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Sample records for carcinogenicity model content

  1. Predicting carcinogenicity of diverse chemicals using probabilistic neural network modeling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kunwar P., E-mail: kpsingh_52@yahoo.com [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Environmental Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Environmental Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Robust global models capable of discriminating positive and non-positive carcinogens; and predicting carcinogenic potency of chemicals in rodents were developed. The dataset of 834 structurally diverse chemicals extracted from Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) was used which contained 466 positive and 368 non-positive carcinogens. Twelve non-quantum mechanical molecular descriptors were derived. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinearity in the data were evaluated using Tanimoto similarity index and Brock–Dechert–Scheinkman statistics. Probabilistic neural network (PNN) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN) models were constructed for classification and function optimization problems using the carcinogenicity end point in rat. Validation of the models was performed using the internal and external procedures employing a wide series of statistical checks. PNN constructed using five descriptors rendered classification accuracy of 92.09% in complete rat data. The PNN model rendered classification accuracies of 91.77%, 80.70% and 92.08% in mouse, hamster and pesticide data, respectively. The GRNN constructed with nine descriptors yielded correlation coefficient of 0.896 between the measured and predicted carcinogenic potency with mean squared error (MSE) of 0.44 in complete rat data. The rat carcinogenicity model (GRNN) applied to the mouse and hamster data yielded correlation coefficient and MSE of 0.758, 0.71 and 0.760, 0.46, respectively. The results suggest for wide applicability of the inter-species models in predicting carcinogenic potency of chemicals. Both the PNN and GRNN (inter-species) models constructed here can be useful tools in predicting the carcinogenicity of new chemicals for regulatory purposes. - Graphical abstract: Figure (a) shows classification accuracies (positive and non-positive carcinogens) in rat, mouse, hamster, and pesticide data yielded by optimal PNN model. Figure (b) shows generalization and predictive

  2. Recent developments in the multistage modeling of cohort data for carcinogenic risk assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazumdar, S; Redmond, C K; Costantino, J P; Patwardhan, R N; Zhou, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The modeling of cohort data based on the Armitage-Doll multistage model of the carcinogenic process has gained popular acceptance as a methodology for quantitative risk assessment for estimating the dose-related relationships between different occupational and environmental carcinogenic exposures and cancer mortality. The multistage model can be used for extrapolation to low doses relevant for setting environmental standards and also provides information regarding whether more than one stage ...

  3. On use of the multistage dose-response model for assessing laboratory animal carcinogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Nitcheva, Daniella; Piegorsch, Walter W.; West, R. Webster

    2007-01-01

    We explore how well a statistical multistage model describes dose-response patterns in laboratory animal carcinogenicity experiments from a large database of quantal response data. The data are collected from the U.S. EPA’s publicly available IRIS data warehouse and examined statistically to determine how often higher-order values in the multistage predictor yield significant improvements in explanatory power over lower-order values. Our results suggest that the addition of a second-order par...

  4. Tobacco, Microbes, and Carcinogens: Correlation Between Tobacco Cure Conditions, Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamine Content, and Cured Leaf Microbial Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Audrey D; Fisher, Colin; Jack, Anne; Moe, Luke A

    2016-07-01

    Tobacco-specific nitrosamines are carcinogenic N-nitrosamine compounds present at very low levels in freshly harvested tobacco leaves that accumulate during leaf curing. Formation of N-nitrosamine compounds is associated with high nitrate levels in the leaf at harvest, and nitrate is presumed to be the source from which the N-nitrosation species originates. More specifically, nitrite is considered to be a direct precursor, and nitrite is linked with N-nitrosation in many environmental matrices where it occurs via microbial nitrate reduction. Here, we initiate work exploring the role of leaf microbial communities in formation of tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Leaves from burley tobacco line TN90H were air cured under various temperature and relative humidity levels, and 22 cured tobacco samples were analyzed for their microbial communities and leaf chemistry. Analysis of nitrate, nitrite, and total tobacco-specific nitrosamine levels revealed a strong positive correlation between the three variables, as well as a strong positive correlation with increasing relative humidity during cure conditions. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was used to assess microbial communities in each of the samples. In most samples, Proteobacteria predominated at the phylum level, accounting for >90 % of the OTUs. However, a distinct shift was noted among members of the high tobacco-specific nitrosamine group, with increases in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Several OTUs were identified that correlate strongly (positive and negative) with tobacco-specific nitrosamine content. Copy number of bacterial nitrate reductase genes, obtained using quantitative PCR, did not correlate strongly with tobacco-specific nitrosamine content. Incomplete denitrification is potentially implicated in tobacco-specific nitrosamine levels. PMID:27023797

  5. Prediction of rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring chemicals in the human diet using high-throughput QSAR predictive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consistent with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Critical Path Initiative, predictive toxicology software programs employing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are currently under evaluation for regulatory risk assessment and scientific decision support for highly sensitive endpoints such as carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity. At the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Office of Food Additive Safety and the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff (ICSAS), the use of computational SAR tools for both qualitative and quantitative risk assessment applications are being developed and evaluated. One tool of current interest is MDL-QSAR predictive discriminant analysis modeling of rodent carcinogenicity, which has been previously evaluated for pharmaceutical applications by the FDA ICSAS. The study described in this paper aims to evaluate the utility of this software to estimate the carcinogenic potential of small, organic, naturally occurring chemicals found in the human diet. In addition, a group of 19 known synthetic dietary constituents that were positive in rodent carcinogenicity studies served as a control group. In the test group of naturally occurring chemicals, 101 were found to be suitable for predictive modeling using this software's discriminant analysis modeling approach. Predictions performed on these compounds were compared to published experimental evidence of each compound's carcinogenic potential. Experimental evidence included relevant toxicological studies such as rodent cancer bioassays, rodent anti-carcinogenicity studies, genotoxic studies, and the presence of chemical structural alerts. Statistical indices of predictive performance were calculated to assess the utility of the predictive modeling method. Results revealed good predictive performance using this software's rodent carcinogenicity module of over 1200 chemicals

  6. Antiproliferative effects of fluoxetine on colon cancer cells and in a colonic carcinogen mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Kannen

    Full Text Available The antidepressant fluoxetine has been under discussion because of its potential influence on cancer risk. It was found to inhibit the development of carcinogen-induced preneoplastic lesions in colon tissue, but the mechanisms of action are not well understood. Therefore, we investigated anti-proliferative effects, and used HT29 colon tumor cells in vitro, as well as C57BL/6 mice exposed to intra-rectal treatment with the carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG as models. Fluoxetine increased the percentage of HT29 cells in the G(0/G(1 phase of cell-cycle, and the expression of p27 protein. This was not related to an induction of apoptosis, reactive oxygen species or DNA damage. In vivo, fluoxetine reduced the development of MNNG-induced dysplasia and vascularization-related dysplasia in colon tissue, which was analyzed by histopathological techniques. An anti-proliferative potential of fluoxetine was observed in epithelial and stromal areas. It was accompanied by a reduction of VEGF expression and of the number of cells with angiogenic potential, such as CD133, CD34, and CD31-positive cell clusters. Taken together, our findings suggest that fluoxetine treatment targets steps of early colon carcinogenesis. This confirms its protective potential, explaining at least partially the lower colon cancer risk under antidepressant therapy.

  7. A QSAR model for the estimation of carcinogenicity: example application to an azo-dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enslein, K; Borgstedt, H H

    1989-12-01

    Since carcinogenicity bioassays are time-consuming, costly, and use animal resources, structure-activity relationship equations which model toxicological end-points have been developed to make available alternative methods which approximate the results that could be obtained from bioassays but which are less expensive and time-consuming and use fewer, if any, animals. These equations are based on sets of bioassay results and explain the end-point under consideration in terms of substructural and other parameters which describe the chemical entities. The resulting equations--or models--can then be used to estimate--or predict--the end-point for new structures. The estimation is followed by validation procedures.

  8. Modelling the effect of exposure to environmetal carcinogens on incidence of cancers in populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk estimation is a complex problem with very important public health consequences. The models in general use for this purpose are simple models that describe some measure of risk as a mathematically simple function of exposure. The available data about environmental carcinogens, however, is rarely enough to allow the authors to test the validity of such models. A solution to this problem is to choose a model that agrees with the understanding of carcinogenesis and exposure effects. Here, exposure effects are modelled quantitative in the framework of a model for carcinogenesis at the cellular level proposed by Moolgavkar and Knudson (1981). The model postulates that a normal cell must undergo two changes before it becomes malignant. It also allows for growth of normal tissue, intermediate cell clones and malignant tumors. Derivations of hazards and relative risks based on various patterns (acute, chronic) and qualities (initiators, promoters) of exposure are shown. The use of such models for data analysis is illustrated on two sets of data: one on acute exposure to γ-rays in an animal carcinogensis experiment; the other on a chronic exposure to arsenic in a cohort of workers from a copper smelter. Results from the analysis are compared to those obtained with standard methods of risk estimation

  9. Statistical Model for Content Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qureshi, Pir Abdul Rasool; Memon, Nasrullah

    2011-01-01

    We present a statistical model for content extraction from HTML documents. The model operates on Document Object Model (DOM) tree of the corresponding HTML document. It evaluates each tree node and associated statistical features to predict significance of the node towards overall content...

  10. Development of a Medium-term Animal Model Using gpt Delta Rats to Evaluate Chemical Carcinogenicity and Genotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kohei; Kijima, Aki; Ishii, Yuji; Takasu, Shinji; Jin, Meilan; Kuroda, Ken; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ogawa, Kumiko; Umemura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the potential for development of an animal model (GPG46) capable of rapidly detecting chemical carcinogenicity and the underlying mechanisms of action were examined in gpt delta rats using a reporter gene assay to detect mutations and a medium-term rat liver bioassay to detect tumor promotion. The tentative protocol for the GPG46 model was developed based on the results of dose-response exposure to diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and treatment with phenobarbital over time following DEN administration. Briefly, gpt delta rats were exposed to various chemicals for 4 weeks, followed by a partial hepatectomy (PH) to collect samples for an in vivo mutation assay. The mutant frequencies (MFs) of the reporter genes were examined as an indication of tumor initiation. A single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 10 mg/kg DEN was administered to rats 18 h after the PH to initiate hepatocytes. Tumor-promoting activity was evaluated based on the development of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive foci at week 10. The genotoxic carcinogens 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f] quinolone (IQ) and safrole (SF), the non-genotoxic carcinogens piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and phenytoin (PHE), the non-carcinogen acetaminophen (APAP) and the genotoxic non-hepatocarcinogen aristolochic acid (AA) were tested to validate the GPG46 model. The validation results indicate that the GPG46 model could be a powerful tool in understanding chemical carcinogenesis and provide valuable information regarding human risk hazards. PMID:23723564

  11. Modelling prokaryote gene content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Susko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The patchy distribution of genes across the prokaryotes may be caused by multiple gene losses or lateral transfer. Probabilistic models of gene gain and loss are needed to distinguish between these possibilities. Existing models allow only single genes to be gained and lost, despite the empirical evidence for multi-gene events. We compare birth-death models (currently the only widely-used models, in which only one gene can be gained or lost at a time to blocks models (allowing gain and loss of multiple genes within a family. We analyze two pairs of genomes: two E. coli strains, and the distantly-related Archaeoglobus fulgidus (archaea and Bacillus subtilis (gram positive bacteria. Blocks models describe the data much better than birth-death models. Our models suggest that lateral transfers of multiple genes from the same family are rare (although transfers of single genes are probably common. For both pairs, the estimated median time that a gene will remain in the genome is not much greater than the time separating the common ancestors of the archaea and bacteria. Deep phylogenetic reconstruction from sequence data will therefore depend on choosing genes likely to remain in the genome for a long time. Phylogenies based on the blocks model are more biologically plausible than phylogenies based on the birth-death model.

  12. Evaluation of the E mu-pim-1 transgenic mouse model for short-term carcinogenicity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kreijl, C. F.; van Oordt, C. W. V.; Kroese, E. D.;

    1998-01-01

    The value of the chronic rodent carcinogenicity assay in adequately predicting cancer risk in humans has become a matter of debate over the past few years. Therefore, more rapid and accurate alternative tests are urgently needed. Transgenic mouse models, those harboring genetic changes that are r......The value of the chronic rodent carcinogenicity assay in adequately predicting cancer risk in humans has become a matter of debate over the past few years. Therefore, more rapid and accurate alternative tests are urgently needed. Transgenic mouse models, those harboring genetic changes...... that are relevant to the multistage cancer process, may provide such alternative tests. Transgenic E mu-pim-1 mice, developed by Berns and coworkers in 1989, contain the pim-1 oncogene, which is expressed at elevated levels in their lymphoid compartments. As a result, these mice are predisposed to the development...

  13. Source apportionment of the carcinogenic potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) associated to airborne PM10 by a PMF model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callén, M S; Iturmendi, A; López, J M; Mastral, A M

    2014-02-01

    In order to perform a study of the carcinogenic potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), benzo(a)pyrene equivalent (BaP-eq) concentration was calculated and modelled by a receptor model based on positive matrix factorization (PMF). Nineteen PAH associated to airborne PM10 of Zaragoza, Spain, were quantified during the sampling period 2001-2009 and used as potential variables by the PMF model. Afterwards, multiple linear regression analysis was used to quantify the potential sources of BaP-eq. Five sources were obtained as the optimal solution and vehicular emission was identified as the main carcinogenic source (35 %) followed by heavy-duty vehicles (28 %), light-oil combustion (18 %), natural gas (10 %) and coal combustion (9 %). Two of the most prevailing directions contributing to this carcinogenic character were the NE and N directions associated with a highway, industrial parks and a paper factory. The lifetime lung cancer risk exceeded the unit risk of 8.7 x 10(-5) per ng/m(3) BaP in both winter and autumn seasons and the most contributing source was the vehicular emission factor becoming an important issue in control strategies. PMID:24022101

  14. Hybrid Model of Content Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qureshi, Pir Abdul Rasool; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    We present a hybrid model for content extraction from HTML documents. The model operates on Document Object Model (DOM) tree of the corresponding HTML document. It evaluates each tree node and associated statistical features like link density and text distribution across the node to predict...... significance of the node towards overall content provided by the document. Once significance of the nodes is determined, the formatting characteristics like fonts, styles and the position of the nodes are evaluated to identify the nodes with similar formatting as compared to the significant nodes. The proposed...... hybrid model is derived from two different models, i.e., one is based on statistical features and other on formatting characteristics and achieved the best accuracy. We describe the validity of model with the help of experiments conducted on the standard data sets. The results revealed that the proposed...

  15. CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN A RAT MODEL OF HEREDITARY RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenicity of Individual and a Mixture of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products in a Rat Model of Hereditary Renal Cell Carcinoma Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 (Tsc2) gene and are ligh...

  16. Evaluation of the Xpa-deficient transgenic mouse model for short-term carcinogenicity testing: 9-month studies with haloperidol, reserpine, phenacetin, and D-mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina, Ben A R; Woutersen, Ruud A; Bruijntjes, Joost P; van Benthem, Jan; van den Berg, Jolanda A H; Monbaliu, Johan; Thoolen, Bob J J M; Beems, Rudolf B; van Kreijl, Coen F

    2004-01-01

    As part of the international evaluation program coordinated by ILSI/HESI, the potential of DNA repair deficient Xpa-/- mice and the double knockout Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice for short term carcinogenicity assays was evaluated. For comparison also wild-type C57BL/6 mice (WT) were included in these studies. Four test compounds were administered to groups of 15 male and 15 female Xpa-/- mice, Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice and WT mice for 39 weeks. The model compounds investigated were haloperidol, reserpine (nongenotoxic rodent carcinogens, putative human noncarcinogens), phenacetin (genotoxic rodent carcinogen, suspected human carcinogen), and D-mannitol (noncarcinogen in rodents and humans). The test compounds were administered as admixture to rodent diet at levels up to 25 mg/kg diet for haloperidol, 7.5 mg/kg diet for reserpine, 0.75% for phenacetin, and 10% for D-mannitol. These levels included the maximum tolerable dose (MTD). Survival was not affected with any of the test compounds. Haloperidol, reserpine and D-mannitol were negative in the carcinogenicity assay with Xpa-/- and Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice, showing low and comparable tumor incidences in controls and high-dose animals. The results obtained with phenacetin may be designated equivocal in Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice, based on the occurrence of a single rare tumor in the target organ (kidney) accompanied by a low incidence of hyperplastic renal lesions and a high incidence of karyomegaly. These results are in agreement with the currently known carcinogenic potential of the 4 test compounds in humans. PMID:15200157

  17. Evaluation of the Xpa-deficient transgenic mouse model for short-term carcinogenicity testing: 9-month studies with haloperidol, reserpine, phenacetin, and D-mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina, Ben A R; Woutersen, Ruud A; Bruijntjes, Joost P; van Benthem, Jan; van den Berg, Jolanda A H; Monbaliu, Johan; Thoolen, Bob J J M; Beems, Rudolf B; van Kreijl, Coen F

    2004-01-01

    As part of the international evaluation program coordinated by ILSI/HESI, the potential of DNA repair deficient Xpa-/- mice and the double knockout Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice for short term carcinogenicity assays was evaluated. For comparison also wild-type C57BL/6 mice (WT) were included in these studies. Four test compounds were administered to groups of 15 male and 15 female Xpa-/- mice, Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice and WT mice for 39 weeks. The model compounds investigated were haloperidol, reserpine (nongenotoxic rodent carcinogens, putative human noncarcinogens), phenacetin (genotoxic rodent carcinogen, suspected human carcinogen), and D-mannitol (noncarcinogen in rodents and humans). The test compounds were administered as admixture to rodent diet at levels up to 25 mg/kg diet for haloperidol, 7.5 mg/kg diet for reserpine, 0.75% for phenacetin, and 10% for D-mannitol. These levels included the maximum tolerable dose (MTD). Survival was not affected with any of the test compounds. Haloperidol, reserpine and D-mannitol were negative in the carcinogenicity assay with Xpa-/- and Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice, showing low and comparable tumor incidences in controls and high-dose animals. The results obtained with phenacetin may be designated equivocal in Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice, based on the occurrence of a single rare tumor in the target organ (kidney) accompanied by a low incidence of hyperplastic renal lesions and a high incidence of karyomegaly. These results are in agreement with the currently known carcinogenic potential of the 4 test compounds in humans.

  18. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens. PMID:27625608

  19. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens. PMID:27625608

  20. Formation and reduction of carcinogenic furan in various model systems containing food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Sil; Her, Jae-Young; Lee, Kwang-Geun

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to analyse and reduce furan in various model systems. Furan model systems consisting of monosaccharides (0.5M glucose and ribose), amino acids (0.5M alanine and serine) and/or 1.0M ascorbic acid were heated at 121°C for 25 min. The effects of food additives (each 0.1M) such as metal ions (iron sulphate, magnesium sulphate, zinc sulphate and calcium sulphate), antioxidants (BHT and BHA), and sodium sulphite on the formation of furan were measured. The level of furan formed in the model systems was 6.8-527.3 ng/ml. The level of furan in the model systems of glucose/serine and glucose/alanine increased 7-674% when food additives were added. In contrast, the level of furan decreased by 18-51% in the Maillard reaction model systems that included ribose and alanine/serine with food additives except zinc sulphate. PMID:26190608

  1. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enara eAguirre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  2. Prophylaxis of Diallyl Disulfide on Skin Carcinogenic Model via p21-dependent Nrf2 stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yunlong; Wei, Zhonghong; Tao, Li; Wang, Siliang; Zhang, Feng; Shen, Cunsi; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Zhaoguo; Zhu, Pingting; Wang, Aiyun; Chen, Wenxing; Lu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer prevention through intake of biologically active natural products appears to be an accessible way to reduce the risk of cancer. Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a major garlic derivative, has exhibited potential role in cancer therapy. The study is aimed to evaluate the prophylactic effect of DADS in chemically induced mouse skin carcinogenesis and investigate the molecular targets mediated by DADS. Two-stage chemically induced carcinogenesis model by cutaneous application of DMBA and subsequent TPA was established to study the prophylactic effect of DADS. As a result, we observed that DADS dose-dependently attenuated skin tumor incidence and multiplicity in the model mice, which was related to the up-regulation of a bunch of antioxidant enzymes activities and the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2. Furthermore, we developed skin carcinogenesis in Nrf2 knockout mice which could reverse the activity of DADS. Finally, we uncovered the underlying mechanism that DADS promoted the endogenous interaction between p21 and Nrf2, which was critical for impairing the Keap1-mediated degradation of Nrf2. Based on the results, we concluded that DADS was a promising cancer chemoprevention agent and suggested a garlic-rich diet might be beneficial to reduce the cancer risk in our daily life. PMID:27759091

  3. Feature Analysis for Modeling Game Content Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2011-01-01

    ’ preferences, and by defining the smallest game session size for which the model can still predict reported emotion with acceptable accuracy. Neuroevolutionary preference learning is used to approximate the function from game content to reported emotional preferences. The experiments are based on a modified......entertainment for individual game players is to tailor player experience in real-time via automatic game content generation. Modeling the relationship between game content and player preferences or affective states is an important step towards this type of game personalization. In this paper we......, and that the models built on selected features derived from the whole set of extracted features (combining the two types of features) outperforms other models constructed on partial information about game content....

  4. Gingerol Reverses the Cancer-Promoting Effect of Capsaicin by Increased TRPV1 Level in a Urethane-Induced Lung Carcinogenic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shengnan; Zheng, Yaqiu; Meng, Mingjing; Guo, Zhenzhen; Cao, Ning; Ma, Xiaofang; Du, Zhenhua; Li, Jiahuan; Duan, Yongjian; Du, Gangjun

    2016-08-10

    Both gingerol and capsaicin are agonists of TRPV1, which can negatively control tumor progression. This study observed the long-term effects of oral administration of 6-gingerol alone or in combination with capsaicin for 20 weeks in a urethane-induced lung carcinogenic model. We showed that lung carcinoma incidence and multiplicity were 70% and 21.2 ± 3.6, respectively, in the control versus 100% and 35.6 ± 5.2 in the capsaicin group (P chili-pepper-rich diets to decrease the risk of cancer development. PMID:27436516

  5. Food derived carcinogenic amnoimidazoazaarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik

    Carcinogenic aminoimidazoazaarenes are formed during cooking of meat and fish. Important factors for the formation of these compounds are meat type, cooking temperature and time. The compounds are genotoxic in bacterial and mammalian cells. In animal feeding studies the compounds tested so far we...... of the exocyclic amino group. Estimations of human cancer risk have indicated that ingestion of food containing aminoimidazoazaarenes are of importance....... found to be multiple organ carcinogens. The aminoimidazoazaarenes are metabolically activated by hydroxylation of the exocyclic aminogroup to the N-hydroxyamino derivative. The resultant proximate mutagens often need further activation by phase II transferases for formation of reactive species that form...

  6. In Silico Methods for Carcinogenicity Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbamaki, Azadi; Benfenati, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Screening compounds for potential carcinogenicity is of major importance for prevention of environmentally induced cancers. A large sequence of alternative predictive models, ranging from short-term biological assays (e.g. mutagenicity tests) to theoretical models, have been attempted in this field. Theoretical approaches such as (Q)SAR are highly desirable for identifying carcinogens, since they actively promote the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal tests. This chapter reports and describes some of the most noted (Q)SAR models based on the human expert knowledge and statistically approach, aiming at predicting the carcinogenicity of chemicals. Additionally, the performance of the selected models has been evaluated and the results are interpreted in details by applying these prediction models to some pharmaceutical molecules.

  7. Procedural Content Graphs for Urban Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Brandão Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive procedural content creation, for example, for virtual urban environments, is a difficult, yet important challenge. While shape grammars are a popular example of effectiveness in architectural modeling, they have clear limitations regarding readability, manageability, and expressive power when addressing a variety of complex structural designs. Moreover, shape grammars aim at geometry specification and do not facilitate integration with other types of content, such as textures or light sources, which could rather accompany the generation process. We present procedural content graphs, a graph-based solution for procedural generation that addresses all these issues in a visual, flexible, and more expressive manner. Besides integrating handling of diverse types of content, this approach introduces collective entity manipulation as lists, seamlessly providing features such as advanced filtering, grouping, merging, ordering, and aggregation, essentially unavailable in shape grammars. Hereby, separated entities can be easily merged or just analyzed together in order to perform a variety of context-based decisions and operations. The advantages of this approach are illustrated via examples of tasks that are either very cumbersome or simply impossible to express with previous grammar approaches.

  8. Carcinogen risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the methods by which risk factors for carcinogenic hazards are determined and the limitations inherent in the process. From statistical and epidemiological studies, the major identifiable factors related to cancer in the United States were determined to be cigarette smoking, diet, reproductive and sexual behavior, infections, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, and alcohol consumption. The incidence of lung cancer due to air pollutants was estimated to be less than 2%. Research needs were discussed

  9. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  10. Chemistry of carcinogenic metals.

    OpenAIRE

    Martell, A E

    1981-01-01

    The periodic distribution of known and suspected carcinogenic metal ions is described, and the chemical behavior of various types of metal ions is explained in terms of the general theory of hard and soft acids and bases. The chelate effect is elucidated, and the relatively high stability of metal chelates in very dilute solutions is discussed. The concepts employed for the chelate effect are extended to explain the high stabilities of macrocyclic and cryptate complexes. Procedures for the us...

  11. Business model scenarios for seamless content distribution and delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wehn de Montalvo, U.W.C.; Ballon, P.J.P.; Sokol, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of feasible business models for seamless multimedia content distribution and delivery over mobile, wireless and fixed networks. An open, interlayer approach to content delivery networks sets the scene for a great deal of flexibility in the value network for content dis

  12. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Wanibuchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, a-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  13. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0015 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P{sub 450} inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  14. Substitution of carcinogenic solvent dichloromethane for the extraction of volatile compounds in a fat-free model food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayot, Nathalie; Lafarge, Céline; Bou-Maroun, Elias; Cayot, Philippe

    2016-07-22

    Dichloromethane is known as a very efficient solvent, but, as other halogenated solvents, is recognized as a hazardous product (CMR substance). The objective of the present work is to propose substitution solvent for the extraction of volatile compounds. The most important physico-chemical parameters in the choice of an appropriate extraction solvent of volatile compounds are reviewed. Various solvents are selected on this basis and on their hazard characteristics. The selected solvents, safer than dichloromethane, are compared using the extraction efficiency of volatile compounds from a model food product able to interact with volatile compounds. Volatile compounds with different hydrophobicity are used. High extraction yields were positively correlated with high boiling points and high Log Kow values of volatile compounds. Mixtures of solvents such as azeotrope propan-2-one/cyclopentane, azeotrope ethyl acetate/ethanol, and mixture ethyl acetate/ethanol (3:1, v/v) gave higher extraction yields than those obtained with dichloromethane.

  15. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism for studying the carcinogenicity of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields and radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voĭchuk, S I

    2014-01-01

    Medical and biological aspects of the effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic (EM) fields and radiation on human health are the important issues that have arisen as a result of anthropogenic impact on the biosphere. Safe use of man-made sources of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields and radiation in a broad range of frequencies--static, radio-frequency and microwave--is a subject of discussions and speculations. The main problem is the lack of understanding of the mechanism(s) of reception of EMFs by living organisms. In this review we have analyzed the existing literature data regarding the effects of the electromagnetic radiation on the model eukaryotic organism--yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An attempt was made to estimate the probability of induction of carcinogenesis in humans under the influence of magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation of extremely low frequency, radio frequency and microwave ranges.

  16. Effects at exposure to low doses of ionising radiation. Carcinogenic effect - validity of the linear no-threshold model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers the validity of the linear no-threshold model (LNT) for estimating the risk related to low (below 200 mSv) and very low (below 10 mSv) doses. LNT was launched in the early 60s aiming mainly at data registering and radiation protection (RP) measures, since it allows the estimation of the risk just by summing all radiation exposures regardless of the dose and dose rates. In 1965 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) stated its position: 'As the existence of a threshold dose is unknown it has been assumed that even the smallest doses involve a proportionately small risk of induction of malignancies. Also, because of the lack of knowledge of the nature of the dose-effect relationship in the induction of malignancies in man - particularly at the dose levels which are relevant in radiological protection - the Commission sees no practical alternative, for the purposes of radiological protection, to assuming non-linear relationship between dose and effect, and that doses act cumulatively. The Commission is aware that the assumptions of no-threshold and of complete ditivity of all doses, but is satisfied that they are unlikely to lead to the underestimation of risks'. In the end of the 70s the discovery of oncogenes was interpreted as a scientific basis of this hypothesis, since only one mutation can transform a proto-oncogene into an oncogene. Meanwhile, LNT validity was questioned by many radiobiologists. The doubts were related to the scientific basis of LNT especially as regards very low doses. This debate is of great importance because the major aim of radiation protection is to estimate the risk related to doses of the order of few mSv, and these are the doses which are received in most of the medical examinations and which are comparable to values from the natural radiation background

  17. Model primary content type for multipurpose internet mail extensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.; Parks, C.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this memo is to propose an update to Internet RFC 2045 to include a new primary content-type to be known as `model`. RFC 2045 [1] describes mechanisms for specifying and describing the format of Internet Message Bodies via content-type/subtype pairs. We believe that `model` defines a fundamental type of content with unique presentational, hardware, and processing aspects. Various subtypes of this primary type are immediately anticipated but will be covered under separate documents.

  18. A conceptual model for local content development in petroleum industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Kazzazi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel concept, local content, in oil industry is gradually emerging. Local content should be defined in terms of value addition in local country (by local staff, local materials, local services and facilities rather than in terms of ownership of the company performing the value added activities. Many oil exporting countries have taken a positive approach toward local content development to maximize the benefits from oil and gas extraction. The purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual model for local content development in petroleum industry. Local content can generally be defined in terms of the ownership and/ or location of the enterprises involved in production and/ or the value-added in the production process. Local content promotion will have to vary significantly between countries, depending on the current status of their economic, political and social development. This model is useful for state governments to consider all aspects and factors affecting local content development generally. Local content development outcomes are economic growth, industrial growth and spillover effects. The paper begins with examining the factors accommodated in literature believed to influence the local content promotion. Based on our review, the conceptual model derived includes key factors of local content that evaluate local content development, and examine interrelations between local policies, local infrastructure, local environment, and local capability.

  19. Modeling soil water content for vegetation modeling improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfrani, Carmen; Buri, Aline; Zingg, Barbara; Vittoz, Pascal; Verrecchia, Eric; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is known to be important for plants as it affects the physiological processes regulating plant growth. Therefore, SWC controls plant distribution over the Earth surface, ranging from deserts and grassland to rain forests. Unfortunately, only a few data on SWC are available as its measurement is very time consuming and costly and needs specific laboratory tools. The scarcity of SWC measurements in geographic space makes it difficult to model and spatially project SWC over larger areas. In particular, it prevents its inclusion in plant species distribution model (SDMs) as predictor. The aims of this study were, first, to test a new methodology allowing problems of the scarcity of SWC measurements to be overpassed and second, to model and spatially project SWC in order to improve plant SDMs with the inclusion of SWC parameter. The study was developed in four steps. First, SWC was modeled by measuring it at 10 different pressures (expressed in pF and ranging from pF=0 to pF=4.2). The different pF represent different degrees of soil water availability for plants. An ensemble of bivariate models was built to overpass the problem of having only a few SWC measurements (n = 24) but several predictors to include in the model. Soil texture (clay, silt, sand), organic matter (OM), topographic variables (elevation, aspect, convexity), climatic variables (precipitation) and hydrological variables (river distance, NDWI) were used as predictors. Weighted ensemble models were built using only bivariate models with adjusted-R2 > 0.5 for each SWC at different pF. The second step consisted in running plant SDMs including modeled SWC jointly with the conventional topo-climatic variable used for plant SDMs. Third, SDMs were only run using the conventional topo-climatic variables. Finally, comparing the models obtained in the second and third steps allowed assessing the additional predictive power of SWC in plant SDMs. SWC ensemble models remained very good, with

  20. Evaluation of the Xpa-Deficient Transgenic Mouse Model for Short-Term Carcinogenicity Testing: 9-Month Studies with Haloperidol, Reserpine, Phenacetin, and D-Mannitol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Woutersen, R.A.; Bruijntjes, J.P.; Benthem, J. van; Berg, J.A.H. van den; Monbaliu, J.; Thoolen, B.J.J.M.; Beems, R.B.; Kreijl, C.F. van

    2004-01-01

    As part of the international evaluation program coordinated by ILSI/HESI, the potential of DNA repair deficient Xpa-/- mice and the double knockout Xpa-/-.p53+/- mice for short term carcinogenicity assays was evaluated. For comparison also wild-type C57BL/6 mice (WT) were included in these studies.

  1. Finding transcriptomics biomarkers for in vivo identification of (non-)genotoxic carcinogens using wild-type and Xpa/p53 mutant mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Jonker; O. Bruning; M. van Iterson; M.M. Schaap; T.V. van der Hoeven; H. Vrieling; R.B. Beems; A. de Vries; H. van Steeg; T.M. Breit; M. Luijten

    2009-01-01

    The carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceuticals is traditionally tested in the chronic, 2 year rodent bioassay. This assay is not only time consuming, expensive and often with a limited sensitivity and specificity but it also causes major distress to the experimental animals. A major imp

  2. Mode-of-Action Uncertainty for Dual-Mode Carcinogens: A Bounding Approach for Naphthalene-Induced Nasal Tumors in Rats Based on PBPK and 2-Stage Stochastic Cancer Risk Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K T

    2007-05-11

    A relatively simple, quantitative approach is proposed to address a specific, important gap in the appr approach recommended by the USEPA Guidelines for Cancer Risk Assessment to oach address uncertainty in carcinogenic mode of action of certain chemicals when risk is extrapolated from bioassay data. These Guidelines recognize that some chemical carcinogens may have a site-specific mode of action (MOA) that is dual, involving mutation in addition to cell-killing induced hyperplasia. Although genotoxicity may contribute to increased risk at all doses, the Guidelines imply that for dual MOA (DMOA) carcinogens, judgment be used to compare and assess results obtained using separate 'linear' (genotoxic) vs. 'nonlinear' (nongenotoxic) approaches to low low-level risk extrapolation. However, the Guidelines allow the latter approach to be used only when evidence is sufficient t to parameterize a biologically based model that reliably o extrapolates risk to low levels of concern. The Guidelines thus effectively prevent MOA uncertainty from being characterized and addressed when data are insufficient to parameterize such a model, but otherwise clearly support a DMOA. A bounding factor approach - similar to that used in reference dose procedures for classic toxicity endpoints - can address MOA uncertainty in a way that avoids explicit modeling of low low-dose risk as a function of administere administered or internal dose. Even when a 'nonlinear' toxicokinetic model cannot be fully validated, implications of DMOA uncertainty on low low-dose risk may be bounded with reasonable confidence when target tumor types happen to be extremely rare. This concept was i illustrated llustrated for a likely DMOA rodent carcinogen naphthalene, specifically to the issue of risk extrapolation from bioassay data on naphthalene naphthalene-induced nasal tumors in rats. Bioassay data, supplemental toxicokinetic data, and related physiologically based p

  3. Mode-of-Action Uncertainty for Dual-Mode Carcinogens:Lower Bounds for Naphthalene-Induced Nasal Tumors in Rats Implied byPBPK and 2-Stage Stochastic Cancer Risk Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K T

    2007-01-30

    As reflected in the 2005 USEPA Guidelines for Cancer Risk Assessment, some chemical carcinogens may have a site-specific mode of action (MOA) that is dual, involving mutation in addition to cell-killing induced hyperplasia. Although genotoxicity may contribute to increased risk at all doses, the Guidelines imply that for dual MOA (DMOA) carcinogens, judgment be used to compare and assess results obtained using separate ''linear'' (genotoxic) vs. ''nonlinear'' (nongenotoxic) approaches to low-level risk extrapolation. However, the Guidelines allow the latter approach to be used only when evidence is sufficient to parameterize a biologically based model that reliably extrapolates risk to low levels of concern. The Guidelines thus effectively prevent MOA uncertainty from being characterized and addressed when data are insufficient to parameterize such a model, but otherwise clearly support a DMOA. A bounding factor approach--similar to that used in reference dose procedures for classic toxicity endpoints--can address MOA uncertainty in a way that avoids explicit modeling of low-dose risk as a function of administered or internal dose. Even when a ''nonlinear'' toxicokinetic model cannot be fully validated, implications of DMOA uncertainty on low-dose risk may be bounded with reasonable confidence when target tumor types happen to be extremely rare. This concept was illustrated for the rodent carcinogen naphthalene. Bioassay data, supplemental toxicokinetic data, and related physiologically based pharmacokinetic and 2-stage stochastic carcinogenesis modeling results all clearly indicate that naphthalene is a DMOA carcinogen. Plausibility bounds on rat-tumor-type specific DMOA-related uncertainty were obtained using a 2-stage model adapted to reflect the empirical link between genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the most potent identified genotoxic naphthalene metabolites, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone. Resulting

  4. Statistical models of video structure for content analysis and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, N; Lippman, A

    2000-01-01

    Content structure plays an important role in the understanding of video. In this paper, we argue that knowledge about structure can be used both as a means to improve the performance of content analysis and to extract features that convey semantic information about the content. We introduce statistical models for two important components of this structure, shot duration and activity, and demonstrate the usefulness of these models with two practical applications. First, we develop a Bayesian formulation for the shot segmentation problem that is shown to extend the standard thresholding model in an adaptive and intuitive way, leading to improved segmentation accuracy. Second, by applying the transformation into the shot duration/activity feature space to a database of movie clips, we also illustrate how the Bayesian model captures semantic properties of the content. We suggest ways in which these properties can be used as a basis for intuitive content-based access to movie libraries.

  5. Impact and compliance: OSHA Carcinogen Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.F. Jr.; Crowder, C.; Wisniewski, S.; Russell, T.; Senn, K.

    1980-06-26

    This document provides an examination of various aspects of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)Carcinogen Policy. To satisfy the dimensions of the Policy's broad, general nature, a two-fold approach was taken. Throughout, the focus is on the possible effects of the Policy's implementation, but this is first approached as it generally will effect research and compliance activities across broad industry sectors, while specific impacts on DOE are addressed separately. To overview and integrate these approaches, and to provide a quick reference for further information, an outline of information is presented. General or industry-wide applications are addressed both in the Summary and Overview of the Policy (Chapters I and II) and in the discussion of the Model Standard (Chapter V). Also included is a copy of the Policy itself in the General Industry Standards and interpretations Change 10. Sections specifically addressed to the major concerns of DOE and its contractors are a discussion of implications for action regarding the synthetic fuels program, a comparison of the OSHA Model Regulations and the FE OSH Manual Standards for Carcinogens, and finally, a list of known carcinogens in coal gasification/liquefaction. Together, these elements illustrate the broad scope of the policy's impact, which economic and other constraining consequences begin to become visible. Measures to minimize these consequences are a common underlying theme to each of the sections.

  6. Business model issues in the development of digital cultural content

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, Gerry

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines business model aspects of digitizing cultural content. It is based in large part on a Study conducted by the author and his colleagues for the Department of Canadian Heritage. Based on data collected from several cultural institutions regarding their efforts to digitize content, the study found that implications for the cost side have been significant, leading to explorations of facilities and content sharing programs, formalized budgeting, the need for better copyright ex...

  7. Carcinogenicity of hair dye components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duuren, B L

    1980-03-01

    The available animal carcinogenicity data on hair dye components was reviewed. From this review it became clear that certain hair dye components, some of which are still in hair dye formulations now on the market, are animal carcinogens. The compounds of concern that are still in use are: 3-amino-4-methoxyaniline, 2-nitro-4-aminoaniline and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyaniline. Certain azo dyes formerly used, and related compounds still in use, contain the benzidine moiety. Two of these compounds, Direct Blue 6 and Direct Black 38, have been shown to be metabolized in animals to the human carcinogen benzidine. Furthermore, skin absorption studies carried out with radiolabeled hair dye components applied to animal or human skin have conclusively shown that these compounds are systemically absorbed and excreted. Known cocarcinogens such as catechol and pyrogallol, which enhance benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenicity on mouse skin, are used as hair dye components. It is not known whether such compounds will enhance the carcinogenicity of substituted aniline hair dye chemicals. The available epidemiologic data are not sufficient to link hair dye use with an increased incidence in human cancer.

  8. Content-based network model with duplication and divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengün, Yasemin; Erzan, Ayşe

    2006-06-01

    We construct a minimal content-based realization of the duplication and divergence model of genomic networks introduced by Wagner [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 91 (1994) 4387] and investigate the scaling properties of the directed degree distribution and clustering coefficient. We find that the content-based network exhibits crossover between two scaling regimes, with log-periodic oscillations for large degrees. These features are not present in the original gene duplication model, but inherent in the content-based model of Balcan and Erzan. The scaling form of the degree distribution of the content-based model turns out to be robust under duplication and divergence, with some re-adjustment of the scaling exponents, while the out-clustering coefficient goes over from a weak power-law dependence on the degree, to an exponential decay under mutations which include splitting and merging of strings.

  9. Simulation Model for OBS Contention Avoidance Routing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, Alvaro L.; Do Carmo R. Medeiros, Maria

    Optical burst switching (OBS) provides a feasible paradigm for the next IP over optical network backbones. However, due to its bufferless nature, OBS efficiency can be reduced by resource contention leading to burst loss. Several methods have been proposed to address this problem, most of them relying on reactive mechanisms which increase the complexity of core nodes, hampering scalability. In this work we consider a preventive traffic engineering approach for contention resolution which provides source routing with the objective of minimizing contention at the transmission links considering only topological information. This paper presents a simulation model aimed at the evaluation of different offline routing strategies in terms of burst contention. The simulation model is used to compare the performance of different novel path selection strategies with the traditional shortest path routing approach. Results confirm that the proposed strategies are effective in reducing the overall blocking and the model is feasible for the proposed QoS evaluation.

  10. Critical analysis of carcinogenicity study outcomes. Relationship with pharmacological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Kasper, Peter; Silva Lima, Beatriz; Jones, David R; Pasanen, Markku

    2016-08-01

    Predicting the outcome of life-time carcinogenicity studies in rats based on chronic (6-month) toxicity studies in this species is possible in some instances. This should reduce the number of such studies and hence have a significant impact on the total number of animals used in safety assessment of new medicines. From a regulatory perspective, this should be sufficient to grant a waiver for a carcinogenicity study in those cases where there is confidence in the outcome of the prediction. Pharmacological properties are a frequent key factor for the carcinogenic mode of action of some pharmaceuticals, but data-analysis on a large dataset has never been formally conducted. We have conducted an analysis of a dataset based on the perspective of the pharmacology of 255 compounds from industrial and regulatory sources. It is proposed that a pharmacological, class-specific, model may consist of an overall causal relationship between the pharmacological class and the histopathology findings in rats after 6 months treatment, leading to carcinogenicity outcome after 2 years. Knowledge of the intended drug target and pathway pharmacology should enhance the prediction of either positive or negative outcomes of rat carcinogenicity studies. The goal of this analysis is to review the pharmacological properties of compounds together with the histopathology findings from the chronic toxicity study in rodents in order to introduce an integrated approach to estimate the risk of human carcinogenicity of pharmaceuticals. This approach would allow scientists to define conditions under which 2-year rat carcinogenicity studies will or will not add value to such an assessment. We have demonstrated the possibility of a regulatory waiver for a carcinogenicity study in rats, as currently discussed in the International Council for Harmonization (ICH) - formerly known as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH), by applying the proposed prediction approach in a number of case studies

  11. Designer Modeling for Personalized Game Content Creation Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2013-01-01

    With the growing use of automated content creation and computer-aided design tools in game development, there is potential for enhancing the design process through personalized interactions between the software and the game developer. This paper proposes designer modeling for capturing the designer’s...... preferences, goals and processes from their interaction with a computer-aided design tool, and suggests methods and domains within game development where such a model can be applied. We describe how designer modeling could be integrated with current work on automated and mixed-initiative content creation......, and envision future directions which focus on personalizing the processes to a designer’s particular wishes....

  12. Fedora Content Modelling for Improved Services for Research Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbæk, Mikael Karstensen; Heller, Alfred; Pedersen, Gert Schmeltz

    A re-implementation of the research database of the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, is based on Fedora. The backbone consists of content models for primary and secondary entities and their relationships, giving flexible and powerful extraction capabilities for interoperability and reporting....... By adopting such an abstract data model, the platform enables new and improved services for researchers, librarians and administrators....

  13. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...... a theoretical approach, which takes complexity as fundamental premise for modern society (Luhmann, 1985, 2002). In educational situations conditionally valuable content generally will exceed what can actually be taught within the frames of an education. In pedagogy this situation is often referred...... to as ‘abundance of material’, and in many cases it is not obvious, how the line between actually chosen and conditionally relevant content can be draw. Difficulties in drawing the line between actual educational content and conditionally relevant content can be handled in different way. One way, quite efficient...

  14. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclophosphamide is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B1 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a).Evidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient," and the evidence from human studies is "...

  15. Content Linking for UGC based on Word Embedding Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiao Gao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are huge amounts of User Generated Contents (UGCs consisting of authors’ articles of different themes and readers’ on-line comments on social networks every day. Generally, an article often gives rise to thousands of readers’ comments, which are related to specific points of the originally published article or previous comments. Hence it has suggested the urgent need for automated methods to implement the content linking task, which can also help other related applications, such as information retrieval, summarization and content management. So far content linking is still a relatively new issue. Because of the unsatisfactory of traditional ways based on feature extraction, we look forward to using deeper textual semantic analysis. The Word Embedding model based on deep learning has performed well in Natural Language Processing (NLP, especially in mining deep semantic information recently. Therefore, we study further on the Word Embedding model trained by different neural network models from which we can learn the structure, principles and training ways of the neural network language model in more depth to complete deep semantic feature extraction. With the aid of the semantic features, we expect to do further research on content linking between comments and their original articles from social networks, and finally verify the validity of the proposed method by comparison with traditional ways based on feature extraction.

  16. Determination of potentially carcinogenic compounds in food : trace analysis of vinylchloride, vinylidenechloride, acrylonitrile, epichlorohydrin and diethylpyrocarbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lierop, van J.B.H.

    1979-01-01

    Toxicological evidence shows that some monomers present in packaging materials may be carcinogenic. These monomers, notably vinylchloride, vinylidenechloride, acrylonitrile and epichlorohydrin, may migrate from the packaging material into the food. Therefore, severe limits are set to the contents of

  17. A personalized web page content filtering model based on segmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Kuppusamy, K S; 10.5121/ijist.2012.2104

    2012-01-01

    In the view of massive content explosion in World Wide Web through diverse sources, it has become mandatory to have content filtering tools. The filtering of contents of the web pages holds greater significance in cases of access by minor-age people. The traditional web page blocking systems goes by the Boolean methodology of either displaying the full page or blocking it completely. With the increased dynamism in the web pages, it has become a common phenomenon that different portions of the web page holds different types of content at different time instances. This paper proposes a model to block the contents at a fine-grained level i.e. instead of completely blocking the page it would be efficient to block only those segments which holds the contents to be blocked. The advantages of this method over the traditional methods are fine-graining level of blocking and automatic identification of portions of the page to be blocked. The experiments conducted on the proposed model indicate 88% of accuracy in filter...

  18. Nucleon Spin Content in a Relativistic Quark Potential Model Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG YuBing; FENG QingGuo

    2002-01-01

    Based on a relativistic quark model approach with an effective potential U(r) = (ac/2)(1 + γ0)r2, the spin content of the nucleon is investigated. Pseudo-scalar interaction between quarks and Goldstone bosons is employed to calculate the couplings between the Goldstone bosons and the nucleon. Different approaches to deal with the center of mass correction in the relativistic quark potential model approach are discussed.

  19. Carcinogenicity/tumour promotion by NDL PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) belong to the group of persistent environmental pollutants exhibiting neurotoxic, teratogenic and tumour-promoting effects in experimental animal models. PCB congeners can be divided into 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners on the basis of their ability to act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Like the most toxic dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 'dioxinlike' PCBs bind to the AhR and show characteristic effects on the expression of AhR-regulated genes including the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. On the other hand, 'non-dioxinlike' PCB congeners have a lower or no binding affinity to the AhR, but exhibit a 'phenobarbital-type' induction of CYP 2B1/2 activity. A carcinogenic potential of PCBs has been demonstrated with technical mixtures such as Aroclors or Clophens. In these studies the liver and the thyroid gland were found to be the principal target organs of PCB-mediated carcinogenesis in rodents. No studies have been published, however, on the carcinogenicity of individual congeners. In two-stage initiation-promotion protocols in rats, both technical mixtures and individual 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners were reported to act as liver tumour promoters.

  20. Inverse modeling of GPR signal for estimating soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambot, S.; van den Bosch, I.; Slob, E. C.; Stockbroeckx, B.; Scheers, B.; Vanclooster, M.

    2003-04-01

    For a large variety of environmental and agricultural applications, the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) for identifying soil water content is a matter of concern. However, the current state of technology still needs improvements and new developments. Research has focused on the development of an integrated inverse modeling approach including GPR design, GPR signal forward modeling, and GPR signal inversion to estimate simultaneously the depth dependent dielectric constant and electrical conductivity of the shallow subsurface. We propose to use as radar system a stepped frequency continuous wave radar with an ultrawide band dielectric filled TEM horn antenna used in monostatic mode. This configuration is appropriate for real time mapping and allows for a more realistic forward modeling of the radar-antenna-soil system. Forward modeling was based on the exact solution of Maxwell's equations and inversion was formulated by the classical least square problem. Given the inherent complex topography of the objective functions to optimize in electromagnetic inversion problems, we used for the inversion the recently developed global multilevel coordinate search algorithm that we combine sequentially with the local Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. We applied the method in laboratory conditions on tank filled with sand subject to different water content levels considering a homogeneous water profile. The inverse estimation of the soil dielectric constant was remarkably well in accordance with each water content level and the corresponding theoretical values of the dielectric constant for the sand. Comparison of GPR measurements with estimations from time domain reflectometry (TDR) were also well in close agreement.

  1. Flavor content of the nucleon in an unquenched quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the flavor content of the nucleon in an unquenched quark model in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs (up, down and strange) are taken into account in an explicit form. It is shown that the inclusion of quark-antiquark pairs leads to an excess of anti-d over anti-u quarks in the proton and to a large contribution of orbital angular momentum to the spin of the proton.

  2. MOOCs in universities: intelligent model for delivering online learning content

    OpenAIRE

    Sammour, George; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Gladun, Anatoly; Khala, Katerina; Schreurs, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    - A massive open online course (MOOC) is a model for delivering learning content online to any person who wants to take a course, with no conditions on attendance. Unlike traditional courses, MOOCs require additional skills, provided by videographers, instructional designers, IT specialists and platform specialists. Over the past few years several Universities facilitated partnership with MOOCs providers and are building MOOC courses, to serve as e-Iearning versions of...

  3. The in vivo rodent test systems for assessment of carcinogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Jan-Willem; Spindler, Per

    2002-01-01

    mouse models, the RasH2 and Tg.AC transgenic mouse models, and the neonatal mouse model. The "ICH Guideline S1B on Testing for Carcinogenicity of Pharmaceuticals" advocates that carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals, when needed, might be carried out choosing one 2-year rodent carcinogenicity study...... (rat) plus one other study that supplements the 2-year study and providing additional information that is not readily available from the 2-year study: either (1) a short- or medium-term in vivo rodent test system or (2) a 2-year carcinogenicity study in a second rodent species (mouse). Another topic of...... end of 2001. The use of the short- and medium-term rodent test systems were not considered appropriate for the assessment of carcinogenic potential of biotechnology-derived medicinal products....

  4. A Network Contention Model for the Extreme-scale Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Naughton III, Thomas J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) is a performance investigation toolkit for high-performance computing (HPC) hardware/software co-design. It permits running a HPC application with millions of concurrent execution threads, while observing its performance in a simulated extreme-scale system. This paper details a newly developed network modeling feature for xSim, eliminating the shortcomings of the existing network modeling capabilities. The approach takes a different path for implementing network contention and bandwidth capacity modeling using a less synchronous and accurate enough model design. With the new network modeling feature, xSim is able to simulate on-chip and on-node networks with reasonable accuracy and overheads.

  5. CONTENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The Development and Evolution of the Idea of the Mandate of Heaven in the Zhou Dynasty The changes in the idea of Mandate of Heaven during the Shang and Zhou dynasties are of great significance in the course of the development of traditional Chinese culture. The quickening and awakening of the humanistic spirit was not the entire content of the Zhou idea of Mandate of Heaven. In the process of annihilating the Shang dynasty and setting up their state, the Zhou propagated the idea of the Mandate of Heaven out of practical needs. Their idea of the Mandate of Heaven was not very different from that of the Shang. From the Western Zhou on, the Zhou idea of Mandate of Heaven by no means developed in a linear way along a rational track. The intermingling of rationality and irrationality and of awakening and non-awakening remained the overall state of the Zhou intellectual superstructure after their "spiritual awakening".

  6. A threshold model of content knowledge transfer for socioscientific argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Troy D.; Fowler, Samantha R.

    2006-11-01

    This study explores how individuals make use of scientific content knowledge for socioscientific argumentation. More specifically, this mixed-methods study investigates how learners apply genetics content knowledge as they justify claims relative to genetic engineering. Interviews are conducted with 45 participants, representing three distinct groups: high school students with variable genetics knowledge, college nonscience majors with little genetics knowledge, and college science majors with advanced genetics knowledge. During the interviews, participants advance positions concerning three scenarios dealing with gene therapy and cloning. Arguments are assessed in terms of the number of justifications offered as well as justification quality, based on a five-point rubric. Multivariate analysis of variance results indicate that college science majors outperformed the other groups in terms of justification quality and frequency. Argumentation does not differ among nonscience majors or high school students. Follow-up qualitative analyses of interview responses suggest that all three groups tend to focus on similar, sociomoral themes as they negotiate socially complex, genetic engineering issues, but that the science majors frequently reference specific science content knowledge in the justification of their claims. Results support the Threshold Model of Content Knowledge Transfer, which proposes two knowledge thresholds around which argumentation quality can reasonably be expected to increase. Research and educational implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Computer Modeling of Violent Intent: A Content Analysis Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Mcgrath, Liam R.; Bell, Eric B.

    2014-01-03

    We present a computational approach to modeling the intent of a communication source representing a group or an individual to engage in violent behavior. Our aim is to identify and rank aspects of radical rhetoric that are endogenously related to violent intent to predict the potential for violence as encoded in written or spoken language. We use correlations between contentious rhetoric and the propensity for violent behavior found in documents from radical terrorist and non-terrorist groups and individuals to train and evaluate models of violent intent. We then apply these models to unseen instances of linguistic behavior to detect signs of contention that have a positive correlation with violent intent factors. Of particular interest is the application of violent intent models to social media, such as Twitter, that have proved to serve as effective channels in furthering sociopolitical change.

  8. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  9. Modelling of DMNB Content for Marked Plastic Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Sinha

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB has been internationally accepted as an additive forthe purpose of marking, as it has desired vapour pressure for reliable detection. It is reportedto be compatible with known explosive formulations and has a good shelf life. Explosivecompositions with DMNB as marking agent can be detected in the temperature range –20 ºC to+ 50 ºC. This paper describes modelling for quantifying activation energy for depletion of  DMNBin the marked explosives, period for definite detection of the marked explosives and optimuminitial concentration needed for the detection of DMNB content in the marked  plastic explosives.

  10. 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzenes: carcinogenicities and reductive cleavage by microsomal azo reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooy, J P; Koffman, B M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four 4-dimethylaminoazobenzenes (DABs) in which systematic structural modifications have been made in the prime ring have been studied for substrate specificity for microsomal azo reductase. The DABs were also evaluated for carcinogenicity and it was found that there was no correlation between carcinogenicity and extent of azo bond cleavage by azo reductase. While any substituent in the prime ring reduces the rate of cleavage of the azo bond relative to the unsubstituted dye, there is a correlation between substituent size and susceptibility to the enzyme. Substituent size was also found to be a significant factor in the induction of hepatomas by the dyes. Preliminary studies have shown that there appears to be a positive correlation between microsomal riboflavin content and the activity of the azo reductase.

  11. Micro-total envelope system with silicon nanowire separator for safe carcinogenic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Ko, Dong-Hyeon; Vishwakarma, Niraj K; Jang, Seungwook; Min, Kyoung-Ik; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Exploration and expansion of the chemistries involving toxic or carcinogenic reagents are severely limited by the health hazards their presence poses. Here, we present a micro-total envelope system (μ-TES) and an automated total process for the generation of the carcinogenic reagent, its purification and its utilization for a desired synthesis that is totally enveloped from being exposed to the carcinogen. A unique microseparator is developed on the basis of SiNWs structure to replace the usual exposure-prone distillation in separating the generated reagent. Chloromethyl methyl ether chemistry is explored as a carcinogenic model in demonstrating the efficiency of the μ-TES that is fully automated so that feeding the ingredients for the generation is all it takes to produce the desired product. Syntheses taking days can be accomplished safely in minutes with excellent yields, which bodes well for elevating the carcinogenic chemistry to new unexplored dimensions. PMID:26916423

  12. Micro-total envelope system with silicon nanowire separator for safe carcinogenic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K.; Ko, Dong-Hyeon; Vishwakarma, Niraj K.; Jang, Seungwook; Min, Kyoung-Ik; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Exploration and expansion of the chemistries involving toxic or carcinogenic reagents are severely limited by the health hazards their presence poses. Here, we present a micro-total envelope system (μ-TES) and an automated total process for the generation of the carcinogenic reagent, its purification and its utilization for a desired synthesis that is totally enveloped from being exposed to the carcinogen. A unique microseparator is developed on the basis of SiNWs structure to replace the usual exposure-prone distillation in separating the generated reagent. Chloromethyl methyl ether chemistry is explored as a carcinogenic model in demonstrating the efficiency of the μ-TES that is fully automated so that feeding the ingredients for the generation is all it takes to produce the desired product. Syntheses taking days can be accomplished safely in minutes with excellent yields, which bodes well for elevating the carcinogenic chemistry to new unexplored dimensions. PMID:26916423

  13. 依据QSAR建立化学致癌物预测TD50的计算模型%A computing model based on QSAR to predict the chemical carcinogen TD50

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李科; 邢立国; 宋宏宇; 王捷

    2011-01-01

    Objective To build a kind of computer predicting model to predict the chemical carcinogen TDW. Methods Building the training sets and the validation sets of the model by using Carcinogenic Potency Database and on the basis of QSAR method. Then performing analysis and calculations on the molecule structures in the training sets. By using bond adjacent matrix of molecules as the calculation basis, the arithmetic convert the atom property weight adjacent bond to the bond weight through calculating formula and list it in the bond adjacent matrix as the weight of the bond, then calculate k-order (O^I^lS) of the matrix, and then calculate the spectral moments of the matrix . Finally by using multiple regression analysis, establishing regression equation with the data of TDH of the compounds in CPDB as dependent variable and the spectral moments as independent variable and then testing the results by using the data in the validation sets. Results In the statistical parameter of the regression equation established by using data in training sets, deciding coefficient r is 0.93524548,and the result of the significance test F is 33.73586. As to the data in validation sets, observations and predictive values of the model are generally in the 95% confidential interval. Conclusion The computer model obtained by this method can comparatively correctly tally with the data in CPDB, and thus provide a feasible method to predict chemical toxicity.%目的 建立一种预测化学致癌物TD50的计算机预测模型.方法 以定量构效关系( QSAR)方法为基础,利用CPDB( Carcinogenic Potency Database)数据库建立模型的训练集和验证集,通过对训练集中分子结构的解析和计算,以分子的键邻接矩阵作为计算基础,将与键邻接的原子性质分量通过计算公式转换为键的分量,并作为键的权值列入键邻接矩阵中,然后计算该矩阵的k次幂(0≤k≤15),进而计算出这些矩阵的谱矩(即矩阵的迹).最后利用多元

  14. Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food requires knowledge of the extent of DNA damage in the target organ which results from the competition between DNA adduct formation and repair. Estimates of DNA adduct levels can be made by direct measurement or indirectly as a consequence of their presence, for example, by tumor formation in animal models or exposed populations epidemiologically. Food-borne DNA-reactive carcinogens are present from a variety of sources. They are generally not intrinsically DNA-reactive but require bioactivation to DNA-reactive metabolites a process which may be modulated by the compound itself or the presence of other xenobiotics. A single DNA reactant may form several distinct DNA adducts each undergoing different rates of repair. Some DNA reactants may be photochemically activated or produce reactive oxygen species and thus indirect oxidative DNA damage. The levels of DNA adducts arising from exposures influenced by variations in the doses, the frequency with which an individual is exposed, and rates of DNA repair for specific adducts. Each adduct has a characteristic efficiency with which it induces mutations. Based on experience with the well-studied DNA-reactive food carcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a limit of 20 ppb or ∼30 μg/day has been set and is considered a tolerable daily intake (TDI). Since AFB1 is considered a potent carcinogen, doses of 32P-postlabeling or the use of surrogates such as hemoglobin adducts, together with approaches to evaluate the results. A discussion of approaches to estimating possible threshold effects for DNA-reactive carcinogens is made

  15. Markovian language model of the DNA and its information content

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Shambhavi

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes a markovian memoryless model for the DNA that simplifies enormously the complexity of it. We encode nucleotide sequences into symbolic sequences, called words, from which we establish meaningful length of words and group of words that share symbolic similarities. Interpreting a node to represent a group of similar words and edges to represent their functional connectivity allows us to construct a network of the grammatical rules governing the appearance of group of words in the DNA. Our model allows to predict the transition between group of words in the DNA with unprecedented accuracy, and to easily calculate many informational quantities to better characterize the DNA. In addition, we reduce the DNA of known bacteria to a network of only tens of nodes, show how our model can be used to detect similar (or dissimilar) genes in different organisms, and which sequences of symbols are responsible for the most of the information content of the DNA. Therefore, the DNA can indeed be treated as a ...

  16. ALOCOM: a generic content model for learning objects

    OpenAIRE

    Verbert, Katrien; Duval, Erik

    2008-01-01

    e-Learning organizations are focusing heavily on learning content reusability. The ultimate goal is a learning object economy characterized by searchable digital libraries of reusable learning objects that can be exchanged and reused across various learning systems. To enable such approach, basic questions of learning content interoperability need to be addressed. This paper investigates the interoperation of learning content defined according to different specifications. A number of content ...

  17. Application of an efficient soil water content model in ecosystem modeling and scenario development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerle, Albin; Calanca, Perluigi; Themessl, Matthias; Gobiet, Andreas; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2013-04-01

    Available soil water is a major constraint for numerous ecosystem functions and is likely to be considerably affected by projected shifts in temperature and precipitation. Quantifying likely future changes in soil water content is therefore essential for assessing impacts of climate change on ecosystem functions. Here we present a modeling study addressing changes in future soil water content of temperate grasslands in the Austrian Alps. We use "SoilBucket", a soil moisture model characterized by an efficient structure and minimal requirements regarding meteorological inputs (solar radiation, precipitation and air temperature). The model is therefore suitable for the analysis of a wide range of ecological datasets and in combination with climate change scenarios. Our analysis relies on two data sources, a repository of soil water content and meteorological data collected at more than ten sites in the Eastern Alps as well as a set of downscaled regional climate scenarios, developed for years 1961 - 2050 with 5 different regional/global climate models (CNRMRM, AITCCLM, KNMIRACMO, DMIHIRHAM, ETHZCLM). Calibration of SoilBucket is carried out using a Bayesian inversion scheme. Calibrated model runs do show a very good performance at the majority of investigated sites despite the simple model structure. First results of investigated grasslands show that if any trend can be found, these ecosystems tend to higher soil water contents under future climate conditions. Despite these stable or increasing general trends some climate models cause an increasing frequency in extreme dry soil water conditions under future climate scenarios.

  18. Carcinogenic effects of benzene: Cesare Maltoni's contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2002-12-01

    Cesare Maltoni's contributions to understanding, identifying, and characterizing widely used commercial chemicals in experimental animals are among the most important methods developed in the history of toxicology and serve to protect working men and women, the general population, and our environment from hazardous substances. Maltoni developed experimental methods that have reached the "platinum standard" for protection of public health. Benzene was among the 400 or more chemicals that Maltoni and his associates tested for carcinogenicity. In 1976, Maltoni reported that benzene is a potent experimental carcinogen. Maltoni's experiments clearly demonstrated that benzene is carcinogenic in Sprague-Dawley rats, Wistar rats, Swiss mice, and RF/J mice when administered by inhalation or ingestion. Benzene caused carcinomas of the Zymbal gland, oral cavity, nasal cavities; cancers of the skin, forestomach, mammary glands, and lungs; angiosarcomas and hepatomas of the liver; and hemolymphoreticular cancers. Thus, benzene was shown to be a multipotential carcinogen that produced cancers in several species of animals by various routes of administration. On November 2, 1977, Chemical Week reported that Maltoni provided a "bombshell" when he demonstrated the "first direct link" between benzene and cancer. In this paper, I shall summarize early experiments and human studies and reports; Maltoni's experimental contribution to understanding the carcinogenicity of benzene in humans and animals; earlier knowledge concerning benzene toxicity; and benzene standards and permissible exposure levels.

  19. Modelling unfrozen water content in a silty clay permafrost deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Frederik Ancker; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of a calibration equation for determining the unfrozen water content of a Greenlandic silty clay permafrost deposit. Calibration experiments have been conducted for water contents in the interval 0 – 10 % at both 5 °C and 22 °C. Calibration equations are verified against permittivity data from a permafrost core......The mechanical properties of both unfrozen soils and permafrost soils are influenced by the amount of unfrozen water in the pore space. When dealing with foundation engineering in permafrost areas it is essential to estimate the unfrozen water content (wu). This paper deals with the establishing...... of material properties similar to the test soil. The calibration for 5°C is seen to make a good fit to the permafrost core data. Further experiments should be performed in order to extend the range of water contents tested and hence the range of validity of the calibration equation....

  20. [Leather azo dyes: mutagenic and carcinogenic risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clonfero, E; Venier, P; Granella, M; Levis, A G

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity data on azo dyes used in the leather industry. Two water soluble benzidine-based dyes were classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). No other dyes have been evaluated by the IARC. Of the 48 azo dyes assayed in the Salmonella/microsome test, 20 gave positive results. Attention is drawn to the important role of the in vivo metabolism of azo compounds, which includes a preliminary reduction of the azo bonds and subsequent release of the aromatic amines of the dye. A useful assay (Prival test) for evaluating the mutagenic properties of azo dyes involves a reductive step that permits the release of any genotoxic agents present in the compounds. A list of leather azo dyes is furnished that are considered as potentially harmful due to the presence of a carcinogenic aromatic amine (benzidine, p-aminobenzene and derivatives) in their formulae.

  1. Mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and teratogenicity of beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Lauwerys, R

    1987-07-01

    The carcinogenicity of a number of beryllium compounds has been confirmed in experiments on laboratory animals and this metal has to be treated as a possible carcinogenic threat to man. These carcinogenic properties are associated with mutagenic activity as shown by the results of short-term tests performed in vitro with beryllium chloride and beryllium sulfate. These soluble beryllium compounds can produce some infidelity of in vitro synthesis, forward gene mutations in microorganisms and in mammalian cells. They are also able to induce cell transformation. In addition to the positive results obtained in several short-term assays beryllium compounds have been found to bind to nucleoproteins, to inhibit certain enzymes needed for DNA synthesis, to bind nucleic acids to cell membranes and to inhibit microtubule polymerization. The teratogenicity of beryllium salts is relatively unknown and needs additional investigation.

  2. The ISS Carcinogens Data Bank (BDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, Roberto; Ceccarelli, Federica; Costamagna, Francesca Marina; D'Angiolini, Antonella; Fabri, Alessandra; Ferri, Maurizio; Riva, Giovanni; Roazzi, Paolo; Trucchi, Daniela; Marcello, Ida

    2008-01-01

    The Data Bank on Carcinogens (Banca Dati Cancerogeni, BDC) is a factual data bank, available on the Istituto Superiore di Sanità website, aimed at supporting the risk management decision making of central and local administrators. It can also represent a valuable tool for industry. The available information on carcinogenicity evaluations/classifications produced by European Union and by other institutions (IARC, USEPA, NTP, CCTN) is presented in a concise form accompanied by bibliographic references enabling the users to consult the original sources and, in some cases, to be directly connected to the relevant website. The classifications carried out by each organization in accordance with its own criteria assign the examined agents to specific qualitative categories and do not include quantitative assessment. BDC intends to provide an easy tool for experts, researchers and risk managers dealing with carcinogenic agents. PMID:18469374

  3. Linearity of dose-response relationships for human carcinogenic exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.H. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    The shape of dose-response relationships is a critical factor in considering cancer risks for the work place and environmental exposure to carcinogens. Markedly different risk estimates result from assumptions of linearity versus sublinear and threshold assumptions. This paper presents evidence that the relationship between the relative risk of development of cancer and the dose rate to carcinogenic exposures is frequently linear with no evidence for thresholds. Dose-response relationships from four studies of asbestos and lung cancer were examined, all of which were consistent with a linear relationship. Analysis of the relationship between the relative risk of lung cancer and exposure to nickel in a smelter study, selected because of relatively good exposure data, demonstrated a close agreement with a linear relationship. The relationship between the level of arsenic in drinking wter and the prevalence of skin cancer also was linear for males in the highest prevalence age group in Taiwan, although there was some evidence of sublinearity for females and younger persons. Also, the relationships between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the relative risk of lung cancer was very close to linear in many studies. The analysis of these and other studies involving human exposure to carcinogens provides empirical evidence for linearity when the response variable is a rate ratio measure, rather than a risk difference measure. Linearity in dose-response is biologically plausible, without invoking a one-hit model. Except in special circumstances. the epidemiological evidence supports linear extrapolation of cancer relative risks.

  4. Peering Strategic Game Models for Interdependent ISPs in Content Centric Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergent content-oriented networks prompt Internet service providers (ISPs to evolve and take major responsibility for content delivery. Numerous content items and varying content popularities motivate interdependence between peering ISPs to elaborate their content caching and sharing strategies. In this paper, we propose the concept of peering for content exchange between interdependent ISPs in content centric Internet to minimize content delivery cost by a proper peering strategy. We model four peering strategic games to formulate four types of peering relationships between ISPs who are characterized by varying degrees of cooperative willingness from egoism to altruism and interconnected as profit-individuals or profit-coalition. Simulation results show the price of anarchy (PoA and communication cost in the four games to validate that ISPs should decide their peering strategies by balancing intradomain content demand and interdomain peering relations for an optimal cost of content delivery.

  5. Land management of bracken needs to account for bracken carcinogens - a case study from Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Donnelly, Eric; Strobel, Bjarne W.;

    2015-01-01

    Bracken ferns are some of the most widespread ferns in the World causing immense problems for land managers, foresters and rangers. Bracken is suspected of causing cancer in Humans due to its content of the carcinogen ptaquiloside. Ingestion of bracken, or food and drinking water contaminated...

  6. Adapting models of visual aesthetics for personalized content creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2012-01-01

    pleasing 2D game spaceships via neuroevolutionary constrained optimization and evaluate the impact of the designed visual properties on the generated spaceships. The offline generated spaceships are used as the initial population of an interactive evolution experiment in which players are asked to choose......This paper introduces a search-based approach to personalized content generation with respect to visual aesthetics. The approach is based on a two-step adaptation procedure where (1) the evaluation function that characterizes the content is adjusted to match the visual aesthetics of users and (2......) the content itself is optimized based on the personalized evaluation function. To test the efficacy of the approach we design fitness functions based on universal properties of visual perception, inspired by psychological and neurobiological research. Using these visual properties we generate aesthetically...

  7. Television production, Funding Models and Exploitation of Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Doyle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The rise of digital platforms has transformative implications for strategies of financing media production and for exploitation of the economic value in creative content. In the television industry, changes in technologies for distribution and the emergence of SVOD services such as Netflix are gradually shifting audiences and financial power away from broadcasters while at the same time creating unprecedented opportunities for programme-makers.  Drawing on findings from recent RCUK-funded research, this article examines how these shifts are affecting production financing and the economics of supplying television content.  In particular, it focuses on how changes in the dynamics of rights markets and in strategic approaches towards the financing of television production might mean for markets, industries and for policies intended to support the economic sustainability of independent television content production businesses.

  8. An integrated modeling method for prediction of sulfur content in agglomerate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓方; 桂卫华; 王雅琳; 吴敏

    2003-01-01

    Based on the idea of fusing modeling, an integrated prediction model for sintering process was proposed.A framework for sulfur content prediction was established, which integrated multi modeling ways together, including mathematical model combined with neural network(NN), rule model based on empirical knowledge and modelchoosing coordinator. Via metallurgic mechanism analysis and material balance computation, a mathematical model calculated the sulfur content in agglomerate by the material balance equation with some parameters predicted by NN method. In the other model, the relationship between sulfur content and key factors was described in the form of expert rules. The model-choosing coordinator based on fuzzy logic was introduced to decide the weight of result of each model according to process conditions. The model was tested by industrial application data and produced a relatively satisfactory prediction error. The model also preferably reflected the varying tendency of sulfur content in agglomerate as the evidence of its prediction performance.

  9. Procedural Personas for Player Decision Modeling and Procedural Content Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgård, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    in specific games. It further explores how simple utility functions, easily defined and changed by game designers, can be used to construct agents expressing a variety of decision making styles within a game, using a variety of contemporary AI approaches, naming the resulting agents "Procedural Personas......." These methods for constructing procedural personas are then integrated with existing procedural content generation systems, acting as critics that shape the output of these systems, optimizing generated content for different personas and by extension, different kinds of players and their decision making styles...

  10. Teaching Concepts of Natural Sciences to Foreigners through Content-Based Instruction: The Adjunct Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satilmis, Yilmaz; Yakup, Doganay; Selim, Guvercin; Aybarsha, Islam

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates three models of content-based instruction in teaching concepts and terms of natural sciences in order to increase the efficiency of teaching these kinds of concepts in realization and to prove that the content-based instruction is a teaching strategy that helps students understand concepts of natural sciences. Content-based…

  11. A Digital Right Management Model for Distribution of Digital Audiovisual Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Kefeng; PEI Qingqi; WANG Meihua; MO Wei; CAO Ling

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a digital rights management model, which considers the integrated factors including legality, communication security, integrity of the content, and trading fairness. The architecture of the model, the necessary protocol for the copyright control and content distribution, the authentication mechanism which offer consumption registration for content fair distribution, of the model are all provided. The scheme also provides distribution and evidence for using the copyright of digital content fairly and effectively. Finally, analysis shows the proposed model has both high security and good performance.

  12. Colorado Model Content Standards for Music: Suggested Grade Level Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    The state of Colorado has set forth five content standards for music education in its public schools: (1) students sing or play on instruments a varied repertoire of music, alone or with others; (2) students will read and notate music; (3) students will create music; (4) students will listen to, analyze, evaluate, and describe music; and (5)…

  13. Content Recognition and Context Modeling for Document Analysis and Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangyu

    2009-01-01

    The nature and scope of available documents are changing significantly in many areas of document analysis and retrieval as complex, heterogeneous collections become accessible to virtually everyone via the web. The increasing level of diversity presents a great challenge for document image content categorization, indexing, and retrieval.…

  14. Occupational exposures to carcinogens in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, N; Matos, E; Boffetta, P; Kogevinas, M; Vainio, H

    1994-09-01

    There have been very few studies of exposure to occupational carcinogens in developing countries, and even fewer studies of the health consequences of such exposures. However, all industrial chemicals, occupations and industrial processes classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as Group 1 or Group 2A (carcinogenic or possibly carcinogenic to humans) have been described in developing countries, and there is growing concern that the health impact of many chemicals used in the developing world has been underestimated. In all regions a very large workforce is employed in the construction industry, in which substantial exposure to asbestos may occur, and there has been a rapid increase in production in countries such as Brazil and India. There is, for instance, a similar pattern for tyre production with a large increase in production in developing countries in the 1980s. Thus, the number of workers in industries entailing a carcinogenic risk is increasing in developing countries, partly as a result of the transfer of hazardous industry from industrialized countries. There is much that could be achieved in the prevention of occupational cancer in developing countries, and there have been a number of successful initiatives. However, the greatest progress in the prevention of occupational cancer in developing countries is most likely to come from political and economic changes. PMID:7847748

  15. Carcinogenic compounds in alcoholic beverages: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflaum, Tabea; Hausler, Thomas; Baumung, Claudia; Ackermann, Svenja; Kuballa, Thomas; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2016-10-01

    The consumption of alcoholic beverages has been classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) since 1988. More recently, in 2010, ethanol as the major constituent of alcoholic beverages and its metabolite acetaldehyde were also classified as carcinogenic to humans. Alcoholic beverages as multi-component mixtures may additionally contain further known or suspected human carcinogens as constituent or contaminant. This review will discuss the occurrence and toxicology of eighteen carcinogenic compounds (acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, furan, glyphosate, lead, 3-MCPD, 4-methylimidazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, pulegone, ochratoxin A, safrole) occurring in alcoholic beverages as identified based on monograph reviews by the IARC. For most of the compounds of alcoholic beverages, quantitative risk assessment provided evidence for only a very low risk (such as margins of exposure above 10,000). The highest risk was found for ethanol, which may reach exposures in ranges known to increase the cancer risk even at moderate drinking (margin of exposure around 1). Other constituents that could pose a risk to the drinker were inorganic lead, arsenic, acetaldehyde, cadmium and ethyl carbamate, for most of which mitigation by good manufacturing practices is possible. Nevertheless, due to the major effect of ethanol, the cancer burden due to alcohol consumption can only be reduced by reducing alcohol consumption in general or by lowering the alcoholic strength of beverages.

  16. Carcinogenic effects of radiation-introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weight of experimental evidence reviewed indicates that UV damage to DNA, probably pyrimidine dimers, is the best molecular candidate for the initiating damage that leads to skin cancer. It is postulated that the carcinogenic action spectrum should be similar to the DNA action spectrum filtered through the upper layer of skin

  17. Integrating content and language in English language teaching in secondary education: Models, benefits, and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Banegas, Darío Luis

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been a major interest in content-based instruction (CBI) and content and language integrated learning (CLIL). These are similar approaches which integrate content and foreign/second language learning through various methodologies and models as a result of different implementations around the world. In this paper, I first offer a sociocultural view of CBI-CLIL. Secondly, I define language and content as vital components in CBI-CLIL. Thirdly, I revie...

  18. Carcinogens formed when Meat is Cooked

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Salmon, C P; Knize, M G

    2003-05-30

    Diet has been associated with varying cancer rates in human populations for many years, yet the causes of the observed variation in cancer patterns have not been adequately explained (Wynder et al. 1977). Along with the effect of diet on human cancer incidence is the strong evidence that mutations are the initiating events in the cancer process (Vogelstein et al. 1992). Foods, when heated, are a good source of genotoxic carcinogens that very likely are a cause for some of these events(Doll et al. 1981). These carcinogens fall into two chemical classes: heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). There is ample evidence that many of these compounds are complete carcinogens in rodents(El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991). Heterocyclic aromatic amines are among the most potent mutagenic substances ever tested in the Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity test (Wakabayashi et al. 1992). Both classes of carcinogen cause tumors in rodents at multiple sites, (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991) many of which are common tumor sites in people on a Western diet. An HAA, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine), and a PAH, B[a]P (benzo[a]pyrene), of comparable carcinogenic potency caused mammary gland tumors in a feeding study in female rats (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995). In addition, PhIP has recently been shown to cause carcinomas in the prostate of the male rat (Shirai et al. 1997). Complementing the rodent cancer studies are numerous human case-control and prospective studies suggesting a relationship between overheated beef, chicken, and lamb, and cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, and stomach (Sinha et al. 1999; Ward et al. 1997; Zheng et al. 1998).

  19. Predictions for the outcome of rodent carcinogenicity bioassays: identification of trans-species carcinogens and noncarcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant, R W; Spalding, J.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty chemicals or substances currently undergoing long-term carcinogenicity bioassays in rodents have been used in a project to further evaluate methods and information that may have the capability of predicting potential carcinogens. In our predictions the principal information used includes structural alerts and in vitro test results for Salmonella mutagenicity, relative subchronic toxicity, and the sites and types of pathology found in subchronic (90-day) studies. This group of chemicals...

  20. Emissions and air exposure of carcinogens and co-carcinogens in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Ketzel, Matthias;

    . A list of carcinogenic andco-carcinogenic pollutants (particles, heavy metals and organic compounds) emittedfrom energy production, industrial activities, road transport, navigation, agriculture, residential heating and product use was compiled. Pollutant emissions levels for 2010and trends for 1990...... sources, traffic and residential wood combustion. An overview of local studies on exposure for cities or communities with emphasis on wood combustion and traffic and a discussion of existing epidemiological studies on cancer and environment were given...

  1. [Estimation of forest canopy chlorophyll content based on PROSPECT and SAIL models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi-guang; Fan, Wen-yi; Yu, Ying

    2010-11-01

    The forest canopy chlorophyll content directly reflects the health and stress of forest. The accurate estimation of the forest canopy chlorophyll content is a significant foundation for researching forest ecosystem cycle models. In the present paper, the inversion of the forest canopy chlorophyll content was based on PROSPECT and SAIL models from the physical mechanism angle. First, leaf spectrum and canopy spectrum were simulated by PROSPECT and SAIL models respectively. And leaf chlorophyll content look-up-table was established for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval. Then leaf chlorophyll content was converted into canopy chlorophyll content by Leaf Area Index (LAD). Finally, canopy chlorophyll content was estimated from Hyperion image. The results indicated that the main effect bands of chlorophyll content were 400-900 nm, the simulation of leaf and canopy spectrum by PROSPECT and SAIL models fit better with the measured spectrum with 7.06% and 16.49% relative error respectively, the RMSE of LAI inversion was 0. 542 6 and the forest canopy chlorophyll content was estimated better by PROSPECT and SAIL models with precision = 77.02%.

  2. School Board Improvement Plans in Relation to the AIP Model of Educational Accountability: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Barneveld, Christina; Stienstra, Wendy; Stewart, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    For this study we analyzed the content of school board improvement plans in relation to the Achievement-Indicators-Policy (AIP) model of educational accountability (Nagy, Demeris, & van Barneveld, 2000). We identified areas of congruence and incongruence between the plans and the model. Results suggested that the content of the improvement plans,…

  3. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF COKE OVEN EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke oven emissions are known human carcinogens, classified as weight-of-evidence Group A under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a). vidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient,". and the evidence rom human studies is "S...

  4. Current investigations into the genotoxicity of zinc oxide and silica nanoparticles in mammalian models in vitro and in vivo: carcinogenic/genotoxic potential, relevant mechanisms and biomarkers, artifacts, and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon JY

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jee Young Kwon,1,* Preeyaporn Koedrith,2,* Young Rok Seo1 1Department of Life Science, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Dongguk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phuttamonthon District, NakhonPathom, Thailand *These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first authors Abstract: Engineered nanoparticles (NPs are widely used in many sectors, such as food, medicine, military, and sport, but their unique characteristics may cause deleterious health effects. Close attention is being paid to metal NP genotoxicity; however, NP genotoxic/carcinogenic effects and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this review, we address some metal and metal oxide NPs of interest and current genotoxicity tests in vitro and in vivo. Metal NPs can cause DNA damage such as chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations. We also discuss several parameters that may affect genotoxic response, including physicochemical properties, widely used assays/end point tests, and experimental conditions. Although potential biomarkers of nanogenotoxicity or carcinogenicity are suggested, inconsistent findings in the literature render results inconclusive due to a variety of factors. Advantages and limitations related to different methods for investigating genotoxicity are described, and future directions and recommendations for better understanding genotoxic potential are addressed. Keywords: carcinogenicity, exposure assessment, genotoxicity, nanoparticles, risk evaluation

  5. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc−/−p53+/− mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  6. The TiN Content Computer Prediction Based on ANN and AR Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Chunyang; Ding Junjie; Ning Yumei; Chu Dianqing

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and autoregressive model (AR model) of nano TiN particles content in Ni-TiN composite coating was established by the method of time series analysis. In this paper, we want to seek for the TiN content computer prediction in Ni-TiN composite coatings by using ANN and AR model. The trend of the nano TiN particles content variation was forecasted with the AR model, and the prediction value and experimental test results were compared. The XRD patterns were investiga...

  7. Method for Measuring the Information Content of Terrain from Digital Elevation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lujin Hu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As digital terrain models are indispensable for visualizing and modeling geographic processes, terrain information content is useful for terrain generalization and representation. For terrain generalization, if the terrain information is considered, the generalized terrain may be of higher fidelity. In other words, the richer the terrain information at the terrain surface, the smaller the degree of terrain simplification. Terrain information content is also important for evaluating the quality of the rendered terrain, e.g., the rendered web terrain tile service in Google Maps (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA. However, a unified definition and measures for terrain information content have not been established. Therefore, in this paper, a definition and measures for terrain information content from Digital Elevation Model (DEM, i.e., a digital model or 3D representation of a terrain’s surface data are proposed and are based on the theory of map information content, remote sensing image information content and other geospatial information content. The information entropy was taken as the information measuring method for the terrain information content. Two experiments were carried out to verify the measurement methods of the terrain information content. One is the analysis of terrain information content in different geomorphic types, and the results showed that the more complex the geomorphic type, the richer the terrain information content. The other is the analysis of terrain information content with different resolutions, and the results showed that the finer the resolution, the richer the terrain information. Both experiments verified the reliability of the measurements of the terrain information content proposed in this paper.

  8. [Carcinogenic activity of the pesticide propoxur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylev, L N; Vasil'eva, L A; Smirnova, O V; Khrustalev, S A; Trukhina, G M

    2010-01-01

    Wistar rats were fed propoxur in their diet at 0, 500, 3000, and 8000 ppm during throughout their life. The number of tumors was equal in the control and experimental groups. These were hemoblastoses and breast and uterine tumors. All tumors occurred spontaneously in the rats. A few experimental animals were found to have bladder epithelial hyperplasia that might be pretumorous; however, no bladder tumors were detected. It is concluded that the investigations revealed no carcinogenic activity of propoxur.

  9. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published values оf total population carcinogenic risk from chemical carcinogens.Results: it is shown that the 304 cases of lung cancer per year (1. 85 10-3 on average from 2006 to 2011 (21280diseases for 70 years in addition to background level induced by radon; the differences in average trends of all lungcancer incidence in the districts can exceed 25%.Conclusion. The potential of risk reduction by measures of mitigation radon concentration exceeds 5 times the cost efficiency to reduce emissions from vehicles and can reduce cancer incidence, on average 236 cases per year; population risk 16520 cases over 70 years or save not less than 2832 person-years of life per year. The annual effect of reducing losses from not-survival of 12 years as a result of radon-induced lung cancer deaths exceeds 14160000 dollars. The evaluating of the carcinogenic risk from radon in accordance with the definition of population risk increases the predictive evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures more than twice.

  10. The multitude and diversity of environmental carcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Belpomme, Dominique; Irigaray, Philippe; Hardell, Lennart; Clapp, Richard; Montagnier, Luc; Epstein, Slava; Sasco, Annie

    2007-01-01

    We have recently proposed that lifestyle-related factors, screening and aging cannot fully account for the present overall growing incidence of cancer. In order to propose the concept that in addition to lifestyle related factors, exogenous environmental factors may play a more important role in carcinogenesis than it is expected, and may therefore account for the growing incidence of cancer, we overview herein environmental factors, rated as certainly or potentially carcinogenic by the Inter...

  11. Cyberbullying behavior and adolescents' use of media with antisocial content: a cyclic process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hamer, Anouk; Konijn, Elly A; Keijer, Micha G

    2014-02-01

    The present study examined the role of media use in adolescents' cyberbullying behavior. Following previous research, we propose a Cyclic Process Model of face-to-face victimization and cyberbullying through two mediating processes of anger/frustration and antisocial media content. This model was tested utilizing a cross-sectional design with adolescent participants (N=892). Exposure to antisocial media content was measured with a newly developed content-based scale (i.e., the C-ME), showing good psychometric qualities. Results of structural equation modeling showed that adolescents' exposure to antisocial media content was significantly associated with cyberbullying behavior, especially in adolescents who experienced anger and frustration due to face-to-face victimization. Goodness of fit indices demonstrated a good fit of the theoretical model to the data and indicated that exposure to antisocial media content acts as an amplifier in a cyclic process of victimization-related anger and cyberbullying behavior. PMID:24015985

  12. Comparison of the expression profiles induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens in rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)]. E-mail: heidrun.ellinger-ziegelbauer@bayerhealthcare.com; Stuart, Barry [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Wahle, Brad [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Bomann, Werner [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Ahr, Hans Juergen [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2005-08-04

    Application of recently developed gene expression techniques using microarrays in toxicological studies (toxicogenomics) facilitate the interpretation of a toxic compound's mode of action and may also allow the prediction of selected toxic effects based on gene expression changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated whether carcinogens at doses known to induce liver tumors in the 2-year rat bioassay deregulate characteristic sets of genes in a short term in vivo study and whether these deregulated genes represent defined biological pathways. Male Wistar rats were dosed with the four nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens methapyrilene (MPy, 60 mg/kg/day), diethylstilbestrol (DES, 10 mg/kg/day), Wy-14643 (Wy, 60 mg/kg/day), and piperonylbutoxide (PBO, 1200 mg/kg/day). After 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, the livers were taken for histopathological evaluation and for analysis of the gene expression profiles on Affymetrix RG{sub U}34A arrays. The expression profile of the four nongenotoxic carcinogens were compared to the profiles of the four genotoxic carcinogens 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and aflatoxin B1 (AB1) from a similar study reported previously. By using statistical and clustering tools characteristically deregulated genes were extracted and functionally classified. Distinct cellular pathways were affected by the nongenotoxic carcinogens compared to the genotoxic carcinogens which at least partly correlated with the two-stage model of carcinogenesis. Characteristic to genotoxic carcinogens were a DNA damage response and the activation of proliferative and survival signaling. Nongenotoxic carcinogens showed responses to oxidative DNA or protein damage, as well as cell cycle progression and signs of regeneration. Many of the gene alterations found with the nongenotoxic carcinogens imply compound-specific mechanisms. Although neither a single gene nor a single pathway will be

  13. The evolving definition of carcinogenic human papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castle Philip E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thirteen human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes have been judged to be carcinogenic or probably carcinogenic, and the cause of virtually all cervical cancer worldwide. Other HPV genotypes could possibly be involved. Although the inclusion of possibly carcinogenic HPV genotypes may hurt test specificity, it may indirectly increase the reassurance following a negative HPV test (i.e. the negative predictive value of an HPV test for cervical precancer and cancer. The future of cervical cancer screening in low-resource setting, however, may include once-in-a-lifetime, low-cost and rapid HPV testing. However, the tradeoff of more false positives for greater reassurance may not be acceptable if the local infrastructure cannot manage the screen positives. Now is the time for the community of scientists, doctors, and public health advocates to use the data presented at the 100th International Agency for Research on Cancer monograph meeting to rationally decide the target HPV genotypes for the next generation of HPV tests for use in high-resource and low-resource settings. The implications of including possibly HPV genotypes on HPV test performance, also for guidance on the use of these tests for cervical cancer prevention programs, are discussed.

  14. Branded Content: A new Model for driving Tourism via Film and Branding Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Horrigan, David

    2009-01-01

    Branded content is described as a fusion of advertising and entertainment into one marketing communications product that is integrated into an organisation’s overall brand strategy intended to be distributed as entertainment content with a highly branded quality. A history of product placement, branded entertainment, and film tourism is presented to identify the effective elements of each strategy in order to inform a more cohesive brand strategy for destinations. A branded content model is...

  15. A Model of Adolescents’ Seeking of Sexual Content in their Media Choices

    OpenAIRE

    Bleakley, Amy; Hennessy, Michael; Fishbein, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the extent to which adolescents report actively seeking sexual content in media, identifies from which media they report seeking, estimates the association between seeking sexual information and romantic and sexual behavior, and shows that active seeking of sexual content in media sources is explained by an intention to seek such content using the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction, a reasoned action approach. The data are a national sample of 810 adolescents age...

  16. Rethinking Web Design Models: Requirements for Addressing the Content

    OpenAIRE

    Woukeu, Arouna; Carr, Les; Wills, Gary; Hall, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    The objective of hypermedia design models is to produce a well-organised web site. The organisation is undertaken at the level of a particular building-block – an abstract data unit which may match a frame, paragraph or region on a Web page. The increasing sophistication of these models allows the designer to deal with interaction and personalisation, but precludes one of the basic features of hypertext – the text itself. This paper argues that this oversight remains a fundamental problem bec...

  17. Chemoprevention with Acetylsalicylic Acid, Vitamin D and Calcium Reduces Risk of Carcinogen-induced Lung Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, J;

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: Research has shown that chemoprevention may be effective against the development of lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral chemoprevention in a mouse model of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumor.......Background/Aim: Research has shown that chemoprevention may be effective against the development of lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral chemoprevention in a mouse model of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumor....

  18. Comparative quality analysis of models of total electron content in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. B.; Gorbachev, O. A.; Kholmogorov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a brief description and comparative analysis of the Klobuchar, GEMTEC, and NTCM-GL models of total electron content in the ionosphere. The quality of model performance against experimental data on the total electron content is compared. Statistical estimates for the residual positioning error are obtained for each of these models on the basis of the international Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Service data. The GEMTEC and NTCM-GL models are shown to have a higher positioning accuracy than the Klobuchar model. The best results of the ionospheric error correction are provided by the GEMTEC model.

  19. Study of elastic-plastic damage model of cement consolidated soil with high organic content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huie; WANG Qing; CAI Keyi

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of elastic-plastic damage model of cement consolidated soil, the authors took organic contents into reasonable damage variable evolution equation in order to seek relation between the organic contents and parameters in the equation, and established the elastic-plastic damage model of cement consolidated soil considering organic contents. The results show that the parameters change correspondingly with difference of the organic contents. The higher the organic contents are, the less the valves of the parameters such as elastic modulus (E), material parameters (K, n) and damage evolution parameter (ε) become, but the larger strain damage threshold value (εd) of the sample is. Meanwhile, the calculation results obtained from established model are compared with the test data in the condition of common indoors test, which is testified with reliability.

  20. Simulations of Mineral Dust Content With CHIMERE-Dust Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmechtig, C.; Marticorena, B.; Menut, L.; Bergametti, G.

    2006-12-01

    Simulations of the mineral dust cycle have been performed whith CHIMERE-Dust model over a domain that includes North Africa, the Mediterranean basin and the North Tropical Atlantic Ocean (10S-60N and 90W-90E) with a 1°x1° resolution using the ECMWF (European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) meteorological fields for two years, 2000 and 2001. As a validation, we compare the simulated dust concentration fields with photometric data from the AERONET network. From the comparisons between the simulated and measured aerosol optical depth for several stations of the Mediterranean basin, the model appears to reproduce correctly the intensity and occurrences of the dust events. Over Western Africa, the results are not as satisfying since some of the most intense dust events observed on the continent and downwind are not captured by the model. In addition, the simulated events are generally underestimated compared to the measured ones. It appears that these differences in the model performances are connected to the origin of the dust plumes. For example, dust plumes coming from Libya are well simulated while dust plumes originating from the Bodélé depression not as frequent as intense as the observations suggest. Soil properties in these two regions are comparable and typical of very erodible surfaces. We thus focused on the comparison between the ECMWF 10m wind speed fields and 10m wind speed measured at the meteorological stations located in both areas. We noticed that over Libya, the measured and ECMWF 10m wind speed are in very good agreement, while the meteorological model does not reproduce the extrema of the measured wind speed in the Bodélé depression. We found that a crude empirical correction of the 10m wind field in the Bodélé Depression significantly improve the simulations in terms of occurrence and of intensity.

  1. A content-oriented model for science exhibit engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Recently, science museums have begun to review their educational purposes and redesign their pedagogies. At the most basic level, this entails accounting for the performance of individual exhibits, and indeed, in some cases, research indicates shortcomings in exhibit design: While often successful...... in prompting visitors to carry out intended actions, exhibits do not necessarily promote the intended interpretations of these actions among visitors. Here, the notion of praxeology from didactics research is suggested as a model to remedy this shortcoming. The suggested role of praxeology is twofold......: as a means to operationalize the link between exhibit features and visitor activities; and as a template to transform scientists’ practices in the research context into visitors’ activities in the exhibit context. The resulting model of science exhibit engineering is presented and exemplified, and its...

  2. Towards Cognizant Hearing Aids: Modeling of Content, Affect and Attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadogan, Seliz

    attention is studied. A computational top-down attention model is presented and behavioral experiments are carried out to investigate the role of top-down task driven attention in the cocktail party problem. Finally, automatic emotion recognition from speech is studied using a dimensional approach...... and with a focus of integrating semantic and acoustic features. An emotional speech corpus that consists of short movie clips with audio and text parts, rated by human subjects in two affective dimensions (arousal and valence), is prepared to evaluate the method proposed....

  3. Quantitative structure carcinogenicity relationship for detecting structural alerts in nitroso-compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevention of environmentally induced cancers is a major health problem of which solutions depend on the rapid and accurate screening of potential chemical hazards. Lately, theoretical approaches such as the one proposed here - Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) - are increasingly used for assessing the risks of environmental chemicals, since they can markedly reduce costs, avoid animal testing, and speed up policy decisions. This paper reports a QSAR study based on the Topological Substructural Molecular Design (TOPS-MODE) approach, aiming at predicting the rodent carcinogenicity of a set of nitroso-compounds selected from the Carcinogenic Potency Data Base (CPDB). The set comprises nitrosoureas (14 chemicals), N-nitrosamines (18 chemicals) C-nitroso-compounds (1 chemical), nitrosourethane (1 chemical) and nitrosoguanidine (1 chemical), which have been bioassayed in male rat using gavage as the route of administration. Here we are especially concerned in gathering the role of both parameters on the carcinogenic activity of this family of compounds. First, the regression model was derived, upon removal of one identified nitrosamine outlier, and was able to account for more than 84% of the variance in the experimental activity. Second, the TOPS-MODE approach afforded the bond contributions - expressed as fragment contributions to the carcinogenic activity - that can be interpreted and provide tools for better understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Finally, and most importantly, we demonstrate the potentialities of this approach towards the recognition of structural alerts for carcinogenicity predictions

  4. MODELS OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: CONTENT AND SCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awny ZREKAT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article are analyzed methods developed to prevent the wastage of the majority of the benefit from the production process: JIT, Value Engineering and Constructability. These methods were developed parallel to the development of quality control, quality assurance and total quality management.MODELE DE SISTEM AL MANAGEMENTULUI CALITĂŢII: CONŢINUTUL ŞI DOMENIUL DE APLICAREÎn acest articol sunt analizate metodele de prevenire a pierderilor beneficiului majoritar din procesul de producţie: JIT (eficienţa timpului, Valoarea Inginerie, Constructivitate. Aceste metode au fost dezvoltate în paralel cu evoluţia controlului calităţii, asigurarea calităţii şi managementului calităţii totale.

  5. The Entropy Estimation of the Physics’ Course Content on the Basis of Intradisciplinary Connections’ Information Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatyana, Gnitetskaya

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the information model of intradisciplinary connections and semantic structures method are described. The information parameters, which we use in information model, are introduced. The question we would like to answer in this paper is - how to optimize the Physics Course’ content. As an example, the differences between entropy values in the contents of physics lecture with one topic but different logics of explanations are showed.

  6. Place prioritization for biodiversity content using species ecological niche modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Sánchez-Cordero

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Place prioritization for biodiversity representation is essential for conservation planning, particularly in megadiverse countries where high deforestation threatens biodiversity. Given the collecting biases and uneven sampling of biological inventories, there is a need to develop robust models of species’ distributions. By modeling species’ ecological niches using point occurrence data and digitized environmental feature maps, we can predict potential and extant distributions of species in untransformed landscapes, as well as in those transformed by vegetation change (including deforestation. Such distributional predictions provide a framework for use of species as biodiversity surrogates in place prioritization procedures such as those based on rarity and complementarity. Beyond biodiversity conservation, these predictions can also be used for place prioritization for ecological restoration under current conditions and under future scenarios of habitat change (e.g., deforestation scenarios. To illustrate these points, we (1 predict distributions under current and future deforestation scenarios for the Mexican endemic mammal Dipodomys phillipsii, and show how areas for restoration may be selected; and (2 propose conservation areas by combining nonvolant mammal distributional predictions as biodiversity surrogates with place prioritization procedures, to connect decreed natural protected areas in a region holding exceptional biodiversity: the Transvolcanic Belt in central Mexico. La selección de áreas prioritarias de conservación es fundamental en la planeación sistemática de la conservación, particularmente en países de mega-diversidad, en donde la alta deforestación es una de las amenazas a la biodiversidad. Debido a los sesgos taxonómicos y geográficos de colecta de los inventarios biológicos, es indispensable generar modelos robustos de distribución de especies. Al modelar el nicho ecológico de especies usando localidades de

  7. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published...

  8. [The Study of the Spectral Model for Estimating Pigment Contents of Tobacco Leaves in Field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao; Lao, Cai-lian; Xu, Zhao-li; Jin, Yan; Guo, Yan; Li, Jun-hui; Yang, Yu-hong

    2015-06-01

    Fast and non-destructive measurements of tobacco leaf pigment contents by spectroscopy in situ in the field has great significance in production guidance for nutrient diagnosis and growth monitoring of tobacco in vegetative growth stage, and it is also very important for the quality evaluation of tobacco leaves in mature stage. The purpose of this study is to estimate the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of tobacco leaves using tobacco leaf spectrum collected in the field. Reflectance spectrum of tobacco leaves in vegetative growth stage and mature stage were collected in situ in the field and the pigment contents of tobacco leaf samples were measured in this study, taking the tobacco leaf samples collected in each and both stages as modeling sets respectively, and using the methods of support vector machine (SVM) and spectral indice to establish the pigment content estimation models, and then compare the prediction performance of the models built by different methods. The study results indicated that the difference of estimation performance by each stage or mixed stages is not significant. For chlorophyll content, SVM and spectral indice modeling methods can both have a well estimation performance, while for carotenoid content, SVM modeling method has a better estimation performance than spectral indice. The coefficient of determination and the root mean square error of SVM model for estimating tobacco leaf chlorophyll content by each stage were 0.867 6 and 0.014 7, while the coefficient of determination and the root mean square error of SVM model for estimating tobacco leaf chlorophyll content by mixed stages were 0.898 6 and 0.012 3; The coefficient of determination and the root mean square error for estimating tobacco leaf carotenoid content by each stage were 0.861 4 and 0.002 5, while the coefficient of determination and the root mean square error of SVM model for estimating tobacco leaf carotenoid content by mixed stages were 0.839 9 and 0.002 5. The

  9. Indoor air-assessment: Indoor concentrations of environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the report, indoor concentration data are presented for the following general categories of air pollutants: radon-222, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), asbestos, gas phase organic compounds, formaldehyde, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and inorganic compounds. These pollutants are either known or suspect carcinogens (i.e., radon-222, asbestos) or more complex mixtures or classes of compounds which contain known or suspect carcinogens. Concentration data for individual carcinogenic compounds in complex mixtures are usually far from complete. The data presented for complex mixtures often include compounds which are not carcinogenic or for which data are insufficient to evaluate carcinogenicity. Their inclusion is justified, however, by the possibility that further work may show them to be carcinogens, cocarcinogens, initiators or promotors, or that they may be employed as markers (e.g., nicotine, acrolein) for the estimation of exposure to complex mixtures

  10. Comparison of rat olfactory mucosal responses to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genter, M.B.; Warner, B.M.; Medvedovic, M.; Sartor, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Alachlor and butachlor are chloracetanilide herbicides that induce olfactory tumors in rats, whereas propachlor does not. The mechanism by which alachlor induces tumors is distinct from many other nasal carcinogens, in that alachlor induces a gradual de-differentiation of the olfactory mucosa (OM) to a more respiratory-like epithelium, in contrast to other agents that induce cytotoxicity, followed by an aberrant regenerative response. We studied biochemical and genomic effects of these compounds to identify processes that occur in common between alachlor- and butachlor-treated rats. Because we have previously shown that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) is activated in OM by alachlor, in the present studies we evaluated both MMP2 activation and changes in OM gene expression in response to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilide treatments. All three chloracetanilides activated MMP2, and > 300 genes were significantly up- or downregulated between control and alachlor-treated rats. The most significantly regulated gene was vomeromodulin, which was dramatically upregulated by alachlor and butachlor treatment (>60-fold), but not by propachlor treatment. Except for similar gene responses in alachlor- and butachlor-treated rats, we did not identify clear-cut differences that would predict OM carcinogenicity in this study. PMID:19425180

  11. Chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes predict human cancer independently of exposure to carcinogens. European Study Group on Cytogenetic Biomarkers and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonassi, S; Hagmar, L; Strömberg, U;

    2000-01-01

    in the regression model. The risk for high versus low levels of CAs was similar in subjects heavily exposed to carcinogens and in those who had never, to their knowledge, been exposed to any major carcinogenic agent during their lifetime, supporting the idea that chromosome damage itself is involved in the pathway...... to cancer. The results have important ramifications for the understanding of the role played by sporadic chromosome damage for the origin of neoplasia-associated CAs....

  12. A carcinogenicity study of sucralose in the CD-1 mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, S W; Yuschak, M M; Amyes, S J; Aughton, P; Finn, J P

    2000-01-01

    The potential carcinogenicity of sucralose was evaluated by feeding groups of 52 male and 52 female CD-1 mice a diet containing sucralose at 0.3% (3000 ppm), 1.0% (10,000 ppm) or 3.0% (30,000 ppm) for 104 weeks. A group of 72 male and 72 female mice received diet without sucralose and served as controls. Week 1 achieved doses ranging from 543 to 5870mg/kg body weight/day in the low-dose males and high-dose females, respectively. Sucralose had no adverse effect on survival. No significant changes attributable to sucralose were found in the clinical condition or behaviour of the mice. Organ weights and the gross appearance of tissues were unaffected by treatment. The mean erythrocyte counts of females receiving the highest dietary concentration were slightly, but statistically significantly, lower than those of the controls after 104 weeks of treatment. Group mean body weight gain at the highest dietary concentration of sucralose was significantly less than that of the control in mice of both sexes. Food consumption, after correction for sucralose content, was lower for female mice, but not statistically significant. Water consumption for male mice receiving the highest dietary concentration was approximately 9% higher than that of the controls. There were statistically significant increases in the incidence of several non-neoplastic findings, but these were not considered to be related to sucralose administration. Treatment with sucralose did not increase the incidence of any tumour or influence the types of tumours observed. It was concluded that sucralose is not carcinogenic in CD-1 mice. The body weight gain and erythrocyte observations at the 3.0% dietary level were of limited biological significance as they were not accompanied by any histopathologic finding and had no impact on survival. The remaining dose levels were judged to have no effects. PMID:10882820

  13. Modelling of total electron content measured by the ATS-6 radio beacon experiment. Technical memo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following conclusions can be reached through the model study: A physically realistic model, when used in conjunction with foF2 and Faraday content observations can be used to infer information on neutral winds and electron density profiles. The resulting profiles are in reasonable agreement in summer and equinox with those from a semi-empirical model. The agreement is not good in winter, be cause the assumptions in the semi-empirical night model are unreliable. Nevertheless, the input quantities to the semi-empirical model, when calculated from the results, are more consistent; Neutral winds can sustain the ionization at F-layer peak altitudes in summer, but they cannot account for the Faraday content at night in equinox and winter; and Discrepancies between calculated and observed electron content values can be reduced by a downward proton flux. A small proton flux suffices to explain the discrepancies

  14. A Hysteresis Model Suitable For Numerical Simulation Of Moisture Content in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan; Damkilde, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium moisture content in wood depends not only on the current relative humidity in the ambient air but also on the history of the relative humidity variations. This hysteresis dependency of sorption in wood implies that in the worst case the moisture content for a given relative humidity...... may deviate by 30-35%. While researchers seem to have reached a general agreement on the hypothesis for the sorption hysteresis phenomenon, only a few models describing the phenomenon are available. Current models as the independent domain model have numerical deficiencies and drawbacks. This paper...... presents a new hysteresis model, which mathematically resolves in closed form expressions, with the current relative humidity and moisture content as the only input parameters. Furthermore, the model has the advantage of being applicable to different sorption isotherms, i.e. different species and different...

  15. Occurrence, uses, and carcinogenicity of arylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King-Thom

    2015-01-01

    Arylamines are chemically synthesized and contained in oxidants, epoxy polymers, explosives, fungicides, pesticides, colorants, polyurethanes, and used in rubber, pharmacology, cosmetics, and other chemical industries. Many arylamines are ubiquitously present in cigarette smoke, cooking fume hoods, foods, automobile exhaust, industrial sites, etc. Some arylamines can be generated through azo reduction by intestinal, skin, and environmental microorganisms from azo dyes that are widely used. Arylamines can also be generated by reduction of the nitro-group containing polyhydrated hydrocarbons including muntions. Some arylamines are released by burning nitrogen containing organic materials at high temperatures. Some medical drugs are also arylamines. Furthermore, many arylamines are essential constituents of normal metabolism or the result of abnormal metabolism or dietary sources. Some arylamines are mutagenic, carcinogenic or the cause of other kinds of maladies. Some arylamine are considered the major etiological agents of bladder tumors in humans and animals but may also induce other types of cancers in various organs. The organ, tissue, and species specificity of the arylamine-inducing carcinogenesis may be determined by their availability, distribution, and the presence of metabolic activation/detoxicification enzymes of each organ or tissue of different species. The ubiquitous arylamines, therefore, pose serious hazards to human health and environment. This article will address the occurrence, uses, carcinogenicity, and other arylamines-induced diseases.

  16. Myricetin stimulates the absorption of the pro-carcinogen PhIP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, M.E.; Sandt, van de J.J.M.; Alink, G.M.; Groten, J.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the flavonoid myricetin on the transport of the pro-carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) through differentiated Caco-2 monolayers, a model for the intestinal epithelium, is described. Myricetin causes an increase of the transport of PhIP from the apical to

  17. Topsoil organic carbon content of Europe, a new map based on a generalised additive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brogniez, Delphine; Ballabio, Cristiano; Stevens, Antoine; Jones, Robert J. A.; Montanarella, Luca; van Wesemael, Bas

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for up-to-date spatially continuous organic carbon (OC) data for global environment and climatic modeling. Whilst the current map of topsoil organic carbon content for Europe (Jones et al., 2005) was produced by applying expert-knowledge based pedo-transfer rules on large soil mapping units, the aim of this study was to replace it by applying digital soil mapping techniques on the first European harmonised geo-referenced topsoil (0-20 cm) database, which arises from the LUCAS (land use/cover area frame statistical survey) survey. A generalized additive model (GAM) was calibrated on 85% of the dataset (ca. 17 000 soil samples) and a backward stepwise approach selected slope, land cover, temperature, net primary productivity, latitude and longitude as environmental covariates (500 m resolution). The validation of the model (applied on 15% of the dataset), gave an R2 of 0.27. We observed that most organic soils were under-predicted by the model and that soils of Scandinavia were also poorly predicted. The model showed an RMSE of 42 g kg-1 for mineral soils and of 287 g kg-1 for organic soils. The map of predicted OC content showed the lowest values in Mediterranean countries and in croplands across Europe, whereas highest OC content were predicted in wetlands, woodlands and in mountainous areas. The map of standard error of the OC model predictions showed high values in northern latitudes, wetlands, moors and heathlands, whereas low uncertainty was mostly found in croplands. A comparison of our results with the map of Jones et al. (2005) showed a general agreement on the prediction of mineral soils' OC content, most probably because the models use some common covariates, namely land cover and temperature. Our model however failed to predict values of OC content greater than 200 g kg-1, which we explain by the imposed unimodal distribution of our model, whose mean is tilted towards the majority of soils, which are mineral. Finally, average

  18. Modified Liu-Carter Compression Model for Natural Clays with Various Initial Water Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial water content has a significant effect on the compression behaviour of reconstituted clays. This effect has to be considered in the Liu-Carter model to ensure the addition voids ratio only related to soil structure. A modified Liu-Carter compression model is proposed by introducing the empirical equations for reconstituted clays at different initial water contents into the Liu-Carter model. The proposed model is verified against the experimental results from the literature. The simulations by the proposed method are also compared with that by old method where the influence of initial water content is not considered. The results show that the predicted virgin compression curves of natural clays are similar, but the values of b and Δey may be very different.

  19. Integrating content and language in English language teaching in secondary education: Models, benefits, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Luis Banegas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, there has been a major interest in content-based instruction (CBI and content and language integrated learning (CLIL. These are similar approaches which integrate content and foreign/second language learning through various methodologies and models as a result of different implementations around the world. In this paper, I first offer a sociocultural view of CBI-CLIL. Secondly, I define language and content as vital components in CBI-CLIL. Thirdly, I review the origins of CBI and the continuum perspective, and CLIL definitions and models featured in the literature. Fourth, I summarise current aspects around research in programme evaluation. Last, I review the benefits and challenges of this innovative approach so as to encourage critically context-responsive endeavours.

  20. Embryonic turkey liver: activities of biotransformation enzymes and activation of DNA-reactive carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Duan, Jian Dong; Jeffrey, Alan M.; Williams, Gary M. [New York Medical College, Department of Pathology, Valhalla (United States); Ahr, Hans-Juergen; Schmidt, Ulrich [Bayer AG, Institute of Toxicology, Wuppertal (Germany); Enzmann, Harald H. [Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Avian embryos are a potential alternative model for chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity research. Because the toxic and carcinogenic effects of some chemicals depend on bioactivation, activities of biotransformation enzymes and formation of DNA adducts in embryonic turkey liver were examined. Biochemical analyses of 22-day in ovoturkey liver post-mitochondrial fractions revealed activities of the biotransformation enzymes 7-ethoxycoumarin de-ethylase (ECOD), 7-ethoxyresorufin de-ethylase (EROD), aldrin epoxidase (ALD), epoxide hydrolase (EH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (GLUT). Following the administration of phenobarbital (24 mg/egg) on day 21, enzyme activities of ECOD, EROD, ALD, EH and GLUT, but not of GST, were increased by two-fold or higher levels by day 22. In contrast, acute administration of 3-methylcholanthrene (5 mg/egg) induced only ECOD and EROD activities. Bioactivation of structurally diverse pro-carcinogens was also examined using {sup 32}P-postlabeling for DNA adducts. In ovoexposure of turkey embryos on day 20 of gestation to 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) resulted in the formation of DNA adducts in livers collected by day 21. Some of the DNA adducts had {sup 32}P-postlabeling chromatographic migration patterns similar to DNA adducts found in livers from Fischer F344 rats exposed to the same pro-carcinogens. We conclude that 21-day embryonic turkey liver is capable of chemical biotransformation and activation of genotoxic carcinogens to form DNA adducts. Thus, turkey embryos could be utilized to investigate potential chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity. (orig.)

  1. Selecting ELL Textbooks: A Content Analysis of Language-Teaching Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBelle, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Many middle school teachers lack adequate criteria to critically select materials that represent a variety of L2 teaching models. This study analyzes the illustrated and written content of 33 ELL textbooks to determine the range of L2 teaching models represented. The researchers asked to what extent do middle school ELL texts depict frequency and…

  2. The Multiple Menu Model: A Successful Marriage for Integrating Content and Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzulli, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    The Multiple Menu Model is a practical set of planning guides that teachers can use to design indepth curriculum units. This model differs from traditional approaches by balancing content and process, involving students as inquirers, and exploring knowledge's structure and interconnectedness. Components include menus for knowledge, instructional…

  3. Probabilistic conditional reasoning: Disentangling form and content with the dual-source model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singmann, Henrik; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Beller, Sieghard

    2016-08-01

    The present research examines descriptive models of probabilistic conditional reasoning, that is of reasoning from uncertain conditionals with contents about which reasoners have rich background knowledge. According to our dual-source model, two types of information shape such reasoning: knowledge-based information elicited by the contents of the material and content-independent information derived from the form of inferences. Two experiments implemented manipulations that selectively influenced the model parameters for the knowledge-based information, the relative weight given to form-based versus knowledge-based information, and the parameters for the form-based information, validating the psychological interpretation of these parameters. We apply the model to classical suppression effects dissecting them into effects on background knowledge and effects on form-based processes (Exp. 3) and we use it to reanalyse previous studies manipulating reasoning instructions. In a model-comparison exercise, based on data of seven studies, the dual-source model outperformed three Bayesian competitor models. Overall, our results support the view that people make use of background knowledge in line with current Bayesian models, but they also suggest that the form of the conditional argument, irrespective of its content, plays a substantive, yet smaller, role. PMID:27416493

  4. Inversion of a radiative transfer model for estimation of rice chlorophyll content using support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jie; Yan, Zhenguo; Wei, Jingyi

    2014-11-01

    Accurate retrieval of crop chlorophyll content is of great importance for crop growth monitoring, crop stress situations, and the crop yield estimation. This study focused on retrieval of rice chlorophyll content from data through radiative transfer model inversion. A field campaign was carried out in September 2009 in the farmland of ChangChun, Jinlin province, China. A different set of 10 sites of the same species were used in 2009 for validation of methodologies. Reflectance of rice was collected using ASD field spectrometer for the solar reflective wavelengths (350-2500 nm), chlorophyll content of rice was measured by SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter. Each sample sites was recorded with a Global Position System (GPS).Firstly, the PROSPECT radiative transfer model was inverted using support vector machine in order to link rice spectrum and the corresponding chlorophyll content. Secondly, genetic algorithms were adopted to select parameters of support vector machine, then support vector machine was trained the training data set, in order to establish leaf chlorophyll content estimation model. Thirdly, a validation data set was established based on hyperspectral data, and the leaf chlorophyll content estimation model was applied to the validation data set to estimate leaf chlorophyll content of rice in the research area. Finally, the outcome of the inversion was evaluated using the calculated R2 and RMSE values with the field measurements. The results of the study highlight the significance of support vector machine in estimating leaf chlorophyll content of rice. Future research will concentrated on the view of the definition of satellite images and the selection of the best measurement configuration for accurate estimation of rice characteristics.

  5. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the carcinogens, promoters, and cocarcinogens

  6. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.E.; Burns, F.J.; Altshuler, B.

    1979-06-01

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the carcinogens, promoters, and cocarcinogens.

  7. Dissipation of pterosin B in acid soils – Tracking the fate of the bracken fern carcinogen ptaquiloside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skourti-Stathaki, Erini; Clauson-Kaas, Frederik; Koefoed Brandt, Kristian;

    2016-01-01

    Bracken ferns (Pteridium spp.) are well-known for their carcinogenic properties, which are ascribed to the content of ptaquiloside and ptaquiloside-like substances. Ptaquiloside leach from the ferns and may cause contamination of drinking water. Pterosin B is formed by hydrolysis of ptaquiloside...

  8. Changes of cerebral contents of neuropeptides in rat models of multiple ischemic dementia (MID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the significance of changes of cerebral contents of the neuropeptides somatostatin (SS), arginine vasopressin (AVP) and substance P in rat models of MID. Methods: The rat models consisted of 15 rats undergoing intracarotid injection of autogenous thrombus powder. Another group of 15 rats undergoing sham operation served as controls. Learning and memory ability in these rats was assessed with daily passive avoidance task testing for 10 consecutive days. The animals were sacrificed on 30d and contents of the neuropeptides in tissue homogenate from different areas of brain (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and corpus striatum) were measured with (RIA). Results: On the first day of passive avoidance task testing, the frequency of errors in the MID group and the control group was about the same. From the third day on, the frequency of errors in the MID group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). The neuropeptides contents of all these cerebral areas in the MID group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01) with the only exception of the contents of substance P in thalamus (no significant difference between the contents in the two groups). Conclusion: The impairment of learning and memory in rat models with MID was possibly related to the lowered contents of SS, AVP and substance P in the brain tissue. (authors)

  9. Quantitative inverse modeling of nitrogen content from hyperion data under stress of exhausted coal mining sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xia; HU Zhen-qi; GUO Li

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluating the nutritional status of vegetation under stress from exhausted coal mining sites by hy-per-spectral remote sensing is important in future ecological restoration engineering. The Wangpingcun coal mine, located in the Mentougou district of Beijing, was chosen as a ease study. The ecological damage was analyzed by 3S technology, field investiga-tion and from chemical data. The derivative spectra of the diagnostic absorption bands are derived from the spectra measured in the field and used as characteristic spectral variables. A correlation analysis was conducted for the nitrogen content of the vegetation samples and the first derivative spectrum and the estimation model of nitrogen content established by a multiple stepwise linear regression method. The spatial distribution of nitrogen content was extracted by a parameter mapping method from the Hyperion data which revealed the distribution of the nitrogen content. In addition, the estimation model was evaluated for two evaluation indicators which are important for the precision of the model. Experimental results indicate that by linear regression and parameter mapping, the estimation model precision was very high. The coefficient of determination, R2, was 0.795 and the standard deviation of residual (SDR) 0.19. The nitrogen content of most samples was about 1.03% and the nitrogen content in the study site seems inversely proportional to the distance from the piles of coal waste. Therefore, we can conclude that inversely modeling nitrogen content by hyper-speetral remote sensing in exhausted coal mining sites is feasible and our study can be taken as reference in spe-cies selection and in subsequent management and maintenance in ecological restoration.

  10. Modeling and optimization of cloud-ready and content-oriented networks

    CERN Document Server

    Walkowiak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on modeling and optimization of cloud-ready and content-oriented networks in the context of different layers and accounts for specific constraints following from protocols and technologies used in a particular layer. It addresses a wide range of additional constraints important in contemporary networks, including various types of network flows, survivability issues, multi-layer networking, and resource location. The book presents recent existing and new results in a comprehensive and cohesive way. The contents of the book are organized in five chapters, which are mostly self-contained. Chapter 1 briefly presents information on cloud computing and content-oriented services, and introduces basic notions and concepts of network modeling and optimization. Chapter 2 covers various optimization problems that arise in the context of connection-oriented networks. Chapter 3 focuses on modeling and optimization of Elastic Optical Networks. Chapter 4 is devoted to overlay networks. The book concludes w...

  11. Researchers exploring faster alternatives to 2-year test for carcinogenicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Charlie

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: Animals;Animals,Laboratory;biomarkers of exposure & effect: validation;Carcinogenicity Tests;Carcinogens;Female;metabolism;methods;Male;Mice;Pharmaceutical Preparations;Predictive Value of Tests;Prognosis;Rats;standards;Species Specificity;trends;Time Factors;Tumor Markers,Biological;United States;United States Environmental Protection Agency;United States Food and Drug Administration.

  12. Environmental carcinogenic agents and cancer prevention. Risk assessment and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many agents in our environment have been established as being carcinogenic, and in most cases, the carcinogenic properties of these agents were identified because of high-dose occupational or accidental exposure. Risk characterization, taking into account the dose-response relationship, and exposure assessment are essential for risk assessment and subsequent cancer prevention. Based on scientific risk assessment, risk management should be conducted practically by considering the economic, social, political, and other technical issues and by balancing the risks and benefits. Asbestos and environmental tobacco smoke are typical examples of established carcinogenic agents in the general environment, contributing to low-dose exposure. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the carcinogenicity of low-dose exposure to known carcinogenic agents such as arsenic and cadmium through dietary intake, radiation via medical and natural exposure, and air pollution due to diesel exhaust. In contrast, occupational chemical exposure to 1,2-dichloropropane and/or dichloromethane, whose carcinogenicity had not been established, was suggested to cause cholangiocarcinoma among workers involved in offset color proof-printing only after a rare situation of high-dose exposure was unveiled. Continuous monitoring of unusual cancer occurrences in target populations such as workers in occupational and regional settings as well as exposure reduction to suspected carcinogenic agents to levels as low as reasonably achievable is essential for reducing the risk of cancer due to environmental carcinogens. (author)

  13. Carcinogens in the Workplace: A Scientific, Political and Social Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Atherley, Gordon; Whiting, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Investigation, assessment, and management of carcinogenic risks are not only scientific but also political responsibilities. In Canada, this becomes cumbersome, since local, provincial and federal policies are involved. The process also involves workers and management. This article outlines Canadian legislative experience, the principles involved, the methods of risk assessment, and the classification of carcinogens in the workplace.

  14. Workshop on problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    A workshop was conducted to discuss problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines. Session topics included (1) definition of a carcinogen for regulatory purposes; (2) potency; (3) risk assessment; (4) uncertainties; (5) de minimis quantity; and (6) legal and regulatory issues. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  15. Carcinogenic risk of copper gluconate evaluated by a rat medium-term liver carcinogenicity bioassay protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Masayoshi; Usuda, Koji; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi; Furukawa, Satoshi [Nissan Chemical Industries Limited, Toxicology and Environmental Science Department, Biological Research Laboratories, Saitama (Japan); Igarashi, Maki [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Laboratory of Protection of Body Function, Department of Food and Nutritional Science, Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Nakae, Dai [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Laboratory of Protection of Body Function, Department of Food and Nutritional Science, Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Carcinogenic risk and molecular mechanisms underlying the liver tumor-promoting activity of copper gluconate, an additive of functional foods, were investigated using a rat medium-term liver carcinogenicity bioassay protocol (Ito test) and a 2-week short-term administration experiment. In the medium-term liver bioassay, Fischer 344 male rats were given a single i.p. injection of N-nitrosodiethylamine at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. as a carcinogenic initiator. Starting 2 weeks thereafter, rats received 0, 10, 300 or 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate in diet for 6 weeks. All rats underwent 2/3 partial hepatectomy at the end of week 3, and all surviving rats were killed at the end of week 8. In the short-term experiment, rats were given 0, 10, 300 or 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate for 2 weeks. Numbers of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive lesions, single GST-P-positive hepatocytes and 8-oxoguanine-positive hepatocytes, and levels of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the liver were significantly increased by 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate in the medium-term liver bioassay. Furthermore, hepatic mRNA expression of genes relating to the metal metabolism, inflammation and apoptosis were elevated by 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate both in the medium-term liver bioassay and the short-term experiments. These results indicate that copper gluconate possesses carcinogenic risk toward the liver at the high dose level, and that oxidative stress and inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signaling statuses may participate in its underlying mechanisms. (orig.)

  16. Lymphocyte reactivity of workers exposed to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, S.; Taylor, G; Hurst, W; Wilson, P.; Costello, C B

    1981-01-01

    Immunological studies have shown an increased lymphocyte reactivity in patients with early stage bladder cancer and individuals with pre-stage T1 exposed to bladder carcinogens (2-naphthylamine and industrial 1-naphthylamine containing 4-8% 2-naphthylamine) before 1952-that is, those at high risk of developing bladder cancer. Because of the close chemical similarity of Tobias acid (2-naphthylamine-1 sulphonic acid) to 2-naphthylamine, the lymphocytotoxicity of workers exposed to this chemical...

  17. Aggregate Interference Modeling in Cognitive Radio Networks with Power and Contention Control

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zengmao; Hong, Xuemin; Thompson, John; Vorobyov, Sergiy A; Ge, Xiaohu; Xiao, Hailin; Zhao, Feng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an interference model for cognitive radio (CR) networks employing power control, contention control or hybrid power/contention control schemes. For the first case, a power control scheme is proposed to govern the transmission power of a CR node. For the second one, a contention control scheme at the media access control (MAC) layer, based on carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA), is proposed to coordinate the operation of CR nodes with transmission requests. The probability density functions of the interference received at a primary receiver from a CR network are first derived numerically for these two cases. For the hybrid case, where power and contention controls are jointly adopted by a CR node to govern its transmission, the interference is analyzed and compared with that of the first two schemes by simulations. Then, the interference distributions under the first two control schemes are fitted by log-normal distributions with greatly reduced complexity...

  18. Morpes: A Model for Personalized Rendering of Web Content on Mobile Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kuppusamy, K S; 10.5121/ijfcst.2012.2204

    2012-01-01

    With the tremendous growth in the information communication sector, the mobile phones have become the prime information communication devices. The convergence of traditional telephony with the modern web enabled communication in the mobile devices has made the communication much effective and simpler. As mobile phones are becoming the crucial source of accessing the contents of the World Wide Web which was originally designed for personal computers, has opened up a new challenge of accommodating the web contents in to the smaller mobile devices. This paper proposes an approach towards building a model for rendering the web pages in mobile devices. The proposed model is based on a multi-dimensional web page segment evaluation model. The incorporation of personalization in the proposed model makes the rendering user-centric. The proposed model is validated with a prototype implementation.

  19. Archetype-based conversion of EHR content models: pilot experience with a regional EHR system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exchange of Electronic Health Record (EHR data between systems from different suppliers is a major challenge. EHR communication based on archetype methodology has been developed by openEHR and CEN/ISO. The experience of using archetypes in deployed EHR systems is quite limited today. Currently deployed EHR systems with large user bases have their own proprietary way of representing clinical content using various models. This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of representing EHR content models from a regional EHR system as openEHR archetypes and inversely to convert archetypes to the proprietary format. Methods The openEHR EHR Reference Model (RM and Archetype Model (AM specifications were used. The template model of the Cambio COSMIC, a regional EHR product from Sweden, was analyzed and compared to the openEHR RM and AM. This study was focused on the convertibility of the EHR semantic models. A semantic mapping between the openEHR RM/AM and the COSMIC template model was produced and used as the basis for developing prototype software that performs automated bi-directional conversion between openEHR archetypes and COSMIC templates. Results Automated bi-directional conversion between openEHR archetype format and COSMIC template format has been achieved. Several archetypes from the openEHR Clinical Knowledge Repository have been imported into COSMIC, preserving most of the structural and terminology related constraints. COSMIC templates from a large regional installation were successfully converted into the openEHR archetype format. The conversion from the COSMIC templates into archetype format preserves nearly all structural and semantic definitions of the original content models. A strategy of gradually adding archetype support to legacy EHR systems was formulated in order to allow sharing of clinical content models defined using different formats. Conclusion The openEHR RM and AM are expressive enough to

  20. Perceived social structural relations and group stereotypes : A test of the Stereotype Content Model in Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Heleen; Verkuijten, Maykel; Khan, Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    Using data from two studies, the current research tests the Stereotype Content Model (SCM) within a Malaysian context using Chinese and ethnic Malay participants. The aim of the research is to examine the theoretical underpinnings of the SCM in a new context by investigating the role of aspects of t

  1. A complex permittivity model for field estimation of soil water contents using time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate electromagnetic sensing of soil water contents (') under field conditions is complicated by the dependence of permittivity on specific surface area, temperature, and apparent electrical conductivity, all which may vary across space or time. We present a physically-based mixing model to pred...

  2. Complex permittivity model for time domain reflectometry soil water content sensing: I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite numerous applications of time-domain reflectometry (TDR), serious difficulties exist in estimating accurate soil water contents under field conditions remain, especially in fine-textured soils. We developed a physically-based calibration model to predict the frequency and temperature depende...

  3. Complex permittivity model for time domain reflectometry soil water content sensing: II. Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite numerous applications of time domain reflectometry (TDR), serious difficulties in estimating accurate soil water contents under field conditions remain, especially in fine-textured soils. Our objectives were to calibrate a complex dielectric mixing model described by Schwartz et al. (this is...

  4. Beacon satellite studies and modelling of total electron contents of the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to highlight some of the beacon satellite studies, particularly those relating to total electron content (TEC) and scintillations, with special attention to Indian subcontinent observations. The modelling of TEC is described. The scope of new experiments for specific problem is indicated. (author). 78 refs., 12 figs

  5. Multi-model Music Content Description and Retrieval Using IEEE 1599 XML Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pinto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The new format IEEE 1599 for music and audio content description defines a standard for the representation of retrieval models within music and music/audio formats that makes use of XML documents as content descriptors. In this article, it is described how music/audio semantics can be actually represented within the Structural Layer of IEEE 1599, thanks to the introduction of novel Music Information Retrieval (MIR objects that can be exploited by music search engines. A complete description of MIR objects is provided and it is shown how they can be used to embed metadata relative to specific music retrieval models, thus allowing for the description of music content in different retrieval contexts. To this aim, a new concept for MIR Model is introduced together with its formalization and tools provided by category theory. The role of MIR objects and morphisms in music content description and retrieval is explained. Furthermore, a concrete example is given with the implementation of a graph-based model within the IEEE 1599 framework.

  6. Effects of soil moisture content on reflectance anisotropy - Laboratory goniometer measurements and RPV model inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosjen, P.P.J.; Bartholomeus, H.M.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Optical methods to study soil moisture content (SMC) are often based on empirically or physically based models that relate changes in reflectance intensity to SMC. The effects of SMC on the reflectance anisotropy, however, have not received much attention. In this paper the effects of SMC on the ani

  7. Comparison of experimental slant electron content and IRI model for moderate solar activity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Reference Ionosphere model only gives the vertical electron content (VTEC). In this paper the slant electron content (SEC) for the ATS 6 satellite - Palehua (21.4 deg. N, 201.9 deg. E) radio signal path for a middle solar activity year is calculated. To this end, IRI model is used to obtain the electron density at different points of the signal path. Equinoxes and solstices are considered. Measurements obtained with Faraday rotation technique at Palehua are compared with the modelled values. Although overestimation was observed for night hours, the results show good SEC predictions for several hours at period of maximum ionisation, suggesting that would be possible to model the STEC using IRI. (author)

  8. A Novel Stackelberg-Bertrand Game Model for Pricing Content Provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the popularity of smart devices such as smartphone, tablet, contents that traditionally be viewed on a personal computer, can also be viewed on these smart devices. The demand for contents thus is increasing year by year, which makes the content providers (CPs get great revenue from either users’ subscription or advertisement. On the other hand, Internet service providers (ISPs, who keep investing in the network technology or capacity capacity to support the huge traffic generated by contents, do not benefit directly from the content traffic. One choice for ISPs is to charge CPs to share the revenue from the huge content traffic. Then ISPs have enough incentives to invest in network infrastructure to improve quality of services (QoS, which eventually benefit CPs and users. This paper presents a novel economic model called Stackelberg-Bertrand game to capture the interaction and competitions among ISPs, CPs and users when ISPs charge CPs. A generic user demand function is assumed to capture the sensitivity of demand to prices of ISPs and CPs. The numerical results show that the price elasticity of ISP and CP plays an important part on the payoff of the ISP and CP.

  9. Modeling the Dispersion and Polarization Content of Gravitational Waves for Tests of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tso, Rhondale; Chen, Yanbei; Stein, Leo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic, phenomenological approach to modifying the dispersion of gravitational waves, independent of corrections to the generation mechanism. This model-independent approach encapsulates all previously proposed parametrizations, including Lorentz violation in the Standard-Model Extension, and provides a roadmap for additional theories. Furthermore, we present a general approach to include modulations to the gravitational-wave polarization content. The framework developed here can be implemented in existing data analysis pipelines for future gravitational-wave observation runs.

  10. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Killilea

    Full Text Available One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease.

  11. Power and Contention Control Scheme: As a Good Candidate for Interference Modeling in Cognitive Radio Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireyuwa E. Igbinosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ever growing need for spectrum, the cognitive radio (CR has been proposed to improve the radio spectrum utilization. In this scenario, the secondary users (SU are permitted to share spectrum with the licensed primary users (SU with a strict condition that they do not cause harmful interference to the cognitive network. In this work, we have proposed an interference model for cognitive radio network that utilizes power or contention control interference management schemes. We derived the probability density function (PDF with the power control scheme, where the power of transmission of the CR transmitter is guided by the power control law and also with contention control scheme that has a fixed transmission power for all CR transmitter controlled by a contention control protocol. This protocol makes a decision on which CR transmitter can transmit at any point in time. In this work, we have shown that power and contention control schemes are good candidates for interference modeling in cognitive radio system. The impact of the unknown location of the primary receiver on the resulting interference generated by the CR transmitters was investigated and the results shows that the challenges of the hidden primary receivers lead to higher CR-primary interference in respect to higher mean and variance. Finally, the presented results show power control and the contention control scheme are good candidates in reducing the interference generated by the cognitive radio network.

  12. Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the feasibility of identifying and monitoring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in the workplace at Canadian nuclear establishments (Whiteshell Laboratories, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Cameco Limited and Canadian General Electric Company Limited). Recent epidemiological studies recommended that potential confounding factors of a non-radiological nature be identified and analyzed, particularly non-radiological carcinogens that may be present in the workplace at nuclear facilities. The feasibility of identifying and measuring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in Canadian nuclear facilities is examined. Also, the report describes the problem of chemical carcinogens and the mechanisms involved in chemical carcinogenesis; the epidemiology related to the problem, followed by a description of the analytical aspects of detection, monitoring and analysis of carcinogens, as well as a discussion on the regulatory aspects and the regulations in place; and the findings, recommendations and concluding remarks of this study. Several problem areas became apparent as the study proceeded. For example, the classification of a chemical as a human carcinogen is a difficult problem, as is its adequate monitoring and analysis. This situation reflects, in turn, the regulatory aspects in the workplace. A list of chemical carcinogens used industrially at the four Canadian nuclear facilities has been identified. The list includes arsenic, asbestos, benzene, cadmium, beryllium, nickel, polychlorinated biphenyls, lead and trichloroethylene. Several recommendations are made in relation to the need for practical and efficient monitoring methods for chemical carcinogens, the definition of radiation and chemical dose equivalencies, and the classification of human chemical carcinogens, as well as their disposal. (author). 122 refs., 8 tabs., 6 figs

  13. Towards incorporating epigenetic mechanisms into carcinogen identification and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zdenko; Lambert, Marie-Pierre; van Veldhoven, Karin; Demetriou, Christiana; Vineis, Paolo; Smith, Martyn T; Straif, Kurt; Wild, Christopher P

    2013-09-01

    Remarkable progress in the field of epigenetics has turned academic, medical and public attention to the potential applications of these new advances in medicine and various fields of biomedical research. The result is a broader appreciation of epigenetic phenomena in the a etiology of common human diseases, most notably cancer. These advances also represent an exciting opportunity to incorporate epigenetics and epigenomics into carcinogen identification and safety assessment. Current epigenetic studies, including major international sequencing projects, are expected to generate information for establishing the 'normal' epigenome of tissues and cell types as well as the physiological variability of the epigenome against which carcinogen exposure can be assessed. Recently, epigenetic events have emerged as key mechanisms in cancer development, and while our search of the Monograph Volume 100 revealed that epigenetics have played a modest role in evaluating human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs so far, epigenetic data might play a pivotal role in the future. Here, we review (i) the current status of incorporation of epigenetics in carcinogen evaluation in the IARC Monographs Programme, (ii) potential modes of action for epigenetic carcinogens, (iii) current in vivo and in vitro technologies to detect epigenetic carcinogens, (iv) genomic regions and epigenetic modifications and their biological consequences and (v) critical technological and biological issues in assessment of epigenetic carcinogens. We also discuss the issues related to opportunities and challenges in the application of epigenetic testing in carcinogen identification and evaluation. Although the application of epigenetic assays in carcinogen evaluation is still in its infancy, important data are being generated and valuable scientific resources are being established that should catalyse future applications of epigenetic testing.

  14. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, F.; Mayer, J.; Santella, R.M.; Brenner, D.; Jeffrey, A.; Latriano, L.; Smith, S.; Warburton, D.; Young, T.L.; Tsai, W.Y.; Brandt-Rauf, P. (Columbia Univ. School of Public Health, New York, NY (United States)); Hemminki, K. (Finnish School of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland))

    1991-01-01

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers have, however, already provided valuable insights into the magnitude of interindividual variation in response to carcinogenic exposures, with major implications for risk assessment.

  15. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers have, however, already provided valuable insights into the magnitude of interindividual variation in response to carcinogenic exposures, with major implications for risk assessment

  16. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc{sup −/−}p53{sup +/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Joost P.M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Speksnijder, Ewoud N. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kuiper, Raoul V. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dutch Molecular Pathology Center, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Salvatori, Daniela C.F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Schaap, Mirjam M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Maas, Saskia [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Robinson, Joke; Verhoef, Aart; Benthem, Jan van; Luijten, Mirjam [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Steeg, Harry van, E-mail: Harry.van.Steeg@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  17. CORAL software: prediction of carcinogenicity of drugs by means of the Monte Carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A

    2014-02-14

    Methodology of building up and validation of models for carcinogenic potentials of drugs by means of the CORAL software is described. The QSAR analysis by the CORAL software includes three phases: (i) definition of preferable parameters for the optimization procedure that gives maximal correlation coefficient between endpoint and an optimal descriptor that is calculated with so-called correlation weights of various molecular features; (ii) detection of molecular features with stable positive correlation weights or vice versa stable negative correlation weights (molecular features which are characterized by solely positive or solely negative correlation weights obtained for several starts of the Monte Carlo optimization are a basis for mechanistic interpretations of the model); and (iii) building up the model that is satisfactory from point of view of reliable probabilistic criteria and OECD principles. The methodology is demonstrated for the case of carcinogenicity of a large set (n = 1464) of organic compounds which are potential or actual pharmaceutical agents.

  18. Using digital elevation models as an environmental predictor for soil clay contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev;

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) as an environmental predictor for soil clay content (SCC). It was based on the applicability of different DEMs, i.e., SRTM with 90-m resolution and airborne Light Detection...... and Ranging (LIDAR) (in 24- and 90-m resolution), using regression-tree analysis. Ten terrain parameters were generated from these DEMs. These terrain parameters were used along other environmental variables to statistically explain SCC content in Denmark. Results indicated that the SRTM tree model (T1: 90-m...... resolution) explained the variability of SCC measurements quasi-similarly (variance V = 60%) to the LIDAR tree models with 24-m (T2) or 90-m (T3) resolution (V = 60% for T2 and 61.5% for T3). The prediction performances (in terms of RMSE) of the produced maps (using these trees) compared with independent...

  19. Decision Making Model for Business Process Outsourcing of Enterprise Content Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuojun Yi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Business process outsourcing (BPO in enterprise content management (ECM is a growing though immature market. BPO in ECM focuses on pursuing market transactions in the process of managing all types of content being used in organizations. However, inadequate sourcing decisions lead to organizational sensitive content exposure, high transaction cost, poor outsourcer performance, low flexibility. ECM BPO in general is rarely discussed in the literature and no discussion was found on decision making strategies in ECM BPO. In this paper, we present a decision making model for ECM BPO that will fill the literature gap and guide industry practitioners with ECM sourcing decision making strategies. Our proposed decision making model includes two parts. Part one is an ECM functional framework that shows what functionality component or functionality combinations can be outsourced. Part two is a decision making model that provides guidance for decision making in ECM BPO. We apply the model in two case studies, and the results indicate that the model can guide the sourcing decision making process for organizations, and determine the factors when considering sourcing alternatives in ECM.

  20. Lipid and moisture content modeling of amphidromous Dolly Varden using bioelectrical impedance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, J.T.; Margraf, F.J.; Carlson, J.G.; Sutton, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological well-being or condition of fish is most commonly estimated from aspects of individual morphology. However, these metrics may be only weakly correlated with nutritional reserves stored as lipid, the primary form of accumulated energy in fish. We constructed and evaluated bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) models as an alternative method of assessing condition in amphidromous Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma collected from nearshore estuarine and lotic habitats of the Alaskan Arctic. Data on electrical resistance and reactance were collected from the lateral and ventral surfaces of 192 fish, and whole-body percent lipid and moisture content were determined using standard laboratory methods. Significant inverse relationships between temperature and resistance and reactance prompted the standardization of these data to a constant temperature using corrective equations developed herein. No significant differences in resistance or reactance were detected among spawning and nonspawning females after accounting for covariates, suggesting that electrical pathways do not intersect the gonads. Best-fit BIA models incorporating electrical variables calculated from the lateral and ventral surfaces produced the strongest associations between observed and model-predicted estimates of proximate content. These models explained between 6% and 20% more of the variability in laboratory-derived estimates of proximate content than models developed from single-surface BIA data and 32% more than models containing only length and weight data. While additional research is required to address the potential effects of methodological variation, bioelectrical impedance analysis shows promise as a way to provide high-quality, minimally invasive estimates of Dolly Varden lipid or moisture content in the field with only small increases in handling time.

  1. Modeling Soil Water Retention Curves in the Dry Range Using the Hygroscopic Water Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Arthur, Emmanuel;

    2014-01-01

    curves of soils and to predict SWRCs at the dry end using the hygroscopic water content at a relative humidity of 50% (θRH50). The Oswin model yielded satisfactory fits to dry-end SWRCs for soils dominated by both 2:1 and 1:1 clay minerals. Compared with the Oswin model, the Campbell and Shiozawa model...... combined with the Kelvin equation (CS-K) produced better fits to dry-end SWRCs of soils dominated by 2:1 clays but provided poor fits for soils dominated by 1:1 clays. The shape parameter α of the Oswin model was dependent on clay mineral type, and approximate values of 0.29 and 0.57 were obtained...... that for soils dominated by 2:1 clay minerals, the predictive ability of the Oswin-KRH50 model was comparable to the CS-KRH50 model in which θRH50 was the input parameter but performed better than the CS-A model where clay content was the input parameter. The Oswin-KRH50 model also has the potential...

  2. Ana insect model for assessing arsenic toxicity: Arsenic elevated glutathione content in the musca domestica and trichoplusia ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaman, K.; Pardini, R.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Throughout history, arsenic has acquired an unparalled reputation as a poison. Arsenic was used as a poison as early as 2000 B.C. The toxicity of arsenic (As) extends to mammals, fish, insects, plants and fungi. According to epidemiological evidence, inorganic arsenic compounds have been strongly suggested as human carcinogens. Human exposure to arsenic through various means is correlated with an increased incidence of skin, lung, and possibly liver cancers. Inorganic trivalent arsenic is systematically more poisonous than the pentavalent form and it is possible that pentavalent arsenic is reduced to the trivalent form before exerting any toxic effects. This study focuses on the potential to use two insect species, the housefly, Musca domestica and the cabbage looper moth, Trichoplusia ni, and a model for the study of arsenic toxicity. After 48 hours of exposure to Arsenic, a significant induction of Glutathione level and subsequent decrease in the level of GSSG in both species were observed. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Potential carcinogenicity of foundry fumes: a comparative in vivo-in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humfrey, C D; Levy, L S; Faux, S P

    1996-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of workers exposed to fumes in the iron and steel foundry industry have consistently demonstrated an increased relative risk of lung cancer of approximately 1.4. Foundry fume is a complex mixture of gases and fine particles generated during the casting process when molten metal is poured into sand moulds bound together with organic binders. The chemical composition of fume varies according to foundry process and, specifically, binder composition. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that some fumes have mutagenic activity and that this varies with fume type. The current study has examined the potential carcinogenicity of three fumes in a 2-yr in vivo rodent bioassay using an intrabronchial pellet implantation technique. The toxicity and genotoxicity of the fumes were tested concurrently in a number of in vitro assays including those identifying mutagenicity, unscheduled DNA synthesis, free radical DNA damage and micronucleus induction. The rodent bioassay failed to demonstrate a carcinogenic response, although an increase in preneoplastic lesions was seen in all fume-treated groups relative to controls. When tested in vitro, the fumes were positive in many assays and activity correlated with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of the fumes. The employment of a combination of in vitro assays for different genotoxic endpoints, such as those presented in the current study, provides information useful for the overall assessment of carcinogenicity of complex mixtures such as foundry fume. PMID:9119322

  4. Contention Modeling for Multithreaded Distributed Shared Memory Machines: The Cray XMT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, Simone; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

    2011-07-27

    Distributed Shared Memory (DSM) machines are a wide class of multi-processor computing systems where a large virtually-shared address space is mapped on a network of physically distributed memories. High memory latency and network contention are two of the main factors that limit performance scaling of such architectures. Modern high-performance computing DSM systems have evolved toward exploitation of massive hardware multi-threading and fine-grained memory hashing to tolerate irregular latencies, avoid network hot-spots and enable high scaling. In order to model the performance of such large-scale machines, parallel simulation has been proved to be a promising approach to achieve good accuracy in reasonable times. One of the most critical factors in solving the simulation speed-accuracy trade-off is network modeling. The Cray XMT is a massively multi-threaded supercomputing architecture that belongs to the DSM class, since it implements a globally-shared address space abstraction on top of a physically distributed memory substrate. In this paper, we discuss the development of a contention-aware network model intended to be integrated in a full-system XMT simulator. We start by measuring the effects of network contention in a 128-processor XMT machine and then investigate the trade-off that exists between simulation accuracy and speed, by comparing three network models which operate at different levels of accuracy. The comparison and model validation is performed by executing a string-matching algorithm on the full-system simulator and on the XMT, using three datasets that generate noticeably different contention patterns.

  5. Carcinogenicity and co-carcinogenicity studies on propoxur in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Y; Baqar, S M; Mehrotra, N K

    1998-12-01

    Propoxur (2-isopropoxyphenyl methylcarbamate) is a widely used broad spectrum carbamate insecticide mainly used to control household pests. Propoxur exposure is reported to inhibit cholinesterase activity in rodents. Apart from other toxic effects, propoxur was found to possess tumorigenic activity in rats after oral administration. Propoxur does not produce tumours in mice or hamsters, or bladder hyperplasia in dogs and monkeys following oral feeding. In this set of investigations the complete carcinogenic, tumour initiating and promoting potential of propoxur was evaluated in male and female Swiss albino mice, since no information was available following dermal exposure of propoxur. The animals were exposed to propoxur through topical painting on the interscapular region at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. The results revealed that propoxur has tumour promoting potential on mouse skin following a two-stage initiation-promotion protocol, but it failed to induce the tumour(s) at a significant level, when tested for tumour initiating and complete carcinogenic property.

  6. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lawrence H. Lash; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence formin...

  7. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, F.; Mayer, J.; Santella, R. M.; Brenner, D; Jeffrey, A.; Latriano, L; Smith, S.; Warburton, D; Young, T. L.; Tsai, W. Y.; Hemminki, K; Brandt-Rauf, P

    1991-01-01

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers h...

  8. Architecture and Performance Models for QoS-Driven Effective Peering of Content Delivery Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pathan, Mukaddim

    2009-01-01

    The proprietary nature of existing Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) means they are closed and do not naturally cooperate. A CDN is expected to provide high performance Internet content delivery through global coverage, which might be an obstacle for new CDN providers, as well as affecting commercial viability of existing ones. Finding ways for distinct CDNs to coordinate and cooperate with other CDNs is necessary to achieve better overall service, as perceived by end-users, at lower cost. In this paper, we present an architecture to support peering arrangements between CDNs, based on a Virtual Organization (VO) model. Our approach promotes peering among providers, while upholding user perceived performance. This is achieved through proper policy management of negotiated Service Level Agreements (SLAs) between peers. We also present a Quality of Service (QoS)-driven performance modeling approach for peering CDNs in order to predict the user perceived performance. We show that peering between CDNs upholds user ...

  9. Best practices for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie K; Hall, Robert L; O'Brien, Peter; Strauss, Volker; Vahle, John L

    2011-02-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASCVP) convened a Clinical Pathology in Carcinogenicity Studies Working Group to recommend best practices for inclusion of clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. Regulatory guidance documents and literature were reviewed, and veterinary pathologists from North America, Japan, and Europe were surveyed regarding current practices, perceived value, and recommendations for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. For two-year rodent carcinogenicity studies, the Working Group recommends that clinical pathology testing be limited to collection of blood smears at scheduled and unscheduled sacrifices to be examined only if indicated to aid in the diagnosis of possible hematopoietic neoplasia following histopathologic evaluation. Additional clinical pathology testing is most appropriately used to address specific issues from prior toxicity studies or known test article-related class effects. Inadequate data were available to make a recommendation concerning clinical pathology testing for alternative six-month carcinogenicity assays using genetically modified mice, although the Working Group suggests that it may be appropriate to use the same approach as for two-year carcinogenicity studies since the study goal is the same.

  10. Paid content strategies for news websites: An empirical study of British newspapers' online business models

    OpenAIRE

    N. Thurman; Herbert, J

    2007-01-01

    This study uses qualitative research interviews and a survey to quantify and analyse business models at online newspapers in the UK. Senior editors and executives reported that news websites rely on advertising income to a greater extent than their print counterparts. Despite this, British news sites continue to charge users for some content, although to a varying degree. The fact that online editions still contribute barely a tenth of total revenues explains this experimental approach toward...

  11. Development of Clinical Contents Model Markup Language for Electronic Health Records

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Ji-Hyun; Ahn, Sun-Ju; Kim, Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop dedicated markup language for clinical contents models (CCM) to facilitate the active use of CCM in electronic health record systems. Methods Based on analysis of the structure and characteristics of CCM in the clinical domain, we designed extensible markup language (XML) based CCM markup language (CCML) schema manually. Results CCML faithfully reflects CCM in both the syntactic and semantic aspects. As this language is based on XML, it can be expressed and processed in ...

  12. Utility and applicability of the sharable content object reference model (SCORM) within Navy higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharopoulos, Ilias Z.; Kohistany, Mohammad B.

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited This thesis critically analyzes the Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM) within higher education and examines SCORM's limitations within a realistic application environment versus within a theoretical/conceptual platform. The thesis also examines environments better suited for implementation of SCORM technology. In addressing the research questions, it was discovered that from the current standards set forth by Advanced Dist...

  13. PORE STRUCTURE MODEL OF CEMENT HYDRATES CONSIDERING PORE WATER CONTENT AND REACTION PROCESS UNDER ARBITRARY HUMIDITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Yusuke; Oshita, Hideki

    A simulation model to estimate the pore structure of cement hydrates by curing in arbitrary relative humidity is presented. This paper describes procedures for predicting phase compositions based on the classical hydration model of Portland cement, calculating the particle size distribution of constituent phases and evaluating the pore size distribution by stereological and statistical considerations. And to estimate the water content in pore structure under any relative humidity, we proposed the simulation model of adsorption isotherm model based on the pore structure. To evaluate the effectiveness of this model, simulation results were compared with experimental results of the pore size distribution measured by mercury porosimetry. As a result, it was found that the experimental and simulated results were in close agreement, and the simulated results indicated characterization of the po re structure of cement hydrates.

  14. Modeling the Impacts of Soil Organic Carbon Content of Croplands on Crop Yields in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Jian-jun; WANG Li-gang; LI Hu; TANG Hua-jun; LI Chang-sheng; Eric Van Ranst

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the impacts of soil organic carbon(SOC)content on the grain yield of crops using a biogeochemical model(DNDC,denitrification-decomposition).Data on climate,soil properties,and farming management regimes of cropping systems were collected from six typical agricultural zones(northeast,north,northwest,mid-south,east and southwest regions of China,respectively)and integrated into a GIS database to support the model runs.According to the model,if the initial SOC content in the cropland was increased by 1g C kg-1,the crop yield may be increased by 176 kg ha-1 for maize in the northeast region,454 kg ha-1 for a maize-wheat rotation in the north region,328 kg ha-1 for maize in the northwest region,185 kg ha-1 for single-rice in the mid-south region,266 kg ha-1 for double-rice in east region,and 229 kg ha-1 for rice and wheat rotation in southwest region.There is a great potential for enhancing the crop yield by improving the SOC content in each region of China.

  15. Induction of active melanocytes in mouse skin by carcinogens: a new method for detection of skin carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, K; Inui, N; Takeuchi, T

    1981-01-01

    Application of potent skin carcinogens, such as 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, 3-methylcholanthrene, benzo[a]pyrene and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, induced numerous dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-positive cells in the interfollicular epidermis of C57BL/6 mice in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Chrysene, a weak skin carcinogen, and croton oil, a tumor promoter, also induced 3--4 times more dopa-positive cells than acetone. Liver carcinogens, such as 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene and N-2-acetylaminofluorene, and non-carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene and pyrene, did not induce increase in these cells. These results indicate that increase in the number of dopa-positive cells after application of chemicals is well correlated with the abilities of these compounds to induce skin carcinogenesis and suppress sebaceous glands. PMID:7273337

  16. Effect of the science teaching advancement through modeling physical science professional development workshop on teachers' attitudes, beliefs and content knowledge and students' content knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Laura

    The Science Teaching Advancement through Modeling Physical Science (STAMPS) professional development workshop was evaluated for effectiveness in improving teachers' and students' content knowledge. Previous research has shown modeling to be an effective method of instruction for improving student and teacher content knowledge, evidenced by assessment scores. Data includes teacher scores on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI; Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhamer, 1992) and the Chemistry Concept Inventory (CCI; Jenkins, Birk, Bauer, Krause, & Pavelich, 2004), as well as student scores on a physics and chemistry assessment. Quantitative data is supported by teacher responses to a post workshop survey and classroom observations. Evaluation of the data shows that the STAMPS professional development workshop was successful in improving both student and teacher content knowledge. Conclusions and suggestions for future study are also included.

  17. Evaluation of toxicogenomics approaches for assessing the risk of nongenotoxic carcinogenicity in rat liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Eichner

    Full Text Available The current gold-standard method for cancer safety assessment of drugs is a rodent two-year bioassay, which is associated with significant costs and requires testing a high number of animals over lifetime. Due to the absence of a comprehensive set of short-term assays predicting carcinogenicity, new approaches are currently being evaluated. One promising approach is toxicogenomics, which by virtue of genome-wide molecular profiling after compound treatment can lead to an increased mechanistic understanding, and potentially allow for the prediction of a carcinogenic potential via mathematical modeling. The latter typically involves the extraction of informative genes from omics datasets, which can be used to construct generalizable models allowing for the early classification of compounds with unknown carcinogenic potential. Here we formally describe and compare two novel methodologies for the reproducible extraction of characteristic mRNA signatures, which were employed to capture specific gene expression changes observed for nongenotoxic carcinogens. While the first method integrates multiple gene rankings, generated by diverse algorithms applied to data from different subsamplings of the training compounds, the second approach employs a statistical ratio for the identification of informative genes. Both methods were evaluated on a dataset obtained from the toxicogenomics database TG-GATEs to predict the outcome of a two-year bioassay based on profiles from 14-day treatments. Additionally, we applied our methods to datasets from previous studies and showed that the derived prediction models are on average more accurate than those built from the original signatures. The selected genes were mostly related to p53 signaling and to specific changes in anabolic processes or energy metabolism, which are typically observed in tumor cells. Among the genes most frequently incorporated into prediction models were Phlda3, Cdkn1a, Akr7a3, Ccng1 and Abcb4.

  18. STAT3 as a chemoprevention target in carcinogen-induced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Peyser, ND; Wang, L.; Zeng, Y.; Acquafondata, M.; Freilino, ML; Li, H.; M. Sen; Gooding, WE; Satake, M; Wang, Z.; Johnson; Grandis, JR

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a frequently fatal disease due in large part to a high rate of second primary tumor (SPT) formation. The 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO) mouse model of oral carcinogenesis provides a robust system in which to study chemopreventive agents in the context of chemically-induced HNSCC tumors. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a potent oncogene that is hyperactivated by tyrosine phosphorylation early in HNSCC carcinogenes...

  19. Quantitative assessment of exposure and risk for three carcinogenics in long-standing pollution sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project attempts a quantitative assessment of risks for three carcinogenics that are common in sites of long-standing pollution. Benzo(a)pyrene stands for the group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, cadmium for heavy metals, and benzene for volatile aromatic compounds. The report discusses the general fundamentals of exposure and risk assessment. The exposure model is described in detail and applied to the three test substances. (orig./MG)

  20. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  1. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Hung [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pei-Hsin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-30

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  2. Sorption, degradation and mobility of ptaquiloside, a carcinogenic Bracken (Pteridium sp.) constituent, in the soil environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Lauren, Denis; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun

    2005-01-01

    very low sorption affinity with distribution coefficients in the range 0.01–0.22 l kg1 at a solution concentration of 1 mg l1 except for the most acid soil; Freundlich affinity coefficients increased linearly with clay and organic matter contents. Negligible sorption was also observed in column studies......Ptaquiloside (PTA) is a carcinogenic norsesquiterpene glucoside produced by Bracken in amounts up to at least 13 500 mg m2. The toxin is transferred from Bracken to the underlying soil from where it may leach to surface and groundwaters impairing the quality of drinking water. The objectives...

  3. Video Quality Prediction Models Based on Video Content Dynamics for H.264 Video over UMTS Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiya Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present video quality prediction models for objective non-intrusive, prediction of H.264 encoded video for all content types combining parameters both in the physical and application layer over Universal Mobile Telecommunication Systems (UMTS networks. In order to characterize the Quality of Service (QoS level, a learning model based on Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS and a second model based on non-linear regression analysis is proposed to predict the video quality in terms of the Mean Opinion Score (MOS. The objective of the paper is two-fold. First, to find the impact of QoS parameters on end-to-end video quality for H.264 encoded video. Second, to develop learning models based on ANFIS and non-linear regression analysis to predict video quality over UMTS networks by considering the impact of radio link loss models. The loss models considered are 2-state Markov models. Both the models are trained with a combination of physical and application layer parameters and validated with unseen dataset. Preliminary results show that good prediction accuracy was obtained from both the models. The work should help in the development of a reference-free video prediction model and QoS control methods for video over UMTS networks.

  4. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-07-30

    Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish populations in the aquatic environment. PMID:24962053

  5. Modeling the effects of water content on TiO2 nanoparticles transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloni, Ivan; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The transport of manufactured titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticles (NP) in porous media was investigated by metric scale column experiments under different water saturation and ionic strength (IS) conditions. The NP breakthrough curves showed that TiO2 NP retention on the interface between air and water (AWI) and the interface between the solid and the fluid (SWI) is insignificant for an IS equal to or smaller than 3 mM KCl. For larger IS, the retention is depending on the water content and the fluid velocity. The experiments, conducted with an IS of 5 mM KCl, showed a significantly higher retention of NP than that observed under saturated conditions and very similar experimental conditions. Water flow was simulated using the standard Richards equation. The hydrodynamic model parameters for unsaturated flow were estimated through independent drainage experiments. A new mathematical model was developed to describe TiO2 NP transport and retention on SWI and AWI. The model accounts for the variation of water content and water velocity as a function of depth and takes into account the presence of the AWI and its role as a NP collector. Comparisons with experimental data showed that the suggested modeled processes can be used to quantify the NPs retentions at the AWI and SWI. The suggested model can be used for both saturated and unsaturated conditions and for a rather large range of velocities.

  6. Automobile tires--a potential source of highly carcinogenic dibenzopyrenes to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiktsis, Ioannis; Bergvall, Christoffer; Johansson, Christer; Westerholm, Roger

    2012-03-20

    Eight tires were analyzed for 15 high molecular weight (HMW) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), using pressurized fluid extraction. The variability of the PAH concentrations determined between different tires was large; a factor of 22.6 between the lowest and the highest. The relative abundance of the analytes was quite similar regardless of tire. Almost all (92.3%) of the total extractable PAH content was attributed to five PAHs: benzo[ghi]perylene, coronene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, benzo[e]pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. The difference in the measured PAH content between summer and winter tires varied substantially across manufacturers, making estimates of total vehicle fleet emissions very uncertain. However, when comparing different types of tires from the same manufacturer they had significantly (p = 0.05) different PAH content. Previously, there have been no data available for carcinogenic dibenzopyrene isomers in automobile tires. In this study, the four dibenzopyrene isomers dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, dibenzo[a,e]pyrene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene, and dibenzo[a,h]pyrene constituted automobile tires may be a potential previously unknown source of carcinogenic dibenzopyrenes to the environment.

  7. Carcinogen-specific mutations in preferred Ras-Raf pathway oncogenes directed by strand bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Ross R; Gestl, Shelley A; Lu, Amy Q; Hoke, Alicia; Feith, David J; Gunther, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    Carcinogen exposures inscribe mutation patterns on cancer genomes and sometimes bias the acquisition of driver mutations toward preferred oncogenes, potentially dictating sensitivity to targeted agents. Whether and how carcinogen-specific mutation patterns direct activation of preferred oncogenes remains poorly understood. Here, mouse models of breast cancer were exploited to uncover a mechanistic link between strand-biased mutagenesis and oncogene preference. When chemical carcinogens were employed during Wnt1-initiated mammary tumorigenesis, exposure to either 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) dramatically accelerated tumor onset. Mammary tumors that followed DMBA exposure nearly always activated the Ras pathway via somatic Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations. Surprisingly, mammary tumors that followed ENU exposure typically lacked Hras mutations, and instead activated the Ras pathway downstream via Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations. Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations involve an A-to-T change on the sense strand, whereas Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations involve an inverse T-to-A change, suggesting that strand-biased mutagenesis may determine oncogene preference. To examine this possibility further, we turned to an alternative Wnt-driven tumor model in which carcinogen exposures augment a latent mammary tumor predisposition in Apc(min) mice. DMBA and ENU each accelerated mammary tumor onset in Apc(min) mice by introducing somatic, "second-hit" Apc mutations. Consistent with our strand bias model, DMBA and ENU generated strikingly distinct Apc mutation patterns, including stringently strand-inverse mutation signatures at A:T sites. Crucially, these contrasting signatures precisely match those proposed to confer bias toward Hras(CAA61CTA) versus Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations in the original tumor sets. Our findings highlight a novel mechanism whereby exposure history acts through strand-biased mutagenesis to specify activation of preferred oncogenes. PMID:27207659

  8. A Model for Semi-Automatic Composition of Educational Content from Open Repositories of Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Rodríguez Marín

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning objects (LOs repositories are important in building educational content and should allow search, retrieval and composition processes to be successfully developed to reach educational goals. However, such processes require so much time-consuming and not always provide the desired results. Thus, the aim of this paper is to propose a model for the semiautomatic composition of LOs, which are automatically recovered from open repositories. For the development of model, various text similarity measures are discussed, while for calibration and validation some comparison experiments were performed using the results obtained by teachers. Experimental results show that when using a value of k (number of LOs selected of at least 3, the percentage of similarities between the model and such made by experts exceeds 75%. To conclude, it can be established that the model proposed allows teachers to save time and effort for LOs selection by performing a pre-filter process.

  9. Modeling of Flow Stress of High Titanium Content 6061 Aluminum Alloy Under Hot Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Guan, Yingping; Wang, Zhenhua

    2016-09-01

    Hot compression tests were performed on high titanium content 6061 aluminum alloy (AA 6061-Ti) using a Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical testing system at temperatures from 350 to 510 °C with a constant strain rate in the range of 0.001-10 s-1. Three types of flow stress models were established from the experimental stress-strain curves, the correlation coefficient ( R), mean absolute relative error ( MARE), and root mean square deviation ( RMSD) between the predicted data and the experimental data were also calculated. The results show that the Fields-Backofen model, which includes a softening factor, was the simplest mathematical expression with a level of precision appropriate for the numerical simulations. However, the Arrhenius and artificial neural network (ANN) models were also consistent with the experimental results but they are more limited in their application in terms of their accuracy and the mathematical expression of the models.

  10. Level Decreasing Kinetics Model of Heavy Metal Contents in the Coal Stockpile Wastewater with Electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusdianasari Rusdianasari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrocoagulation is one of methods used to treat wastewater in the coal stockpile without using coagulants. Characteristics of wastewater observed are heavy metals (Fe and Mn and pH.  The decrease in the heavy metals content and the increase in the pH of this wastewater treatment process will then be proposed in the adsorption kinetics model. The influence of  variations in currents and processing time were observed. The time variation of the adsorption process were 60 to 120 minutes with current variations from 1.3 to 3.0 Ampere at a fixed 12 voltages. The results obtained that the Fe content could be decreased to 0.03 ppm at 90 minutes while the content of Mn was decreased to 0.01 ppm at the same time. The increase in pH (7.11 was achieved when applying 2.5 A current at 90 minutes process time. The results obtained from the electrocoagulation method was then proposed in the model of the Langmuir isotherm adsorption kinetics and Freundlich isotherm.

  11. Review Content Analytics for the Prediction of Learner’s Feedback with Multivariate Regression Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chellatamilan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available E-learning facilitates both synchronous and asynchronous learning and it plays very important role in the teaching learning process. A large group of learners are engaged in the idea exchange independently by interacting with the members present in the learning management system. In order to generate meaningful learning outcome of the individual peer learners, the feedback review is very essential to extract the conceptual content which reflect the instantaneous learner’s behavior, emotions, capabilities, interestingness and difficulties and to fits them effectively. Collecting feedback in the form of numeric scale is very tough for both the learners and facilitators while specifying the rating, but it is too easy for the learners provide feedback in the form of text messages. The key challenge for analyzers is to extract the meaningful feedback content and dynamic rating of the learner’s feedback related to various conceptual contexts. We propose a novel method using multivariate predictive model for conceptual content analytics based on e-learners reviews using standard statistical model inverse regression. Finally the analysis is used in the prediction studies and to illustrate their effectiveness against the learner’s feedback.

  12. High-content chemical and RNAi screens for suppressors of neurotoxicity in a Huntington's disease model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Schulte

    Full Text Available To identify Huntington's Disease therapeutics, we conducted high-content small molecule and RNAi suppressor screens using a Drosophila primary neural culture Huntingtin model. Drosophila primary neurons offer a sensitive readout for neurotoxicty, as their neurites develop dysmorphic features in the presence of mutant polyglutamine-expanded Huntingtin compared to nonpathogenic Huntingtin. By tracking the subcellular distribution of mRFP-tagged pathogenic Huntingtin and assaying neurite branch morphology via live-imaging, we identified suppressors that could reduce Huntingtin aggregation and/or prevent the formation of dystrophic neurites. The custom algorithms we used to quantify neurite morphologies in complex cultures provide a useful tool for future high-content screening approaches focused on neurodegenerative disease models. Compounds previously found to be effective aggregation inhibitors in mammalian systems were also effective in Drosophila primary cultures, suggesting translational capacity between these models. However, we did not observe a direct correlation between the ability of a compound or gene knockdown to suppress aggregate formation and its ability to rescue dysmorphic neurites. Only a subset of aggregation inhibitors could revert dysmorphic cellular profiles. We identified lkb1, an upstream kinase in the mTOR/Insulin pathway, and four novel drugs, Camptothecin, OH-Camptothecin, 18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid, and Carbenoxolone, that were strong suppressors of mutant Huntingtin-induced neurotoxicity. Huntingtin neurotoxicity suppressors identified through our screen also restored viability in an in vivo Drosophila Huntington's Disease model, making them attractive candidates for further therapeutic evaluation.

  13. Modeling the influence of water content on the mechanical behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Jia, Y.; Bian, H. B.; Duveau, G.

    A unified elastic-plastic-viscoplastic model is presented for argillites in this paper. Emphasis is put on the description of long-term hydromechanical behavior of argillites under unsaturated condition. Base on the experimental investigation, the material’s behavior is characterized by important plastic deformation coupled with damage on the short-term scale while important creep deformation has been observed for the long-term material’s response. Furthermore, the water content has an important impact on mechanical behavior of argillite at different time scales. Using the unified approach proposed by Jia (2006) and Zhou et al. (2008), a general constitutive model is proposed for the poromechanical behavior of argillites in both saturated and unsaturated conditions. Main features observed in experiments are taken into account, particularly the elastic degradation due to microcracks, coupling between plastic deformation and induced damage, creep deformation and influence of water content on plastic flow on different time scales. The performance of the model is examined by simulation of creep tests with different hydraulic states. Finally, the model is applied to study the hydromechanical coupling in a resaturation-desaturation test.

  14. Modeling shoot water contents in high-elevation Picea rubens during winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, R L; Friedland, A J; Macdonald, V N

    1992-12-01

    During the winter of 1990-1991, a meteorological tower was established at an 880-m elevation site within the spruce-fir zone on Mt. Moosilauke, New Hampshire, USA. Hourly means of air, needle and trunk temperatures, wind velocity, relative humidity and solar radiation were recorded. On a weekly basis, shoots that had elongated during the preceding growing season were collected from four red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees and their relative water contents (RWC) determined. Cuticular resistances of needles from these shoots were measured four times during the winter.Measured meteorological parameters were used in a previously developed model to simulate changes in red spruce shoot RWC during the winter. The modeled results were compared to measured shoot RWCs. The predictive power of the model was improved when it was modified to include measured values of cuticular resistance and needle and trunk temperatures. The new version of the model accurately predicted RWC from late December 1990 to the beginning of April 1991, after which spring recharge appeared to occur. We conclude that water lost from foliage was easily replaced by stored reserves and that uptake of water by the roots was not required to maintain an adequate foliar water content during the winter.

  15. Modeling compositional dynamics based on GC and purine contents of protein-coding sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhang

    2010-11-08

    Background: Understanding the compositional dynamics of genomes and their coding sequences is of great significance in gaining clues into molecular evolution and a large number of publically-available genome sequences have allowed us to quantitatively predict deviations of empirical data from their theoretical counterparts. However, the quantification of theoretical compositional variations for a wide diversity of genomes remains a major challenge.Results: To model the compositional dynamics of protein-coding sequences, we propose two simple models that take into account both mutation and selection effects, which act differently at the three codon positions, and use both GC and purine contents as compositional parameters. The two models concern the theoretical composition of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids, with no prerequisite of homologous sequences or their alignments. We evaluated the two models by quantifying theoretical compositions of a large collection of protein-coding sequences (including 46 of Archaea, 686 of Bacteria, and 826 of Eukarya), yielding consistent theoretical compositions across all the collected sequences.Conclusions: We show that the compositions of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids are largely determined by both GC and purine contents and suggest that deviations of the observed from the expected compositions may reflect compositional signatures that arise from a complex interplay between mutation and selection via DNA replication and repair mechanisms.Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Zhaolei Zhang (nominated by Mark Gerstein), Guruprasad Ananda (nominated by Kateryna Makova), and Daniel Haft. 2010 Zhang and Yu; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  16. Chemomodulation of carcinogen metabolising enzymes, antioxidant profiles and skin and forestomach papillomagenesis by Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, T; Banejee, S; Yadav, P K; Rao, A R

    2001-10-01

    Numerous reports have revealed an inverse association between consumption of some selective natural products and risk of developing cancer. In the present study the effect of 250 and 500 mg/kg body wt. of Spirulina was examined on drug metabolising phase I and phase II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, glutathione content, lactate dehydrogenase and lipid peroxidation in the liver of 7-week-old Swiss albino mice. The implications of these biochemical alterations have been further evaluated adopting the protocol of benzo(a)pyrene induced forestomach and 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) initiated and croton oil promoted skin papillomagenesis. Our primary findings reveal the 'Monofunctional' nature of Spirulina as deduced from its potential to induce only the phase II enzyme activities associated mainly with carcinogen detoxification. The glutathione S-transferase and DT-diaphorase specific activities were induced in hepatic and all the extrahepatic organs examined (lung, kidney and forestomach) by Spirulina pretreatment (significance level being from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005) except for the low dose treatment in forestomach. With reference to antioxidant enzymes viz., superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione were increased significantly by both the chosen doses of Spirulina from p < 0.01 to p < 0.005. Chemopreventive response was quantitated by the average number of papillomas per effective mouse (tumor burden) as well as percentage of tumor bearing animals. There was a significant inhibition of tumor burden as well as tumor incidence in both the tumor model systems studied. In the skin tumor studies tumor burden was reduced from 4.86 to 1.20 and 1.15 by the low and high dose treatment respectively. In stomach tumor studies tumor burden was 2.05 and 1.73 by the low and high doses of Spirulina treatment against 3.73 that of control. PMID:11768236

  17. Mechanism-Based Classification of PAH Mixtures to Predict Carcinogenic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, Susan C; Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Larkin, Andrew J; Löhr, Christiane V; Williams, David E; Baird, William M; Waters, Katrina M

    2015-07-01

    We have previously shown that relative potency factors and DNA adduct measurements are inadequate for predicting carcinogenicity of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH mixtures, particularly those that function through alternate pathways or exhibit greater promotional activity compared to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Therefore, we developed a pathway-based approach for classification of tumor outcome after dermal exposure to PAH/mixtures. FVB/N mice were exposed to dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), BaP, or environmental PAH mixtures (Mix 1-3) following a 2-stage initiation/promotion skin tumor protocol. Resulting tumor incidence could be categorized by carcinogenic potency as DBC > BaP = Mix2 = Mix3 > Mix1 = Control, based on statistical significance. Gene expression profiles measured in skin of mice collected 12 h post-initiation were compared with tumor outcome for identification of short-term bioactivity profiles. A Bayesian integration model was utilized to identify biological pathways predictive of PAH carcinogenic potential during initiation. Integration of probability matrices from four enriched pathways (P < .05) for DNA damage, apoptosis, response to chemical stimulus, and interferon gamma signaling resulted in the highest classification accuracy with leave-one-out cross validation. This pathway-driven approach was successfully utilized to distinguish early regulatory events during initiation prognostic for tumor outcome and provides proof-of-concept for using short-term initiation studies to classify carcinogenic potential of environmental PAH mixtures. These data further provide a 'source-to-outcome' model that could be used to predict PAH interactions during tumorigenesis and provide an example of how mode-of-action-based risk assessment could be employed for environmental PAH mixtures. PMID:25908611

  18. Comparison of in vivo genotoxic and carcinogenic potency to augment mode of action analysis: Case study with hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Bichteler, Anne; Rager, Julia E; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Recent analyses-highlighted by the International Workshops on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group on Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Toxicology Risk Assessment-have identified a correlation between (log) estimates of a carcinogen's in vivo genotoxic potency and in vivo carcinogenic potency in typical laboratory animal models, even when the underlying data have not been matched for tissue, species, or strain. Such a correlation could have important implications for risk assessment, including informing the mode of action (MOA) of specific carcinogens. When in vivo genotoxic potency is weak relative to carcinogenic potency, MOAs other than genotoxicity (e.g., endocrine disruption or regenerative hyperplasia) may be operational. Herein, we review recent in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), following oral ingestion, in relevant tissues and species in the context of the aforementioned correlation. Potency estimates were generated using benchmark doses, or no-observable-adverse-effect-levels when data were not amenable to dose-response modeling. While the ratio between log values for carcinogenic and genotoxic potency was ≥1 for many compounds, the ratios for several Cr(VI) datasets (including in target tissue) were less than unity. In fact, the ratios for Cr(VI) clustered closely with ratios for chloroform and diethanolamine, two chemicals posited to have non-genotoxic MOAs. These findings suggest that genotoxicity may not play a major role in the cancers observed in rodents following exposure to high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking water-a finding consistent with recent MOA and adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses concerning Cr(VI). This semi-quantitative analysis, therefore, may be useful to augment traditional MOA and AOP analyses. More case examples will be needed to further explore the general applicability and validity of this approach for human health risk assessment. PMID:27085472

  19. Human Inspired Self-developmental Model of Neural Network (HIM): Introducing Content/Form Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajíček, Jiří

    This paper presents cross-disciplinary research between medical/psychological evidence on human abilities and informatics needs to update current models in computer science to support alternative methods for computation and communication. In [10] we have already proposed hypothesis introducing concept of human information model (HIM) as cooperative system. Here we continue on HIM design in detail. In our design, first we introduce Content/Form computing system which is new principle of present methods in evolutionary computing (genetic algorithms, genetic programming). Then we apply this system on HIM (type of artificial neural network) model as basic network self-developmental paradigm. Main inspiration of our natural/human design comes from well known concept of artificial neural networks, medical/psychological evidence and Sheldrake theory of "Nature as Alive" [22].

  20. Content-based similarity for 3D model retrieval and classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Lü; Ning He; Jian Xue

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid development of 3D digital shape information,content-based 3D model retrieval and classification has become an important research area.This paper presents a novel 3D model retrieval and classification algorithm.For feature representation,a method combining a distance histogram and moment invariants is proposed to improve the retrieval performance.The major advantage of using a distance histogram is its invariance to the transforms of scaling,translation and rotation.Based on the premise that two similar objects should have high mutual information,the querying of 3D data should convey a great deal of information on the shape of the two objects,and so we propose a mutual information distance measurement to perform the similarity comparison of 3D objects.The proposed algorithm is tested with a 3D model retrieval and classification prototype,and the experimental evaluation demonstrates satisfactory retrieval results and classification accuracy.

  1. Food Additives of Public Concern for their Carcinogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Gultekin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No-Observed-Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL of food additives has been long determined on the basis of toxicological studies. Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI levels of food additives for human are derived from these NOAEL, and their legal limits are then established for the food products, intentionally added with food additives. However, recent studies demonstrated that consumption of some processed food containing certain food additives might have increased the risk of cancer in human although the legal limits of these additives in processed foods are well respected by the manufacturers. Possible reasons for increased carcinogenicity risk in processed foods containing these additives can be due to various factors: -interaction of additives with some food ingredients, -food processing may change the chemical formula of food additive to a formula to be acting similarly as carcinogenic compound, -a negative synergistic effects when combined with other additives, -improper storage conditions, and -unknown carcinogenic by-products occurring during the food processing. Due to the above mentioned factors we recommend that an additive, intentionally added to the food during processing must be traced officially for its carcinogenicity. In this review, we overviewed all of the food additives authorized in European Union. Therefore, the traceability issues of processed foods containing certain food additives, which have a negligible probability of carcinogenicity in legal limits, must be reinforced in the perspective of public health concerns.

  2. Peer-to-Peer Video Conferencing Using Hybrid Content Distribution Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad Jasim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Multimedia Conferencing System (MCS is a server-based video conferencing system. One of the most critical limitations faced by this approach is the scalability issue. In the MCS, the outgoing bandwidth of the server is shared among all concurrent clients. Thus, the more clients there are, the lesser the bandwidth each client can have. The performance of this approach therefore deteriorates rapidly as the number of simultaneous clients increases. In addition, a pure server-based solution is expensive. Approach: In this research, the server-based infrastructure is modified into a peer-to-peer video conferencing system while preserving the same functionality and features of the existing MCS. This modification can be achieved using a hybrid content distribution model, which is a combination of fluid and chunk content distribution models to distribute parts of the video stream fairly among participants. The hybrid content distribution model offers a better way of handling heterogeneous networks because it can distinguish between a fast peer and a slow peer, dealing with each one according to its capabilities. Results: In our proposed system, the function server will not be used for video distribution. Instead, it will only be used for monitoring and controlling the peers to reduce the burden on the servers. Experimental results conducted in the nation advanced IPv6 center as a real environment and live conferencing. Conclusion: This will lead to overcome the problem of scalability and a bandwidth bottleneck on the main server and achieve good way to distribute video chunks.

  3. Carcinogenic potential of hydrotreated petroleum aromatic extracts.

    OpenAIRE

    Doak, S. M.; Hend, R W; van der Wiel, A; Hunt, P F

    1985-01-01

    Five experimental petroleum extracts were produced from luboil distillates derived from Middle East paraffinic crude by solvent extraction and severe hydrotreatment. The polycyclic aromatic content (PCA) of the extracts was determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction and ranged from 3.7-9.2% w/w. The five extracts were evaluated for their potential to induce cutaneous and systemic neoplasia in female mice derived from Carworth Farm No 1 strain (CF1). The test substances were applied undilute...

  4. Research on the Estimation Model of Soil Moisture Content Based on the Characteristics of Thermal Infrared Data

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jun; Jiang, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    With the portable Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), the reflectance spectra of soil samples with different moisture content are measured in laboratory for expounding the characteristic of radiation in the thermal infrared part of the spectrum with different soil moisture content. A model of estimating the moisture content in soil is attempted to make based on Moisture Diagnostic Index (MDI). In general,the spectral characteristic of soil emissivity in laboratory includes the f...

  5. A GP-MOEA/D Approach for Modelling Total Electron Content over Cyprus

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantinidis, Andreas; Agapitos, Alexandros; Papadopoulos, Harris

    2011-01-01

    Vertical Total Electron Content (vTEC) is an ionospheric characteristic used to derive the signal delay imposed by the ionosphere on near-vertical trans-ionospheric links. The major aim of this paper is to design a prediction model based on the main factors that influence the variability of this parameter on a diurnal, seasonal and long-term time-scale. The model should be accurate and general (comprehensive) enough for efficiently approximating the high variations of vTEC. However, good approximation and generalization are conflicting objectives. For this reason a Genetic Programming (GP) with Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm based on Decomposition characteristics (GP-MOEA/D) is designed and proposed for modeling vTEC over Cyprus. Experimental results show that the Multi-Objective GP-model, considering real vTEC measurements obtained over a period of 11 years, has produced a good approximation of the modeled parameter and can be implemented as a local model to account for the ionospheric imposed error ...

  6. Studies in vitro to discern the structural requirements for carcinogenicity in analogues of the carcinogen 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (butter yellow).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, J; Styles, J A; Paton, D

    1980-01-01

    4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene (butter yellow, DAB), is the parent member of a large family of 'azo-carcinogens'. Experiments have been conducted in vitro to determine the key structural requirements for carcinogenic activity in this chemical class, and it is suggested, based on the activity observed for 4-cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline, that the 4-phenylazo group of DAB is not an essential structural feature per se. The N-oxide derivative of DAB has been evaluated in vitro and the positive response observed related to its metabolic activation. It is concluded that cyclic amines, such as pyrrolidine, can replace the N-dimethyl group of DAB with a retention of biological activity. The confusion that exists in the literature concerning the chemical identity and carcinogenic status of 2-dimethylaminobenzo[c]cinnoline has been investigated, and it is concluded that it is a potential animal carcinogen. This observation also indicates that the phenylazo group of DAB can be incorporated within an aromatic ring system with a retention of biological activity. As observed earlier with a mixture of azobenzene and DAB, azobenzene also potentiates the cell transforming properties of the above cinnoline derivative in vitro. Two charts are presented. The first attempts to integrate DAB within a much larger family of carcinogens, and the second illustrates the usefulness of structure-activity studies in general.

  7. A METHODOLOGICAL MODEL FOR INTEGRATING CHARACTER WITHIN CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING IN SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Yasir Alimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I describe a methodological model I used in a experimental study on how to integrate character within the practice of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL at the higher education Indonesia.This research can be added to research about character education and CLIL in tertiary education, giving nuances to the practice of CLIL so far predominantly a practice in primary and secondary schools.The research was conducted in Semarang State University, in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, in Sociology of Religion bilingual class. The research indicates that the integration of character within CLIL enrich the perspective of CLIL by strengthening the use of CLIL for intellectual growth and moral development. On the other side, the use of CLIL with character education gives methods and perspectives to the practice of character education so far which so far only emphasise contents reforms without learning methods reforms. The research also reveals that the weakness of CLIL in using text for classroom learning can be overcome bythe use ofspecific reading and writing strategies. I develop a practical text strategy which can be effectively used in highly conceptual subject such as sociology of religion. Artikel ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan model metodologis yang saya pakai untuk mengintegrasikannya karakter dalam Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL pada pendidikan tinggi di Indonesia. Penelitian ini memperkaya penelitian mengenai pendidikan karakter dan penerapan CLIL di perguruan tinggi, selama ini penelitian semacam itu hanya biasa di level lebih rendah. Penelitian dilakukan di Universitas Negeri Semarang, pada kelas bilingual yang diikuti 25 mahasiswa, dan diujikan pada mata kuliah Sosiologi Agama. Pelajaran dari penelitian ini adalah integrasi karakter dalam CLIL dapat memperkaya CLIL. Sebaliknya penggunaan CLIL untuk mendidikkan karakter di kelas bilingual mampu menjawab berbagai tantangan pendidikan

  8. [Research on Resistant Starch Content of Rice Grain Based on NIR Spectroscopy Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi; Wu, Fang-xi; Xie, Hong-guang; Zhu, Yong-sheng; Zhang, Jian-fu; Xie, Hua-an

    2016-03-01

    A new method based on near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) analysis was explored to determine the content of rice-resistant starch instead of common chemical method which took long time was high-cost. First of all, we collected 62 spectral data which have big differences in terms of resistant starch content of rice, and then the spectral data and detected chemical values are imported chemometrics software. After that a near-infrared spectroscopy calibration model for rice-resistant starch content was constructed with partial least squares (PLS) method. Results are as follows: In respect of internal cross validation, the coefficient of determination (R2) of untreated, pretreatment with MSC+1thD, pretreatment with 1thD+SNV were 0.920 2, 0.967 0 and 0.976 7 respectively. Root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) were 1.533 7, 1.011 2 and 0.837 1 respectively. In respect of external validation, the coefficient of determination (R2) of untreated, pretreatment with MSC+ 1thD, pretreatment with 1thD+SNV were 0.805, 0.976 and 0.992 respectively. The average absolute error was 1.456, 0.818, 0.515 respectively. There was no significant difference between chemical and predicted values (Turkey multiple comparison), so we think near infrared spectrum analysis is more feasible than chemical measurement. Among the different pretreatment, the first derivation and standard normal variate (1thD+SNV) have higher coefficient of determination (R2) and lower error value whether in internal validation and external validation. In other words, the calibration model has higher precision and less error by pretreatment with 1thD+SNV. PMID:27400508

  9. Development of Experienced Science Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Models of the Solar System and the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Ineke; van Driel, Jan H.; Verloop, Nico

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the developing pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of nine experienced science teachers in their first few years of teaching a new science syllabus in the Dutch secondary education system. We aimed to identify the content and structure of the PCK for a specific topic in the new syllabus, "Models of the Solar System and the…

  10. Current issues in carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publications dealing with study of radiation sources and biological evaluation of increasing doses of people irradiation under occupational and usual living conditions is presented. The existing natural and artifial irradiation sources are considered. It is noted that all types of ionizing radiations are characterized by high carcinogenic efficiency and can induce benign and malignant tumors practically in all organs. Statistically reliable data in experimental and epidemiological investigations were recorded under the effect of large and mean doses. Minor radiation doses not responsible for visible functional and morphological changes in early periods can cause pathological changes in delayed periods. The data on carcinogenic effect of relatively small radiation doses are available

  11. Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamede Robert

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract More people are using the cannabis plant as modern basic and clinical science reaffirms and extends its medicinal uses. Concomitantly, concern and opposition to smoked medicine has occurred, in part due to the known carcinogenic consequences of smoking tobacco. Are these reactions justified? While chemically very similar, there are fundamental differences in the pharmacological properties between cannabis and tobacco smoke. Cannabis smoke contains cannabinoids whereas tobacco smoke contains nicotine. Available scientific data, that examines the carcinogenic properties of inhaling smoke and its biological consequences, suggests reasons why tobacco smoke, but not cannabis smoke, may result in lung cancer.

  12. Environmental carcinogens in human target tissues in culture: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have accumulated more experimental evidences that demonstrated the comparative approaches with human cells will allow us to predict human risk with good accuracy following exposure to toxic chemicals. We also synthesized several carcinogenic DNA adducts, i.e., the major benzo[a]pyrene DNA adduct, 06-methyldeoxyguanosine, 7-methyl- deoxyguanosine and 2-methyl-deoxyguanosine to be used as standards for quantitating DNA adduct formation in carcinogen exposed cells. A simple synthetic method was developed for preparation of the major B[a]p DNA adduct with yields better than those reported. The main accomplishments related to the originally stated objectives are summarized. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  13. Hepatic content of collagens and laminin in rat model of experimental liverfibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying De Wang; Le Wei Jia; Chun Mei Li

    2000-01-01

    AIM The hepatic content of collagens (type I, Ⅲ and Ⅶ) and laminin (LN) in rat model of experimentalliver fibrosis was observed to find out their roles in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis.METHODS The experimental rat model was established by immunological injury induced by injectinghuman albumin. Histopathological and immunohistochemical methods were used to measure the hepaticcontent of collagens and laminin in the fibrotic rat livers.RESULTS The hepatic contents of collagens (type I, Ⅲ, Ⅶ) and LN in the fibrotic rat livers weresignificantly increased as compared with those in the control group, and they were found to be mainlylocalized in the portal space, central veins and fibrous septa. Electron microscopic study showed that pro-collagens were present around the “activated” hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and the hepatocytes atrophied.CONCLUSION Pathological deposition of collagens (type Ⅰ, Ⅲ and Ⅶ ) and laminin was the fundamentallesion of liver fibrosis. HSC may be the major cellular source of collagens (type Ⅰ, Ⅲ and Ⅶ) and laminin inthe liver tissue.

  14. Structured Metametadata Model to Augment Semantic Searching Algorithms in Learning Content Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirah Ismail

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses on a novel technique for semantic searching and retrieval of information about learning materials. A novel structured metametadata model has been created to provide the foundation for a semantic search engine to extract, match and map queries to retrieve relevant results. Metametadata encapsulate metadata instances by using the properties and attributes provided by ontologies rather than describing learning objects. The use of ontological views assists the pedagogical content of metadata extracted from learning objects by using the control vocabularies as identified from the metametadata taxonomy. The use of metametadata (based on the metametadata taxonomy supported by the ontologies have contributed towards a novel semantic searching mechanism. This research has presented a metametadata model for identifying semantics and describing learning objects in finer-grain detail that allows for intelligent and smart retrieval by automated search and retrieval software.

  15. Regional reference total electron content model over Japan based on neural network mapping techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional reference model of total electron content (TEC was constructed using data from the GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET, which consists of more than 1000 Global Positioning System (GPS satellite receivers distributed over Japan. The data covered almost one solar activity period from April 1997 to June 2007. First, TECs were determined for 32 grid points, expanding from 27 to 45° N in latitude and from 127 to 145° E in longitude at 15-min intervals. Secondly, the time-latitude variation averaged over three days was determined by using the surface harmonic functional expansion. The coefficients of the expansion were then modeled by using a neural network technique with input parameters of the season (day of the year and solar activity (F10.7 index and sunspot number. Thus, two-dimensional TEC maps (time vs. latitude can be obtained for any given set of solar activity and day of the year.

  16. Mass quantization in quantum and susy cosmological models with matter content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, C [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Socorro, J [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Tkach, V I [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Torres, J [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Rosales, J [Facultad de IngenierIa Mecanica Electrica y Electronica, Universidad de Guanajuato Prolongacion Tampico 912, Bellavista, Salamanca, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2005-01-15

    We present the study of the quantum closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with a matter content given by a perfect fluid with barotropic state equation p = {gamma}{rho} The Wheeler-DeWitt equation is viewed as the Schroedinger equation for the linear harmonic oscillator with energy E. Such type of Universe has quantized masses of the order of the Planck mass and harmonic oscillator wave functions. Then, we consider the n = 2 supersymmetric superfield approach for the same model and obtain a normalizable wave function (at zero energy) of the universe. Besides, the mass parameter spectrum is found in the Schroedinger picture, being similar to those obtained by other methods, using a black hole system.

  17. How to Build a Course in Mathematical–Biological Modeling: Content and Processes for Knowledge and Skill

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskinson, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Biological problems in the twenty-first century are complex and require mathematical insight, often resulting in mathematical models of biological systems. Building mathematical–biological models requires cooperation among biologists and mathematicians, and mastery of building models. A new course in mathematical modeling presented the opportunity to build both content and process learning of mathematical models, the modeling process, and the cooperative process. There was little guidance fro...

  18. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Comprehensive progress report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1978. [Mouse skin, rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.E.; Burns, F.J.; Altshuler, B.

    1978-02-01

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the same carcinogens.

  19. A new regional total electron content empirical model in northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiandi; Wang, Zhengtao; Jiang, Weiping; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Bingbing

    2016-10-01

    Using total electron content (TEC) data over one and a half solar cycles (1999-2015) provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), this paper proposes a new empirical TEC model for northeast China (40-50N, 120-130E). The model, called TECM-NEC, involves the multiplication of four separable components, including diurnal variation, seasonal variation, geomagnetic field dependency, and solar dependency. Diurnal variation is composed of three parts: the typical daily variation of TEC; corrections of Mid-latitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (MSNA) that depend on geographic location, season, and local time; and corrections of day-to-night ratio under different seasons and solar activities. Four sub-harmonics of the year with annual, semiannual, four-, and three-month periods are used to describe seasonal variations. For geomagnetic variation, geomagnetic latitude is based on the latest International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF12) model. Compared with similar empirical models, the solar proxy index F10.7P = (F10.7 + F10.7A)/2, where F10.7A is the 81-day running mean of daily F10.7, is chosen as having linear relationship with TEC for the model. This model has 43 coefficients, which are determined by nonlinear least squares fitting (NLSF) technique. The TECM-NEC model fits with the TEC/CODE input data with a bias of 0.03TECU and a RMS deviation of 2.76TECU. The proposed TECM-NEC model can reproduce the MSNA and nighttime TEC enhancements phenomenon over northeast China.

  20. Disposition of smoked cannabis with high Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol content: A kinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: No model exists to describe the disposition and kinetics of inhaled cannabis containing a high THC dose. We aimed to develop a kinetic model providing estimates of the THC serum concentrations after smoking cannabis cigarettes containing high THC doses (up to 69 mg THC). Methods: Twenty-four male non-daily cannabis users smoked cannabis cigarettes containing 29.3 mg, 49.1 mg, and 69.4 mg THC. Blood samples were collected over a period of 0-8 h and serum THC concentrations were measured. A two-compartment open model was fitted on the individual observed data. Results: Large inter-individual variability was observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters. The median pharmacokinetic parameters generated by the model were Cmax = 175 ng/mL, Tmax = 14 min, and AUC0-8h = 8150 ng x min/mL for the 69.4 mg THC dose. Median model results show an almost linear dose response relation for Cmax/Dose = 2.8 x 10-6/mL and AUC0-8h/Dose = 136 x 10-6 min/mL. However, for increasing dose level, there was a clear decreasing trend: Cmax/Dose = 3.4, 2.6 and 2.5 x 10-6/mL and AUC0-8h/Dose = 157, 133 and 117 x 10-6 min/mL for the 29.3, 49.1 and 69.4 mg dose, respectively. Within the restriction of 8 h of observation, the apparent terminal half life of THC was 150 min. Conclusion: The model offers insight into the pharmacokinetics of THC in recreational cannabis users smoking cannabis containing high doses of THC mixed with tobacco. The model is an objective method for providing serum THC concentrations up to 8 h after smoking cannabis with a high THC content (up to 23%).

  1. Formation and Human Risk of Carcinogenic Heterocyclic Amines Formed from Natural Precursors in Meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knize, M G; Felton, J S

    2004-11-22

    A group of heterocyclic amines that are mutagens and rodent carcinogens form when meat is cooked to medium and well-done states. The precursors of these compounds are natural meat components: creatinine, amino acids and sugars. Defined model systems of dry-heated precursors mimic the amounts and proportions of heterocyclic amines found in meat. Results from model systems and cooking experiments suggest ways to reduce their formation and, thus, to reduce human intake. Human cancer epidemiology studies related to consumption of well-done meat products are listed and compared.

  2. Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity study of erythritol in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Bos-Kuijpers, M.H.M.; Til, H.P.; Bär, A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential toxicity and carcinogenicity of erythritol, a low-calorie sugar substitute, were examined in Wistar Crl:(WI) WU BR rats. Groups of 50 rats of each sex consumed diets with 0, 2, 5, or 10% erythritol, or 10% mannitol, for a period of 104-107 weeks. To each of these main groups, two satel

  3. Flavonoids and alkenylbenzenes: mechanisms of mutagenic action and carcinogenic risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Woude, van der H.; Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Schutte, M.E.; Alink, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mechanisms of mutagenic action and the carcinogenic risk of two categories of botanical ingredients, namely the flavonoids with quercetin as an important bioactive representative, and the alkenylbenzenes, namely safrole, methyleugenol and estragole. For quercetin a

  4. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein...

  5. Occurrence of the carcinogenic compound ptaquiloside in the soil environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Kroghsbo, Stine; Frisvad, Jens Christian;

    2003-01-01

    Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn) is a common fern found on all continents except Antarctica. It is under suspicion of causing cancer among people who utilizes it as food. The main carcinogenic compound is thought to be the water-soluble compound ptaquiloside. Ptaquiloside-uptake may occur...

  6. Modern Electrochemical Methods for Monitoring of Chemical Carcinogens

    OpenAIRE

    Zima, J; Moreira, J.; J. Barek

    2005-01-01

    This contribution is based on our presentation at the 1st International Symposium on Sensor Science, Paris, 16-20 June 2003. It presents recent results regarding the electrochemical determination of submicromolar and nanomolar concentrations of various carcinogenic substances (nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic compounds, azo compounds, aromatic amino compounds, etc.) using both traditional (classical dropping mercury electrode, static mercury drop electrode, hanging merc...

  7. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studie

  8. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Neil E; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier A; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Kristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela C; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Seniori Constantini, Adele; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silvermann, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that IARC Working Groups' fa

  9. Non—Genotoxic Carcinogens.Approaches to Their Rish Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.CASTRO; M.I.DiazGomez; 等

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support the idea that most human cancers are related to chemicals present in the human environment.In turn,chemicals are believed to cause cancer via either genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms.There were described in literature several simple rapid and inexpensive short term ests to reasonably predict the genotoxic nature of chemicals but in contrast,there is no reliable test or battery of tests available to predict the carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic compounds and this poses a major problem to their rish assessment.In addition,there are conflictive opinions about rish assessment needs for both classes of carcinogens.Some workers elieve that for non-genotoxic carcinogens,thresholds for exposure can be drawn while others do not.In this review,the reasons behind both of these opinions and the present hypotheses about the mechanism of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens are described and analyzed in relation to future needs.

  10. 18. Adduct detection in human monitoring for carcinogen exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Determination of the covalently bound products (adducts) of carcinogens with DNA or proteins may be used for the monitoring of exposure to these compounds. Protein adducts are generally stable and are not enzymatically repaired, and the use of these for cxposure monitoring is normally carried out with globin or albumin, because

  11. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Cagatay Bilgin

    Full Text Available BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC, and (ii heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation.

  12. EVALUATION OF ANTIOXIDANT AND TOTAL FLAVANOID CONTENT OF MIRABILIS JALAPA LINN USING IN VITRO MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subin Mary Zachariah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The herbal drugs form the backbone of all traditional system of medicine around the world due to their endless therapeutic activity. Mirabilis jalapa Linn has been hailed as a cure for many common pathological conditions affecting the human body. It has folkloric use as antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory agent, laxative, and a host of other uses. The present study was conducted to evaluate the plants potential as an antioxidant lead by using various in vitro models like FRAP (Ferric reducing ability of plasma DCF(AAPH, superoxide anion scavenging activity, nitric oxide scavenging activity and by the estimation of total flavanoid content. The plant exhibited significant inhibition of the superoxide anion and the nitric oxide radicals even at low concentration. The total flavanoid content of the extract was found to be 4.41 ± 0.02 mg /gram. The findings indicate that the methanolic extract of Mirabilis jalapa has potential antioxidant activity which is comparable to the standards. The results concluded that the extract have a potential source of antioxidants of natural origin.

  13. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Fontenay, Gerald; Cheng, Qingsu; Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i) morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC), and (ii) heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation. PMID:26978075

  14. Laboratory evaluation of a hydrodynamic inverse modeling method based on water content data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambot, S.; Hupet, F.; Javaux, M.; Vanclooster, M.

    2004-03-01

    The inverse modeling method of [2002] for estimating the hydraulic properties of partially saturated soils, which was numerically validated, is further tested on laboratory-scale transient flow experiments. The method uses the global multilevel coordinate search algorithm combined sequentially with the local Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm to obtain the inverse of the one-dimensional Richards equation using soil moisture time series measured at three different depths during natural infiltration. Flow experiments were conducted on a homogeneous artificial sand column and three undisturbed soil columns collected from agricultural fields. Three models describing the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties were used and compared: the model of Mualem and van Genuchten, the model of Assouline, and the decoupled van Genuchten-Brooks and Corey combination. The performances of all three models were similar, except for Assouline's model, which provided poorer results in two cases. The inversion method provided relatively good estimates for the water retention curves and also for the saturated conductivity when the moisture range explored was not too small. Water content time series were very well reproduced for the artificial soil and a sandy loam soil, but for two silt loam soils, larger errors were observed. The prediction of the water transfer behavior in the soil columns was poor when flow properties were estimated using directly determined hydraulic properties. The main limiting factor for applying the inversion method, particularly for nonsandy soils, was the characterization of the initial conditions in terms of the pressure head profile. Furthermore, the use of only soil moisture data is essential to enable the hydrogeophysical characterization of soils.

  15. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of PLGA nanoparticles with varied mPEG content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avgoustakis K

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mingguang Li1, Zoi Panagi2, Konstantinos Avgoustakis2, Joshua Reineke11Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Biodistribution of nanoparticles is dependent on their physicochemical properties (such as size, surface charge, and surface hydrophilicity. Clear and systematic understanding of nanoparticle properties' effects on their in vivo performance is of fundamental significance in nanoparticle design, development and optimization for medical applications, and toxicity evaluation. In the present study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was utilized to interpret the effects of nanoparticle properties on previously published biodistribution data. Biodistribution data for five poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle formulations prepared with varied content of monomethoxypoly (ethyleneglycol (mPEG (PLGA, PLGA-mPEG256, PLGA-mPEG153, PLGA-mPEG51, PLGA-mPEG34 were collected in mice after intravenous injection. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated to simulate the mass-time profiles of nanoparticle distribution in tissues. In anticipation that the biodistribution of new nanoparticle formulations could be predicted from the physiologically based pharmacokinetic model, multivariate regression analysis was performed to build the relationship between nanoparticle properties (size, zeta potential, and number of PEG molecules per unit surface area and biodistribution parameters. Based on these relationships, characterized physicochemical properties of PLGA-mPEG495 nanoparticles (a sixth formulation were used to calculate (predict biodistribution profiles. For all five initial formulations, the developed model adequately simulates the experimental data indicating that the model is suitable for

  16. Development of Prediction Model and Experimental Validation in Predicting the Curcumin Content of Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Abdul; Kuanar, Ananya; Joshi, Raj K.; Sandeep, I. S.; Mohanty, Sujata; Naik, Pradeep K.; Mishra, Antaryami; Nayak, Sanghamitra

    2016-01-01

    The drug yielding potential of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) is largely due to the presence of phyto-constituent ‘curcumin.’ Curcumin has been found to possess a myriad of therapeutic activities ranging from anti-inflammatory to neuroprotective. Lack of requisite high curcumin containing genotypes and variation in the curcumin content of turmeric at different agro climatic regions are the major stumbling blocks in commercial production of turmeric. Curcumin content of turmeric is greatly influenced by environmental factors. Hence, a prediction model based on artificial neural network (ANN) was developed to map genome environment interaction basing on curcumin content, soli and climatic factors from different agroclimatic regions for prediction of maximum curcumin content at various sites to facilitate the selection of suitable region for commercial cultivation of turmeric. The ANN model was developed and tested using a data set of 119 generated by collecting samples from 8 different agroclimatic regions of Odisha. The curcumin content from these samples was measured that varied from 7.2% to 0.4%. The ANN model was trained with 11 parameters of soil and climatic factors as input and curcumin content as output. The results showed that feed-forward ANN model with 8 nodes (MLFN-8) was the most suitable one with R2 value of 0.91. Sensitivity analysis revealed that minimum relative humidity, altitude, soil nitrogen content and soil pH had greater effect on curcumin content. This ANN model has shown proven efficiency for predicting and optimizing the curcumin content at a specific site. PMID:27766103

  17. A stoichiometric producer-grazer model incorporating the effects of excess food-nutrient content on consumer dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace, Angela; Zhao, Yuqin; Loladze, Irakli; Elser, James J; Kuang, Yang

    2013-08-01

    There has been important progress in understanding ecological dynamics through the development of the theory of ecological stoichiometry. For example, modeling under this framework allows food quality to affect consumer dynamics. While the effects of nutrient deficiency on consumer growth are well understood, recent discoveries in ecological stoichiometry suggest that consumer dynamics are not only affected by insufficient food nutrient content (low phosphorus (P): carbon (C) ratio) but also by excess food nutrient content (high P:C). This phenomenon is known as the stoichiometric knife edge, in which animal growth is reduced not only by food with low P content but also by food with high P content, and needs to be incorporated into mathematical models. Here we present a Lotka-Volterra type model to investigate the growth response of Daphnia to algae of varying P:C ratios capturing the mechanism of the stoichiometric knife edge.

  18. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogenic aromatic and heterocyclic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlewska-Roberts, Katarzyna M; Teitel, Candee H; Lay, Jackson O; Roberts, Dean W; Kadlubar, Fred F

    2004-12-01

    Lactoperoxidase, an enzyme secreted from the human mammary gland, plays a host defensive role through antimicrobial activity. It has been implicated in mutagenic and carcinogenic activation in the human mammary gland. The potential role of heterocyclic and aromatic amines in the etiology of breast cancer led us to examination of the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of the most commonly studied arylamine carcinogens: 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]-pyridine (PhIP), benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx). In vitro activation was performed with lactoperoxidase (partially purified from bovine milk or human milk) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and calf thymus DNA. Products formed during enzymatic activation were monitored by HPLC with ultraviolet and radiometric detection. Two of these products were characterized as hydrazo and azo derivatives by means of mass spectrometry. The DNA binding level of 3H- and 14C-radiolabeled amines after peroxidase-catalyzed activation was dependent on the hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the highest levels of carcinogen binding to DNA were observed at 100 microM H2O2. Carcinogen activation and the level of binding to DNA were in the order of benzidine > ABP > IQ > MeIQx > PhIP. One of the ABP adducts was identified, and the level at which it is formed was estimated to be six adducts/10(5) nucleotides. The susceptibility of aromatic and heterocyclic amines for lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation and the binding levels of activated products to DNA suggest a potential role of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogens in the etiology of breast cancer.

  19. A new model for estimating subsurface ice content based on combined electrical and seismic data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hauck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Detailed knowledge of the material properties and internal structures of frozen ground is one of the prerequisites in many permafrost studies. In the absence of direct evidence, such as in-situ borehole measurements, geophysical methods are an increasingly interesting option for obtaining subsurface information on various spatial and temporal scales. The indirect nature of geophysical soundings requires a relation between the measured variables (e.g. electrical resistivity, seismic velocity and the actual subsurface constituents (rock, water, air, ice. In this work, we present a model which provides estimates of the volumetric fractions of these four constituents from tomographic electrical and seismic images. The model is tested using geophysical data sets from two rock glaciers in the Swiss Alps, where ground truth information in form of borehole data is available. First results confirm the applicability of the so-called 4-phase model, which allows to quantify the contributions of ice-, water- and air within permafrost areas as well as detecting solid bedrock. Apart from a similarly thick active layer with enhanced air content for both rock glaciers, the two case studies revealed a heterogeneous distribution of ice and unfrozen water within Muragl rock glacier, where bedrock was detected at depths of 20–25 m, but a comparatively homogeneous ice body with only minor heterogeneities within Murtèl rock glacier.

  20. Modeling the global ionospheric total electron content with empirical orthogonal function analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN WeiXing; DING Feng; REN ZhiPeng; ZHANG ManLian; LIU LiBo; NING BaiQi

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we model the global ionospheric total electron content (TEC) with the analysis of empirical orthogonal functions (EOF).The obtained statistical eigen modes,which makeup the modeled TEC,consist of two factors:the eigen vectors mapping TEC patterns at latitude and longitude (or local time LT),and the corresponding coefficients displaying the TEC variations in different time scales,i.e.,the solar cycle,the yearly (annual and semiannual) and the diurnal universal time variations.It is found that the EOF analysis can separate the TEC variations into chief processes and the first two modes illustrate the most of the ionospheric climate properties.The first mode contains both the semiannual component which shows the semiannual ionospheric anomaly and the annual component which shows the annual or non-seasonal ionospheric anomaly.The second mode contains mainly the annual component and shows the normal seasonal ionospheric variation at most latitudes and local time sectors.The annual component in the second mode also manifests seasonal anomaly of the ionosphere at higher mid-latitudes around noontime.It is concluded that the EOF analysis,as a statistical eigen mode method,is resultful in analyzing the ionospheric climatology hence can be used to construct the empirical model for the ionospheric climatology.

  1. Modeling sugar content of farmer-managed sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A. Jaradat

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We measured or estimated leaf and root physical and chemical traits of spatio-temporally heterogeneousfield-grown sugar beet throughout its ontogeny during three growing seasons. The objective was toquantify the impact of temporal changes in these traits on root sugar content [S(R; g 100 g-1 root dryweight]. Artificial Neural Network (ANN, in conjunction with thermal time (ºCd, adequately delineatedthe boundaries (mean ± standard deviation, S.D. between S(R during early (41.6 ± 6.2, med (54.5 ± 3.0,and late ontogeny (63.4 ± 2.4, corresponding, respectively to low, medium, and high S(R. Calibrationand validation Partial Least Squares (PLS regression models, using plant physical and chemical traits,predicted and validated sugar content of sugar beet leaves [S(L] and roots [S(R] throughout its ontogenywith significant probabilities. Most physical and all chemical traits exhibited dynamic changesthroughout plant ontogeny and, consequently, negatively or positively impacted S(R. The positiveimpact of S(L and root volume (RV on S(R diminished towards the end of the growing season;whereas, the positive impact of root density (RD and carbon:nitrogen (C:N ratio in leaves [C:N(L] androots [C:N(R] persisted throughout plant ontogeny. Specific leaf area (SLA, in particular, exhibitednegative, then positive impact on S(R. The utility of physical and chemical traits of field-grown sugarbeets in building reliable PLS models was confirmed using multivariate analysis on secondary statistics(residual mean square errors, RMSE and validation coefficients of determination, Q2 whichdiscriminated between and correctly classified low (100%, medium (95% and high (97% S(R groups.The findings may have implications to design management practices that can enhance C:N ratio and Csequestrationin roots, maintain optimum, but not excessive, N level in developing leaves and roots,optimize root sugar content and minimize its variation under field conditions

  2. A METHODOLOGICAL MODEL FOR INTEGRATING CHARACTER WITHIN CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING IN SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Yasir Alimi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this article, I describe a methodological model I used in a experimental study on how to integrate character within the practice of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL at the higher education Indonesia.This research can be added to research about character education and CLIL in tertiary education, giving nuances to the practice of CLIL so far predominantly a practice in primary and secondary schools.The research was conducted in Semarang State University, in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, in Sociology of Religion bilingual class. The research indicates that the integration of character within CLIL enrich the perspective of CLIL by strengthening the use of CLIL for intellectual growth and moral development. On the other side, the use of CLIL with character education gives methods and perspectives to the practice of character education which so far only emphasise contents reforms without learning methods reforms. The research also reveals that the weakness of CLIL in using text for classroom learning can be overcome by the use of specific reading and writing strategies. I develop a practical text strategy which can be effectively used in highly conceptual subject such as sociology of religion. AbstrakArtikel ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan model metodologis yang saya pakai untuk mengintegrasikannya karakter dalam Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL pada pendidikan tinggi di Indonesia. Penelitian ini memperkaya penelitian mengenai pendidikan karakter dan penerapan CLIL di perguruan tinggi, selama ini penelitian semacam itu hanya biasa di level lebih rendah. Penelitian dilakukan di Universitas Negeri Semarang, pada kelas bilingual yang diikuti 25 mahasiswa, dan diujikan pada mata kuliah Sosiologi Agama. Pelajaran dari penelitian ini adalah integrasi karakter dalam CLIL dapat memperkaya CLIL. Sebaliknya penggunaan CLIL untuk mendidikkan karakter di kelas bilingual mampu menjawab berbagai tantangan

  3. Normalisation models for accounting for fat content in stable isotope measurements in salmonid muscle tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Abrantes, K.G.; Semmens, J. M.; Lyle, J.M.; Nichols, P D

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is increasingly used in ecological studies. Because lipid content influences d13C, lipids should be removed from lipid-rich samples before d13C analysis. To account for differences in d13C arising from differences in lipid content, relationships between lipid content, C:N ratio and ?d13C with lipid removal can be used to normalise lipid content to uniform levels. We investigate these relationships for salmonid muscle and evaluate the suitability of previously published...

  4. Construction of Models for Nondestructive Prediction of Ingredient Contents in Blueberries by Near-infrared Spectroscopy Based on HPLC Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wenming; Yoshimura, Norio; Takayanagi, Masao; Che, Jingai; Horiuchi, Naomi; Ogiwara, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Nondestructive prediction of ingredient contents of farm products is useful to ship and sell the products with guaranteed qualities. Here, near-infrared spectroscopy is used to predict nondestructively total sugar, total organic acid, and total anthocyanin content in each blueberry. The technique is expected to enable the selection of only delicious blueberries from all harvested ones. The near-infrared absorption spectra of blueberries are measured with the diffuse reflectance mode at the positions not on the calyx. The ingredient contents of a blueberry determined by high-performance liquid chromatography are used to construct models to predict the ingredient contents from observed spectra. Partial least squares regression is used for the construction of the models. It is necessary to properly select the pretreatments for the observed spectra and the wavelength regions of the spectra used for analyses. Validations are necessary for the constructed models to confirm that the ingredient contents are predicted with practical accuracies. Here we present a protocol to construct and validate the models for nondestructive prediction of ingredient contents in blueberries by near-infrared spectroscopy. PMID:27404089

  5. Azoreductase activity of Sprague Dawley and Wistar-derived rats towards both carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic analogues of 4-dimethylaminophenylazobenzene (DAB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, B M

    1984-08-01

    Azoreductase activity towards the hepatocarcinogen p-dimethylaminophenylazobenzene (DAB) and four analogues has been measured in vitro in the liver and caecum of Sprague Dawley (Alpk/SD) and Alderley Park (Alpk/AP Wistar-derived) rats. Two carcinogenic DAB analogues, 3'-methyl-p-dimethylaminophenylazobenzene (3M) and 6-p-dimethylaminophenylazobenzothiazole (6BT) and two non-carcinogenic analogues, 4-N-pyrrolidinylazobenzene (4N) and 5-p-dimethylaminophenylazoindazole (5I) have been examined. The azoreductase activity towards DAB of a 9000 g supernatant of liver homogenate was greater in the SD than the AP strain between 6 and 13 weeks of age, but comparable to that of AP rats at 4 weeks of age. The activity towards DAB fell in both strains with increasing age. Animals of both strains fed a riboflavin-low diet (2-3 mg kg-1) had reduced azoreductase activity with DAB when compared to a standard diet at all ages studied, although the difference was less marked in the AP rats. 3M and 4N were azoreduced by the livers of both strains of rat fed a standard diet at a rate of approximately 50% of that of DAB, whereas 5I and 6BT were cleaved at a much lower rate (5-20%). All the chemicals were reduced by an oxygen-insensitive enzyme in the liver preparation, as has previously been reported for DAB. DAB, 3M and 6BT were reduced at a similar rate to each other by a fraction containing caecal contents, both in and between the two strains of rat. Similarly, 4N and 5I were reduced by a caecal preparation at a similar rate to each other in and between both strains of rat, but at a rate of only 30-50% that shown by DAB, 3M and 6BT. In contrast to the conditions required by the liver azoreductase enzyme, anaerobic conditions were required for maximal activity of the caecal preparation. Liver azoreductase activity towards all the DAB analogues was reduced in both strains of rat maintained on a riboflavin-low diet, while the caecal azoreductase activity was unaffected. Neither the

  6. Carcinogenicity of oil shale tars, some of their components, and commercial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovski, P A; Vinkmann, F

    1979-06-01

    Bioassays for carcinogenicity of various primary processing products (crude oils or tars) and commercial products obtained from Estorian oil shale have been carried out since 1951. The products (undiluted or diluted) were painted twice weekly 50 times on the interscapular area of the skin of random-bred or CC57Br mice. The products processed at high temperatures have a higher carcinogenic activity. Blends of products containing over 10% of high temperature crude oil (chamber furnace oil) have about the same carcinogenic activity as the latter. There is no strict correlation between the concentration of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) in oil shale products and their carcinogenic activity. Determination of BP in such products can serve as an approximate estimate of carcinogenic properties. The results of animal experiments with chromatographic fractions of the high temperature shale oil demonstrated the presence of compounds which lengthen the latency period of the carcinogenic effect of BP in the aromatic fraction of this oil as well as other carcinogens and compounds enhancing the activity of carcinogenic compounds. Under industrial conditions, contact of workers with carcinogenic shale oils can be reduced by means of coking the carcinogenic oils, which results in production of solid coke and of distillate which is recycled. Medical vaseline potentiates the carcinogenic action of BP and similar compounds. Dilution of shale oils with oils containing aliphatic hydrocarbons cannot be considered as diminution of the carcinogenic potency of these products. PMID:446447

  7. Swedish review strengthens grounds for concluding that radiation from cellular and cordless phones is a probable human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Devra Lee; Kesari, Santosh; Soskolne, Colin L; Miller, Anthony B; Stein, Yael

    2013-04-01

    higher water content in children's tissues. High resolution computerized models based on human imaging data suggest that children are indeed more susceptible to the effects of EMF exposure at microwave frequencies. If the increased brain cancer risk found in young users in these recent studies does apply at the global level, the gap between supply and demand for oncology services will continue to widen. Many nations, phone manufacturers, and expert groups, advise prevention in light of these concerns by taking the simple precaution of "distance" to minimize exposures to the brain and body. We note than brain cancer is the proverbial "tip of the iceberg"; the rest of the body is also showing effects other than cancers.

  8. Swedish review strengthens grounds for concluding that radiation from cellular and cordless phones is a probable human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Devra Lee; Kesari, Santosh; Soskolne, Colin L; Miller, Anthony B; Stein, Yael

    2013-04-01

    higher water content in children's tissues. High resolution computerized models based on human imaging data suggest that children are indeed more susceptible to the effects of EMF exposure at microwave frequencies. If the increased brain cancer risk found in young users in these recent studies does apply at the global level, the gap between supply and demand for oncology services will continue to widen. Many nations, phone manufacturers, and expert groups, advise prevention in light of these concerns by taking the simple precaution of "distance" to minimize exposures to the brain and body. We note than brain cancer is the proverbial "tip of the iceberg"; the rest of the body is also showing effects other than cancers. PMID:23664410

  9. A Text Classifier Model for Categorizing Feed Contents Consumed by a Web Aggregator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.O.D. Longe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of using a Text Classifier to automatically categorize the content of web feeds consumed by a web aggregator. The pre-defined category of the feed to be consumed by the aggregator does not always match the content being consumed and categorizing the content using the pre-defined category of the feed curtails user experience as users would not see all the contents belonging to their category of interest. A web aggregator was developed and this was integrated with the SVM classifier to automatically categorize feed content being consumed. The experimental results showed that the text classifier performs well in categorizing the content of feed being consumed and it also affirmed the disparity in the pre-defined category of the source feed and appropriate category of the consumed content.

  10. MIRI: A Semi-Empirical Model for the Total Electron Content of the Martian Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvaez, Clara; Mendillo, Michael; Herina, Dylan; Campbell, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    The integral with height of an ionosphere's electron density profile, N _{e}(h), is defined as the total electron content (TEC). It is the total number of electrons in a column of unit area, often expressed in units of 10 ^{16} e ^{-}/m ^{2} at Earth where TEC varies between 2 and 200 such units. Mars has a far less robust ionosphere and the standard unit for TEC is 10 ^{15} e ^{-}/m ^{2}, called a TECU, with martian values being onboard the Mars Express (MEX) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) derived TEC values as part of range-error corrections and/or radargram phase focusing, and thus large data bases of TEC are now available. In this paper we use a new set of TEC data from the SHARAD experiment on MRO to develop a first-order semi-empirical model of TEC as a function of solar flux and solar zenith angle. The results are validated using a previous analysis of TEC data from the MARSIS radar on MEX, and with recent MAVEN data. A model of TEC is also useful operationally for predicting ranging-errors, phase focusing on radargrams and validation of future N _{e}(h) profiles obtained by radio occultation methods. Since most of the TEC comes from altitudes above the height of maximum electron density, TEC values may be a useful way to assess overall ionospheric escape processes at Mars.

  11. Building Information Modelling and Standardised Construction Contracts: a Content Analysis of the GC21 Contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Manderson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Building Information Modelling (BIM is seen as a panacea to many of the ills confronting the Architectural, Engineering and Construction (AEC sector. In spite of its well documented benefits the widespread integration of BIM into the project lifecycle is yet to occur. One commonly identified barrier to BIM adoption is the perceived legal risks associated with its integration, coupled with the need for implementation in a collaborative environment. Many existing standardised contracts used in the Australian AEC industry were drafted before the emergence of BIM. As BIM continues to become ingrained in the delivery process the shortcomings of these existing contracts have become apparent. This paper reports on a study that reviewed and consolidated the contractual and legal concerns associated with BIM implementation. The findings of the review were used to conduct a qualitative content analysis of the GC21 2nd edition, an Australian standardised construction contract, to identify possible changes to facilitate the implementation of BIM in a collaborative environment. The findings identified a number of changes including the need to adopt a collaborative contract structure with equitable risk and reward mechanisms, recognition of the model as a contract document and the need for standardisation of communication/information exchange.

  12. MIRI: A Semi-Empirical Model for the Total Electron Content of the Martian Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvaez, Clara; Mendillo, Michael; Herina, Dylan; Campbell, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    The integral with height of an ionosphere's electron density profile, N _{e}(h), is defined as the total electron content (TEC). It is the total number of electrons in a column of unit area, often expressed in units of 10 ^{16} e ^{-}/m ^{2} at Earth where TEC varies between 2 and 200 such units. Mars has a far less robust ionosphere and the standard unit for TEC is 10 ^{15} e ^{-}/m ^{2}, called a TECU, with martian values being Global Surveyor satellites in orbit at Mars. Subsequent radar experiments onboard the Mars Express (MEX) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) derived TEC values as part of range-error corrections and/or radargram phase focusing, and thus large data bases of TEC are now available. In this paper we use a new set of TEC data from the SHARAD experiment on MRO to develop a first-order semi-empirical model of TEC as a function of solar flux and solar zenith angle. The results are validated using a previous analysis of TEC data from the MARSIS radar on MEX, and with recent MAVEN data. A model of TEC is also useful operationally for predicting ranging-errors, phase focusing on radargrams and validation of future N _{e}(h) profiles obtained by radio occultation methods. Since most of the TEC comes from altitudes above the height of maximum electron density, TEC values may be a useful way to assess overall ionospheric escape processes at Mars.

  13. Model of Hot Metal Silicon Content in Blast Furnace Based on Principal Component Analysis Application and Partial Least Square

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Lin; LI Zhi-ling; YU Tao; LI Jiang-peng

    2011-01-01

    In blast furnace (BF) iron-making process, the hot metal silicon content was usually used to measure the quality of hot metal and to reflect the thermal state of BF. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least- square (PLS) regression methods were used to predict the hot metal silicon content. Under the conditions of BF rela- tively stable situation, PCA and PLS regression models of hot metal silicon content utilizing data from Baotou Steel No. 6 BF were established, which provided the accuracy of 88.4% and 89.2%. PLS model used less variables and time than principal component analysis model, and it was simple to calculate. It is shown that the model gives good results and is helpful for practical production.

  14. Hypoplastic model for simulation of compressibility characteristics of cement-admixed Bangkok soft clay at high water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattonjai, Piyachat

    2016-06-01

    The developed hypoplastic model for simulation of compressibility characteristics of cement-admixed Bangkok soft clay at high water content was proposed in this paper. By using unique equation, the model is able to predict the relationship between void ratio and vertical effective stress of different water and cement content of soil cement. For practically convenient utilization and understanding, the parameters of Q1 which represented to initial cement bonding of soil (the initial value of structure tensor at time = 0) and C2 which effected to the model stiffness on isotropic consolidation direction, at 45° for loading and 225° for unloading of stress response envelope, were proposed as the function of cement and water content by comparing with dry weight of soil. By numerical integration that satisfied one-dimensional settlement, the simulation results were directly compared with fifteen experimental results to verify the accuracy of the proposed model.

  15. Production of amines in equine cecal contents in an in vitro model of carbohydrate overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S R; Rycroft, A; Elliott, J

    2002-10-01

    Acute laminitis can be induced experimentally in horses by the administration of carbohydrate, resulting in fermentation within the cecum and ischemia-reperfusion of the digits. The products of fermentation that trigger acute laminitis are as yet unknown; however, compounds such as amines might play a role due to their potential vasoactive properties. The objectives of this study were to quantify the amines present in equine cecal contents and to use a model of carbohydrate overload in vitro to test the hypothesis that carbohydrate fermentation is associated with increased amine production. Cecal contents from each horse were divided into aliquots and incubated anaerobically with either cornstarch or inulin (a form of fructan carbohydrate; both 1 g/100 mL). The pH was measured and samples were taken at the same time for amine measurement by HPLC at 2-h intervals over a 24-h period. In a second set of experiments, the effects of the antibiotic virginiamycin (1 mg/100 mL), calcium (CaPO4; 0.3 g/100 mL), and plant steroidal saponin (Yucca schidigera extract; 0.1 g/100 mL) were examined on pH and amine concentrations in cecal contents incubated with starch or inulin. Both starch and inulin caused significant time-dependent falls in pH, from 6.7 +/- 0.1 at 0 h to 5.2 +/- 0.1 (starch) and 5.0 +/- 0.1 (inulin) at 24 h. Fermentation of carbohydrate was also associated with increased production of phenylethylamine and isoamylamine (two- to threefold increases) as well as putrescine and cadaverine (1.5- to twofold increases). Virginiamycin inhibited the fall in pH and increases in production of phenylethylamine and isoamylamine, while calcium phosphate moderated the changes in pH only. Yucca schidigera extract was without effect. These data show that fermentation of carbohydrate by equine cecal microbiota may lead to increased production of amines. PMID:12413088

  16. Explorable Three-Dimensional Digital Model of the Female Pelvis, Pelvic Contents, and Perineum for Anatomical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergovich, Aimee; Johnson, Marjorie; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    The anatomy of the pelvis is complex, multilayered, and its three-dimensional organization is conceptually difficult for students to grasp. The aim of this project was to create an explorable and projectable stereoscopic, three-dimensional (3D) model of the female pelvis and pelvic contents for anatomical education. The model was created using…

  17. Modelling global change impacts on soil carbon contents of agro-silvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2016-04-01

    To assess the impact of climate change on soil organic C (SOC) stocks in agro-silvo-pastoral environments, different models have been applied worldwide at local or regional scales, such as as RothC (Francaviglia et al., 2012) or CENTURY (Alvaro-Fuentes et al., 2012). However, some of these models may require a high number of input parameters or can underestimate the effect of soil depth. CarboSOIL (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2013) is an empirical model based on regression techniques and developed to predict SOC contents at standard soil depths (0-25, 25-50 and 50-75 cm) under a range of climate and/or land use change scenarios. CarboSOIL has been successfully applied in different Mediterranean areas ,e.g. Southern Spain (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2013; Abd-Elmabod et al., 2014), Northern Egypt (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2014) and Italy (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2015). In this study, CarboSOIL was applied in the Cardeña and Montoro mountain range Natural Park. This area covers 385 km2 and is located within Sierra Morena (Córdoba, South Spain) and has a semiarid Mediterranean climate. It is characterized by agro-silvo-pastoral systems. The Mediterranean evergreen oak woodland (MEOW-dehesa) is savanna-like open woodland ecosystem characterized by silvopastoral uses, being an ancient human modified Mediterranean landscape (Corral-Fernández et al., 2013; Lozano-García and Parras-Alcántara 2013). The most representative soils in the Cardeña and Montoro mountain range Natural Park are Cambisols, Regosols, Leptosols and Fluvisols. These soils are characterized by low fertility, poor physical conditions and marginal capacity for agricultural use, together with low organic matter (OM) content due to climate conditions (semiarid Mediterranean climate) and soil texture (sandy). The model was applied at different soil depths: 0-25, 25-50 and 50-75 cm (Parras-Alcántara et al., 2015) considering land use and climate changes scenarios based on available global climate models (IPPC, 2007). A

  18. Prediction of Non-Genotoxic Carcinogenicity Based on Genetic Profiles of Short Term Exposure Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Luis Orlando; González-José, Rolando; García, Pilar Peral

    2016-01-01

    Non-genotoxic carcinogens are substances that induce tumorigenesis by non-mutagenic mechanisms and long term rodent bioassays are required to identify them. Recent studies have shown that transcription profiling can be applied to develop early identifiers for long term phenotypes. In this study, we used rat liver expression profiles from the NTP (National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, USA) DrugMatrix Database to construct a gene classifier that can distinguish between non-genotoxic carcinogens and other chemicals. The model was based on short term exposure assays (3 days) and the training was limited to oxidative stressors, peroxisome proliferators and hormone modulators. Validation of the predictor was performed on independent toxicogenomic data (TG-GATEs, Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System, Osaka, Japan). To build our model we performed Random Forests together with a recursive elimination algorithm (VarSelRF). Gene set enrichment analysis was employed for functional interpretation. A total of 770 microarrays comprising 96 different compounds were analyzed and a predictor of 54 genes was built. Prediction accuracy was 0.85 in the training set, 0.87 in the test set and increased with increasing concentration in the validation set: 0.6 at low dose, 0.7 at medium doses and 0.81 at high doses. Pathway analysis revealed gene prominence of cellular respiration, energy production and lipoprotein metabolism. The biggest target of toxicogenomics is accurately predict the toxicity of unknown drugs. In this analysis, we presented a classifier that can predict non-genotoxic carcinogenicity by using short term exposure assays. In this approach, dose level is critical when evaluating chemicals at early time points.

  19. [Carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in the tire industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol?kaia, N N; Krivosheeva, L V; Khesing, A Ia; Piven, V A; Kavun, S M

    1993-01-01

    The level of volatile carcinogenic N-nitrosamines (NA) was studied in the air of various technological sites of tyre production. Reported total levels of NA in air exceeded MACs set in certain countries for the same enterprises. For example, German total MAC for 12 carcinogenic NA is 1 g/m3. N-nitrosomorpholine appeared to have the highest level (91 g/m3), probably, because its derivatives are used as raw material for technological process. Relative rate of volatile NA release from rubber samples containing 4-nitrosodiphenylamine (modifier) was studied. The parameter was reported to have no influence on NA outlet in conditions simulating technological process. NA was detected by means of gas chromatography with thermal energy detector TEA 502A provided by Thermo Electron Corporation, USA. The article necessitates regulation of NA in tyre production and better rubber mixtures to control the pollution of atmosphere. PMID:8069502

  20. Chronic exposure to combined carcinogens enhances breast cell carcinogenesis with mesenchymal and stem-like cell properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenora Ann Pluchino

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in North America and Europe. More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to small quantities of multiple carcinogens. To understand how multiple carcinogens act together to induce cellular carcinogenesis, we studied the activity of environmental carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, and dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP using our breast cell carcinogenesis model. Our study revealed, for the first time, that combined NNK and B[a]P enhanced breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by PhIP in both non-cancerous and cancerous breast cells. Co-exposure was more potent than sequential exposure to combined NNK and B[a]P followed by PhIP in inducing carcinogenesis. Initiation of carcinogenesis was measured by transient endpoints induced in a single exposure, while progression of carcinogenesis was measured by acquisition of constitutive endpoints in cumulative exposures. Transient endpoints included DNA damage, Ras-Erk-Nox pathway activation, reactive oxygen species elevation, and increased cellular proliferation. Constitutive endpoints included various cancer-associated properties and signaling modulators, as well as enrichment of cancer stem-like cell population and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program. Using transient and constitutive endpoints as targets, we detected that a combination of the green tea catechins ECG and EGCG, at non-cytotoxic levels, was more effective than individual agents in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by combined NNK, B[a]P, and PhIP. Thus, use of combined ECG and EGCG should be seriously considered for early intervention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens.

  1. A Novel Stackelberg-Bertrand Game Model for Pricing Content Provider

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Zhang; Bo Gu; Kyoko Yamori; Sugang Xu; Yoshiaki Tanaka

    2015-01-01

    With the popularity of smart devices such as smartphone, tablet, contents that traditionally be viewed on a personal computer, can also be viewed on these smart devices. The demand for contents thus is increasing year by year, which makes the content providers (CPs) get great revenue from either users’ subscription or advertisement. On the other hand, Internet service providers (ISPs), who keep investing in the network technology or capacity capacity to support the huge traffic generated by c...

  2. Decision Making Model for Business Process Outsourcing of Enterprise Content Management

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuojun Yi; Dongming Xu

    2013-01-01

    Business process outsourcing (BPO) in enterprise content management (ECM) is a growing though immature market. BPO in ECM focuses on pursuing market transactions in the process of managing all types of content being used in organizations. However, inadequate sourcing decisions lead to organizational sensitive content exposure, high transaction cost, poor outsourcer performance, low flexibility. ECM BPO in general is rarely discussed in the literature and no discussion was found on decision ma...

  3. The Integration of Disability Content into Social Work Education: An Examination of Infused and Dedicated Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen Faye Bean; Taylor E. Krcek

    2012-01-01

    Disability content has been slowly integrated into social work curricula despite the large proportion of social workers supporting people with disabilities and its requirement in social work education by the Council on Social Work Education Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Schools of social work offer disability content to their students in three ways: infused, dedicated (specialization), or a combination of both. A content analysis of 1620 course titles and descriptions from t...

  4. Router Modelling and Packet Level Cache Implementation for Content Aware TCP (CATCP)

    OpenAIRE

    Budigere Ramakrishna, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Internet is more content oriented than ever before, In today's Internet scalable content access is provided by content distribution networks (CDN), application specific caches, proxies etc. The proliferation of these systems is complex and expensive. In the past few years many data-oriented or information-centric network architectures have been proposed such as DONA, PSIRP, CCN etc, but these new clean-state architecture proposals have seen little deployment because of its expensive initial c...

  5. Some carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R. K.; Kumar, Pardeep; Ram, R. S.; Zaidi, Zahid H.

    1999-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have attracted spectroscopists, astrophysicts and environmentalist because of their importance in our day to day life. It is well known that epoxides are produced during the metabolism of PAHs and have the requisite chemical reactivity to qualify them for the role as an ultimate carcinogenic form of PAHs. Several carcinogenic PAHs such as 3.4-benzopyrene, 1.2,3.4-dibenzopyrene, 3.4,9.10- dibenzopyrene etc. are found to be present in tobacco smoke and among air pollutants. Although PAH molecules are being studied for last several years by using conventional spectroscopy but no systematic attempt has been made to study non-radiative transitions. In our laboratory, we have studied many PAH molecules by a non-destructive technique with unique capability and sensitivity, known as Photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy. PA spectroscopy is an analytical and research tool to get information about non-radiative transitions and singlet-triplet electronic transitions, where the conventional spectroscopic technique fails. The study of electronic transitions of some carcinogenic molecules are reported using PA and optical absorption spectra in boric acid glass in the region 250 - 400 nm. The electronic transitions of these molecules observed experimentally, have been interpreted using the optimized geometries and CNDO/S-CI method. A good agreement is found between the experimental and calculated results. Assignments of observed electronic transitions are made on the basis of singlet-triplet electronic transitions. Vibrations attached to these electronic transitions are attributed to the ground state vibrational modes.

  6. Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, M R; Diehl, V

    2004-10-01

    Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible. PMID:15367404

  7. Superstrings, entropy and the elementary particles content of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of interconnected issues involving superstring theory, entropy and the particle content of the standard model of high energy physics are discussed in the present work. It is found that within a non-transfinite approximation, the number of elementary particles is given by DimSU(8) in full agreement with the prediction gained from dividing the total number of the massless level of Heterotic string theory (256)(16)=8064 by the spin representation 27=128 which gives DimSU(8)=(8)2-1=(8064)/(128)=63 particles. For the exact transfinite case however, one finds our previously established E-infinity result:N=(336+16k)(3/2+k)(16+k)/(128+8k)=α-bar o/2,where k=φ3(1-φ3), φ=(5-1)/2 and α-bar o/2=68.54101965. Setting k=0 one finds that n=63 exactly as in the non-transfinite case

  8. Vesiculation in rhyolite at low H2O contents: A thermodynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Amy G.; Russell, James K.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Phillion, Andre B.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental data on the thermodynamics and kinetics of bubble nucleation and growth in weakly H2O-oversaturated rhyolitic melts. The high-temperature (900-1100°C) experiments involve heating of rhyolitic obsidian from Hrafntinnuhryggur, Krafla, Iceland to above their glass transition temperature (Tg ˜ 690°C) at 0.1 MPa for times of 0.25-24 h. During experiments, the rhyolite cores increase in volume as H2O vapor-filled bubbles nucleate and expand. The extent of vesiculation, as tracked by porosity, is mapped in temperature-time (T-t) space. At constant temperature and for a characteristic dwell time, the rhyolite cores achieve a maximum volume where the T-t conditions reach thermochemical equilibrium. For each T-t snapshot of vesiculation, we use 3-D analysis of X-ray computed tomographic (XCT) images of the quenched cores to obtain the bubble number density (BND) and bubble-size distribution (BSD). BNDs for the experimental cores are insensitive to T and t, indicating a single nucleation event. All BSDs converge to a common distribution, independent of T, melt viscosity (η), or initial degree of saturation, suggesting a common growth process. We use these data to calibrate an empirical model for predicting the rates and amounts of vesiculation in rhyolitic melts as a function of η and thermochemical affinity (A): two computable parameters that are dependent on T, pressure and H2O content. The model reproduces the experimental data set and data from the literature to within experimental error, and has application to natural volcanic systems where bubble formation and growth are not diffusion limited (e.g., lavas, domes, ignimbrites, conduit infill).

  9. [MATline, a job-exposure matrix for the prevision of exposure to carcinogens: new functions and potential applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Umberto; Gilardi, Luisella; Santoro, Silvano; Orengia, Manuela; Marighella, Massimo; Coffano, Maria Elena

    2013-01-01

    MATline, the job-exposure matrix for carcinogenic agents, is a data bank free accessible online. It provides data as classification and toxicological properties of carcinogenic agents, and a list of industrial processes with potential exposure to each carcinogen agent, and an up-to-date estimation of the number of activities and workers related to the industrial process on Regional basis. It also lists the target organs for which a causal relationship with the agent has been established. MATline was recently updated with the new classifications introduced by Regulation EC No. 1272/2008 (CLP). The Authorisation List or the Restriction of the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization of Chemicals (REACh) regulation specifically mark chemicals. The matrix is helpful for professionals in the public health sector to identify in advance the potential sources of exposure, and prioritise intervention plans; for occupational physicians to help identifying causes of occupational cancer cases; for health professionals in the private sector to address chemical risks; for company physicians to validate health surveillance plans; for trade unions to independently check formation contents provided to workers potentially exposed to such risks. PMID:23585435

  10. Station Based Polynomial Modeling of the local ionospheric Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) using Particle Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Eren; Onur Karslioglu, Mahmut; Durmaz, Murat; Aghakarimi, Armin

    2014-05-01

    parameters, Ionospheric VTEC map covering the predefined region has been produced by interpolation. VTEC values at a grid node of the map have been computed based on the four closest ground stations by means of inverse distance squared weighted average. The GPS data which is acquired from ground based stations have been made available from the International GNSS Service (IGS) and the Reference Frame Sub-commission for Europe (EUREF). Raw GPS observations have been preprocessed to detect cycle slips and to form geometry-free linear combinations of observables for each continuous arc. Then the obtained pseudoranges have been smoothed with the carrier to code leveling method. Finally, the performance of the particle filter to investigate the local characteristics of the ionospheric Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) has been evaluated and the result has been compared with the result of a standard Kalman filter. Keywords: ionosphere, GPS , Particle filer, VTEC modeling

  11. Use of the Rasch measurement model to explore the relationship between content knowledge and topic-specific pedagogical content knowledge for organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowitz, Bette; Potgieter, Marietjie

    2016-06-01

    Research has shown that a high level of content knowledge (CK) is necessary but not sufficient to develop the special knowledge base of expert teachers known as pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This study contributes towards research to quantify the relationship between CK and PCK in science. In order to determine the proportion of the variance in PCK accounted for by the variance in CK, instruments are required which are valid and reliable as well as being unidimensional to measure person abilities for CK and PCK. An instrument consisting of two paper-and-pencil tests was designed to assess Grade 12 teachers CK and PCK in organic chemistry. We used the Rasch measurement model to convert raw score data into interval measures and to provide empirical evidence for the validity, reliability and unidimensionality of the tests. The correlation between CK and PCK was estimated as r = .66 (p < .001). We found evidence to suggest that while topic-specific PCK (TSPCK) develops with increasing teaching experience, high levels of CK can be acquired with limited teaching experience. These findings support the hypothesis that CK is a requirement for the development of TSPCK; proficiency in CK is, however, not necessarily associated with high levels of TSPCK.

  12. Study on Model of Correlation Between Chemical Element Contents in Tree Rings and Soils near Tree Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KESHAN-ZHE; QIANJUN-LONG; 等

    1994-01-01

    The chemical element contents in tree rings are correlated with those in the soils near the tree roots,The results in the present study showed that the correlation between them could be described using the following logarithmic linear correlation model:lgC'(Z)=a(Z)+b(Z)lgC(Z).Therefor,by determining the chrono-sequence C(Z,t),where Z is the atomic number and t the year,of elemental contents in the annual growth rings of trees,we could get the chrono-sequence C'(Z,t) of elemental contents in the soil,thus inferring the dynaminc variations of relevant elemental contents in the soil.

  13. Carcinogenicity of azo colorants: influence of solubility and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golka, Klaus; Kopps, Silke; Myslak, Zdislaw W

    2004-06-15

    In the past, azo colorants based on benzidine, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine, 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine (o-tolidine), and 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine (o-dianisidine) have been synthesized in large amounts and numbers. Studies in exposed workers have demonstrated that the azoreduction of benzidine-based dyes occurs in man. The metabolic conversion of benzidine-, 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine- and 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine-based dyes to their (carcinogenic) amine precursors in vivo is a general phenomenon that must be considered for each member of this class of chemicals. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the use of the benzidine-based dyes has caused bladder cancer in humans. However, in contrast to water-soluble dyes, the question of biological azoreduction of (practically insoluble) pigments has been a matter of discussion. As a majority of azo pigments are based on 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine, much of the available experimental data are focused on this group. Long-term animal carcinogenicity studies performed with pigments based on 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine did not show a carcinogenic effect. The absence of a genotoxic effect has been supported by mutagenicity studies with the 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine-based Pigment Yellow 12. Studies in which azo pigments based on 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine had been orally administered to rats, hamsters, rabbits and monkeys could generally not detect significant amounts of 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine in the urine. It, therefore, appears well established that the aromatic amine components from azo pigments based on 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine are practically not bioavailable. Hence, it is very unlikely that occupational exposure to insoluble azo pigments would be associated with a substantial risk of (bladder) cancer in man. According to current EU regulations, azo dyes based on benzidine, 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine and 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine have been classified as carcinogens of category 2 as "substances which should be regarded as if they are carcinogenic

  14. SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR PACKAGING, MODEL 9977, ADDENDUM 3, JUSTIFICATION FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITY CONTENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramczyk, G.

    2011-10-31

    This Addendum establishes a new family of content envelopes consisting of small quantities of radioactive materials. These content envelopes and specific packing configurations are shown to be subcritical. However, the dose rates of some payloads must be measured and shown to comply with applicable radiation limits. Authorization for shipment of the content envelop requires acceptance of this Addendum by the DOE-HQ certifying official as a supplement to the 9977 SARP Revision 2 and DOE-HQ's subsequent revision of the CoC Revision 10 (which is based on SARP Addendum 2 and SARP Addendum 4) to authorize the additional content envelope. The Small Gram Quantity Content Envelopes and packing configurations will be incorporated in the next revision of the 9977 SARP.

  15. The establishment and evaluation of near infrared universal model to determinate the effective ingredient content in pesticide rapidly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Mei Xiong; Xiang Zhong Song; Chang Zhou Chen; Hong Ping Lin; Guo Tang; Yue Huang; Jia Duan; Shun Geng Min

    2012-01-01

    A near infrared universal quantitative analysis model was established to determinate the effective ingredient content in pesticide EC (hikernalisation) by the PLS (partial least squares) algorithm,the model predictive ability was evaluated by the external inspection method.The model was established among samples containing the same active ingredient from five different companies,and the model determination coefficient R2 and RMSECV (root mean square error of cross validation) were 0.9997 and 0.0223,respectively,the relative error between predicted value and chemical value of the testing set samples was between -2.71% and 3.36%,which indicated that the method to determinate the effective ingredient content in pesticide EC by the established universal model can meet the need of pesticide market monitoring.

  16. Measurement of total anthocyanins content in flowering tea using near infrared spectroscopy combined with ant colony optimization models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaowei, Huang; Xiaobo, Zou; Jiewen, Zhao; Jiyong, Shi; Xiaolei, Zhang; Holmes, Mel

    2014-12-01

    Flowering tea has become a popular beverage consumed across the world. Anthocyanins content is considered as an important quality index of flowering tea. The feasibility of using near infrared (NIR) spectra at the wavelength range of 10,000-4000 cm(-1) for rapid and nondestructive determination of total anthocyanins content in flowering tea was investigated. Ant colony optimization interval partial least squares (ACO-iPLS) and Genetic algorithm interval partial least squares (GA-iPLS) were used to develop calibration models for total anthocyanins content. Two characteristic wavelength regions (4590-4783, 5770-5,963 cm(-1)), which corresponding to the ultraviolet/visible absorption bands of anthocyanins, were selected by ACO-iPLS. The optimal ACO-iPLS model for total anthocyanins content (R=0.9856, RMSECV=0.1,198 mg/g) had better performance than full-spectrum PLS, iPLS, and GA-iPLS models. It could be concluded that NIR spectroscopy has significant potential in the nondestructive determination of total anthocyanins content in flowering tea. PMID:24996367

  17. Effects of electro-acupuncture on brain tissue norepinephrine contents in a morphine withdrawal anxiety mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qizhi Zhou; Yuxing Liu; Xuguang Liu; Jiaolu Wei; Yong Tang; Junmei Wu; Yi Pu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following morphine withdrawal, anxiety is associated with abnormal norepinephrine content change. However, increasing blood lactic acid content can induce anxiety or panic in patients with anxiety disorder or endogenous opioid peptide functional disorder. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to observe the effects of electro-acupuncture, at the "Sanyinjiao" point (SP 6), on brain tissue norepinephrine and blood lactic acid content in anxiety-model mice after morphine withdrawal.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment. SETTING: This study was performed in the Laboratory of Acupuncture, Electro-acupuncture & Tuina College, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, from June to September 2001.MATERIALS: A total of 50 healthy Kunming male mice were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines stated in the Guide for the use and care of laboratory animals, approved by the Committee on the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources Commission on Life Sciences, National Research Council, China (1985). Experimental reagents and equipment used were as follows: morphine hydrochloride (Lot No. 930503, Shenyang No.1 Pharmaceutical Factory, China), norepinephrine (Sigma Chemical Company, USA), fluorospectrophotometer (RF-510, Shimadzu Corporation, Japan), Han electro-acupuncture apparatus (WQ 1002, No. zun (91)-227270-588, Beijing Anlong Photoelectricity-Technique Company, China), and T-maze (self-made). METHODS: A total of 50 mice were randomly divided into 5 groups, with 10 mice in each group: blank control, T-maze, model, model + electro-acupuncture, and electro-acupuncture groups. Establishment of anxiety model after morphine withdrawal: the mouse hot plate assay was used to detect the activity of morphine. The median effective dose of morphine, 2.95 mg/kg, was defined as the base. Mice were

  18. Application of muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) pomace extract to reduce carcinogenic acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changmou; Yagiz, Yavuz; Marshall, Sara; Li, Zheng; Simonne, Amarat; Lu, Jiang; Marshall, Maurice R

    2015-09-01

    Acrylamide is a byproduct of the Maillard reaction and is formed in a variety of heat-treated commercial starchy foods. It is known to be toxic and potentially carcinogenic to humans. Muscadine grape polyphenols and standard phenolic compounds were examined on the reduction of acrylamide in an equimolar asparagine/glucose chemical model, a potato chip model, and a simulated physiological system. Polyphenols were found to significantly reduce acrylamide in the chemical model, with reduced rates higher than 90% at 100 μg/ml. In the potato chip model, grape polyphenols reduced the acrylamide level by 60.3% as concentration was increased to 0.1%. However, polyphenols exhibited no acrylamide reduction in the simulated physiological system. Results also indicated no significant correlation between the antioxidant activities of polyphenols and their acrylamide inhibition. This study demonstrated muscadine grape extract can mitigate acrylamide formation in the Maillard reaction, which provides a new value-added application for winery pomace waste.

  19. A Simple Beta-Function Model for Soil-Water Repellency as a Function of Water and Organic Carbon Contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunarathna, Anurudda Kumara; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per;

    2010-01-01

    WR(θ) models is still lacking. In this study, a simple empirical beta function was suggested to describe the effect of changing soil-water content on the change of WR given as apparent contact angle (α) measured by the molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) method. The beta function for predicting α......Soil-water content (θ) and soil organic carbon (SOC) are key factors controlling the occurrence and magnitude of soil-water repellency (WR). Although expressions have recently been proposed to describe the nonlinear variation of WR with θ, the inclusion of easily measurable parameters in predictive......(θ) is based on measurement of WR on air-dry soil and three additional model parameters: the water contents at which the maximum WR (highest α) occurs and where WR ceases (α = 90 degrees), and the maximum α value. The MED data for three data sets from literature comprising WR measurements across moisture...

  20. Determination of the moisture content of Nordic spruce wood through cone heater experiments and an integral model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mindykowski, Pierrick Anthony; Jørgensen, M.; Svensson, Staffan;

    2015-01-01

    The combination of cone heater experiments and an integral model was used to determine the moisture content of Nordic spruce with varying degree of drying. Nine specimens of Nordic spruce were pre-heated to 105°C in a convective oven for durations ranging from 0 days (no drying) and up to 63 days...... in increments of 7 days. The fuel moisture content was measured by weighting the specimens before and after the pre-heating. A mass loss cone was used to determine the time for piloted ignition of each specimen. A high-flux asymptotic solution from an integral model permitted to determine that the ignition...... temperature (directly linked to the intercept heat flux) was constant for dry and wet wood pieces. Furthermore, from this result and the high-flux asymptotic solution, the fuel moisture content of the wet specimen was calculated and found to be very close to the measured value. As a result, one equation...

  1. Three-band model for noninvasive estimation of chlorophyll, carotenoids, and anthocyanin contents in higher plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelson, Anatoly A.; Keydan, Galina P.; Merzlyak, Mark N.

    2006-06-01

    Leaf pigment content and composition provide important information about plant physiological status. Reflectance measurements offer a rapid, nondestructive technique to estimate pigment content. This paper describes a recently developed three-band conceptual model capable of remotely estimating total of chlorophylls, carotenoids and anthocyanins contents in leaves from many tree and crop species. We tuned the spectral regions used in the model in accord with pigment of interest and the optical characteristics of the leaves studied, and showed that the developed technique allowed accurate estimation of total chlorophylls, carotenoids and anthocyanins, explaining more than 91%, 70% and 93% of pigment variation, respectively. This new technique shows a great potential for noninvasive tracking of the physiological status of vegetation and the impact of environmental changes.

  2. Social media fundamentals, models, and ranking of user-generated content

    CERN Document Server

    Wyrwoll, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The increasing amount of user-generated content available on social media platforms requires new methods to find, evaluate, and to compare. To this day, existing ranking approaches to user-generated content do not allow for evaluation across platforms by exploiting its metadata. User-generated content, such as blog postings, forum discussions, shared videos etc. does however contain information that can be used for its evaluation independent of specific search interests. Claudia Wyrwoll presents a query- and language-independent ranking approach that allows for global evaluation of user-genera

  3. Modeling of experimental data on trace elements and organic compounds content in industrial waste dumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliński, Adam; Drobek, Leszek; Dombek, Václav; Bąk, Andrzej

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of the study presented was to investigate the differences between 20 mine waste dumps located in the Silesian Region of Poland and Czech Republic, in terms of trace elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contents. The Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Clustering Analysis were applied in exploration of the studied data. Since the data set was affected by outlying objects, the employment of a relevant analysis strategy was necessary. The final PCA model was constructed with the use of the Expectation-Maximization iterative approach preceded by a correct identification of outliers. The analysis of the experimental data indicated that three mine waste dumps located in Poland were characterized by the highest concentrations of dibenzo(g,h,i)anthracene and benzo(g,h,i)perylene, and six objects located in Czech Republic and three objects in Poland were distinguished by high concentrations of chrysene and indeno (1.2.3-cd) pyrene. Three of studied mine waste dumps, one located in Czech Republic and two in Poland, were characterized by low concentrations of Cr, Ni, V, naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthen, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo (b) fluoranthene, benzo (k) fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(g,h,i)anthracene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene and indeno (1.2.3-cd) pyrene in comparison with the remaining ones. The analysis contributes to the assessment and prognosis of ecological and health risks related to the emission of trace elements and organic compounds (PAHs) from the waste dumps examined. No previous research of similar scope and aims has been reported for the area concerned. PMID:27497349

  4. A PUBLISHED KINETIC MODEL EXPLAINS THE VARIATION IN NITROGEN CONTENT OF Pichia guilliermondii DURING ITS BATCH CULTIVATION ON DIESEL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORZANI W.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in nitrogen content of Pichia guilliermondii during its batch cultivation on media containing diesel oil as the main carbon source may be explained by means of a kinetic model proposed earlier to interpret the kinetics of nitrogen consumption during the process.

  5. In Tags We Trust: Trust modeling in social tagging of multimedia content

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Ivan; Vajda, Péter; Lee, Jong Seok; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2012-01-01

    Tagging in online social networks is very popular these days, as it facilitates search and retrieval of multimedia content. However, noisy and spam annotations often make it difficult to perform an efficient search. Users may make mistakes in tagging and irrelevant tags and content may be maliciously added for advertisement or self-promotion. This article surveys recent advances in techniques for combatting such noise and spam in social tagging. We classify the state-of-the-art approaches int...

  6. Modeling And Forecasting Imported Japanese Parts Content Of US Transplants: An Error Correction And State Space Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Cadogan, Godfrey

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a sectoral examination of the impact of trade policies and custom valuation procedures on estimating time varying import content of Japanese transplant automobiles. Using monthly data from 1985 to 1992, we introduce an error correction model (ECM) and a state space VAR model to purify trade data of measurement errors induced by unobserveable prices and customs valuation procedures. Data show that US import of Japanese auto parts are elastic to...

  7. Hyperspectral remote sensing of crop leaf chlorophyll content using reflectance simulation model and field data in open canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Quanjun; Wu, Yanhong; Liu, Liangyun; Zhang, Bing

    2015-04-01

    Leaf chlorophyll content -a and -b content (Cab) is an indicator for crop nutrition status and photosynthetic capacity. Remote sensing of Cab plays an important role in crop growth monitoring, pest and disease diagnosis, and crop yield assessment, yet the feasibility and stability of such estimation has not been assessed thoroughly for mixed pixels when crop canopies are not closed. This study analyzes the influence of spectral mixing on leaf chlorophyll content estimation using canopy spectra simulated by the PROSAIL reflectance model and the spectral linear mixture concept. It is observed that the accuracy of leaf chlorophyll content estimation would be degraded for mixed pixels using the well accepted approach of the combination of TCARI and OSAVI. A two-step method was thus developed for winter wheat chlorophyll content estimation by taking into consideration the fractional vegetation cover using a look-up table approach. The two methods were validated using ground spectra, airborne hyperspectral data and leaf chlorophyll content measured the same time over experimental winter wheat fields. Using the two-step method, the leaf chlorophyll content of the open canopy was estimated from the airborne hyperspectral imagery with a root mean square error of 5.18 μg cm-2, which is an improvement of about 8.9% relative to the accuracy obtained using the TCARI/OSAVI ratio directly. This implies that the method proposed in this study has great potential for hyperspectral applications in agricultural management, particularly for applications before crop canopy closure. This study, therefore, offers a feasible technique that might be applied to crop chlorophyll content estimation using large-scale remote sensing data.

  8. Impairment-Factor-Based Audiovisual Quality Model for IPTV: Influence of Video Resolution, Degradation Type, and Content Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia MN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an audiovisual quality model for IPTV services. The model estimates the audiovisual quality of standard and high definition video as perceived by the user. The model is developed for applications such as network planning and packet-layer quality monitoring. It mainly covers audio and video compression artifacts and impairments due to packet loss. The quality tests conducted for model development demonstrate a mutual influence of the perceived audio and video quality, and the predominance of the video quality for the overall audiovisual quality. The balance between audio quality and video quality, however, depends on the content, the video format, and the audio degradation type. The proposed model is based on impairment factors which quantify the quality-impact of the different degradations. The impairment factors are computed from parameters extracted from the bitstream or packet headers. For high definition video, the model predictions show a correlation with unknown subjective ratings of 95%. For comparison, we have developed a more classical audiovisual quality model which is based on the audio and video qualities and their interaction. Both quality- and impairment-factor-based models are further refined by taking the content-type into account. At last, the different model variants are compared with modeling approaches described in the literature.

  9. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary

  10. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-08-01

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary.

  11. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary.

  12. Preferential binding of growth inhibitory prostaglandins by the target protein of a carcinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.H.; Sorof, S. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is the principal target protein of the hepatic carcinogen N-(2-fluorenyl)acetamide (2-acetylaminofluorene) in rat liver. In addition, the cyclopentenone prostaglandins (PG), PGA, PGJ{sub 2}, and {Delta}{sup 12}-PGJ{sub 2}, inhibit the growth of many cell types in vitro. This report describes the preferential binding of the growth inhibitory prostaglandins by L-FABP and the reversible inhibition of thymidine incorporation into DNA by PGA{sub 2} and {Delta}{sup 12}-PGJ{sub 2} in primary cultures of purified rat hepatocytes. As a model ligand, ({sup 3}H)PGA{sub 1} bound to L-FABP specifically, reversibly, rapidly, and with high affinity. Its dissociation constants were 134 nM (high affinity) and 3.6 {mu}M (low affinity). The high-affinity finding of ({sup 3}H)PGA{sup 1} correlated with their growth inhibitory activities reported previously and here. The in vitro actions of L-FABP are compatible with those of a specific and dissociable carrier of growth inhibitory prostaglandins in rat hepatocytes and suggest that the carcinogen may usurp the cellular machinery of the growth inhibitory prostaglandins.

  13. Preferential binding of growth inhibitory prostaglandins by the target protein of a carcinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is the principal target protein of the hepatic carcinogen N-(2-fluorenyl)acetamide (2-acetylaminofluorene) in rat liver. In addition, the cyclopentenone prostaglandins (PG), PGA, PGJ2, and Δ12-PGJ2, inhibit the growth of many cell types in vitro. This report describes the preferential binding of the growth inhibitory prostaglandins by L-FABP and the reversible inhibition of thymidine incorporation into DNA by PGA2 and Δ12-PGJ2 in primary cultures of purified rat hepatocytes. As a model ligand, [3H]PGA1 bound to L-FABP specifically, reversibly, rapidly, and with high affinity. Its dissociation constants were 134 nM (high affinity) and 3.6 μM (low affinity). The high-affinity finding of [3H]PGA1 correlated with their growth inhibitory activities reported previously and here. The in vitro actions of L-FABP are compatible with those of a specific and dissociable carrier of growth inhibitory prostaglandins in rat hepatocytes and suggest that the carcinogen may usurp the cellular machinery of the growth inhibitory prostaglandins

  14. Modeling local control effects on the temporal stability of soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gonzalo; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Vereecken, Harry; Hardelauf, Horst; Herbst, Michael; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2013-02-01

    SummaryOccurrence of temporal stability of soil water content has been observed for a range of soil and landscape conditions and is generally explained as a consequence of local and non-local controls. However, the underlying factors for this phenomenon are not completely understood and have not been quantified. This work attempts to elucidate and quantify the effects of several local controls, such as soil hydraulic properties and root water uptake, through water flow simulations. One-dimensional water flow was simulated with the HYDRUS code for bare and grassed sandy loam, loam and clay soils at different levels of variability in the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat. Soil water content at 0.05 and 0.60 m and the average water content of the top 1 m were analyzed. Temporal stability was characterized by calculating the mean relative differences of soil water content in 100 soil columns used for each combination of soil and season. Using log-normal distributions of Ksat resulted in mean relative differences distributions that were commonly observed in experimental studies of soil water content variability. Linear relationships were observed between scaling factor of ln Ksat and spread of the mean relative differences distributions. For the same scaling factor and soil texture, simulated shapes of the mean relative differences distributions depended on the duration of the simulation period and the season. Variation in mean relative differences was higher in coarser textures than in finer ones and more variability was seen in the topsoil than in the subsoil. Root water uptake decreased the mean relative differences variability in the root zone and increased variability below it. This work presents a preliminary research to promote the use of water flow simulations under site-specific conditions to better understand the temporal stability of soil water contents. The estimation of the spatial variability of Ksat from soil water content monitoring presents an

  15. Content-Based Search on a Database of Geometric Models: Identifying Objects of Similar Shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XAVIER, PATRICK G.; HENRY, TYSON R.; LAFARGE, ROBERT A.; MEIRANS, LILITA; RAY, LAWRENCE P.

    2001-11-01

    The Geometric Search Engine is a software system for storing and searching a database of geometric models. The database maybe searched for modeled objects similar in shape to a target model supplied by the user. The database models are generally from CAD models while the target model may be either a CAD model or a model generated from range data collected from a physical object. This document describes key generation, database layout, and search of the database.

  16. Two-Region Model for Soil Water Repellency as a Function of Matric Potential and Water Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunarathna, A. K.; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, K.;

    2010-01-01

    by the so-called Dexter index) is useful for predicting if soils are likely to exhibit WR. Expression of soil water repellency depends on soil water content; however, only a limited amount of predictive description is available to date. In this study, based on experimental data, a simple two-region model......Soil water repellency (WR) occurs worldwide and affects hydrologic processes such as infiltration, preferential flow, and surface erosion. The degree of WR varies with soil organic C (SOC) and water contents. In this study, we measured WR (by ethanol molarity) as a function of moisture conditions...... for two soil profiles (17 layers, of which 13 exhibited WR), representing different vegetation and SOC between 0.6 and 14%. Generally, WR was found at SOC ≥2%. Based on measured data, a two-region water repellency (TRWR) model was developed. The model assumes two linear regions in a WR vs. pF (=log...

  17. Discovering Plate Boundaries Update: Builds Content Knowledge and Models Inquiry-based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Pringle, M. S.; Henning, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    Discovering Plate Boundaries (DPB) is a jigsaw-structured classroom exercise in which students explore the fundamental datasets from which plate boundary processes were discovered. The exercise has been widely used in the past ten years as a classroom activity for students in fifth grade through high school, and for Earth Science major and general education courses in college. Perhaps more importantly, the exercise has been used extensively for professional development of in-service and pre-service K-12 science teachers, where it simultaneously builds content knowledge in plate boundary processes (including natural hazards), models an effective data-rich, inquiry-based pedagogy, and provides a set of lesson plans and materials which teachers can port directly into their own classroom (see Pringle, et al, this session for a specific example). DPB is based on 4 “specialty” data maps, 1) earthquake locations, 2) modern volcanic activity, 3) seafloor age, and 4) topography and bathymetry, plus a fifth map of (undifferentiated) plate boundary locations. The jigsaw is structured so that students are first split into one of the four “specialties,” then re-arranged into groups with each of the four specialties to describe the boundaries of a particular plate. We have taken the original DPB materials, used the latest digital data sets to update all the basic maps, and expanded the opportunities for further student and teacher learning. The earthquake maps now cover the recent period including the deadly Banda Aceh event. The topography/bathymetry map now has global coverage and uses ice-free elevations, which can, for example, extend to further inquiry about mantle viscosity and loading processes (why are significant portions of the bedrock surface of Greenland and Antarctica below sea level?). The volcanic activity map now differentiates volcano type and primary volcanic lithology, allowing a more elaborate understanding of volcanism at different plate boundaries

  18. Photochemistry in Saturn's Ring-Shadowed Atmosphere: Modeling of Key Molecules and Observations of Dust Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, S. G.; Atreya, S. K.; Wilson, E. H.; West, R. A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Baines, K. H.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Momary, T.

    2014-12-01

    Cassini has been orbiting Saturn for over ten years now. During this epoch, the ring shadow has moved from covering a large portion of the northern hemisphere to covering a large swath south of the equator and continues to move southward. At Saturn Orbit Insertion in 2004, the ring plane was inclined by ~24 degrees relative to the Sun-Saturn vector. The projection of the B-ring onto Saturn reached as far as 40N along the central meridian (~52N at the terminator). At its maximum extent, the ring shadow can reach as far as 48N/S (~58N/S at the terminator). The net effect is that the intensity of both ultraviolet and visible sunlight penetrating into any particular latitude will vary depending on both Saturn's axis relative to the Sun and the optical thickness of each ring system. In essence, the rings act like venetian blinds. Our previous work [1] examined the variation of the solar flux as a function of solar inclination, i.e. ~7.25 year season at Saturn. Here, we report on the impact of the oscillating ring shadow on the photolysis and production rates of hydrocarbons in Saturn's stratosphere and upper troposphere, including acetylene, ethane, propane, and benzene. Beginning with methane, we investigate the impact on production and loss rates of the long-lived photochemical products leading to haze formation are examined at several latitudes over a Saturn year. Similarly, we assess its impact on phosphine abundance, a disequilibrium species whose presence in the upper troposphere is a tracer of convective processes in the deep atmosphere. We will also present our ongoing analysis of Cassini's CIRS, UVIS, and VIMS datasets that provide an estimate of the evolving haze content of the northern hemisphere and we will begin to assess the implications for dynamical mixing. In particular, we will examine how the now famous hexagonal jet stream acts like a barrier to transport, isolating Saturn's north polar region from outside transport of photochemically

  19. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health

  20. Systematized Water content Calculation in Cartilage Using T1-mapping MR Estimations. Design of a Mathematical Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Ramirez Garcia-Luna, Jose Luis; Rahbek, Ole;

    described. Purpose/Aim of Study Development of a mathematical model to measure the water content in tissue using T1-values obtained from MR. Materials and Methods T-1 values were obtained from 45 samples from tissue-mimicking gelatin with previously known water concentrations. We analyzed the samples in a 1.......5 Tesla by calculating absolute T1 values in real maps through inverse angle phase inverse sequence recuperation (11 inversion times, from 200 to 2200 msec) at 37(±0.5) °C. Regions of interest were manually delineated and the mean T1 value was estimated using a T1-map analysis software. The collected data...... values in real maps and inverse sequence recuperation by the equation Water Content = (0.476 + T1 Signal Intensity * 0.000193) * 100. Conclusions It is possible to calculate water content in a tissue using absolute T1-values from MR. This technology allows quantification of disease manifestations...

  1. Furosemide modifies heart hypertrophy and glycosaminoglycan myocardium content in a rat model of neurogenic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Tsaousi, Georgia; Manthou, Maria Eleni; Karakiulakis, Georgios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios; Papakonstantinou, Eleni

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for atherogenesis and heart hypertrophy, both of which are associated with specific morphological and functional changes of the myocardium. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are complex molecules involved both in tissue morphology and function. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neurogenic hypertension and subsequent antihypertensive treatment with furosemide, on heart hypertrophy and the content of GAGs in the myocardium. Neurogenic hypertension was achieved in male Wistar rats by bilateral aortic denervation (bAD). At days 2, 7 and 15 after surgery, animals were sacrificed and the hearts were dissected away, weighted, and homogenized. Total GAGs were assessed by measuring the uronic acid content colorimetrically and individual GAGs were isolated and characterized by enzymatic treatment, with GAG-degrading enzymes, using electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gradient gels and cellulose acetate membranes. In bAD-animals blood pressure, blood pressure lability, heart rate and heart weight were significantly increased 15 days postoperatively. These effects were prevented by treatment with furosemide. Major GAGs identified in the heart were chondroitin sulphates, heparin (H), heparan sulphate (HS) and hyaluronic acid. The content of uronic and the relative content of H and HS in the heart in bAD animals significantly decreased from day 2 to day 15 postoperatively. Furosemide prevented the bAD induced decrease in GAG content. Considering that H and HS are potent inhibitors of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, our results indicate that heart hypertrophy induced by neurogenic hypertension may be associated with decreases in the relative content of heparin and heparan sulphate in the heart. PMID:27221775

  2. Compatible Models of Carbon Content of Individual Trees on a Cunninghamia lanceolata Plantation in Fujian Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Lin; Tao, Hong; Wei, Hong; Chengzhen, Wu

    2016-01-01

    We tried to establish compatible carbon content models of individual trees for a Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) plantation from Fujian province in southeast China. In general, compatibility requires that the sum of components equal the whole tree, meaning that the sum of percentages calculated from component equations should equal 100%. Thus, we used multiple approaches to simulate carbon content in boles, branches, foliage leaves, roots and the whole individual trees. The approaches included (i) single optimal fitting (SOF), (ii) nonlinear adjustment in proportion (NAP) and (iii) nonlinear seemingly unrelated regression (NSUR). These approaches were used in combination with variables relating diameter at breast height (D) and tree height (H), such as D, D2H, DH and D&H (where D&H means two separate variables in bivariate model). Power, exponential and polynomial functions were tested as well as a new general function model was proposed by this study. Weighted least squares regression models were employed to eliminate heteroscedasticity. Model performances were evaluated by using mean residuals, residual variance, mean square error and the determination coefficient. The results indicated that models with two dimensional variables (DH, D2H and D&H) were always superior to those with a single variable (D). The D&H variable combination was found to be the most useful predictor. Of all the approaches, SOF could establish a single optimal model separately, but there were deviations in estimating results due to existing incompatibilities, while NAP and NSUR could ensure predictions compatibility. Simultaneously, we found that the new general model had better accuracy than others. In conclusion, we recommend that the new general model be used to estimate carbon content for Chinese fir and considered for other vegetation types as well.

  3. Results of screening NCI/NTP nongenotoxic carcinogens and genotoxic noncarcinogens with the ke test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interdependence of the electrophilic and carcinogenic properties of chemicals that was demonstrated two decades ago rekindled interest in the somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis. Interest in this theory grew with the development of a reverse-mutation bacterial assay in the laboratory of B.N. Ames that permitted the mutagenic properties of the chemicals to be determined quickly and yielded results which indicated that ''carcinogens are mutagens.'' Subsequent validation studies of this bioassay, the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome or ''Ames test,'' by Ames' group and others provided additional support for the correlation between mutagenicity and carcinogenicity which led to the worldwide deployment of the Ames test in thousands of laboratories and to the development of more than 100 other short-term tests that continue to be used to identify potential carcinogens via various end-points of genotoxicity. This document discusses electrophilicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity relationships as well as carcinogen-screening of chemicals. 28 refs., 4 tabs

  4. An extension of the talbot-ogden hydrology model to an affine multi-dimensional moisture content domain

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2013-09-01

    The Talbot-Ogden hydrology model provides a fast mass conservative method to compute infiltration in unsaturated soils. As a replacement for a model based on Richards equation, it separates the groundwater movement into infiltration and redistribution for every time step. The typical feature making this method fast is the discretization of the moisture content domain rather than the spatial one. The Talbot-Ogden model rapidly determines how well ground water and aquifers are recharged only. Hence, it differs from models based on advanced reservoir modeling that are uniformly far more expensive computationally since they determine where the water moves in space instead, a completely different and more complex problem.According to the pore-size distribution curve for many soils, this paper extends the one dimensional moisture content domain into a two dimensional one by keeping the vertical spatial axis. The proposed extension can describe any pore-size or porosity distribution as an important soil feature. Based on this extension, infiltration and redistribution are restudied. The unconditional conservation of mass in the Talbot-Ogden model is inherited in this extended model. A numerical example is given for the extended model.

  5. Research on the Estimation Model of Soil Moisture Content Based on the Characteristics of Thermal Infrared Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun; XU; Jianjun; JIANG

    2013-01-01

    With the portable Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), the reflectance spectra of soil samples with different moisture content are measured in laboratory for expounding the characteristic of radiation in the thermal infrared part of the spectrum with different soil moisture content. A model of estimating the moisture content in soil is attempted to make based on Moisture Diagnostic Index (MDI). In general,the spectral characteristic of soil emissivity in laboratory includes the following aspects.Firstly,in the region of 8.0-9.5 μm,along with the increase of soil moisture content,the emissivity of soil increases to varying degrees. The spectral curves are parallel relatively and have a tendency to become horizontal and the absorbed characteristic of reststrahlen is also weakened relatively with the increase of soil moisture in this region.Secondly,in the region of 11.0-14.0 μm,the emissivity of soil has a tendency of increasing.There is an absorption value near about 12.7 μm. As the soil moisture content increases,the depth of absorption also increases. This phenomenon may be caused by soil moisture absorption. Methods as derivative, difference and standardized ratio transformation may weaken the background noise effectively to the spectrum data. Especially using the ratio of the emissivity to the average of 8-14 μm may obviously enhance the correlation between soil moisture and soil emissivity. According to the result of correlation analysis, the 8.237 μm is regarded as the best detecting band for soil moisture content. Moreover,based on the Moisture Diagnostic Index ( MDI) in the 8.194-8.279 μm, the logarithmic model of estimating soil moisture is made.

  6. Precipitable water vapour contents at "local" scale: a comparative study on GNSS-derived data versus modelled ones from ECMWF operational models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Umberto; Tammaro, Umberto; Boy, Jean-Paul; Masson, Frederic; Capuano, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We present a comparative study between GNSS-derived precipitable water (PW) contents and modelled data from ECMWF operational models. Nearly 4 years of PW contents derived from meteorological and GNSS data are analyzed. We use GNSS data from a geodetic monitoring network of the Neapolitan active volcanoes managed by INGV as well as from some GPS stations installed on purpose. We compare PW time series retrieved from GNSS observations with those coming from models. The total water vapour content of the atmosphere can be derived by modelling from the vertical profile of the specific humidity. We use ECMWF operational models available at a horizontal resolution of about 15 km, 3-hourly samples. The number of vertical model levels is 91 up to mid 2013 and 137 afterwards. We recomputed the surface pressure on the real Earth surface, which differs from the orography, i.e. the smooth surface of the atmospheric model, by propagating the pressure from the orography to the surface. A very good agreement is achieved between PW retrieved from GNSS observations and computed from models using the highest time and space resolution (0.15 degree, 3-hourly 91-137 layers) operational models. We even focus our analysis on the occasion of some extreme raining events hitting Campania region (Italy).

  7. Coal fires, industrial emissions and motor vehicles as sources of environmental carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawther, P J; Waller, R E

    1976-01-01

    One of the most widely studied carcinogenic agents in the environment is the polycyclic hydrocarbon, benzo(a) pyrene. As a component of soot from the inefficient combustion of coal, its association with cancer can be traced back 200 years, but its possible relevance to lung cancer as a widely distributed air relevance to lung cancer as a widely distributed air pollutant has been investigated only during the past 25 years. Domestic coal fires have been shown to be important sources, and smaller amounts come from industrial sources and from motor vehicles. There is evidence now that the concentration of benzo (a) pyrene in large towns in Britain has decreased by a factor of about ten during the last few decades, as a result of changing heating methods and smoke control. In view of the overwhelming effect of cigarette smoking, it is difficult to determine whether the benzo(a)pyrene content of the air has had any importnat effect on the development of lung cancer, but careful analysis of trends in mortality may now throw some light on this. Among other materials with carcinogenic properties that may be dispersed into the general air, asbestos is the one that has been investigated most thoroughly. The association between exposure to asbestos and the development of lung cancer and mesothelioma of the pleura has been clearly demonstrated among people occupationally exposed to the dust, but as far as the general public is concerned, any risk may be limited to the immediate vicinity of major sources. These and other hazards demonstrated among occupational gropus serve as a warning however to maintain careful scutiny of urban air pollutants in relation to the acetiology of cancer.

  8. Collagen Content in Skin and Internal Organs of the Tight Skin Mouse: An Animal Model of Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthi Manne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tight Skin mouse is a genetically induced animal model of tissue fibrosis caused by a large in-frame mutation in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (Fbn-1. We examined the influence of gender on the collagen content of tissues in C57BL/6J wild type (+/+ and mutant Tight Skin (Tsk/+ mice employing hydroxyproline assays. Tissue sections were stained with Masson’s trichrome to identify collagen in situ. Adult Tsk/+ mice skin contains ~15% more collagen, on average, than skin from +/+ mice of the same gender. The heart of Tsk/+ males had significantly more collagen than that of +/+ males. No significant gender differences were found in lungs and kidney collagen content. Overall, the collagen content of Tsk/+ males and +/+ males was higher than that of their Tsk/+ and +/+ female counterparts, respectively. Our data confirm increased deposition of collagen in skin and hearts of Tsk/+ mice; however, the effects of the Tsk mutation on collagen content are both tissue specific and gender specific. These results indicate that comparative studies of collagen content between normal and Tsk/+ mice skin and internal organs must take into account gender differences caused by expression of the androgen receptor.

  9. KEYNOTE LECTURES-KL1 New development in risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens in foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jun-Shi

    2006-01-01

    @@ The no-observed-effect level (NOEL) in a study of carcinogenicity for compounds that are both genotoxic and carcinogenic represents the limit of detection in that bioassay, rather than an estimate of a possible threshold. Therefore, for those genotoxic and carcinogenic contaminants (e.g. acrylamides, PAHs, etc.) in foods it is not possible to develop health-based guidance values (e.g. ADI or PTWI) using the traditional NOEL and safety/uncertainty factors.

  10. Discrimination of Carcinogens by Hepatic Transcript Profiling in Rats Following 28-day Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Matsumoto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at discriminating carcinogens on the basis of hepatic transcript profiling in the rats administrated with a variety of carcinogens and non-carcinogens. We conducted 28-day toxicity tests in male F344 rats with 47 carcinogens and 26 non- carcinogens, and then investigated periodically the hepatic gene expression profiles using custom microarrays. By hierarchical cluster analysis based on significantly altered genes, carcinogens were clustered into three major groups (Group 1 to 3. The formation of these groups was not affected by the gene sets used as well as the administration period, indicating that the grouping of carcinogens was universal independent of the conditions of both statistical analysis and toxicity testing. Seventeen carcinogens belonging to Group 1 were composed of mainly rat hepatocarcinogens, most of them being mutagenic ones. Group 2 was formed by three subgroups, which were composed of 23 carcinogens exhibiting distinct properties in terms of genotoxicity and target tissues, namely nonmutagenic hepatocarcinogens, and mutagenic and nonmutagenic carcinogens both of which are targeted to other tissues. Group 3 contained 6 carcinogens including 4 estrogenic substances, implying the group of estrogenic carcinogens. Gene network analyses revealed that the significantly altered genes in Group 1 included Bax, Tnfrsf6, Btg2, Mgmt and Abcb1b, suggesting that p53-mediated signaling pathway involved in early pathologic alterations associated with preceding mutagenic carcinogenesis. Thus, the common transcriptional signatures for each group might reflect the early molecular events of carcinogenesis and hence would enable us to identify the biomarker genes, and then to develop a new assay for carcinogenesis prediction.

  11. Carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption: an epigenetic viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavaty, Abbas

    2015-08-08

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modifications and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I first discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modifications that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic viewpoint. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  12. Formaldehyde in dentistry: a review of mutagenic and carcinogenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.B.; Chestner, S.B.

    1981-09-01

    For many years there has been controversy over the value of antimicrobial drugs for intracanal dressings in endodontics. Formocresol, a formaldehyde compound, has evolved as the preferred drug for routine endodontic procedures, as well as pediatric endodontics. The increase in the use of formaldehyde has been complicated by the introduction of paraformaldehyde pastes for filling root canals. Neither of these formulas has ever been standardized. The doses are arbitrary, and the common dose of formocresol has been shown to be many times greater than the minimum dose needed for effect. The efficacy of paraformaldehyde pastes is questionable and remains clouded by inconclusive evidence, conflicting research, inadequate terminology, and a lack of convincing statistical evidence. The clinical use and delivery of formocresol and paraformaldehyde pastes remain arbitrary and unscientific. Formaldehyde has a known toxic mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. Many investigations have been conducted to measure the risk of exposure to formaldehyde; it is clear that formaldehyde poses a carcinogenic risk in humans. There is a need to reevaluate the rationale underlying the use of formaldehyde in dentistry particularly in light of its deleterious effects.

  13. The liver fluke Opisthorchis felineus: biology, epidemiology and carcinogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakharukova, Mariya Y; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2016-01-01

    The liver fluke Opisthorchis felineus is a member of the triad of epidemiologically important liver fluke species belonging to the family Opisthorchiidae and the major agent causing opisthorchiasis over a vast territory, covering Russia, Kazakhstan and several European countries. The similarity between the diseases caused by O. felineus and other liver flukes, O. viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis, in clinical manifestations and course suggests that the scenarios of their development and, possibly, complications have much in common. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classified O. viverrini and C. sinensis as group 1 agents and the major factors inducing cholangiocarcinoma in endemic regions. However, a carcinogenic potential of O. felineus is poorly studied. This review characterizes O. felineus, briefs the epidemiological situation in Western Siberia, the world's largest opisthorchiasis focus, and assesses the carcinogenic potential of this liver fluke. The review is based on a comprehensive analysis of the published medical data on opisthorchiasis and its complications in Western Siberia. Results of performed analysis reflect the actual epidemiological situation in opisthorchiasis focus and suggest an association of this disease with bile duct cancer. PMID:26740360

  14. Carcinogenic effects ofcircadian disruption:an epigenetic viewpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbas Salavaty

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modiifcations and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modiifcations, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I ifrst discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modiifcations that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic view-point. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  15. Rhetorical Savvy as Social Skill: Modeling Entrepreneur Identity Construction within Educational Content Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spartz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on one aspect of rhetorical training that writing instructors have an opportunity--if not an obligation--to inculcate (or at least introduce) in students studying to be entrepreneurs and taking their writing classes. Specifically, through the use of an open source Content Management System (CMS) (e.g., Drupal or Moodle),…

  16. Modeling the Physical Properties of Popcorn Varieties as a Function of Kernel Moisture Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyejo ODUOLA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties such as the axial dimensions (length, width, thickness, geometric mean diameter, thousand kernel weight, shape characteristics (sphericity, kernel volume, kernel surface area, bulk density, particle or kernel density, as well as porosity have been evaluated as a function of kernel moisture content for “pin” and “deep” yellow varieties of Nigerian popcorn kernels. It has been observed that the length, width, thickness as well as the thousand kernel weight increase with increasing moisture content for both varieties under investigation in the moisture range 11-17% (wet basis., while the bulk and particle densities together with the kernel porosity have been found to decrease with increasing moisture content. These physical properties vs moisture content dependencies have been fitted to linear, polynomial and other non-linear equations and the empirical constants determined for each case. Regression analyses have revealed that the third-order polynomial and quadratic functions more adequately describe the observed dependencies than the linear equation in most cases, based on the resulting correlation coefficients and standard errors.

  17. Technology-Based Content through Virtual and Physical Modeling: A National Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Clark, Aaron C.

    2009-01-01

    Visualization is becoming more prevalent as an application in science, engineering, and technology related professions. The analysis of static and dynamic graphical visualization provides data solutions and understandings that go beyond traditional forms of communication. The study of technology-based content and the application of conceptual…

  18. Introducing the PCMC Model: An Investigative Framework for Young People's Processing of Commercialized Media Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.A.; Reijmersdal, E.A. van; Owen, L.H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a vital need for an updated evaluation of children's and adolescents' changing commercial media environment. In this article, we introduce an investigative framework for young people's processing of commercial media content (PCMC) that can deal with current and future developments in the me

  19. Reply : Collective Action and the Empirical Content of Stochastic Learning Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macy, M.W.; Flache, A.

    2007-01-01

    We are grateful for the opportunity that Bendor, Diermeier, and Ting (hereafter BDT) have provided to address important questions about the empirical content of learning theoretic solutions to the collective action problem. They discuss two well-known classes of adaptive models— stochastic learning

  20. Sugar and acid content of Citrus prediction modeling using FT-IR fingerprinting in combination with multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seung Yeob; Lee, Young Koung; Kim, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A high-throughput screening system for Citrus lines were established with higher sugar and acid contents using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis. FT-IR spectra confirmed typical spectral differences between the frequency regions of 950-1100 cm(-1), 1300-1500 cm(-1), and 1500-1700 cm(-1). Principal component analysis (PCA) and subsequent partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were able to discriminate five Citrus lines into three separate clusters corresponding to their taxonomic relationships. The quantitative predictive modeling of sugar and acid contents from Citrus fruits was established using partial least square regression algorithms from FT-IR spectra. The regression coefficients (R(2)) between predicted values and estimated sugar and acid content values were 0.99. These results demonstrate that by using FT-IR spectra and applying quantitative prediction modeling to Citrus sugar and acid contents, excellent Citrus lines can be early detected with greater accuracy.

  1. An Accurate Analytical Model for 802.11e EDCA under Different Traffic Conditions with Contention-Free Bursting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Chendeb Taher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research addressing IEEE 802.11e enhanced distributed channel access (EDCA performance analysis, by means of analytical models, exist in the literature. Unfortunately, the currently proposed models, even though numerous, do not reach this accuracy due to the great number of simplifications that have been done. Particularly, none of these models considers the 802.11e contention free burst (CFB mode which allows a given station to transmit a burst of frames without contention during a given transmission opportunity limit (TXOPLimit time interval. Despite its influence on the global performance, TXOPLimit is ignored in almost all existing models. To fill in this gap, we develop in this paper a new and complete analytical model that (i reflects the correct functioning of EDCA, (ii includes all the 802.11e EDCA differentiation parameters, (iii takes into account all the features of the protocol, and (iv can be applied to all network conditions, going from nonsaturation to saturation conditions. Additionally, this model is developed in order to be used in admission control procedure, so it was designed to have a low complexity and an acceptable response time. The proposed model is validated by means of both calculations and extensive simulations.

  2. How well can in vitro data predict in vivo effects of chemicals? Rodent carcinogenicity as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony Tony Cox, Louis; Popken, Douglas A; Kaplan, A Michael; Plunkett, Laura M; Becker, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    A recent research article by the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) (Kleinstreuer et al., 2013), indicated that high throughput screening (HTS) data from assays linked to hallmarks and presumed pathways of carcinogenesis could be used to predict classification of pesticides as either (a) possible, probable or likely rodent carcinogens; or (b) not likely carcinogens or evidence of non-carcinogenicity. Using independently developed software to validate the computational results, we replicated the majority of the results reported. We also found that the prediction model correlating cancer pathway bioactivity scores with in vivo carcinogenic effects in rodents was not robust. A change of classification of a single chemical in the test set was capable of changing the overall study conclusion about the statistical significance of the correlation. Furthermore, in the subset of pesticide compounds used in model validation, the accuracy of prediction was no better than chance for about three quarters of the chemicals (those with fewer than 7 positive outcomes in HTS assays representing the 11 histopathological endpoints used in model development), suggesting that the prediction model was not adequate to predict cancer hazard for most of these chemicals. Although the utility of the model for humans is also unclear because a number of the rodent responses modeled (e.g., mouse liver tumors, rat thyroid tumors, rat testicular tumors, etc.) are not considered biologically relevant to human responses, the data examined imply the need for further research with HTS assays and improved models, which might help to predict classifications of in vivo carcinogenic responses in rodents for the pesticide considered, and thus reduce the need for testing in laboratory animals.

  3. Study of the mechanism of carcinogenesis by carcinogens which are negative in the Ames test. Progress report, April 1-September 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Carcinogens ethionine, thioacetamide, and actinomycin D, all of which are negative in the Ames test and all of which raise the progesterone level in the chicken, were tested to determine their physiological role in carcinogenesis. The optimization of the carcinogenesis model also included evaluation of the chicken as the biological indicator of physiological changes relative to the above compounds. (PCS)

  4. Model for estimation of Sr-90 content in the population of West Java through consumption of fresh milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model for estimation of Sr-90 content in the critical organ of West Java population was developed. By using this model and data of the average consumption of fresh milk and the average concentration of Sr-90 in fresh milk produced in this area it was found that the average content of Sr-90 in critical organ of this population had a value of 220 Bq (=6.0 nCi). This value was lower than the allowable maximum concentration of Sr-90 in critical organ which has a value of 7.4x104 Bq (=2 uCi). Therefore, it is concluded that milk is not an important food item for the Sr-90 pathway to the population. (author). 11 refs

  5. Improving Global Models of Remotely Sensed Ocean Chlorophyll Content Using Partial Least Squares and Geographically Weighted Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, H.; Robeson, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical models have been widely used to estimate global chlorophyll content from remotely sensed data. Here, we focus on the standard NASA empirical models that use blue-green band ratios. These band ratio ocean color (OC) algorithms are in the form of fourth-order polynomials and the parameters of these polynomials (i.e. coefficients) are estimated from the NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Data set (NOMAD). Most of the points in this data set have been sampled from tropical and temperate regions. However, polynomial coefficients obtained from this data set are used to estimate chlorophyll content in all ocean regions with different properties such as sea-surface temperature, salinity, and downwelling/upwelling patterns. Further, the polynomial terms in these models are highly correlated. In sum, the limitations of these empirical models are as follows: 1) the independent variables within the empirical models, in their current form, are correlated (multicollinear), and 2) current algorithms are global approaches and are based on the spatial stationarity assumption, so they are independent of location. Multicollinearity problem is resolved by using partial least squares (PLS). PLS, which transforms the data into a set of independent components, can be considered as a combined form of principal component regression (PCR) and multiple regression. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) is also used to investigate the validity of spatial stationarity assumption. GWR solves a regression model over each sample point by using the observations within its neighbourhood. PLS results show that the empirical method underestimates chlorophyll content in high latitudes, including the Southern Ocean region, when compared to PLS (see Figure 1). Cluster analysis of GWR coefficients also shows that the spatial stationarity assumption in empirical models is not likely a valid assumption.

  6. Book Sprint: A new model for rapid book authoring and content development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss our experiences and successes with the new 'Book Sprint' methodology for use in rapid authoring and content development for technical books and documentation, using a distributed team and appropriate on-line collaborative technologies. A sprint begins by assembling a group of domain experts for a short period of time-intensive content creation. The outline, scope, and approximate length of the book are established, and key contributors are identified. This is followed by remote and distributed work over a period of a few months, focussing on the bulk of the book. The Sprint Book methodology has already been used in the 'Wireless Networking in the Developing World' and 'Bandwidth Optimization and Management' books. Both of these are freely available under a Creative Commons License. (author)

  7. Dynamics of a producer-grazer model incorporating the effects of excess food nutrient content on grazer's growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace, Angela; Wang, Hao; Kuang, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Modeling under the framework of ecological stoichiometric allows the investigation of the effects of food quality on food web population dynamics. Recent discoveries in ecological stoichiometry suggest that grazer dynamics are affected by insufficient food nutrient content (low phosphorus (P)/carbon (C) ratio) as well as excess food nutrient content (high P:C). This phenomenon is known as the "stoichiometric knife edge." While previous models have captured this phenomenon, they do not explicitly track P in the producer or in the media that supports the producer, which brings questions to the validity of their predictions. Here, we extend a Lotka-Volterra-type stoichiometric model by mechanistically deriving and tracking P in the producer and free P in the environment in order to investigate the growth response of Daphnia to algae of varying P:C ratios. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations of the full model, that explicitly tracks phosphorus, lead to quantitative different predictions than previous models that neglect to track free nutrients. The full model shows that the fate of the grazer population can be very sensitive to excess nutrient concentrations. Dynamical free nutrient pool seems to induce extreme grazer population density changes when total nutrient is in an intermediate range. PMID:25124765

  8. The Data Literacy Advisory Team at Virginia Tech: Developing a Content Model for Data Literacy Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Ogier, Andrea L.; Lener, Edward; Miller, Rebecca K

    2013-01-01

    In Spring 2013, the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship and the University Libraries at Virginia Tech formed a Data Literacy Advisory Team (DLAT) composed of reference, instruction, collections, data services and subject librarians and library specialists. Tasked with developing an instructional framework for delivering research and data-related content to faculty, staff and students (both graduate and undergraduate) in the univeristy-at-large, DLAT began by developing a skill-focuse...

  9. Modeling the Physical Properties of Popcorn Varieties as a Function of Kernel Moisture Content

    OpenAIRE

    Koyejo ODUOLA; Falilat Taiwo ADEMILUYI

    2011-01-01

    The physical properties such as the axial dimensions (length, width, thickness), geometric mean diameter, thousand kernel weight, shape characteristics (sphericity, kernel volume, kernel surface area), bulk density, particle or kernel density, as well as porosity have been evaluated as a function of kernel moisture content for pin and deep yellow varieties of Nigerian popcorn kernels. It has been observed that the length, width, thickness as well as the thousand kernel weight increase with in...

  10. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  11. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  12. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  13. Using the SIOP Model for Effective Content Teaching with Second and Foreign Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Veronika; Echevarria, Jana

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a comprehensive model of instruction for providing consistent, high quality teaching to L2 students. This model, the SIOP Model (Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol), provides an explicit framework for organizing instructional practices to optimize the effectiveness of teaching second and foreign language learners.…

  14. The fermion content of the Standard Model from a simple world-line theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, Paul, E-mail: P.R.W.Mansfield@durham.ac.uk

    2015-04-09

    We describe a simple model that automatically generates the sum over gauge group representations and chiralities of a single generation of fermions in the Standard Model, augmented by a sterile neutrino. The model is a modification of the world-line approach to chiral fermions.

  15. The fermion content of the Standard Model from a simple world-line theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Mansfield

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple model that automatically generates the sum over gauge group representations and chiralities of a single generation of fermions in the Standard Model, augmented by a sterile neutrino. The model is a modification of the world-line approach to chiral fermions.

  16. Development of a coal shrinkage-swelling model accounting for water content in the micropores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prob Thararoop; Zuleima T. Karpyn; Turgay Ertekin [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Changes in cleat permeability of coal seams are influenced by internal stress, and release or adsorption of gas in the coal matrix during production/injection processes. Coal shrinkage-swelling models have been proposed to quantify such changes; however none of the existing models incorporates the effect of the presence of water in the micropores on the gas sorption of coalbeds. This paper proposes a model of coal shrinkage and swelling, incorporating the effect of water in the micropores. The proposed model was validated using field permeability data from San Juan basin coalbeds and compared with coal shrinkage and swelling models existing in the literature.

  17. Carcinogenicity, allergenicity, and lupus-inducibility of arylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King-Thom

    2016-01-01

    Arylamines are widely used in food, drugs, and cosmetics as well as other industries. These chemicals are present ubiquitously in cigarette smoke, smoke emitted from cooking fume hoods as well as are generated by diverse industries. Arylamines can be generated by cleavage of azo dyes by intestinal and skin microbiota. Some arylamines are used as drugs while others are constituents of human metabolism. Many of the arylamines are mutagenic and carcinogenic. They are generally recognized as the major cause of human bladder cancer, but arylamines can induce cancers of other organs in humans and animals. Some arylamines are allergenic, causing lupus like syndrome, or other maladies. In view of their unbiquitious nature and the diseases they cause, arylamines are probably the most important chemicals causing health problems.

  18. Screening tests for determination of cytotoxic agent, mutagens and carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegelberg, T.; Koerdel, W.; Goertz, T.; Thriemer, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is supposed that chemical substances are the primary factors responsible for the development of tumors and genetic damages. From this results the urgend demand to examine at least the frequently applied and suspicious substances on possibly health-affecting effects. The performance of these examinations with experimental animals requires a lot of time and financial support and has increasingly been criticised in public with regard to protection of animals. Experience gained in the U.S.A. revealed that the carcinogenicity test of one single substance performed with animal experiments takes approximately 3 years and costs about 300,000 Dollars. Therefore the application of cell cultures for such examinations and tests has been postulated and discussed for several years. Cell cultures require only little space and generally the observed effects develop after only a short time. Objectification and statistical assessment (due to high cell amounts per test) can be performed without any problems.

  19. Carcinogenic risks associated with radiation pollution. [UV radiation, sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latarjet, R.

    1976-01-01

    The cancerogenic pollution by non-ionizing radiations is limited to the case of solar ultraviolet, whose activity at ground level may be increased as a consequence of the stratospheric depletion of ozone, produced by certain chemical pollutants: nitrogen oxides from supersonic aircrafts, freon. As regards ionizing radiations, the discussion is focused on the fundamental problem of the threshold, and on the means by which one may obtain some quantitative data related to carcinogenesis by small radiation doses in man. A new concept, that of a practical threshold, is proposed. A theory which links radiocancerogenesis, as well as chemical cancerogenesis, to errors produced in the repair of lesions in the DNA is discussed. The rads-equivalent project for chemical mutagens and carcinogens is described.

  20. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Beland, Frederick A.; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Brownson, Ross C.; Bucher, John R.; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W.; Christiani, David C.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A.; Dement, John M.; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fleming, Lora E.; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K.; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A.; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H.; Lynch, Charles F.; Lynge, Elsebeth; ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J.; McLaughlin, John R.; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A.; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E.; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Cristian; Olshan, Andrew F.; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P.; Perry, Melissa J.; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B.; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M.; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A.; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M.; Sandler, Dale P.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra T.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H.; Smith, Martyn T.; Spinelli, John J.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T.; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E.; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G.; Ward, Elizabeth M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia Hoar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working Groups to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans. Objectives: The authors of this Commentary are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We examined criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. Here, we present the results of that examination, review the history of IARC evaluations, and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed. Discussion: We concluded that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various disciplines and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. Conclusions: The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public’s health. Citation: Pearce N, Blair A, Vineis P, Ahrens W, Andersen A, Anto JM, Armstrong BK, Baccarelli AA, Beland FA, Berrington A, Bertazzi PA, Birnbaum LS, Brownson RC, Bucher JR, Cantor KP

  1. Retraction: Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehic, Bakir

    2010-11-01

    The Editor-in-chief of the Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences has decided to retract the article from Bayazit V et al. [1] entitled as: "Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF)" published in Bosn J Basic Med Sci. 2010 Aug;10(3):245-50. After the editorial office was alerted of possible plagiarism in the article, it conducted thorough investigation and concluded that the article apparently represents plagiarized material from two World Health Organization reports, one European Commission report and other sources. Since this is considered scientific plagiarism and scientific misconduct, Editor-in-chief has decided to withdraw the article. The authors have agreed with the editorial office decision.

  2. [Thoughts on carcinogenic pollution caused by ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, R

    1976-01-01

    The pollution phenomenon groups the effects of small doses of radiation on large populations. These effects on Man are not directly accessible. One must: a) consider some epidemiological statistics (cosmic radiation at high altitudes; radioactivity from granitic surroundings); b) extrapolate from datas obtained with high doses; c) extrapolate from datas obtained with low doses in micro-organisms or mammalian cells in vitro. The interpolation scheme of Abrahamson et al. is so available for mutagenicity. The question of a threshold remains theoretical, although radiation-induced carcinogenesis often displays a dose-effects curve with a well market threshold. A new concept, that of a "practical threshold" is developped, which may be of great usefulness. The main genetic considerations are listed upon which the present international admissible doses are based. Finally, in order to establish quantitative comparisons between chemical and radiation carcinogenic pollution, the concept of "rad equivalents" for the main chemical mutagens is stressed.

  3. ESIP's Emerging Provenance and Context Content Standard Use Cases: Developing Examples and Models for Data Stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdeen, S.; Hills, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earth science data collections range from individual researchers' private collections to large-scale data warehouses, from computer-generated data to field or lab based observations. These collections require stewardship. Fundamentally, stewardship ensures long term preservation and the provision of access to the user community. In particular, stewardship includes capturing appropriate metadata and documentation--and thus the context of the data's creation and any changes they underwent over time --to enable data reuse. But scientists and science data managers must translate these ideas into practice. How does one balance the needs of current and (projected) future stakeholders? In 2011, the Data Stewardship Committee (DSC) of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) began developing the Provenance and Context Content Standard (PCCS). As an emerging standard, PCCS provides a framework for 'what' must be captured or preserved as opposed to describing only 'how' it should be done. Originally based on the experiences of NASA and NOAA researchers within ESIP, the standard currently provides data managers with content items aligned to eight key categories. While the categories and content items are based on data life cycles of remote sensing missions, they can be generalized to cover a broader set of activities, for example, preservation of physical objects. These categories will include the information needed to ensure the long-term understandability and usability of earth science data products. In addition to the PCCS, the DSC is developing a series of use cases based on the perspectives of the data archiver, data user, and the data consumer that will connect theory and practice. These cases will act as specifications for developing PCCS-based systems. They will also provide for examination of the categories and content items covered in the PCCS to determine if any additions are needed to cover the various use cases, and also provide rationale and

  4. Rodent carcinogenicity with the thiazolidinedione antidiabetic agent troglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J R; Dethloff, L A; McGuire, E J; Parker, R F; Walsh, K M; Gough, A W; Masuda, H; de la Iglesia, F A

    2002-07-01

    Carcinogenic potential of the thiazolidinedione antidiabetic troglitazone was assessed in 104-week studies in mice and rats. Mice were given 50, 400, or 800 mg/kg, male rats 100, 400, or 800 mg/kg, and female rats 25, 50, or 200 mg/kg. Vehicle and placebo controls were included. Survival was significantly decreased in both sexes of both species at high doses, but was adequate for valid evaluation of carcinogenicity. Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of brown adipose tissue was observed in both species at all doses, and fatty change and hypocellularity of bone marrow was noted in mice at all doses and in female rats at 50 and 200 mg/kg. Hepatocellular vacuolation was observed in mice at 400 and 800 mg/kg, and centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy occurred in rats at > or = 200 mg/kg. Ventricular dilatation, myocardial fibrosis, and atrial myocyte karyomegaly in male rats at 400 and 800 mg/kg and female rats at all doses were morphologically similar to spontaneous lesions, but incidence and severity were increased compared with controls. In mice, the incidence of hemangiosarcoma was increased in females at 400 mg/kg and in both sexes at 800 mg/kg. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma was increased in female mice at 800 mg/kg. Troglitazone exposure [AUC((0-24))] at the lowest dose associated with increased tumor incidence in mice was 16 times human therapeutic exposure at 400 mg daily. No tumors of any type were increased in rats at exposures up to 47 times therapeutic exposure.

  5. A regional estimate of soil organic carbon content linking the RothC model to spatialised climate and soil database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirca, Costantino; Salis, Michele; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) represents the largest pool of organic carbon in the biosphere, and plays a vital role in ecosystem function determining soil fertility, water holding capacity, and susceptibility to land degradation. The SOC amount is mainly led by soil type, land use, and climate. In this work an assessment of SOC pools in Mediterranean soils is presented. The SOC content was estimated at regional scale in Sardinia, the second largest island of the Mediterranean Basin, linking the RothC model (Rothamsted Carbon model) to a high detailed spatialised climate, land use and soil database. More than 300 soil analysis data, covering different land use typologies, were used for the calibration and validation of the model. A good agreement between soil C estimated from the model and ground data was found. The methodology allowed to obtain the current SOC pools estimation for the different land use categories at regional scale.

  6. A novel random void model and its application in predicting void content of composites based on ultrasonic attenuation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Xiang; Chen, Jun; Mu, Yunfei; Li, Ximeng

    2011-06-01

    A novel two-dimensional random void model (RVM) based on random medium theory and a statistical method is proposed to describe random voids in composite materials. The spatial autocorrelation function and statistical parameters are used to describe the large-scale heterogeneity from the composite matrix and the small-scale heterogeneities of elastic fluctuations from random voids, the values of which are determined by statistical data from microscopic observations of void morphology. A RVM for CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced polymer) composite specimens with void content of 0.03-4.62% is presented. It is found that the geometric morphology of voids from the RVM presents good matches to the microscopic images. Calculations of ultrasonic attenuation coefficients from the RVM at 5 MHz are much closer to the experiments than those from the previous deterministic model. Furthermore, the RVM can also cover abnormal coefficients from unusually large voids, which unpredictably occur during the composite preparation and have a detrimental effect on the strength and mechanical properties of the components. The significant enhancements in description of void morphology and quantitative correlation between void content and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient make this method a good candidate for predicting void content of composite materials non-destructively.

  7. Salt Composition Derived from Veazey Composition by Thermodynamic Modeling and Predicted Composition of Drum Contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisbrod, Kirk Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clark, David Lewis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report describes the derivation of the salt composition from the Veazey salt stream analysis. It also provides an estimate of the proportions of the kitty litter, nitrate salt and neutralizer that was contained in drum 68660. While the actinide content of waste streams was judiciously followed in the 1980s in TA-55, no record of the salt composition could be found. Consequently, a salt waste stream produced from 1992 to 1994 and reported by Gerry Veazey provided the basis for this study. While chemical analysis of the waste stream was highly variable, an average analysis provided input to the Stream Analyzer software to calculate a composition for a concentrated solid nitrate salt and liquid waste stream. The calculation predicted the gas / condensed phase compositions as well as solid salt / saturated liquid compositions. The derived composition provides an estimate of the nitrate feedstream to WIPP for which kinetic measurements can be made. The ratio of salt to Swheat in drum 68660 contents was estimated through an overall mass balance on the parent and sibling drums. The RTR video provided independent confirmation concerning the volume of the mixture. The solid salt layer contains the majority of the salt at a ratio with Swheat that potentially could become exothermic.

  8. OVERVIEW OF DRINKING WATER MUTAGENICITY AND CARCINOGENICITY AND RISK FOR BLADDER CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroacetic acid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of 2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxici...

  9. The carcinogenicity of dietary acrylamide intake: A comparative discussion of epidemiological and experimental animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, J.G.F.; Baars, B.-J.; Schouten, L.J.; Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Since 2002, it is known that the probable human carcinogen acrylamide is present in commonly consumed carbohydrate-rich foods, such as French fries and potato chips. In this review, the authors discuss the body of evidence on acrylamide carcinogenicity from both epidemiological and rodent studies, i

  10. Inter-laboratory comparison of turkey in ovo carcinogenicity assessment (IOCA) of hepatocarcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzmann, H; Brunnemann, K; Iatropoulos, M; Shpyleva, S; Lukyanova, N; Todor, I; Moore, M; Spicher, K; Chekhun, V; Tsuda, H; Williams, G

    2013-09-01

    In three independent laboratories carcinogens (diethylnitrosamine, DEN, 4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, NNK) and non-carcinogens (N-nitrosoproline, nicotine) were evaluated in turkey eggs for in ovo carcinogenicity assessment (IOCA). Compounds were injected into aseptic fertilized eggs. After incubation for 24 days, foci of altered hepatocytes (FAH), some with a pseudoglandular structure and/or signs of compression of the surrounding tissue were observed in the fetal liver. All laboratories were able to distinguish unequivocally the hepatocarcinogen-exposed groups from those exposed to non-carcinogens or the vehicle controls, based on the pre-specified evaluation parameters: tumor-like lesions, pseudoglandular areas and FAH. In addition to focal changes, only the carcinogens induced hepatocellular karyomegaly. Lower doses of the carcinogens, which did not induce FAH, were sufficient to induce hepatocellular karyomegaly. After exposure to 4 mg DEN, gall bladder agenesis was observed in all fetuses. The IOCA may be a valuable tool for early investigative studies on carcinogenicity and since it does not use rodents may complement chronic rat or mouse bioassays. Test substances that are positive in both rodents and fertilized turkey eggs are most probably trans-species carcinogens with particular significance for humans. The good concordance observed among the three laboratories demonstrates that the IOCA is a reliable and robust method.

  11. Aflatoxin is not a probably human carcinogen: the published evidence is sufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoloff, L

    1989-12-01

    infection for aflatoxin could not be ruled out. However, the epidemiological studies of the HBV/PLC relation indicate that an accessory factor is not an essential condition, a conclusion supported by animal models and a laboratory study that specifically found no interaction between aflatoxin and a hepatitis virus in the duck, a species in which liver cancer can be induced by either agent. It was surprising that an IARC Working Group meeting in 1987 concluded, on the basis of much of this evidence that was available at that time, and citing other studies that appear to be irrelevant to the issue, that there was sufficient evidence to consider aflatoxin a probable human carcinogen.

  12. Modelling soil water content variations under drought stress on soil column cropped with winter wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Csorba, Szilveszter; Raveloson, Andrea; Tóth, Estzer; Nagy, Viliam; Farkas, Csilla

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models are effective tools for evaluating the impact of predicted climate change on agricultural production, but it is difficult to test their applicability to future weather conditions. We applied the SWAP model to assess its applicability to climate conditions, differing from those, for which the model was developed. We used a database obtained from a winter wheat drought stress experiment. Winter wheat was grown in six soil columns, three having optimal water supply (NS), whil...

  13. Development of NIRS models to predict protein and amylose content of brown rice and proximate compositions of rice bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Torit Baran; Sharma, Srigopal; Chattopadhyay, Krishnendu

    2016-01-15

    With the escalating persuasion of economic and nutritional importance of rice grain protein and nutritional components of rice bran (RB), NIRS can be an effective tool for high throughput screening in rice breeding programme. Optimization of NIRS is prerequisite for accurate prediction of grain quality parameters. In the present study, 173 brown rice (BR) and 86 RB samples with a wide range of values were used to compare the calibration models generated by different chemometrics for grain protein (GPC) and amylose content (AC) of BR and proximate compositions (protein, crude oil, moisture, ash and fiber content) of RB. Various modified partial least square (mPLSs) models corresponding with the best mathematical treatments were identified for all components. Another set of 29 genotypes derived from the breeding programme were employed for the external validation of these calibration models. High accuracy of all these calibration and prediction models was ensured through pair t-test and correlation regression analysis between reference and predicted values. PMID:26258697

  14. ICT Integration in Nigeria and the Quest for Indigenous Contents: Prospects of the i-CLAP Model Design Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azi, J. I.; Nkom, A. A.; Schweppe, M.

    2012-10-01

    Advances in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is transforming the 21st century learning environment, from its traditional face-to-face, structured curriculum, fixed location and teacher-centered nature, into a more flexible and self-directed process. For instance, variously designed and developed instructional multimedia contents and interfaces in forms of (i) productivity, (ii) educational or (iii) gaming software, enable active learning access as mobile or classroom technologies, interactive tutorials, online discussions, internet conferencing and online databases. However, while this article considers these recent developments such as Intellimedia, NEPAD e-School, OLPC and Intel Classmate projects and so on as trendy and groundbreaking. It observes with discontent that the design of their contents and interfaces seem to be targeted at cross-cultural audiences, with very little or no consideration for minorities like Africa. The authors opine therefore that if the challenge of ICT integration towards bridging the digital divides in Africa must be taken very serious, the task transcends merely supplying networked computer hardware to local schools. Digital contents are required that reflect the beauty and riches of Africaís culture and heritage like music, fashion, architecture, arts and crafts. Against which backdrop, the Interactive Child Learning Aid Project (i-CLAP) model was initiated as a potential indigenous resource, for enhancing pre-primary education in Nigeria adapting the ADDIE model structure. The researchers observe that while 'customizationí of ICT applications targeted at local audience is commendable, integrating relevant indigenous contents has the potential to enhance efficacy and consequently raise the motivational level of local learners.

  15. Nucleon form factors and spin content in a quark-diquark model with a pion cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Cloet, Ian C.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new model of the nucleon in which quark-diquark configurations immersed in a pion cloud are treated in a manner consistent with Poincar\\'e invariance. With suitably chosen parameters, the computations employing this model reproduce the measured electromagnetic form factors and the quark-spin contribution to the total nucleon angular momentum.

  16. Disposition of smoked cannabis with high [Delta]9-tetrahydrocannabinol content: A kinetic model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunault, C.C.; van Eijkeren, J.C.; Mensinga, T.T.; de Vries, I.; Leenders, M.E.C.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction No model exists to describe the disposition and kinetics of inhaled cannabis containing a high THC dose. We aimed to develop a kinetic model providing estimates of the THC serum concentrations after smoking cannabis cigarettes containing high THC doses (up to 69 mg THC).Methods Twenty-f

  17. Role of iron content on serpentinite dehydration depth in subduction zones: Experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkulova, Margarita; Muñoz, Manuel; Vidal, Olivier; Brunet, Fabrice

    2016-11-01

    A series of dehydration experiments in the piston-cylinder apparatus was carried out at 2 GPa and 550-850 °C on a natural antigorite sample mixed with 5 wt.% of magnetite. Chemical analyses of experimental products show a progressive decrease of the Mg# in antigorite and clinopyroxene between 550 and 675 °C, whereas the Mg# of olivine increases. The observed behavior of Mg# signifies Fe-Mg exchange between coexisting minerals. At higher temperatures, between 700 and 850 °C, compositions remain stable for all minerals in experimental assemblages. Thermodynamic parameters of the ferrous antigorite end-member were refined with the use of Holland and Powell (1998) data set and added to the antigorite solid solution. Good agreement between theoretical calculations performed for the studied bulk composition and experimental results confirms extrapolated thermodynamic data for Fe-antigorite. Constrained parameters allowed to calculate phase relationships for various serpentinite compositions. First, we assessed the effect of bulk iron content, from 0 to 10 wt.% FeO, on the stability field of antigorite. The results show significant decrease of the antigorite thermal stability with increasing bulk Fe content. Second, we demonstrated the influence of bulk iron content on dehydration reactions in subduction zones along typical thermal gradients. Dehydration observed in pure MSH (MgO-SiO2-H2O) systems comprised of antigorite appears as a univariant reaction, which happens at 710 °C/3.7 GPa and 640 °C/6 GPa in "hot" and "cold" subduction, respectively. In contrast, more complex in composition Fe-bearing serpentinites show spread dehydration profiles through divariant reactions from ~ 300 °C/0.8 GPa to 700 °C/3.6 GPa and from 450 °C/4 GPa to 650 °C/7.4 GPa for "hot" and "cold" thermal gradients respectively. A comparison between depths of "water-release events" and "earthquake occurrence" in the South Chile slab ("hot" subduction) highlights a clear correlation between

  18. Evaluation of ice and snow content in the global numerical weather prediction model GME with CloudSat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eikenberg

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the global numerical weather prediction model GME with respect to frozen particles, both ice and snow, focusing on the performance of a diagnostic versus a prognostic precipitation scheme. As a reference, CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar observations are utilized – the so far only near-globally available data set which vertically resolves clouds. Both the observation-to-model and the model-to-observation approach are applied and compared to each other. For the latter, the radar simulator QuickBeam is utilized. Criteria are applied to further improve the comparability between model and observations. The two model versions are statistically evaluated for a four-month period.

    The comparison reveals that the prognostic scheme reproduces the shape of the CloudSat frequency distributions for both ice water content (IWC and reflectivity factor well, while the diagnostic scheme produces no large IWCs or reflectivity factors because snow falls out instantaneously. However, the prognostic scheme overestimates the occurrence of high ice water paths (IWP, especially in the mid-latitudes. Sensitivity tests show that an increased fall speed of snow successfully reduces IWP. Both approaches capture the general features, but for details, the two together deliver the largest informational content. In case of limited resources, the model-to-observation approach is preferred. Finally, the results indicate that the lack of IWC in most global circulation models might be attributed to the use of diagnostic precipitation schemes, i.e., the lack of snow aloft.

    Based on its good performance the prognostic scheme went into operational mode in February 2010. The adjusted snow fall speed went operational in December 2010. However, continual improvements of the ice microphysics are necessary, which can be assessed by the proposed evaluation technique.

  19. The content of mercury in various types of cereals that were grown in the model conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľuboš Harangozo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of cereals in Slovakia but also worldwide is increasing by every year. From 30000 to 50000 tons of mercury circulates throught the biosphere that gets into the atmosphere degassing of the earth's crust and world oceans. Mercury affects CNS and causes its disorders. The high doses of mercury causes a lot of different changes of personality as well as increased agitation, memory lossorinsomnia. It can also affect other organ systems such as the kidney. The exposure level is reflected in the concentration of mercury in blood and urine. The aim of our work was the evaluation of transfer of mercury from sludge to edible part of chosen cereals. The objectives were achieved in simulated conditions of growing pot experiment. We used agricultural soil from the location of Výčapy - Opatovce for the realization of the experiment. The sludge, which was added atvarious doses, was taken from Central Spiš area from locality of Rudňany near the village where minedironore that contains mainly copperand mercury during last few decades was. We used three types of cereals: barley (Hordeum sativum L. variety PRESTIGE, spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. variety ISJARISSA and oat (Avena sativa L. variety TATRAN. The length of growing season was 90 days. From the obtained results of two years can be concluded that the accumulation of mercury by seed follows wheat ˂ barley ˂ oat. Even though that the oat is characterized by the highest accumulation of mercuryin the seeds, the content did not exceed the maximum level sspecified by The Codex Alimentarius of Slovak Republic. The results shows that the suitable cultivation of the cereals in localities, which are contaminated with heavy metals, especially by mercury, that the high content of mercury in soil do not pose a risk of accumulation of the metal into the cereal grain.

  20. Using Micromechanical Resonators to Measure Rheological Properties and Alcohol Content of Model Solutions and Commercial Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart W. Hoogenboom

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Micromechanic resonators provide a small-volume and potentially high-throughput method to determine rheological properties of fluids. Here we explore the accuracy in measuring mass density and viscosity of ethanol-water and glycerol-water model solutions, using a simple and easily implemented model to deduce the hydrodynamic effects on resonating cantilevers of various length-to-width aspect ratios. We next show that these measurements can be extended to determine the alcohol percentage of both model solutions and commercial beverages such as beer, wine and liquor. This demonstrates how micromechanical resonators can be used for quality control of every-day drinks.

  1. Modeling of secondary treated wastewater disinfection by UV irradiation: effects of suspended solids content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Mounaouer; Belhadi, Noureddine Hamed; Hamdi, Helmi; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2010-01-01

    This work aimed to study UV-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to propose a formulation of the kinetics of secondary treated wastewater disinfection and to underline the influence of suspended solids on the inactivation kinetics of these strains. Some investigations were carried out for the validation of some simulation models, from the simplest, the kinetics model of Chick-Watson reduced to first order, to rather complex models such as multi-kinetic and Collins-Selleck models. Results revealed that the involved processes of UV irradiation were too complex to be approached by a simplified formulation, even in the case of specific strains of microorganisms and the use of nearly constant UV radiation intensity. In fact, the application of Chick-Watson model in its original form is not representative of the kinetics of UV disinfection. Modification, taking into account the speed change during the disinfection process, has not significantly improved results. On the other hand, the application of Collins-Selleck model demonstrates that it was necessary to exceed a least dose of critical radiation to start the process of inactivation. To better explain the process of inactivation, we have assumed that the action of disinfectant on the survival of lonely microorganisms is faster than its action on suspended solids protected or agglomerated to each others. We can assume in this case the existence of two inactivation kinetics during the processes (parallel and independent) of the first-order. For this reason, the application of a new kinetic model by introducing a third factor reflecting the influence of suspended solids in water on disinfection kinetics appeared to be determinant for modeling UV inactivation of P. aeruginosa in secondary treated wastewater.

  2. The empirical content of models with multiple equilibria in economies with social interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Bisin, Alberto; Moro, Andrea; Topa, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    We study a general class of models with social interactions that might display multiple equilibria. We propose an estimation procedure for these models and evaluate its efficiency and computational feasibility relative to different approaches taken to the curse of dimensionality implied by the multiplicity. Using data on smoking among teenagers, we implement the proposed estimation procedure to understand how group interactions affect health-related choices. We find that interaction effects a...

  3. Modelling soil water content variations under drought stress on soil column cropped with winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csorba Szilveszter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models are effective tools for evaluating the impact of predicted climate change on agricultural production, but it is difficult to test their applicability to future weather conditions. We applied the SWAP model to assess its applicability to climate conditions, differing from those, for which the model was developed. We used a database obtained from a winter wheat drought stress experiment. Winter wheat was grown in six soil columns, three having optimal water supply (NS, while three were kept under drought-stressed conditions (S. The SWAP model was successfully calibrated against measured values of potential evapotranspiration (PET, potential evaporation (PE and total amount of water (TSW in the soil columns. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (N-S for TWS for the stressed columns was 0.92. For the NS treatment, we applied temporally variable soil hydraulic properties because of soil consolidation caused by regular irrigation. This approach improved the N-S values for the wetting-drying cycle from -1.77 to 0.54. We concluded that the model could be used for assessing the effects of climate change on soil water regime. Our results indicate that soil water balance studies should put more focus on the time variability of structuredependent soil properties.

  4. Content-adaptive pentary steganography using the multivariate generalized Gaussian cover model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Vahid; Fridrich, Jessica; Cogranne, Rémi

    2015-03-01

    The vast majority of steganographic schemes for digital images stored in the raster format limit the amplitude of embedding changes to the smallest possible value. In this paper, we investigate the possibility to further improve the empirical security by allowing the embedding changes in highly textured areas to have a larger amplitude and thus embedding there a larger payload. Our approach is entirely model driven in the sense that the probabilities with which the cover pixels should be changed by a certain amount are derived from the cover model to minimize the power of an optimal statistical test. The embedding consists of two steps. First, the sender estimates the cover model parameters, the pixel variances, when modeling the pixels as a sequence of independent but not identically distributed generalized Gaussian random variables. Then, the embedding change probabilities for changing each pixel by 1 or 2, which can be transformed to costs for practical embedding using syndrome-trellis codes, are computed by solving a pair of non-linear algebraic equations. Using rich models and selection-channel-aware features, we compare the security of our scheme based on the generalized Gaussian model with pentary versions of two popular embedding algorithms: HILL and S-UNIWARD.

  5. Carotenoid content of commonly consumed herbs and assessment of their bioaccessibility using an in vitro digestion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Trevor; Jiwan, Marvin A; O'Brien, Nora M; Aherne, S Aisling

    2010-06-01

    Herbs are a rich source of bioactive phytochemicals such as carotenoids, which are known to exert various positive biological effects. However, there is very limited information in the literature regarding the content and bioavailability of carotenoids from commonly consumed herbs. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were first, to determine the carotenoid content of eight herbs namely basil (Ocimum basilicum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), dill (Anethum graveolens), mint (Metha L.), parsley (Petroselinum crispum), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), sage (Salvia officinalis), and tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.); and second, to assess carotenoid bioaccessibility from these herbs using a simulated human in vitro digestion model. Carotenoid bioaccessibility is defined as the amount of carotenoids transferred to micelles after digestion when compared with the original amount present in the food. The content of individual carotenoids varied significantly among the herbs tested. Carotenoid bioaccessibility varied from 0 to 42.8%. Basil and coriander, and their respective micelles, contained the highest levels of beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and lutein + zeaxanthin. Our findings show that herbs are rich sources of carotenoids and that these foods can significantly contribute to the intake of bioaccessible carotenoids. PMID:20443063

  6. Collagen Content in Skin and Internal Organs of the Tight Skin Mouse: An Animal Model of Scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanthi Manne; Marina Markova; Siracusa, Linda D.; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2013-01-01

    The Tight Skin mouse is a genetically induced animal model of tissue fibrosis caused by a large in-frame mutation in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (Fbn-1). We examined the influence of gender on the collagen content of tissues in C57BL/6J wild type (+/+) and mutant Tight Skin (Tsk/+) mice employing hydroxyproline assays. Tissue sections were stained with Masson’s trichrome to identify collagen in situ. Adult Tsk/+ mice skin contains ~15% more collagen, on average, than skin from +/+ mice of t...

  7. THE CONTENT MODEL AND THE EQUATIONS OF MOTION OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Soroka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The calculation methods improvement of the electric vehicle curve movement and the cost of electricity with the aim of performance and accuracy of calculations improving are considered in the paper. Methodology. The method is based upon the general principles of mathematical simulation, when a conceptual model of problem domain is created and then a mathematic model is formulated according to the conceptual model. Development of an improved conceptual model of electric vehicles motion is proposed and a corresponding mathematical model is studied. Findings. The authors proposed model in which the vehicle considers as a system of interacting point-like particles with defined interactions under the influence of external forces. As a mathematical model the Euler-Lagrange equation of the second kind is used. Conservative and dissipative forces affecting the system dynamics are considered. Equations for calculating motion of electric vehicles with taking into account the energy consumption are proposed. Originality. In the paper the conceptual model of motion for electric vehicles with distributed masses has been developed as a system of interacting point-like particles. In the easiest case the system has only one degree of freedom. The mathematical model is based on Lagrange equations. The shown approach allows a detailed and physically based description of the electric vehicles dynamics. The derived motion equations for public electric transport are substantially more precise than the equations recommended in textbooks and the reference documentation. The motion equations and energy consumption calculations for transportation of one passenger with a trolleybus are developed. It is shown that the energy consumption depends on the data of vehicle and can increase when the manload is above the certain level. Practical value. The authors received the equations of motion and labour costs in the calculations focused on the use of computer methods

  8. Selection of a suitable model for the prediction of soil water content in north of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Esmaeelnejad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Linear Regression (MLR, Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Rosetta model were employed to develop pedotransfers functions (PTFs for soil moisture prediction using available soil properties for northern soils of Iran. The Rosetta model is based on ANN works in a hierarchical approach to predict water retention curves. For this purpose, 240 soil samples were selected from the south of Guilan province, Gilevan region, northern Iran. The data set was divided into two subsets for calibration and testing of the models. The general performance of PTFs was evaluated using coefficient of determination (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and mean biased error between the observed and predicted values. Results showed that ANN with two hidden layers, Tan-sigmoid and linear functions for hidden and output layers respectively, performed better than the others in predicting soil moisture. In the other hand, ANN can model non-linear functions and showed to perform better than MLR. After ANN, MLR had better accuracy than Rosetta. The developed PTFs resulted in more accurate estimation at matric potentials of 100, 300, 500, 1000, 1500 kPa. Whereas, Rosetta model resulted in slightly better estimation than derived PTFs at matric potentials of 33 kPa. This research can provide the scientific basis for the study of soil hydraulic properties and be helpful for the estimation of soil water retention in other places with similar conditions, too.

  9. A 1-D modelling of streaming potential dependence on water content during drainage experiment in sand

    CERN Document Server

    Allègre, Vincent; Ackerer, Philippe; Jouniaux, Laurence; Sailhac, Pascal; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05371.x

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of electrokinetics for unsaturated conditions is crucial for numerous of geophysical data interpretation. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the streaming potential coefficient C as a function of the water saturation Sw is still discussed. We propose here to model both the Richards' equation for hydrodynamics and the Poisson's equation for electrical potential for unsaturated conditions using 1-D finite element method. The equations are first presented and the numerical scheme is then detailed for the Poisson's equation. Then, computed streaming potentials (SPs) are compared to recently published SP measurements carried out during drainage experiment in a sand column. We show that the apparent measurement of DV / DP for the dipoles can provide the SP coefficient in these conditions. Two tests have been performed using existing models for the SP coefficient and a third one using a new relation. The results show that existing models of unsaturated SP coefficients C(Sw) provide poor results in term...

  10. Effects of Video Modeling on Implementation of Literature Circles in Inclusive Content Area Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Dieker

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Trends in special education favor inclusion and concurrently the implementation of inclusive instructional practices. As students with learning disabilities are increasingly placed in general education classrooms, the need to assist general educators in establishing inclusive classrooms becomes a major priority. Cooperative learning, in the form of literature circles, is offered as a means of providing support to academically diverse student populations. In light of research-to-practice challenges, this study investigated the potential for students with learning disabilities and their peers to learn about literature circles by viewing video models of the practice in action. Students in the video modeling group demonstrated significantly more effective implementation of literature circles including cooperative behaviors, suggesting that video modeling could serve as a means of improving the translation of research on effective instructional strategies to actual practice in classrooms.

  11. Weakly nonlinear models for internal waves: inverse scattering transform and solitary wave contents

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shengqian

    2016-01-01

    The time evolution emanating from ``internal dam-break'' initial conditions is studied for a class of models of stratified Euler fluids in configurations close to two-homogeneous layers separated by a thin diffused interface. Direct numerical simulations and experiments in wave tanks show that such initial conditions eventually give rise to coherent structures that are close to solitary-wave solutions moving ahead of a region of dispersive wave motion and turbulent mixing close to the location of the initial dam step. A priori theoretical predictions of the main features of these solitary waves, such as their amplitudes and speeds, appear to be unavailable, even for simplified models of wave evolution in stratified fluids. With the aim of providing estimates of the existence, amplitude and speed of such solitary waves, an approach based on Inverse Scattering Transform (IST) for completely integrable models is developed here and tested against direct numerical simulations of Euler fluids and some of their mode...

  12. Prevention of cancer and the dose-effect relationship: the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    seldom occur. Promoting factors are agents that either perturb intercellular signalling or stimulate cell proliferation (e.g. hormones) or increase cell mortality: mechanical or chemical irritation (e.g. alcohol, bacteria, viruses) thereby inducing compensatory cell proliferation. Thus, gradually pre-cancerous cells become able to divide more rapidly with greater autonomy. This phase ends when a sub clone of cells has acquired the capacity of autonomous proliferation. The third phase is that of progression during which cells proliferate regularly without any stimulation. In one of the cells of one of the pre-cancerous lesions (e.g. polyps) a cell acquires the capacity of invading surrounding tissue or to metastasize. The whole carcinogenic process is very slow, extending over several decades, because the specific mutations seldom occur and the probability of an accumulation of several specific mutations in the same cell or cell lineage is very small. It can be accelerated by intense stimulation of cell proliferation or genetic instability. Ionizing radiations act firstly as a mutagen, however when the dose is high they also kill a significant proportion of cells and by a homeostatic mechanism they induce cell proliferation and clonal amplification. It has been claimed that even the smallest dose of radiation can induce a cancer. This concept is associated with the L.N.T. model and it is not based on scientific evidence. It has fuelled a fear of radiation which had detrimental consequences. Conversely the high efficacy of defense mechanisms against radio carcinogenesis, particularly when the tissue is not disorganized, can explain the lack of carcinogenic effect of contamination by small doses of radium or thorium which has been observed on radium dial painters or in patients injected with thorotrast. The study of second cancers in patients treated by radiotherapy could provide important information and should be actively pursued with two aims: reduce the incidence of

  13. THE INFORMATION CONTENT IN ANALYTIC SPOT MODELS OF BROADBAND PRECISION LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08534 (United States); Basri, Gibor [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Valenti, Jeff A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  14. A critique of Phanerozoic climatic models involving changes in the CO 2 content of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucot, A. J.; Gray, Jane

    2001-12-01

    Critical consideration of varied Phanerozoic climatic models, and comparison of them against Phanerozoic global climatic gradients revealed by a compilation of Cambrian through Miocene climatically sensitive sediments (evaporites, coals, tillites, lateritic soils, bauxites, calcretes, etc.) suggests that the previously postulated climatic models do not satisfactorily account for the geological information. Nor do many climatic conclusions based on botanical data stand up very well when examined critically. Although this account does not deal directly with global biogeographic information, another powerful source of climatic information, we have tried to incorporate such data into our thinking wherever possible, particularly in the earlier Paleozoic. In view of the excellent correlation between CO 2 present in Antarctic ice cores, going back some hundreds of thousands of years, and global climatic gradient, one wonders whether or not the commonly postulated Phanerozoic connection between atmospheric CO 2 and global climatic gradient is more coincidence than cause and effect. Many models have been proposed that attempt to determine atmospheric composition and global temperature through geological time, particularly for the Phanerozoic or significant portions of it. Many models assume a positive correlation between atmospheric CO 2 and surface temperature, thus viewing changes in atmospheric CO 2 as playing the critical role in regulating climate/temperature, but none agree on the levels of atmospheric CO 2 through time. Prior to the relatively recent interval of time in which atmospheric CO 2 is directly measurable, a variety of biological and geological proxies have been proposed to correlate with atmospheric CO 2 level or with pCO 2/temperature. Atmospheric models may be constructed for the Pre-Cenozoic but the difficulties of assessing variables in their construction are many and complex. None of the modelers have gathered enough biological and geological data to

  15. Modeling a content-aware LTE MAC downlink scheduler with heterogeneous traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artuso, Matteo; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2013-01-01

    The scheduling policy adopted in the LTE (Long Term Evolution) MAC layer is the most valuable degree of freedom left from the 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project) consortium to the industry and the research community . This paper presents an OPNET model of the downlink scheduling in a one...

  16. The Wheel Model of STEAM Education Based on Traditional Korean Scientific Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyoung Won

    2016-01-01

    The Korean STEAM education pursues a convergent human resources education, but there are shortcomings associated with it due to the fact that it excludes the Humanities in its curriculum. This study embodies the accomplishments from the design and field application of the STEAM education model that has added Humanities fields (history, geography,…

  17. Extension of the Hapke bidirectional reflectance model to retrieve soil water content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.-J. Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture links the hydrologic cycle and the energy budget of land surfaces by regulating latent heat fluxes. An accurate assessment of the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture is important to the study of surface biogeophysical processes. Although remote sensing has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for obtaining land surface parameters, no effective methodology yet exists for in situ soil moisture measurement based on a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF model, such as the Hapke model. To retrieve and analyze soil moisture, this study applied the soil water parametric (SWAP-Hapke model, which introduced the equivalent water thickness of soil, to ground multi-angular and hyperspectral observations coupled with, Powell-Ant Colony Algorithm methods. The inverted soil moisture data resulting from our method coincided with in situ measurements (R2 = 0.867, RMSE = 0.813 based on three selected bands (672 nm, 866 nm, 2209 nm. It proved that the extended Hapke model can be used to estimate soil moisture with high accuracy based on the field multi-angle and multispectral remote sensing data.

  18. Extension of the Hapke bidirectional reflectance model to retrieve soil water content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.-J. Yang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture links the hydrologic cycle and the energy budget of land surfaces by regulating latent heat fluxes. An accurate assessment of the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture is important to the study of surface biogeophysical processes. Although remote sensing has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for obtaining land surface parameters, no effective methodology yet exists for in situ soil moisture measurement based on a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF model, such as the Hapke model. To retrieve and analyze soil moisture, this study applied the soil water parametric (SWAP-Hapke model, which introduced the equivalent water thickness of soil, to ground multi-angular and hyperspectral observations coupled with, Powell–Ant Colony Algorithm methods. The inverted soil moisture data resulting from our method coincided with in situ measurements (R2 = 0.867, RMSE = 0.813 based on three selected bands (672 nm, 866 nm, 2209 nm. It proved that the extended Hapke model can be used to estimate soil moisture with high accuracy based on the field multi-angle and multispectral remote sensing data.

  19. Unidirectional high fiber content composites: Automatic 3D FE model generation and damage simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    A new method and a software code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical FE models of unidirectional long-fiber-reinforced composite (LFRC) with high fiber volume fraction with random fiber arrangement are presented. The fiber arrangement in the cross-section is generated through random...

  20. Peritoneal wash contents used to predict mortality in a murine sepsis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuethe, Joshua W.; Midura, Emily F.; Rice, Teresa C.; Caldwell, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) is considered the gold standard for inducing abdominal sepsis in mice. However, the model lacks source control, a component of sepsis management in humans. Using a CLP-excision model, we characterized peritoneal cytokines and cells and hypothesized these analyses would allow us to predict survival. Methods Fifty-eight mice were first subjected to CLP. Twenty hours later, the necrotic cecums were debrided, abdominal cavity lavaged, and intraperitoneal antibiotics administered. Peritoneal cytokines and leukocytes collected from the peritoneal lavage were analyzed. These immune parameters were used to generate receiver operator characteristic curves. In separate experiments, the accuracy of the model was verified with a survival cohort. Finally, we collected the peritoneal lavage and analyzed both serum and peritoneal cytokines, bacterial load, and leukocyte functionality. Results Peritoneal interleukin (IL)-6 levels and neutrophil CD11b intensity were observed to be significantly different in mice that lived versus those who died. In separate experiments, mice predicted to live (P-LIVE) had decreased bacterial loads, systemic IL-10, and neutrophil oxidative burst and increased peritoneal inflammatory monocyte numbers and phagocytosis. Conclusions This study couples a clinically relevant sepsis model with methodology to limit pathogen spread. Using surgical waste, stratification of the mice into groups P-LIVE and predicted to die was possible with a high degree of accuracy and specificity. In mice P-LIVE, increased inflammatory monocyte recruitment and phagocytosis were associated with decreased systemic IL-10 and bacterial loads. PMID:26049288

  1. Wideband On-ground Monostatic Radar Antenna for Water Content Soil Evaluation: Modeling, Design and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Q.; Rejiba, F.; Guérin, R.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of soil's hydraulic properties spatial distribution is important in agricultural practice optimization and hydrological studies. Non-invasive methods of measurement of the dielectric permittivity such as time domain reflectometry (TDR) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) are increasingly used in order to asses soil water content at the field scale. In order to acquire radar data over a wide frequency range, we designed a simple on-ground radar antenna operating on the frequency range 350 MHz - 2GHz. The antenna was designed using a powerful commercial three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic field solver. A prototype of the frequency type radar transmission link was constructed and laboratory measurements were first performed with calibration purpose (the antenna was placed on a 13 cm-thick sand layer of known dielectric permittivity). The antenna is used in monostatic configuration and associated with a vector network analyzer to perform measurements of the antenna-soil reflection coefficients (S11) in the frequency domain. Those measurements are compared to FDTD simulations using the root mean square criterion in order to assess the sand dielectric properties. The use of full-wave FDTD software allows simulation of the whole antenna components, thus all potential influence on the reflection coefficient are recorded. The estimated permittivity with this procedure was close to the real one. In order to test the prototype in real field conditions measurements were performed on a single profile characterized by several agricultural practices (wheat crop, vegetative buffer strip and corn crop). Reflection coefficient (S11) measurements acquired with the prototype are compared to TDR measurements and DC electrical soundings in order to validate the soil apparent dielectric permittivity as well as its apparent electrical conductivity.

  2. Physiological loading can restore the proteoglycan content in a model of early IVD degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Gawri

    Full Text Available A hallmark of early IVD degeneration is a decrease in proteoglycan content. Progression will eventually lead to matrix degradation, a decrease in weight bearing capacity and loss of disc height. In the final stages of IVD degradation, fissures appear in the annular ring allowing extrusion of the NP. It is crucial to understand the interplay between mechanobiology, disc composition and metabolism to be able to provide exercise recommendations to patients with early signs of disc degeneration. This study evaluates the effect of physiological loading compared to no loading on matrix homeostasis in bovine discs with induced degeneration. Bovine discs with trypsin-induced degeneration were cultured for 14 days in a bioreactor under dynamic loading with maintained metabolic activity. Chondroadherin abundance and structure was used to confirm that a functional matrix was preserved in the chosen loading environment. No change was observed in chondroadherin integrity and a non-significant increase in abundance was detected in trypsin-treated loaded discs compared to unloaded discs. The proteoglycan concentration in loaded trypsin-treated discs was significantly higher than in unloaded disc and the newly synthesised proteoglycans were of the same size range as those found in control samples. The proteoglycan showed an even distribution throughout the NP region, similar to that of control discs. Significantly more newly synthesised type II collagen was detected in trypsin-treated loaded discs compared to unloaded discs, demonstrating that physiological load not only stimulates aggrecan production, but also that of type II collagen. Taken together, this study shows that dynamic physiological load has the ability to repair the extracellular matrix depletion typical of early disc degeneration.

  3. A model of relationship between climate and soil factors related to oxalate content in porang (Amorphophallus muelleri Blume corm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERAFINAH INDRIYANI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indriyani S, Arisoesilaningsih E, Wardiyati T, Purnobasuki H (2011 A model of relationship between climate and soil factors related to oxalate content in porang (Amorphophallus muelleri Blume corm. Biodiversitas 12: 45-51. The abiotic environment as well as the biotic environment, involved climate and soil affect directly or indirectly to plant growth as well as plant substance. The objective of the research was to obtain a model of relationship between climate and soil factors related to oxalate content in porang corm. Porang corms were collected from five locations of porang agroforestry in East Java. The locations were (i Klangon Village, Saradan Subdistrict, Madiun District; (ii Klino Villlage, Sekar Subdistrict, Bojonegoro District; (iii Bendoasri Village, Rejoso Subdistrict, Nganjuk District; (iv Sugihwaras Village, Nggluyu Subdistrict, Nganjuk District and (v Kalirejo Village, Kalipare Subdistrict, Malang District. Geography variable consist of altitude. Climate variables consist of percentage of radiation, temperature and rainfall. Soil variables consist of electrical conductivity, pH, soil specific gravity, soil organic matter, available of calcium, and cation exchange capacity (CEC. Vegetation variables consist of species of plant tree and percentage of coverage. Porang vegetative growth variables consist of plant height, number of bulbil, canopy diameter, and petiole diameter. Corm variables consist of corm diameter, corm weight, and corm specific gravity. Oxalate variables consist of total oxalate, soluble oxalate, insoluble oxalate, and density of calcium oxalate crystal. Oxalate contents were measured based on AOAC method. All of variables were collected from first to fourth growth period of porang. Data were analyzed by smartPLS (Partial Least Square software. The results showed that there were significantly direct effect between altitude and temperature, altitude and CEC of soil, temperature and CEC of soil, altitude and

  4. Human carcinogens: an evaluation study via the COMPACT and HazardExpert procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewi, D F V; Bird, M G; Jacobs, M N

    2002-03-01

    The results of computer-optimized molecular parametric analysis of chemical toxicity (COMPACT) and HazardExpert evaluations on 14 established human carcinogens are reported. The concordances between COMPACT and carcinogenicity (71%) and between HazardExpert and carcinogenicity (57%) are significantly improved when taken in combination, where all 14 carcinogens are correctly identified by the two systems used in conjunction. However, if a negative energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E(HOMO)) value is regarded as evidence of electrophilic reactivity likely to give rise to mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, then 13/14 (93%) of the carcinogens are correctly identified by combination with the COMPACT procedure alone. It is possible, therefore, to establish likely carcinogenicity arising from either P450 mediation (CYP1 and CYP2E) or compound electrophilicity via the employment of a straightforward approach to molecular and electronic structure calculation, a process that can be performed in a relatively short time frame (i.e., less than 1 hour per chemical) and at a low cost. PMID:12102536

  5. The carcinogenic effects of aspartame: The urgent need for regulatory re-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffritti, Morando; Padovani, Michela; Tibaldi, Eva; Falcioni, Laura; Manservisi, Fabiana; Belpoggi, Fiorella

    2014-04-01

    Aspartame (APM) is an artificial sweetener used since the 1980s, now present in >6,000 products, including over 500 pharmaceuticals. Since its discovery in 1965, and its first approval by the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) in 1981, the safety of APM, and in particular its carcinogenicity potential, has been controversial. The present commentary reviews the adequacy of the design and conduct of carcinogenicity bioassays on rodents submitted by G.D. Searle, in the 1970s, to the FDA for market approval. We also review how experimental and epidemiological data on the carcinogenic risks of APM, that became available in 2005 motivated the European Commission (EC) to call the European Food and Safety Authority (EFSA) for urgent re-examination of the available scientific documentation (including the Searle studies). The EC has further requested that, if the results of the evaluation should suggest carcinogenicity, major changes must be made to the current APM specific regulations. Taken together, the studies performed by G.D. Searle in the 1970s and other chronic bioassays do not provide adequate scientific support for APM safety. In contrast, recent results of life-span carcinogenicity bioassays on rats and mice published in peer-reviewed journals, and a prospective epidemiological study, provide consistent evidence of APM's carcinogenic potential. On the basis of the evidence of the potential carcinogenic effects of APM herein reported, a re-evaluation of the current position of international regulatory agencies must be considered an urgent matter of public health.

  6. Strategies of reducing the carcinogenic risk of cytostatic agents on the basis of bioassay evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M R

    1991-01-01

    This article described strategies that can be used to reduce the carcinogenic risk of cytostatic chemotherapy and summarizes our recent experimental results. Reduction of neoplasms caused by the carcinogenic potency inherent in cytostatic agents can be obtained. (A) by chemical modifications such as: (1) exchanging a chlorine atom in N, N'-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea (BCNU) in the chloroethyl group at N'-position for a hydroxyl group to form the less carcinogenic analog N-(2-chloroethyl)-N'-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-nitrosourea (HECNU); (2) linking chlorambucil to the steroid prednisolone to obtain a conjugate (prednimustine) with distinctly lower carcinogenic potential than chlorambucil; (3) progressive ring halogenation of phenyl-triazenes to generate agents with decreased long-term toxic risk; (B) by replacing cyclophosphamide within the carcinogenic drug combination of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) by vincristine to form the combination VMF which has no detectable carcinogenic potential; (C) by coadministration of cyclophosphamide and mesna to achieve a dose-related reduction of cyclophosphamide-induced urinary bladder carcinomas; (D) by administration of dinaline, a compound which reduces the spontaneous incidence of malignant tumors in rats. These examples demonstrate that the carcinogenic risk of single agents and drug combinations used for antineoplastic chemotherapy has successfully been reduced, as assessed in long-term bioassays. Such strategies should be considered in the treatment of patients with long life expectancy following cytotoxic chemotherapy.

  7. Ionospheric total electron content variations observed before earthquakes: Possible physical mechanism and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Namgaladze, A A; Zakharenkova, I E; Shagimuratov, I I; Martynenko, O V

    2009-01-01

    The GPS derived anomalous TEC disturbances before earthquakes were discovered in the last years using global and regional TEC maps, measurements over individual stations as well as measurements along individual GPS satellite passes. For strong mid-latitudinal earthquakes the seismo-ionospheric anomalies look like local TEC enhancements or decreases located in the vicinity of the forthcoming earthquake epicenter In case of strong low-latitudinal earthquakes there are effects related with the modification of the equatorial F2-region anomaly: deepening or filling of the ionospheric electron density trough over the magnetic equator. We consider that the most probable reason of the NmF2 and TEC disturbances observed before the earthquakes is the vertical drift of the F2-region ionospheric plasma under the influence of the zonal electric field of seismic origin. To check this hypothesis, the model calculations have been carried out with the use of the Upper Atmosphere Model. The electric potential distribution at t...

  8. EVALUATION OF ANTIOXIDANT AND TOTAL FLAVANOID CONTENT OF MIRABILIS JALAPA LINN USING IN VITRO MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    Subin Mary Zachariah; Aleykutty, N. A.; Jaykar, B; Vidya Viswanad; Halima.O.A

    2012-01-01

    The herbal drugs form the backbone of all traditional system of medicine around the world due to their endless therapeutic activity. Mirabilis jalapa Linn has been hailed as a cure for many common pathological conditions affecting the human body. It has folkloric use as antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory agent, laxative, and a host of other uses. The present study was conducted to evaluate the plants potential as an antioxidant lead by using various in vitro models like FRAP (Ferric reducing...

  9. Model of modern strategic management of an enterprise: contents and components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.T. Raykovska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates different interpretations and definitions of the concept of strategic management. It also aims to identify the ways of revealing the components and peculiarities of the concept.On the base of the critical analysis of economic literature the author singles out process, target, and complex approaches to the interpretation of the essence of strategic management and indicates that strategic management is a complex concept that encompasses management of strategic opportunities and operative management of problems in real time to respond to unpredictable changes fast. According to the modern understanding of strategic management the author singles out its main peculiarities which presuppose ensuring of quick response of an enterprise to the changes of external environment with the help of already developed strategic methods and models, strategic thinking of employees of an economic entity aimed at achieving its development strategy. The parameters of comparison of operating and strategic management are systematized. It is established that operating management is centered on the search for the ways of better use of enterprise resources, while strategic management looks to the needs and changes of external environment, tracking and adapting to its changes, search for new possibilities in competitive environment. The conceptual model of strategic management of an enterprise is formed. It is stated that the use of the model enables to determine the place of strategic analysis in the discussed system and to ensure the fulfillment of strategic plans.

  10. Urban air carcinogens and their effects on health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, J.F.

    1994-11-01

    Airborne carcinogens may be relevant especially in metropolitan regions with extreme smog as a primary cause of lung cancer. Lung cancer is most common in urban environs and the incidence directly correlates with the size of the city. In addition, several, but not all formal epidemiological studies also suggest a positive correlation between lung cancer incidence and the intensity of air pollution exposure. There is further support for a role of air pollution; as of 1993, 4.4% of all of the bronchogenic adenocarcinoma cancer cases among Mexicans living in industrialized cities are under 40 years of age. It is plausible that chronic inhalation of automobile combustion products, factory emissions, and/or radon is at least partially responsible for the higher incidence of lung cancer exemplified by the never-smoking urban residents. The exceptionally high incidence of lung cancer cases among never-smokers living in highly industrialized Mexican cities offers a unique opportunity to use molecular epidemiology to test whether chronic inhalation of atmospheric pollutants increases the risk for this disease. Overall, the analysis of the genetic alterations in two cancer genes, and possibly the hprt locus should give new insight as to whether the urban never-smokers developed their cancers because of exposure to environmental pollutants.

  11. [Urban air pollution by carcinogenic N-nitrosamines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khesina, A Ia; Krivosheeva, L V; Sokol'skaia, N N; Koliadich, M N

    1996-01-01

    Moscow is used as an example to discuss the problem of urban atmospheric pollution by carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. An analytical method is proposed, which is based on the use of a Russian gas chromatograph compatible with a chemiluminescence detector, that is a TEA thermal energy analyzer (USA) having some modifications to reduce the time of analysis and loss during sample pretreatment. The minimal detected concentration is 3 ng/m3 for 2-hour sampling. The method identifies and quantifies 7 volatile N-nitrosamines: N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosodibutylamine, N-nitrosodipropylamine, N-nitrosopiperidine, N-nitrosopyrrolidine, N-nitrosomorpholine. The pollution of the Moscow air was evaluated in the center of Moscow (30-60 ng/m3 for NDMA), in the industrial emission area (as high as several hundred ng/m3, and in the heavy traffic area (100 ng/m3 or more). It is proposed to study the working area for rubber and tire industries, to establish nitrosamine tolerances for these industries and maximum allowable discharge concentrations in the urban air and to monitor these parameters. PMID:8672956

  12. Incorporating moisture content in modeling the surface energy balance of debris-covered Changri Nup Glacier, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Alexandra; Boone, Aaron; Morin, Samuel; Lejeune, Yves; Wagnon, Patrick; Dumont, Marie; Hawley, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Glaciers whose ablation zones are covered in supraglacial debris comprise a significant portion of glaciers in High Mountain Asia and two-thirds in the South Central Himalaya. Such glaciers evade traditional proxies for mass balance because they are difficult to delineate remotely and because they lose volume via thinning rather than via retreat. Additionally, their surface energy balance is significantly more complicated than their clean counterparts' due to a conductive heat flux from the debris-air interface to the ice-debris boundary, where melt occurs. This flux is a function of the debris' thickness; thermal, radiative, and physical properties; and moisture content. To date, few surface energy balance models have accounted for debris moisture content and phase changes despite the fact that they are well-known to affect fluxes of mass, latent heat, and conduction. In this study, we introduce a new model, ISBA-DEB, which is capable of solving not only the heat equation but also moisture transport and retention in the debris. The model is based upon Meteo-France's Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) soil and vegetation model, significantly adapted for debris and coupled with the snowpack model Crocus within the SURFEX platform. We drive the model with continuous ERA-Interim reanalysis data, adapted to the local topography (i.e. considering local elevation and shadowing) and downscaled and de-biased using 5 years of in-situ meteorological data at Changri Nup glacier [(27.859N, 86.847E)] in the Khumbu Himal. The 1-D model output is then evaluated through comparison with measured temperature in and ablation under a 10-cm thick debris layer on Changri Nup. We have found that introducing a non-equilibrium model for water flow, rather than using the mixed-form Richard's equation alone, promotes greater consistency with moisture observations. This explicit incorporation of moisture processes improves simulation of the snow-debris-ice column

  13. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  14. Information content in $F(R)$ brane models with non-constant curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Correa, R A C; Dutra, A de Souza; da Rocha, Roldao; Menezes, R

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the entropic information-measure in the context of braneworlds with non-constant curvature. The braneworld entropic information is studied for gravity modified by the squared of the Ricci scalar, besides the usual Einstein-Hilbert term. We showed that the minimum value of the brane configurational entropy provides a stricter bound on the parameter that is responsible for the $F(R)$ model to differ from the Einstein-Hilbert standard one. Our results are moreover consistent to a negative bulk cosmological constant.

  15. A Novel Model of Resolving Contention in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Anpeng(黄安鹏); Xie Linzhen; Li Jingcong; Li Zhengbin; Xu Anshi

    2004-01-01

    A Novel segmentation and feedback model (SFM) applied to resolve collision has been proposed. The SFM is featured with Burst Segmentation and Prioritized Feedback (BSPF) that are used to provide quality of service (QoS) and realize high throughput and faster switching in the optical burst switched networks. Simulation and performance analyses show that the SFM effectively avoid collision in optical burst switching (OBS). Long delay time of deflection routing and immature technology of wavelength converter and optical buffer are not employed in the SFM. The SFM not only realizes quick switching but also allows preemption for higher priority bursts.

  16. The ×-BMAP/G/1 Queueing Model: Queue Contents and Delay Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Steyaert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a single-server discrete-time queueing system with N sources, where each source is modelled as a correlated Markovian customer arrival process, and the customer service times are generally distributed. We focus on the analysis of the number of customers in the queue, the amount of work in the queue, and the customer delay. For each of these quantities, we will derive an expression for their steady-state probability generating function, and from these results, we derive closed-form expressions for key performance measures such as their mean value, variance, and tail distribution. A lot of emphasis is put on finding closed-form expressions for these quantities that reduce all numerical calculations to an absolute minimum.

  17. Web 2.0 Articles: Content Analysis and a Statistical Model to Predict Recognition of the Need for New Instructional Design Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Leping; Maddux, Cleborne D.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study of Web 2.0 articles intended to (a) analyze the content of what is written and (b) develop a statistical model to predict whether authors' write about the need for new instructional design strategies and models. Eighty-eight technology articles were subjected to lexical analysis and a logistic regression model was…

  18. Assessing carcinogenic risks associated with ingesting arsenic in farmed smeltfish (Ayu, Plecoglossus altirelis) in aseniasis-endemic area of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Jing; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Liang, Ching-Ping; Liu, Chen-Wuing

    2008-09-15

    This study spatially analyzed potential carcinogenic risks associated with ingesting arsenic (As) contents in aquacultural smeltfish (Plecoglossus altirelis) from the Lanyang Plain of northeastern Taiwan. Sequential indicator simulation (SIS) was adopted to reproduce As exposure distributions in groundwater based on their three-dimensional variability. A target cancer risk (TR) associated with ingesting As in aquacultural smeltfish was employed to evaluate the potential risk to human health. The probabilistic risk assessment determined by Monte Carlo simulation and SIS is used to propagate properly the uncertainty of parameters. Safe and hazardous aquacultural regions were mapped to elucidate the safety of groundwater use. The TRs determined from the risks at the 95th percentiles exceed one millionth, indicating that ingesting smeltfish that are farmed in the highly As-affected regions represents a potential cancer threat to human health. The 95th percentile of TRs is considered in formulating a strategy for the aquacultural use of groundwater in the preliminary stage.

  19. Techniques and Technology to Revise Content Delivery and Model Critical Thinking in the Neuroscience Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, Kurt R

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate neuroscience courses typically involve highly interdisciplinary material, and it is often necessary to use class time to review how principles of chemistry, math and biology apply to neuroscience. Lecturing and Socratic discussion can work well to deliver information to students, but these techniques can lead students to feel more like spectators than participants in a class, and do not actively engage students in the critical analysis and application of experimental evidence. If one goal of undergraduate neuroscience education is to foster critical thinking skills, then the classroom should be a place where students and instructors can work together to develop them. Students learn how to think critically by directly engaging with course material, and by discussing evidence with their peers, but taking classroom time for these activities requires that an instructor find a way to provide course materials outside of class. Using technology as an on-demand provider of course materials can give instructors the freedom to restructure classroom time, allowing students to work together in small groups and to have discussions that foster critical thinking, and allowing the instructor to model these skills. In this paper, I provide a rationale for reducing the use of traditional lectures in favor of more student-centered activities, I present several methods that can be used to deliver course materials outside of class and discuss their use, and I provide a few examples of how these techniques and technologies can help improve learning outcomes. PMID:26240525

  20. Intracerebral injection of oil cyst content of human craniopharyngioma (oil machinery fluid) as a toxic model in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Hernández-Campos, Ma Elena; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Santamaría, Abel

    2014-04-01

    Craniopharyngiomas (CPs) are benign epithelial cystic tumors of the sellar and suprasellar region with a high survival rate and high recurrence in children. CPs contain dense oily fluid, but little is known yet about this content and its contribution to tissue damage and tumoral growth. In this study, we developed a simple experimental model produced by intracortical injection to rats of the cyst fluid content collected from human CPs to explore its possible contribution to brain tissue damage. The cyst fluid of the CPs ("oil machinery fluid") was collected during surgical removal, briefly preserved and further tested in rats through intracortical infusion. The group receiving "oil machinery fluid" presented increased reactive oxygen species formation, oxidative damage to lipids and reactive gliosis accompanied by augmented immunoreactivity to peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin reductase 1 at 15, 30 and 45 days post-injection. Other markers of inflammation and cell damage were stimulated at all post-lesion days tested. There was also a body weight gain. The persistence of tissue damage and oxidative stress suggests that "oil machinery fluid" exerts progressive alterations similar to those observed in patients with CPs, supporting the concept that some components of cyst fluid may contribute to brain tissue damage in these patients.

  1. Biomarkers for assessing potential carcinogenic effects of chronic arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the environment. Chronic arsenic exposure via drinking water has been associated. with carcinogenic, cardiovascular, neurological and diabetic effects in humans and has been of great public health concern worldwide. In 2001, U.S. Environmental Protection ...

  2. AI AND SAR APPROACHES FOR PREDICTING CHEMICAL CARCINOGENICITY: SURVEY AND STATUS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide variety of artificial intelligence (AI) and structure-activity relationship (SAR approaches have been applied to tackling the general problem of predicting rodent chemical carcinogenicity. Given the diversity of chemical structures and mechanisms relative to this endpoin...

  3. 29 CFR 1990.131 - Priority lists for regulating potential occupational carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... List. The inclusion or exclusion of any substance on these lists shall not be subject to judicial... carcinogen which has not been placed on these lists. The inclusion of a substance on either of these...

  4. An investigation of carcinogenic agents at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study with the following results: 1. Three of the metals reported as carcinogens, arsenic, chromium, and nickel, were found within the...

  5. Carcinogenicity evaluation for the application of carbon nanotubes as biomaterials in rasH2 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Seiji; Hara, Kazuo; Aoki, Kaoru; Usui, Yuki; Shimizu, Masayuki; Haniu, Hisao; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Ishigaki, Norio; Nakamura, Koichi; Okamoto, Masanori; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sano, Kenji; Nishimura, Naoyuki; Tsutsumi, Hideki; Machida, Kazuhiko; Saito, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    The application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as biomaterials is of wide interest, and studies examining their application in medicine have had considerable significance. Biological safety is the most important factor when considering the clinical application of CNTs as biomaterials, and various toxicity evaluations are required. Among these evaluations, carcinogenicity should be examined with the highest priority; however, no report using transgenic mice to evaluate the carcinogenicity of CNTs has been published to date. Here, we performed a carcinogenicity test by implanting multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) into the subcutaneous tissue of rasH2 mice, using the carbon black present in black tattoo ink as a reference material for safety. The rasH2 mice did not develop neoplasms after being injected with MWCNTs; instead, MWCNTs showed lower carcinogenicity than carbon black. Such evaluations should facilitate the clinical application and development of CNTs for use in important medical fields.

  6. 78 FR 15020 - Report on Carcinogens Webinar on Pentachlorophenol; Notice of Public Webinar and Registration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Report on Carcinogens Webinar on Pentachlorophenol; Notice of Public Webinar and Registration Information SUMMARY: The National Toxicology Program (NTP) announces a public webinar, ``Human cancer studies on exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP):...

  7. Correlation of levels of volatile versus carcinogenic particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air samples from smokehouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Poulsen, O M; Christensen, J M

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, data on the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in air samples from fish smokehouses (Nordholm et al. 1986) and meat smokehouses (Hansen et al. submitted for publication) were used to analyze the extent to which six different volatile PAH compounds could...... carcinogenic PAH compounds in air samples from smokehouses, whereas fluoranthene and pyrene displayed the highest specificity. However, when the applicability of the six markers was tested on air samples from iron foundries, only naphthalene and pyrene were useful as markers for the carcinogenic compounds...... function as markers for the total concentration of six different carcinogenic particulate PAH compounds. Although a significant positive correlation was observed between the concentration of each of six volatile compounds and the total concentration of carcinogenic PAH compounds, a particularly good...

  8. 78 FR 57868 - Nominations to the Report on Carcinogens; Request for Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... RoC. 20 Substances Nominated to the RoC* Aloe vera whole leaf extract (Aloe barbadensis Miller) 2..., ongoing, or planned studies related to evaluating carcinogenicity; (3) scientific issues important...

  9. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.ruano@usc.es [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); García-Lavandeira, José Antonio [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Preventive Medicine, A Coruña University Hospital Complex, Coruña (Spain); Torres-Durán, María [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Prini-Guadalupe, Luciana [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Parente-Lamelas, Isaura [Service of Neumology, Ourense Hospital Complex, Ourense (Spain); Leiro-Fernández, Virginia [Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Montero-Martínez, Carmen [Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of A Coruña, Coruña (Spain); González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio [Service of Neumology, Santiago de Compostela University Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Martínez, Cristina [National Institute of Silicosis, University Hospital of Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Castro-Añón, Olalla [Service of Neumology, Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo (Spain); Mejuto-Martí, María José [Service of Neumology, Hospital Arquitecto Marcide, Ferrol (Spain); and others

    2014-07-15

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78–2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93–5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Some leisure time activities are associated with the exposure to carcinogenic substances. • These activities are model-making, painting (artistic or not), furniture refinishing or wood working. • Few studies have assessed lung cancer risk due to these hobbies and none in never-smokers. • Leisure activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances present higher lung cancer risk. • The risk is higher when these activities are performed for more than 10 years.

  10. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78–2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93–5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Some leisure time activities are associated with the exposure to carcinogenic substances. • These activities are model-making, painting (artistic or not), furniture refinishing or wood working. • Few studies have assessed lung cancer risk due to these hobbies and none in never-smokers. • Leisure activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances present higher lung cancer risk. • The risk is higher when these activities are performed for more than 10 years

  11. Carcinogenicity of sublimed urethane in mice through the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, T; Hayashi, T; Masuyama, T; Tanaka, S; Nakajima, H; Kurokawa, N; Isa, Y

    1990-08-01

    The carcinogenicity of sublimed urethane (ethyl carbamate) in air was examined with mice. JCL:ICR mice were nursed in a plastic cage inside a vinyl chamber which was ventilated 4 times per hour. The mice were exposed to urethane gas for various periods by passing air which contained a high concentration of sublimed urethane (1.29 micrograms/ml) into the vinyl chamber, or by placing a vessel containing crystalline urethane inside the vinyl chamber so that it was filled with spontaneously-sublimed urethane gas at a low concentration (0.25 microgram/ml). When female mice were killed 5 months after exposure, lung tumor frequency increased almost linearly with the number of days of exposure in the low concentration experiment, but increased in a non-linear manner in the high concentration experiment. In terms of nearly the same total dose, i.e., (concentration of urethane gas in air) X (days of inhalation), one day of exposure to urethane gas at the low concentration induced lung tumors at a significantly higher frequency than 1/4 day of exposure to urethane gas at the high concentration. When male mice were killed at 12 months after exposure to examine the progressive change of induced tumors, malignant, invasive and metastatic tumors were found to have been induced more frequently in the lung after exposure to urethane gas at the low concentration (0.25 microgram/ml for 10 days) than at the high concentration (1.29 microgram/ml for 4 days), although the total dose in the former group was about half of that in the latter. Continuous exposure to urethane gas for a longer period at the low concentration seems to be more efficient for the induction, promotion and/or progression of lung tumors than the exposure for a shorter period at the high concentration.

  12. Effect of ATRA on Contents of liver Retinoids, Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Injury in Rat Model of Extrahepatic Cholestasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Haiyan; DAN Zili; WANG Hui; LIN Jusheng

    2007-01-01

    The effects of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) administration on the concentration of retinoids (RA and vitamin A) in liver, oxidative stress and the hepatic injury in a rat model of com-mon bile duct ligation (CBDL)-induced liver injury were investigated. Female rats were subjected to a sham (n=5) or CBDL (n=48). Two weeks after operation, rats undergoing CBDL were randomized to receive treatment with either ATRA at three different doses (0.1, 1.5, 7.5 mg/kg) dissolved in bean oil or only bean oil every day over a 4-week experimental period. Rats were killed and blood samples were collected from the heart for determination of the serum transaminase. The contents of retinoids in rat liver were detected by using HPLC. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superox-ide dismutase (SOD) levels in liver were determined by a spectrophotometric method according to the instruction of the kits. Liver pathologic changes were observed under the light microscopy and electron microscopy. The results showed that compared with sham-operated group, the levels of reti-noids in the liver tissue were significantly decreased in the CBDL group (P<0.01). ATRA (0.1 mg/kg) administration in CBDL rats partially restored the contents of retinoids (P<0.05). Liver RA and vita-min A contents in CBDL group were significantly increased after ATRA (1.5 and 7.5 mg/kg) sup-plementation as compared with sham-operated group (P<0.05). However, in ATRA-treated CBDL group, hepatic GSH level and SOD activity, depressed by CBDL, and hepatic MDA level, increased by CBDL were returned to those in sham-operated group (P<0.05). The histologic observation of liver tissues indicated that ATRA treatment notably alleviated hepatocellular swelling, steatosis, the swelling of mitochondria and proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER). Treatment with ATRA could reduce levels of serum transaminase as compared with sham-operated group, more greatly in 1.5 and 7.5 mg/kg ATRA-treated groups than in 0.1 mg

  13. Carcinogenic effects of the combined action of /sup 241/Am and. gamma. -radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippova, L.G.; Buldakov, L.A.; Nifatov, A.P. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    In experiments on Wistar rats a study was made of the carcinogenic effects of the combined exposure to /sup 241/Am administered intrapertioneally (6.7 to 229.4 kBq/kg body weight) and external ..gamma..-radiation (/sup 137/Cs, 175 cGy). The occurrence of osteosarcoma, leucosis, skin and mammary tumors increased in the exposed animals. The combined irradiation produced an additive carcinogenic effect.

  14. Analysis of carcinogenicity testing for regulatory purposes in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    MADIA FEDERICA; Worth, Andrew; Corvi, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The approaches for evaluating the carcinogenic potential of substances, including whether carcinogenicity studies should be conducted, differ substantially across sectors. Despite variations in testing schemes, the two-year bioassay study in rodents represents the standard element across all sectors. The validity of the two-year bioassay though has been questioned in the last decade. Uncertainty is associated with the extrapolation of data from rodents to humans. Furthermore, these stud...

  15. In vivo transgenic bioassays and assessment of the carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals.

    OpenAIRE

    Contrera, J F; DeGeorge, J J

    1998-01-01

    There is general agreement in the scientific community on the need to improve carcinogenicity testing and the assessment of human carcinogenic risk and to incorporate more information on mechanisms and modes of action into the risk assessment process. Advances in molecular biology have identified a growing number of genes such as protooncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are highly conserved across species and are associated with a wide variety of human and animal cancers. In vivo transg...

  16. Thermal remote sensing of surface soil water content with partial vegetation cover for incorporation into climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robert R.; Carlson, Toby N.

    1995-01-01

    This study outlines a method for the estimation of regional patterns of surface moisture availability (M(sub 0)) and fractional vegetation (Fr) in the presence of spatially variable vegetation cover. The method requires relating variations in satellite-derived (NOAA, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)) surface radiant temperature to a vegetation index (computed from satellite visible and near-infrared data) while coupling this association to an inverse modeling scheme. More than merely furnishing surface soil moisture values, the method constitues a new conceptual and practical approach for combining thermal infrared and vegetation index measurements for incorporating the derived values of M(sub 0) into hydrologic and atmospheric prediction models. Application of the technique is demonstrated for a region in and around the city of Newcastle upon Tyne situated in the northeast of England. A regional estimate of M(sub 0) is derived and is probabbly good for fractional vegetation cover up to 80% before errors in the estimated soil water content become unacceptably large. Moreover, a normalization scheme is suggested from which a nomogram, `universal triangle,' is constructed and is seen to fit the observed data well. The universal triangle also simplifies the inclusion of remotely derived M(sub 0) in hydrology and meteorological models and is perhaps a practicable step toward integrating derived data from satellite measurements in weather forecasting.

  17. Effect of DNA type on response of DNA biosensor for carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Nor Diyana bt. Md.; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Lazim, Azwani Mat

    2013-11-01

    Carcinogens are cancer causing chemicals that can bind to DNA and cause damage to the DNA. These chemicals are available everywhere including in water, air, soil and food. Therefore, a sensor that can detect the presence of these chemicals will be a very useful tool. Since carcinogens bind to DNA, DNA can be used as the biological element in a biosensor. This study has utilized different types of DNA in a biosensor for carcinogen detection. The DNAs include double stranded calf thymus DNA, single stranded calf thymus DNA and guanine rich single stranded DNA. The modified SPE was exposed to a carcinogen followed by interaction with methylene blue which acts as the electroactive indicator. The SPE was then analysed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization studies were conducted for MB concentration and accumulation time, DNA concentration, as well as effect of buffer concentration, buffer pH and ionic strength. The performance of the biosensor was tested on a group 1 carcinogen, formaldehyde. The results indicated that the usage of guanine rich single stranded DNA also gives higher response as carcinogens prefer to bind with guanine compared to other bases.

  18. A comprehensive review of the carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic potential of capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bley, Keith; Boorman, Gary; Mohammad, Bashir; McKenzie, Donald; Babbar, Sunita

    2012-08-01

    Human exposure to capsaicin, the most abundant pungent chili pepper component, is ubiquitous. Evaluation of capsaicin's carcinogenic potential has produced variable results in in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. The capsaicin tested in older studies was often from pepper plant extracts and included other capsaicinoids and diverse impurities. Recent studies utilizing high-purity capsaicin and standardized protocols provide evidence that the genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of capsaicin is quite low and that the purity of capsaicin is important. Several small epidemiological studies suggest a link between capsaicin consumption and stomach or gall bladder cancer, but contamination of capsaicin-containing foods with known carcinogens renders their interpretation problematic. The postulated ability of capsaicin metabolites to damage DNA and promote carcinogenesis remains unsupported. Anticancer activities of capsaicin have been widely reported, as it inhibits the activity of carcinogens and induces apoptosis in numerous cancer cell lines in vitro and explanted into rodents. Diverse mechanisms have been postulated for capsaicin's anticancer properties. One hypothesis is that inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes-particularly CYP2E1-retards carcinogen activation but is contradicted by the low potency of capsaicin for CYP inhibition. The potential for dietary capsaicin to act as a chemopreventative is now widely postulated. PMID:22563012

  19. An empirical model of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) near the crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajra, Rajkumar; Chakraborty, Shyamal Kumar; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; DasGupta, Ashish; Echer, Ezequiel; Brum, Christiano G. M.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Sobral, José Humberto Andrade

    2016-07-01

    We present a geomagnetic quiet time (Dst > -50 nT) empirical model of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) for the northern equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crest over Calcutta, India. The model is based on the 1980-1990 TEC measurements from the geostationary Engineering Test Satellite-2 (ETS-2) at the Haringhata (University of Calcutta, India: 22.58° N, 88.38° E geographic; 12.09° N, 160.46° E geomagnetic) ionospheric field station using the technique of Faraday rotation of plane polarized VHF (136.11 MHz) signals. The ground station is situated virtually underneath the northern EIA crest. The monthly mean TEC increases linearly with F10.7 solar ionizing flux, with a significantly high correlation coefficient (r = 0.89-0.99) between the two. For the same solar flux level, the TEC values are found to be significantly different between the descending and ascending phases of the solar cycle. This ionospheric hysteresis effect depends on the local time as well as on the solar flux level. On an annual scale, TEC exhibits semiannual variations with maximum TEC values occurring during the two equinoxes and minimum at summer solstice. The semiannual variation is strongest during local noon with a summer-to-equinox variability of ~50-100 TEC units. The diurnal pattern of TEC is characterized by a pre-sunrise (0400-0500 LT) minimum and near-noon (1300-1400 LT) maximum. Equatorial electrodynamics is dominated by the equatorial electrojet which in turn controls the daytime TEC variation and its maximum. We combine these long-term analyses to develop an empirical model of monthly mean TEC. The model is validated using both ETS-2 measurements and recent GNSS measurements. It is found that the present model efficiently estimates the TEC values within a 1-σ range from the observed mean values.

  20. An empirical model of ionospheric total electron content (TEC near the crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajra Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a geomagnetic quiet time (Dst > −50 nT empirical model of ionospheric total electron content (TEC for the northern equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA crest over Calcutta, India. The model is based on the 1980–1990 TEC measurements from the geostationary Engineering Test Satellite-2 (ETS-2 at the Haringhata (University of Calcutta, India: 22.58° N, 88.38° E geographic; 12.09° N, 160.46° E geomagnetic ionospheric field station using the technique of Faraday rotation of plane polarized VHF (136.11 MHz signals. The ground station is situated virtually underneath the northern EIA crest. The monthly mean TEC increases linearly with F10.7 solar ionizing flux, with a significantly high correlation coefficient (r = 0.89–0.99 between the two. For the same solar flux level, the TEC values are found to be significantly different between the descending and ascending phases of the solar cycle. This ionospheric hysteresis effect depends on the local time as well as on the solar flux level. On an annual scale, TEC exhibits semiannual variations with maximum TEC values occurring during the two equinoxes and minimum at summer solstice. The semiannual variation is strongest during local noon with a summer-to-equinox variability of ~50–100 TEC units. The diurnal pattern of TEC is characterized by a pre-sunrise (0400–0500 LT minimum and near-noon (1300–1400 LT maximum. Equatorial electrodynamics is dominated by the equatorial electrojet which in turn controls the daytime TEC variation and its maximum. We combine these long-term analyses to develop an empirical model of monthly mean TEC. The model is validated using both ETS-2 measurements and recent GNSS measurements. It is found that the present model efficiently estimates the TEC values within a 1-σ range from the observed mean values.

  1. Statistical evaluation of mortality in long-term carcinogenicity bioassays using a Williams-type procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberich, Esther; Hothorn, Ludwig A

    2012-10-01

    Several doses and a control group can be compared under order restriction using the Williams procedure for normally distributed endpoints assuming variance homogeneity. Comparison of the survival functions represents a secondary endpoint in long-term in vivo bioassays of carcinogenicity. Therefore, a Williams-type procedure for the comparison of survival functions is proposed for the assumption of the Cox proportional hazards model or the general frailty Cox model to allow a joint analysis over sex and strains. Interpretation according to both statistical significance and biological relevance is possible with simultaneous confidence intervals for hazard ratios. Related survival data can be analyzed using the R packages survival, coxme, and multcomp. Together with the R packages MCPAN and nparcomp, Dunnett- or Williams-type procedures are now available for the statistical analysis of the following endpoint types in toxicology: (i) normally distributed, (ii) non-normally distributed, (iii) score (ordered categorical) data, (iv) crude proportions, (v) survival functions, and (vi) time-to-tumor data with and without cause-of-death information.

  2. Evaluation of human health risks posed by carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic multiple contaminants associated with consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Wang, Xinxin; Yang, Dan; Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xinyu

    2014-07-01

    The present study estimated the human daily intake and uptake of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and toxic trace elements [mercury (Hg), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As)] due to consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China, and the associated potential health risks posed by these contaminants. The health risks posed by the contaminants were assessed using a risk quotient of the fish consumption rate to the maximum allowable fish consumption rate considering the contaminants for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effect endpoints. The results showed that fish consumption would not pose non-cancer risks. However, some species would cause a cancer risk. Relative risks of the contaminants were calculated to investigate the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. As a result, in view of the contaminants for carcinogenic effects, As was the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. However, when non-carcinogenic effects of the contaminants were considered, Hg posed the highest risk. The risk caused by PBDEs was negligible. The results demonstrated that traditional contaminants, such as As, Hg, DDTs (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites), and PCBs, require more attention in Taihu Lake than the other target contaminants. PMID:24727049

  3. Evaluation of human health risks posed by carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic multiple contaminants associated with consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Wang, Xinxin; Yang, Dan; Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xinyu

    2014-07-01

    The present study estimated the human daily intake and uptake of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and toxic trace elements [mercury (Hg), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As)] due to consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China, and the associated potential health risks posed by these contaminants. The health risks posed by the contaminants were assessed using a risk quotient of the fish consumption rate to the maximum allowable fish consumption rate considering the contaminants for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effect endpoints. The results showed that fish consumption would not pose non-cancer risks. However, some species would cause a cancer risk. Relative risks of the contaminants were calculated to investigate the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. As a result, in view of the contaminants for carcinogenic effects, As was the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. However, when non-carcinogenic effects of the contaminants were considered, Hg posed the highest risk. The risk caused by PBDEs was negligible. The results demonstrated that traditional contaminants, such as As, Hg, DDTs (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites), and PCBs, require more attention in Taihu Lake than the other target contaminants.

  4. Use of the modified Ames test as an indicator of the carcinogenicity of residual aromatic extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boogaard, P.; Hedelin, A.; Riley, A.; Rushton, E.; Vaissiere, M.; Minsavage, G.; Rohde, A.; Dalbey, W.

    2013-01-15

    Existing data demonstrate that residual aromatic extracts (RAEs) can be either carcinogenic or non-carcinogenic. CONCAWE had previously concluded that 'Although limited data available indicate that some RAEs are weakly carcinogenic, it is not possible to provide a general recommendation. Classify on a case-by-case basis' (CONCAWE 2005). Therefore CONCAWE's Health/Toxicology Subgroup (H/TSG) has developed a proposal for the use of the modified Ames test as a short-term predictive screening tool for decisions on the classification of RAEs for carcinogenicity. The relationship between RAE chemistry and carcinogenic potential is not as well understood as it is for some other categories of substances, e.g. Other Lubricant Base Oils (OLBO). However, a correlation has been found between the results of the skin carcinogenicity bioassay and the mutagenicity index (MI) obtained from the modified Ames test. Data supporting this correlation are summarised in this report. The H/TSG confirmed that the modified Ames test can be used as a predictive screening tool and that a cut-off value can be established to make a distinction between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic products. RAEs with a MI > 0.4 demonstrated carcinogenic potential upon dermal application to mouse skin with chronic exposure. RAEs with a MI > 0.4 did not demonstrate a carcinogenic potential. To justify the use of the modified Ames test with RAEs, additional analysis of the repeatability of the test with RAEs was required. With this objective, CONCAWE sponsored a round robin study with different samples of RAEs from member companies, at three different laboratories. The repeatability demonstrated in the round robin study with RAEs support the proposed use of the modified Ames test. As part of the tools available for use by member companies, the H/TSG proposed a standard operating procedure (SOP) (included as an Appendix to this report) on the conduct of the modified Ames test with RAEs. The H

  5. Inhalation toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of cobalt sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, J R; Hailey, J R; Roycroft, J R; Haseman, J K; Sills, R C; Grumbein, S L; Mellick, P W; Chou, B J

    1999-05-01

    Cobalt sulfate is a water-soluble cobalt salt with a variety of industrial and agricultural uses. Several cobalt compounds have induced sarcomas at injection sites in animals, and reports have suggested that exposure to cobalt-containing materials may cause lung cancer in humans. The present studies were done because no adequate rodent carcinogenicity studies had been performed with a soluble cobalt salt using a route relevant to occupational exposures. Groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to aerosols containing 0, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 cobalt sulfate hexahydrate, 6 h/day, 5 days/week, for 104 weeks. Survival and body weights of exposed rats and mice were generally unaffected by the exposures. In rats, proteinosis, alveolar epithelial metaplasia, granulomatous alveolar inflammation, and interstitial fibrosis were observed in the lung in all exposed groups. Nonneoplastic lesions of the nose and larynx were also attributed to exposure to all concentrations of cobalt sulfate. In 3.0 mg/m3 male rats and in female rats exposed to 1.0 or 3.0 mg/m3, the incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms were increased over those in the control groups. Lung tumors occurred with significant positive trends in both sexes. The incidences of adrenal pheochromocytoma in 1.0 mg/m3 male rats and in 3.0 mg/m3 female rats were increased. Nonneoplastic lesions of the respiratory tract were less severe in mice than in rats. In mice, alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms in 3.0 mg/m3 males and females were greater than those in the controls, and lung tumors occurred with significantly positive trends. Male mice had liver lesions consistent with a Helicobacter hepaticus infection. Incidences of liver hemangiosarcomas were increased in exposed groups of male mice; however, because of the infection, no conclusion could be reached concerning an association between liver hemangiosarcomas and cobalt sulfate. In summary, exposure to cobalt sulfate by inhalation

  6. Acupuncture at the San Jiao meridian affects brain stem issue G protein content in a rat migraine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sue Wang; Wei Li; Guangwei Zhong; Zhenyan Li; Lingbo Wen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: G protein is closely associated with vasomotion. Vasomotor dysfunction accompanies migraine attack. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of the San Jiao meridian acupuncture on G protein content in a rat migraine model. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present randomized grouping, cellular and molecular biological level trial was performed at the Institute of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University & Key Laboratory for Tumor Proteomics of Ministry of Health between October 2003 and June 2004. MATERIALS: Forty healthy, male, Sprague Dawley rats were included in this study. The G6805-2A elector-acupuncture apparatus was a product of Shanghai Huayi Medical Instrument Factory, China. Nitroglycerin was produced by Guangzhou Mingxing Pharmaceutical Factory, China. Antibodies against inhibitory and stimulatory G proteins were purchased from Sigma Chemical Company, USA. METHODS: All 40 rats were randomly and evenly divided into 4 groups. In the blank control group, the rats remained untouched. Rats from the normal control group were subcutaneously administered 2 mL/kg physiological saline. In the model group, migraine was induced with a subcutaneous injection of 10 mg/kg nitroglycerin (5 g/L), and the rats received no further treatment. In the acupuncture-treated group, 30 minutes after migraine induction, acupuncture was performed at the bilateral Waiguan (SJ 5) and Yifeng (SJ 17) points, with an acupuncture depth of 1 mm. Electric-stimulation parameters of 20 Hz for low frequency, 40 Hz for high frequency, and 0.5-1.0 mA for current intensity were set. Ten acupuncture sessions were applied, with 20-minute low-frequency and 20-minute high-frequency stimulation and 3 seconds of interval time. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Inhibitory and stimulatory G protein contents were detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: At 4 hours after migraine induction, compared with the blank control and normal control groups

  7. Information content of measurements from tracer microlysimeter experiments designed for parameter identification in dual-permeability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsbo, Mats; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2006-06-01

    Parameters regulating the degree of preferential flow in the dual-permeability water flow and solute transport model MACRO are difficult or impossible to derive from direct measurements. The objectives were (i) to find an improved temporal measurement scheme for identification of these parameters using laboratory microlysimeter experiments and (ii) to evaluate the possibilities of parameter identification in the MACRO model. Artificial data from laboratory microlysimeter experiments consisting of high time-resolution 'measurements' of percolation rate, effluent concentration and resident concentrations at six depths were used with PIMLI (parameter identification method using the localisation of information). The data contained enough information to successfully reduce the uncertainty in the parameter governing mass exchange between pore domains, the saturated micropore hydraulic conductivity and the dispersivity for two hypothetical soils representing one typical clay and one loam. Parameters governing water flow in the macropores were shown to be sensitive in a screening analysis with the Morris method and the uncertainty in these parameters was also reduced by PIMLI. However, some of these parameters did not converge towards their true values probably because of parameter interdependence. In all cases, 'measurements' with large information content were found early in the experiments where less than 0.2 pore volumes of water had passed through the column. For successful identification of parameters determining the degree of preferential flow, efforts should be made to perform high time-resolution measurements during the first irrigations following solute application.

  8. Modeling of soil water content and soil temperature at selected U.S. and central European stations using SoilClim model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavinka, P.; Trnka, M.; Balek, J.; Zalud, Z.; Hayes, M.; Svoboda, M.; Eitzinger, J.

    2009-04-01

    Within the presented study the SoilClim model was tested through various climatic and soil conditions. SoilClim model enables to estimate reference and actual evapotranspiration from defined vegetation cover and consequently the soil water content within two defined layers (named as Moisture control section I and II) could be deduced. The soil temperature in 0.5 m depth is also estimated (on the basis of simple empirical model). Mentioned outputs could be additionally used for identification of soil climate regimes (both Hydric and Thermic) within selected location. The SoilClim works in daily step and needs daily maximum and minimum air temperature, global radiation, precipitation, air humidity and wind speed as input. The brief information about soil layers (field capacity, wilting point, depth) and vegetation cover is necessary. The algorithm for reference evapotranspiration is based on Penman-Monteith method. The main aim of the study was to assess accuracy and suitability of the SoilClim for simulation of soil water content in the two defined layers and temperature in 0.50 m depth. For this purpose the seven stations through central U.S. were selected (by twos from Nebraska, Iowa and Kansas and one from South Dakota). Used measurements were observed from 2004 to 2008. The central European region was represented by Austrian Lysimetric station Gross-Enzersdorf. The data within three different soil profiles and for various crop covers (spring barley, winter wheat, maize and potato) from 1999 to 2004 were used. During introduced reserch SoilClim provided reasonable results of soil moisture for both layers against lysimetric measurements. Agreement between measured and estimated water content (30 days averages) could be described by coefficient of determination (R2) which varied from 0.45 to 0.75. The Mean Bias Error (MBE) for values in daily step was from -12.87 % to 20.66 % and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) varied from 14.49 % to 34.76 %. The modeling efficiency

  9. Ensemble kalman filtering to perform data assimilation with soil water content probes and pedotransfer functions in modeling water flow in variably saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from modern soil water contents probes can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling, i.e. continual correction of the flow model performance based on observations. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. The method requires estimates of the unce...

  10. The potential effect of patulin on mice bearing melanoma cells: an anti-tumour or carcinogenic effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussabbeh, Manel; Ben Salem, Intidhar; Rjiba-Touati, Karima; Bouyahya, Chedy; Neffati, Fadwa; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-05-01

    Mycotoxins are bioactive compounds that are noxious to human. Their effects on oncogenesis have been satisfactorily elucidated, and some of mycotoxins have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. Nevertheless, patulin (PAT) is considered by the International Agency of Research on Cancer as 'not carcinogenic to humans'. The present study was designed to understand the effect of this mycotoxin on melanoma cells (B16F10) by measuring cell proliferation and assessing the anti-tumour effect in vivo in Balb/c mice. Our results revealed that intraperitoneally administration of PAT for 20 days significantly induces tumour regression in B16F10 cell-implanted mice. This effect was evidenced by the activation of apoptosis which is supported by the increase in p53 and Bax expressions, the downregulation of the protein levels of Bcl2, and the increase in caspase-3 activity. Moreover, systemic toxicity analysis demonstrated that there is no potential toxicity following PAT treatment unlike untreated melanoma mice which suffer from anaemia, inflammation and liver dysfunction. Remarkably, this is the first published report demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of PAT in vivo models. PMID:26619846

  11. Model for decision making about the curricular contents of Knowledge Organization in academic programs of Library Science, Documentation or Information Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Martínez Tamayo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A model is introduced for decision making on curricular contents of Knowledge Organization for academic programs of Library Science, Documentation and Information Science, orientated to the Mercosur region. The design of the model has taken into account the core contents recommended by the Mercosur meetings of directors and teachers from library schools, the so called ISKO trend, and the contributions of several authors related to both sources. The model has three primary categories: foundations, applications and ethics of Knowledge Organization. The foundations are considered from a multidimensional approach. The applications are divided into three secondary categories: a construction of knowledge organization systems, b content description, and c quality management of Knowledge Organization. The ethics is also divided into three secondary categories: ethical commitment, ethical values and ethical problems. The model should be understood as an empty mold that needs to be filled with the contents determined by each academic program or curricular space, and it is expected that facilitates the assessment, updating and comparison of those contents. The limitation of the model is that it is based on the Mercosur recommendations and ISKO trends, which are not accepted by all the specialists.

  12. Monitoring of the Liquid Water Content During Snowmelt Using C-Band SAR Data and the Snow Model CROCUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau-Genesse, G.; Trudel, M.; Leconte, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coupling C-Band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to a multilayer snow model is a step in better understanding the temporal evolution of the radar backscattering coefficient during snowmelt. The watershed used for this study is the Nechako River Basin, located in the Rocky Mountains of British-Columbia (Canada). This basin has a snowpack of several meters in depth and part of its water is diverted to the Kemano hydropower system, managed by Rio-Tinto Alcan. Eighteen RADARSAT-2 ScanSAR Wide archive images were acquired in VV/VH polarization for the winter of 2011-2012, under different snow conditions. They are interpreted along with CROCUS, a multilayer physically-based snow model developed by Météo-France. This model discretizes the snowpack into 50 layers, which makes it possible to monitor various characteristics, such as liquid water content (LWC), throughout the season. CROCUS is used to model three specific locations of the Nechako River Basin. Results vary from one site to another, but in general there is a good agreement between the modeled LWC of the first layer of the snowpack and the backscattering coefficient of the RADARSAT-2 images, with a coefficient of determination (R²) of 0.80 and more. The radar images themselves were processed using an updated version of Nagler's methodology, which consists of subtracting an image in wet snow conditions to one in dry snow conditions, as wet snow can then be identified using a soft threshold centered around -3 dB. A second filter was used in order to differentiate dry snow and bare soil. That filter combines a VH/VV ratio threshold and an altitude criterion. The ensuing maps show a good agreement with the MODIS snow-covered area, which is already obtained daily over the Nechako River Basin, but with additional information on the location of wet snow and without sensibility to cloud cover. As a next step, the outputs of CROCUS will be used in Mätzler's Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) to

  13. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the dose-response assessment of genotoxic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Shoji; Gi, Min; Kakehashi, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Matsumoto, Michiharu

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative approaches are important issues in field of carcinogenic risk assessment of the genotoxic carcinogens. Herein, we provide quantitative data on low-dose hepatocarcinogenicity studies for three genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN). Hepatocarcinogenicity was examined by quantitative analysis of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci, which are the preneoplastic lesions in rat hepatocarcinogenesis and the endpoint carcinogenic marker in the rat liver medium-term carcinogenicity bioassay. We also examined DNA damage and gene mutations which occurred through the initiation stage of carcinogenesis. For the establishment of points of departure (PoD) from which the cancer-related risk can be estimated, we analyzed the above events by quantitative no-observed-effect level and benchmark dose approaches. MeIQx at low doses induced formation of DNA-MeIQx adducts; somewhat higher doses caused elevation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyquanosine levels; at still higher doses gene mutations occurred; and the highest dose induced formation of GST-P positive foci. These data indicate that early genotoxic events in the pathway to carcinogenesis showed the expected trend of lower PoDs for earlier events in the carcinogenic process. Similarly, only the highest dose of IQ caused an increase in the number of GST-P positive foci in the liver, while IQ-DNA adduct formation was observed with low doses. Moreover, treatment with DEN at low doses had no effect on development of GST-P positive foci in the liver. These data on PoDs for the markers contribute to understand whether genotoxic carcinogens have a threshold for their carcinogenicity. The most appropriate approach to use in low dose-response assessment must be approved on the basis of scientific judgment.

  14. A Web-based Simulator for Sample Size and Power Estimation in Animal Carcinogenicity Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Moon

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A Web-based statistical tool for sample size and power estimation in animal carcinogenicity studies is presented in this paper. It can be used to provide a design with sufficient power for detecting a dose-related trend in the occurrence of a tumor of interest when competing risks are present. The tumors of interest typically are occult tumors for which the time to tumor onset is not directly observable. It is applicable to rodent tumorigenicity assays that have either a single terminal sacrifice or multiple (interval sacrifices. The design is achieved by varying sample size per group, number of sacrifices, number of sacrificed animals at each interval, if any, and scheduled time points for sacrifice. Monte Carlo simulation is carried out in this tool to simulate experiments of rodent bioassays because no closed-form solution is available. It takes design parameters for sample size and power estimation as inputs through the World Wide Web. The core program is written in C and executed in the background. It communicates with the Web front end via a Component Object Model interface passing an Extensible Markup Language string. The proposed statistical tool is illustrated with an animal study in lung cancer prevention research.

  15. An improved classification of foci for carcinogenicity testing by statistical descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegaro, Giulia; Stefanini, Federico Mattia; Colacci, Annamaria; Vaccari, Monica; Urani, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process involving genetic alterations and non-genotoxic mechanisms. The in vitro cell transformation assay (CTA) is a promising tool for both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogenesis. CTA relies on the ability of cells (e.g. BALB/c 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts) to develop a transformed phenotype after the treatment with suspected carcinogens. The classification of the transformed phenotype is based on coded morphological features, which are scored under a light microscope by trained experts. This procedure is time-consuming and somewhat prone to subjectivity. Herewith we provide a promising approach based on image analysis to support the scoring of malignant foci in BALB/c 3T3 CTA. The image analysis system is a quantitative approach, based on measuring features of malignant foci: dimension, multilayered growth, and invasivity into the surrounding monolayer of non-transformed cells. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability for each focus to be transformed as a function of three statistical image descriptors. The estimated sensitivity of the derived classifier (untransformed against Type III) was 0.9, with an Area Under the Curve (AUC) value equal to 0.90 under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve.

  16. Joint leaf chlorophyll content and leaf area index retrieval from Landsat data using a regularized model inversion system (REGFLEC)

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2015-01-19

    Leaf area index (LAI) and leaf chlorophyll content (Chll) represent key biophysical and biochemical controls on water, energy and carbon exchange processes in the terrestrial biosphere. In combination, LAI and Chll provide critical information on vegetation density, vitality and photosynthetic potentials. However, simultaneous retrieval of LAI and Chll from space observations is extremely challenging. Regularization strategies are required to increase the robustness and accuracy of retrieved properties and enable more reliable separation of soil, leaf and canopy parameters. To address these challenges, the REGularized canopy reFLECtance model (REGFLEC) inversion system was refined to incorporate enhanced techniques for exploiting ancillary LAI and temporal information derived from multiple satellite scenes. In this current analysis, REGFLEC is applied to a time-series of Landsat data.A novel aspect of the REGFLEC approach is the fact that no site-specific data are required to calibrate the model, which may be run in a largely automated fashion using information extracted entirely from image-based and other widely available datasets. Validation results, based upon in-situ LAI and Chll observations collected over maize and soybean fields in central Nebraska for the period 2001-2005, demonstrate Chll retrieval with a relative root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) on the order of 19% (RMSD=8.42μgcm-2). While Chll retrievals were clearly influenced by the version of the leaf optical properties model used (PROSPECT), the application of spatio-temporal regularization constraints was shown to be critical for estimating Chll with sufficient accuracy. REGFLEC also reproduced the dynamics of in-situ measured LAI well (r2 =0.85), but estimates were biased low, particularly over maize (LAI was underestimated by ~36 %). This disparity may be attributed to differences between effective and true LAI caused by significant foliage clumping not being properly accounted for in the canopy

  17. FTIR-ATR-based prediction and modelling of lignin and energy contents reveals independent intra-specific variation of these traits in bioenergy poplars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Gail

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing demand for renewable resources to replace fossil fuels. However, different applications such as the production of secondary biofuels or combustion for energy production require different wood properties. Therefore, high-throughput methods are needed for rapid screening of wood in large scale samples, e.g., to evaluate the outcome of tree breeding or genetic engineering. In this study, we investigated the intra-specific variability of lignin and energy contents in extractive-free wood of hybrid poplar progenies (Populus trichocarpa × deltoides and tested if the range was sufficient for the development of quantitative prediction models based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Since lignin is a major energy-bearing compound, we expected that the energy content of wood would be positively correlated with the lignin content. Results Lignin contents of extractive-free poplar wood samples determined by the acetyl bromide method ranged from 23.4% to 32.1%, and the calorific values measured with a combustion calorimeter varied from 17260 to 19767 J g-1. For the development of calibration models partial least square regression and cross validation was applied to correlate FTIR spectra determined with an attenuated total reflectance (ATR unit to measured values of lignin or energy contents. The best models with high coefficients of determination (R2 (calibration = 0.91 and 0.90; R2 (cross-validation = 0.81 and 0.79 and low root mean square errors of cross validation (RMSECV = 0.77% and 62 J g-1 for lignin and energy determination, respectively, were obtained after data pre-processing and automatic wavenumber restriction. The calibration models were validated by analyses of independent sets of wood samples yielding R2 = 0.88 and 0.86 for lignin and energy contents, respectively. Conclusions These results show that FTIR-ATR spectroscopy is suitable as a high-throughput method for lignin and energy

  18. The global morphology of the plasmaspheric electron content during Northern winter 2009 based on GPS/COSMIC observation and GSM TIP model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Zakharenkova, I. E.; Cherniak, Iu. V.

    2015-04-01

    We studied the contribution of the global plasmaspheric and ionospheric electron content (PEC and IEC) into total electron content (TEC). The experimental PEC was estimated by comparison of GPS TEC observations and FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC radio occultation IEC measurements. Results are retrieved for the winter solstice (January and December 2009) conditions. Global maps of COSMIC-derived IEC, PEC and GPS TEC were compared with Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) results. In addition, we used GSM TIP model results in order to estimate the contribution of plasmaspheric electron content into TEC value at the different altitudinal regions. The advantages and problems of the outer ionospheric/plasmaspheric parameters (O+/H+ transition height, TEC and electron density at height above F2 layer peak) representation by the IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) model are discussed.

  19. Review of carcinogenicity of asbestos and proposal of approval standards of an occupational cancer caused by asbestos in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sanghyuk; Youn, Kan-Woo; Shin, Donghee; Lee, Myeoung-Jun; Choi, Sang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenicity of asbestos has been well established for decades and it has similar approval standards in most advanced countries based on a number of studies and international meetings. However, Korea has been lagging behind such international standards. In this study, we proposed the approval standards of an occupational cancer due to asbestos through intensive review on the Helsinki Criteria, post-Helsinki studies, job exposure matrix (JEM) based on the analysis of domestic reports and recognized occupational lung cancer cases in Korea. The main contents of proposed approval standards are as follows; ① In recognizing an asbestos-induced lung cancer, diagnosis of asbestosis should be based on CT. In addition, initial findings of asbestosis on CT should be considered. ② High Exposure industries and occupations to asbestos should be also taken into account in Korea ③ An expert's determination is warranted in case of a worker who has been concurrently exposed to other carcinogens, even if the asbestos exposure duration is less than 10 years. ④ Determination of a larynx cancer due to asbestos exposure has the same approval standards with an asbestos-induced lung cancer. However, for an ovarian cancer, an expert's judgment is necessary even if asbestosis, pleural plaque or pleural thickening and high concentration asbestos exposure are confirmed. ⑤ Cigarette smoking status or the extent should not affect determination of an occupational cancer caused by asbestos as smoking and asbestos have a synergistic effect in causing a lung cancer and they are involved in carcinogenesis in a complicated manner. PMID:26719804

  20. Partial lipectomy reduces dimethylhydrazine-induced carcinogenic initiation in the colon of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated whether visceral adipose tissue directly modulates the development of preneoplastic lesions in the colon of carcinogen-treated rats. Wistar rats (n = 64) were randomly assigned to 8 experimental groups in two experiments. In one experiment, 32 rats were exposed or not to either carcinogen treatment (dimethylhydrazine, DMH; 125 mg/kg) or high-fat diet (standard chow enriched with 14% lard) or both for 56 days. In a second experiment, 32 rats were exposed to a carcinogen or they underwent partial lipectomy or both for 30 days (partial lipectomy groups underwent ablation of mesenteric and parametrial fat pads, whereas sham groups did not; all rats were fed with standard chow). Colon was collected for histopathological analysis. After 56 experimental days a high-fat diet increased carcinogenic mutations in the colonic epithelia. Partial lipectomy reduced weight gain in carcinogen-exposed rats and decreased the de novo formation of mesenteric and parametrial fat pads. Partial lipectomy significantly inhibited the mutational process after 30 days: there were fewer colonic preneoplastic lesions and less proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation. These data suggest that visceral adipose tissue promotes colon carcinogenesis and enhances the establishment and expansion of genetically mutated cells in colonic epithelia

  1. An exact model for predicting tablet and blend content uniformity based on the theory of fluctuations in mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Rane, Sagar S; Rieschl, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The content uniformity (CU) of blend and tablet formulations is a critical property that needs to be well controlled in order to produce an acceptable pharmaceutical product. Methods that allow the formulations scientist to predict the CU accurately can greatly help in reducing the development efforts. This article presents a new statistical mechanical framework for predicting CU based on first principles at the molecular level. The tablet is modeled as an open system which can be treated as a grand canonical ensemble to calculate fluctuations in the number of granules and thus the CU. Exact analytical solutions to hard sphere mixture systems available in the literature are applied to derive an expression for the CU and elucidate the different factors that impact CU. It is shown that there is a single ratio, {\\lambda}{\\equiv}/; that completely characterizes "granule quality" with respect to impact on CU. Here w and f denote the weight of granule and the fractional (w/w) assay of API in it. This ratio should b...

  2. Modeling research on wheat protein content measurement using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy and optimized radial basis function neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy and radial basis function (RBF neural network algorithm were used to measure the protein content of wheat owing to their nondestructiveness and quick speed as well as better performance compared to the traditional measuring method (semimicro-Kjeldahl in actual practice. To simplify the complex structure of the RBF network caused by the excessive wave points of samples obtained by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, we proposed the particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm to optimize the cluster center in the hidden layers of the RBF neural network. In addition, a series of improvements for the PSO algorithm was also made to deal with its drawbacks in premature convergence and mechanical inertia weight setting. The experimental analysis demonstrated that the improved PSO algorithm greatly reduced the complexity of the network structure and improved the training speed of the RBF network. Meanwhile, the research result also proved the high performance of the model with its root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP and prediction correlation coefficient (R at 0.26576 and 0.975, respectively, thereby fulfilling the modern agricultural testing requirements featuring nondestructiveness, real-timing, and abundance in the number of samples.

  3. Production of thymine glycols in DNA by radiation and chemical carcinogens as detected by a monoclonal antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Leadon, S A

    1987-01-01

    In order to understand the role in carcinogenesis of damage indirectly induced by chemical carcinogens, it is important to identify the primary DNA lesions. We have measured the formation and repair of one type of DNA modification, 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine (thymine glycol), following exposure of cultured human cells to the carcinogens N-hydroxy-2-naphthylamine or benzo(a)pyrene. The efficiency of production of thymine glycols in DNA by these carcinogens was compared to that by ionizing rad...

  4. On Paraphrasing Metaphor's Content and the Model%隐喻释义及其释义模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟守满; 孙崇飞

    2012-01-01

    The paper explores the problems of whether a metaphor has a definite meaning and whether this meaning can be fully described by non-metaphorical language. The authors point out that a metaphorical usage of language does have a specific meaning( speaker's intended meaning) which can be fully described by a non-metaphorical language (natural semantic metalanguage), in other words, a metaphor's meaning can be paraphrasable. The paper also studies Goddard's metaphor paraphrasing model and concludes that although Natural Semantic Metalanguage Theory provides a good describing tool and a new approach for paraphrasing metaphor's content, the model still has room for improvement.%本研究通过对“隐喻是否具有确定意义”和“隐喻意义是否可被非隐喻性语言所充分描写”问题的讨论,认为特定语境中的隐喻具有确定意义(即说话者的意图意义),且该意义可被非隐喻性语言(即自然语义元语言)所充分描写。因此,隐喻意义具有可释义性。对Goddard隐喻释义模式的考察表明,尽管NSM理论可作为释义隐喻内容的描写工具和释义方法,但该模式并不充分。针对该模式的不足,本研究考察了其它几个释义模式,并提出了改进建议。

  5. The effect of soy hydrolysates on changes in cholesterol content and its oxidation products in fine - ground model sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bilska

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Meat products belong to products particularly at risk of fat oxidation processes. One of the methods to prevent disadvantageous oxidative changes of lipids in food is the application of antioxidants. Material and methods. The experimental material consisted of fine – ground model sausages. Produced processed meats differed in terms of the presence and amount of acid and enzymatic soy hydrolysates (0.3% and 0.7%. The reference sample comprised processed meat product with no hydrolysate added. Model processed meat products were stored at 4°C for 29 days. The analyses included changes in peroxide value, changes in cholesterol and its oxidation products. Results. It was found that changes of peroxide value, 7α-OHC, 7β-OHC, α-epoxy-C, β-epoxy-C, 20α-OHC, 25-OHC and total oxisterols were statistically significantly affected, apart from storage time, also by the type and level of applied hydrolysates. The addition of enzymatic and acid hydrolysates to batter of experimental sausages effectively inhibited the process of fat oxidation. Conclusions. In samples with enzymatic hydrolysate an approx. 20% loss of initial cholesterol content was recorded. In contrast, in the other samples this loss amounted to approx. 10%. The process of cholesterol metabolism in tested processed meat products was affected by their storage time and the type of added hydrolysate. It was observed that the highest dynamics of cholesterol metabolism occurred in a sample with no hydrolysate added. The level of total oxisterols in the sample with no addition of hydrolysate was over two times higher than in samples with an addition of hydrolysate.

  6. Educational use of 3D models and photogrammetry content: the Europeana space project for Cypriot UNESCO monuments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, M.; Chatzigrigoriou, P.; Bokolas, V.; Nikolakopoulou, V.; Athanasiou, V.

    2016-08-01

    Digital heritage data are now more accessible through crowdsourcing platforms, social media and blogs. At the same time, evolving technology on 3D modelling, laser scanning and 3D reconstruction is constantly upgrading and multiplying the information that we can use from heritage digitalisation. The question of reusing the information in different aspects rises. Educators and students are potential users of the digital content; developing for them an adaptable environment for applications and services is our challenge. One of the main objective of the EU Europeana Space project is the development of a holistic approach for educating people (grown ups and kids) on Monuments that are listed at UNESCO world heritage list, in Cyprus. The challenge was the use of Europeana Data (Pictures and the 3D objects) in a way that the information on the platform would be comprehensible by the users. Most of the data have little metadata information and they lack history and cultural value description (semantics). The proposed model ction is based on the cross cultural approach which responds to the multicultural features of present era but at the same time to the contemporary pedagogical and methodological directions. The system uses all innovative digital heritage resources, in order to help the user, in a UX friendly way, to learn about the different phases of the monument, the history, the pathology state, the architectural value and the conservation stage. The result is a responsive platform, accessible through smart devices and desktop computers, (in the frame of "Bring Your Own Device" a.k.a. BYOD) where every Monument is a different course and every course is addressed to different age groups (from elementary level to adults' vocational training).

  7. Variability of the ocean heat content during the last millennium – an assessment with the ECHO-g Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ortega

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies addressing climate variability during the last millennium generally focus on variables with a direct influence on climate variability, like the fast thermal response to varying radiative forcing, or the large-scale changes in atmospheric dynamics (e.g. North Atlantic Oscillation. The ocean responds to these variations by slowly integrating in depth the upper heat flux changes, thus producing a delayed influence on ocean heat content (OHC that can later impact low frequency SST (sea surface temperature variability through reemergence processes. In this study, both the externally and internally driven variations of the OHC during the last millennium are investigated using a set of fully coupled simulations with the ECHO-G (coupled climate model ECHAMA4 and ocean model HOPE-G atmosphere–ocean general circulation model (AOGCM. When compared to observations for the last 55 yr, the model tends to overestimate the global trends and underestimate the decadal OHC variability. Extending the analysis back to the last one thousand years, the main impact of the radiative forcing is an OHC increase at high latitudes, explained to some extent by a reduction in cloud cover and the subsequent increase of short-wave radiation at the surface. This OHC response is dominated by the effect of volcanism in the preindustrial era, and by the fast increase of GHGs during the last 150 yr. Likewise, salient impacts from internal climate variability are observed at regional scales. For instance, upper temperature in the equatorial Pacific is controlled by ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation variability from interannual to multidecadal timescales. Also, both the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO modulate intermittently the interdecadal OHC variability in the North Pacific and Mid Atlantic, respectively. The NAO, through its influence on North Atlantic surface heat fluxes and convection, also plays an important role on

  8. Effects of panaxadiol saponins on contents of TNF-α and IL-6 in two-hit rat models with hemorrhage and lipopolysaech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum TNF-α and IL-6 contents in the two-hit rat models with hemorrhage and lipopolysaech (LPS) and the effects of panaxadiol saponins (PDS) on TNF-α and contents IL-6. Methods: Adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: sham operational group (S), hemorrhage group (H), two-hit group with hemorrhage and LPS groups (HL), Dexamethasone pretreatment group (HLD), PDS pretreatment group (HLP). The rat models were made by hemorrhagic shock as the first hit and with endotoxin as the second hit. Then the rats were killed after 6 h. The contents of serum TNF-α and IL-6 in rats were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results: The serum TNF-α and IL-6 contents in HL group were increased significantly compared with S group or H group (P<0.001). The TNF-α and IL-6 contents in HLP group and HLD group were significantly lower than those in HL group (P<0.01). Conclusion: LPS can increase significantly the contents of serum TNF-α and IL-6 in rats with hemorrhagic shock. PDS can inhibit the release of serum TNF-α and IL-6, and has the same effects with DEX to protect against the tissue injuries of two-hit rats with hemorrhage and LPS. (authors)

  9. Formulation of Japanese consensus-building model for HLW geological disposal site determination. 3. Development of digital contents on social consensus-buildings at educational institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish the sustainable community in Japan, formation of Japanese social consensus-building model for HLW geologic disposal site determination is one of key issues. In our project team of faculty of education, we found interesting middle school digital contents for HLW disposal site determination in London. We have been translating all of the digital contents for HLW disposal site determination into Japanese and we have been discussing on the model for next-generation Japanese consensus-building at middle school level. (author)

  10. Modelovanje korisnika u sistemima za upravljanje sadržajem / The user modeling issues in the content management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Šimić

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sistemi za upravljanje informacionim sadržajima, zahvaljujući različitim funkcionalnim mogućnostima, vrlo su rasprostranjeni na Webu kao globalnoj mreži, i u lokalnim mrežama institucija i organizacija različitih namena. Oni omogućavaju potpuno administriranje informacionim sadržajima i njihovo dinamičko komponovanje i distribuciju. Iako postoje tehnološki preduslovi, ovi sistemi su fokusirani na sadržaje i nemaju podršku za njihovo personalizovano predstavljanje. Ovaj materijal opisuje mogućnosti proširivanja funkcionalnosti navedenih sistema radi adaptacije sadržaja koji se isporučuje korisnicima. / Owing to different functional possibilities, there are many content management systems (CMS on the Web and in the local networks of different organizations. They provide administering of different information content (delegation of content authoring and content using grants, as well as dynamical content composing and distribution. They are focused on their content. Although there are technology prerequisites, these systems lack content personalization. This paper describes the possibility of the CMS functional extending to adjust data structure and content with particular users' skills, interests and demands.

  11. Identifying carcinogenic activity of methylated and non-methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) through electronic and topological indices

    CERN Document Server

    Braga, R S; Barone, P M V B

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of planar molecules, abundant in urban environment, which can induce chemical carcinogenesis. Their carcinogenic power varies in a large range, from very strong carcinogens to inactive ones. In a previous study, we proposed a methodology to identify the PAHs carcinogenic activity exploring electronic and topological indices. In the present work, we show that it is possible to simplify that methodology and expand its applicability to include methylated PAHs compounds. Using very simple rules, we can predict their carcinogenic activity with high accuracy (approx 89%).

  12. Factors modifying sensitivity to carcinogens and the problem of threshold in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximum allowable concentrations of chemical carcinogens and dose rates of ionizing radiation have been under extensive study both experimentally and epidemiologically. The problem of the carcinogenic hazards of low-level radiation is a very difficult one: in epidemiological studies it is hard to take into account the many factors (e.g. diseases, diet, genetic peculiarities) that may affect sensitivity to radiation; in experimental studies it is hard to extrapolate with accuracy from one species to another or from the individual threshold to that of the whole population. Age, enzyme activity, sex, and DNA repair capability also modify sensitivity to radiation; when factors such as these are better understood it is expected that epidemiological studies will give a solution that allows estimation of the carcinogenic risk from low-level radiation and hence establishment of a threshold dose. (author)

  13. [Mapping of carcinogens in the chemical production industry in the province of Ferrara].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldotti, M; Spagnolo, M R; Minisci, S; De Rosa, E

    2008-01-01

    This study consists in the reconnaissance of the carcinogenic risk in some processing in Ferrara. The main object is to know, to estimate and to verify the diffusion of the carcinogenic substances and to estimate the number of the exposed or potentially exposed workers. The study has interested the synthesis chemistry and polymer production, woodworking, welding on stainless steel and chromium conversion coating and chrome electroplating. The research has involved 54 factories and 436 workers estimated exposed or potentially exposed to carcinogenic substances. The survey has consisted of inspections in the working places, collection of exposure data, control of the precautionary measures and exposure determination in the case of stainless steel welding. The smallest factories had less knowledge of the risk and for this reason it is necessary to keep constant attention.

  14. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  15. Detection of mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds in unused and used motor oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, R; Monarca, S

    1983-12-15

    The discharge of used motor oils in the environment poses public health problems because of the mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds in them. Among these hazardous chemicals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are of particular interest since the carcinogenic properties of some of them are known. The authors have applied the Salmonella/microsome test, coupled with two preparation methods of samples, to motor oils of different brands, both before and after use in car petrol engines. A PAH determination method was also studied. The results showed the unused motor oils to be nonmutagenic and to contain traces of PAH, while the used motor oils of the samples taken according to both preparation methods were highly mutagenic and contained a much higher quantity of mutagenic/carcinogenic PAH.

  16. An Overview of Carcinogenic Heavy Metal: Molecular Toxicity Mechanism and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Almost all heavy metals are serious toxicants as carcinogens. However, due to their chemical and physiological properties, heavy metals are useful in industrial areas including alloy, smelting and production of commercial products. Such applications increase the opportunity for heavy metal exposure. Waste from industrial processes is also a major source of environmental contamination and accumulation in the human body. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel are classified as group 1 carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and are utilized commercially. In this review, we used molecular pathway analysis to understand the toxicity and carcinogenic mechanisms of these metals. Our analyzed data showed that above-mentioned metallic substances induce oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell death processes, resulting in increase the risk of cancer and cancer-related diseases. Thus, we might think phytochelatin molecules and antioxidative phytochemical substances are helpful for prevention of heavy metal-induced cancer. PMID:26734585

  17. Transgenic expression of walleye dermal sarcoma virus rv-cyclin gene in zebrafish and its suppressive effect on liver tumor development after carcinogen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Huiqing; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Qing, Wei; Wu, Yi Lian; Paul, Thomas A; Casey, James W; Her, Guor Muor; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2010-11-01

    A retrovirus homologue gene of cellular cyclin D₁, walleye dermal sarcoma virus rv-cyclin gene (orf A or rv-cyclin), was expressed in the livers of zebrafish under the control of liver fatty acid-binding protein (lfabp) promoter. To prevent possible fatality caused by overexpression of the oncogene, the GAL4/upstream activation sequence (GAL4/UAS) system was used to maintain the transgenic lines. Thus, both GAL4-activator [Tg(lfabp:GAL4)] and UAS-effector [Tg(UAS:rvcyclin)] lines were generated, and the rv-cyclin gene was activated in the liver after crossing these two lines. Since no obvious neoplasia phenotypes were observed in the double-transgenic line, cancer susceptibility of the transgenic fish expressing rv-cyclin was tested by carcinogen treatment. Unexpectedly, transgenic fish expressing rv-cyclin gene (rvcyclin+) were more resistant to the carcinogen than siblings not expressing this gene (rvcyclin-). Lower incidences of multiple and malignant liver tumors were observed in rvcyclin+ than in rvcyclin- fish, and the liver tumors in the rvcyclin+ group appeared later and were less malignant. These results suggest that expression of rv-cyclin protects the fish liver from carcinogen damage and delays onset of malignancy. These findings indicate that transgenic fish models are powerful systems for investigating mechanisms of inhibition and regression of liver tumors. PMID:20052603

  18. Tobacco carcinogen induces both lung cancer and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular carcinomas in ferrets which can be attenuated by lycopene supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Koichi; Liu, Chun; Tang, Sanyuan; Veeramachaneni, Sudipta; Hu, Kang-Quan; Smith, Donald E; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Early epidemiologic studies have reported that tobacco smoking, which is causally associated with liver cancer, is an independent risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). Lycopene from tomatoes has been shown to be a potential preventive agent against NAFLD and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we investigated whether the tobacco carcinogen 4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) induces lesions in both lungs and livers of ferrets with or without lycopene intervention. Male ferrets (6 groups, n = 8-10) were treated either with NNK (50 mg/kg BW, i.p., once a month for four consecutive months) or saline with or without dietary lycopene supplementation (2.2 and 6.6 mg/kg BW/day, respectively) for 26 weeks. Results demonstrate that NNK exposure results in higher incidences of lung tumors, HCC and steatohepatitis (which is characterized by severe inflammatory cell infiltration with concurrent fat accumulation in liver, hepatocellular ballooning degeneration and increased NF-κB expression), as well as elevations in bilirubin and AST levels in ferrets. Lycopene supplementation at two doses prevented NNK-induced expressions of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the lung and NF-κB and CYP2E1 in the liver and attenuated the NNK-induced mortality and pathological lesions in both the lungs and livers of ferrets. The present study provided strong experimental evidence that the tobacco carcinogen NNK can induce both HCC and steatohepatitis in the ferrets and can be a useful model for studying tobacco carcinogen-associated NAFLD and liver cancer. Furthermore, lycopene could provide potential benefits against smoke carcinogen-induced pulmonary and hepatic injury. PMID:27116542

  19. Chemical carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2008–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Konieczko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this paper is to present a concise but comprehensive information on the occurrence of carcinogenic or mutagenic agents in Polish enterprises and the number of workers exposed to those agents reported to the central register by employers. Objectives and responsibilities of the register, as well as the range and methods of data gathering are discussed. Material and Methods: Data concerning carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and technological processes reported to central register in 2008-2010 were analyzed. Results: In 2008-2010 more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances were reported to the register. Approximately 2500 plants reported above 150 000 per-person-exposures annually. Among all technological processes regarded as occupational carcinogens, hardwood dusts exposure (about 660 companies; 11 000-13 000 exposed workers each year and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs present in coal products (117-125 plantsl 3000 exposed per year were reported. Conclusions: The most widespread carcinogenic/mutagenic substances were: benzene, chromium(VI compounds: potassium dichromate and chromate, chromium(VI trioxide and other chromium compounds, ethylene oxide, asbestos, benzo[a]pyrene and gasoline. The highest number of men was exposed to particular PAHs and benzene , and the majority of women was exposed to benzene, potassium dichromate and chromate, acrylamide, ethylene oxide and gasoline. The lack of clear-cut definitione of occupational exposure to carcinogen creates a problem faced by employers in defining the accurate number of exposed workers. Med Pr 2013;64(2:181–192

  20. Carcinogen-induced DNA repair in nucleotide-permeable Escherichia coli cells. Induction of DNA repair by the carcinogens methyl and ethyl nitrosourea and methyl methanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielmann, H W; Vosberg, H P; Reygers, U

    1975-08-15

    Ether-permeabilized (nucleotide-permeable) cells of Escherichia coli show excision repair of their DNA after having been exposed to the carcinogens N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MeNOUr), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (EtNOUr) and methyl methanesulfonate (MeSO2OMe) which are known to bind covalently to DNA. Defect mutations in genes uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, recA, recB, recC and rep did not inhibit this excision repair. Enzymic activities involved in this repair were identified by measuring size reduction of DNA, DNA degradation to acid-soluble nucleotides and repair polymerization. 1. In permeabilized cells methyl and ethyl nitrosourea induced endonucleolytic cleavage of endogenous DNA, as determined by size reduction of denatured DNA in neutral and alkaline sucrose gradients. An enzymic activity from E. coli K-12 cell extracts was purified (greater than 2000-fold) and was found to cleave preferentially methyl-nitrosourea-treated DNA and to convert the methylated supercoiled DNA duplex (RFI) of phage phiX 174 into the nicked circular form. 2. Degradation of alkylated cellular DNA to acid solubility was diminished in a mutant lacking the 5' leads to 3' exonucleolytic activity of DNA polymerase I but was not affected in a mutant which lacked the DNA polymerizing but retained the 5' leads 3' exonucleolytic activity of DNA polymerase I. 3. An easily measurable effect is carcinogen-induced repair polymerization, making it suitable for detection of covalent binding of carcinogens and potentially carcinogenic compounds. PMID:170107

  1. Analysis of the effect of gallium content on the magnetomechanical behavior of single-crystal FeGa alloys using an energy-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetomechanical behavior of single-crystal iron–gallium alloys with varying gallium content was found to be strongly dependent on the Ga content (Atulasimha 2006 PhD Thesis). An energy-based model (Atulasimha 2006 PhD Thesis, Armstrong and William 1997 J. Appl. Phys. 81 2321) is employed to simulate the strikingly different actuation behavior (λ–H and B–H curves under different compressive stresses) and validated against experimental data for 19, 24.7 and 29 at.% Ga, [100] oriented, slow-cooled single-crystal FeGa alloys. The effect of gallium content on the model parameters, specifically the cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy constants and the Armstrong-smoothing factor Ω, their physical significance and ultimately their effect on the magnetomechanical behavior are analyzed and explained

  2. GST-π EXPRESSION IN TRANSFORMED CELLS BY TRANSFECTING OF DNA ISOLATED FROM HUMAN FETAL LUNG TISSUES TREATED WITH CARCINOGENS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Denggao; Hu Guogang; Luo Xianmao; Zhu Ming

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the GSTs, GST-π expression and initiation of lung carcinogenesis. Methods: The Rat-1 cells were transformed by carcinogens (DEN, MNU and CSC) treated fetal lung DNA for 24 h. Results: The GSTs activities toward 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitro-benzene (CDNB) in transformed cells were significantly higher than in the solvent control cells (P<0.05). GST-π content and GST-π mRNA expression level of transformed cells were also higher than those of control cells which were performed by ELISA and Northern blotting method respectively. The results indicated that the higher GSTS activities of transformed cells were due to the increase of GST-π content and the GST-π mRNA overexpressing may be responsible for the increase of GST-π protein level of the transformed cells. Conclusion: The changes of GSTs and GST-π may be considered as the one of the biomarkers of the initiation of human lung carcinogenesis.

  3. Interactive 3D multimedia content

    CERN Document Server

    Cellary, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    The book describes recent research results in the areas of modelling, creation, management and presentation of interactive 3D multimedia content. The book describes the current state of the art in the field and identifies the most important research and design issues. Consecutive chapters address these issues. These are: database modelling of 3D content, security in 3D environments, describing interactivity of content, searching content, visualization of search results, modelling mixed reality content, and efficient creation of interactive 3D content. Each chapter is illustrated with example a

  4. Analysis of mutagenic and carcinogenic risks: nitrates, nitrites, N-Nitroso compounds. Comparison with radioactive risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report comes within the scope of the general studies on mutagenic and carcinogenic agents other than ionizing radiations. Through feeding, way of life and working activities, man is exposed to genotoxic risks of N-nitroso compounds (NNC). In spite of differences in the molecular modes of action, there exists some analogy between the effects of radiation exposures and those of NNC: DNA is the target in either instance. Unlike radiations, NNC are alkylating agents. The whole activation process of carcinogens arises from mechanisms leading to DNA repair

  5. Content and Face Validation of a Curriculum for Ultrasonic Propulsion of Calculi in a Human Renal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunmire, Barbrina; Cunitz, Bryan W.; He, Xuemei; Sorensen, Mathew D.; Harper, Jonathan D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Lendvay, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Ultrasonic propulsion to reposition urinary tract calculi requires knowledge about ultrasound image capture, device manipulation, and interpretation. The purpose of this study was to validate a cognitive and technical skills curriculum to teach urologists ultrasonic propulsion to reposition kidney stones in tissue phantoms. Materials and Methods: Ten board-certified urologists recruited from a single institution underwent a didactic session on renal ultrasound imaging. Subjects completed technical skills modules in tissue phantoms, including kidney imaging, pushing a stone through a translucent maze, and repositioning a lower pole calyceal stone. Objective cognitive and technical performance metrics were recorded. Subjects completed a questionnaire to ascertain face and content validity on a five-point Likert scale. Results: Eight urologists (80%) had never attended a previous ultrasound course, and nine (90%) performed renal ultrasounds less frequently than every 6 months. Mean cognitive skills scores improved from 55% to 91% (p<0.0001) on pre- and post-didactic tests. In the kidney phantom, 10 subjects (100%) repositioned the lower pole calyceal stone to at least the lower pole infundibulum, while 9 (90%) successfully repositioned the stone to the renal pelvis. A mean±SD (15.7±13.3) pushes were required to complete the task over an average of 4.6±2.2 minutes. Urologists rated the curriculum's effectiveness and realism as a training tool at a mean score of 4.6/5.0 and 4.1/5.0, respectively. Conclusions: The curriculum for ultrasonic propulsion is effective and useful for training urologists with limited ultrasound proficiency in stone repositioning technique. Further studies in animate and human models will be required to assess predictive validity. PMID:24228719

  6. A Universally Designed for Learning (UDL) Infused Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Practitioners' Model Essential for Teacher Preparation in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton-Borghi, Beatrice Hope

    2013-01-01

    This article challenges educational computing researchers and teacher educators to consider a merger between universal design for learning and technological pedagogical content knowledge to create a practitioners' model to prepare teachers to graduate with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to teach the full spectrum of learners.…

  7. Building Kinetic Models for Determining Vitamin C Content in Fresh Jujube and Predicting Its Shelf Life Based on Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yaohua Hu; Cong Liu; Qian Hao; Qiang Zhang; Yong He

    2013-01-01

    Fresh jujube (Ziziphus jujube) is rich in vitamin C, which is an important quality index and generally decreases with storage time. The aim of this study was to build kinetic models for determining the vitamin C content, thus predicting the quality characteristics and shelf life of fresh jujube. The quality changes of the jujube stored at room temperature (20 °C) were analyzed using near-infrared spectroscopy. The significant spectra were determined and a calibration model for vitamin C conte...

  8. Encryption for digital content

    CERN Document Server

    Kiayias, Aggelos

    2010-01-01

    Encryption for Digital Content is an area in cryptography that is widely used in commercial productions (e.g., Blu-Ray and HD-DVDs). This book provides a comprehensive mathematical treatment of combinatorial encryption techniques used in digital content distribution systems and related attack models. A complete description of broadcast encryption with various revocation and tracing functionalities is included. ""Encryption for Digital Content"" introduces the subset cover framework (currently used in AACS, Blu-Ray and HD-DVDs,) and tracking/revocation mechanisms in various attack models. Pirat

  9. Content Marketing Practices in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Suuronen, Toni

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to draw attention to increasingly important business phenomenon of content marketing. This paper defines content marketing, identifies its key elements and phases, and explores content marketing practices. The theorethical part is based on Pam Didner's 4P model that describes the stages of content marketing cycle: plan, produce, promote and perfect. The empirical part of the study is based on semi-structured interviews of seasoned content marketing professionals t...

  10. Determination of DNA adducts by combining acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and chromatographic analysis of the carcinogen-modified nucleobases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Elvis M K; Deng, Kailin; Wong, Tin-Yan; Chan, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used method of analyzing carcinogen-induced DNA adducts involves the hydrolysis of carcinogen-modified DNA samples by using a mixture of enzymes, followed by (32)P-postlabeling or liquid chromatography (LC)-based analyses of carcinogen-modified mononucleotides/nucleosides. In the present study, we report the development and application of a new approach to DNA adduct analysis by combining the H(+)/heat-catalyzed release of carcinogen-modified nucleobases and the use of LC-based methods to analyze DNA adducts. Results showed that heating the carcinogen-modified DNA samples at 70 °C for an extended period of 4 to 6 h in the presence of 0.05% HCl can efficiently induce DNA depurination, releasing the intact carcinogen-modified nucleobases for LC analyses. After optimizing the hydrolysis conditions, DNA samples with C8- and N (2) -modified 2'-deoxyguanosine, as well as N (6) -modified 2'-deoxyadenosine, were synthesized by reacting DNA with 1-nitropyrene, acetaldehyde, and aristolochic acids, respectively. These samples were then hydrolyzed, and the released nucleobase adducts were analyzed using LC-based analytical methods. Analysis results demonstrated a dose-dependent release of target DNA adducts from carcinogen-modified DNA samples, indicating that the developed H(+)/heat-catalyzed hydrolysis method was quantitative. Comparative studies with enzymatic digestion method on carcinogen-modified DNA samples revealed that the two hydrolysis methods did not yield systematically different results.

  11. Content Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Duc

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to introduce the new trend in today’s marketing world: content marketing. It has been employed by many companies and organizations in the world and has been proven success even when it is still a fairly new topic. Five carefully selected theories of content marketing proposed by experts in the field has been collected, compared and displayed as originally and scientifically as possible in this thesis. The chosen theories provide a diversified perspectives of...

  12. A simple procedure for estimating pseudo risk ratios from exposure to non-carcinogenic chemical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scinicariello, Franco; Portier, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Non-cancer risk assessment traditionally assumes a threshold of effect, below which there is a negligible risk of an adverse effect. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry derives health-based guidance values known as Minimal Risk Levels (MRLs) as estimates of the toxicity threshold for non-carcinogens. Although the definition of an MRL, as well as EPA reference dose values (RfD and RfC), is a level that corresponds to "negligible risk," they represent daily exposure doses or concentrations, not risks. We present a new approach to calculate the risk at exposure to specific doses for chemical mixtures, the assumption in this approach is to assign de minimis risk at the MRL. The assigned risk enables the estimation of parameters in an exponential model, providing a complete dose-response curve for each compound from the chosen point of departure to zero. We estimated parameters for 27 chemicals. The value of k, which determines the shape of the dose-response curve, was moderately insensitive to the choice of the risk at the MRL. The approach presented here allows for the calculation of a risk from a single substance or the combined risk from multiple chemical exposures in a community. The methodology is applicable from point of departure data derived from quantal data, such as data from benchmark dose analyses or from data that can be transformed into probabilities, such as lowest-observed-adverse-effect level. The individual risks are used to calculate risk ratios that can facilitate comparison and cost-benefit analyses of environmental contamination control strategies.

  13. The relevance of radiation induced bystander effects for low dose radiation carcinogenic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Where epidemiology studies lack the ability to prescribe radiation doses, customise sample sizes and replicate findings, radiobiology experiments provide greater flexibility to control experimental conditions. This control simplifies the process of answering questions concerning carcinogenic risk after low dose radiation exposures. However, the flexibility requires critical evaluation of radiobiology findings to ensure that the right questions are being asked, the experimental conditions are relevant to human exposure scenarios and that the data are cautiously interpreted in the context of the experimental model. In particular, low dose radiobiology phenomena such as adaptive responses, genomic instability and bystander effects need to be investigated thoroughly, with continual reference to the way these phenomena might occur in the real world. Low dose radiation induced bystander effects are of interest since their occurrence in vivo could complicate the shape of the radiation dose-response curve in the low dose range for a number of biological endpoints with subsequent effects on radiation-induced cancer risk. Conversely, radiation-induced abscopal effects implicate biological consequences of radiation exposure outside irradiated volumes, and complicate the notion of effective dose calculations. Achieving a consensus on the boundaries that distinguish the radiobiology phenomena of bystander and abscopal effects will aid progress towards understanding their relevance to in vivo radiation exposures. A proposed framework for discussing bystander effects and abscopal effects in their appropriate context will be outlined, with a discussion on the future investigation of radiation-induced bystander effects. Such frameworks can assist the integration of results from experimental radiobiology to risk evaluation and management practice. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, BioI. and Environ. Research, US Dept. of Energy, Grant DE

  14. Investigations into the mechanisms of aflatoxin B sub 1 genotoxicity and carcinogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) was used as a model carcinogen for investigations into the initiation, promotion and progression phases of chemically induced carcinogenesis. In initial experiments {sup 3}H-AFB{sub 1} was evaluated for its rate of tritium exchange in vitro and in vivo. Tritium exchange form {sup 3}H-AFB{sub 1} to water in vitro (pH 7.4, 37{degree}C) and in-vivo from covalently bound AFB{sub 1} had a half-life of {approx}1 week. The physical interaction of AFB{sub 1} with DNA was examined to further characterize the steps involved in initiation. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy it was established that AFB{sub 1} binds to the outside of the DNA double helix and does not intercalate between the base pairs in spite of its relatively planar structure. In contrast to results obtained from NMR experiments, AFB{sub 1} and AFM{sub 1} were found to be direct acting mutagens in the Ames test and strain sensitivity indicated the direct mutagenicity was a result of a frameshift mutation suggesting intercalation. To determine if a free radical mechanism was converting the parent compound to a mutagenic derivative, the effect of the free radical inhibitor, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), on the mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} to Salmonella typhimurium TA98 was determined. DNA sequences believed responsible for reversion of different Salmonella typhimurium strains were compared to the direct mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} in these strains and with the rules reported in the literature for the sequence specific covalent binding of AFB{sub 1}. An alternative mechanism for the metabolic activation of AFB{sub 1} and AFM{sub 1} to genotoxic metabolites was investigated.

  15. Comparative genomics and proteomics of Helicobacter mustelae, an ulcerogenic and carcinogenic gastric pathogen

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Paul W

    2010-03-10

    Abstract Background Helicobacter mustelae causes gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer in ferrets and other mustelids. H. mustelae remains the only helicobacter other than H. pylori that causes gastric ulceration and cancer in its natural host. To improve understanding of H. mustelae pathogenesis, and the ulcerogenic and carcinogenic potential of helicobacters in general, we sequenced the H. mustelae genome, and identified 425 expressed proteins in the envelope and cytosolic proteome. Results The H. mustelae genome lacks orthologs of major H. pylori virulence factors including CagA, VacA, BabA, SabA and OipA. However, it encodes ten autotransporter surface proteins, seven of which were detected in the expressed proteome, and which, except for the Hsr protein, are of unknown function. There are 26 putative outer membrane proteins in H. mustelae, some of which are most similar to the Hof proteins of H. pylori. Although homologs of putative virulence determinants of H. pylori (NapA, plasminogen adhesin, collagenase) and Campylobacter jejuni (CiaB, Peb4a) are present in the H. mustelae genome, it also includes a distinct complement of virulence-related genes including a haemagglutinin\\/haemolysin protein, and a glycosyl transferase for producing blood group A\\/B on its lipopolysaccharide. The most highly expressed 264 proteins in the cytosolic proteome included many corresponding proteins from H. pylori, but the rank profile in H. mustelae was distinctive. Of 27 genes shown to be essential for H. pylori colonization of the gerbil, all but three had orthologs in H. mustelae, identifying a shared set of core proteins for gastric persistence. Conclusions The determination of the genome sequence and expressed proteome of the ulcerogenic species H mustelae provides a comparative model for H. pylori to investigate bacterial gastric carcinogenesis in mammals, and to suggest ways whereby cag minus H. pylori strains might cause ulceration and cancer. The genome sequence was

  16. Heavy incense burning in temples promotes exposure risk from airborne PMs and carcinogenic PAHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuo-Chih; Liao, Chung-Min

    2006-12-15

    We present the mechanistic-based exposure and risk models, appraised with reported empirical data, to assess how the human exposure to airborne particulate matters (PMs) and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during heavy incense burning episodes in temples. The models integrate size-dependent PM levels inside a temple from a published exploratory study associated with a human expiratory tract (HRT) model taking into account the personal exposure levels and size distributions in the HRT. The probabilistic exposure profiles of total-PAH levels inside a temple and internal PAHs doses are characterized by a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the reconstructed dose-response relationships based on an empirical three-parameter Hill equation model, describing PAHs toxicity for DNA adducts formation and lung tumor incidence responses in human white blood cells and lung. Results show that the alveolar-interstitial (AI) region has a lower mass median diameter (0.29 microm) than that in extrathoracic (ET(1), 0.37 microm), brochial (BB, 0.36 microm) and bronchiolar (bb, 0.32 microm) regions. The 50% probability (risk=0.5) of exceeding the DNA adducts frequency (DA(f)) ratio of 1.28 (95% CI: 0.55-2.40) and 1.78 (95% CI: 0.84-2.95) for external exposure of B[a]P and B[a]P(eq), respectively. The 10% (risk=0.1) probability or more of human affected by lung tumor is approximately 7.62x10(-5)% (95% CI: 3.39x10(-5)-1.71x10(-4)%) and 3.87x10(-4)% (95% CI: 1.72x10(-4)-8.69x10(-4)%) for internal exposure of B[a]P and B[a]P(eq), respectively. Our results implicate that exposure to smoke emitted from heavy incense burning may promote lung cancer risk. Our study provides a quantitative basis for objective risk prediction of heavy incense burning exposure in temples and for evaluating the effectiveness of management.

  17. Human cytochrome P450 enzyme specificity for bioactivation of safrole to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxysafrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Brand, W.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, van T.A.; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the cytochrome P450 mediated bioactivation of safrole to its proximate carcinogenic metabolite, 1'-hydroxysafrole, has been investigated for the purpose of identifying the human P450 enzymes involved. The 1'-hydroxylation of safrole was characterized in a variety of in vitro te

  18. Levels of Genotoxic and Carcinogenic Compounds in Plant food Supplements and Associated Risk Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den S.J.P.L.; Restani, P.; Boersma, M.G.; Delmulle, L.; Rietjens, I.

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the selection, analysis and risk assessment of genotoxic and carcinogenic compounds of botanicals and botanical preparations which can be found in plant food supplements (PFS). First an inventory was made of botanical compounds that are of possible concern for human healt

  19. 76 FR 71346 - Public Meeting and Request for Information: Carcinogen and Recommended Exposure Limit (REL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... carcinogen policy and the REL policy. NIOSH has also created a new NIOSH Cancer and REL Policy Web Topic Page....cdc.gov/niosh/enews/enewsV8N12.html and on the NIOSH Cancer and REL Policy Web Topic Page . II... comments submitted will be available within 30 days of the closing date on the NIOSH Web page at...

  20. Evaluation of an information campaign about working safely with carcinogenic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, I.P.P.; Rijt, G.A.J. van der; Koppen, K.F.C.J. van; Gulden, J.W.J. van der

    1995-01-01

    An information campaign, organised in the Netherlands to foster safer working conditions for those who find themselves exposed to carcinogenic substances, has been evaluated. Posters, leaflets, and booklets had been distributed to those who are liable to run a risk while at work, managers as well as