation, lineage commitment, terminal differentiation, and, ultimately, cell death. The epithelium is shaped into spatially distinct compartments that are dedicated to ea

  1. Strategies for future histocompatible stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan; Barington, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell therapy based on the safe and unlimited self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells is envisioned for future use in tissue or organ replacement after injury or disease. A gradual decline of regenerative capacity has been documented among the adult stem cell population in some body organs...... during the aging process. Recent progress in human somatic cell nuclear transfer and inducible pluripotent stem cell technologies has shown that patient-derived nuclei or somatic cells can be reprogrammed in vitro to become pluripotent stem cells, from which the three germ layer lineages can be generated......, genetically identical to the recipient. Once differentiation protocols and culture conditions can be defined and optimized, patient-histocompatible pluripotent stem cells could be directed towards virtually every cell type in the human body. Harnessing this capability to enrich for given cells within...

  2. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    made recently in the field of stem cell biology, researchers now have improved tools to define novel populations of stem cells, examine them ex vivo using conditions that promote self-renewal, track them into recipients, and determine whether they can contribute to the repair of damaged tissues......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... in regulating stem cell renewal in the microenvironment, and how these molecules can be exploited in ex vivo stem cell culture, are reviewed. The importance of identification of stem cells using functional as well as phenotypic markers is discussed. The novel field of nanotechnology is then discussed...

  3. Stem cell facelift: between reality and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Ibrahim, Amir E; Saad, Dibo A

    2013-03-01

    Stem cells are "big business" throughout medical technology, and their potential application in cosmetic procedures is no exception. One of the latest nonsurgical facial treatments (and new catchphrases) in plastic surgery is the "stem cell facelift." It is evident from the currently available scientific literature that the use of stem cell therapy for facial rejuvenation is limited to the theoretical induction of skin tightening and can in no way be equated to a facelift. In fact, what is advertised and promoted as a new and original technique of stem cell facelifting is mostly stem cell-enriched lipofilling. Despite encouraging data suggesting that adult stem cells hold promise for future applications, the data from clinical evidence available today do not substantiate the marketing and promotional claims being made to patients. To claim that the "stem cell facelift" is a complete facial rejuvenation procedure surgery is unethical.

  4. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell Scott H

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung.

  5. Stem Cells, Science, and Public Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, J. Benjamin; Robert, Jason Scott

    2012-01-01

    These are interesting days in the scientific, social, and political debates about human embryonic stem cell research. Pluripotent stem cells--cells that can, in principle, give rise to the body's full range of cell types--were previously derivable only from human embryos that were destroyed in the process. Now, a variety of somatic cell types can…

  6. Adult stem cells and tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körbling, M; Estrov, Z; Champlin, R

    2003-08-01

    Recently, adult stem cells originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been suggested to contribute to repair and genesis of cells specific for liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, gut, and brain tissue. The mechanism involved has been termed transdifferentiation, although other explanations including cell fusion have been postulated. Using adult stem cells to generate or repair solid organ tissue obviates the immunologic, ethical, and teratogenic issues that accompany embryonic stem cells. PMID:12931235

  7. SHED - Basic Structure for Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Kashyap, Rucha

    2015-01-01

    The discovery that stem cells from dental pulp are capable of differentiating into endothelial cells raised the exciting possibility that these cells can be a single source of odontoblasts and vascular networks in dental tissue engineering. These so-called mesenchymal stem cell populations have been identified from human exfoliated deciduous teeth because of their ability to generate clonogenic adherent colonies when grown and expanded. In addition to these stem cells, other population of ste...

  8. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  9. Application of Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells have become an important source of seed cells for tissue engineering because they are relatively easy to expand in vitro and can be induced to differentiate into various cell types in vitro or in vivo. In the current stage, most stem cell researches focus on in vitro studies, including in vitro induction and phenotype characterization. Our center has made a great deal of effort in the in vivo study by using stem cells as seed cells for tissue construction. We have used bone marrow stem cells (BMS...

  10. RhoGTPases in stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    RhoGTPases are small molecules that control a wide variety of signal transduction pathways. Their profound function in regulating the actin cytoskeleton is well recognized. Stem cells are unique in their ability to self-renew and produce progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells. RhoGT-Pases influence stem cell morphology and cell migration as well as stem cell self-renewal, proliferation, transplantation, homing and differentiation. In this review, the multiple roles of the RhoGTPases in stem cells are discussed.

  11. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Shin Fujimaki; Tamami Wakabayashi; Tohru Takemasa; Makoto Asashima; Tomoko Kuwabara

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease, and that may b...

  12. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative...

  13. Diamond for stem cell biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent rise in life expectancy has led an increase in the number of cases of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and macular degeneration. Traditional therapeutic approaches are ineffective as regeneration is limited in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Neural prosthetics and stem cell therapy present exciting solutions for enabling the function of the brain to be restored. Implanted materials for neuronal prosthetics must have outstanding electrical properties whilst b...

  14. Osteoporosis after stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Khalesi; Mehran Beiraghi Toosi

    2014-01-01

    Background Stem cell transplantation has become as a novel treatment  for end-stage kidney, lung, heart , liver diseases and several hematologic disorders. Improved survival of transplant recipients has raised awareness of post-transplant complications. One of these complications is transplant-related osteoporosis. Methods  In this manuscript we review prevention methods for transplant-related osteoporosis according to the literature. Results Transplant-related osteoporosis is ...

  15. Stem cell signatures in glioma

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xiaobing

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common tumors of the central nervous system in adults. Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form, has a median survival of 15 months regardless of the standard treatment with surgery and temozolomide-based radiochemotherapy. Therefore, it is imperative to improve treatment options for patients with glioblastoma. It has been suggested that the putative tumor stem cells in brain tumors are responsible for glioma initiation, development and resistance to ...

  16. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neura...

  17. Inflammation Promotes Expression of Stemness-Related Properties in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Sheng Chang

    Full Text Available The expression of cancer stemness is believed to reduce the efficacy of current therapies against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Understanding of the stemness-regulating signaling pathways incurred by a specific etiology can facilitate the development of novel targets for individualized therapy against HCC. Niche environments, such as virus-induced inflammation, may play a crucial role. However, the mechanisms linking inflammation and stemness expression in HCC remain unclear. Here we demonstrated the distinct role of inflammatory mediators in expressions of stemness-related properties involving the pluripotent octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4 in cell migration and drug resistance of hepatitis B virus-related HCC (HBV-HCC. We observed positive immunorecognition for macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1/CD68 and OCT4/NANOG in HBV-HCC tissues. The inflammation-conditioned medium (inflamed-CM generated by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated U937 human leukemia cells significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of OCT4/NANOG preferentially in HBV-active (HBV+HBsAg+ HCC cells. The inflamed-CM also increased the side population (SP cell percentage, green fluorescent protein (GFP-positive cell population, and luciferase activity of OCT4 promoter-GFP/luciferase in HBV-active HCC cells. Furthermore, the inflamed-CM upregulated the expressions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I/IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR and activated IGF-IR/Akt signaling in HBV-HCC. The IGF-IR phosphorylation inhibitor picropodophyllin (PPP suppressed inflamed-CM-induced OCT4 and NANOG levels in HBV+HBsAg+ Hep3B cells. Forced expression of OCT4 significantly increased the secondary sphere formation and cell migration, and reduced susceptibility of HBV-HCC cells to cisplatin, bleomycin, and doxorubicin. Taking together, our results show that niche inflammatory mediators play critical roles in inducing the expression of stemness-related properties involving IGF

  18. Stem cells - biological update and cell therapy progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlovanu, Mihai; Susman, Sergiu; Soritau, Olga; Rus-Ciuca, Dan; Melincovici, Carmen; Constantin, Anne-Marie; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the advances in stem cell research have suggested that the human body may have a higher plasticity than it was originally expected. Until now, four categories of stem cells were isolated and cultured in vivo: embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Although multiple studies were published, several issues concerning the stem cells are still debated, such as: the molecular mechanisms of differentiation, the methods to prevent teratoma formation or the ethical and religious issues regarding especially the embryonic stem cell research. The direct differentiation of stem cells into specialized cells: cardiac myocytes, neural cells, pancreatic islets cells, may represent an option in treating incurable diseases such as: neurodegenerative diseases, type I diabetes, hematologic or cardiac diseases. Nevertheless, stem cell-based therapies, based on stem cell transplantation, remain mainly at the experimental stages and their major limitation is the development of teratoma and cancer after transplantation. The induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a prime candidate for future cell therapy research because of their significant self-renewal and differentiation potential and the lack of ethical issues. This article presents an overview of the biological advances in the study of stem cells and the current progress made in the field of regenerative medicine.

  19. Therapeutic potential of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Keith, W. Nicol

    2006-01-01

    lineages are an attractive alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hES) in regenerative medicine. In many countries, present legislation surrounding hES cells makes their use problematic, and indeed the origin of hES cells may represent a controversial issue for many communities. However, adult stem...... is the necessity to be able to identify, select, expand and manipulate cells outside the body. Recent advances in adult stem cell technologies and basic biology have accelerated therapeutic opportunities aimed at eventual clinical applications. Adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate down multiple...... cells are not subject to these issues. This review will therefore focus on adult stem cells. Based on their extensive differentiation potential and, in some cases, the relative ease of their isolation, adult stem cells are appropriate for clinical development. Recently, several observations suggest...

  20. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  1. Stem cells in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Soto, Angel R; Oakley, Derek H; Wichterle, Hynek; Stein, Joel; Doetsch, Fiona K; Henderson, Christopher E

    2014-11-01

    Given their capacity to regenerate cells lost through injury or disease, stem cells offer new vistas into possible treatments for degenerative diseases and their underlying causes. As such, stem cell biology is emerging as a driving force behind many studies in regenerative medicine. This review focuses on the current understanding of the applications of stem cells in treating ailments of the human brain, with an emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases. Two types of neural stem cells are discussed: endogenous neural stem cells residing within the adult brain and pluripotent stem cells capable of forming neural cells in culture. Endogenous neural stem cells give rise to neurons throughout life, but they are restricted to specialized regions in the brain. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms regulating these cells is key in determining their therapeutic potential as well as finding mechanisms to activate dormant stem cells outside these specialized microdomains. In parallel, patient-derived stem cells can be used to generate neural cells in culture, providing new tools for disease modeling, drug testing, and cell-based therapies. Turning these technologies into viable treatments will require the integration of basic science with clinical skills in rehabilitation.

  2. Engineering Stem Cells for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Perry T; Han, Edward; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by a number of useful properties, including their ability to migrate, differentiate, and secrete a variety of therapeutic molecules such as immunomodulatory factors. As such, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have utilized stem cell-based therapies and demonstrated their tremendous potential for the treatment of various human diseases and disorders. Recently, efforts have focused on engineering stem cells in order to further enhance their innate abilities as well as to confer them with new functionalities, which can then be used in various biomedical applications. These engineered stem cells can take on a number of forms. For instance, engineered stem cells encompass the genetic modification of stem cells as well as the use of stem cells for gene delivery, nanoparticle loading and delivery, and even small molecule drug delivery. The present Review gives an in-depth account of the current status of engineered stem cells, including potential cell sources, the most common methods used to engineer stem cells, and the utilization of engineered stem cells in various biomedical applications, with a particular focus on tissue regeneration, the treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, and cancer.

  3. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  5. Pituitary stem cells: candidates and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Farshad; Cusimano, Michael; Zuccato, Jeff A; Mohammed, Safraz; Rotondo, Fabio; Horvath, Eva; Syro, Luis V; Kovacs, Kalman; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2013-09-01

    The pituitary is the master endocrine gland of the body. It undergoes many changes after birth, and these changes may be mediated by the differentiation of pituitary stem cells. Stem cells in any tissue source must display (1) pluripotent capacity, (2) capacity for indefinite self-renewal, and (3) a lack of specialization. Unlike neural stem cells identified in the hippocampus and subventricular zone, pituitary stem cells are not associated with one specific cell type. There are many major candidates that are thought to be potential pituitary stem cell sources. This article reviews the evidence for each of the major cell types and discuss the implications of identifying a definitive pituitary stem cell type. PMID:23423660

  6. Stem cell biology meets systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Roeder, I.; Radtke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells and their descendents are the building blocks of life. How stem cell populations guarantee their maintenance and/or self-renewal, and how individual stem cells decide to transit from one cell stage to another to generate different cell types are long-standing and fascinating questions in the field. Here, we review the discussions that took place at a recent EMBO conference in Cambridge, UK, in which these questions were placed in the context of the latest advances in stem cell biol...

  7. Stem Cells for Augmenting Tendon Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence V. Gulotta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon healing is fraught with complications such as reruptures and adhesion formation due to the formation of scar tissue at the injury site as opposed to the regeneration of native tissue. Stem cells are an attractive option in developing cell-based therapies to improve tendon healing. However, several questions remain to be answered before stem cells can be used clinically. Specifically, the type of stem cell, the amount of cells, and the proper combination of growth factors or mechanical stimuli to induce differentiation all remain to be seen. This paper outlines the current literature on the use of stem cells for tendon augmentation.

  8. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  9. Stem cell strategies for Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, K; Alvarez, A; Marutle, A; Kwak, Y D; Choumkina, E

    2006-06-01

    We have found much evidence that the brain is capable of regenerating neurons after maturation. In our previous study, human neural stem cells (HNSCs) transplanted into aged rat brains differentiated into neural cells and significantly improved the cognitive functions of the animals, indicating that HNSCs may be a promising candidate for cell-replacement therapies for neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, ethical and practical issues associated with HNSCs compel us to explore alternative strategies. Here, we report novel technologies to differentiate adult human mesenchymal stem cells, a subset of stromal cells in the bone marrow, into neural cells by modifying DNA methylation or over expression of nanog, a homeobox gene expressed in embryonic stem cells. We also report peripheral administrations of a pyrimidine derivative that increases endogenous stem cell proliferation improves cognitive function of the aged animal. Although these results may promise a bright future for clinical applications used towards stem cell strategies in AD therapy, we must acknowledge the complexity of AD. We found that glial differentiation takes place in stem cells transplanted into amyloid-( precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We also found that over expression of APP gene or recombinant APP treatment causes glial differentiation of stem cells. Although further detailed mechanistic studies may be required, RNA interference of APP or reduction of APP levels in the brain can significantly reduced glial differentiation of stem cells and may be useful in promoting neurogenesis after stem cell transplantation. PMID:16953146

  10. Epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquiria Pessoa Chinem

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma basocelular é a neoplasia maligna mais comum em humanos e sua incidência vem aumentando nas últimas décadas. Sua grande frequência gera significativo ônus ao sistema de saúde, configurando problema de saúde pública. Apesar das baixas taxas de mortalidade e de rara ocorrência de metástases, o tumor pode apresentar comportamento invasivo local e recidivas após o tratamento, provocando importante morbidade. Exposição à radiação ultravioleta representa o principal fator de risco ambiental associado a sua gênese. Entretanto, descrevem-se outros elementos de risco: fotótipos claros, idade avançada, história familiar de carcinomas de pele, olhos e cabelos claros, sardas na infância e imunossupressão, além de aspectos comportamentais, como exercício profissional exposto ao sol, atividade rural e queimaduras solares na juventude. Entre 30% e 75% dos casos esporádicos estão associados à mutação do gene patched hedgehog, mas outras alterações genéticas são ainda descritas. A neoplasia é comumente encontrada concomitantemente com lesões cutâneas relacionadas à exposição solar crônica, tais como: queratoses actínicas, lentigos solares e telangiectasias faciais. A prevenção do carcinoma basocelular se baseia no conhecimento de fatores de risco, no diagnóstico e tratamento precoces e na adoção de medidas específicas, principalmente, nas populações susceptíveis. Os autores apresentam uma revisão da epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular.Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans and its incidence has increased over the last decades. Its high frequency significantly burdens the health system, making the disease a public health issue. Despite the low mortality rates and the rare occurrence of metastases, the tumor may be locally invasive and relapse after treatment, causing significant morbidity. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor

  11. Vascular Potential of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Iacobas, Ionela; Vats, Archana; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathologic processes is an essential part of the paradigm in enabling us to achieve a reduction in related deaths. Both human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising sources of cells for c...

  12. Turning Stem Cells into Mesenchymal Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Tiziano Barberi; Willis, Lucy M.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Lorenz Studer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells provide access to the earliest stages of human development and may serve as a source of specialized cells for regenerative medicine. Thus, it becomes crucial to develop protocols for the directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells into tissue-restricted precursors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we present culture conditions for the derivation of unlimited numbers of pure mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells and demonstrate multilinea...

  13. Telomere regulation in pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yan; Liang, Puping; Liu, Dan; Huang, Junjiu; Songyang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the potential to produce any types of cells from all three basic germ layers and the capacity to self-renew and proliferate indefinitely in vitro. The two main types of PSCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), share common features such as colony morphology, high expression of Oct4 and Nanog, and strong alkaline phosphatase activity. In recent years, increasing evidences suggest that telomere length represents another imp...

  14. Stem cells in dentistry, sources, and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mozafar Khazaei; Azam Bozorgi; Saber Khazaei; Abbasali Khademi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stem cells (SCs), known as cells with characteristics such as self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are generally obtained from two sources: Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells (ASCs). SC research is expected to play a pivotal role in future medicine. The aim of the present review was to introduce dental and nondental SCs, examining the general characteristics, in vivo and in vitro differentiation capacities, immunosuppressive properties as well as the appl...

  15. Clinical application of stem cells: An update 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Van, Phuc Pham

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has the long history of more than 50 years from the first bone marrow transplantation in 1957. From the 2000s, clinical applications of stem cells significantly increased with more diseases and more patients treated with stem cells. Both autologous stem cells and allogenic stem cells as well as adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and both in vitro non-expanded stem cells and in vitro expanded stem cells were clinically applied. For adult stem...

  16. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  17. Autonomous behavior of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Akkerman, [No Value; Weersing, E; Ausema, A; Dontje, B; Van Zant, G; de Haan, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Mechanisms that affect the function of primitive hematopoietic stem cells with long-term proliferative potential remain largely unknown. Here we assessed whether properties of stem cells are cell-extrinsically or cell-autonomously regulated. Materials and Methods. We developed a model in

  18. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  19. Pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells: From basic research to applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahiro; Otsu; Takashi; Nakayama; Nobuo; Inoue

    2014-01-01

    Basic research on pluripotent stem cells is designed to enhance understanding of embryogenesis, whereas applied research is designed to develop novel therapies and prevent diseases. Attainment of these goals has been enhanced by the establishment of embryonic stem cell lines, the technological development of genomic reprogramming to generate induced-pluripotent stem cells, and improvements in in vitro techniques to manipulate stem cells. This review summarizes the techniques required to generate neural cells from pluripotent stem cells. In particular, this review describes current research applications of a simple neural differentiation method, the neural stem sphere method, which we developed.

  20. Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing YIN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs, including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2. Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  1. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  2. Therapeutic potential of amniotic fluid stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrazzak, Hassan; De Coppi, Paolo; Guillot, Pascale V

    2013-03-01

    Human amniotic fluid cells have been used traditionally as a diagnostic tool for genetic anomalies. More recently it has been recognized that amniotic fluid contains populations of stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC) were first to be described. These cells are able to differentiate towards mesodermal lineages. More recently cells with broader potential, defined as amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC), were also isolated. They have intermediate characteristics between embryonic and adult stem cells and are able to differentiate into lineages representative of all three germ layers but unlike ES cells they do not form tumours in vivo. Furthermore, AFSC have been reverted to functional pluripotency in a transgene-free approach using an epigenetics modifier. These characteristics, together with absence of ethical issues concerning their employment, have made stem cells from amniotic fluid a promising candidate for cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  3. Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Aydemir

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung are extremely rare. There are difficulties related to the diagnosis and treatment and there are no consensus because of the small number of studies. 65-year-old male patient presented with hemoptysis. Chest X-ray and thoracic computorized tomography scan showed a mass lesion and it could not be diagnosed by bronchoscopic biopsy and lavage. Lobectomy was performed due to the high value of standardized uptake value in positron emission tomography. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was diagnosed with pathological evaluation and immunohistochemical study and after 20-month follow-up there was no recurrence. The diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma in the light of the literature is presented.

  4. The role of SOX2 in small cell lung cancer, lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael; Viteri, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    SOX2 is a stem cell transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the regulation of embryonic development. It is one of the genes in a set of factors (Oct4, SOX2, Nanog) that are able to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells. Overexpression of SOX2 has been described in all types of lung cancer tissues, including small cell and squamous cell carcinoma but also adenocarcinoma. An in-depth view of the spectrum of genomic alterations in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has ide...

  5. The bone marrow stem cell niche grows up: mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages move in (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Ehninger, A; Trumpp, A

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell niches are defined as the cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate stem cell function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. This includes control of the balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as the engagement of specific programs in response to stress. In mammals, the best understood niche is that harboring bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Recent studies have expanded the number of cell types contributing to the HSC...

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ian A; Sanina, Cristina; Balkan, Wayne; Hare, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for more deaths globally than any other single disease. There are on average 1.5 million episodes of myocardial infarction (heart attack) each year in the United States alone with roughly one-third resulting in death. There is therefore a major need for developing new and effective strategies to promote cardiac repair. Intramyocardial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a leading contender in the pursuit of clinical intervention and therapy. MSCs are potent mediators of cardiac repair and are therefore an attractive tool in the development of preclinical and clinical trials. MSCs are capable of secreting a large array of soluble factors, which have had demonstrated effects on pathogenic cardiac remolding, fibrosis, immune activation, and cardiac stem cell proliferation within the damaged heart. MSCs are also capable of differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, although the relative contribution of trilineage differentiation and paracrine effectors on cardiac repair remains the subject of active investigation. PMID:27236666

  7. SIS3逆转多药耐药肝癌细胞的干性作用%Reversal of stemness in multidrug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cells by SIS3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严威; 文霆; 林素琼; 刘中财; 杨文超; 吴国洋

    2015-01-01

    ) hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Methods MDR HCC Huh7. 5. 1/ADM cell lines were developed by exposing parental cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of ADM. CCK⁃8 assay was used to determine the cellular sensitivity of various anticancer drugs. Flow cytometry ( FCM) was used to analyze the expression level of cancer stem cell marker CD133. Clone formation assay and mouse subcutaneous xenograft tumors were used to investigate the tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Western blotting ( WB) was used to analyze the changes of expressions of CD133, Smad3, Bcl⁃2, Bax and p⁃Smad3 in different conditions. Results ADM treatment of HCC cells in vitro resulted in a development of subline, Huh7. 5. 1/ADM cells, with CSC phenotypes: stable MDR phenotype ( besides ADMc Huh7.5.1/ADM cells were also more resistant to some other anticancer drugs including VCR, MMC and CTX ) (IC50:0.215±0.018 vs. 0.123± 0.004, 0.145±0.009 vs. 0.014±0.002, 1.021± 0.119 vs. 0.071± 0.006, 27.007±1.606 vs. 1.919±0.032)(unit: μg/ml)(P multidrug resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  8. Biased DNA Segregation during Stem Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Anversa, Piero; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells are a heterogeneous cell population characterized by a small subset of undifferentiated cells that express at high level the paired/homeodomain gene Pax7. This category of satellite cells divides predominantly by asymmetric chromatid segregation generating a daughter cell that carries the mother DNA and retains stem cell property, and a daughter cell that inherits the newly-synthesized DNA and acquires the myocyte lineage.1

  9. [Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and premalignant skin lesions--how to treat?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Sari; Jeskanen, Leila; Ylitalo, Leea

    2014-01-01

    Increasing exposure to UV radiation is considered the most important etiologic factor of nonmelanoma skin cancers. Consequently, exposed areas such as the scalp and face, are the primary areas for developing non-melanoma skin cancers. Once a patient has presented with one tumor, additional lesions are common. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical picture and biopsy or excision for histopathological analysis. Various non-surgical treatment options have been established. Superficial basal cell carcinoma, superficial carcinoma in situ and all actinic keratoses are preferentially treated non-surgically. Most other basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas should be surgically removed. PMID:24724463

  10. Rising incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Dorte; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Dahlstrøm, Karin;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark, and to investi......Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark...

  11. Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Samet Vasfi Kuvat; Zuhal Gücin; Barış Keklik; Gülzade Özyalvaçlı; Karaca Başaran

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly seen nonmelanoma skin cancer which is rarely encountered in the childhood period. An 11-year old child was admitted to our clinic due to an erythematous and a slightly pigmented lesion with a 3 × 4 cm diameter on his posterior scalp. Macroscopically, the lesion was excised with a 10 mm safety margin. Pathologic examination revealed a basal cell carcinoma. No symptoms or signs of a syndrome were observed both in the patient and his family.

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Tattooed Eyebrow

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Park, Jin; Kim, Seong-min; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk

    2009-01-01

    Malignant skin tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, have occurred in tattoos. Seven documented cases of basal cell carcinoma associated with tattoos have also been reported in the medical literature. We encountered a patient with basal cell carcinoma in a tattooed eyebrow. We report on this case as the eighth reported case of a patient with basal cell carcinoma arising in a tattooed area.

  13. Two-photon imaging of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, A.; Gorjup, E.; Riemann, I.; Sauer, D.; König, K.

    2008-02-01

    A variety of human and animal stem cells (rat and human adult pancreatic stem cells, salivary gland stem cells, dental pulpa stem cells) have been investigated by femtosecond laser 5D two-photon microscopy. Autofluorescence and second harmonic generation have been imaged with submicron spatial resolution, 270 ps temporal resolution, and 10 nm spectral resolution. In particular, NADH and flavoprotein fluorescence was detected in stem cells. Major emission peaks at 460nm and 530nm with typical mean fluorescence lifetimes of 1.8 ns and 2.0 ns, respectively, were measured using time-correlated single photon counting and spectral imaging. Differentiated stem cells produced the extracellular matrix protein collagen which was detected by SHG signals at 435 nm.

  14. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  15. Renal cell carcinoma with areas mimicking renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor/clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Fredrik; Grossmann, Petr; Hora, Milan; Sperga, Maris; Montiel, Delia Perez; Martinek, Petr; Gutierrez, Maria Evelyn Cortes; Bulimbasic, Stela; Michal, Michal; Branzovsky, Jindrich; Hes, Ondrej

    2013-07-01

    We present a cohort of 8 renal carcinomas that displayed a variable (5%-95% extent) light microscopic appearance of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor/clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (RAT/CCPRCC) without fulfilling the criteria for these tumors. All but 1 case predominantly (75%-95% extent) showed histopathologic features of conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. In 5 of 7 cases with mostly conventional clear renal cell carcinoma (CRCC) morphology, a diagnosis of CRCC was supported by the molecular genetic findings (presence of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor [VHL] mutation and/or VHL promoter methylation and/or loss of heterozygosity [LOH] for 3p). Of the other 2 cases with predominantly characteristic CRCC morphology, 1 tumor did not reveal any VHL mutation, VHL promoter methylation, or LOH for 3p, and both chromosomes 7 and 17 were disomic, whereas the other tumor displayed polysomy for chromosomes 7 and 17 and no VHL mutation, VHL promoter methylation, or LOH for 3p. One tumor was composed primarily (95%) of distinctly RAT/CCPRCC-like morphology, and this tumor harbored a VHL mutation and displayed polysomy for chromosomes 7 and 17. Of the 5 cases with both histomorphologic features and molecular genetic findings of CRCC, we detected significant immunoreactivity for α-methylacyl-CoA racemase in 2 cases and strong diffuse immunopositivity for cytokeratin 7 in 3 cases. Despite the combination of positivity for α-methylacyl-CoA racemase and cytokeratin 7 in 2 cases, there was nothing to suggest of the possibility of a conventional papillary renal cell carcinoma with a predominance of clear cells.

  16. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  17. Human Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hari Reddi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  18. Ethical Issues in Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell research offers great promise for understanding basic mechanisms of human development and differentiation, as well as the hope for new treatments for diseases such as diabetes, spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and myocardial infarction. However, human stem cell (hSC) research also raises sharp ethical and political controversies. The derivation of pluripotent stem cell lines from oocytes and embryos is fraught with disputes about the onset of human personhood. The reprogramm...

  19. Stem cell transplantation for treating Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Runhui

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends of stem cell transplantation for treating Parkinson's disease using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for stem cell transplantation for treating Parkinson's disease from 2002 to 2011 using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on stem cell transplantation for treating Parkinson's disease which were published and ind...

  20. Thyroid stem cells – danger or resource?

    OpenAIRE

    GIBELLI, B.; El-Fattah, AMA; Giugliano, G; PROH, M.; GROSSO, E.

    2009-01-01

    The thyroid gland has long since been known for its self-renewal ability, mainly in cases of hyperplastic disease such as goitre. Recently the amazing improvement in knowledge about stem cells has explained this potentiality. Some stem cell features and their clinical usefulness are summarized here, reviewing data from the literature: the proven presence of adult stem cells in thyroid tissue, either normal, goitrous or neoplastic, bring with it important implications regarding tissue regenera...

  1. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving floor of the mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sah Kunal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basaloid squamous cell carcinomas of oral mucosa are uncommon. Majority of them can be differentiated from squamous cell carcinoma by their aggressive clinical course and their histopathological features. This case report presents a case of 70-year-old male with basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving the floor of the mouth.

  2. Stem cell reprogramming: A 3D boost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abilez, Oscar J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-03-01

    Biophysical factors in an optimized three-dimensional microenvironment enhance the reprogramming efficiency of human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells when compared to traditional cell-culture substrates.

  3. Cancer Stem Cells, Cancer Cell Plasticity and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be ...

  4. Burning Fat Fuels Leukemic Stem Cell Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-07-01

    Obese leukemia patients exhibit reduced survival after chemotherapy, suggesting an important role of adipose tissue in disease progression. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Ye et al. (2016) reveal metabolic heterogeneity in leukemic stem cell (LSC) subpopulations and show that chemotherapy-resistant CD36+ LSCs co-opt gonadal adipose tissue to support their metabolism and survival. PMID:27392217

  5. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mead

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs, MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC, adipose tissues (ADSC and dental pulp (DPSC, together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment.

  6. Spermatogonial stem cells in the bull

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aponte, P.M

    2009-01-01

    In the testis a complex process, called spermatogenesis, generates millions of spermatozoa per day. At the start of this process there are spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) that have the ability to divide either into new stem cells (self-renewal) or daughter cells committed to develop into spermatozo

  7. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal a

  8. Advances in studies on hepatic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The question whether hepatic stem cells exist or not has been debated for several decades. Current researches confirm that there are hepatic stem cells in the liver. Oval cells, putative bipotential hepatic stem cells, are probably located within canals of Hering, portal tracts or branches of biliary trees. Bone marrow is a potential source of oval cells, indicating that there exists a close relationship between liver and hematopoiesis in adulthood. Hepatic stem cells are able to proliferate in vitro and can be induced to differentiate into hepatocytes. This will provide a promising approach of cell transplantation, tissue engineering and gene therapy for liver diseases. In this review, the evidence of their presence, origin, identification, proliferation in vitro, differentiation by induction, application prospects of hepatic stem cells and future directions for the field are discussed.

  9. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-06-27

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer.

  10. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  11. Stomach development, stem cells and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2016-02-15

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms.

  12. Are hematopoietic stem cells involved in hepatocarcinogenesis?

    OpenAIRE

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Antonino, Matteo; Del Prete, Valentina; Neve, Viviana; Scavo, Maria Principia; Barone, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The liver has three cell lineages able to proliferate after a hepatic injury: the mature hepatocyte, the ductular “bipolar” progenitor cell termed “oval cell” and the putative periductular stem cell. Hepatocytes can only produce other hepatocytes whereas ductular progenitor cells are considerate bipolar since they can give rise to biliary cells or hepatocytes. Periductular stem cells are rare in the liver, have a very long proliferation potential and may be multipotent, being this aspect stil...

  13. Endothelial potential of human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Zoldan, Janet; Basevitch, Yaara; Langer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Growing interest in using endothelial cells for therapeutic purposes has led to exploring human embryonic stem cells as a potential source for endothelial progenitor cells. Embryonic stem cells are advantageous when compared with other endothelial cell origins, due to their high proliferation capability, pluripotency, and low immunogenity. However, there are many challenges and obstacles to overcome before the vision of using embryonic endothelial progenitor cells in the clinic can be realize...

  14. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical s...

  15. Strategies to improve homing of mesenchymal stem cells for greater efficacy in stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Mirahmadi, Mahdi; Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    Stem/progenitor cell-based therapeutic approach in clinical practice has been an elusive dream in medical sciences, and improvement of stem cell homing is one of major challenges in cell therapy programs. Stem/progenitor cells have a homing response to injured tissues/organs, mediated by interactions of chemokine receptors expressed on the cells and chemokines secreted by the injured tissue. For improvement of directed homing of the cells, many techniques have been developed either to engineer stem/progenitor cells with higher amount of chemokine receptors (stem cell-based strategies) or to modulate the target tissues to release higher level of the corresponding chemokines (target tissue-based strategies). This review discusses both of these strategies involved in the improvement of stem cell homing focusing on mesenchymal stem cells as most frequent studied model in cellular therapies.

  16. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  17. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jeong Min [Department of Preventive and Social Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Hwang, Yu-Shik [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mantalaris, Anathathios, E-mail: yshwang@khu.ac.k [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  18. The biology of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilvassy, Stephen J

    2003-01-01

    Rarely has so much interest from the lay public, government, biotechnology industry, and special interest groups been focused on the biology and clinical applications of a single type of human cell as is today on stem cells, the founder cells that sustain many, if not all, tissues and organs in the body. Granting organizations have increasingly targeted stem cells as high priority for funding, and it appears clear that the evolving field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine will require as its underpinning a thorough understanding of the molecular regulation of stem cell proliferation, differentiation, self-renewal, and aging. Despite evidence suggesting that embryonic stem (ES) cells might represent a more potent regenerative reservoir than stem cells collected from adult tissues, ethical considerations have redirected attention upon primitive cells residing in the bone marrow, blood, brain, liver, muscle, and skin, from where they can be harvested with relative sociological impunity. Among these, it is arguably the stem and progenitor cells of the mammalian hematopoietic system that we know most about today, and their intense study in rodents and humans over the past 50 years has culminated in the identification of phenotypic and molecular genetic markers of lineage commitment and the development of functional assays that facilitate their quantitation and prospective isolation. This review focuses exclusively on the biology of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their immediate progeny. Nevertheless, many of the concepts established from their study can be considered fundamental tenets of an evolving stem cell paradigm applicable to many regenerating cellular systems. PMID:14734085

  19. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    nonprecursor cells and cells from the bulk of a tumor. A historical overview of research on human breast stem cells in primary tissue and in culture reveals the progress that has been made in this area, whereas a focus on the cell-of-origin and reprogramming that occurs during neoplastic conversion provides......The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...... mammary cell lineages, producing an increasing number of cells with distinct properties. Understanding the biological characteristics of human breast stem cells and their progeny is crucial in attempts to compare the features of normal stem cells and cancer precursor cells and distinguish these from...

  20. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Michaela E., E-mail: michaela_sharpe@yahoo.com [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom); Morton, Daniel [Exploratory Drug Safety, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc, Cambridge, 02140 (United States); Rossi, Annamaria [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  1. Stem cells and cancer: Evidence for bone marrow stem cells in epithelial cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Chen Li; Calin Stoicov; Arlin B Rogers; JeanMarie Houghton

    2006-01-01

    Cancer commonly arises at the sites of chronic inflammation and infection. Although this association has long been recognized, the reason has remained unclear. Within the gastrointestinal tract, there are many examples of inflammatory conditions associated with cancer, and these include reflux disease and Barrett's adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, Helicobacter infection and gastric cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer and viral hepatitis leading to hepatocellular carcinoma.There are several mechanisms by which chronic inflammation has been postulated to lead to cancer which includes enhanced proliferation in an endless attempt to heal damage, the presence of a persistent inflammatory environment creating a pro-carcinogenic environment and more recently a role for engraftment of circulating marrow-derived stem cells which may contribute to the stromal components of the tumor as well as the tumor mass itself. Here we review the recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of circulating bone marrow-derived stem cells to the formation of tumors in animal models as well as in human beings.

  2. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells: From Identification to Tumor Immune Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, L K; Driver, E R; Wang, X J

    2015-11-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer. Annually, more than half a million individuals are diagnosed with this devastating disease, with increasing incidence in Europe and Southeast Asia. The diagnosis of HNSCC often occurs in late stages of the disease and is characterized by manifestation of a high-grade primary tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, precluding timely management of this deadly cancer. Recently, HNSCC cancer stem cells have emerged as an important factor for cancer initiation and maintenance of tumor bulk. Like normal stem cells, cancer stem cells can undergo self-renewal and differentiation. This unique trait allows for maintenance of the cancer stem cell pool and facilitates differentiation into heterogeneous neoplastic progeny when necessary. Recent studies have suggested coexistence of different cancer stem cell populations within a tumor mass, where the tumor initiation and metastasis properties of these cancer stem cells can be uncoupled. Cancer stem cells also possess resistant phenotypes that evade standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy, resulting in tumor relapse. Therefore, understanding distinctive pathways relating to cancer stem cells will provide insight into early diagnosis and treatment of HNSCC. In this review, we highlight current advances in identifying cancer stem cells, detail the interactions of these cells with the immune system within the tumor niche, and discuss the potential use of immunotherapy in managing HNSCC.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are clonogenic, non-haematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages e.g. osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages e.g. neuronal-like cells. Several methods...... are currently available for isolation of the mesenchymal stem cells based on their physical and immunological characteristics. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, mesenchymal stem cells are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Recent...... studies have demonstrated that the life span of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro can be extended by increasing the levels of telomerase expression in the cells and thus allowing culture of large number of cells needed for therapy. In addition, it has been shown that it is possible to culture the cells...

  4. Ipsilateral synchronous renal pelvic transitional cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩平; 魏强; 石明; 杨宇如

    2004-01-01

    @@ Reports of multiple synchronous primary renal neoplasms in the literature are rare. Although primary renal tumors of 2 distinctively dissimilar origins have been sporadically described,1-6 to our knowledge there have been no reported cases of triple primary renal neoplasms in the same kidney. Here we report a very rare case of ipsilateral synchronous renal pelvic transitional cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma with marked hydronephrosis and multiple stones in the same kidney.

  5. Morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma peritumoral stroma varies among basal cell carcinoma subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lesack Kyle; Naugler Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The role that the peritumoral stroma plays in the growth of tumours is currently poorly understood. In this manuscript the morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma subtypes and their associated peritumoral stromas are presented. Methods Ninety eight digitized basal cell carcinoma histology slides were categorized as infiltrative, nodular, or superficial subtypes, and were analysed using a combination of manual and computer-assisted approaches. The morphometric ...

  6. Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of feline oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma are described. In both cases, diagnosis was achieved by radiography, endoscopy and cytology, and later confirmed by histology. One cat underwent oesophagectomy followed by end-to-end anastomosis, but died three days postsurgery; the second cat was euthanased after diagnosis

  7. The epidemiology of renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljungberg, B.; Campbell, S.C.; Cho, H.Y.; Jacqmin, D.; Lee, J.E.; Weikert, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Kidney cancer is among the 10 most frequently occurring cancers in Western communities. Globally, about 270 000 cases of kidney cancer are diagnosed yearly and 116 000 people die from the disease. Approximately 90% of all kidney cancers are renal cell carcinomas (RCC). OBJECTIVE: The causes

  8. Neurogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, M; Mikula, M; Preitschopf, A; Feichtinger, M; Schipany, K; Hengstschläger, M

    2012-05-01

    In 2003, human amniotic fluid has been shown to contain stem cells expressing Oct-4, a marker for pluripotency. This finding initiated a rapidly growing and very promising new stem cell research field. Since then, amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into any of the three germ layers and to form three-dimensional aggregates, so-called embryoid bodies, known as the principal step in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Marker selection and minimal dilution approaches allow the establishment of monoclonal AFS cell lineages with high proliferation potential. AFS cells have a lower risk for tumour development and do not raise the ethical issues of embryonic stem cells. Compared to induced pluripotent stem cells, AFS cells do not need exogenic treatment to induce pluripotency, are chromosomal stable and do not harbour the epigenetic memory and accumulated somatic mutations of specific differentiated source cells. Compared to adult stem cells, AFS can be grown in larger quantities and show higher differentiation potential. Accordingly, in the recent past, AFS became increasingly accepted as an optimal tool for basic research and probably also for specific cell-based therapies. Here, we review the current knowledge on the neurogenic differentiation potential of AFS cells.

  9. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition and diagnosis of suspected lesions by performing histopathological examination in unusual circumstances. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2452-2454

  10. Dedifferentiation of committed epithelial cells into stem cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tata, Purushothama Rao; Mou, Hongmei; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Zhao, Rui; Prabhu, Mythili; Law, Brandon M.; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Josalyn L Cho; Breton, Sylvie; Sahay, Amar; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cellular plasticity contributes to the regenerative capacity of plants, invertebrates, teleost fishes, and amphibians. In vertebrates, differentiated cells are known to revert into replicating progenitors, but these cells do not persist as stable stem cells. We now present evidence that differentiated airway epithelial cells can revert into stable and functional stem cells in vivo. Following the ablation of airway stem cells, we observed a surprising increase in the proliferation of c...

  11. Dedifferentiation of committed epithelial cells into stem cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tata, Purushothama Rao; Mou, Hongmei; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Zhao, Rui; Prabhu, Mythili; Law, Brandon M.; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Josalyn L Cho; Breton, Sylvie; Sahay, Amar; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cellular plasticity contributes to the regenerative capacity of plants, invertebrates, teleost fishes, and amphibians. In vertebrates, differentiated cells are known to revert into replicating progenitors, but these cells do not persist as stable stem cells. We now present evidence that differentiated airway epithelial cells can revert into stable and functional stem cells in vivo. Following the ablation of airway stem cells, we observed a surprising increase in the proliferation of c...

  12. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  13. FGF2 mediates DNA repair in epidermoid carcinoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a well-known survival factor. However, its role in DNA repair is poorly documented. The present study was designed to investigate in epidermoid carcinoma cells the potential role of FGF2 in DNA repair. The side population (SP) with cancer stem cell-like properties and the main population (MP) were isolated from human A431 squamous carcinoma cells. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. FGF2 expression was quantified by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SP cells exhibited rapid repair of radiation induced DNA damage and a high constitutive level of nuclear FGF2. Blocking FGF2 signaling abrogated the rapid DNA repair. In contrast, in MP cells, a slower repair of damage was associated with low basal expression of FGF2. Moreover, the addition of exogenous FGF2 accelerated DNA repair in MP cells. When irradiated, SP cells secreted FGF2, whereas MP cells did not. FGF2 was found to mediate DNA repair in epidermoid carcinoma cells. We postulate that carcinoma stem cells would be intrinsically primed to rapidly repair DNA damage by a high constitutive level of nuclear FGF2. In contrast, the main population with a low FGF2 content exhibits a lower repair rate which can be increased by exogenous FGF2. (authors)

  14. Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Michler, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the publication of a large number of clinical trials primarily using bone marrow-derived stem cells as the injected cell. These “first-generation” clinical trials have advanced our understanding and shown us that (1) cell therapy is safe, (2) cell therapy has been modestly effective, and (3) in humans, bone marrow-derived stem cells do not transdifferentiate into cardiomyocytes or new blood vessels (or at least in sufficient numbers to have any effect).

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mundra, Vaibhav; Gerling, Ivan C.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells which have self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential into several mesenchymal lineages including bones, cartilages, adipose tissues and tendons. MSCs may repair tissue injuries and prevent immune cell activation and proliferation. Immunomodulation and secretion of growth factors by MSCs have led to realizing the true potential of MSC-based cell therapy. The use of MSCs as immunomdulators has been explored in cell/organ t...

  16. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmara Jaworska; Wojciech Król; Ewelina Szliszka

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve th...

  17. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei-Bo; Xu; Chao; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells(liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future.

  18. DNA damage response in adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    This review discusses the processes of DNA-damage-response and DNA-damage repair in stem and progenitor cells of several tissues. The long life-span of stem cells suggests that they may respond differently to DNA damage than their downstream progeny and, indeed, studies have begun to elucidate the unique stem cell response mechanisms to DNA damage. Because the DNA damage responses in stem cells and progenitor cells are distinctly different, stem and progenitor cells should be considered as two different entities from this point of view. Hematopoietic and mammary stem cells display a unique DNA-damage response, which involves active inhibition of apoptosis, entry into the cell-cycle, symmetric division, partial DNA repair and maintenance of self-renewal. Each of these biological events depends on the up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21. Moreover, inhibition of apoptosis and symmetric stem cell division are the consequence of the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor p53, as a direct result of p21 up-regulation. A deeper understanding of these processes is required before these findings can be translated into human anti-aging and anti-cancer therapies. One needs to clarify and dissect the pathways that control p21 regulation in normal and cancer stem cells and define (a) how p21 blocks p53 functions in stem cells and (b) how p21 promotes DNA repair in stem cells. Is this effect dependent on p21s ability to inhibit p53? Such molecular knowledge may pave the way to methods for maintaining short-term tissue reconstitution while retaining long-term cellular and genomic integrity.

  19. Adult stem-like cells in kidney

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiichi Hishikawa; Osamu Takase; Masahiro Yoshikawa; Taro Tsujimura; Masaomi Nangaku; Tsuyoshi Takato

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatmentfor kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivationof kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidneytissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lowervertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephronsafter tubular damages is commonly observed after renalinjury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitorcell or system is reportedly presents suggesting thatadult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinicaltargets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclearif kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. Ingeneral, stemness is defined by several factors suchas self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency andcharacteristic gene expression profiles. The definiteuse of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidneyregeneration, and here we describe the recent broadfindings of kidney regeneration and the cells thatcontribute regeneration.

  20. The potential application of stem cell in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketut Suardita

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are generally defined as cells that have the capacity to self-renewal and differentiate to specialize cell. There are two kinds of stem cell, embryonic stem cell and adult stem cells. Stem cell therapy has been used to treat diseases including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, spinal cord injury, stroke, burns, heart diseases, diabetes, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Stem cells were found in dental pulp, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone marrow. Because of their potential in medical therapy, stem cells were used to regenerate lost or damage teeth and periodontal structures. This article discusses the potential application of stem cells for dental field.

  1. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihori; Tanabe

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have reve-aled that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell pro-gramming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review,the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to stem cell differentiation are discussed.

  2. Three-dimensional approach to stem cell therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Il-Hoan; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2002-01-01

    Recent progress in stem cell research is opening a new hope for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. Two breakthroughs were made in the stem cell era, one, new discoveries in multi-potentiality of adult stem cells beyond the traditionally appreciated extent, and the other, establishment of pluripotent stem cell from human embryo. In addition to the newly identified multi-potentiality of adult stem cells, their ability to be trans-differentiated toward other tissue types (stem cell plasticit...

  3. Clonogenicity: holoclones and meroclones contain stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Charlotte M; Ahmed, Aamir; Masters, John R

    2014-01-01

    When primary cultures of normal cells are cloned, three types of colony grow, called holoclones, meroclones and paraclones. These colonies are believed to be derived from stem cells, transit-amplifying cells and differentiated cells respectively. More recently, this approach has been extended to cancer cell lines. However, we observed that meroclones from the prostate cancer cell line DU145 produce holoclones, a paradoxical observation as meroclones are thought to be derived from transit-amplifying cells. The purpose of this study was to confirm this observation and determine if both holoclones and meroclones from cancer cell lines contain stem cells. We demonstrated that both holoclones and meroclones can be serially passaged indefinitely, are highly proliferative, can self-renew to form spheres, are serially tumorigenic and express stem cell markers. This study demonstrates that the major difference between holoclones and meroclones derived from a cancer cell line is the proportion of stem cells within each colony, not the presence or absence of stem cells. These findings may reflect the properties of cancer as opposed to normal cells, perhaps indicating that the hierarchy of stem cells is more extensive in cancer.

  4. Paracrine Molecules of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

    OpenAIRE

    Tian Li; Yaojiong Wu

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are both adult stem cells residing in the bone marrow. MSCs interact with HSCs, they stimulate and enhance the proliferation of HSCs by secreting regulatory molecules and cytokines, providing a specialized microenvironment for controlling the process of hematopoiesis. In this paper we discuss how MSCs contribute to HSC niche, maintain the stemness and proliferation of HSCs, and support HSC transplantation.

  5. Bilateral acrometastasis in a case renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Vaish, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    We present a unique case of bilateral skeletal metastasis below the knee in a patient with renal cell carcinoma. In this rarest of rare cases, bony metastases were the first presentation of a primary tumour. Incidentally, the primary tumour (renal cell carcinoma) involved the solitary kidney of the patient and the same patient also had coexisting carcinoma of the prostate. PMID:25368128

  6. Enabling stem cell therapies through synthetic stem cell–niche engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Peerani, Raheem; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Enabling stem cell–targeted therapies requires an understanding of how to create local microenvironments (niches) that stimulate endogenous stem cells or serve as a platform to receive and guide the integration of transplanted stem cells and their derivatives. In vivo, the stem cell niche is a complex and dynamic unit. Although components of the in vivo niche continue to be described for many stem cell systems, how these components interact to modulate stem cell fate is only beginning to be u...

  7. Cisplatin Induces Bmi-1 and Enhances the Stem Cell Fraction in Head and Neck Cancer12

    OpenAIRE

    Nör, Carolina; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Warner, Kristy A.; Bernardi, Lisiane; Visioli, Fernanda; Helman, Joseph I.; Roesler, Rafael; Jacques E Nör

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has unveiled a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic, multipotent cells capable of self-renewal in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). These unique cells, named here cancer stem cells (CSCs), proliferate slowly and might be involved in resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We have shown that CSCs are found in perivascular niches and rely on endothelial cell-secreted factors [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] for their survival and self-renewal in HNSCC. Here, we...

  8. Cisplatin Induces Bmi-1 and Enhances the Stem Cell Fraction in Head and Neck Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Nör; Zhaocheng Zhang; Warner, Kristy A.; Lisiane Bernardi; Fernanda Visioli; Helman, Joseph I.; Rafael Roesler; Jacques E Nör

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has unveiled a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic, multipotent cells capable of self-renewal in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). These unique cells, named here cancer stem cells (CSCs), proliferate slowly and might be involved in resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We have shown that CSCs are found in perivascular niches and rely on endothelial cell-secreted factors [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] for their survival and self-renewal in HNSCC. Here, we...

  9. Stem Cell Research and Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J.; Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.; Klasko, Stephen K.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are being touted as the greatest discovery for the potential treatment of a myriad of diseases in the new millennium, but there is still much research to be done before it will be known whether they can live up to this description. There is also an ethical debate over the production of one of the most valuable types of stem cell: the…

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells in oral reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Sørensen, J A; Kassem, M;

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated clinical outcomes following intraoperative use of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in various oral reconstructive procedures. PubMed was searched without language restrictions from 2000 to 2011 using the search words stem cell, oral surgery, tissue engineering, sinus lift...

  11. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) ... Medicine Clinics 225,676 views 6:18 Alicia's bone marrow donation - Duration: 8:33. ... Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 15:50. Dartmouth-Hitchcock 2,764 views ...

  12. Skeletal stem cells in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Bianco, Paolo

    2015-01-15

    The nature, biological characteristics, and contribution to organ physiology of skeletal stem cells are not completely determined. Chan et al. and Worthley et al. demonstrate that a stem cell for skeletal tissues, and a system of more restricted, downstream progenitors, can be identified in mice and demonstrate its role in skeletal tissue maintenance and regeneration.

  13. Skeletal stem cells in space and time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Bianco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The nature, biological characteristics, and contribution to organ physiology of skeletal stem cells are not completely determined. Chan et al. and Worthley et al. demonstrate that a stem cell for skeletal tissues, and a system of more restricted, downstream progenitors, can be identified in mice ...

  14. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3:22. CTV News 322 views 3:22 Stem Cell Therapy Injections - Duration: 6:18. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics 254,233 views 6:18 Bone Marrow/Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 7:24. tannermom80 106,911 views ...

  15. Pathological modifications of plant stem cell destiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    In higher plants, the shoot apex contains undifferentiated stem cells that give rise to various tissues and organs. The fate of these stem cells determines the pattern of plant growth as well as reproduction; and such fate is genetically preprogrammed. We found that a bacterial infection can derai...

  16. The ageing haematopoietic stem cell compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geiger, Hartmut; de Haan, Gerald; Florian, M. Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell ageing underlies the ageing of tissues, especially those with a high cellular turnover. There is growing evidence that the ageing of the immune system is initiated at the very top of the haematopoietic hierarchy and that the ageing of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) directly contributes t

  17. Representations of stem cell clinics on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Reshef, Amir; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    The practice of travelling abroad to receive unproven and unregulated stem cell treatments has become an increasingly problematic global phenomenon known as 'stem cell tourism'. In this paper, we examine representations of nine major clinics and providers of such treatments on the microblogging network Twitter. We collected and conducted a content analysis of Twitter posts (n = 363) by these establishments and by other users mentioning them, focusing specifically on marketing claims about treatment procedures and outcomes, discussions of safety and efficacy of stem cell transplants, and specific representations of patients' experiences. Our analysis has shown that there were explicit claims or suggestions of benefits associated with unproven stem cell treatments in approximately one third of the tweets and that patients' experiences, whenever referenced, were presented as invariably positive and as testimonials about the efficacy of stem cell transplants. Furthermore, the results indicated that the tone of most tweets (60.2 %) was overwhelmingly positive and there were rarely critical discussions about significant health risks associated with unproven stem cell therapies. When placed in the context of past research on the problems associated with the marketing of unproven stem cell therapies, this analysis of representations on Twitter suggests that discussions in social media have also remained largely uncritical of the stem cell tourism phenomenon, with inaccurate representations of risks and benefits for patients. PMID:24970380

  18. Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues From the Director: Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease Past Issues / Summer ... Zerhouni, NIH Director, described the need for expanding stem cell research. Recently, he spoke about stem cell research with ...

  19. Differential localization of LGR5 and Nanog in clusters of colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Freyhan, Ora; Fabrikant, Yakov; Melzer, Ehud; Givol, David

    2013-05-01

    One paradigm of cancer development claims that cancer emerges at the niche of tissue stem cells and these cells continue to proliferate in the tumor as cancer stem cells. LGR5, a membrane receptor, was recently found to be a marker of normal colon stem cells in colon polyps and is also expressed in colon cancer stem cells. Nanog, an embryonic stem cell nuclear factor, is expressed in several embryonic tissues, but Nanog expression is not well documented in cancerous stem cells. Our aim was to examine whether both LGR5 and Nanog are expressed in the same clusters of colon stem cells or cancer stem cells, using immunocytochemistry with specific antibodies to each antigen. We analyzed this aspect using paraffin embedded tumor tissue sections obtained from 18 polyps and 36 colon cancer specimens at stages I-IV. Antibodies to LGR5 revealed membrane and cytoplasm immunostaining of scattered labeled cells in normal crypts, with no labeling of Nanog. However, in close proximity to the tumors, staining to LGR5 was much more intensive in the crypts, including that of the epithelial cells. In cancer tissue, positive LGR5 clusters of stem cells were observed mainly in poorly differentiated tumors and in only a few scattered cells in the highly differentiated tumors. In contrast, antibodies to Nanog mainly stained the growing edges of carcinoma cells, leaving the poorly differentiated tumor cells unlabeled, including the clustered stem cells that could be detected even by direct morphological examination. In polyp tissues, scattered labeled cells were immunostained with antibodies to Nanog and to a much lesser extent with antibodies to LGR5. We conclude that expression of LGR5 is probably specific to stem cells of poorly differentiated tumors, whereas Nanog is mainly expressed at the edges of highly differentiated tumors. However, some of the cell layers adjacent to the carcinoma cell layers that still remained undifferentiated, expressed mainly Nanog with only a few cells

  20. Stem Cells in Niemann-Pick Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sun-Jung Kim; Joon-Suk Park; Kyung-Sun Kang

    2008-01-01

    Neural stem cells are multi-potent and able to self renew to maintain its character throughout the life. Loss of self renewal ability of stem cells prevents recovery or replacement of cells damaged by disease with new cells. The Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is one of the neurodegenerative diseases, caused by a mutation of NPC1 gene which affects the function of NPC1 protein. We reported that NPC 1 gene deficiency could lead to lack of the self renewal ability of neural stem cells in Ni...